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Sample records for nicotiana tabacum defence

  1. Phenylpropanoid Defences in Nicotiana tabacum Cells: Overlapping Metabolomes Indicate Common Aspects to Priming Responses Induced by Lipopolysaccharides, Chitosan and Flagellin-22

    PubMed Central

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved both constitutive and inducible defence strategies to cope with different biotic stimuli and stresses. Exposure of a plant to a challenging stress can lead to a primed state that allows it to launch a more rapid and stronger defence. Here we applied a metabolomic approach to study and compare the responses induced in Nicotiana tabacum cells by microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules, namely lipopolysaccharides (LPS), chitosan (CHT) and flagellin-22 (FLG22). Early response metabolites, extracted with methanol, were analysed by UHPLC-MS/MS. Using multivariate statistical tools the metabolic profiles induced by these elicitors were analysed. In the metabolic fingerprint of these agents a total of 19 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to quinic acids (chlorogenic acids), shikimic acid, tyramine, polyamines or glucose were found as discriminant biomarkers. In addition, treatment with the phytohormones salicylic acid (SA), methyljasmonic acid (MJ) and abscisic acid (ABA) resulted in differentially-induced phenylpropanoid pathway metabolites. The results indicate that the phenylpropanoid pathway is activated by these elicitors while hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives are commonly associated with the metabolic response to the MAMPs, and that the activated responses are modulated by both SA and MJ, with ABA not playing a role. PMID:26978774

  2. Phenylpropanoid Defences in Nicotiana tabacum Cells: Overlapping Metabolomes Indicate Common Aspects to Priming Responses Induced by Lipopolysaccharides, Chitosan and Flagellin-22.

    PubMed

    Mhlongo, Msizi I; Piater, Lizelle A; Madala, Ntakadzeni E; Steenkamp, Paul A; Dubery, Ian A

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved both constitutive and inducible defence strategies to cope with different biotic stimuli and stresses. Exposure of a plant to a challenging stress can lead to a primed state that allows it to launch a more rapid and stronger defence. Here we applied a metabolomic approach to study and compare the responses induced in Nicotiana tabacum cells by microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules, namely lipopolysaccharides (LPS), chitosan (CHT) and flagellin-22 (FLG22). Early response metabolites, extracted with methanol, were analysed by UHPLC-MS/MS. Using multivariate statistical tools the metabolic profiles induced by these elicitors were analysed. In the metabolic fingerprint of these agents a total of 19 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to quinic acids (chlorogenic acids), shikimic acid, tyramine, polyamines or glucose were found as discriminant biomarkers. In addition, treatment with the phytohormones salicylic acid (SA), methyljasmonic acid (MJ) and abscisic acid (ABA) resulted in differentially-induced phenylpropanoid pathway metabolites. The results indicate that the phenylpropanoid pathway is activated by these elicitors while hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives are commonly associated with the metabolic response to the MAMPs, and that the activated responses are modulated by both SA and MJ, with ABA not playing a role. PMID:26978774

  3. Silicon delays tobacco Ringspot virus systemic symptoms in Nicotiana tabacum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soluble silicon (Si) provides protection to plants against a variety of abiotic and biotic stress. However, the role of Si in viral infections has been elusive. To investigate the role of Si in viral infections, hydroponic studies were conducted in Nicotiana tabacum with two pathogens: Tobacco rings...

  4. Isolation of viable sperm cells from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Reece, A; Russell, S D

    1996-05-01

    Viable sperm cells of Nicotiana tabacum were isolated by the semi-vivo technique. After pollination, excised styles were floated, cut end immersed, in a solution of 15% sucrose with 0.01% boric acid and 0.03% Ca(NO3)2 at 27 degrees C in a growth chamber until pollen tubes emerged. After sperm cells were formed (at least 8 h after pollination) tubes were immersed in a 9% mannitol solution. In this solution, sperm cells are nearly ellipsoidal and retain viability for over 6 h.

  5. Purine metabolism in mesophyll protoplasts of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Barankiewicz, J; Paszkowski, J

    1980-01-01

    The overall metabolism of purines was studied in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mesophyll protoplasts. Metabolic pathways were studied by measuring the conversion of radioactive adenine, adenosine, hypoxanthine and guanine into purine ribonucleotides, ribonucleosides, bases and nucleic acid constituents. Adenine was extensively deaminated to hypoxanthine, whereupon it was also converted into AMP and incorporated into nucleic acids. Adenosine was mainly hydrolysed to adenine. Inosinate formed from hypoxanthine was converted into AMP and GMP, which were then catabolized to adenine and guanosine respectively. Guanine was mainly deaminated to xanthine and also incorporated into nucleic acids via GTP. Increased RNA synthesis in the protoplasts resulted in enhanced incorporation of adenine and guanine, but not of hypoxanthine and adenosine, into the nucleic acid fraction. The overall pattern of purine-nucleotide metabolic pathways in protoplasts of tobacco leaf mesophyll is proposed. PMID:6154458

  6. Piriformospora indica confers cadmium tolerance in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Hui, Feiqiong; Liu, Jian; Gao, Qikang; Lou, Binggan

    2015-11-01

    Piriformospora indica, a root-colonizing endophytic fungus of Sebacinales, promotes plant growth and confers resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses. In order to confirm the influence of P. indica on growth, proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), chlorophyll, and cadmium (Cd) amounts in Nicotiana tabacum under Cd stress, hydroponics, pot and field trials were conducted. The results showed that P. indica can store Cd in plant roots and reduce leaf Cd content, reduce the concentration of MDA, and increase the proline and chlorophyll content and the activities of catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase under hydroponic Cd stress. RT-PCR analysis showed that the relative expression level of genes Gsh2, TaPCS1, oas1, GPX, and Hsp70 in colonized plants was 4.3, 1.4, 2.9, 1.7, and 6.9 fold higher than in un-colonized plants respectively. Cd exposure significantly reduced un-colonized plants' agronomic traits compared to P. indica-colonized ones. Our results suggested that P. indica can sequester Cd in roots, so that much less cadmium was transported to leaves, and the increased concentrations of antioxidant enzymes, pigments and proline contents, as well as the higher expression of stress-related phytochelatin biosynthesis genes in P. indica-inoculated plants, may also serve to protect N. tabacum plants against oxidative damage, enhancing Cd tolerance. PMID:26574103

  7. Pollination triggers female gametophyte development in immature Nicotiana tabacum flowers

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Michael S.; Bertolino, Lígia T.; Cossalter, Viviane; Quiapim, Andréa C.; DePaoli, Henrique C.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Teixeira, Simone P.; Goldman, Maria H. S.

    2015-01-01

    In Nicotiana tabacum, female gametophytes are not fully developed at anthesis, but flower buds pollinated 12 h before anthesis produce mature embryo sacs. We investigated several pollination-associated parameters in N. tabacum flower buds to determine the developmental timing of important events in preparation for successful fertilization. First, we performed hand pollinations in flowers from stages 4 to 11 to study at which developmental stage pollination would produce fruits. A Peroxtesmo test was performed to correlate peroxidase activity on the stigma surface, indicative of stigma receptivity, with fruit set. Pollen tube growth and female gametophyte development were microscopically analyzed in pistils of different developmental stages. Fruits were obtained only after pollinations of flower buds at late stage 7 and older; fruit weight and seed germination capacity increased as the developmental stage of the pollinated flower approached anthesis. Despite positive peroxidase activity and pollen tube growth, pistils at stages 5 and 6 were unable to produce fruits. At late stage 7, female gametophytes were undergoing first mitotic division. After 24 h, female gametophytes of unpollinated pistils were still in the end of the first division, whereas those of pollinated pistils showed egg cells. RT-qPCR assay showed that the expression of the NtEC1 gene, a marker of egg cell development, is considerably higher in pollinated late stage 7 ovaries compared with unpollinated ovaries. To test whether ethylene is the signal eliciting female gametophyte maturation, the expression of ACC synthase was examined in unpollinated and pollinated stage 6 and late stage 7 stigmas/styles. Pollination induced NtACS expression in stage 6 pistils, which are unable to produce fruits. Our results show that pollination is a stimulus capable of triggering female gametophyte development in immature tobacco flowers and suggests the existence of a yet undefined signal sensed by the pistil. PMID

  8. Glyphosate Tolerance in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, William E.; Weller, Stephen C.; Bressan, Ray A.; Herrmann, Klaus M.

    1988-01-01

    A glyphosate-tolerant tobacco cell line, Nicotiana tabacum L. Indiana (I7), was selected from the glyphosate-sensitive Wisconsin 38 (W38) line through a single step exposure to the herbicide. Tolerance and growth characteristics of I7 cells were the same for cells maintained for more than 1 year in the presence or absence of glyphosate. Glyphosate tolerance levels were constant through the growth cycle. Tolerance is not due to reduced uptake of glyphosate. Shikimate levels in I7 and W38 cells maintained in glyphosate-free medium were similar, whereas W38 cells accumulated 46 times more shikimate than I7 cells, when cells of both lines were exposed to the herbicide. Glyphosate treatment caused increased levels of aromatic amino acids in W38 cells and slightly lower levels in I7 cells. Specific activities of dehydroquinate synthase, shikimate dehydrogenase, and shikimate kinase were similar in the two cell types, whereas DAHP synthase and EPSP synthase specific activities were elevated in I7 cells. Plants regenerated from I7 cells retained tolerance to glyphosate. Images Fig. 7 PMID:16666365

  9. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junping; Wang, Genhong; Ma, Sanyuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingtan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is one of the most powerful tools for revealing gene function and improving crop plants. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as a powerful and efficient tool for genome editing in various organisms. Here, we report genome editing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two genes, NtPDS and NtPDR6, were used for targeted mutagenesis. First, we examined the transient genome editing activity of this system in tobacco protoplasts, insertion and deletion (indel) mutations were observed with frequencies of 16.2-20.3% after transfecting guide RNA (gRNA) and the nuclease Cas9 in tobacco protoplasts. The two genes were also mutated using multiplexing gRNA at a time. Additionally, targeted deletions and inversions of a 1.8-kb fragment between two target sites in the NtPDS locus were demonstrated, while indel mutations were also detected at both the sites. Second, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants with NtPDS and NtPDR6 mutations induced by Cas9/gRNA. The mutation percentage was 81.8% for NtPDS gRNA4 and 87.5% for NtPDR6 gRNA2. Obvious phenotypes were observed, etiolated leaves for the psd mutant and more branches for the pdr6 mutant, indicating that highly efficient biallelic mutations occurred in both transgenic lines. No significant off-target mutations were obtained. Our results show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a useful tool for targeted mutagenesis of the tobacco genome.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) anionic peroxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-De-Leon, F.; Klotz, K.L.; Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in numerous physiological processes including lignification (Grisebach, 1981), wound-healing (Espelie et al., 1986), phenol oxidation (Lagrimini, 1991), pathogen defense (Ye et al., 1990), and the regulation of cell elongation through the formation of interchain covalent bonds between various cell wall polymers (Fry, 1986; Goldberg et al., 1986; Bradley et al., 1992). However, a complete description of peroxidase action in vivo is not available because of the vast number of potential substrates and the existence of multiple isoenzymes. The tobacco anionic peroxidase is one of the better-characterized isoenzymes. This enzyme has been shown to oxidize a number of significant plant secondary compounds in vitro including cinnamyl alcohols, phenolic acids, and indole-3-acetic acid (Maeder, 1980; Lagrimini, 1991). A cDNA encoding the enzyme has been obtained, and this enzyme was shown to be expressed at the highest levels in lignifying tissues (xylem and tracheary elements) and also in epidermal tissue (Lagrimini et al., 1987). It was shown at this time that there were four distinct copies of the anionic peroxidase gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). A tobacco genomic DNA library was constructed in the [lambda]-phase EMBL3, from which two unique peroxidase genes were sequenced. One of these clones, [lambda]POD1, was designated as a pseudogene when the exonic sequences were found to differ from the cDNA sequences by 1%, and several frame shifts in the coding sequences indicated a dysfunctional gene (the authors' unpublished results). The other clone, [lambda]POD3, described in this manuscript, was designated as the functional tobacco anionic peroxidase gene because of 100% homology with the cDNA. Significant structural elements include an AS-2 box indicated in shoot-specific expression (Lam and Chua, 1989), a TATA box, and two intervening sequences. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Production, partial purification and characterization of xylanase using Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust as substrate.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Komal P; Shilpkar, Prateek

    2016-03-01

    Isolated Bacillus sp. was used in the present study for production of xylanase from Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust. The strain was able to give a maximum of 1.77 Uml⁻¹ xylanase activity under optimized fermentation conditions which was further increased upto 2.77 Uml⁻¹ after extraction and partial purification of enzyme. After partial purification, the enzyme was characterized and it gave the highest xylanase activity at pH 7.0, when 0.2 ml enzyme was incubated with 2.0% substrate (Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust) for 60 min at 60°C. Saccharification study of Nicotiana tabacum leaf dust with partially purified enzyme revealed that 18.4% reducing sugar was released in 20 hrs incubation, and TLC and HPTLC analysis showed that xylose and glucose sugars were obtained after hydrolysis of substrate. FTIR analysis confirmed decomposition of substrate. PMID:27097451

  12. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  13. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants

    PubMed Central

    Hehle, Verena K.; Paul, Matthew J.; Roberts, Victoria A.; van Dolleweerd, Craig J.; Ma, Julian K.-C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformed Nicotiana tabacum. Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy’s 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently in N. tabacum and demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.—Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  14. Cloning and Expression of TNF Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Hamid Reza; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Vahidi, Hossein; Barar, Jaleh; Kazemi, Bahram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Molecular farming has been considered as a secure and economical approach for production of biopharmaceuticals. Human TNF Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) as a promising biopharmaceutical candidate has been produced in different expression hosts. However, little attention has been paid to molecular farming of the TRAIL in spite of numerous advantages of plant expression systems. Therefore, in this study the cytoplasmic production of the TRAIL was tackled in Nicotiana tabacum using Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA 4404. Initially, the desired coding sequence was obtained using PCR technique on the constructed human cDNA library. Afterward, the necessary requirements for expression of the TRAIL in plant cell system were provided through sub-cloning into 35S-CaMV (Cauliflower Mosaic Virus) helper and final 0179-pGreen expression vectors. Then, the final TRAIL-pGreen expression vector was cloned into A. tumefaciens LBA 4404. Subsequently, the N. tabacum cells were transformed through co-culture method and expression of the TRAIL was confirmed by western blot analysis. Finally, the recombinant TRAIL was extracted through chromatographic technique and biological activity was evaluated through MTT assay (Methylthiazol Tetrazolium Assay). The result of western blot analysis indicated that only monomer and oxidized dimer forms of the TRAIL can be extracted from the N. tabacum cells. Moreover, the lack of trimeric assembly of the extracted TRAIL diminished its biological activity in sensitive A549 cell line. In conclusion, although N. tabacum cells can successfully produce the TRAIL, proper assembly and functionality of the TRAIL were unfavorable.

  15. Influence of selected herbicides on ozone injury in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, J.J.; Moore, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted over a four year period to determine the influence of selected herbicides on ozone injury in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Isopropalin (2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropylcumidine), pebulate (S-propyl butylethylthiocarbamate), and diphenamid (N,N-dimethyl-2,2-diphenylacetamide) were applied at the recommended rates of 1.7, 4.5, and 4.5 kg/ha (ai), respectively. Treatment of tobacco plants with isopropalin or diphenamid reduced oxidant injury for the first two to four weeks after transplanting, but not later in the season. Pebulate has no consistent affect on the sensitivity of tobacco to ozone. 26 references, 3 tables.

  16. Product identification and adenylyl cyclase activity in chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Witters, Erwin; Quanten, Lieve; Bloemen, Jo; Valcke, Roland; Van Onckelen, Harry

    2004-01-01

    In view of the ongoing debate on plant cyclic nucleotide metabolism, especially the functional presence of adenylyl cyclase, a novel detection method has been worked out to quantify the reaction product. Using uniformly labelled (15)N-ATP as a substrate for adenylyl cyclase, a qualitative and quantitative liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) method was developed to measure de novo formed (15)N-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. Adenylyl cyclase activity was observed in chloroplasts obtained from Nicotiana tabacum cv. Petit Havana and the kinetic parameters and influence of various metabolic effectors are discussed in their context.

  17. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  18. Characterization of two cDNAs encoding auxin-binding proteins in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, N; Roux, C; Pradier, J M; Perrot-Rechenmann, C

    1997-03-01

    The isolation and the characterization of two tobacco cDNAs, Nt-ERabp1 and Nt-ERabp2, homologous to Zm-ERabp1, encoding the major auxin-binding protein from maize coleoptiles, are described. Their predicted amino acid sequences correspond to proteins of ca. 21 kDa, in which the characteristic regions common to ABP1-related polypeptides are well-conserved. Southern analysis indicates that the genes corresponding to Nt-ERabp1 cDNA and Nt-ERabp2 cDNA derive respectively from Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris, the diploid progenitors of Nicotiana tabacum. Analysis of mRNA distribution in tobacco plants indicates that these two genes are preferentially expressed in flowers and growing seedlings. Whatever the tissue tested, Nt-ERabp1 mRNA is more abundant than Nt-ERabp2 mRNA. Furthermore, RT-PCR reveals developmental and organ-specific expression of these two genes in flower parts of tobacco plants. In particular, regulation of Nt-ERabp1 mRNA accumulation appears to be correlated with elongation growth of each floral organ. Recombinant Nt-ERabp1, produced in Escherichia coli, is recognized by antibodies raised against Zm-ERabp1.

  19. Cell Death Processes during Expression of Hybrid Lethality in Interspecific F1 Hybrid between Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Mino, Masanobu; Maekawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2002-01-01

    Hybrid lethality, a type of reproductive isolation, is a genetically controlled event appearing at the seedling stage in interspecific hybrids. We characterized the lethality of F1 hybrid seedlings from Nicotiana gossei Domin and Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright-Yellow 4 using a number of traits including growth rate, microscopic features of tissues and cells, ion leakage, DNA degradation, reactive oxygen intermediates including superoxide radical (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and expression of stress response marker genes. Lethal symptoms appeared at 4 d after germination in the basal hypocotyl and extended toward both the hypocotyl and root of the plants grown at 26°C. Microscopic analysis revealed a prompt lysis of cell components during cell death. Membrane disruption and DNA degradation were found in the advanced stage of the lethality. The death of mesophyll cells in the cotyledon was initiated by the vascular bundle, suggesting that a putative factor inducing cell death diffused into surrounding cells from the vascular tissue. In contrast, these symptoms were not observed in the plants grown at 37°C. Seedlings grown at 26°C generated larger amounts of reactive oxygen intermediate in the hypocotyl than those grown at 37°C. A number of stress response marker genes were expressed at 26°C but not at 37°C. We proposed that a putative death factor moving systemically through the vascular system induced a prompt and successive lysis of the cytoplasm of cells and that massive cell death eventually led to the loss of the hybrid plant. PMID:12481061

  20. Complete genome sequence of tobacco virus 1, a closterovirus from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Qi, Shuishui; Gao, Zhengliang; Akinyemi, Ibukun A; Xu, Dafeng; Zhou, Benguo

    2016-04-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel virus, provisionally named tobacco virus 1 (TV1), was determined, and this virus was identified in leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exhibiting leaf mosaic and yellowing symptoms in Anhui Province, China. The genome sequence of TV1 consists of 15,395 nucleotides with 61.6 % nucleotide sequence identity to mint virus 1 (MV1). Its genome organization is similar to that of MV1, containing nine open reading frames (ORFs) that potentially encode proteins with putative functions in virion assembly, cell-to-cell movement and suppression of RNA silencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the heat shock protein 70 homolog (HSP70h) placed TV1 alongside members of the genus Closterovirus in the family Closteroviridae. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of the complete genome sequence of a closterovirus identified in tobacco. PMID:26795159

  1. Early events induced by the toxin deoxynivalenol lead to programmed cell death in Nicotiana tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Yekkour, Amine; Tran, Daniel; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Briand, Joël; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Errakhi, Rafik; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Bouteau, François

    2015-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin affecting animals and plants. This toxin synthesized by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum is currently believed to play a decisive role in the fungal phytopathogenesis as a virulence factor. Using cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum BY2, we showed that DON-induced programmed cell death (PCD) could require transcription and translation processes, in contrast to what was observed in animal cells. DON could induce different cross-linked pathways involving (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and a transcriptional down-regulation of the alternative oxidase (Aox1) gene and (ii) regulation of ion channel activities participating in cell shrinkage, to achieve PCD.

  2. Identification of Multivesicular Bodies as Prevacuolar Compartments in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 CellsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Yu Chung; Mo, Beixin; Hillmer, Stefan; Zhao, Min; Lo, Sze Wan; Robinson, David G.; Jiang, Liwen

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the dynamics and molecular components of plant prevacuolar compartments (PVCs). We have demonstrated recently that vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR) proteins are concentrated on PVCs. In this study, we generated transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) BY-2 cell lines expressing two yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-fusion reporters that mark PVC and Golgi organelles. Both transgenic cell lines exhibited typical punctate YFP signals corresponding to distinct PVC and Golgi organelles because the PVC reporter colocalized with VSR proteins, whereas the Golgi marker colocalized with mannosidase I in confocal immunofluorescence. Brefeldin A induced the YFP-labeled Golgi stacks but not the YFP-marked PVCs to form typical enlarged structures. By contrast, wortmannin caused YFP-labeled PVCs but not YFP-labeled Golgi stacks to vacuolate. VSR antibodies labeled multivesicular bodies (MVBs) on thin sections prepared from high-pressure frozen/freeze substituted samples, and the enlarged PVCs also were indentified as MVBs. MVBs were further purified from BY-2 cells and found to contain VSR proteins via immunogold negative staining. Similar to YFP-labeled Golgi stacks, YFP-labeled PVCs are mobile organelles in BY-2 cells. Thus, we have unequivocally identified MVBs as PVCs in N. tabacum BY-2 cells. Uptake studies with the styryl dye FM4-64 strongly indicate that PVCs also lie on the endocytic pathway of BY-2 cells. PMID:14973159

  3. [Induction of polyploid in hairy roots of Nicotiana tabacum and its plant regeneration].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lili; Shi, Heping; Yu, Wu; Tsang, Po Keung Eric; Chow, Cheuk Fai Stephen

    2014-04-01

    By genetic transformation with Agrobacterum rhizogenes and artificial chromosome doubling techniques, we studied the induction of hairy roots and their polyploidization, and subsequent plant regeneration and nicotine determination to enhance the content of nicotine in Nicotiana tabacum. The results show that hairy roots could be induced from the basal surface of leaf explants of N. tabacum 8 days after inoculation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC15834. The percentage of the rooting leaf explants was 100% 15 days after inoculation. The hairy roots could grow rapidly and autonomously on solid or liquid phytohormones-free MS medium. The transformation was confirmed by PCR amplification of rol gene of Ri plasmid and paper electrophoresis of opines from N. tabacum hairy roots. The highest rate of polyploidy induction, more than 64.71%, was obtained after treatment of hairy roots with 0.1% colchicine for 36 h. The optimum medium for plant regeneration from polyploid hairy roots was MS+2.0 mg/L 6-BA +0.2 mg/L NAA. Compared with the control diploid plants, the hairy roots-regenerated plants had weak apical dominance, more axillary buds and more narrow leaves; whereas the polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants had thicker stems, shorter internodes and the colour, width and thickness of leaves were significantly higher than that of the control. Observation of the number of chromosomes in their root tip cells reveals that the obtained polyploid regenerated plants were tetraploidy, with 96 (4n = 96) chromosomes. Pot-grown experiments showed compared to the control, the flowering was delayed by 21 days in diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants and polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants. GC-MS detection shows that the content of nicotine in polyploid plants was about 6.90 and 4.57 times the control and the diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants, respectively. PMID:25195248

  4. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of fifteen NtabSPL genes in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Qinyan95.

    PubMed

    Han, Yao-Yao; Ma, Yan-Qin; Li, Dian-Zhen; Yao, Jing-Wen; Xu, Zi-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen SPL (SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE) genes were identified and characterized in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Qinyan95. The exon-intron structures of these genes were determined according to the coding sequences confirmed by RT-PCR and the genomic DNA sequences downloaded from the databases in Sol Genomics Network, and thirteen of them were found to carry the response element of miR156. To elucidate the origin of the validated NtabSPL genes, multiple alignments of the nucleotide sequences encompassing the open reading frames were conducted by using the orthologs in N. tabacum, Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tomentosiformis, and Nicotiana otophora. The results showed that six NtabSPL genes were derived from a progenitor of N. sylvestris, and nine NtabSPL genes were derived from a progenitor of N. tomentosiformis, further corroborating that N. tabacum came from the interspecific hybridization between the ancestors of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. In contrast to previous statements about highly repetitive sequences, the genome of N. tabacum mainly retained the paternal-derived SPL genes in diploidization process. Phylogenetic analyses based on the highly conserved SBP (SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN) domains and the full-length amino acid sequences reveal that the SPL proteins of tobacco, tomato, and Arabidopsis can be categorized into eight groups. It is worth noting that N. tabacum contains seven NtabSPL6 genes originated from two parental genomes and NtabSPL6-2 possesses a GC-AG intron. In addition, transgenic tobacco plants harboring Arabidopsis Pri-miR156A were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method, and the constitutive expression of miR156 could obviously inhibit the activity of the NtabSPL genes containing its target site, suggesting the function of miR156 is conservative in tobacco and Arabidopsis.

  5. Expression of synthetic human tropoelastin (hTE) protein in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghani, Mona; El-Heba, Ghada A Abu; Abdelhadi, Abdelhadi A; Abdallah, Naglaa A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plant molecular farming (PMF) is an important growing prospective approach in plant biotechnology; it includes production of recombinant pharmaceutical and industrial proteins in large quantities from engineered plants. Elastin is a major protein component of tissues that require elasticity, it helps keep skin smooth as it stretches to allow normal.  Elastin is used as a raw material for the cosmetic industry. In this work, we aimed to use plant as a bioreactor for the expression and production of the full human tropoelastin protein. Agrobacterium- mediated transient expression system into Nicotiana tabacum using syringe agroinfiltration was used to provide fast and convenient way to produce recombinant proteins with greater expression overall the plant leaf. This study aimed to establish an efficient and rapid system for transiently expression and production of human recombinant tropoelastin protein in transgenic N. tabacum plants. Modified elastin (ELN) gene was biosynthesized and cloned into pCambia1390 vector to be used into N. tabacum agroinfilteration. Optimization of codon usage for the human tropoelastin gene, without changing the primary structure of the protein was carried out to ensure high expression in tobacco plants. The obtained data proved that the 5th day post-infiltration is the optimum interval to obtain the maximum production of our recombinant protein. Southern blot analysis was able to detect 2175 bp fragment length representing the ELN orf (open reding frame). On the other hand, ELN -expression within plant's tissue was visualized by RT-PCR during the period 3–10 days post agroinfiltration. At the protein level, western and ELISA confirmed the expression of recombinant tropoelastin protein. Western blot analysis detected the tropoelastin protein as parent band at ∼70 kDa from freshly extracted protein, while two degraded bands of ∼55 and ∼45 kDa, representing a pattern of tropoelastin were appeared with frozen samples

  6. Gene Inactivation by CRISPR-Cas9 in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Suspension Cells.

    PubMed

    Mercx, Sébastien; Tollet, Jérémie; Magy, Bertrand; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Plant suspension cells are interesting hosts for the heterologous production of pharmacological proteins such as antibodies. They have the advantage to facilitate the containment and the application of good manufacturing practices. Furthermore, antibodies can be secreted to the extracellular medium, which makes the purification steps much simpler. However, improvements are still to be made regarding the quality and the production yield. For instance, the inactivation of proteases and the humanization of glycosylation are both important targets which require either gene silencing or gene inactivation. To this purpose, CRISPR-Cas9 is a very promising technique which has been used recently in a series of plant species, but not yet in plant suspension cells. Here, we sought to use the CRISPR-Cas9 system for gene inactivation in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells. We transformed a transgenic line expressing a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) with a binary vector containing genes coding for Cas9 and three guide RNAs targeting mCherry restriction sites, as well as a bialaphos-resistant (bar) gene for selection. To demonstrate gene inactivation in the transgenic lines, the mCherry gene was PCR-amplified and analyzed by electrophoresis. Seven out of 20 transformants displayed a shortened fragment, indicating that a deletion occurred between two target sites. We also analyzed the transformants by restriction fragment length polymorphism and observed that the three targeted restriction sites were hit. DNA sequencing of the PCR fragments confirmed either deletion between two target sites or single nucleotide deletion. We therefore conclude that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used in N. tabacum BY2 cells. PMID:26870061

  7. Gene Inactivation by CRISPR-Cas9 in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Suspension Cells.

    PubMed

    Mercx, Sébastien; Tollet, Jérémie; Magy, Bertrand; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Plant suspension cells are interesting hosts for the heterologous production of pharmacological proteins such as antibodies. They have the advantage to facilitate the containment and the application of good manufacturing practices. Furthermore, antibodies can be secreted to the extracellular medium, which makes the purification steps much simpler. However, improvements are still to be made regarding the quality and the production yield. For instance, the inactivation of proteases and the humanization of glycosylation are both important targets which require either gene silencing or gene inactivation. To this purpose, CRISPR-Cas9 is a very promising technique which has been used recently in a series of plant species, but not yet in plant suspension cells. Here, we sought to use the CRISPR-Cas9 system for gene inactivation in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells. We transformed a transgenic line expressing a red fluorescent protein (mCherry) with a binary vector containing genes coding for Cas9 and three guide RNAs targeting mCherry restriction sites, as well as a bialaphos-resistant (bar) gene for selection. To demonstrate gene inactivation in the transgenic lines, the mCherry gene was PCR-amplified and analyzed by electrophoresis. Seven out of 20 transformants displayed a shortened fragment, indicating that a deletion occurred between two target sites. We also analyzed the transformants by restriction fragment length polymorphism and observed that the three targeted restriction sites were hit. DNA sequencing of the PCR fragments confirmed either deletion between two target sites or single nucleotide deletion. We therefore conclude that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used in N. tabacum BY2 cells.

  8. Expression of HPV-11 L1 protein in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Thomas O; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Christensen, Neil D; Rybicki, Edward P

    2007-01-01

    Background We have investigated the possibility and feasibility of producing the HPV-11 L1 major capsid protein in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia and Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi as potential sources for an inexpensive subunit vaccine. Results Transformation of plants was only achieved with the HPV-11 L1 gene with the C-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS-) encoding region removed, and not with the full-length gene. The HPV-11 L1 NLS- gene was stably integrated and inherited through several generations of transgenic plants. Plant-derived HPV-11 L1 protein was capable of assembling into virus-like particles (VLPs), although resulting particles displayed a pleomorphic phenotype. Neutralising monoclonal antibodies binding both surface-linear and conformation-specific epitopes bound the A. thaliana-derived particles and – to a lesser degree – the N. tabacum-derived particles, suggesting that plant-derived and insect cell-derived VLPs displayed similar antigenic properties. Yields of up to 12 μg/g of HPV-11 L1 NLS- protein were harvested from transgenic A. thaliana plants, and 2 μg/g from N. tabacum plants – a significant increase over previous efforts. Immunization of New Zealand white rabbits with ~50 μg of plant-derived HPV-11 L1 NLS- protein induced an antibody response that predominantly recognized insect cell-produced HPV-11 L1 NLS- and not NLS+ VLPs. Evaluation of the same sera concluded that none of them were able to neutralise pseudovirion in vitro. Conclusion We expressed the wild-type HPV-11 L1 NLS- gene in two different plant species and increased yields of HPV-11 L1 protein by between 500 and 1000-fold compared to previous reports. Inoculation of rabbits with extracts from both plant types resulted in a weak immune response, and antisera neither reacted with native HPV-11 L1 VLPs, nor did they neutralise HPV-11 pseudovirion infectivity. This has important and potentially negative implications for the production of HPV-11

  9. Light and clomazone effects on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) callus and leaf discs.

    PubMed

    Camper, N D; McDonald, S K; Burrows, P M

    2003-11-01

    The effects of clomazone on the growth of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. 'NC2326') callus and leaf discs were studied under four light regimes. Callus cultures and leaf discs were grown on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with IAA and kinetin. Light regimes were: dark grown callus kept in the dark and also transferred to the light; light grown callus kept in the light and also transferred to the dark. Two-month-old callus (cultured for 2 months from initiation) grew more rapidly than twelve-month-old callus (cultured for 12 months from initiation) under all conditions tested. Callus transferred from light to dark, or from dark to light, increased in fresh weight slower than did the callus maintained totally in light or dark. Clomazone (2-[(2-chlorophenyl)methyl]-4,4-dimethyl-3-isoxazolidinone) at 140 mg l(-1) or more was lethal to both callus and leaf discs whereas 10 mg l(-1) was stimulatory to growth. Callus tissue responded to clomazone differently depending on the light regime under which it was grown. While clomazone may be affecting the isoprenoid pathway in the callus and leaf disks resulting in growth inhibition, it is possible that other target sites are also being affected and contribute to the reduced growth.

  10. Kinetic mechanism of Nicotiana tabacum myosin-11 defines a new type of a processive motor.

    PubMed

    Diensthuber, Ralph P; Tominaga, Motoki; Preller, Matthias; Hartmann, Falk K; Orii, Hidefumi; Chizhov, Igor; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    The 175-kDa myosin-11 from Nicotiana tabacum (Nt(175kDa)myosin-11) is exceptional in its mechanical activity as it is the fastest known processive actin-based motor, moving 10 times faster than the structurally related class 5 myosins. Although this ability might be essential for long-range organelle transport within larger plant cells, the kinetic features underlying the fast processive movement of Nt(175kDa)myosin-11 still remain unexplored. To address this, we generated a single-headed motor domain construct and carried out a detailed kinetic analysis. The data demonstrate that Nt(175kDa)myosin-11 is a high duty ratio motor, which remains associated with actin most of its enzymatic cycle. However, different from other processive myosins that establish a high duty ratio on the basis of a rate-limiting ADP-release step, Nt(175kDa)myosin-11 achieves a high duty ratio by a prolonged duration of the ATP-induced isomerization of the actin-bound states and ADP release kinetics, both of which in terms of the corresponding time constants approach the total ATPase cycle time. Molecular modeling predicts that variations in the charge distribution of the actin binding interface might contribute to the thermodynamic fine-tuning of the kinetics of this myosin. Our study unravels a new type of a high duty ratio motor and provides important insights into the molecular mechanism of processive movement of higher plant myosins. PMID:25326536

  11. Leucine: tRNA Ligase from Cultured Cells of Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Nigel R.; Wray, John L.

    1978-01-01

    Leucine:tRNA ligase was assayed in extracts from cultured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) XD cells by measuring the initial rate of aminoacylation of transfer RNA with l-[4,5-3H]leucine. Transfer RNA was purified from tobacco XD cells after the method of Vanderhoef et al. (Phytochemistry 9: 2291-2304). The buoyant density of leucine:tRNA ligase from cells grown for 100 generations in 2.5 mm [15N]nitrate and 30% deuterium oxide was 1.3397. After transfer of cells into light medium (2.5 mm [14N]nitrate and 100% H2O) the ligase activity increased and the buoyant density decreased with time to 1.3174 at 72 hours after transfer. It was concluded that leucine:tRNA ligase molecules were synthesized de novo from light amino acids during the period of activity increase. The width at half-peak height of the enzyme distribution profiles following isopycnic equilibrium centrifugation in caesium chloride remained constant at all times after transfer into light medium providing evidence for the loss of preexisting functional ligase molecules. It was concluded that during the period of activity increase the cellular level of enzyme activity was determined by a balance between de novo synthesis and the loss of functional enzyme molecules due to either inactivation or degradation. PMID:16660229

  12. Influence of Iron Chlorosis on Pigment and Protein Metabolism in Leaves of Nicotiana tabacum L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, A. S.; Miller, G. W.

    1966-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on Nicotiana tabacum, L. to study the relation in the grana among chlorophylls, carotenoids, and proteins. The effect of iron chlorosis on protein and pigment synthesis was studied at different stages of chlorosis using glycine-U-C14. Pigments were separated by thin layer chromatography. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoid, and protein contents of chloroplasts from chlorotic tissue were less than those of normal tissues. A 25% decrease in protein labeling and a 45% decrease in chlorophyll labeling was noted in deficient tissue compared to normal tissue even before chlorosis was perceptible. Both normal and iron deficient leaf discs which received iron in the incubation medium incorporated higher amounts of radioactive glycine into chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b at all stages of development than their respective counterparts not supplied with iron in the incubation medium. The presence of iron in the incubation medium reduced the amount of glycine incorporated into carotenes and xanthophylls, except where the tissue was severely chlorotic. This may be attributed to active competition for glycine between the iron-dependent- (chlorophyll) and iron-independent-(carotenoid) biosynthetic pathways. Incorporation of glycine into chloroplast pigments was lowest at severe chlorosis, probably due to a reduction in the overall enzyme activity. PMID:16656270

  13. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase maintains respiration and preserves photosynthetic capacity during moderate drought in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Wang, Jia; Martyn, Greg D; Rahimy, Farkhunda; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2014-11-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain includes an alternative oxidase (AOX) that is hypothesized to aid photosynthetic metabolism, perhaps by acting as an additional electron sink for photogenerated reductant or by dampening the generation of reactive oxygen species. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosystem I (PSI) absorbance, and biochemical and protein analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum 'Petit Havana SR1' wild-type plants with that of transgenic AOX knockdown (RNA interference) and overexpression lines, under both well-watered and moderate drought-stressed conditions. During drought, AOX knockdown lines displayed a lower rate of respiration in the light than the wild type, as confirmed by two independent methods. Furthermore, CO2 and light response curves indicated a nonstomatal limitation of photosynthesis in the knockdowns during drought, relative to the wild type. Also relative to the wild type, the knockdowns under drought maintained PSI and PSII in a more reduced redox state, showed greater regulated nonphotochemical energy quenching by PSII, and displayed a higher relative rate of cyclic electron transport around PSI. The origin of these differences may lie in the chloroplast ATP synthase amount, which declined dramatically in the knockdowns in response to drought. None of these effects were seen in plants overexpressing AOX. The results show that AOX is necessary to maintain mitochondrial respiration during moderate drought. In its absence, respiration rate slows and the lack of this electron sink feeds back on the photosynthetic apparatus, resulting in a loss of chloroplast ATP synthase that then limits photosynthetic capacity.

  14. Improved photosynthetic performance during severe drought in Nicotiana tabacum overexpressing a nonenergy conserving respiratory electron sink.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Martyn, Greg D; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts have means to manage excess reducing power but these mechanisms may become restricted by rates of ATP turnover. Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a mitochondrial terminal oxidase that uncouples the consumption of reducing power from ATP synthesis. Physiological and biochemical analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum wild-type (WT) plants with that of transgenic lines overexpressing AOX, under both well-watered and drought stress conditions. With increasing drought severity, AOX overexpression acted to increase respiration in the light (RL ) relative to WT. CO2 and light response curves indicated that overexpression also improved photosynthetic performance relative to WT, as drought severity increased. This was not due to an effect of AOX amount on leaf water status or the development of the diffusive limitations that occur due to drought. Rather, AOX overexpression dampened photosystem stoichiometry adjustments and losses of key photosynthetic components that occurred in WT. The results indicate that AOX amount influences RL , particularly during severe drought, when cytochrome pathway respiration may become increasingly restricted. This impacts the chloroplast redox state, influencing how the photosynthetic apparatus responds to increasing drought severity. In particular, the development of biochemical limitations to photosynthesis are dampened in plants with increased nonenergy conserving RL . PMID:26032897

  15. Agroinfiltration by cytokinin-producing Agrobacterium sp. strain GV3101 primes defense responses in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Arsheed Hussain; Raghuram, Badmi; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2014-11-01

    Transient infiltrations in tobacco are commonly used in plant studies, but the host response to different disarmed Agrobacterium strains is not fully understood. The present study shows that pretreatment with disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 primes the defense response to subsequent infection by Pseudomonas syringae in Nicotiana tabacum. The presence of a trans-zeatin synthase (tzs) gene in strain GV3101 may be partly responsible for the priming response, as the tzs-deficient Agrobacterium sp. strain LBA4404 only weakly imparts such responses. Besides inducing the expression of defense-related genes like PR-1 and NHL10, GV3101 pretreatment increased the expression of tobacco mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway genes like MEK2, WIPK (wound-induced protein kinase), and SIPK (salicylic acid-induced protein kinase). Furthermore, the GV3101 strain showed a stronger effect than the LBA4404 strain in activating phosphorylation of the tobacco MAPK, WIPK and SIPK, which presumably prime the plant immune machinery. Lower doses of exogenously applied cytokinins increased the activation of MAPK, while higher doses decreased the activation, suggesting a balanced level of cytokinins is required to generate defense response in planta. The current study serves as a cautionary warning for plant researchers over the choice of Agrobacterium strains and their possible consequences on subsequent pathogen-related studies. PMID:25054409

  16. Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-Interacting Ferredoxin 1 Affects Biotic and Abiotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Sung Un; Lee, In-Ju; Ham, Byung-Kook; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Tsip1, a Zn finger protein that was isolated as a direct interactor with tobacco stress-induced 1 (Tsi1), plays an important role in both biotic and abiotic stress signaling. To further understand Tsip1 function, we searched for more Tsip1-interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid screening using a tobacco cDNA library. Screening identified a new Tsip1-interacting protein, Nicotiana tabacum Tsip1-interacting ferredoxin 1 (NtTfd1), and binding specificity was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. The four repeats of a cysteine-rich motif (CXXCXGXG) of Tsip1 proved important for binding to NtTfd1. Virus-induced gene silencing of NtTfd1, Tsip1, and NtTfd1/Tsip1 rendered plants more susceptible to salinity stress compared with TRV2 control plants. NtTfd1- and Tsip1-silenced tobacco plants were more susceptible to infection by Cucumber mosaic virus compared with control plants. These results suggest that NtTfd1 might be involved in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stresses in chloroplasts by interaction with Tsip1. PMID:22699755

  17. Isoprene emission protects photosynthesis but reduces plant productivity during drought in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette C; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Possell, Malcolm; Vickers, Claudia E; Purnell, Anna; Mullineaux, Philip M; Davies, William J; Dodd, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Isoprene protects the photosynthetic apparatus of isoprene-emitting plants from oxidative stress. The role of isoprene in the response of plants to drought is less clear. Water was withheld from transgenic isoprene-emitting and non-emitting tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, to examine: the response of isoprene emission to plant water deficit; a possible relationship between concentrations of the drought-induced phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and isoprene; and whether isoprene affected foliar reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation levels. Isoprene emission did not affect whole-plant water use, foliar ABA concentration or leaf water potential under water deficit. Compared with well-watered controls, droughted non-emitting plants significantly increased ROS content (31-46%) and lipid peroxidation (30-47%), concomitant with decreased operating and maximum efficiencies of photosystem II photochemistry and lower leaf and whole-plant water use efficiency (WUE). Droughted isoprene-emitting plants showed no increase in ROS content or lipid peroxidation relative to well-watered controls, despite isoprene emission decreasing before leaf wilting. Although isoprene emission protected the photosynthetic apparatus and enhanced leaf and whole-plant WUE, non-emitting plants had 8-24% more biomass under drought, implying that isoprene emission incurred a yield penalty.

  18. Nicotiana tabacum protoplasts secretome can evidence relations among regulatory elements of exocytosis mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ul-Rehman, Reiaz; Rinalducci, Sara; Zolla, Lello; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro

    2011-08-01

    An alternative study involving proteome analysis of the 24 hour Nicotiana tabacum protoplast culture medium was performed with the aim to confirm relations among regulatory elements of exocytotic processes. Protoplasts present many convenient features to study cellular processes during transient over-expression or suppression of specific gene's products. We performed a proteomic analysis of the culture medium fraction of protoplasts transiently expressing transgenes for 24 hours to characterize the effect of various regulatory proteins dominant negative mutants. A total number of 49 spots were found reproducible in the medium. 24 of these spots were identified with nano RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Only three and six spots were respectively identified as canonical and non-canonical secreted cell wall proteins. The low number of spots present in the culture medium fraction allowed us the ambitious experiment to analyze the influence of various SNAREs (SYP121, SYP122, SNAP33) and Rab (Rab11) dominant negative mutants. Missing a reasonable number of identified proteins the analyses gave rise to a similarity matrix statistically analyzed considering variation within the presence of 24 spots reproducible in presence of transient over-expression of SNAREs (SYP121 and SYP122) and Rab11 native cDNAs. The similarity confirmed the closer relation between the function of SYP122 and Rab11 as evidenced by the secRGUS based analysis. This analysis included the effect of SNAP33 DN mutant and showed that this Qb-c-SNARE influence both SYP121 and SYP122 SNARE complexes.

  19. Improved photosynthetic performance during severe drought in Nicotiana tabacum overexpressing a nonenergy conserving respiratory electron sink.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Martyn, Greg D; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts have means to manage excess reducing power but these mechanisms may become restricted by rates of ATP turnover. Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a mitochondrial terminal oxidase that uncouples the consumption of reducing power from ATP synthesis. Physiological and biochemical analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum wild-type (WT) plants with that of transgenic lines overexpressing AOX, under both well-watered and drought stress conditions. With increasing drought severity, AOX overexpression acted to increase respiration in the light (RL ) relative to WT. CO2 and light response curves indicated that overexpression also improved photosynthetic performance relative to WT, as drought severity increased. This was not due to an effect of AOX amount on leaf water status or the development of the diffusive limitations that occur due to drought. Rather, AOX overexpression dampened photosystem stoichiometry adjustments and losses of key photosynthetic components that occurred in WT. The results indicate that AOX amount influences RL , particularly during severe drought, when cytochrome pathway respiration may become increasingly restricted. This impacts the chloroplast redox state, influencing how the photosynthetic apparatus responds to increasing drought severity. In particular, the development of biochemical limitations to photosynthesis are dampened in plants with increased nonenergy conserving RL .

  20. In vitro anthelmintic effect of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) extract on parasitic nematode, Marshallagia marshalli.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Fatemeh; Nourollahi-Fard, Saeid R; Foroodi, Hamid R; Sharifi, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Because of developing resistance to the existing anthelmintic drugs, there is a need for new anthelmintic agents. Tobacco plant has alkaloid materials that have antiparasitic effect. We investigated the in vitro anthelminthic effect of aqueous and alcoholic extract of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) against M. marshalli. For investigating this effect, we prepared three dilutions of aqueous and alcoholic extract of Tobacco (25, 50 and 75 mg/ml). The worms exposed to extracts for 10 h at 25-30 °C. The buffer PBS used as negative control and 50 mg/ml dilution of Levamisole used as standard reference. In each group, 50 worms were examined. We used an inhibition mobility test for our study. Survival analysis with Cox proportional hazard model was used for data analysis. The result showed that compared with Levamisole 50 mg/ml, dilution of 25 and 50 mg/ml of the aqueous extract had the same anthelminthic effects (P > 0.05), but 75 mg/ml dilution of the aqueous extract and dilution of 25, 50 and 75 mg/ml of alcoholic extract had more anthelminthic effect (P < 0.05). Overall, extracts of Tobacco possess considerable anthelminthic activity and more potent effects were observed with the highest concentrations. Therefore, the in vivo study on Tobocco in animal models is recommended. PMID:27605759

  1. In vitro anthelmintic effect of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) extract on parasitic nematode, Marshallagia marshalli.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Fatemeh; Nourollahi-Fard, Saeid R; Foroodi, Hamid R; Sharifi, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Because of developing resistance to the existing anthelmintic drugs, there is a need for new anthelmintic agents. Tobacco plant has alkaloid materials that have antiparasitic effect. We investigated the in vitro anthelminthic effect of aqueous and alcoholic extract of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) against M. marshalli. For investigating this effect, we prepared three dilutions of aqueous and alcoholic extract of Tobacco (25, 50 and 75 mg/ml). The worms exposed to extracts for 10 h at 25-30 °C. The buffer PBS used as negative control and 50 mg/ml dilution of Levamisole used as standard reference. In each group, 50 worms were examined. We used an inhibition mobility test for our study. Survival analysis with Cox proportional hazard model was used for data analysis. The result showed that compared with Levamisole 50 mg/ml, dilution of 25 and 50 mg/ml of the aqueous extract had the same anthelminthic effects (P > 0.05), but 75 mg/ml dilution of the aqueous extract and dilution of 25, 50 and 75 mg/ml of alcoholic extract had more anthelminthic effect (P < 0.05). Overall, extracts of Tobacco possess considerable anthelminthic activity and more potent effects were observed with the highest concentrations. Therefore, the in vivo study on Tobocco in animal models is recommended.

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of Nicotiana tabacum Infected by Cucumber mosaic virus during Systemic Symptom Development

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jun; Chen, Ling-Na; Qiu, Yan-Hong; Li, Gui-Fen; Meng, Xiao-Hua; Zhu, Shui-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Virus infection of plants may induce a variety of disease symptoms. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of systemic symptom development in infected plants. Here we performed the first next-generation sequencing study to identify gene expression changes associated with disease development in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc) induced by infection with the M strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (M-CMV). Analysis of the tobacco transcriptome by RNA-Seq identified 95,916 unigenes, 34,408 of which were new transcripts by database searches. Deep sequencing was subsequently used to compare the digital gene expression (DGE) profiles of the healthy plants with the infected plants at six sequential disease development stages, including vein clearing, mosaic, severe chlorosis, partial and complete recovery, and secondary mosaic. Thousands of differentially expressed genes were identified, and KEGG pathway analysis of these genes suggested that many biological processes, such as photosynthesis, pigment metabolism and plant-pathogen interaction, were involved in systemic symptom development. Our systematic analysis provides comprehensive transcriptomic information regarding systemic symptom development in virus-infected plants. This information will help further our understanding of the detailed mechanisms of plant responses to viral infection. PMID:22952684

  3. Larval Helicoverpa zea Transcriptional, Growth and Behavioral Responses to Nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Gog, Linus; Vogel, Heiko; Hum-Musser, Sue M.; Tuter, Jason; Musser, Richard O.

    2014-01-01

    The polyphagous feeding habits of the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), underscore its status as a major agricultural pest with a wide geographic distribution and host plant repertoire. To study the transcriptomic response to toxins in diet, we conducted a microarray analysis of H. zea caterpillars feeding on artificial diet, diet laced with nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum (L.) plants. We supplemented our analysis with growth and aversion bioassays. The transcriptome reflects an abundant expression of proteases, chitin, cytochrome P450 and immune-related genes, many of which are shared between the two experimental treatments. However, the tobacco treatment tended to elicit stronger transcriptional responses than nicotine-laced diet. The salivary factor glucose oxidase, known to suppress nicotine induction in the plant, was upregulated by H. zea in response to tobacco but not to nicotine-laced diet. Reduced caterpillar growth rates accompanied the broad regulation of genes associated with growth, such as juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase. The differential expression of chemosensory proteins, such as odorant binding-protein-2 precursor, as well as the neurotransmitter nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor subunit 9, highlights candidate genes regulating aversive behavior towards nicotine. We suggest that an observed coincidental rise in cannibalistic behavior and regulation of proteases and protease inhibitors in H. zea larvae signify a compensatory response to induced plant defenses. PMID:26462833

  4. Shading Influence on the Sterol Balance of Nicotiana tabacum L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Claus

    1978-01-01

    Tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were grown in the field and the apex was removed at the 42-day stage. Shading screens were set up which produced 0, 26, 67, and 90% shade. Plants were grown an additional 25 days before leaves from top, middle, and bottom stalk positions were harvested. Each leaf group was analyzed for free sterol, steryl ester, steryl glycoside, and acylsteryl glycoside. The free sterol content was lowest in top leaves and highest in bottom leaves; however, the top leaves had more steryl ester than the bottom leaves. Leaf position had no effect on steryl glycosides and acylsteryl glycosides. Shading did not influence the level of any sterol class; but in general, shading increased stigmasterol and decreased sitosterol. This trend was observed for all sterol classes, and the free sterols showed the largest and most consistent change. The younger top leaves showed a greater response than the older bottom leaves, but bottom leaves always had more stigmasterol than sitosterol even without shade. PMID:16660242

  5. Intracellular compartmentation of ions in salt adapted tobacco cells. [Nicotiana tabacum L

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, M.L.; Hess, F.D.; Bressan, R.A.; Hasegawa, P.M. )

    1988-02-01

    Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} are the principal solutes utilized for osmotic adjustment in cells of Nicotiana tabacum L. var Wisconsin 38 (tobacco) adapted to NaCl, accumulating to levels of 472 and 386 millimolar, respectively, in cells adapted to 428 millimolar NaCl. X-ray microanalysis of unetched frozen-hydrated cells adapted to salt indicated that Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} were compartmentalized in the vacuole, at concentrations of 780 and 624 millimolar, respectively, while cytoplasmic concentrations of the ions were maintained at 96 millimolar. The morphometric differences which existed between unadapted and salt adapted cells, (cytoplasmic volume of 22 and 45% of the cell, respectively), facilitated containment of the excited volume of the x-ray signal in the cytoplasm of the adapted cells. Confirmation of ion compartmentation in salt adapted cells was obtained based on kinetic analyses of {sup 22}Na{sup +} and {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} efflux from cells in steady state. These data provide evidence that ion compartmentation is a component of salt adaptation of glycophyte cells.

  6. Long-chain bases and their phosphorylated derivatives differentially regulate cryptogein-induced production of reactive oxygen species in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Coursol, Sylvie; Fromentin, Jérôme; Noirot, Elodie; Brière, Christian; Robert, Franck; Morel, Johanne; Liang, Yun-Kuan; Lherminier, Jeannine; Simon-Plas, Françoise

    2015-02-01

    The proteinaceous elicitor cryptogein triggers defence reactions in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) through a signalling cascade, including the early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the plasma membrane (PM)-located tobacco respiratory burst oxidase homologue D (NtRbohD). Sphingolipid long-chain bases (LCBs) are emerging as potent positive regulators of plant defence-related mechanisms. This led us to question whether both LCBs and their phosphorylated derivatives (LCB-Ps) are involved in the early signalling process triggered by cryptogein in tobacco BY-2 cells. Here, we showed that cryptogein-induced ROS production was inhibited by LCB kinase (LCBK) inhibitors. Additionally, Arabidopsis thaliana sphingosine kinase 1 and exogenously supplied LCB-Ps increased cryptogein-induced ROS production, whereas exogenously supplied LCBs had a strong opposite effect, which was not driven by a reduction in cellular viability. Immunogold-electron microscopy assay also revealed that LCB-Ps are present in the PM, which fits well with the presence of a high LCBK activity associated with this fraction. Our data demonstrate that LCBs and LCB-Ps differentially regulate cryptogein-induced ROS production in tobacco BY-2 cells, and support a model in which a cooperative synergism between LCBK/LCB-Ps and NtRbohD/ROS in the cryptogein signalling pathway is likely at the PM in tobacco BY-2 cells.

  7. In vitro and In vivo anthelmintic activity of Nicotiana tabacum L. leaves against gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar; Lateef, Muhammad; Jabbar, Abdul; Ghayur, Muhammad Nabeel; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of Nicotiana tabacum L. leaves was studied to rationalize its traditional use. Live Haemonchus contortus were used to assess the in vitro anthelmintic effect of a crude aqueous extract (CAE) and a methanol extract (CME) of N. tabacum. The in vitro inhibitory effect of both the extracts was evident from the paralysis and/or mortality of worms noted at 6 h post-exposure. For the in vivo studies, CAE and CME were administered in increasing doses (1.0-3.0 g/kg) to sheep naturally infected with mixed species of gastrointestinal nematodes. A maximum reduction of 73.6% in eggs per gram (EPG) of faeces was recorded on day 5 post-treatment with CME (3.0 g/kg) while the same dose of CAE showed a 49.4% reduction. Levamisole (7.5 mg/kg), a standard anthelmintic agent, showed a 99.6% reduction in EPG. These data show that the aqueous and methanol extracts of Nicotiana tabacum exhibit dose-dependent anthelmintic activity both in vitro and in vivo, thus justifying its use in the traditional medicine system of Pakistan.

  8. Proteomic profiling of cellular targets of lipopolysaccharide-induced signalling in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Isak B; Laukens, Kris; De Vijlder, Thomas; Witters, Erwin; Dubery, Ian A

    2008-11-01

    Plants constantly monitor for pathogen challenge and utilize a diverse array of adaptive defense mechanisms, including differential protein regulation, during pathogen attack. A proteomic analysis of Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 cells was performed in order to investigate the dynamic changes following perception of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. A multiplexed proteome analysis, employing two-dimensional difference-in-gel-electrophoresis with CyDye DIGE fluors, as well as Ruthenium II tris (bathophenanthroline disulfonate) fluorescence staining and Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein-specific gel staining, monitored over 1500 proteins and resulted in the identification of 88 differentially regulated proteins and phosphoproteins responsive to LPS(B.cep.)-elicitation. Functional clustering of the proteins both at the level of their abundance and phosphorylation status, revealed 9 proteins involved in transport, ion homeostasis and signal transduction. A large number of responsive proteins were found to be involved in metabolism- and energy-related processes (36), representing various metabolic pathways. Another abundant category corresponded to proteins classified as molecular chaperones and involved in protein destination/targeting (12). Other categories of proteins found to be LPS(B.cep.)-responsive and differentially regulated include cell structure- and cytoskeletal rearrangement proteins (8) and proteins involved in transcription and translation as well as degradation (11). The results indicate that LPS(B.cep.) induces metabolic reprogramming and changes in cellular activities supporting protein synthesis, -folding, vesicle trafficking and secretion; accompanied by changes to the cytoskeleton and proteosome function. Many of the identified proteins are known to be interconnected at various levels through a complex web of activation/deactivation, complex formation, protein-protein interactions, and chaperoning reactions. The presented data offers novel insights and further

  9. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on arsenic accumulation by tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Hua, Jianfeng; Lin, Xiangui; Yin, Rui; Jiang, Qian; Shao, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (from contaminated or uncontaminated soils) on arsenic (As) uptake of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) in As-contaminated soil. Mycorrhizal colonization rate, dry weight, As and P uptake by plants, concentrations of water-extractable As and As fractions were determined. A low mycorrhizal colonization rate (< 25%) was detected. Our research indicated that AM fungi isolated from polluted soils were no more effective than those from unpolluted soils when grown in symbiosis with tobacco. No significant differences were observed in roots and stalks dry weights among all treatments. Leaves and total plant dry weights were much higher in Glomus versiforme treatment than that in control treatment. As contents in roots and stalks from mycorrhizal treatments were much lower than that from control treatment. Total plant As content exhibited the same trend. P concentrations in tobacco were not affected by colonization, nor were stalks, leaves and total plant P contents. Roots P contents were remarkably lower in HN treatments than in other treatments. Meanwhile, decreased soil pH and lower water-extractable As concentrations and higher levels of As fraction bound to well-crystallized hydrous oxides of Fe and Al were found in mycorrhizal treatments than in controls. The protective effect of mycorrhiza against plant As uptake may be associated with changes in As solubility mediated by changing soil pH. These results indicated that under As stress, proper mechanisms employed by AM fungi can protect tobacco against As uptake. Results confirmed that AM fungi can play an important role in food quality and safety. PMID:19999968

  10. Profiling of Altered Metabolomic States in Nicotiana tabacum Cells Induced by Priming Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has developed into a valuable tool for advancing our understanding of plant metabolism. Plant innate immune defenses can be activated and enhanced so that, subsequent to being pre-sensitized, plants are able to launch a stronger and faster defense response upon exposure to pathogenic microorganisms, a phenomenon known as priming. Here, three contrasting chemical activators, namely acibenzolar-S-methyl, azelaic acid and riboflavin, were used to induce a primed state in Nicotiana tabacum cells. Identified biomarkers were then compared to responses induced by three phytohormones—abscisic acid, methyljasmonate, and salicylic acid. Altered metabolomes were studied using a metabolite fingerprinting approach based on liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Multivariate data models indicated that these inducers cause time-dependent metabolic perturbations in the cultured cells and revealed biomarkers of which the levels are affected by these agents. A total of 34 metabolites were annotated from the mass spectral data and online databases. Venn diagrams were used to identify common biomarkers as well as those unique to a specific agent. Results implicate 20 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to (i) quinic acid (chlorogenic acids), (ii) tyramine, (iii) polyamines, or (iv) glucose as discriminatory biomarkers of priming in tobacco cells. Functional roles for most of these metabolites in plant defense responses could thus be proposed. Metabolites induced by the activators belong to the early phenylpropanoid pathway, which indicates that different stimuli can activate similar pathways but with different metabolite fingerprints. Possible linkages to phytohormone-dependent pathways at a metabolomic level were indicated in the case of cells treated with salicylic acid and methyljasmonate. The results contribute to a better understanding of the priming phenomenon and advance our knowledge of cinnamic acid derivatives as versatile defense metabolites. PMID

  11. Structural and Functional Similarities between Osmotin from Nicotiana Tabacum Seeds and Human Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Osmotin, a plant protein, specifically binds a seven transmembrane domain receptor-like protein to exert its biological activity via a RAS2/cAMP signaling pathway. The receptor protein is encoded in the gene ORE20/PHO36 and the mammalian homolog of PHO36 is a receptor for the human hormone adiponectin (ADIPOR1). Moreover it is known that the osmotin domain I can be overlapped to the β-barrel domain of adiponectin. Therefore, these observations and some already existing structural and biological data open a window on a possible use of the osmotin or of its derivative as adiponectin agonist. We have modelled the three-dimensional structure of the adiponectin trimer (ADIPOQ), and two ADIPOR1 and PHO36 receptors. Moreover, we have also modelled the following complexes: ADIPOQ/ADIPOR1, osmotin/PHO36 and osmotin/ADIPOR1. We have then shown the structural determinants of these interactions and their physico-chemical features and analyzed the related interaction residues involved in the formation of the complexes. The stability of the modelled structures and their complexes was always evaluated and controlled by molecular dynamics. On the basis of these results a 9 residues osmotin peptide was selected and its interaction with ADIPOR1 and PHO36 was modelled and analysed in term of energetic stability by molecular dynamics. To confirm in vivo the molecular modelling data, osmotin has been purified from nicotiana tabacum seeds and its nine residues peptide synthesized. We have used cultured human synovial fibroblasts that respond to adiponectin by increasing the expression of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via ADIPOR1. The biological effect on fibroblasts of osmotin and its peptide derivative has been found similar to that of adiponectin confirming the results found in silico. PMID:21311758

  12. Manipulation of monoubiquitin improves chilling tolerance in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanan; Zhang, Meng; Guo, Qifang; Wang, Guokun; Gong, Jiangfeng; Xu, Ying; Wang, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a multifunctional protein that mainly functions to tag proteins for selective degradation by the 26S proteasome. We cloned an Ub gene TaUb2 from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) previously. To study the function of TaUB2 in chilling stress, sense and antisense Ub transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.), as well as wild type (WT) and vector control β-glucuronidase (T-GUS) plants, were used. Under stress, leaf wilting in sense plants was significantly less than in controls, but more severe in antisense plants. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) in sense plants were greater than controls, but lower in antisense plants during chilling stress and recovery. Less wilting in sense plants resulted from improved water status, which may be related to the accumulation of proline and solute sugar. Furthermore, as indicated by electrolyte leakage, membrane damage under stress was less in sense plants and more severe in antisense plants than controls. Consistent with electrolyte leakage, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was less in sense plants, but more in antisense plants compared to controls. Meanwhile, the less accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the greater antioxidant enzyme activity in sense plants implied the improved antioxidant competence by the overexpression of monoubiquitin gene Ta-Ub2 from wheat. We suggest that overexpressing Ub is a useful strategy to promote chilling tolerance. The improvement of ROS scavenging may be an important mechanism underlying the role of Ub in promoting plants tolerant to chilling stress.

  13. [Antioxidative response of Phytolacca americana and Nicotiana tabacum to manganese stresses].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-xiu; Huang, Zhi-bo; Zhang, Hong-mei; Li, Lin-feng; Chai, Tuan-yao

    2009-12-01

    Plant species capable of accumulating heavy metals are of considerable interest for phytoremediation and phytomining. The mechanism of Mn tolerance/hyperaccumulate in Phytolacca americana L. is less known. To elucidate the role of antioxidative enzyme in response to Mn, the 6-week-old seedling of Mn hyperaccumulator P. americana and non-accumulator-tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were exposed to half strength Hoagland solution with 1 mmol x L(-1) or 3 mmol x L(-1) MnCl2 for 4 days. The photosynthetic rate in P. americana decreased more slowly than that in tobacco, while the MDA content and electrolyte leakage in tobacco increased more rapidly than that in P. americana. For example, after exposure to 1 mmol x L(-1) Mn for 4 days, the photosynthetic rates of P. americana and tobacco in comparison to the control reduced by 13.3% and 75.5%, respectively. The MDA content and electrolyte leakage in tobacco increased by 347.3% and 120.1%, respectively, whereas Mn had no marked effect on both of it in P. americana, indicated that the oxidative damage in tobacco was more serious than that in P. americana. The activities of SOD and POD of both species increased rapidly with elevated Mn concentration and exposure time in both species, the increase of SOD activity in P. americana was higher than that in tobacco. CAT activity in tobacco declined rapidly, while the activity of CAT in P. americana was increased. The activities of SOD, POD and CAT in P. americana upon 1 mmol x L(-1) Mn exposure increased by 161.1%, 111.3% and 17.5%, respectively. The activities of SOD and POD in tobacco increased by 55.5% and 206.0%, respectively, while CAT activity decreased by 15.6%, indicating that the antioxidative enzymes in P. americana, particularly in CAT,could fully scavenge the reactive oxygen species generated by Mn toxicity. These results collectively indicate that the enzymatic antioxidation capacity is one of the important mechanisms responsible for Mn tolerance in hyperaccumulator plant

  14. Genome-wide identification of the expansin gene family in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Ding, Anming; Marowa, Prince; Kong, Yingzhen

    2016-10-01

    Expansins are pH-dependent cell wall loosening proteins which form a large family in plants. They have been shown to be involved in various developmental processes and been implicated in enabling plants' ability to absorb nutrients from the soil as well as conferring biotic and abiotic stress resistances. It is therefore clear that they can be potential targets in genetic engineering for crop improvement. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is a major crop species as well as a model organism. Considering that only a few tobacco expansins have been studied, a genome-wide analysis of the tobacco expansin gene family is necessary. In this study, we identified 52 expansins in tobacco, which were classified into four subfamilies: 36 NtEXPAs, 6 NtEXPBs, 3 NtEXLAs and 7 NtEXLBs. Compared to other species, the NtEXLB subfamily size was relatively larger. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 52 tobacco expansins were divided into 13 subgroups. Gene structure analysis revealed that genes within subfamilies/subgroups exhibited similar characteristics such as gene structure and protein motif arrangement. Whole-genome duplication and tandem duplication events may have played important roles in the expanding of tobacco expansins. Cis-Acting element analysis revealed that each expansin gene was regulated or several expansin genes were co-regulated by both internal and environmental factors. 35 of these genes were identified as being expressed according to a microarray analysis. In contrast to most NtEXPAs which had higher expression levels in young organs, NtEXLAs and NtEXLBs were preferentially expressed in mature or senescent tissues, suggesting that they might play different roles in different organs or at different developmental stages. As the first step towards genome-wide analysis of the tobacco expansin gene family, our work provides solid background information related to structure, evolution and expression as well as regulatory cis-acting elements of the tobacco expansins. This

  15. Genome-wide identification of the expansin gene family in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Ding, Anming; Marowa, Prince; Kong, Yingzhen

    2016-10-01

    Expansins are pH-dependent cell wall loosening proteins which form a large family in plants. They have been shown to be involved in various developmental processes and been implicated in enabling plants' ability to absorb nutrients from the soil as well as conferring biotic and abiotic stress resistances. It is therefore clear that they can be potential targets in genetic engineering for crop improvement. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is a major crop species as well as a model organism. Considering that only a few tobacco expansins have been studied, a genome-wide analysis of the tobacco expansin gene family is necessary. In this study, we identified 52 expansins in tobacco, which were classified into four subfamilies: 36 NtEXPAs, 6 NtEXPBs, 3 NtEXLAs and 7 NtEXLBs. Compared to other species, the NtEXLB subfamily size was relatively larger. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 52 tobacco expansins were divided into 13 subgroups. Gene structure analysis revealed that genes within subfamilies/subgroups exhibited similar characteristics such as gene structure and protein motif arrangement. Whole-genome duplication and tandem duplication events may have played important roles in the expanding of tobacco expansins. Cis-Acting element analysis revealed that each expansin gene was regulated or several expansin genes were co-regulated by both internal and environmental factors. 35 of these genes were identified as being expressed according to a microarray analysis. In contrast to most NtEXPAs which had higher expression levels in young organs, NtEXLAs and NtEXLBs were preferentially expressed in mature or senescent tissues, suggesting that they might play different roles in different organs or at different developmental stages. As the first step towards genome-wide analysis of the tobacco expansin gene family, our work provides solid background information related to structure, evolution and expression as well as regulatory cis-acting elements of the tobacco expansins. This

  16. Cloning of the Lycopene β-cyclase Gene in Nicotiana tabacum and Its Overexpression Confers Salt and Drought Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanmei; Guo, Jinggong; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Lifeng; Liu, Pingping; Chen, Xia; Li, Feng; Wei, Pan; Li, Zefeng; Li, Wenzheng; Wei, Chunyang; Zheng, Qingxia; Chen, Qiansi; Zhang, Jianfeng; Lin, Fucheng; Qu, Lingbo; Snyder, John Hugh; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are important pigments in plants that play crucial roles in plant growth and in plant responses to environmental stress. Lycopene β cyclase (β-LCY) functions at the branch point of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, catalyzing the cyclization of lycopene. Here, a β-LCY gene from Nicotiana tabacum, designated as Ntβ-LCY1, was cloned and functionally characterized. Robust expression of Ntβ-LCY1 was found in leaves, and Ntβ-LCY1 expression was obviously induced by salt, drought, and exogenous abscisic acid treatments. Strong accumulation of carotenoids and expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes resulted from Ntβ-LCY1 overexpression. Additionally, compared to wild-type plants, transgenic plants with overexpression showed enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stress with higher abscisic acid levels and lower levels of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species. Conversely, transgenic RNA interference plants had a clear albino phenotype in leaves, and some plants did not survive beyond the early developmental stages. The suppression of Ntβ-LCY1 expression led to lower expression levels of genes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway and to reduced accumulation of carotenoids, chlorophyll, and abscisic acid. These results indicate that Ntβ-LCY1 is not only a likely cyclization enzyme involved in carotenoid accumulation but also confers salt and drought stress tolerance in Nicotiana tabacum. PMID:26703579

  17. Cloning of the Lycopene β-cyclase Gene in Nicotiana tabacum and Its Overexpression Confers Salt and Drought Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanmei; Guo, Jinggong; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Lifeng; Liu, Pingping; Chen, Xia; Li, Feng; Wei, Pan; Li, Zefeng; Li, Wenzheng; Wei, Chunyang; Zheng, Qingxia; Chen, Qiansi; Zhang, Jianfeng; Lin, Fucheng; Qu, Lingbo; Snyder, John Hugh; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are important pigments in plants that play crucial roles in plant growth and in plant responses to environmental stress. Lycopene β cyclase (β-LCY) functions at the branch point of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, catalyzing the cyclization of lycopene. Here, a β-LCY gene from Nicotiana tabacum, designated as Ntβ-LCY1, was cloned and functionally characterized. Robust expression of Ntβ-LCY1 was found in leaves, and Ntβ-LCY1 expression was obviously induced by salt, drought, and exogenous abscisic acid treatments. Strong accumulation of carotenoids and expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes resulted from Ntβ-LCY1 overexpression. Additionally, compared to wild-type plants, transgenic plants with overexpression showed enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stress with higher abscisic acid levels and lower levels of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species. Conversely, transgenic RNA interference plants had a clear albino phenotype in leaves, and some plants did not survive beyond the early developmental stages. The suppression of Ntβ-LCY1 expression led to lower expression levels of genes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway and to reduced accumulation of carotenoids, chlorophyll, and abscisic acid. These results indicate that Ntβ-LCY1 is not only a likely cyclization enzyme involved in carotenoid accumulation but also confers salt and drought stress tolerance in Nicotiana tabacum. PMID:26703579

  18. Herbivore induction of jasmonic acid and chemical defences reduce photosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Nabity, Paul D; Zavala, Jorge A; DeLucia, Evan H

    2013-01-01

    Herbivory initiates a shift in plant metabolism from growth to defence that may reduce fitness in the absence of further herbivory. However, the defence-induced changes in carbon assimilation that precede this reallocation in resources remain largely undetermined. This study characterized the response of photosynthesis to herbivore induction of jasmonic acid (JA)-related defences in Nicotiana attenuata to increase understanding of these mechanisms. It was hypothesized that JA-induced defences would immediately reduce the component processes of photosynthesis upon attack and was predicted that wild-type plants would suffer greater reductions in photosynthesis than plants lacking JA-induced defences. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and thermal spatial patterns were measured together with the production of defence-related metabolites after attack and through recovery. Herbivore damage immediately reduced electron transport and gas exchange in wild-type plants, and gas exchange remained suppressed for several days after attack. The sustained reductions in gas exchange occurred concurrently with increased defence metabolites in wild-type plants, whereas plants lacking JA-induced defences suffered minimal suppression in photosynthesis and no increase in defence metabolite production. This suppression in photosynthesis occurred only after sustained defence signalling and defence chemical mobilization, whereas a short bout of feeding damage only transiently altered components of photosynthesis. It was identified that lipoxygenase signalling interacted with photosynthetic electron transport and that the resulting JA-related metabolites reduced photosynthesis. These data represent a metabolic cost to mounting a chemical defence against herbivory and link defence-signalling networks to the differential effects of herbivory on photosynthesis in remaining leaf tissues in a time-dependent manner.

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF EST-SSR MARKER FOR THE GENETIC DIVERSITY AMONG TOBACCOS (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Cai, C; Yang, Y; Cheng, L; Tong, C; Feng, J

    2015-06-01

    Because of the advantages of EST-SSR markers, it has been employed as powerful markers for genetic diversity analysis, comparative mapping and phylogenetic studies. In this study, a total of 429,869 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) ESTs were downloaded from the public databases, which offers an opportunity to identify SSRs in ESTs by data mining, and 38,165 SSRs were identified from 379,967 uni-ESTs with the frequency of one SSR per 5.52 kb. Mono- and tri-nucleotide repeat motifs were the dominant repeat types, accounting for 40.53 and 34.51% of all SSRs, respectively. After eliminating mononucleotide-containing sequences, 86 pairs of primers were designed to amplify in four tobacco accessions. Only 15 primers (17.44%) showed polymorphism, and then they were further used to assess genetic diversity of 20 tobacco accessions. Unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average dendrograms (UPGMA) and principal coordinates analysis plots (PCA) revealed genetic differentiation between N. rustica and N. tabacum, and between oriental tobacco and other accessions of N. tabacum. The present study reported the development of EST-SSR markers in tobacco by exploiting EST databases, and confirmed the effective way to develop markers. These EST-SSRs can serve in studies on cultivar identification, genetic diversity analysis, and genetics in tobacco.

  20. Independent, rapid and targeted loss of highly repetitive DNA in natural and synthetic allopolyploids of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Renny-Byfield, Simon; Kovařík, Ales; Chester, Michael; Nichols, Richard A; Macas, Jiri; Novák, Petr; Leitch, Andrew R

    2012-01-01

    Allopolyploidy (interspecific hybridisation and polyploidy) has played a significant role in the evolutionary history of angiosperms and can result in genomic, epigenetic and transcriptomic perturbations. We examine the immediate effects of allopolyploidy on repetitive DNA by comparing the genomes of synthetic and natural Nicotiana tabacum with diploid progenitors N. tomentosiformis (paternal progenitor) and N. sylvestris (maternal progenitor). Using next generation sequencing, a recently developed graph-based repeat identification pipeline, Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) we characterise two highly repetitive DNA sequences (NicCL3 and NicCL7/30). Analysis of two independent high-throughput DNA sequencing datasets indicates NicCL3 forms 1.6-1.9% of the genome in N. tomentosiformis, sequences that occur in multiple, discontinuous tandem arrays scattered over several chromosomes. Abundance estimates, based on sequencing depth, indicate NicCL3 is almost absent in N. sylvestris and has been dramatically reduced in copy number in the allopolyploid N. tabacum. Surprisingly elimination of NicCL3 is repeated in some synthetic lines of N. tabacum in their forth generation. The retroelement NicCL7/30, which occurs interspersed with NicCL3, is also under-represented but to a much lesser degree, revealing targeted elimination of the latter. Analysis of paired-end sequencing data indicates the tandem component of NicCL3 has been preferentially removed in natural N. tabacum, increasing the proportion of the dispersed component. This occurs across multiple blocks of discontinuous repeats and based on the distribution of nucleotide similarity among NicCL3 units, was concurrent with rounds of sequence homogenisation. PMID:22606317

  1. [Preferential localization of cadmium on the iterative DNA sequences from cultured tissues of the crown gall of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum, var. Wisconsis 38)].

    PubMed

    Sissoëff, I; Grisvard, J; Guillé, E; Laterjet, R

    1975-05-26

    Fractionation of total crown-gall tissue culture DNA from Nicotiana tabacum by Ag+-Cs2SO4 density gradient is described. Cadmium ions determination is performed in each fraction by anodic stripping voltammetry. The cadmium content of the DNA in the lightest density fractions is 100 to 1000 times higher than in the other fractions.

  2. [Transgenic Expression of Serratia marcescens Native and Mutant Nucleases Modulates Tobacco Mosaic Virus Resistance in Nicotiana tabacum L].

    PubMed

    Trifonova, E A; Saveleva, A V; Romanova, A V; Filipenko, E A; Sapotsky, M V; Malinovsky, V I; Kochetov, A V; Shumny, V K

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular Serratia marcescens nuclease is an extremely active enzyme which non-specifically degrades RNA and DNA. Its antiviral activity was previously shown both in animals and in plants when applied exogenously. Transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L cv. SR1) expressing S. marcescens chimeric, mutant, and intracellular mutant nuclease gene variants were regenerated and challenged with tobacco mosaic virus. The transgenic plants exhibited a higher level of resistance to the virus infection than the control non-transgenic plants. The resistance was evidenced by the delay of the appearance of mosaic symptoms and the retarded accumulation of viral antigen. Thus, these results reveal that modulations of both extracellular nuclease activity and intracellular RNA/DNA binding can protect plants against viral diseases. PMID:26410939

  3. Soft material-based microculture system having air permeable cover sheet for the protoplast culture of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jong Il; Ko, Jung-Moon; Kim, So Hyeon; Baek, Ju Yeoul; Cha, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2006-08-01

    In plant cell culture, the delivery of nutrition and gas (mainly oxygen) to the cells is the most important factor for viability. In this paper, we propose a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microculture system that is designed to have good aeration. PDMS is known to have excellent air permeability, and through the experimental method, we investigated the relation between the degree of air delivery and the thickness of the PDMS sheet covering the culture chamber. We determined the proper thickness of the cover sheet, and cultured protoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum in a culture chamber covered with a PDMS sheet having thickness of 400 microm. The cells were successfully divided, and lived well inside the culture chamber for 10 days. In addition, protoplasts were cultured inside the culture chambers covered with the cover glass and the PDMS sheet, respectively, and the microcolonies were formed well inside the PDMS covered chamber after 10 days.

  4. Ionome changes in Xylella fastidiosa-infected Nicotiana tabacum correlate with virulence and discriminate between subspecies of bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J E; Sefick, S A; Parker, J K; Arnold, T; Cobine, P A; De La Fuente, L

    2014-10-01

    Characterization of ionomes has been used to uncover the basis of nutrient utilization and environmental adaptation of plants. Here, ionomic profiles were used to understand the phenotypic response of a plant to infection by genetically diverse isolates of Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterial plant pathogen. In this study, X. fastidiosa isolates were used to infect a common model host (Nicotiana tabacum 'SR1'), and leaf and sap concentrations of eleven elements together with plant colonization and symptoms were assessed. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that changes in the ionome were significantly correlated with symptom severity and bacterial populations in host petioles. Moreover, plant ionome modification by infection could be used to differentiate the X. fastidiosa subspecies with which the plant was infected. This report establishes host ionome modification as a phenotypic response to infection. PMID:24983508

  5. A pleiotropic drug resistance transporter in Nicotiana tabacum is involved in defense against the herbivore Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Manuela D; Siegmund, Stephanie E G; Drozak, Anna; Trombik, Tomasz; Bultreys, Alain; Baldwin, Ian T; Boutry, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters are a group of membrane proteins belonging to the ABCG sub-family of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. There is clear evidence for the involvement of plant ABC transporters in resistance to fungal and bacterial pathogens, but not in the biotic stress response to insect or herbivore attack. Here, we describe a PDR transporter, ABCG5/PDR5, from Nicotiana tabacum. GFP fusion and subcellular fractionation studies revealed that ABCG5/PDR5 is localized to the plasma membrane. Staining of transgenic plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the ABCG5/PDR5 transcription promoter and immunoblotting of wild-type plants showed that, under standard growth conditions, ABCG5/PDR5 is highly expressed in roots, stems and flowers, but is only expressed at marginal levels in leaves. Interestingly, ABCG5/PDR5 expression is induced in leaves by methyl jasmonate, wounding, pathogen infiltration, or herbivory by Manduca sexta. To address the physiological role of ABCG5/PDR5, N. tabacum plants silenced for the expression of ABCG5/PDR5 were obtained. No phenotypic modification was observed under standard conditions. However, a small increase in susceptibility to the fungus Fusarium oxysporum was observed. A stronger effect was observed in relation to herbivory: silenced plants allowed better growth and faster development of M. sexta larvae than wild-type plants, indicating an involvement of this PDR transporter in resistance to M. sexta herbivory.

  6. Vacuolar transport of nicotine is mediated by a multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masahiko; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sawada, Keisuke; Van Montagu, Marc C E; Inzé, Dirk; Rischer, Heiko; Goossens, Alain; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2009-02-17

    Alkaloids play a key role in plant defense mechanisms against pathogens and herbivores, but the plants themselves need to cope with their toxicity as well. The major alkaloid of the Nicotiana species, nicotine, is translocated via xylem transport from the root tissues where it is biosynthesized to the accumulation sites, the vacuoles of leaves. To unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this membrane transport, we characterized one transporter, the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) jasmonate-inducible alkaloid transporter 1 (Nt-JAT1), whose expression was coregulated with that of nicotine biosynthetic genes in methyl jasmonate-treated tobacco cells. Nt-JAT1, belonging to the family of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters, was expressed in roots, stems, and leaves, and localized in the tonoplast of leaf cells. When produced in yeast cells, Nt-JAT1 occurred mainly in the plasma membrane and showed nicotine efflux activity. Biochemical analysis with proteoliposomes reconstituted with purified Nt-JAT1 and bacterial F(0)F(1)-ATPase revealed that Nt-JAT1 functioned as a proton antiporter and recognized endogenous tobacco alkaloids, such as nicotine and anabasine, and other alkaloids, such as hyoscyamine and berberine, but not flavonoids. These findings strongly suggest that Nt-JAT1 plays an important role in the nicotine translocation by acting as a secondary transporter responsible for unloading of alkaloids in the aerial parts and deposition in the vacuoles. PMID:19168636

  7. Priming of anti-herbivore defence in Nicotiana attenuata by insect oviposition: herbivore-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Bandoly, Michele; Grichnik, Roland; Hilker, Monika; Steppuhn, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Oviposition by Spodoptera exigua on Nicotiana attenuata primes plant defence against its larvae that consequently suffer reduced performance. To reveal whether this is a general response of tobacco to insect oviposition or species-specific, we investigated whether also Manduca sexta oviposition primes N. attenuata's anti-herbivore defence. The plant response to M. sexta and S. exigua oviposition overlapped in the egg-primed feeding-induced production of the phenylpropanoid caffeoylputrescine. While M. sexta larvae were unaffected in their performance, they showed a novel response to the oviposition-mediated plant changes: a reduced antimicrobial activity in their haemolymph. In a cross-resistance experiment, S. exigua larvae suffered reduced performance on M. sexta-oviposited plants like they did on S. exigua-oviposited plants. The M. sexta oviposition-mediated plant effects on the S. exigua larval performance and on M. sexta larval immunity required expression of the NaMyb8 transcription factor that is governing biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids such as caffeoylputrescine. Thus, NaMyb8-dependent defence traits mediate the effects that oviposition by both lepidopteran species exerts on the plant's anti-herbivore defence. These results suggest that oviposition by lepidopteran species on N. attenuata leaves may generally prime the feeding-induced production of certain plant defence compounds but that different herbivore species show different susceptibility to egg-primed plant effects. PMID:26566692

  8. Enhancement of cadmium tolerance and accumulation by introducing Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt var. frutescens genes in Nicotiana tabacum L. plants.

    PubMed

    Wei, Keqiang; Pang, Shengxi; Yang, Junxian; Wei, Zhizhong

    2015-04-01

    The tobacco has the genetic potential to remove toxic metals from the soil. To develop hyperaccumulating tobacco plants, distant hybridization between tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), a high-biomass crop, and Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt var. frutescens, a newfound Cd-hyperaccumulator species, was carried out using a novel method viz. pollination following grafting. Their hybrid nature was preliminarily confirmed by phenotype, isozyme pattern, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and metabolites analysis. About 120 putative F2 hybrids derived from the cross-combination [(N. sylvestris Speg. & Comes rootstock + N. tabacum L. var. 78-04 scion) × P. frutescens (L.) Britt var. frutescens] were then subjected to up to 300 μM CdCl2 in hydroponic conditions for 10 days. Results showed five seedlings were more resistant to Cd than female parent and accumulated 314.6 ± 99.9 mg kg(-1) Cd in their aerial biomass, which was 5.7 times greater than that in "78-04" tobacco (47.2 ± 3.56 mg kg(-1)) (P ≤ 0.05). Two of these seedlings exceeded male parent P. frutescens in the Cd concentration of shoots and reached 424 and 396 mg kg(-1), which was 13% and 6% greater for that of perilla (374.2 ± 10.38 mg kg(-1)), respectively. Compared with parents, two other F2 hybrids tended to accumulate more Cd in the root with bioconcentration factor (BCF) 7.05 and 5.17, respectively. Only one hybrid showed lower Cd concentration but transferred Cd more effectively from the root to the shoot than parents and other F2 hybrids, with the maximum translocation factor (TF) value 1.37. These indicated that the introduction of P. frutescens genes could obviously enhance the cadmium tolerance and accumulation of superior individuals.

  9. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the WRKY gene family in common tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Xiaohua, Xiang; Xinru, Wu; Jiangtao, Chao; Minglei, Yang; Fan, Yang; Guo, Chen; Guanshan, Liu; Yuanying, Wang

    2016-09-01

    The coding products of WRKY gene family plays important roles in plant growth and development as well as in various stress responses. They have been identified in various plants, but only few in common tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). In this study, 164 putative WRKY proteins in the common tobacco genome were identified by using the conserved WRKY sequence (PF03106) from the Pfam database. Phylogenetic trees, functional domain analysis, chromosomal localization, subcellular localization and tissue expression patterns were analyzed with the bioinformatics softwares, including DNAMAN 5.0, Weblogo 3, MEGA 5.1, MG2C and MEME. First of all, phylogenetic trees divided all the candidate genes into three subfamilies: Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ, respectively, and subfamily Ⅱ could be further divided into five subgroups: group Ⅱ-a, -b, -c, -d and -e. Secondly, the WRKY regions contained a highly conserved heptapeptide stretch WRKYGQK followed by a zinc-finger motif. Most of the NtWRKY genes contained 2-5 exons and a highly conserved gene structure. Thirdly, 154 out of 164 NtWRKY genes were distributed with different densities on 24 chromosomes, and each subfamily with different patterns and frequency. The largest number of NtWRKY genes was found on chromosome VI, and only one on chromosome X. Fourthly, the majority of NtWRKY members located in the nucleus, with 74 percent of subfamily Ⅲ in the extracellular matrix. Lastly, the members in the same subfamily had different spatial and temporal expression profiles, with 11 NtWRKY genes in roots, stems and leaves expressed at various levels. The expression of genes NtWRKY26, NtWRKY30 and NtWRKY32 can be induced by Phytophthora nicotianae. Our research thus provides valuable information for NtWRKY gene cloning and functional characterization in common tobacco. PMID:27644745

  10. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Heidi L; Blomstedt, Cecilia K; Neale, Alan D; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D; Hamill, John D

    2016-05-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana. PMID

  11. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Heidi L.; Blomstedt, Cecilia K.; Neale, Alan D.; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D.; Hamill, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana. PMID

  12. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Heidi L; Blomstedt, Cecilia K; Neale, Alan D; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D; Hamill, John D

    2016-05-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana.

  13. Cloning, expression analysis and recombinant expression of a gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Feng, Chao; Wang, Jing; Kong, Fanyu; Sun, Wenxiu; Wang, Fenglong

    2016-05-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are major defensive proteins produced by plant cell walls that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance by reducing polygalacturonase (PG) activity. In the present study, a novel PGIP gene was isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), hereafter referred as NtPGIP. A full-length NtPGIP cDNA of 1,412 bp with a 186 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and 209 bp 3'-UTR was cloned from tobacco, NtPGIP is predicted to encode a protein of 338 amino acids. The NtPGIP sequence from genomic DNA showed no introns and sequence alignments of NtPGIP's deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology with known PGIPs from other plant species. Moreover, the putative NtPGIP protein was closely clustered with several Solanaceae PGIPs. Further, the expression profile of NtPGIP was examined in tobacco leaves following stimulation with the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae and other stressors, including salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), salt, and cold treatment. The results showed that all of the treatments up-regulated the expression of NtPGIP at different times. To understand the biochemical activity of NtPGIP gene, a full-length NtPGIP cDNA sequence was subcloned into a pET28a vector and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). Recombinant proteins were successfully induced by 1.0 nmol/L IPTG and the purified proteins effectively inhibited Phytophthora capsici PG activity. The results of this study suggest that NtPGIP may be a new candidate gene with properties that could be exploited in plant breeding. PMID:27441281

  14. Gene-splitting technology: a novel approach for the containment of transgene flow in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Jing; Jin, Xi; Dun, Bao-Qing; Kong, Ning; Jia, Shi-Rong; Tang, Qiao-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact of transgene escape on the environment and food safety is a major concern to the scientists and public. This work aimed to assess the effect of intein-mediated gene splitting on containment of transgene flow. Two fusion genes, EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc, were constructed and integrated into N. tabacum, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. EPSPSn-In encodes the first 295 aa of the herbicide resistance gene 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) fused with the first 123 aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (In), whereas Ic-EPSPSc encodes the 36 C-terminal aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (Ic) fused to the rest of EPSPS C terminus peptide sequences. Both EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc constructs were introduced into the same N. tabacum genome by genetic crossing. Hybrids displayed resistance to the herbicide N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine (glyphosate). Western blot analysis of protein extracts from hybrid plants identified full-length EPSPS. Furthermore, all hybrid seeds germinated and grew normally on glyphosate selective medium. The 6-8 leaf hybrid plants showed tolerance of 2000 ppm glyphosate in field spraying. These results indicated that functional EPSPS protein was reassembled in vivo by intein-mediated trans-splicing in 100% of plants. In order to evaluate the effect of the gene splitting technique for containment of transgene flow, backcrossing experiments were carried out between hybrids, in which the foreign genes EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc were inserted into different chromosomes, and non-transgenic plants NC89. Among the 2812 backcrossing progeny, about 25% (664 plantlets) displayed glyphosate resistance. These data indicated that transgene flow could be reduced by 75%. Overall, our findings provide a new and highly effective approach for biological containment of transgene flow. PMID:24915192

  15. Gene-splitting technology: a novel approach for the containment of transgene flow in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Jing; Jin, Xi; Dun, Bao-Qing; Kong, Ning; Jia, Shi-Rong; Tang, Qiao-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact of transgene escape on the environment and food safety is a major concern to the scientists and public. This work aimed to assess the effect of intein-mediated gene splitting on containment of transgene flow. Two fusion genes, EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc, were constructed and integrated into N. tabacum, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. EPSPSn-In encodes the first 295 aa of the herbicide resistance gene 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) fused with the first 123 aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (In), whereas Ic-EPSPSc encodes the 36 C-terminal aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (Ic) fused to the rest of EPSPS C terminus peptide sequences. Both EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc constructs were introduced into the same N. tabacum genome by genetic crossing. Hybrids displayed resistance to the herbicide N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine (glyphosate). Western blot analysis of protein extracts from hybrid plants identified full-length EPSPS. Furthermore, all hybrid seeds germinated and grew normally on glyphosate selective medium. The 6-8 leaf hybrid plants showed tolerance of 2000 ppm glyphosate in field spraying. These results indicated that functional EPSPS protein was reassembled in vivo by intein-mediated trans-splicing in 100% of plants. In order to evaluate the effect of the gene splitting technique for containment of transgene flow, backcrossing experiments were carried out between hybrids, in which the foreign genes EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc were inserted into different chromosomes, and non-transgenic plants NC89. Among the 2812 backcrossing progeny, about 25% (664 plantlets) displayed glyphosate resistance. These data indicated that transgene flow could be reduced by 75%. Overall, our findings provide a new and highly effective approach for biological containment of transgene flow.

  16. Pretreatment with alternation of light/dark periods improves the tolerance of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) to clomazone herbicide.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Majd; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; El Maataoui, Mohamed; Urban, Laurent; Sallanon, Huguette

    2014-05-01

    This work analyses the effects of alternation of light/dark periods pretreatment (AL) in tobacco plantlets (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv.Virginie vk51) growing in solution with low concentration of the clomazone herbicide. The experimentation has been carried out by exposing the plantlets to successive and regulated periods of light (16min light/8min dark cycles, PAR 50μmolm(-2)s(-1)) for three days. The photosynthesis efficiency was determined by mean of the chlorophyll fluorescence and JIP-test. The AL pretreatment improved the clomazone tolerance; this has been observed by the increase in the leaf area of the plant, the maximal photochemical quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), the actual PSII efficiency (ФPSII), the performance index (PIabs), the electron flux beyond Quinone A (1-VJ), and also by the diminution of the energy dissipating into heat (DI0/RC). Furthermore, AL pretreatment led to low accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) which proves that the scavenging enzymatic system have been activated before clomazone treatment. In the plantlets pretreated with AL, with regard to the ascorbate content, some of antioxidant enzyme whose function is associated with it have continued to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by clomazone, such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and glutathione reductase (GR). So, the observed photooxidative damages induced by clomazone herbicide were noticeably reduced.

  17. Effects of plant vascular architecture on aboveground-belowground-induced responses to foliar and root herbivores on Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Ian; Halitschke, Rayko; Kessler, André; Sardanelli, Sandra; Denno, Robert F

    2008-10-01

    Herbivores induce systemic changes in plant traits, and the strength of these induced responses is often associated with the degree of vascular connectivity that links damaged and undamaged plant tissues. Although this phenomenon is known to occur aboveground in leaves, it is unknown whether or not leaf-root induction similarly follows the vascular architecture of plants. To test for this possibility, we manipulated foliar and root herbivory on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) by the leaf-chewing insect Spodoptera exigua and the root-galling nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Subsequent changes in secondary chemistry (alkaloids and phenolics) were measured in leaves and roots that were orthostichous (vertically aligned) and nonorthostichous (opposite) from the herbivore-damaged tissues. Aboveground caterpillar herbivory elicited stronger secondary chemical responses in orthostichous compared with nonorthostichous plant tissues, although the magnitude of this difference was greater in leaves than roots. However, belowground nematode herbivory did not affect the secondary chemistry of tobacco leaves, despite inducing strong local responses in roots. Thus, plant vascular architecture can mediate the magnitude of systemic induction in roots as well as in leaves, with stronger responses in tissues that are more closely aligned. As a result, herbivores that co-occur on the same sector of plant (both aboveground and belowground) may be more likely to affect one another via induced responses than herbivores that occur on plant tissues sharing fewer resources.

  18. Isoprene emission aids recovery of photosynthetic performance in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum following high intensity acute UV-B exposure.

    PubMed

    Centritto, Mauro; Haworth, Matthew; Marino, Giovanni; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Tsonev, Tsonko; Velikova, Violeta; Nogues, Isabel; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Isoprene emission by terrestrial plants is believed to play a role in mitigating the effects of abiotic stress on photosynthesis. Ultraviolet-B light (UV-B) induces damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of plants, but the role of isoprene in UV-B tolerance is poorly understood. To investigate this putative protective role, we exposed non-emitting (NE) control and transgenic isoprene emitting (IE) Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants to high intensity UV-B exposure. Methanol emissions increased with UV-B intensity, indicating oxidative damage. However, isoprene emission was unaffected during exposure to UV-B radiation, but declined in the 48 h following UV-B treatment at the highest UV-B intensities of 9 and 15 Wm(-2). Photosynthesis and the performance of photosystem II (PSII) declined to similar extents in IE and NE plants following UV-B exposure, suggesting that isoprene emission did not ameliorate the immediate impact of UV-B on photosynthesis. However, after the stress, photosynthesis and PSII recovered in IE plants, which maintained isoprene formation, but not in NE plants. Recovery of IE plants was also associated with elevated antioxidant levels and cycling; suggesting that both isoprene formation and antioxidant systems contributed to reinstating the integrity and functionality of cellular membranes and photosynthesis following exposure to excessive levels of UV-B radiation.

  19. NtCP56, a new cysteine protease in Nicotiana tabacum L., involved in pollen grain development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-mei; Wang, Ying; Lv, Xiao-meng; Li, Hui; Sun, Peng; Lu, Hai; Li, Feng-lan

    2009-01-01

    Proteinases play a critical role in developmental homeostasis and in response to environ-mental stimuli. Our present research reports that a new cysteine protease, NtCP56, is involved in the development of pollen grains in Nicotiana tabacum L. The NtCP56 gene, which encodes a protein of 361 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 40 kDa, is strongly expressed in anthers. The recombinant NtCP56 showed a high activity towards casein. Kinetic analysis revealed a Km of 2.20 mg ml−1 and Vmax of 11.07 μg ml−1 min−1. The recombinant NtCP56 retained more than 50% of its maximum enzymatic activity from 20 °C to 60 °C with an optimum Tm range of 30–50 °C. The enzyme had a maximum activity at approximately pH 6.5. Suppression of the NtCP56 gene in anti-sense transgenic tobaccos resulted in the sterility of pollen grains. Our data indicated that, as a cysteine protease, NtCP56 might play an important role in pollen development. PMID:19246592

  20. Cloning the bacterial bphC gene into Nicotiana tabacum to improve the efficiency of phytoremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Novakova, Martina; Mackova, Martina; Antosova, Zuzana; Viktorova, Jitka; Szekeres, Miklos; Demnerova, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct transgenic plants with increased capabilities to degrade organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls. The environmentally important gene of bacterial dioxygenase, the bphC gene, was chosen to clone into a plant of Nicotiana tabacum. The chosen bphC gene encodes 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase, which cleaves the aromatic ring of dihydroxybiphenyl, and we cloned it in fusion with the gene for β-glucuronidase (GUS), luciferase (LUC) or with a histidine tail. Several genetic constructs were designed and prepared and the possible expression of desired proteins in tobacco plants was studied by transient expression. We used genetic constructs successfully expressing dioxygenase's genes we used for preparation of transgenic tobacco plants by agrobacterial infection. The presence of transgenic DNA , mRNA and protein was determined in parental and the first filial generation of transgenic plants with the bphC gene. Properties of prepared transgenic plants will be further studied. PMID:21468210

  1. Synthesis of glycolate from pyruvate via isocitrate lyase by tobacco leaves in light. [Nicotiana tabacum var Havana Seed

    SciTech Connect

    Zelitch, I. )

    1988-02-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Havana Seed) leaf discs were supplied tracer quantities of (2-{sup 14}C)- and (3-{sup 14}C) pyruvate for 60 minutes in steady state photosynthesis with 21% or 1% O{sub 2}, and the glycolate oxidase inhibitor {alpha}-hydroxy-2-pyridinemethanesulfonic acid was then added for 5 or 10 minutes to cause glycolate to accumulate. The (3-{sup 14}C) pyruvate was converted directly to glycolate as shown by a 50% greater than equal-labeled {sup 14}C in C-2 of glycolate, and the fraction of {sup 14}C in C-2 increased in 1% O{sub 2} to 80% greater than equal-labeled. This suggests the pathway using pyruvate is less O{sub 2}-dependent than the oxygenase reaction producing glycolate from the Calvin cycle. The formation of glycolate from pyruvate in the leaf discs was time-dependent and with (2-{sup 14}C)- and (3-{sup 14}C) pyruvate supplied leaf discs the C-2 of glyoxylate derived from C-2 of isocitrate was labeled asymmetrically in a manner similar to the asymmetrical labeling of C-2 of glycolate under a number of conditions. Thus glycolate was probably formed by the reduction of glyoxylate. Isocitric lyase activity of tobacco leaves was associated with leaf mitochondria, through most of the activity was in the supernatant fraction after differential centrifugation of leaf homogenates.

  2. Early inhibition of photosynthesis during development of Mn toxicity in tobacco. [Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY14

    SciTech Connect

    Nable, R.O.; Houtz, R.L.; Cheniae, G.M. )

    1988-04-01

    Early physiological effects of developing Mn toxicity in young leaves of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY 14) were examined in glass-house/water cultured plants grown at high (summer) and low (winter) photon flux. Following transfer of plants to solutions containing 1 millimolar Mn{sup 2+}, sequential samplings were made at various times for the following 9 days, during which Mn accumulation by leaves increased rapidly from {approx} 70 on day 0 to {approx} 1700 and {approx} 5000 microgram per gram dry matter after 1 and 9 days, respectively. In plants grown at high photon flux, net photosynthesis declined by {approx} 20 and {approx} 60% after 1 and 9 days, respectively, and the onset of this decline preceded appearance (after 3 to 4 days) of visible foliar symptoms of Mn toxicity. Intercellular CO{sub 2} concentrations and rates of transpiration were not significantly affected. Though the activity of latent or activated polyphenol oxidase increased in parallel with Mn accumulation, neither leaf respiration nor the activity of catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) and peroxidase (EC 1.10.1.7) were greatly affected. These effects from Mn toxicity could not be explained by any changes in protein or chlorophyll abundance. Additionally, they were not a consequence of Mn induced Fe deficiency. Therefore, inhibition of net photosynthesis and enhancement of polyphenol oxidase activity are early indicators of excess Mn accumulation in tobacco leaves.

  3. Nicotiana tabacum actin-depolymerizing factor 2 is involved in actin-driven, auxin-dependent patterning.

    PubMed

    Durst, Steffen; Nick, Peter; Maisch, Jan

    2013-08-15

    Polar transport of auxin has been identified as a central element of pattern formation. To address the underlying cellular mechanisms, we use the tobacco cell line (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2; BY-2) as model. We showed previously that cell divisions within a cell file are synchronized by polar auxin flow, linked to the organization of actin filaments (AF) which, in turn, is modified via actin-binding proteins (ABPs). From a preparatory study for disturbed division synchrony in cell lines overexpressing different ABPs, we identified the actin depolymerizing factor 2 (ADF2). A cell line overexpressing GFP-NtADF2 was specifically affected in division synchrony. The cell division pattern could be rescued by addition of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) or by phalloidin. These observations allow to draw first conclusions on the pathway linking auxin signalling via actin reorganization to synchronized cell division placing the regulation of cortical actin turnover by ADF2 into the focus. PMID:23545293

  4. GC-MS and MALDI-TOF MS profiling of sucrose esters from Nicotiana tabacum and N. rustica.

    PubMed

    Haliński, Łukasz P; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been applied for the first time to the analysis of the sucrose esters from the surface of Nicotiana L. leaves. The profiles obtained for the model plant N. tabacum were similar to those from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) analysis. The most reproducible results were obtained using a dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) matrix. The main advantage of this method is that crude plant extracts can be analysed without sample clean-up. GC-MS analysis of Aztec tobacco (N. rustica) extracts revealed the presence of three types of sucrose esters. All identified compounds had three C4-C8 acyl chains substituting the glucose moiety, while the fructose part of the molecule was substituted with 0, 1, or 2 acetyl groups. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the sucrose ester fraction revealed the presence of compounds not eluting from a GC column. Combining the data from both GC-MS and MALDI-TOF MS experiments, we obtained a full sucrose ester profile, which is based on the molecular weight of the compounds and on the number of acyl chains in the molecule. PMID:23923618

  5. Mitochondrial Alternative Oxidase Maintains Respiration and Preserves Photosynthetic Capacity during Moderate Drought in Nicotiana tabacum1[W

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Keshav; Wang, Jia; Martyn, Greg D.; Rahimy, Farkhunda; Vanlerberghe, Greg C.

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain includes an alternative oxidase (AOX) that is hypothesized to aid photosynthetic metabolism, perhaps by acting as an additional electron sink for photogenerated reductant or by dampening the generation of reactive oxygen species. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosystem I (PSI) absorbance, and biochemical and protein analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum ‘Petit Havana SR1’ wild-type plants with that of transgenic AOX knockdown (RNA interference) and overexpression lines, under both well-watered and moderate drought-stressed conditions. During drought, AOX knockdown lines displayed a lower rate of respiration in the light than the wild type, as confirmed by two independent methods. Furthermore, CO2 and light response curves indicated a nonstomatal limitation of photosynthesis in the knockdowns during drought, relative to the wild type. Also relative to the wild type, the knockdowns under drought maintained PSI and PSII in a more reduced redox state, showed greater regulated nonphotochemical energy quenching by PSII, and displayed a higher relative rate of cyclic electron transport around PSI. The origin of these differences may lie in the chloroplast ATP synthase amount, which declined dramatically in the knockdowns in response to drought. None of these effects were seen in plants overexpressing AOX. The results show that AOX is necessary to maintain mitochondrial respiration during moderate drought. In its absence, respiration rate slows and the lack of this electron sink feeds back on the photosynthetic apparatus, resulting in a loss of chloroplast ATP synthase that then limits photosynthetic capacity. PMID:25204647

  6. Immunodiagnostic Properties of Wucheraria bancrofti SXP-1, a Potential Filarial Diagnostic Candidate Expressed in Tobacco Plant, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Mathangi; Chakravarthi, M; Charles, S Jason; Harunipriya, P; Jaiganesh, S; Subramonian, N; Kaliraj, P

    2015-08-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants were developed expressing WbSXP-1, a diagnostic antigen isolated from the cDNA library of L3 stage larvae of Wucheraria bancrofti. This antigen produced by recombinant Escherichia coli has been demonstrated by to be successful as potential diagnostic candidate against lymphatic filariasis. A rapid format simple and qualitative flow through immune-filtration diagnostic kit has been developed for the identification of IgG antibodies to the recombinant WbSXP-1 and is being marketed by M/S Span Diagnostics Ltd in India and Africa. Here, we present the results of experiments on the transformation and expression of the same filarial antigen, WbSXP-1, in tobacco plant, Nicotiana tabacum, to produce plant-based diagnostic antigen. It was possible to successfully transform the tobacco plant with WbSXP-1, the integration of the parasite-specific gene in plants was confirmed by PCR amplification and the expression of the filarial protein by Western blotting. The immunoreactivity of the plant-produced WbSXP-1 was assessed based on its reaction with the monoclonal antibodies developed against the E. coli-produced protein. Immunological screening using clinical sera from patients indicates that the plant-produced protein is comparable to E. coli-produced diagnostic antigen. The result demonstrated that plants can be used as suitable expression systems for the production of diagnostic proteins against lymphatic filariasis, a neglected tropical infectious disease which has a negative impact on socioeconomic development. This is the first report of the integration, expression and efficacy of a diagnostic candidate of lymphatic filariasis in plants.Key MessageTransgenic tobacco plants with WbSXP-1, a filarial diagnostic candidate, were developed. The plant-produced protein showed immunoreactivity on par with the E. coli product. PMID:26043851

  7. Comparative study on macro- and micro-elements concentration in Nicotiana tabacum and Faba siliquis plants by ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazs, Zoltan; Voica, Cezara; Dehelean, Adriana; Magdas, Dana Alina; Ristoiu, Dumitru

    2015-12-01

    Plants are important components of ecosystems as they transfer elements from abiotic into biotic environments. The concentration of macro and micro-elements in tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum) and bean (Faba siliquis) was analyzed using ICP-MS technique. The results obtained indicated that the mean concentration of Mg, P, K and Ca in tobacco leaves was 0.965, 0.812, 4.412 and 2.694 g.kg-1, respectively, while in bean samples were 0.899, 2.024, 6.725 and 1.387 g.kg-1, respectively. Mn concentration ranged from 156.835 mg.kg-1 to 234.593 mg.kg-1 in tobacco leaves and from 116.174 mg.kg-1 to 440.423 mg.kg-1 in bean samples. The results for Cu and Zn were between 7.262 mg.kg-1 and 105.738 mg.kg-1, 68.549 mg.kg-1 and 113.720 mg.kg-1 (tobacco leaves); and 6.830 mg.kg-1 and 46.034 mg.kg-1, 50.166 mg.kg-1 and 77.242 mg.kg-1 (bean samples), respectively. In analyzed samples, Pb, Cd and As concentrations ranged between <0.001-0.717 mg.kg-1, 0.046 mg.kg-1 -6.218 mg.kg-1, <0.001-0.381 mg.kg-1. The paper discusses the transfer of metal ions (Mn, As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn, respectively) from soil to these plants in terms of transfer factors (TF).

  8. Immunodiagnostic Properties of Wucheraria bancrofti SXP-1, a Potential Filarial Diagnostic Candidate Expressed in Tobacco Plant, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Mathangi; Chakravarthi, M; Charles, S Jason; Harunipriya, P; Jaiganesh, S; Subramonian, N; Kaliraj, P

    2015-08-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants were developed expressing WbSXP-1, a diagnostic antigen isolated from the cDNA library of L3 stage larvae of Wucheraria bancrofti. This antigen produced by recombinant Escherichia coli has been demonstrated by to be successful as potential diagnostic candidate against lymphatic filariasis. A rapid format simple and qualitative flow through immune-filtration diagnostic kit has been developed for the identification of IgG antibodies to the recombinant WbSXP-1 and is being marketed by M/S Span Diagnostics Ltd in India and Africa. Here, we present the results of experiments on the transformation and expression of the same filarial antigen, WbSXP-1, in tobacco plant, Nicotiana tabacum, to produce plant-based diagnostic antigen. It was possible to successfully transform the tobacco plant with WbSXP-1, the integration of the parasite-specific gene in plants was confirmed by PCR amplification and the expression of the filarial protein by Western blotting. The immunoreactivity of the plant-produced WbSXP-1 was assessed based on its reaction with the monoclonal antibodies developed against the E. coli-produced protein. Immunological screening using clinical sera from patients indicates that the plant-produced protein is comparable to E. coli-produced diagnostic antigen. The result demonstrated that plants can be used as suitable expression systems for the production of diagnostic proteins against lymphatic filariasis, a neglected tropical infectious disease which has a negative impact on socioeconomic development. This is the first report of the integration, expression and efficacy of a diagnostic candidate of lymphatic filariasis in plants.Key MessageTransgenic tobacco plants with WbSXP-1, a filarial diagnostic candidate, were developed. The plant-produced protein showed immunoreactivity on par with the E. coli product.

  9. Induction of UDP-glucose:salicylic acid glucosyltransferase activity in tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Enyedi, A.J.; Raskin, I. )

    1993-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a putative signal that activates plant resistance to pathogens. SA levels increase systemically following the hypersensitive response produced by tobacco masaic virus (TMV) inoculation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Xanthi-nc) leaves. The SA increase in the inoculated leaf coincided with the appearance of a [beta]-glucosidase-hydrolyzable SA conjugate identified as [beta]-O-D-glucosylsalicylic acid (GSA). SA and GSA accumulation in the TMV-inoculated leaf paralleled the increase in the activity of a UDP-glucose:salicylic acid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35) ([beta]-GTase) capable of converting SA to GSA. Healthy tissues had constitutive [beta]-GTase activity of 0.076 milliunits g[sup [minus]1] fresh weight. This activity started to increase 48 h after TMV inoculation, reaching its maximum (6.7-fold induction over the basal levels) 72 h after TMV inoculation. No significant GSA or elevated [beta]-GTase activity could be detected in the healthy leaf immediately above the TMV-inoculated leaf. The effect of TMV inoculation on the [beta]-GTase and GSA accumulation could be duplicated by infiltrating tobacco leaf discs with SA at the levels naturally produced in TMV-inoculated leaves (2.7--27.0 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1] fresh weight). Pretreatment of leaf discs with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide inhibited the induction of [beta]GTase by SA and prevented the formation of GSA. Of 12 analogs of SA tested, only 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid induced [beta]-GTase activity. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Heterologous expression of a rice miR395 gene in Nicotiana tabacum impairs sulfate homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ning; Yuan, Shuangrong; Li, Zhigang; Li, Dayong; Hu, Qian; Luo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur participates in many important mechanisms and pathways of plant development. The most common source of sulfur in soil -SO4(2-)- is absorbed into root tissue and distributed into aerial part through vasculature system, where it is reduced into sulfite and finally sulfide within the subcellular organs such as chloroplasts and mitochondria and used for cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. MicroRNAs are involved in many regulation pathways by repressing the expression of their target genes. MiR395 family in Arabidopsis thaliana has been reported to be an important regulator involved in sulfate transport and assimilation, and a high-affinity sulphate transporter and three ATP sulfurylases (ATPS) were the target genes of AthmiR395 (Arabidopsis thaliana miR395). We have cloned a miR395 gene from rice (Oryza sativa) and studied its function in plant nutritional response. Our results indicated that in rice, transcript level of OsamiR395 (Oryza sativa miR395) increased under sulfate deficiency conditions, and the two predicted target genes of miR395 were down-regulated under the same conditions. Overexpression of OsamiR395h in tobacco impaired its sulfate homeostasis, and sulfate distribution was also slightly impacted among leaves of different ages. One sulfate transporter (SULTR) gene NtaSULTR2 was identified to be the target of miR395 in Nicotiana tobacum, which belongs to low affinity sulfate transporter group. Both miR395 and NtaSULTR2 respond to sulfate starvation in tobacco. PMID:27350219

  11. Heterologous expression of a rice miR395 gene in Nicotiana tabacum impairs sulfate homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ning; Yuan, Shuangrong; Li, Zhigang; Li, Dayong; Hu, Qian; Luo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur participates in many important mechanisms and pathways of plant development. The most common source of sulfur in soil –SO42−– is absorbed into root tissue and distributed into aerial part through vasculature system, where it is reduced into sulfite and finally sulfide within the subcellular organs such as chloroplasts and mitochondria and used for cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. MicroRNAs are involved in many regulation pathways by repressing the expression of their target genes. MiR395 family in Arabidopsis thaliana has been reported to be an important regulator involved in sulfate transport and assimilation, and a high-affinity sulphate transporter and three ATP sulfurylases (ATPS) were the target genes of AthmiR395 (Arabidopsis thaliana miR395). We have cloned a miR395 gene from rice (Oryza sativa) and studied its function in plant nutritional response. Our results indicated that in rice, transcript level of OsamiR395 (Oryza sativa miR395) increased under sulfate deficiency conditions, and the two predicted target genes of miR395 were down-regulated under the same conditions. Overexpression of OsamiR395h in tobacco impaired its sulfate homeostasis, and sulfate distribution was also slightly impacted among leaves of different ages. One sulfate transporter (SULTR) gene NtaSULTR2 was identified to be the target of miR395 in Nicotiana tobacum, which belongs to low affinity sulfate transporter group. Both miR395 and NtaSULTR2 respond to sulfate starvation in tobacco. PMID:27350219

  12. The extremophile Nicotiana benthamiana has traded viral defence for early vigour.

    PubMed

    Bally, Julia; Nakasugi, Kenlee; Jia, Fangzhi; Jung, Hyungtaek; Ho, Simon Y W; Wong, Mei; Paul, Chloe M; Naim, Fatima; Wood, Craig C; Crowhurst, Ross N; Hellens, Roger P; Dale, James L; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    A single lineage of Nicotiana benthamiana is widely used as a model plant(1) and has been instrumental in making revolutionary discoveries about RNA interference (RNAi), viral defence and vaccine production. It is peerless in its susceptibility to viruses and its amenability in transiently expressing transgenes(2,3). These unparalleled characteristics have been associated both positively and negatively with a disruptive insertion in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 gene, Rdr1(4-6). For a plant so routinely used in research, the origin, diversity and evolution of the species, and the basis of its unusual abilities, have been relatively unexplored. Here, by comparison with wild accessions from across the spectrum of the species' natural distribution, we show that the laboratory strain of N. benthamiana is an extremophile originating from a population that has retained a mutation in Rdr1 for ∼0.8 Myr and thereby traded its defence capacity for early vigour and survival in the extreme habitat of central Australia. Reconstituting Rdr1 activity in this isolate provided protection. Silencing the functional allele in a wild strain rendered it hypersusceptible and was associated with a doubling of seed size and enhanced early growth rate. These findings open the way to a deeper understanding of the delicate balance between protection and vigour. PMID:27251536

  13. Multi-Platform Metabolomic Analyses of Ergosterol-Induced Dynamic Changes in Nicotiana tabacum Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tugizimana, Fidele; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is providing new dimensions into understanding the intracellular adaptive responses in plants to external stimuli. In this study, a multi-technology-metabolomic approach was used to investigate the effect of the fungal sterol, ergosterol, on the metabolome of cultured tobacco cells. Cell suspensions were treated with different concentrations (0–1000 nM) of ergosterol and incubated for different time periods (0–24 h). Intracellular metabolites were extracted with two methods: a selective dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction and a general methanol extraction. Chromatographic techniques (GC-FID, GC-MS, GC×GC-TOF-MS, UHPLC-MS) and 1H NMR spectroscopy were used for quantitative and qualitative analyses. Multivariate data analyses (PCA and OPLS-DA models) were used to extract interpretable information from the multidimensional data generated from the analytical techniques. The results showed that ergosterol triggered differential changes in the metabolome of the cells, leading to variation in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PCA scores plots revealed dose- and time-dependent metabolic variations, with optimal treatment conditions being found to be 300 nM ergosterol and an 18 h incubation period. The observed ergosterol-induced metabolic changes were correlated with changes in defence-related metabolites. The ‘defensome’ involved increases in terpenoid metabolites with five antimicrobial compounds (the bicyclic sesquiterpenoid phytoalexins: phytuberin, solavetivone, capsidiol, lubimin and rishitin) and other metabolites (abscisic acid and phytosterols) putatively identified. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors, cinnamic acid derivatives and - conjugates, coumarins and lignin monomers were annotated. These annotated metabolites revealed a dynamic reprogramming of metabolic networks that are functionally correlated, with a high complexity in their regulation. PMID:24498209

  14. Effect of UV irradiation, toluidine blue, and environment on maternal haploid frequencies from the cross between Nicotiana tabacum and N. africana

    SciTech Connect

    Chimoyo, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Treating Nicotiana africana Merxm. pollen with three levels UV radiation prior to pollinating four cultivars of flue-cured tobacco (Coker 176, NC95, McN944 and PD4), Nicotiana tabacum produced 1,953 viable seedlings from an estimated total of 170,248 seeds, of which 1,667 were haploid and 286 were hybrids. Drenching N. tabacum flowers with toluidine blue 18 hours after pollination with normal N. africana pollen, yielded 511 viable seedlings from 70,613 seeds, of which 346 were haploid and 165 hybrids. Untreated pollen gave 548 viable seedlings from 56,291 seeds, comprising 341 haploids and 208 hybrids. Contrary to results from a previous histological study, in vivo pollen tube growth rate appears to be similar irrespective of pollen source or treatment, and fertilization seems to occur at about the same time as in the selfed control. From an estimated total of 803,854 seeds sown, 3,014 viable seedlings were obtained. Coker 176 gave significantly higher yields of haploids than the other three cultivars. Field grown plants produced more haploids than greenhouse grown plants. Further evidence was obtained to support selective chromosomal elimination as the mechanism governing the development of maternal haploids from this interspecific cross.

  15. Root-specific expression of opine genes and opine accumulation in some cultivars of the naturally occurring genetically modified organism Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; de Borne, François Dorlhac; Julio, Emilie; Obszynski, Julie; Pale, Patrick; Otten, Léon

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that Nicotiana tabacum contains three Agrobacterium-derived T-DNA sequences inherited from its paternal ancestor Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Among these, the TB locus carries an intact mannopine synthase 2' gene (TB-mas2'). This gene is similar to the Agrobacterium rhizogenes A4-mas2' gene that encodes the synthesis of the Amadori compound deoxyfructosyl-glutamine (DFG or santhopine). In this study we show that TB-mas2' is expressed at very low levels in N. tomentosiformis and in most N. tabacum cultivars; however, some cultivars show high TB-mas2' expression levels. The TB-mas2' promoter sequences of low- and high-expressing cultivars are identical. The low/high level of expression segregates as a single Mendelian factor in a cross between a low- and a high-expression cultivar. pTB-mas2'-GUS and pA4-mas2'-GUS reporter genes were stably introduced in N. benthamiana. Both were mainly expressed in the root expansion zone and leaf vasculature. Roots of tobacco cultivars with high TB-mas2' expression contain detectable levels of DFG.

  16. Root-specific expression of opine genes and opine accumulation in some cultivars of the naturally occurring genetically modified organism Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; de Borne, François Dorlhac; Julio, Emilie; Obszynski, Julie; Pale, Patrick; Otten, Léon

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that Nicotiana tabacum contains three Agrobacterium-derived T-DNA sequences inherited from its paternal ancestor Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Among these, the TB locus carries an intact mannopine synthase 2' gene (TB-mas2'). This gene is similar to the Agrobacterium rhizogenes A4-mas2' gene that encodes the synthesis of the Amadori compound deoxyfructosyl-glutamine (DFG or santhopine). In this study we show that TB-mas2' is expressed at very low levels in N. tomentosiformis and in most N. tabacum cultivars; however, some cultivars show high TB-mas2' expression levels. The TB-mas2' promoter sequences of low- and high-expressing cultivars are identical. The low/high level of expression segregates as a single Mendelian factor in a cross between a low- and a high-expression cultivar. pTB-mas2'-GUS and pA4-mas2'-GUS reporter genes were stably introduced in N. benthamiana. Both were mainly expressed in the root expansion zone and leaf vasculature. Roots of tobacco cultivars with high TB-mas2' expression contain detectable levels of DFG. PMID:27125327

  17. The transmitting tissue of Nicotiana tabacum is not essential to pollen tube growth, and its ablation can reverse prezygotic interspecific barriers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan G; Eberle, Carrie A; Moss, Nicole G; Anderson, Neil O; Clasen, Benjamin M; Hegeman, Adrian D

    2013-12-01

    The Nicotiana tabacum transmitting tissue is a highly specialized file of metabolically active cells that is the pathway for pollen tubes from the stigma to the ovules where fertilization occurs. It is thought to be essential to pollen tube growth because of the nutrients and guidance it provides to the pollen tubes. It also regulates gametophytic self-incompatibility in the style. To test the function of the transmitting tissue in pollen tube growth and to determine its role in regulating prezygotic interspecific incompatibility, genetic ablation was used to eliminate the mature transmitting tissue, producing a hollow style. Despite the absence of the mature transmitting tissue and greatly reduced transmitting-tissue-specific gene expression, self-pollen tubes had growth to the end of the style. Pollen tubes grew at a slower rate in the transmitting-tissue-ablated line during the first 24 h post-pollination. However, pollen tubes grew to a similar length 40 h post-pollination with and without a transmitting tissue. Ablation of the N. tabacum transmitting tissue significantly altered interspecific pollen tube growth. These results implicate the N. tabacum transmitting tissue in facilitating or inhibiting interspecific pollen tube growth in a species-dependent manner and in controlling prezygotic reproductive barriers.

  18. Functional validation of Capsicum frutescens aminotransferase gene involved in vanillylamine biosynthesis using Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation studies in Nicotiana tabacum and Capsicum frutescens calli cultures.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, Harishchandra B; Padma, Mallaya N; Giridhar, Parvatam; Ravishankar, Gokare A

    2012-10-01

    Capsaicinoid biosynthesis involves the participation of two substrates viz. vanillylamine and C(9)-C(11) fatty acid moieties. Vanillylamine which is a derivative of vanillin is synthesized through a transaminase reaction in the phenylpropanoid pathway of capsaicinoid synthesis. Here we report the functional validation of earlier reported putative aminotransferase gene for vanillylamine biosynthesis in heterologous system using Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation studies in Nicotiana tabacum and Capsicum frutescens calli cultures. Molecular analysis tools comprising PCR and Southern blot analysis have shown the integration of the foreign gene in N. tabacum and C. frutescens calli cultures. The study shows the production of vanillylamine in transformed N. tabacum callus cultures and also the reduction of vanillylamine production when whole gene based antisense binary vector construct was used in transformation of C. frutescens callus cultures. Vanillylamine production, aminotransferase assay with Western blot analysis for crude proteins of transformants established the production of putative aminotransferase (pAMT) protein in alternate plant. The result is a clear evidence of involvement of the reported putative aminotransferase responsible for vanillylamine biosynthesis in capsaicinoid biosynthesis pathway, confirming the gene function through functional validation.

  19. Acidic α-galactosidase is the most abundant nectarin in floral nectar of common tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Hong-Guang; Flowers, V. Lynn; Yang, Min; Chen, Ling-Yang; Sun, Hang

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims To date, most floral nectarins (nectar proteins) are reported to function in nectar defence, particularly for insect-pollinated outcrossing species. We compared nectarin composition and abundance in selfing common tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum) with outcrossing ornamental tobacco plants to elucidate the functional difference of nectarins in different reproductive systems. Methods Common tobacco (CT) nectarins were separated by SDS-PAGE and the N terminus of the most abundant nectarin was sequenced via Edman degradation. The full-length nectarin gene was amplified and cloned from genomic DNA and mRNA with hiTail-PCR and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends), and expression patterns were then investigated in different tissues using semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Additionally, high-performance liquid chromatography and enzymatic analyses of nectar sugar composition, and other biochemical traits and functions of the novel nectarin were studied. Key Results The most abundant nectarin in CT nectar is an acidic α-galactosidase, here designated NTα-Gal. This compound has a molecular mass of 40 013 Da and a theoretical pI of 5·33. NTα-Gal has a conserved α-Gal characteristic signature, encodes a mature protein of 364 amino acids and is expressed in different organs. Compared with 27 other melliferous plant species from different families, CT floral nectar demonstrated the highest α-Gal activity, which is inhibited by d-galactose. Raffinose family oligosaccharides were not detected in CT nectar, indicating that NTα-Gal does not function in post-secretory hydrolysis. Moreover, tobacco plant fruits did not develop intact skin with galactose inhibition of NTα-Gal activity in nectar, suggesting that NTα-Gal induces cell-wall surface restructuring during the initial stages of fruit development. Conclusions α-Gal was the most abundant nectarin in selfing CT plants, but was not detected in the nectar of strictly outcrossing sister tobacco

  20. Improvement in the stability and functionality of Nicotiana tabacum produced recombinant TRAIL through employment of endoplasmic reticulum expression and ascorbate buffer mediated extraction strategies

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Hamid Reza; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Vahidi, Hossein; Barar, Jaleh; Kazemi, Bahram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In order to employ Nicotiana tabacum cells as a profitable natural bioreactor for production of bio-functional "Soluble human TRAIL" (ShTRAIL), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeted expression and innovative extraction procedures were exploited. Methods: At first, the ShTRAIL encoding gene was sub-cloned into designed H2 helper vector to equip it with potent TMV omega leader sequences, ER sorting signal peptide, poly-histidine tag and ER retention signal peptide (KDEL). Then, the ER targeted ShTRAIL cassette was sequentially sub-cloned into "CaMV-35S" helper and "pGreen-0179" final expression vectors. Afterward, Agrobacterium mediated transformation method was adopted to express the ShTRAIL in the ER of N. tabacum . Next, the ShTRAIL protein was extracted through both phosphate and innovative ascorbate extraction buffers. Subsequently, oligomerization state of the ShTRAIL was evaluated through cross-linking assay and western blot analysis. Then, semi-quantitative western blot analysis was performed to estimate the ShTRAIL production. Finally, biological activity of the ShTRAIL was evaluated through MTT assay. Results: The phosphate buffer extracted ShTRAIL was produced in dimmer form, whereas the ShTRAIL extracted with ascorbate buffer generated trimer form. The ER targeted ShTRAIL strategy increased the ShTRAIL’s production level up to about 20 μg/g of fresh weight of N. tabacum . MTT assay indicated that ascorbate buffer extracted ShTRAIL could prohibit proliferation of A549 cell line. Conclusion: Endoplasmic reticulum expression and reductive ascorbate buffer extraction procedure can be employed to enhance the stability and overall production level of bio-functional recombinant ShTRAIL from transgenic N. tabacum cells. PMID:25337465

  1. S-Carvone Suppresses Cellulase-Induced Capsidiol Production in Nicotiana tabacum by Interfering with Protein Isoprenylation1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Huchelmann, Alexandre; Gastaldo, Clément; Veinante, Mickaël; Zeng, Ying; Heintz, Dimitri; Tritsch, Denis; Schaller, Hubert; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J.; Hemmerlin, Andréa

    2014-01-01

    S-Carvone has been described as a negative regulator of mevalonic acid (MVA) production by interfering with 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity, a key player in isoprenoid biosynthesis. The impact of this monoterpene on the production of capsidiol in Nicotiana tabacum, an assumed MVA-derived sesquiterpenoid phytoalexin produced in response to elicitation by cellulase, was investigated. As expected, capsidiol production, as well as early stages of elicitation such as hydrogen peroxide production or stimulation of 5-epi-aristolochene synthase activity, were repressed. Despite the lack of capsidiol synthesis, apparent HMGR activity was boosted. Feeding experiments using (1-13C)Glc followed by analysis of labeling patterns by 13C-NMR, confirmed an MVA-dependent biosynthesis; however, treatments with fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of the MVA-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) isoprenoid pathway, unexpectedly down-regulated the biosynthesis of this sesquiterpene as well. We postulated that S-carvone does not directly inhibit the production of MVA by inactivating HMGR, but possibly targets an MEP-derived isoprenoid involved in the early steps of the elicitation process. A new model is proposed in which the monoterpene blocks an MEP pathway–dependent protein geranylgeranylation necessary for the signaling cascade. The production of capsidiol was inhibited when plants were treated with some inhibitors of protein prenylation or by further monoterpenes. Moreover, S-carvone hindered isoprenylation of a prenylable GFP indicator protein expressed in N. tabacum cell lines, which can be chemically complemented with geranylgeraniol. The model was further validated using N. tabacum cell extracts or recombinant N. tabacum protein prenyltransferases expressed in Escherichia coli. Our study endorsed a reevaluation of the effect of S-carvone on plant isoprenoid metabolism. PMID:24367019

  2. Spectral reflectance, chlorophyll fluorescence and virological investigations of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Hristova, Dimitrina; Iliev, Ilko; Yanev, Tony

    Application of multispectral remote sensing techniques to plant condition monitoring has been adopted for various purposes. Remote sensing is a reliable tool for detecting signs of vege-tation stress and diseases. Spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence are functions of tissue optical properties and biological status of the plants, and illumination conditions. The mean reflectance spectrum depends on the relative composition of all the pigments in the leaf including chlorophylls, carotenoids etc. Chlorophyll fluorescence results from the primary re-actions of photosynthesis and during the last decade it finds widening application as a means for revelation of stress and diseases. The changes in chlorophyll function take place before the alteration in chlorophyll content to occur so that changes in the fluorescence signal arise before any visible signs are apparent. The aim of our investigations was to study the development and spreading out of a viral infection on the leaves of two cultivars tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We applied two remote sensing tech-niques (spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements) for evaluation of the changes in the optical properties of the plants in accordance to their physiological status. The serological analyses via the Double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) were made with appropriate kits (Leowe, Germany) for quantitative assessment of the concentration of viruses in the plants. The tobacco plants were grown in green house under controlled conditions. The first cultivar Nevrocop 1146 is known as resistive to the TMV, i.e. it shows hypersensitive response. The second cultivar named Krumovgrad is normally sen-sitive to the TMV. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, up to one leaf from 20 plants for each cultivar were inoculated with TMV. The leaves opposite to the infected ones formed the group of control (untreated) leaves. The

  3. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the lycopene ε-cyclase gene via virus-induced gene silencing and its expression pattern in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanmei; Wang, Ran; Luo, Zhaopeng; Jin, Lifeng; Liu, Pingping; Chen, Qiansi; Li, Zefeng; Li, Feng; Wei, Chunyang; Wu, Mingzhu; Wei, Pan; Xie, He; Qu, Lingbo; Lin, Fucheng; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Lycopene ε-cyclase (ε-LCY) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of α-branch carotenoids through the cyclization of lycopene. Two cDNA molecules encoding ε-LCY (designated Ntε-LCY1 and Ntε-LCY2) were cloned from Nicotiana tabacum. Ntε-LCY1 and Ntε-LCY2 are encoded by two distinct genes with different evolutionary origins, one originating from the tobacco progenitor, Nicotiana sylvestris, and the other originating from Nicotiana tomentosiformis. The two coding regions are 97% identical at the nucleotide level and 95% identical at the amino acid level. Transcripts of Ntε-LCY were detectable in both vegetative and reproductive organs, with a relatively higher level of expression in leaves than in other tissues. Subcellular localization experiments using an Ntε-LCY1-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that mature Ntε-LCY1 protein is localized within the chloroplast in Bright Yellow 2 suspension cells. Under low-temperature and low-irradiation stress, Ntε-LCY transcript levels substantially increased relative to control plants. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated silencing of ε-LCY in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in an increase of β-branch carotenoids and a reduction in the levels of α-branch carotenoids. Meanwhile, transcripts of related genes in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway observably increased, with the exception of β-OHase in the TRV-ε-lcy line. Suppression of ε-LCY expression was also found to alleviate photoinhibition of Potosystem II in virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) plants under low-temperature and low-irradiation stress. Our results provide insight into the regulatory role of ε-LCY in plant carotenoid biosynthesis and suggest a role for ε-LCY in positively modulating low temperature stress responses.

  4. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the lycopene ε-cyclase gene via virus-induced gene silencing and its expression pattern in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanmei; Wang, Ran; Luo, Zhaopeng; Jin, Lifeng; Liu, Pingping; Chen, Qiansi; Li, Zefeng; Li, Feng; Wei, Chunyang; Wu, Mingzhu; Wei, Pan; Xie, He; Qu, Lingbo; Lin, Fucheng; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Lycopene ε-cyclase (ε-LCY) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of α-branch carotenoids through the cyclization of lycopene. Two cDNA molecules encoding ε-LCY (designated Ntε-LCY1 and Ntε-LCY2) were cloned from Nicotiana tabacum. Ntε-LCY1 and Ntε-LCY2 are encoded by two distinct genes with different evolutionary origins, one originating from the tobacco progenitor, Nicotiana sylvestris, and the other originating from Nicotiana tomentosiformis. The two coding regions are 97% identical at the nucleotide level and 95% identical at the amino acid level. Transcripts of Ntε-LCY were detectable in both vegetative and reproductive organs, with a relatively higher level of expression in leaves than in other tissues. Subcellular localization experiments using an Ntε-LCY1-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that mature Ntε-LCY1 protein is localized within the chloroplast in Bright Yellow 2 suspension cells. Under low-temperature and low-irradiation stress, Ntε-LCY transcript levels substantially increased relative to control plants. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated silencing of ε-LCY in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in an increase of β-branch carotenoids and a reduction in the levels of α-branch carotenoids. Meanwhile, transcripts of related genes in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway observably increased, with the exception of β-OHase in the TRV-ε-lcy line. Suppression of ε-LCY expression was also found to alleviate photoinhibition of Potosystem II in virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) plants under low-temperature and low-irradiation stress. Our results provide insight into the regulatory role of ε-LCY in plant carotenoid biosynthesis and suggest a role for ε-LCY in positively modulating low temperature stress responses. PMID:25153631

  5. Uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L.): dependence on stomatal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, A.; Kley, D.; Wildt, J.; Segschneider, H. J.; Förstel, H.

    The uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers ( Helianthus annuus L. var. giganteus) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Bel W3), using concentrations representative for moderately polluted air, has been determined by gas exchange experiments. Conductivities for these trace gases were measured at different light fluxes ranging from 820 μEm -2s -1 to darkness. The conductivities to water vapor and the trace gases are highly correlated. It is concluded that the uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers and tobacco plants is linearly dependent on stomatal opening. While the uptake of NO is limited by the mesophyll resistance, the uptake of NO 2 is only by diffusion through the stomata. Loss processes by deposition to the leaf surfaces are more pronounced for O 3 than for NO and NO 2.

  6. Gel-based and gel-free proteomic analysis of Nicotiana tabacum trichomes identifies proteins involved in secondary metabolism and in the (a)biotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Van Cutsem, Emmanuel; Simonart, Géraldine; Degand, Hervé; Faber, Anne-Marie; Morsomme, Pierre; Boutry, Marc

    2011-02-01

    Nicotiana tabacum leaves are covered by trichomes involved in the secretion of large amounts of secondary metabolites, some of which play a major role in plant defense. However, little is known about the metabolic pathways that operate in these structures. We undertook a proteomic analysis of N. tabacum trichomes in order to identify their protein complement. Efficient trichome isolation was obtained by abrading frozen leaves. After homogenization, soluble proteins and a microsomal fraction were prepared by centrifugation. Gel-based and gel-free proteomic analyses were then performed. 2-DE analysis of soluble proteins led to the identification of 1373 protein spots, which were digested and analyzed by MS/MS, leading to 680 unique identifications. Both soluble proteins and microsomal fraction were analyzed by LC MALDI-MS/MS after trypsin digestion, leading to 858 identifications, many of which had not been identified after 2-DE, indicating that the two methods complement each other. Many enzymes putatively involved in secondary metabolism were identified, including enzymes involved in the synthesis of terpenoid precursors and in acyl sugar production. Several transporters were also identified, some of which might be involved in secondary metabolite transport. Various (a)biotic stress response proteins were also detected, supporting the role of trichomes in plant defense. PMID:21268273

  7. Transfer of the cytochrome P450-dependent dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into Nicotiana tabacum chloroplasts for light-driven synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Karcher, Daniel; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Martens, Helle Juel; Ruf, Stephanie; Kroop, Xenia; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawie, Mohammed Saddik; Pribil, Mathias; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bock, Ralph; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Plant chloroplasts are light-driven cell factories that have great potential to act as a chassis for metabolic engineering applications. Using plant chloroplasts, we demonstrate how photosynthetic reducing power can drive a metabolic pathway to synthesise a bio-active natural product. For this purpose, we stably engineered the dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into the chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Dhurrin is a cyanogenic glucoside and its synthesis from the amino acid tyrosine is catalysed by two membrane-bound cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP79A1 and CYP71E1) and a soluble glucosyltransferase (UGT85B1), and is dependent on electron transfer from a P450 oxidoreductase. The entire pathway was introduced into the chloroplast by integrating CYP79A1, CYP71E1, and UGT85B1 into a neutral site of the N. tabacum chloroplast genome. The two P450s and the UGT85B1 were functional when expressed in the chloroplasts and converted endogenous tyrosine into dhurrin using electrons derived directly from the photosynthetic electron transport chain, without the need for the presence of an NADPH-dependent P450 oxidoreductase. The dhurrin produced in the engineered plants amounted to 0.1–0.2% of leaf dry weight compared to 6% in sorghum. The results obtained pave the way for plant P450s involved in the synthesis of economically important compounds to be engineered into the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, and demonstrate that their full catalytic cycle can be driven directly by photosynthesis-derived electrons. PMID:26969746

  8. Immunocompetent truncated E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) expressed in Nicotiana tabacum plants: a candidate antigen for new generation of veterinary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Guillermo; Marconi, Patricia; Periolo, Osvaldo; La Torre, José; Alvarez, María Alejandra

    2012-06-22

    The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is the etiological agent responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical diseases in cattle. The glycoprotein E2 is the major envelope protein of this virus and the strongest inductor of the immune response. There are several available commercial vaccines against bovine viral diarrhea (BVD), which show irregular performances. Here, we report the use of tobacco plants as an alternative productive platform for the expression of the truncated version of E2 glycoprotein (tE2) from the BVDV. The tE2 sequence, lacking the transmembrane domain, was cloned into the pK7WG2 Agrobacterium binary vector. The construct also carried the 2S2 Arabidopsis thaliana signal for directing the protein into the plant secretory pathway, the Kozak sequence, an hexa-histidine tag to facilitate protein purification and the KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal. The resulting plasmid (pK-2S2-tE2-His-KDEL) was introduced into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 by electroporation. The transformed A. tumefaciens was then used to express tE2 in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum plants. Western blot and ELISA using specific monoclonal antibodies confirmed the presence of the recombinant tE2 protein in plant extracts. An estimated amount of 20 μg of tE2 per gram of fresh leaves was regularly obtained with this plant system. Injection of guinea pigs with plant extracts containing 20 μg of rtE2 induced the production of BVDV specific antibodies at equal or higher levels than those induced by whole virus vaccines. This is the first report of the production of an immunocompetent tE2 in N. tabacum plants, having the advantage to be free of any eventual animal contaminant. PMID:22554468

  9. Transfer of the cytochrome P450-dependent dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into Nicotiana tabacum chloroplasts for light-driven synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Karcher, Daniel; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Martens, Helle Juel; Ruf, Stephanie; Kroop, Xenia; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawie, Mohammed Saddik; Pribil, Mathias; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bock, Ralph; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-04-01

    Plant chloroplasts are light-driven cell factories that have great potential to act as a chassis for metabolic engineering applications. Using plant chloroplasts, we demonstrate how photosynthetic reducing power can drive a metabolic pathway to synthesise a bio-active natural product. For this purpose, we stably engineered the dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into the chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Dhurrin is a cyanogenic glucoside and its synthesis from the amino acid tyrosine is catalysed by two membrane-bound cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP79A1 and CYP71E1) and a soluble glucosyltransferase (UGT85B1), and is dependent on electron transfer from a P450 oxidoreductase. The entire pathway was introduced into the chloroplast by integrating CYP79A1, CYP71E1, and UGT85B1 into a neutral site of the N. tabacum chloroplast genome. The two P450s and the UGT85B1 were functional when expressed in the chloroplasts and converted endogenous tyrosine into dhurrin using electrons derived directly from the photosynthetic electron transport chain, without the need for the presence of an NADPH-dependent P450 oxidoreductase. The dhurrin produced in the engineered plants amounted to 0.1-0.2% of leaf dry weight compared to 6% in sorghum. The results obtained pave the way for plant P450s involved in the synthesis of economically important compounds to be engineered into the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, and demonstrate that their full catalytic cycle can be driven directly by photosynthesis-derived electrons. PMID:26969746

  10. Immunocompetent truncated E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) expressed in Nicotiana tabacum plants: a candidate antigen for new generation of veterinary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Guillermo; Marconi, Patricia; Periolo, Osvaldo; La Torre, José; Alvarez, María Alejandra

    2012-06-22

    The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is the etiological agent responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical diseases in cattle. The glycoprotein E2 is the major envelope protein of this virus and the strongest inductor of the immune response. There are several available commercial vaccines against bovine viral diarrhea (BVD), which show irregular performances. Here, we report the use of tobacco plants as an alternative productive platform for the expression of the truncated version of E2 glycoprotein (tE2) from the BVDV. The tE2 sequence, lacking the transmembrane domain, was cloned into the pK7WG2 Agrobacterium binary vector. The construct also carried the 2S2 Arabidopsis thaliana signal for directing the protein into the plant secretory pathway, the Kozak sequence, an hexa-histidine tag to facilitate protein purification and the KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal. The resulting plasmid (pK-2S2-tE2-His-KDEL) was introduced into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 by electroporation. The transformed A. tumefaciens was then used to express tE2 in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum plants. Western blot and ELISA using specific monoclonal antibodies confirmed the presence of the recombinant tE2 protein in plant extracts. An estimated amount of 20 μg of tE2 per gram of fresh leaves was regularly obtained with this plant system. Injection of guinea pigs with plant extracts containing 20 μg of rtE2 induced the production of BVDV specific antibodies at equal or higher levels than those induced by whole virus vaccines. This is the first report of the production of an immunocompetent tE2 in N. tabacum plants, having the advantage to be free of any eventual animal contaminant.

  11. Relationship between leaf antioxidants and ozone injury in Nicotiana tabacum 'Bel-W3' under environmental conditions in São Paulo, SE - Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Marisia P.; Ferreira, Mauricio L.; Sant'Anna, Silvia M. R.; Domingos, Marisa; Souza, Silvia R.

    Previous studies have reported that the extent of leaf injury in Nicotiana tabacum "Bel-W3" exposed to environmental conditions in the city of São Paulo is influenced by weather conditions. This influence may occur by means of antioxidant responses. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate whether daily antioxidant responses to environmental variations interfere on the progression of leaf injury on plants of this cultivar during their exposure in a state park of São Paulo and to determine a linear combination of variables, among antioxidants and environmental factors, which mostly explain this visible response. Plants were exposed at the mentioned site for 14 days in four different experiments. During each experiment, three plants were daily sampled to determine the accumulated percentage of leaf area affected by necrosis and antioxidant responses (concentrations of total ascorbic acid (AA) and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidases (POD)). Ozone concentrations and weather conditions were also daily measured. Pearson correlations and multivariate analyses assessed the relationship between biological and environmental variables. Leaf injury appeared between the 3rd and 6th days of exposure and increased over the exposure periods. The daily concentrations of AA tended to decrease with time of exposure in all experiments, but the activity of SOD and POD oscillated during plant exposure. Positive correlations were observed between AA or SOD and O 3 concentrations, as well as negative correlations between AA and air temperature. The increasing percentage of leaf necrosis across the whole period was explained by decreasing levels of AA 2 days before injury estimation and by higher O 3 concentrations 5 days before ( R2 = 0.36; p < 0.001). The use of N. tabacum Bel-W3 as a bioindicator can be restricted by leaf antioxidant responses to both atmospheric contamination and weather conditions.

  12. Involvement of the leaf-specific multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter Nt-JAT2 in vacuolar sequestration of nicotine in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Shitan, Nobukazu; Minami, Shota; Morita, Masahiko; Hayashida, Minaho; Ito, Shingo; Takanashi, Kojiro; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Goossens, Alain; Moriyasu, Masataka; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-01-01

    Alkaloids play a key role in higher plant defense against pathogens and herbivores. Following its biosynthesis in root tissues, nicotine, the major alkaloid of Nicotiana species, is translocated via xylem transport toward the accumulation sites, leaf vacuoles. Our transcriptome analysis of methyl jasmonate-treated tobacco BY-2 cells identified several multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter genes. In this study, we characterized a MATE gene, Nicotiana tabacum jasmonate-inducible alkaloid transporter 2 (Nt-JAT2), which encodes a protein that has 32% amino acid identity with Nt-JAT1. Nt-JAT2 mRNA is expressed at a very low steady state level in whole plants, but is rapidly upregulated by methyl jasmonate treatment in a leaf-specific manner. To characterize the function of Nt-JAT2, yeast cells were used as the host organism in a cellular transport assay. Nt-JAT2 was localized at the plasma membrane in yeast cells. When incubated in nicotine-containing medium, the nicotine content in Nt-JAT2-expressing cells was significantly lower than in control yeast. Nt-JAT2-expressing cells also showed lower content of other alkaloids like anabasine and anatabine, but not of flavonoids, suggesting that Nt-JAT2 transports various alkaloids including nicotine. Fluorescence assays in BY-2 cells showed that Nt-JAT2-GFP was localized to the tonoplast. These findings indicate that Nt-JAT2 is involved in nicotine sequestration in leaf vacuoles following the translocation of nicotine from root tissues. PMID:25268729

  13. Involvement of the Leaf-Specific Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) Transporter Nt-JAT2 in Vacuolar Sequestration of Nicotine in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Shitan, Nobukazu; Minami, Shota; Morita, Masahiko; Hayashida, Minaho; Ito, Shingo; Takanashi, Kojiro; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Goossens, Alain; Moriyasu, Masataka; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-01-01

    Alkaloids play a key role in higher plant defense against pathogens and herbivores. Following its biosynthesis in root tissues, nicotine, the major alkaloid of Nicotiana species, is translocated via xylem transport toward the accumulation sites, leaf vacuoles. Our transcriptome analysis of methyl jasmonate-treated tobacco BY-2 cells identified several multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter genes. In this study, we characterized a MATE gene, Nicotiana tabacum jasmonate-inducible alkaloid transporter 2 (Nt-JAT2), which encodes a protein that has 32% amino acid identity with Nt-JAT1. Nt-JAT2 mRNA is expressed at a very low steady state level in whole plants, but is rapidly upregulated by methyl jasmonate treatment in a leaf-specific manner. To characterize the function of Nt-JAT2, yeast cells were used as the host organism in a cellular transport assay. Nt-JAT2 was localized at the plasma membrane in yeast cells. When incubated in nicotine-containing medium, the nicotine content in Nt-JAT2-expressing cells was significantly lower than in control yeast. Nt-JAT2-expressing cells also showed lower content of other alkaloids like anabasine and anatabine, but not of flavonoids, suggesting that Nt-JAT2 transports various alkaloids including nicotine. Fluorescence assays in BY-2 cells showed that Nt-JAT2-GFP was localized to the tonoplast. These findings indicate that Nt-JAT2 is involved in nicotine sequestration in leaf vacuoles following the translocation of nicotine from root tissues. PMID:25268729

  14. Tobacco plants transformed with the bean. alpha. ai gene express an inhibitor of insect. alpha. -amylase in their seeds. [Nicotiana tabacum; Tenebrio molitor

    SciTech Connect

    Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds contain a putative plant defense protein that inhibits insect and mammalian but not plant {alpha}-amylases. We recently presented strong circumstantial evidence that this {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is encoded by an already-identified lectin gene whose product is referred to as lectin-like-protein (LLP). We have now made a chimeric gene consisting of the coding sequence of the lectin gene that encodes LLP and the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences of the lectin gene that encodes phytohemagglutinin-L. When this chimeric gene was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we observed in the seeds a series of polypeptides (M{sub r} 10,000-18,000) that cross-react with antibodies to the bean {alpha}-amylase inhibitor. Most of these polypeptides bind to a pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase affinity column. An extract of the seeds of the transformed tobacco plants inhibits pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase activity as well as the {alpha}-amylase present in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor. We suggest that introduction of this lectin gene (to be called {alpha}ai) into other leguminous plants may be a strategy to protect the seeds from the seed-eating larvae of Coleoptera.

  15. Metabolism of methoxychlor by the P450-monooxygenase CYP6G1 involved in insecticide resistance of Drosophila melanogaster after expression in cell cultures of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Joussen, Nicole; Schuphan, Ingolf; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2010-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP6G1 of Drosophila melanogaster was heterologously expressed in a cell suspension culture of Nicotiana tabacum. This in vitro system was used to study the capability of CYP6G1 to metabolize the insecticide methoxychlor (=1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane, 1) against the background of endogenous enzymes of the corresponding non-transgenic culture. The Cyp6g1-transgenic cell culture metabolized 96% of applied methoxychlor (45.8 microg per assay) within 24 h by demethylation and hydroxylation mainly to trishydroxy and catechol methoxychlor (16 and 17%, resp.). About 34% of the metabolism and the distinct formation of trishydroxy and catechol methoxychlor were due to foreign enzyme CYP6G1. Furthermore, methoxychlor metabolism was inhibited by 43% after simultaneous addition of piperonyl butoxide (458 microg), whereas inhibition in the non-transgenic culture amounted to 92%. Additionally, the rate of glycosylation was reduced in both cultures. These results were supported by the inhibition of the metabolism of the insecticide imidacloprid (6; 20 microg, 24 h) in the Cyp6g1-transgenic culture by 82% in the presence of piperonyl butoxide (200 microg). Due to CYP6G1 being responsible for imidacloprid resistance of Drosophila or being involved in DDT resistance, it is likely that CYP6G1 conveys resistance to methoxychlor (1). Furthermore, treating Drosophila with piperonyl butoxide could weaken the observed resistance phenomena.

  16. Analysis of the enhancer-blocking function of the TBS element from Petunia hybrida in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Singer, Stacy D; Hily, Jean-Michel; Cox, Kerik D

    2011-11-01

    Transcriptional enhancers possess the ability to override the tissue-specificity and efficiency of nearby promoters, which is of concern when generating transgenic constructs bearing multiple cassettes. One means of preventing these inappropriate interactions is through the use of enhancer-blocking insulators. The 2-kb transformation booster sequence (TBS) from Petunia hybrida has been shown previously to exhibit this function when inserted between an enhancer and promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we attempted to further characterize the ability of this fragment to impede enhancer-promoter interference through an analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis and Nicotiana tabacum lines bearing various permutations of the TBS element between the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S enhancer and an assortment of tissue-specific promoters fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The full-length TBS fragment was found to function in both orientations, although to a significantly lesser degree in the reverse orientation, and was operational in both plant species tested. While multiple deletion fragments were found to exhibit activity, it appeared that several regions of the TBS were required for maximal enhancer-blocking function. Furthermore, we found that this element exhibited promoter-like activity, which has implications in terms of possible mechanisms behind its ability to impede enhancer-promoter communication in plants.

  17. The Development of DNA Based Methods for the Reliable and Efficient Identification of Nicotiana tabacum in Tobacco and Its Derived Products

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Li, Rong; Li, Sifan; Ping, Wenli; Li, Shujun; Naumova, Alexandra; Peelen, Tamara; Yuan, Zheng; Zhang, Dabing

    2016-01-01

    Reliable methods are needed to detect the presence of tobacco components in tobacco products to effectively control smuggling and classify tariff and excise in tobacco industry to control illegal tobacco trade. In this study, two sensitive and specific DNA based methods, one quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay and the other loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, were developed for the reliable and efficient detection of the presence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in various tobacco samples and commodities. Both assays targeted the same sequence of the uridine 5′-monophosphate synthase (UMPS), and their specificities and sensitivities were determined with various plant materials. Both qPCR and LAMP methods were reliable and accurate in the rapid detection of tobacco components in various practical samples, including customs samples, reconstituted tobacco samples, and locally purchased cigarettes, showing high potential for their application in tobacco identification, particularly in the special cases where the morphology or chemical compositions of tobacco have been disrupted. Therefore, combining both methods would facilitate not only the detection of tobacco smuggling control, but also the detection of tariff classification and of excise.

  18. Evaluation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) hairy roots for the production of geraniol, the first committed step in terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway.

    PubMed

    Ritala, Anneli; Dong, Lemeng; Imseng, Nicole; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Vasilev, Nikolay; van der Krol, Sander; Rischer, Heiko; Maaheimo, Hannu; Virkki, Arho; Brändli, Johanna; Schillberg, Stefan; Eibl, Regine; Bouwmeester, Harro; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2014-04-20

    The terpenoid indole alkaloids are one of the major classes of plant-derived natural products and are well known for their many applications in the pharmaceutical, fragrance and cosmetics industries. Hairy root cultures are useful for the production of plant secondary metabolites because of their genetic and biochemical stability and their rapid growth in hormone-free media. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) hairy roots, which do not produce geraniol naturally, were engineered to express a plastid-targeted geraniol synthase gene originally isolated from Valeriana officinalis L. (VoGES). A SPME-GC-MS screening tool was developed for the rapid evaluation of production clones. The GC-MS analysis revealed that the free geraniol content in 20 hairy root clones expressing VoGES was an average of 13.7 μg/g dry weight (DW) and a maximum of 31.3 μg/g DW. More detailed metabolic analysis revealed that geraniol derivatives were present in six major glycoside forms, namely the hexose and/or pentose conjugates of geraniol and hydroxygeraniol, resulting in total geraniol levels of up to 204.3 μg/g DW following deglycosylation. A benchtop-scale process was developed in a 20-L wave-mixed bioreactor eventually yielding hundreds of grams of biomass and milligram quantities of geraniol per cultivation bag. PMID:24530945

  19. The symbiosis between Nicotiana tabacum and the endomycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae increases the plant glutathione level and decreases leaf cadmium and root arsenic contents.

    PubMed

    Degola, Francesca; Fattorini, Laura; Bona, Elisa; Sprimuto, Christian Triscari; Argese, Emanuele; Berta, Graziella; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    Over time, anthropogenic activities have led to severe cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) pollution in several environments. Plants inhabiting metal(loid)-contaminated areas should be able to sequester and detoxify these toxic elements as soon as they enter roots and leaves. We postulated here that an important role in protecting plants from excessive metal(loid) accumulation and toxicity might be played by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. In fact, human exploitation of plant material derived from Cd- and As-polluted environments may lead to a noxious intake of these toxic elements; in particular, a possible source of Cd and As for humans is given by cigarette and cigar smoke. We investigated the role of AM fungus Funneliformis mosseae (T.H. Nicolson & Gerd.) C. Walker & A. Schüßler in protecting Nicotiana tabacum L. (cv. Petit Havana) from the above-mentioned metal(loid) stress. Our findings proved that the AM symbiosis is effective in increasing the plant tissue content of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH), in influencing the amount of metal(loid)-induced chelators as phytochelatins, and in reducing the Cd and As content in leaves and roots of adult tobacco plants. These results might also prove useful in improving the quality of commercial tobacco, thus reducing the risks to human health due to inhalation of toxic elements contained in smoking products.

  20. Relationship between ozone, meteorological conditions, gas exchange and leaf injury in Nicotiana tabacum Bel-W3 in a sub-tropical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Daiane T.; Meirelles, Sérgio T.; Moraes, Regina M.

    2012-12-01

    The city of São Paulo is located in a subtropical region whose climate exhibits few defined seasons as well as frequent oscillations in temperature and rainfall throughout the year. In addition to interfering with physiological processes, these peculiar climatic dynamics influence the formation of O3 and its influx into leaves, causing species used as bioindicators in temperate climates to be ineffective here. This study evaluated gas exchange variations in CO2 and H2O and leaf injuries induced by O3 in Nicotiana tabacum Bel-W3 in relation to oscillations in environmental conditions. Plants were exposed to an O3-polluted environment for fifteen periods of fourteen days each throughout 2008. Gas exchange and O3 were higher during the summer and winter but were highly variable in all seasons. Severe injuries occurred during the winter and spring, with significant variation in this parameter being observed throughout the year. An analysis of biotic and abiotic variables revealed complex relationships among them, with great importance of meteorological factors in plant responses. We conclude that under unstable climatic conditions, the relationship between O3 flux and injury is weak, and the qualitative character of biomonitoring is further confirmed.

  1. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in response to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Xie, He; Yang, Da-Hai; Yao, Heng; Bai, Ge; Zhang, Yi-Han; Xiao, Bing-Guang

    2016-01-15

    Drought is one of the most severe forms of abiotic stresses that threaten the survival of plants, including crops. In turn, plants dramatically change their physiology to increase drought tolerance, including reconfiguration of proteomes. Here, we studied drought-induced proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), a solanaceous plant, using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based protein labeling technology. Of identified 5570 proteins totally, drought treatment increased and decreased abundance of 260 and 206 proteins, respectively, compared with control condition. Most of these differentially regulated proteins are involved in photosynthesis, metabolism, and stress and defense. Although abscisic acid (ABA) levels greatly increased in drought-treated tobacco leaves, abundance of detected ABA biosynthetic enzymes showed no obvious changes. In contrast, heat shock proteins (HSPs), thioredoxins, ascorbate-, glutathione-, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-related proteins were up- or down-regulated in drought-treated tobacco leaves, suggesting that chaperones and redox signaling are important for tobacco tolerance to drought, and it is likely that redox-induced posttranslational modifications play an important role in modulating protein activity. This study not only provides a comprehensive dataset on overall protein changes in drought-treated tobacco leaves, but also shed light on the mechanism by which solanaceous plants adapt to drought stress. PMID:26692494

  2. Evidence for effects on the in vivo activity of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase during development of Mn toxicity in tobacco. [Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY14

    SciTech Connect

    Houtz, R.L.; Nable, R.O.; Cheniae, G.M. )

    1988-04-01

    The progressive decrease in net photosynthesis accompanying development of Mn toxicity in young leaves of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY 14) is a result of effects on in vivo activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco, EC 4.1.1.39). This conclusion is supported by: (a) decrease in rates of CO{sub 2} depletion during measurements of CO{sub 2} compensation, (b) increase in leaf RuBP concentrations, (c) progressive decreases in rate-constants of RuBP loss (light to dark transition analyses) with progressive increases of leaf Mn concentrations, and (d) restoration of diminished rates of net photosynthesis to control rates by elevated CO{sub 2} (5%). Moreover, elevated CO{sub 2} (1100 microliters per liter) during culture of Mn-treated plants decreased elevated RuBP concentrations to control levels and alleviated foliar symptoms of Mn toxicity. These effects of Mn toxicity on in vivo activity of rubisco were not expressed by in vitro kinetic analyses of rubisco prepared under conditions to sequester Mn or to adsorb polyphenols or their oxidation products. Similarly, the in vitro activity of fructose bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) was unaffected by Mn toxicity.

  3. Cloning and molecular characterisation of a Delta8-sphingolipid-desaturase from Nicotiana tabacum closely related to Delta6-acyl-desaturases.

    PubMed

    García-Maroto, Federico; Garrido-Cárdenas, José A; Michaelson, Louise V; Napier, Johnathan A; Alonso, Diego López

    2007-06-01

    Investigation on the absence of Delta(6)-desaturase activity in Nicotiana tabacum has led to the cloning of a new desaturase gene from this organism (NTDXDES) that exhibited unexpected biochemical activity. Cladistic analysis shows clustering of NTDXDES together with functional Delta(6)-acyl-desaturases of near Solanales plants, such as Borago and Echium. This group lies apart from that of previously characterised Delta(8)-sphingolipid-desaturases, which also includes two putative tobacco members identified in this study. Moreover, strong expression of NTDXDES is found in leaves, flowers, fruits and developing seeds of tobacco plants that is highly dependent on the development phase, with transcriptional activity being higher at stages of active tissue growth. This pattern is similar to that showed by Delta(6)-acyl-desaturases characterised in Boraginaceae species. However, functional assays using a yeast expression system revealed that the protein encoded by NTDXDES lacks Delta(6)-desaturase activity, but instead it is able to desaturate sphingolipid substrates by introducing a double bond on the Delta(8)-position. These data indicate that NTDXDES represent a novel desaturase gene placed in a different evolutionary lineage to that of previously characterised Delta(8)-desaturases. PMID:17325828

  4. Comparison of Thermobifida fusca Cellulases Expressed in Escherichia coli and Nicotiana tabacum Indicates Advantages of the Plant System for the Expression of Bacterial Cellulases.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Johannes; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The economic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels requires in addition to pretreatment techniques access to large quantities of inexpensive cellulases to be competitive with established first generation processes. A solution to this problem could be achieved by plant based expression of these enzymes. We expressed the complete set of six cellulases and an additional β-glucosidase expressed from Thermobifida fusca in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum). This was done to determine whether functional enzyme expression was feasible in these organisms. In extracts of recombinant E. coli cells, five of the proteins were detected by western blot analysis, but exocellulases E3 and E6 were undetectable. In the plant-based expression system we were able to detect all six cellulases but not the β-glucosidase even though activity was detectable. When E. coli was used as the expression system, endocellulase E2 was active, while endocellulases E1 and E5 showed only residual activity. The remaining cellulases appeared completely inactive against the model substrates azo-carboxymethyl-cellulose (Azo-CMC) and 4-methylumbelliferyl-cellobioside (4-MUC). Only the β-glucosidase showed high activity against 4-MUC. In contrast, all the plant-derived enzymes were active against the respective model substrates. Our data indicate that some enzymes of bacterial origin are more active and more efficiently expressed in plants than in a bacterial host.

  5. Stable internal reference genes for normalization of real-time RT-PCR in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) during development and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gregor W; Delaney, Sven K

    2010-03-01

    Real-time RT-PCR is a powerful technique for the measurement of gene expression, but its accuracy depends on the stability of the internal reference gene(s) used for data normalization. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is an important model in studies of plant gene expression, but stable reference genes have not been well-studied in the tobacco system. We address this problem by analysing the expression stability of eight potential tobacco reference genes. Primers targeting each gene (18S rRNA, EF-1alpha, Ntubc2, alpha- and beta-tubulin, PP2A, L25 and actin) were developed and optimized. The expression of each gene was then measured by real-time PCR in a diverse set of 22 tobacco cDNA samples derived from developmentally distinct tissues and from plants exposed to several abiotic stresses. L25 and EF-1alpha demonstrated the highest expression stability, followed by Ntubc2. Measurement of L25 and EF-1alpha was sufficient for accurate normalization in either the developmental or stress-treated samples, but Ntubc2 was also required when considering the entire sample set. Analysis of a tobacco circadian gene (NTCP-23) verified these reference genes in an additional context, and all techniques were optimized to enable a high-throughput approach. These results provide a foundation for the more accurate and widespread use of real-time RT-PCR in tobacco. PMID:20098998

  6. The symbiosis between Nicotiana tabacum and the endomycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae increases the plant glutathione level and decreases leaf cadmium and root arsenic contents.

    PubMed

    Degola, Francesca; Fattorini, Laura; Bona, Elisa; Sprimuto, Christian Triscari; Argese, Emanuele; Berta, Graziella; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    Over time, anthropogenic activities have led to severe cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) pollution in several environments. Plants inhabiting metal(loid)-contaminated areas should be able to sequester and detoxify these toxic elements as soon as they enter roots and leaves. We postulated here that an important role in protecting plants from excessive metal(loid) accumulation and toxicity might be played by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. In fact, human exploitation of plant material derived from Cd- and As-polluted environments may lead to a noxious intake of these toxic elements; in particular, a possible source of Cd and As for humans is given by cigarette and cigar smoke. We investigated the role of AM fungus Funneliformis mosseae (T.H. Nicolson & Gerd.) C. Walker & A. Schüßler in protecting Nicotiana tabacum L. (cv. Petit Havana) from the above-mentioned metal(loid) stress. Our findings proved that the AM symbiosis is effective in increasing the plant tissue content of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH), in influencing the amount of metal(loid)-induced chelators as phytochelatins, and in reducing the Cd and As content in leaves and roots of adult tobacco plants. These results might also prove useful in improving the quality of commercial tobacco, thus reducing the risks to human health due to inhalation of toxic elements contained in smoking products. PMID:25900420

  7. RNA-sequencing Reveals Global Transcriptomic Changes in Nicotiana tabacum Responding to Topping and Treatment of Axillary-shoot Control Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Wu, Yongmei; Ghosh, Jayadri S.; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Fisher, Colin; Wang, Ying; Lawson, Darlene; Yuan, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Removal of terminal buds (topping) and control of the formation of axillary shoots (suckers) are common agronomic practices that significantly impact the yield and quality of various crop plants. Application of chemicals (suckercides) to plants following topping is an effective method for sucker control. However, our current knowledge of the influence of topping, and subsequent suckercide applications, to gene expression is limited. We analyzed the differential gene expression using RNA-sequencing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that are topped, or treated after topping by two different suckercides, the contact-localized-systemic, Flupro® (FP), and contact, Off-Shoot-T®. Among the differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 179 were identified as common to all three conditions. DEGs, largely related to wounding, phytohormone metabolism and secondary metabolite biosynthesis, exhibited significant upregulation following topping, and downregulation after suckercide treatments. DEGs related to photosynthetic processes were repressed following topping and suckercide treatments. Moreover, topping and FP-treatment affect the expression of auxin and cytokinin signaling pathway genes that are possibly involved in axillary shoot formation. Our results provide insights into the global change of plant gene expression in response to topping and suckercide treatments. The regulatory elements of topping-inducible genes are potentially useful for the development of a chemical-free sucker control system. PMID:26670135

  8. Exclusion of a Proton ATPase from the Apical Membrane Is Associated with Cell Polarity and Tip Growth in Nicotiana tabacum Pollen Tubes[W

    PubMed Central

    Certal, Ana C.; Almeida, Ricardo B.; Carvalho, Lara M.; Wong, Eric; Moreno, Nuno; Michard, Erwan; Carneiro, Jorge; Rodriguéz-Léon, Joaquín; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y.; Feijó, José A.

    2008-01-01

    Polarized growth in pollen tubes results from exocytosis at the tip and is associated with conspicuous polarization of Ca2+, H+, K+, and Cl− -fluxes. Here, we show that cell polarity in Nicotiana tabacum pollen is associated with the exclusion of a novel pollen-specific H+-ATPase, Nt AHA, from the growing apex. Nt AHA colocalizes with extracellular H+ effluxes, which revert to influxes where Nt AHA is absent. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis showed that Nt AHA moves toward the apex of growing pollen tubes, suggesting that the major mechanism of insertion is not through apical exocytosis. Nt AHA mRNA is also excluded from the tip, suggesting a mechanism of polarization acting at the level of translation. Localized applications of the cation ionophore gramicidin A had no effect where Nt AHA was present but acidified the cytosol and induced reorientation of the pollen tube where Nt AHA was absent. Transgenic pollen overexpressing Nt AHA-GFP developed abnormal callose plugs accompanied by abnormal H+ flux profiles. Furthermore, there is no net flux of H+ in defined patches of membrane where callose plugs are to be formed. Taken together, our results suggest that proton dynamics may underlie basic mechanisms of polarity and spatial regulation in growing pollen tubes. PMID:18364468

  9. Rice salT promoter is activated in Papaver somniferum and Nicotiana tabacum transgenic cells in the absence of exogenous ABA.

    PubMed

    Elleuch; Belbahri; Boetti; David; Thomassetb; David

    2001-01-01

    With the aim of modifying secondary metabolism in Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells, gene transfer was performed using the sam1 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana under the control of the salT promoter. This promoter is induced by ABA in rice and in tobacco and we have shown that it is also induced in poppy cells (gus gene). Putatively transformed poppy and tobacco cell lines with the sam1 gene were obtained. In the absence of exogenous inducer we noticed the expression of the transgene resulting in a significant increase of SAM-S activity in all tested transformants of poppy and in half the transgenic tobacco cell lines tested. Addition of ABA to the culture medium failed to enhance the expression of the transgene in both species and resulted in a decrease of the sam1 gene expression in some cell lines. Since the salT promoter is induced by exogenous ABA in both species (gus reporter gene), we suggest a partial sam1 transgene inactivation in certain cell lines. These results show that the efficiency of a regulatory sequence may be different when fused with a reporter gene (gus) compared to fusion with a gene belonging to the housekeeping family (sam1).

  10. RNA-sequencing Reveals Global Transcriptomic Changes in Nicotiana tabacum Responding to Topping and Treatment of Axillary-shoot Control Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay K; Wu, Yongmei; Ghosh, Jayadri S; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Fisher, Colin; Wang, Ying; Lawson, Darlene; Yuan, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Removal of terminal buds (topping) and control of the formation of axillary shoots (suckers) are common agronomic practices that significantly impact the yield and quality of various crop plants. Application of chemicals (suckercides) to plants following topping is an effective method for sucker control. However, our current knowledge of the influence of topping, and subsequent suckercide applications, to gene expression is limited. We analyzed the differential gene expression using RNA-sequencing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that are topped, or treated after topping by two different suckercides, the contact-localized-systemic, Flupro(®) (FP), and contact, Off-Shoot-T(®). Among the differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 179 were identified as common to all three conditions. DEGs, largely related to wounding, phytohormone metabolism and secondary metabolite biosynthesis, exhibited significant upregulation following topping, and downregulation after suckercide treatments. DEGs related to photosynthetic processes were repressed following topping and suckercide treatments. Moreover, topping and FP-treatment affect the expression of auxin and cytokinin signaling pathway genes that are possibly involved in axillary shoot formation. Our results provide insights into the global change of plant gene expression in response to topping and suckercide treatments. The regulatory elements of topping-inducible genes are potentially useful for the development of a chemical-free sucker control system. PMID:26670135

  11. Comparison of Thermobifida fusca Cellulases Expressed in Escherichia coli and Nicotiana tabacum Indicates Advantages of the Plant System for the Expression of Bacterial Cellulases

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Johannes; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The economic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels requires in addition to pretreatment techniques access to large quantities of inexpensive cellulases to be competitive with established first generation processes. A solution to this problem could be achieved by plant based expression of these enzymes. We expressed the complete set of six cellulases and an additional β-glucosidase expressed from Thermobifida fusca in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum). This was done to determine whether functional enzyme expression was feasible in these organisms. In extracts of recombinant E. coli cells, five of the proteins were detected by western blot analysis, but exocellulases E3 and E6 were undetectable. In the plant-based expression system we were able to detect all six cellulases but not the β-glucosidase even though activity was detectable. When E. coli was used as the expression system, endocellulase E2 was active, while endocellulases E1 and E5 showed only residual activity. The remaining cellulases appeared completely inactive against the model substrates azo-carboxymethyl-cellulose (Azo-CMC) and 4-methylumbelliferyl-cellobioside (4-MUC). Only the β-glucosidase showed high activity against 4-MUC. In contrast, all the plant-derived enzymes were active against the respective model substrates. Our data indicate that some enzymes of bacterial origin are more active and more efficiently expressed in plants than in a bacterial host. PMID:26648951

  12. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in response to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Xie, He; Yang, Da-Hai; Yao, Heng; Bai, Ge; Zhang, Yi-Han; Xiao, Bing-Guang

    2016-01-15

    Drought is one of the most severe forms of abiotic stresses that threaten the survival of plants, including crops. In turn, plants dramatically change their physiology to increase drought tolerance, including reconfiguration of proteomes. Here, we studied drought-induced proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), a solanaceous plant, using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based protein labeling technology. Of identified 5570 proteins totally, drought treatment increased and decreased abundance of 260 and 206 proteins, respectively, compared with control condition. Most of these differentially regulated proteins are involved in photosynthesis, metabolism, and stress and defense. Although abscisic acid (ABA) levels greatly increased in drought-treated tobacco leaves, abundance of detected ABA biosynthetic enzymes showed no obvious changes. In contrast, heat shock proteins (HSPs), thioredoxins, ascorbate-, glutathione-, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-related proteins were up- or down-regulated in drought-treated tobacco leaves, suggesting that chaperones and redox signaling are important for tobacco tolerance to drought, and it is likely that redox-induced posttranslational modifications play an important role in modulating protein activity. This study not only provides a comprehensive dataset on overall protein changes in drought-treated tobacco leaves, but also shed light on the mechanism by which solanaceous plants adapt to drought stress.

  13. Feruloylputrescine and Caffeoylputrescine Are Not Involved in Growth and Floral Bud Formation of Stem Explants from Nicotiana tabacum L. var Xanthi nc

    PubMed Central

    Wyss-Benz, Markus; Streit, Luc; Ebert, Edith

    1990-01-01

    The role of feruloylputrescine (FP) and of caffeoylputrescine (CP) was investigated in an explant system of stem explants from day-neutral Nicotiana tabacum L. var Xanthi nc. Previously, a correlation between cortical callus formation and increase in FP content, as well as between in vitro flower formation and increase in CP content had been shown. During the explant growth in vitro, the increase of both FP and CP was inhibited by 4-fluor-(1-amino-2-phenylethyl)phosphonic acid and 2-amino-indene-2-phosphonic acid, both inhibitors of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5). dl-α-difluoromethylarginine, an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.19), prevented only the increase in FP, while dl-α-difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.17), reduced only that of CP. Increase in dry weight and the formation of cortical callus and of floral buds of explants were not affected by any of the inhibitors. We conclude, in contrast to earlier hypotheses, that FP and CP do not trigger growth and differentiation in the explants. It seems more likely that FP and CP increase in response to auxin and cytokinin in the media. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667407

  14. The Development of DNA Based Methods for the Reliable and Efficient Identification of Nicotiana tabacum in Tobacco and Its Derived Products

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Li, Rong; Li, Sifan; Ping, Wenli; Li, Shujun; Naumova, Alexandra; Peelen, Tamara; Yuan, Zheng; Zhang, Dabing

    2016-01-01

    Reliable methods are needed to detect the presence of tobacco components in tobacco products to effectively control smuggling and classify tariff and excise in tobacco industry to control illegal tobacco trade. In this study, two sensitive and specific DNA based methods, one quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay and the other loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, were developed for the reliable and efficient detection of the presence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in various tobacco samples and commodities. Both assays targeted the same sequence of the uridine 5′-monophosphate synthase (UMPS), and their specificities and sensitivities were determined with various plant materials. Both qPCR and LAMP methods were reliable and accurate in the rapid detection of tobacco components in various practical samples, including customs samples, reconstituted tobacco samples, and locally purchased cigarettes, showing high potential for their application in tobacco identification, particularly in the special cases where the morphology or chemical compositions of tobacco have been disrupted. Therefore, combining both methods would facilitate not only the detection of tobacco smuggling control, but also the detection of tariff classification and of excise. PMID:27635142

  15. The Development of DNA Based Methods for the Reliable and Efficient Identification of Nicotiana tabacum in Tobacco and Its Derived Products.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sukumar; Fan, Wei; Li, Rong; Li, Sifan; Ping, Wenli; Li, Shujun; Naumova, Alexandra; Peelen, Tamara; Kok, Esther; Yuan, Zheng; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Reliable methods are needed to detect the presence of tobacco components in tobacco products to effectively control smuggling and classify tariff and excise in tobacco industry to control illegal tobacco trade. In this study, two sensitive and specific DNA based methods, one quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay and the other loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, were developed for the reliable and efficient detection of the presence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in various tobacco samples and commodities. Both assays targeted the same sequence of the uridine 5'-monophosphate synthase (UMPS), and their specificities and sensitivities were determined with various plant materials. Both qPCR and LAMP methods were reliable and accurate in the rapid detection of tobacco components in various practical samples, including customs samples, reconstituted tobacco samples, and locally purchased cigarettes, showing high potential for their application in tobacco identification, particularly in the special cases where the morphology or chemical compositions of tobacco have been disrupted. Therefore, combining both methods would facilitate not only the detection of tobacco smuggling control, but also the detection of tariff classification and of excise. PMID:27635142

  16. The F-box protein COI1 functions upstream of MYB305 to regulate primary carbohydrate metabolism in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) plays an important role in regulating plant male fertility and secondary metabolism, but its role in regulating primary metabolism remains unclear. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) is a critical component of the JA receptor, and mediates JA-signalling by targeting JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins for proteasomal degradation in response to JA perception. Here, we found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NtCOI1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. TN90) recapitulated many previously observed phenotypes in coi1 mutants, including male sterility, JA insensitivity, and loss of floral anthocyanin production. It also affected starch metabolism in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary, leading to pollen abortion and loss of floral nectar. Transcript levels of genes encoding starch metabolism enzymes were significantly altered in the pollen, anther wall, and floral nectary of NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. Changes in leaf primary metabolism were also observed in the NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. The expression of NtMYB305, an orthologue of MYB305 previously identified as a flavonoid metabolic regulator in Antirrhinum majus flowers and as a floral-nectar regulator mediating starch synthesis in ornamental tobacco, was extremely downregulated in NtCOI1-silenced tobacco. These findings suggest that NtCOI1 functions upstream of NtMYB305 and plays a fundamental role in coordinating plant primary carbohydrate metabolism and correlative physiological processes. PMID:24604735

  17. Expression of ipt gene controlled by an ethylene and auxin responsive fragment of the LEACO1 promoter increases flower number in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Khodakovskaya, Mariya; Zhao, Degang; Smith, William; Li, Yi; McAvoy, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Cytokinins play important roles in regulating plant growth and development. A new genetic construct for regulating cytokinin content in plant cells was cloned and tested. The gene coding for isopentenyl transferase (ipt) was placed under the control of a 0.821 kb fragment of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase gene promoter from Lycopersicon esculentum (LEACO1) and introduced into Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Havana). Some LEACO1(0.821) (kb)-ipt transgenic plant lines displayed normal shoot morphology but with a dramatic increase in the number of flower buds compared to nontransgenic plants. Other transgenic lines produced excessive lateral branch development but no change in flower bud number. Isolated leaves of transgenic tobacco plants showed a significantly prolonged retention of chlorophyll under dark incubation (25 degrees C for 20 days). Leaves of nontransformed plants senesced gradually under the same conditions. Experiments with LEACO1(0.821) (kb)-gus transgenic tobacco plants suggested auxin and ethylene involvement in induction of LEACO1(0.821) (kb) promoter activity. Multiple copies of nucleotide base sequences associated with either ethylene or auxin response elements were identified in the LEACO1(0.821) (kb) promoter fragment. The LEACO1(0.821) (kb)-ipt fusion gene appears to have potential utility for improving certain ornamental and agricultural crop species by increasing flower bud initiation and altering branching habit. PMID:16786314

  18. Type B Phosphatidylinositol-4-Phosphate 5-Kinases Mediate Arabidopsis and Nicotiana tabacum Pollen Tube Growth by Regulating Apical Pectin Secretion[W

    PubMed Central

    Ischebeck, Till; Stenzel, Irene; Heilmann, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] occurs in the apical plasma membrane of growing pollen tubes. Because enzymes responsible for PtdIns(4,5)P2 production at that location are uncharacterized, functions of PtdIns(4,5)P2 in pollen tube tip growth are unresolved. Two candidate genes encoding pollen-expressed Arabidopsis thaliana phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PI4P 5-kinases) of Arabidopsis subfamily B were identified (PIP5K4 and PIP5K5), and their recombinant proteins were characterized as being PI4P 5-kinases. Pollen of T-DNA insertion lines deficient in both PIP5K4 and PIP5K5 exhibited reduced pollen germination and defects in pollen tube elongation. Fluorescence-tagged PIP5K4 and PIP5K5 localized to an apical plasma membrane microdomain in Arabidopsis and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen tubes, and overexpression of either PIP5K4 or PIP5K5 triggered multiple tip branching events. Further studies using the tobacco system revealed that overexpression caused massive apical pectin deposition accompanied by plasma membrane invaginations. By contrast, callose deposition and cytoskeletal structures were unaltered in the overexpressors. Morphological effects depended on PtdIns(4,5)P2 production, as an inactive enzyme variant did not produce any effects. The data indicate that excessive PtdIns(4,5)P2 production by type B PI4P 5-kinases disturbs the balance of membrane trafficking and apical pectin deposition. Polar tip growth of pollen tubes may thus be modulated by PtdIns(4,5)P2 via regulatory effects on membrane trafficking and/or apical pectin deposition. PMID:19060112

  19. Ectopic expression of class 1 KNOX genes induce adventitious shoot regeneration and alter growth and development of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L).

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, C; Liu, Zongrang; Scorza, Ralph

    2011-04-01

    Transgenic plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L) were produced by transforming with the apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKN1 and MdKN2) or corn KNOX1 gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were regenerated in vitro from transformed leaf discs cultured in a medium lacking cytokinin. Ectopic expression of KNOX genes retarded shoot growth by suppressing elongation of internodes in transgenic tobacco plants. Expression of each of the three KNOX1 genes induced malformation and extensive lobbing in tobacco leaves. In situ regeneration of adventitious shoots was observed from leaves and roots of transgenic tobacco plants expressing each of the three KNOX genes. In vitro culture of leaf explants and internode sections excised from in vitro grown MdKN1 expressing tobacco shoots regenerated adventitious shoots on MS (Murashige and Skoog 1962) basal medium in the absence of exogenous cytokinin. Transgenic plum plants that expressed the MdKN2 or corn KNOX1 gene grew normally but MdKN1 caused a significant reduction in plant height, leaf shape and size and produced malformed curly leaves. A high frequency of adventitious shoot regeneration (96%) was observed in cultures of leaf explants excised from corn KNOX1-expressing transgenic plum shoots. In contrast to KNOX1-expressing tobacco, leaf and internode explants of corn KNOX1-expressing plum required synthetic cytokinin (thidiazuron) in the culture medium to induce adventitious shoot regeneration. The induction of high-frequency regeneration of adventitious shoots in vitro from leaves and stem internodal sections of plum through the ectopic expression of a KNOX1 gene is the first such report for a woody perennial fruit trees.

  20. A MADS-box gene NtSVP regulates pedicel elongation by directly suppressing a KNAT1-like KNOX gene NtBPL in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zenglin; Liu, Danmei; Song, Gaoyuan; Kong, Xingchen; Geng, Shuaifeng; Yang, Jiayue; Wang, Bingnan; Wu, Liang; Li, Aili; Mao, Long

    2015-10-01

    Optimal inflorescence architecture is important for plant reproductive success by affecting the ultimate number of flowers that set fruits and for plant competitiveness when interacting with biotic or abiotic conditions. The pedicel is one of the key contributors to inflorescence architecture diversity. To date, knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of pedicel development is derived from Arabidopsis. Not much is known regarding other plants. Here, an SVP family MADS-box gene, NtSVP, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) that is required for pedicel elongation was identified. It is shown that knockdown of NtSVP by RNA interference (RNAi) caused elongated pedicels, while overexpression resulted in compact inflorescences with much shortened pedicels. Moreover, an Arabidopsis BREVIPEDECELLUS/KNAT1 homologue NtBP-Like (NtBPL) was significantly up-regulated in NtSVP-RNAi plants. Disruption of NtBPL decreased pedicel lengths and shortened cortex cells. Consistent with the presence of a CArG-box at the NtBPL promoter, the direct binding of NtSVP to the NtBPL promoter was demonstrated by yeast one-hybrid assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and dual-luciferase assay, in which NtSVP may act as a repressor of NtBPL. Microarray analysis showed that down-regulation of NtBPL resulted in differential expression of genes associated with a number of hormone biogenesis and signalling genes such as those for auxin and gibberellin. These findings together suggest the function of a MADS-box transcription factor in plant pedicel development, probably via negative regulation of a BP-like class I KNOX gene. The present work thus postulates the conservation and divergence of the molecular regulatory pathways underlying the development of plant inflorescence architecture. PMID:26175352

  1. Tolerance to clomazone herbicide is linked to the state of LHC, PQ-pool and ROS detoxification in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Darwish, Majd; Vidal, Véronique; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; Alnaser, Osama; Junglee, Sanders; El Maataoui, Mohamed; Sallanon, Huguette

    2015-03-01

    In this study, plantlets of two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) varieties that are clomazone-tolerant (cv. Xanthi) and clomazone-sensitive (cv. Virginie vk51) were subjected to low concentration of clomazone herbicide. The oxygen-evolving rate of isolated chloroplasts, chlorophyll a fluorescence transients, JIP-test responses, hydrogen peroxide contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, cytohistological results and photosynthetic pigment contents were recorded. The results indicated that the carotenoid content was 2-fold higher in Virginie, which had greater clomazone sensitivity than Xanthi. Virginie exhibited noticeable decreases in the LHC content (Chl a/b ratio), the maximum photochemical quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), the performance index on the absorption basis (PIabs), and the electron flux beyond the first PSII QA evaluated as (1-VJ) with VJ=(FJ-F0)/(Fm-F0) as well as increases in the rate of photon absorption (ABS/RC) and the energy dissipation as heat (DI0/RC). These results suggest that PSII photoinhibition occurred as a consequence of more reduced PQ-pool and accumulated QA(-). The oxygen evolution measurements indicate that PSI electron transport activity was not affected by clomazone. The more significant accumulation of H2O2 in Virginie compared to Xanthi was due to the absence of ROS-scavenging enzymes, and presumably induced programmed cell death (PCD). The symptoms of PCD were observed by cytohistological analysis, which also indicated that the leaf tissues of clomazone-treated Virginie exhibited significant starch accumulation compared to Xanthi. Taken together, these results indicate that the variable tolerance to clomazone observed between Virginie and Xanthi is independent of the carotenoid content and could be related to the state of the LHC, the redox state of the PQ-pool, and the activity of detoxification enzymes.

  2. Nicotiana tabacum EIL2 directly regulates expression of at least one tobacco gene induced by sulphur starvation.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2010-03-01

    Sulphur deficiency severely affects plant growth and their agricultural productivity leading to diverse changes in development and metabolisms. Molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression under low sulphur conditions remain largely unknown. AtSLIM1, a member of the EIN3-like (EIL) family was reported to be a central transcriptional regulator of the plant sulphur response, however, no direct interaction of this protein with any sulphur-responsive promoters was demonstrated. The focus of this study was on the analysis of a promoter region of UP9C, a tobacco gene strongly induced by sulphur limitation. Cloning and subsequent examination of this promoter resulted in the identification of a 20-nt sequence (UPE-box), also present in the promoters of several Arabidopsis genes, including three out of four homologues of UP9C. The UPE-box, consisting of two parallel tebs sequences (TEIL binding site), proved to be necessary to bind the transcription factors belonging to the EIL family and of a 5-nt conserved sequence at the 3'-end. The yeast one-hybrid analysis resulted in the identification of one transcription factor (NtEIL2) capable of binding to the UPE-box. The interactions of NtEIL2, and its homologue from Arabidopsis, AtSLIM1, with DNA were affected by mutations within the UPE-box. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana have further shown that both factors, NtEIL2 and AtSLIM1, activate the UP9C promoter. Interestingly, activation by NtEIL2, but not by AtSLIM1, was dependent on the sulphur-deficiency of the plants.

  3. Synchronous high-resolution phenotyping of leaf and root growth in Nicotiana tabacum over 24-h periods with GROWMAP-plant

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Root growth is highly responsive to temporal changes in the environment. On the contrary, diel (24 h) leaf expansion in dicot plants is governed by endogenous control and therefore its temporal pattern does not strictly follow diel changes in the environment. Nevertheless, root and shoot are connected with each other through resource partitioning and changing environments for one organ could affect growth of the other organ, and hence overall plant growth. Results We developed a new technique, GROWMAP-plant, to monitor growth processes synchronously in leaf and root of the same plant with a high resolution over the diel period. This allowed us to quantify treatment effects on the growth rates of the treated and non-treated organ and the possible interaction between them. We subjected the root system of Nicotiana tabacum seedlings to three different conditions: constant darkness at 22°C (control), constant darkness at 10°C (root cooling), and 12 h/12 h light–dark cycles at 22°C (root illumination). In all treatments the shoot was kept under the same 12 h/12 h light–dark cycles at 22°C. Root growth rates were found to be constant when the root-zone environment was kept constant, although the root cooling treatment significantly reduced root growth. Root velocity was decreased after light-on and light-off events of the root illumination treatment, resulting in diel root growth rhythmicity. Despite these changes in root growth, leaf growth was not affected substantially by the root-zone treatments, persistently showing up to three times higher nocturnal growth than diurnal growth. Conclusion GROWMAP-plant allows detailed synchronous growth phenotyping of leaf and root in the same plant. Root growth was very responsive to the root cooling and root illumination, while these treatments altered neither relative growth rate nor diel growth pattern in the seedling leaf. Our results that were obtained simultaneously in growing leaves and roots of the same

  4. Expression of a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase gene in mesophyll and vascular cells and functions of the enzyme in ammonium assimilation in Nicotiana tabacum (L.).

    PubMed

    Feraud, Magali; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline; Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Pageau, Karine; Lelandais, Maud; Ziegler, Christine; Leboeuf, Edouard; Jouglet, Tiphaine; Viret, Lauriane; Spampinato, Axelle; Paganelli, Vanina; Hammouda, Mounir Ben; Suzuki, Akira

    2005-11-01

    GLU1 encodes the major ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotype Columbia). With the aim of providing clues on the role of Fd-GOGAT, we analyzed the expression of Fd-GOGAT in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). The 5' flanking element of GLU1 directed the expression of the uidA reporter gene in the palisade and spongy parenchyma of mesophyll, in the phloem cells of vascular tissue and in the roots of tobacco. White light, red light or sucrose induced GUS expression in the dark-grown seedlings in a pattern similar to the GLU1 mRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis. The levels of GLU2 mRNA encoding the second Fd-GOGAT and NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT, EC 1.4.1.14) were not affected by light. Both in the light and in darkness, (15)NH4(+) was incorporated into [5-(15)N]glutamine and [2-(15)N]glutamate by glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) and Fd-GOGAT in leaf disks of transgenic tobacco expressing antisense Fd-GOGAT mRNA and in wild-type tobacco. In the light, low level of Fd-glutamate synthase limited the [2-(15)N]glutamate synthesis in transgenic leaf disks. The efficient dark labeling of [2-(15)N]glutamate in the antisense transgenic tobacco leaves indicates that the remaining Fd-GOGAT (15-20% of the wild-type activity) was not the main limiting factor in the dark ammonium assimilation. The antisense tobacco under high CO2 contained glutamine, glutamate, asparagine and aspartate as the bulk of the nitrogen carriers in leaves (62.5%), roots (69.9%) and phloem exudates (53.2%). The levels of glutamate, asparagine and aspartate in the transgenic phloem exudates were similar to the wild-type levels while the glutamine level increased. The proportion of these amino acids remained unchanged in the roots of the transgenic plants. Expression of GLU1 in mesophyll cells implies that Fd-GOGAT assimilates photorespiratory and primary ammonium. GLU1 expression in vascular cells indicates that Fd-GOGAT provides

  5. Herbivory: Caterpillar saliva beats plant defences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musser, Richard O.; Hum-Musser, Sue M.; Eichenseer, Herb; Peiffer, Michelle; Ervin, Gary; Murphy, J. Brad; Felton, Gary W.

    2002-04-01

    Blood-feeding arthropods secrete special salivary proteins that suppress the defensive reaction they induce in their hosts. This is in contrast to herbivores, which are thought to be helpless victims of plant defences elicited by their oral secretions. On the basis of the finding that caterpillar regurgitant can reduce the amount of toxic nicotine released by the tobacco plant Nicotiana tabacum, we investigate here whether specific salivary components from the caterpillar Helicoverpa zea might be responsible for this suppression. We find that the enzyme glucose oxidase counteracts the production of nicotine induced by the caterpillar feeding on the plant.

  6. Functional characterization of a sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase of the cold-resistant grass Bromus pictus by heterelogous expression in Pichia pastoris and Nicotiana tabacum and its involvement in freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Casabuono, Adriana C; Couto, Alicia S; Hopp, H Esteban; Puebla, Andrea F; Heinz, Ruth A

    2011-03-15

    We have previously reported the molecular characterization of a putative sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) of Bromus pictus, a graminean species from Patagonia, tolerant to cold and drought. Here, this enzyme was functionally characterized by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris and Nicotiana tabacum. Recombinant P. pastoris Bp6-SFT showed comparable characteristics to barley 6-SFT and an evident fructosyltransferase activity synthesizing bifurcose from sucrose and 1-kestotriose. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing Bp6-SFT, showed fructosyltransferase activity and fructan accumulation in leaves. Bp6-SFT plants exposed to freezing conditions showed a significantly lower electrolyte leakage in leaves compared to control plants, indicating less membrane damage. Concomitantly these transgenic plants resumed growth more rapidly than control ones. These results indicate that Bp6-SFT transgenic tobacco plants that accumulate fructan showed enhanced freezing tolerance compared to control plants.

  7. Na+/H+ exchanger 1 participates in tobacco disease defence against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae by affecting vacuolar pH and priming the antioxidative system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianyang; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Guo, Jie; Jia, Weitao; Tai, Fang; Nie, Lingling; Jiang, Ping; Feng, Juanjuan; Lv, Sulian; Li, Yinxin

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of NHX1 (Na+/H+ exchanger 1) in plant salt tolerance, little is known about its other functions. In this study, intriguingly, it was found that NHX1 participated in plant disease defence against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae (Ppn) in Nicotiana benthamiana. NbNHX1 was originally isolated from N. benthamiana, and characterized. The subcellular localization of NbNHX1 with its C-terminus fused with green fluorescent protein indicated that NbNHX1 localized primarily to the tonoplast. Tobacco rattle virus-induced NbNHX1 silencing led to reduced H+ efflux from the vacuole to cytoplasts, and decreased Ppn resistance in N. benthamiana. After attack by Ppn, NbNHX1-silenced plants exhibited impaired ability to scavenge reactive oxidative species (ROS) induced by the pathogen. Pea early browning virus-mediated ectopic expression of SeNHX1 (from Salicornia europaea) or AtNHX1 (from Arabidopsis thaliana) both conferred enhanced Ppn resistance to N. benthamiana, with a lower H2O2 concentration after Ppn inoculation. Further investigation of the role of NHX1 demonstrated that transient overexpression of NbNHX1 improved the vacuolar pH and cellular ROS level in N. benthamiana, which was coupled with an enlarged NAD(P) (H) pool and higher expression of ROS-responsive genes. In contrast, NbNHX1 silencing led to a lower pH in the vacuole and a lower cellular ROS level in N. benthamiana, which was coupled with a decreased NAD(P) (H) pool and decreased expression of ROS-responsive genes. These results suggest that NHX1 is involved in plant disease defence; and regulation of vacuolar pH by NHX1, affecting the cellular oxidation state, primes the antioxidative system which is associated with Ppn resistance in tobacco. PMID:25170102

  8. AtRAB-H1b and AtRAB-H1c GTPases, homologues of the yeast Ypt6, target reporter proteins to the Golgi when expressed in Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Jorunn Nergaard; Chow, Cheung-Ming; Moore, Ian; Hawes, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Ypt/Rab GTPases act as key regulators of intracellular traffic through the conformational differences exhibited by their GTP or GDP-bound forms. In this paper, two Arabidopsis Ypt6 homologues, AtRAB-H1(b) and AtRAB-H1(c) were characterized and compared. Using a live cell imaging approach, it is shown that yellow fluorescent protein-fusions (YFP) of AtRAB-H1(b) and AtRAB-H1(c) locate to the Golgi and to the cytosol in both Nicotiana tabacum and in Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition, YFP-AtRAB-H1(b) targets an as yet unknown compartment not labelled by YFP-AtRAB-H1(c) or Golgi markers. It is also shown that the subcellular location of YFP-AtRAB-H1(b) and YFP-AtRAB-H1(c) is affected by the state of GTP-binding and that expression of a GTP-deficient mutant results in increased apoplastic fluorescence of a secretory form of YFP.

  9. Nuclear-encoded chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 of Nicotiana tabacum: characterization of mature protein and isolation and sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding its cytoplasmic precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, G A; Thomas, F J; McCreery, T P; Bourque, D P

    1992-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Petite Havana) leaves was used to prepare a cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. Recombinant phage containing cDNAs coding for chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 were identified and sequenced. Mature tobacco L12 protein has 44% amino acid identity with ribosomal protein L7/L12 of Escherichia coli. The longest L12 cDNA (733 nucleotides) codes for a 13,823 molecular weight polypeptide with a transit peptide of 53 amino acids and a mature protein of 133 amino acids. The transit peptide and mature protein share 43% and 79% amino acid identity, respectively, with corresponding regions of spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. The predicted amino terminus of the mature protein was confirmed by partial sequence analysis of HPLC-purified tobacco chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. A single L12 mRNA of about 0.8 kb was detected by hybridization of L12 cDNA to poly(A)+ and total leaf RNA. Hybridization patterns of restriction fragments of tobacco genomic DNA probed with the L12 cDNA suggested the existence of more than one gene for ribosomal protein L12. Characterization of a second cDNA with an identical L12 coding sequence but a different 3'-noncoding sequence provided evidence that at least two L12 genes are expressed in tobacco. Images PMID:1542565

  10. Cotton GhMKK1 Induces the Tolerance of Salt and Drought Stress, and Mediates Defence Responses to Pathogen Infection in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenjing; Chu, Xiaoqian; Li, Yuzhen; Wang, Chen; Guo, Xingqi

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK) mediate a variety of stress responses in plants. So far little is known on the functional role of MAPKKs in cotton. In the present study, Gossypium hirsutum MKK1 (GhMKK1) function was investigated. GhMKK1 protein may activate its specific targets in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Treatments with salt, drought, and H2O2 induced the expression of GhMKK1 and increased the activity of GhMKK1, while overexpression of GhMKK1 in Nicotiana benthamiana enhanced its tolerance to salt and drought stresses as determined by many physiological data. Additionally, GhMKK1 activity was found to up-regulate pathogen-associated biotic stress, and overexpression of GhMKK1 increased the susceptibility of the transgenic plants to the pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum by reducing the expression of PR genes. Moreover, GhMKK1-overexpressing plants also exhibited an enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging capability and markedly elevated activities of several antioxidant enzymes. These results indicate that GhMKK1 is involved in plants defence responses and provide new data to further analyze the function of plant MAPK pathways. PMID:23844212

  11. Effects of ambient CO{sub 2} concentration on growth and nitrogen use in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants transformed with an antisense gene to the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Masle, J.; Hudson, G.S.; Badger, M.R.

    1993-12-01

    Growth of the R{sub 1} progeny of a tobacco plant (Nicotiana tabacum) transformed with an antisense gene to the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was analyzed under 330 and 930 {mu}bar of CO{sub 2r} at an irradiance of 1000 {mu}mol quanta m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. Rubisco activity was reduced to 30 to 50% and 13 to 18% of that in the wild type when one and two copies of the antisense gene, respectively, were present in the genome, whereas null plants and wild-type plants had similar phenotypes. At 330 {mu}bar of CO{sub 2} all antisense plants were smaller than the wild type. There was no indication that Rubisco is present in excess in the wild type with respect to growth under high light. Raising ambient CO{sub 2} pressure to 930 {mu}bar caused plants with one copy of the DNA transferred from plasmid to plant genome to achieve the same size as the wild type at 330 {mu}bar, but plants with two copies remained smaller. The authors suggest other intrinsic rate-limiting processes independent of carbohydrate supply were involved. Under plentiful nitrogen supply, reduction in the amount of nitrogen invested in Rubisco was more than compensated for by an increase in leaf nitrate. Nitrogen content of organic matter, excluding Rubisco, was unaffected by the antisense gene. In contrast, it was systematically lower at elevated p{sub a} than at normal p{sub a}. Combined with the positive effects of p{sub a} on growth, this resulted in the single-dose antisense plants growing as fast at 930 {mu}bar of CO{sub 2} as the wild-type plants at 330 {mu}bar of CO{sub 2} but at a lower organic nitrogen cost.

  12. Reference genomes and transcriptomes of Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis are members of the Solanaceae family that includes tomato, potato, eggplant and pepper. These two Nicotiana species originate from South America and exhibit different alkaloid and diterpenoid production. N. sylvestris is cultivated largely as an ornamental plant and it has been used as a diploid model system for studies of terpenoid production, plastid engineering, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis are considered to be modern descendants of the maternal and paternal donors that formed Nicotiana tabacum about 200,000 years ago through interspecific hybridization. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of these two Nicotiana species. Results Draft genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis were assembled to 82.9% and 71.6% of their expected size respectively, with N50 sizes of about 80 kb. The repeat content was 72-75%, with a higher proportion of retrotransposons and copia-like long terminal repeats in N. tomentosiformis. The transcriptome assemblies showed that 44,000-53,000 transcripts were expressed in the roots, leaves or flowers. The key genes involved in terpenoid metabolism, alkaloid metabolism and heavy metal transport showed differential expression in the leaves, roots and flowers of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. Conclusions The reference genomes of N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis represent a significant contribution to the SOL100 initiative because, as members of the Nicotiana genus of Solanaceae, they strengthen the value of the already existing resources by providing additional comparative information, thereby helping to improve our understanding of plant metabolism and evolution. PMID:23773524

  13. Cytosolic calcium rises and related events in ergosterol-treated Nicotiana cells.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Parul; Chiltz, Annick; Luini, Estelle; Vandelle, Elodie; Pugin, Alain; Roblin, Gabriel

    2011-07-01

    The typical fungal membrane component ergosterol was previously shown to trigger defence responses and protect plants against pathogens. Most of the elicitors mobilize the second messenger calcium, to trigger plant defences. We checked the involvement of calcium in response to ergosterol using Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi cells expressing apoaequorin in the cytosol. First, it was verified if ergosterol was efficient in these cells inducing modifications of proton fluxes and increased expression of defence-related genes. Then, it was shown that ergosterol induced a rapid and transient biphasic increase of free [Ca²⁺](cyt) which intensity depends on ergosterol concentration in the range 0.002-10 μM. Among sterols, this calcium mobilization was specific for ergosterol and, ergosterol-induced pH and [Ca²⁺](cyt) changes were specifically desensitized after two subsequent applications of ergosterol. Specific modulators allowed elucidating some events in the signalling pathway triggered by ergosterol. The action of BAPTA, LaCl₃, nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, U73122 and ruthenium red suggested that the first phase was linked to calcium influx from external medium which subsequently triggered the second phase linked to calcium release from internal stores. The calcium influx and the [Ca²⁺](cyt) increase depended on upstream protein phosphorylation. The extracellular alkalinization and ROS production depended on calcium influx but, the ergosterol-induced MAPK activation was calcium-independent. ROS were not involved in cytosolic calcium rise as described in other models, indicating that ROS do not systematically participate in the amplification of calcium signalling. Interestingly, ergosterol-induced ROS production is not linked to cell death and ergosterol does not induce any calcium elevation in the nucleus.

  14. Deep sequencing of the ancestral tobacco species Nicotiana tomentosiformis reveals multiple T-DNA inserts and a complex evolutionary history of natural transformation in the genus Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Dorlhac de Borne, François; Szegedi, Ernö; Otten, Léon

    2014-11-01

    Nicotiana species carry cellular T-DNA sequences (cT-DNAs), acquired by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We characterized the cT-DNA sequences of the ancestral Nicotiana tabacum species Nicotiana tomentosiformis by deep sequencing. N. tomentosiformis contains four cT-DNA inserts derived from different Agrobacterium strains. Each has an incomplete inverted-repeat structure. TA is similar to part of the Agrobacterium rhizogenes 1724 mikimopine-type T-DNA, but has unusual orf14 and mis genes. TB carries a 1724 mikimopine-type orf14-mis fragment and a mannopine-agropine synthesis region (mas2-mas1-ags). The mas2' gene codes for an active enzyme. TC is similar to the left part of the A. rhizogenes A4 T-DNA, but also carries octopine synthase-like (ocl) and c-like genes normally found in A. tumefaciens. TD shows a complex rearrangement of T-DNA fragments similar to the right end of the A4 TL-DNA, and including an orf14-like gene and a gene with unknown function, orf511. The TA, TB, TC and TD insertion sites were identified by alignment with N. tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris sequences. The divergence values for the TA, TB, TC and TD repeats provide an estimate for their relative introduction times. A large deletion has occurred in the central part of the N. tabacum cv. Basma/Xanthi TA region, and another deletion removed the complete TC region in N. tabacum. Nicotiana otophora lacks TA, TB and TD, but contains TC and another cT-DNA, TE. This analysis, together with that of Nicotiana glauca and other Nicotiana species, indicates multiple sequential insertions of cT-DNAs during the evolution of the genus Nicotiana.

  15. Genotoxicity of Nicotiana tabacum leaves on Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fernanda R; Erdtmann, Bernardo; Dalpiaz, Tiago; Nunes, Emilene; Ferraz, Alexandre; Martins, Tales L C; Dias, Johny F; da Rosa, Darlan P; Porawskie, Marilene; Bona, Silvia; da Silva, Juliana

    2013-07-01

    Tobacco farmers are routinely exposed to complex mixtures of inorganic and organic chemicals present in tobacco leaves. In this study, we examined the genotoxicity of tobacco leaves in the snail Helix aspersa as a measure of the risk to human health. DNA damage was evaluated using the micronucleus test and the Comet assay and the concentration of cytochrome P450 enzymes was estimated. Two groups of snails were studied: one fed on tobacco leaves and one fed on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L) leaves (control group). All of the snails received leaves (tobacco and lettuce leaves were the only food provided) and water ad libitum. Hemolymph cells were collected after 0, 24, 48 and 72 h. The Comet assay and micronucleus test showed that exposure to tobacco leaves for different periods of time caused significant DNA damage. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes occurred only in the tobacco group. Chemical analysis indicated the presence of the alkaloid nicotine, coumarins, saponins, flavonoids and various metals. These results show that tobacco leaves are genotoxic in H. aspersa and inhibit cytochrome P450 activity, probably through the action of the complex chemical mixture present in the plant. PMID:23885210

  16. Antioxidant defence in UV-irradiated tobacco leaves is centred on hydrogen-peroxide neutralization.

    PubMed

    Majer, Petra; Czégény, Gyula; Sándor, Györgyi; Dix, Philip J; Hideg, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Greenhouse grown tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana) plants were exposed to supplemental UV centred at 318 nm and corresponding to 13.6 kJ m(-2) d(-1) biologically effective UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation. After 6 days this treatment decreased photosynthesis by 30%. Leaves responded by a large increase in UV-absorbing pigment content and antioxidant capacities. UV-stimulated defence against ROS was strongest in chloroplasts, since activities of plastid enzymes FeSOD and APX had larger relative increases than other, non-plastid specific SODs or peroxidases. In addition, non-enzymatic defence against hydroxyl radicals was doubled in UV treated leaves as compared to controls. In UV treated leaves, the extent of activation of ROS neutralizing capacities followed a peroxidases > hydroxyl-radical neutralization > SOD order. These results suggest that highly effective hydrogen peroxide neutralization is the focal point of surviving UV-inducible oxidative stress and argue against a direct signalling role of hydrogen peroxide in maintaining adaptation to UV, at least in laboratory experiments.

  17. Current status and prospects for the study of Nicotiana genomics, genetics, and nicotine biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2015-02-01

    Nicotiana, a member of the Solanaceae family, is one of the most important research model plants, and of high agricultural and economic value worldwide. To better understand the substantial and rapid research progress with Nicotiana in recent years, its genomics, genetics, and nicotine gene studies are summarized, with useful web links. Several important genetic maps, including a high-density map of N. tabacum consisting of ~2,000 markers published in 2012, provide tools for genetics research. Four whole genome sequences are from allotetraploid species, including N. benthamiana in 2012, and three N. tabacum cultivars (TN90, K326, and BX) in 2014. Three whole genome sequences are from diploids, including progenitors N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis in 2013 and N. otophora in 2014. These and additional studies provide numerous insights into genome evolution after polyploidization, including changes in gene composition and transcriptome expression in N. tabacum. The major genes involved in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway have been identified and the genetic basis of the differences in nicotine levels among Nicotiana species has been revealed. In addition, other progress on chloroplast, mitochondrial, and NCBI-registered projects on Nicotiana are discussed. The challenges and prospects for genomic, genetic and application research are addressed. Hence, this review provides important resources and guidance for current and future research and application in Nicotiana.

  18. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed. PMID:25628332

  19. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed.

  20. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  1. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Nicotiana otophora and its Comparison with Related Species.

    PubMed

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul L; Khan, Abdur R; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad A; Lee, Seok-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana otophora is a wild parental species of Nicotiana tabacum, an interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris. However, N. otophora is least understood as an alternative paternal donor. Here, we compared the fully assembled chloroplast (cp) genome of N. otophora and with those of closely related species. The analysis showed a cp genome size of 156,073 bp and exhibited a typical quadripartite structure, which contains a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, containing 163 representative genes, with 165 microsatellites distributed unevenly throughout the genome. Comparative analysis of a gene with known function across Nicotiana species revealed 76 protein-coding sequences, 20 tRNA sequences, and 3 rRNA sequence shared between the cp genomes. The analysis revealed that N. otophora is a sister species to N. tomentosiformis within the Nicotiana genus, and Atropha belladonna and Datura stramonium are their closest relatives. These findings provide a valuable analysis of the complete N. otophora cp genome, which can identify species, elucidate taxonomy, and reconstruct the phylogeny of genus Nicotiana. PMID:27379132

  2. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Nicotiana otophora and its Comparison with Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul L.; Khan, Abdur R.; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad A.; Lee, Seok-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana otophora is a wild parental species of Nicotiana tabacum, an interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris. However, N. otophora is least understood as an alternative paternal donor. Here, we compared the fully assembled chloroplast (cp) genome of N. otophora and with those of closely related species. The analysis showed a cp genome size of 156,073 bp and exhibited a typical quadripartite structure, which contains a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, containing 163 representative genes, with 165 microsatellites distributed unevenly throughout the genome. Comparative analysis of a gene with known function across Nicotiana species revealed 76 protein-coding sequences, 20 tRNA sequences, and 3 rRNA sequence shared between the cp genomes. The analysis revealed that N. otophora is a sister species to N. tomentosiformis within the Nicotiana genus, and Atropha belladonna and Datura stramonium are their closest relatives. These findings provide a valuable analysis of the complete N. otophora cp genome, which can identify species, elucidate taxonomy, and reconstruct the phylogeny of genus Nicotiana. PMID:27379132

  3. Molecular characterization of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRtase) in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, S J; Murphy, K J; Birch, C D; Hamill, J D

    2000-11-01

    Quinolate acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRTase), a key enzyme in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis, also plays an important role in ensuring nicotinic acid is available for the synthesis of defensive pyridine alkaloids in Nicotiana species. In this study, cDNAs for QPRTase were characterized from N. rustica and N. tabacum. Deduced proteins from both cDNAs are almost identical and contain a 24 amino acid N-terminal extension, not reported in other QPRTases, that has characteristics of a mitochondrial targeting sequence. In N. tabacum and N. sylvestris, both of which contain nicotine as the major pyridine alkaloid, QPRTase transcript was detected in roots, the site of nicotine synthesis, but not in leaves. QPRTase transcript levels increased markedly in roots of both species 12-24 h after damage to aerial tissues, with a concomitant rise in transcript levels of putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT), another key enzyme in nicotine biosynthesis. In N. glauca, however, in which anabasine represents the major pyridine alkaloid, QPRTase transcript was detected in both leaf and root tissues. Moreover, wound induction of QPRTase but not PMT was observed in leaf tissues, and not in roots, 12-24 h after wounding. Southern analysis of genomic DNA from the Nicotiana species noted above, and also several others from within the genus, suggested that QPRTase is encoded by a small gene family in all the species investigated. PMID:11198422

  4. A distinct endogenous pararetrovirus family in Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a diploid progenitor of polyploid tobacco.

    PubMed

    Gregor, Wolfgang; Mette, M Florian; Staginnus, Christina; Matzke, Marjori A; Matzke, Antonius J M

    2004-03-01

    A distinct endogenous pararetrovirus (EPRV) family corresponding to a previously unknown virus has been identified in the genome of Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a diploid ancestor of allotetraploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The putative virus giving rise to N. tomentosiformis EPRVs (NtoEPRVs) is most similar to tobacco vein clearing virus, an episomal form of a normally silent EPRV family in Nicotiana glutinosa; it is also related to a putative virus giving rise to the NsEPRV family in Nicotiana sylvestris (the second diploid progenitor of tobacco) and in the N. sylvestris fraction of the tobacco genome. The copy number of NtoEPRVs is significantly higher in N. tomentosiformis than in tobacco. This suggests that after the polyploidization event, many copies were lost from the polyploid genome or were accumulated specifically in the diploid genome. By contrast, the copy number of NsEPRVs has remained constant in N. sylvestris and tobacco, indicating that changes have occurred preferentially in the NtoEPRV family during evolution of the three Nicotiana species. NtoEPRVs are often flanked by Gypsy retrotransposon-containing plant DNA. Although the mechanisms of NtoEPRV integration, accumulation, and/or elimination are unknown, these processes are possibly linked to retrotransposon activity.

  5. PHANTASTICA regulates development of the adaxial mesophyll in Nicotiana leaves.

    PubMed

    McHale, Neil A; Koning, Ross E

    2004-05-01

    Initiation and growth of leaf blades is oriented by an adaxial/abaxial axis aligned with the original axis of polarity in the leaf primordium. To investigate mechanisms regulating this process, we cloned the Nicotiana tabacum ortholog of PHANTASTICA (NTPHAN) and generated a series of antisense transgenics in N. sylvestris. We show that NSPHAN is expressed throughout emerging blade primordia in the wild type and becomes localized to the middle mesophyll in the expanding lamina. Antisense NSPHAN leaves show ectopic expression of NTH20, a class I KNOX gene. Juvenile transgenic leaves have normal adaxial/abaxial polarity and generate leaf blades in the normal position, but the adaxial mesophyll shows disorganized patterns of cell division, delayed maturation of palisade, and ectopic reinitiation of blade primordia along the midrib. Reversal of the phenotype with exogenous gibberellic acid suggests that NSPHAN, acting via KNOX repression, maintains determinacy in the expanding lamina and sustains the patterns of cell proliferation critical to palisade development.

  6. Nicotiana Roots Recruit Rare Rhizosphere Taxa as Major Root-Inhabiting Microbes.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Law, Audrey D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Root-associated microbes have a profound impact on plant health, yet little is known about the distribution of root-associated microbes among different root morphologies or between rhizosphere and root environments. We explore these issues here with two commercial varieties of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing from rhizosphere soil, as well as from primary, secondary, and fine roots. While rhizosphere soils exhibited a fairly rich and even distribution, root samples were dominated by Proteobacteria. A comparison of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between rhizosphere and root samples indicated that Nicotiana roots select for rare taxa (predominantly Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria) from their corresponding rhizosphere environments. The majority of root-inhabiting OTUs (~80 %) exhibited habitat generalism across the different root morphological habitats, although habitat specialists were noted. These results suggest a specific process whereby roots select rare taxa from a larger community.

  7. Rhizosecretion improves the production of Cyanovirin-N in Nicotiana tabacum through simplified downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Luisa M; Szeto, Tim H; Ma, Julian K-C; Drake, Pascal M W

    2016-07-01

    Rhizosecretion has many advantages for the production of recombinant pharmaceuticals, notably facile downstream processing from hydroponic medium. The aim of this study was to increase yields of the HIV microbicide candidate, Cyanovirin-N (CV-N), obtained using this production platform and to develop a simplified methodology for its downstream processing from hydroponic medium. Placing hydroponic cultures on an orbital shaker more than doubled the concentration of CV-N in the hydroponic medium compared to plants which remained stationary, reaching a maximum of approximately 20μg/ml in one week, which is more than 3 times higher than previously reported yields. The protein composition of the hydroponic medium, the rhizosecretome, was characterised in plants cultured with or without the plant growth regulator alpha-napthaleneacetic acid by LC-ESI-MS/MS, and CV-N was the most abundant protein. The issue of large volumes in the rhizosecretion system was addressed by using ion exchange chromatography to concentrate CV-N and partially remove impurities. The semi-purified CV-N was demonstrated to bind to HIV gp120 in an ELISA and to neutralise HIVBa-L with an IC50 of 6nM in a cell-based assay. Rhizosecretion is therefore a practicable and inexpensive method for the production of functional CV-N.

  8. Antibiotics induce genome-wide hypermethylation in cultured Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, F; Oakeley, E J; Jost, J P

    1997-01-17

    Plant genomic DNA methylation was analyzed by an improved SssI methyltransferase assay and by genomic sequencing with sodium bisulfite. Kanamycin, hygromycin, and cefotaxime (also called Claforan) are commonly used as selective agents for the production of transgenic plants. These antibiotics caused DNA hypermethylation in tobacco plants grown in vitro, which was both time- and dose-dependent. An exposure of the plantlets to 500 mg/liter cefotaxime for 1 month caused the de novo methylation of 3 x 10(7) CpG sites/haploid genome of 3.5 x 10(9) base pairs. It occurred in high, moderate, and low repetitive DNA and was not reversible upon the removal of the antibiotics. Reversion was only observed in progeny grown in the absence of drugs. Analysis of the promoter regions of two single-copy genes, an auxin-binding protein gene and the class I chitinase gene, showed the hypermethylation to be heterogeneous but biased toward CpGs. The hypermethylation of the class I chitinase and the auxin-binding protein promoters was not a consequence of a drug-induced gene amplification. PMID:8999825

  9. Expression of a mammalian PCB-metabolizing cytochrome P-450 in Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, V.D.; Galbraith, D.W.; Halpert, J.R.; Bourque, D.P. )

    1991-05-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are resistant to metabolism in most animal species. The dog possesses the unique ability to metabolize and eliminate certain PCB congeners, as a result of the activity of the cytochrome P-450 isozyme PBD-2. An expressible cDNA coding for PBD-2 has been introduced into the genome of tobacco plants. PBD-2 cDNA and a screenable marker gene coding for neomycin phosphotransferase were introduced into tobacco leaf disks using a binary Agrobacterium tumefaciens vector system. Southern and Western blot analyses have confirmed chromosomal integration of the cDNA and expression of the PBD-2 polypeptide. Differential centrifugation and Western blot analyses have shown the PBD-2 protein to be associated with a membrane fraction in transgenic tobacco leaf homogenates. The authors goal is to develop transgenic plants in which the PBD-2 protein metabolizes PCBs, thus providing a novel method for bioremediation of PCB-contaminated soils.

  10. Overexpression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) induces a hypoxic response in Nicotiana tabacum leaves

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Pedro; Okura, Vagner; Pena, Izabella A.; Maia, Renato; Maia, Ivan G.; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) decreases reactive oxygen species production under stress conditions by uncoupling the electrochemical gradient from ATP synthesis. This study combined transcriptome profiling with experimentally induced hypoxia to mechanistically dissect the impact of Arabidopsis thaliana UCP1 (AtUCP1) overexpression in tobacco. Transcriptomic analysis of AtUCP1-overexpressing (P07) and wild-type (WT) plants was carried out using RNA sequencing. Metabolite and carbohydrate profiling of hypoxia-treated plants was performed using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The transcriptome of P07 plants revealed a broad induction of stress-responsive genes that were not strictly related to the mitochondrial antioxidant machinery, suggesting that overexpression of AtUCP1 imposes a strong stress response within the cell. In addition, transcripts that mapped into carbon fixation and energy expenditure pathways were broadly altered. It was found that metabolite markers of hypoxic adaptation, such as alanine and tricarboxylic acid intermediates, accumulated in P07 plants under control conditions at similar rates to WT plants under hypoxia. These findings indicate that constitutive overexpression of AtUCP1 induces a hypoxic response. The metabolites that accumulated in P07 plants are believed to be important in signalling for an improvement in carbon assimilation and induction of a hypoxic response. Under these conditions, mitochondrial ATP production is less necessary and fermentative glycolysis becomes critical to meet cell energy demands. In this scenario, the more flexible energy metabolism along with an intrinsically activated hypoxic response make these plants better adapted to face several biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26494730

  11. Rhizosecretion improves the production of Cyanovirin-N in Nicotiana tabacum through simplified downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Luisa M; Szeto, Tim H; Ma, Julian K-C; Drake, Pascal M W

    2016-07-01

    Rhizosecretion has many advantages for the production of recombinant pharmaceuticals, notably facile downstream processing from hydroponic medium. The aim of this study was to increase yields of the HIV microbicide candidate, Cyanovirin-N (CV-N), obtained using this production platform and to develop a simplified methodology for its downstream processing from hydroponic medium. Placing hydroponic cultures on an orbital shaker more than doubled the concentration of CV-N in the hydroponic medium compared to plants which remained stationary, reaching a maximum of approximately 20μg/ml in one week, which is more than 3 times higher than previously reported yields. The protein composition of the hydroponic medium, the rhizosecretome, was characterised in plants cultured with or without the plant growth regulator alpha-napthaleneacetic acid by LC-ESI-MS/MS, and CV-N was the most abundant protein. The issue of large volumes in the rhizosecretion system was addressed by using ion exchange chromatography to concentrate CV-N and partially remove impurities. The semi-purified CV-N was demonstrated to bind to HIV gp120 in an ELISA and to neutralise HIVBa-L with an IC50 of 6nM in a cell-based assay. Rhizosecretion is therefore a practicable and inexpensive method for the production of functional CV-N. PMID:26901579

  12. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles affect the growth and microRNA expression of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Frazier, Taylor P; Burklew, Caitlin E; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is one of the most widely used pigments in the world. Due to its heavy use in industry and daily life, such as food additives, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and paints, many residues are released into the environment and currently TiO(2) nanoparticles are considered an emerging environmental contaminant. Although several studies have shown the effect of TiO(2) nanoparticles on a wide range of organisms including bacteria, algae, plankton, fish, mice, and rats, little research has been performed on land plants. In this study, we investigated the effect of TiO(2) nanoparticles on the growth, development, and gene expression of tobacco, an important economic and agricultural crop in the southeastern USA as well as around the world. We found that TiO(2) nanoparticles significantly inhibited the germination rates, root lengths, and biomasses of tobacco seedlings after 3 weeks of exposure to 0.1, 1, 2.5, and 5 % TiO(2) nanoparticles and that overall growth and development of the tobacco seedlings significantly decreased as TiO(2) nanoparticle concentrations increased. Overall, tobacco roots were the most sensitive to TiO(2) nanoparticle exposure. Nano-TiO(2) also significantly influenced the expression profiles of microRNAs (miRNAs), a recently discovered class of small endogenous noncoding RNAs (∼20-22 nt) that are considered important gene regulators and have been shown to play an important role in plant development as well as plant tolerance to abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, cold, and heavy metal. Low concentrations (0.1 and 1 %) of TiO(2) nanoparticles dramatically induced miRNA expression in tobacco seedlings with miR395 and miR399 exhibiting the greatest fold changes of 285-fold and 143-fold, respectively. The results of this study show that TiO(2) nanoparticles have a negative impact on tobacco growth and development and that miRNAs may play an important role in tobacco response to heavy metals/nanoparticles by regulating gene expression.

  13. Inhibition of Trehalose Breakdown Increases New Carbon Partitioning into Cellulosic Biomass in Nicotiana tabacum

    SciTech Connect

    Best, F.M.; Ferrieri, R.; Best, F.M.; Koenig, K.; McDonald, K.; Schueller, M.J.; Rogers, A.; Ferrieri, R.A.

    2011-01-18

    Validamycin A was used to inhibit in vivo trehalase activity in tobacco enabling the study of subsequent changes in new C partitioning into cellulosic biomass and lignin precursors. After 12-h exposure to treatment, plants were pulse labeled using radioactive {sup 11}CO{sub 2}, and the partitioning of isotope was traced into [{sup 11}C]cellulose and [{sup 11}C]hemicellulose, as well as into [{sup 11}C]phenylalanine, the precursor for lignin. Over this time course of treatment, new carbon partitioning into hemicellulose and cellulose was increased, while new carbon partitioning into phenylalanine was decreased. This trend was accompanied by a decrease in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity. After 4 d of exposure to validamycin A, we also measured leaf protein content and key C and N metabolite pools. Extended treatment increased foliar cellulose and starch content, decreased sucrose, and total amino acid and nitrate content, and had no effect on total protein.

  14. Exogenous jasmonic acid induces stress tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exposed to imazapic.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Armagan; Doganlar, Zeynep Banu

    2016-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is one of the important phytohormones, regulating the stress responses as well as plant growth and development. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of exogenous JA application on stress responses of tobacco plant exposed to imazapic. In this study, phytotoxic responses resulting from both imazapic and imazapic combined with JA treatment are investigated comparatively for tobacco plants. For plants treated with imazapic at different concentrations (0.030, 0.060 and 0.120mM), antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase), carotenoids, glutathione and malondialdehyte (MDA) contents, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid and indole-3-acetic acid levels as well as herbicide residue amounts on leaves increased in general compared to the control group. In the plants treated with 45µM jasmonic acid, pigment content, antioxidant activity and phytohormone level increased whereas MDA content and the amount of herbicidal residue decreased compared to the non-treated plants. Our findings show that imazapic treatment induces some phytotoxic responses on tobacco leaves and that exogenous jasmonic acid treatment alleviates the negative effects of herbicide treatment by regulating these responses. PMID:26629659

  15. Characterisation of detergent-insoluble membranes in pollen tubes of Nicotiana tabacum (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Moscatelli, Alessandra; Gagliardi, Assunta; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Bini, Luca; Stroppa, Nadia; Onelli, Elisabetta; Landi, Claudia; Scali, Monica; Idilli, Aurora Irene; Moreau, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pollen tubes are the vehicle for sperm cell delivery to the embryo sac during fertilisation of Angiosperms. They provide an intriguing model for unravelling mechanisms of growing to extremes. The asymmetric distribution of lipids and proteins in the pollen tube plasma membrane modulates ion fluxes and actin dynamics and is maintained by a delicate equilibrium between exocytosis and endocytosis. The structural constraints regulating polarised secretion and asymmetric protein distribution on the plasma membrane are mostly unknown. To address this problem, we investigated whether ordered membrane microdomains, namely membrane rafts, might contribute to sperm cell delivery. Detergent insoluble membranes, rich in sterols and sphingolipids, were isolated from tobacco pollen tubes. MALDI TOF/MS analysis revealed that actin, prohibitins and proteins involved in methylation reactions and in phosphoinositide pattern regulation are specifically present in pollen tube detergent insoluble membranes. Tubulins, voltage-dependent anion channels and proteins involved in membrane trafficking and signalling were also present. This paper reports the first evidence of membrane rafts in Angiosperm pollen tubes, opening new perspectives on the coordination of signal transduction, cytoskeleton dynamics and polarised secretion. PMID:25701665

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Tanaka, Nobukazu; Esaka, Muneharu

    2012-01-01

    L-Galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPPase) is an enzyme involved in ascorbate biosynthesis in higher plants. We isolated a cDNA encoding GPPase from tobacco, and named it NtGPPase. The putative amino acid sequence of NtGPPase contained inositol monophosphatase motifs and metal binding sites. Recombinant NtGPPase hydrolyzed not only L-galactose-1-phosphate, but also myo-inositol-1-phosphate. The optimum pH for the GPPase activity of NtGPPase was 7.5. Its enzyme activity required Mg2+, and was inhibited by Li+ and Ca2+. Its fluorescence, fused with green fluorescence protein in onion cells and protoplasts of tobacco BY-2 cells, was observed in both the cytosol and nucleus. The expression of NtGPPase mRNA and protein was clearly correlated with L-ascorbic acid (AsA) contents of BY-2 cells during culture. The AsA contents of NtGPPase over expression lines were higher than those of empty lines at 13 d after subculture. This suggests that NtGPPase contributes slightly to AsA biosynthesis. PMID:22790939

  17. Isonitrosoacetophenone Drives Transcriptional Reprogramming in Nicotiana tabacum Cells in Support of Innate Immunity and Defense

    PubMed Central

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T.; Maake, Mmapula P.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to various stress stimuli by activating broad-spectrum defense responses both locally as well as systemically. As such, identification of expressed genes represents an important step towards understanding inducible defense responses and assists in designing appropriate intervention strategies for disease management. Genes differentially expressed in tobacco cell suspensions following elicitation with isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP) were identified using mRNA differential display and pyro-sequencing. Sequencing data produced 14579 reads, which resulted in 198 contigs and 1758 singletons. Following BLAST analyses, several inducible plant defense genes of interest were identified and classified into functional categories including signal transduction, transcription activation, transcription and protein synthesis, protein degradation and ubiquitination, stress-responsive, defense-related, metabolism and energy, regulation, transportation, cytoskeleton and cell wall-related. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the expression of 17 selected target genes within these categories. Results indicate that INAP has a sensitising or priming effect through activation of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid- and ethylene pathways that result in an altered transcriptome, with the expression of genes involved in perception of pathogens and associated cellular re-programming in support of defense. Furthermore, infection assays with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci confirmed the establishment of a functional anti-microbial environment in planta. PMID:25658943

  18. Regulation of catalase activity in leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris by high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Havir, E.A.; McHale, N.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The effect of high CO{sub 2} (1% CO{sub 2}/21% O{sub 2}) on the activity of specific forms of catalase (CAT-1, -2, and -3) in seedling leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum) was examined. In high CO{sub 2} total catalase activity decreased by 50% in the first 2 days, followed by a more gradual decline in the next 4 days. The loss of total activity resulted primarily from a decrease in CAT-1 catalase. In contrast, the activity of CAT-3 catalase, a form with enhanced peroxidatic activity, increased 3-fold in high CO{sub 2} relative to air controls after 4 days. Short-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} indicated that the 50% loss of total activity occurs in the firs 12 hours. Catalase levels increased to normal within 12 hours after seedlings were returned to air. When seedlings were transferred to air after prolonged exposure to high CO{sub 2} (13 days), the levels of CAT-1 catalase were partially restored while CAT-3 remained at its elevated level. Levels of superoxide dismutase activity and those of several peroxisomal enzymes were not affected by high CO{sub 2}. Total catalase levels did not decline when seedlings were exposed to atmospheres of 0.04% CO{sub 2}/5% O{sub 2} or 0.04% CO{sub 2}/1% O{sub 2}, indicating that regulation of catalase in high CO{sub 2} is not related directly to suppression of photorespiration. Antibodies prepared against CAT-1 catalase from N. tabacum reacted strongly against CAT-1 catalase from both N. sylvestris and N. tabacum but not against CAT-3 catalase from either species.

  19. Comparison of the hypersensitive response induced by the tomato Cf-4 and Cf-9 genes in Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C M; Tang, S; Hammond-Kosack, K; Jones, J D

    2000-04-01

    We have previously shown that tomato Cf-9 induces an Avr9-dependent hypersensitive response (HR) in Nicotiana tabacum and potato. We show here that Cf-4 also induces an Avr4-dependent HR in two tobacco species (N. tabacum and N. benthamiana). The HR induced by Cf-4 and Cf-9 was compared in stable tobacco transgenics by a seedling lethal assay and resistance to recombinant Potato virus X expressing Avr4 or Avr9. We also compared HR induction with Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression. The Cf-4/Avr4 combination induced a more rapid HR than Cf-9/Avr9. Sensitive assays for Cf-9 and Cf-4 function should prove useful for structure/function analyses of these resistance proteins in tobacco. PMID:10755310

  20. Nicotiana Small RNA Sequences Support a Host Genome Origin of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Satellite RNA

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Neil A.; Schumann, Ulrike; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Dennis, Elizabeth S.; Zhang, Ren; Guo, Hui-Shan; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Satellite RNAs (satRNAs) are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS) transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat) sequence (35S-GUS:Sat) was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs. PMID:25568943

  1. Diverse opportunities in defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gareth

    2016-08-01

    Working at the UK's defence laboratory gives Gareth Brown the ability to apply his physics and mathematics knowledge to real-world applications - and not necessarily in the ways you might expect. This article is Crown copyright

  2. The effect of polyploidy and hybridization on the evolution of floral colour in Nicotiana (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W.; Arnold, Sarah E. J.; Chittka, Lars; Le Comber, Steven C.; Verity, Robert; Dodsworth, Steven; Knapp, Sandra; Kelly, Laura J.; Chase, Mark W.; Baldwin, Ian T.; Kovařík, Aleš; Mhiri, Corinne; Taylor, Lin; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Speciation in angiosperms can be accompanied by changes in floral colour that may influence pollinator preference and reproductive isolation. This study investigates whether changes in floral colour can accompany polyploid and homoploid hybridization, important processes in angiosperm evolution. Methods Spectral reflectance of corolla tissue was examined for 60 Nicotiana (Solanaceae) accessions (41 taxa) based on spectral shape (corresponding to pigmentation) as well as bee and hummingbird colour perception in order to assess patterns of floral colour evolution. Polyploid and homoploid hybrid spectra were compared with those of their progenitors to evaluate whether hybridization has resulted in floral colour shifts. Key Results Floral colour categories in Nicotiana seem to have arisen multiple times independently during the evolution of the genus. Most younger polyploids displayed an unexpected floral colour, considering those of their progenitors, in the colour perception of at least one pollinator type, whereas older polyploids tended to resemble one or both of their progenitors. Conclusions Floral colour evolution in Nicotiana is weakly constrained by phylogeny, and colour shifts do occur in association with both polyploid and homoploid hybrid divergence. Transgressive floral colour in N. tabacum has arisen by inheritance of anthocyanin pigmentation from its paternal progenitor while having a plastid phenotype like its maternal progenitor. Potentially, floral colour evolution has been driven by, or resulted in, pollinator shifts. However, those polyploids that are not sympatric (on a regional scale) with their progenitor lineages are typically not divergent in floral colour from them, perhaps because of a lack of competition for pollinators. PMID:25979919

  3. The insanity defence.

    PubMed

    Milliken, A D

    1985-08-01

    The recent A.P.A. Statement on the Insanity Defence is a document important to all psychiatrists and medicolegal professionals in North America. Its contents are reviewed and contrasted with current Canadian practice on the insanity defence, as well as the proposals of the Mental Disorder Project of the Canadian Department of Justice. The American Psychiatric Association's proposal on the definition of mental disorder is contrasted with the current practice. It is also suggested that the proposal of the Mental Disorder Project to change the disposition of insanity acquittees will lead to difficulties similar to those which provoked the current crisis in the United States.

  4. Leaf surface chemicals fromNicotiana affecting germination ofPeronospora tabacina (adam) sporangia.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B S; Nielsen, M T; Severson, R F; Sisson, V A; Stephenson, M K; Jackson, D M

    1992-09-01

    A bioassay was used to evaluate the effects of cuticular leaf components, isolated fromN. tabacum, N. glutinosa (accessions 24 and 24a), and 23other Nicotiana species, on germinationof P. tabacina (blue mold). The leaf surface compounds includedα- andβ-4,8,13,-duvatriene-l,3-diols (DVT-diols), (13-E)-labda-13-ene-8α-,15-diol (labdenediol), (12-Z)-labda-12,14-diene-8α-ol (cis-abienol), (13-R)-labda-8,14-diene-13-ol (manool), 2-hydroxymanool, a mixture of (13-R)-labda-14-ene-8α,13-diol (sclareol), and (13-S)-labda-14-ene-8α,13-diol (episclareol), and various glucose and/or sucrose ester isolates. The above in acetone were applied onto leaf disks of the blue moldsusceptibleN. tabacum cv. TI 1406, which was then inoculated with blue mold sporangia. Estimated IC50 values (inhibitory concentration) were 3.0μg/cm(2) forα-DVT-diol, 2.9μ/cm(2) forβ-DVT-diol, 0.4μg/cm(2) for labdenediol and 4.7μg/cm(2) for the sclareol mixture. Manool, 2-hydroxymanool, andcis-abienol at application rates up to 30μg/cm(2) had little or no effect on sporangium germination. Glucose and/or sucrose ester isolates from the cuticular leaf extracts of 23Nicotiana species and three different fractions fromN. bigelovii were also evaluated for antimicrobial activity at a concentration of 30μg/cm(2). Germination was inhibited by >20% when exposed to sugar esters isolated fromN. acuminata, N. benthamiana, N. attenuata, N. clevelandii, andN. miersii, and accessions 10 and 12 ofN. bigelovii. These results imply that a number of compounds may influence resistance to blue mold in tobacco. PMID:24254279

  5. Visual monitoring of Cucumber mosaic virus infection in Nicotiana benthamiana following transmission by the aphid vector Myzus persicae.

    PubMed

    Krenz, Bjoern; Bronikowski, Agathe; Lu, Xiaoyun; Ziebell, Heiko; Thompson, Jeremy R; Perry, Keith L

    2015-09-01

    The single-stranded, positive-sense and tripartite RNA virus Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was used in this study as a method for monitoring the initial stages of virus infection following aphid transmission. The RNA2 of CMV was modified to incorporate, in a variety of arrangements, an open reading frame (ORF) encoding an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The phenotypes of five engineered RNA2s were tested in Nicotiana tabacum, Nicotiana clevelandii and Nicotiana benthamiana. Only one construct (F4), in which the 2b ORF was truncated at the 3' end and fused in-frame with the eGFP ORF, was able to systemically infect N. benthamiana plants, express eGFP and be transmitted by the aphid Myzus persicae. The utility of this construct was demonstrated following infection as early as one day post-transmission (dpt) continuing through to systemic infection. Comparisons of the inoculation sites in different petiole sections one to three dpt clearly showed that the onset of infection and eGFP expression always occurred in the epidermal or collenchymatous tissue just below the epidermis; an observation consistent with the rapid time frame characteristic of the non-persistent mode of aphid transmission. PMID:25979730

  6. S-glycoprotein-like protein regulates defense responses in Nicotiana plants against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Maimbo, Milimo; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2010-04-01

    RsRGA4 (for Ralstonia solanacearum-responsive gene A4) encodes a polypeptide similar to S-locus glycoprotein (SGP) from Brassica rapa and SGP-like proteins from Ipomoea trifida and Medicago truncatula. Therefore, we designated RsRGA4 as NtSGLP (for Nicotiana tabacum SGP-like protein) and NbSGLP (its Nicotiana benthamiana ortholog). NbSGLP is expressed in root, leaf, petal, gynoecium, and stamen. Expression of NbSGLP was strongly induced by inoculation with an avirulent strain of R. solanacearum (Rs8107) and slightly enhanced by inoculation with virulent R. solanacearum (RsOE1-1). Expression of NbSGLP was induced by inoculation with an hrpY-deficient mutant of RsOE1-1 and Rs8107. Expression was also induced by aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid and salicylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSGLP enhanced the growth of Rs8107. Growth of RsOE1-1 and appearance of wilt symptoms were also accelerated in silenced plants. Expression of PR-1a and EREBP was reduced, and markers for basal defense, such as callose deposition and reduced vascular flow, were compromised in NbSGLP-silenced plants. Moreover, growth of Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci, and P. syringae pv mellea was also enhanced in the silenced plants. On the other hand, silencing of NbSGLP did not interfere with the appearance of the hypersensitive response. NbSGLP was secreted in a signal peptide-dependent manner. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression of NbSGLP induced PR-1a and EREBP expression, callose deposition, and reduced vascular flow. NbSGLP-induced callose deposition and reduced vascular flow were not observed in salicylic acid-deficient N. benthamiana NahG plants. Taken together, SGLP might have a role in the induction of basal defense in Nicotiana plants.

  7. S-glycoprotein-like protein regulates defense responses in Nicotiana plants against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Maimbo, Milimo; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2010-04-01

    RsRGA4 (for Ralstonia solanacearum-responsive gene A4) encodes a polypeptide similar to S-locus glycoprotein (SGP) from Brassica rapa and SGP-like proteins from Ipomoea trifida and Medicago truncatula. Therefore, we designated RsRGA4 as NtSGLP (for Nicotiana tabacum SGP-like protein) and NbSGLP (its Nicotiana benthamiana ortholog). NbSGLP is expressed in root, leaf, petal, gynoecium, and stamen. Expression of NbSGLP was strongly induced by inoculation with an avirulent strain of R. solanacearum (Rs8107) and slightly enhanced by inoculation with virulent R. solanacearum (RsOE1-1). Expression of NbSGLP was induced by inoculation with an hrpY-deficient mutant of RsOE1-1 and Rs8107. Expression was also induced by aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid and salicylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSGLP enhanced the growth of Rs8107. Growth of RsOE1-1 and appearance of wilt symptoms were also accelerated in silenced plants. Expression of PR-1a and EREBP was reduced, and markers for basal defense, such as callose deposition and reduced vascular flow, were compromised in NbSGLP-silenced plants. Moreover, growth of Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci, and P. syringae pv mellea was also enhanced in the silenced plants. On the other hand, silencing of NbSGLP did not interfere with the appearance of the hypersensitive response. NbSGLP was secreted in a signal peptide-dependent manner. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression of NbSGLP induced PR-1a and EREBP expression, callose deposition, and reduced vascular flow. NbSGLP-induced callose deposition and reduced vascular flow were not observed in salicylic acid-deficient N. benthamiana NahG plants. Taken together, SGLP might have a role in the induction of basal defense in Nicotiana plants. PMID:20118275

  8. Effect of calcium carbonate on cadmium and nutrients uptake in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) planted on contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Ai; Li, Fan; Zhou, Hang; Qin, Xiao-Li; Zou, Zi-Jin; Tian, Tao; Zeng, Min; Liao, Bo-Han

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was applied to Cd-contaminated soil at rates of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 g kg(-1). The effect of CaCO3 on soil pH, organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd and level of major nutrients in a tobacco field and on accumulation of various elements in tobacco plants was determined. The results showed that CaCO3 application significantly increased the pH level, available P and exchangeable Ca but decreased organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd, available heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) and available K in soil. Additionally, CaCO3 application substantially reduced Cd accumulation in tobacco roots, stems, upper leaves, middle leaves and lower leaves, with maximum decrease of 22.3%, 32.1%, 24.5%, 22.0% and 18.2%, respectively. There were large increase in total Ca and slight increases in total N and K but decrease to varying degrees in total Fe, Cu and Zn due to CaCO3 application. CaCO3 had little effect on total P and Mn levels in tobacco leaves.

  9. The role of gluconate production by Pseudomonas spp. in the mineralization and bioavailability of calcium-phytate to Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Giles, Courtney D; Hsu, Pei-Chun Lisa; Richardson, Alan E; Hurst, Mark R H; Hill, Jane E

    2015-12-01

    Organic phosphorus (P) is abundant in most soils but is largely unavailable to plants. Pseudomonas spp. can improve the availability of P to plants through the production of phytases and organic anions. Gluconate is a major component of Pseudomonas organic anion production and may therefore play an important role in the mineralization of insoluble organic P forms such as calcium-phytate (CaIHP). Organic anion and phytase production was characterized in 2 Pseudomonas spp. soil isolates (CCAR59, Ha200) and an isogenic mutant of strain Ha200, which lacked a functional glucose dehydrogenase (Gcd) gene (strain Ha200 gcd::Tn5B8). Wild-type and mutant strains of Pseudomonas spp. were evaluated for their ability to solubilize and hydrolyze CaIHP and to promote the growth and assimilation of P by tobacco plants. Gluconate, 2-keto-gluconate, pyruvate, ascorbate, acetate, and formate were detected in Pseudomonas spp. supernatants. Wild-type pseudomonads containing a functional gcd could produce gluconate and mineralize CaIHP, whereas the isogenic mutant could not. Inoculation with Pseudomonas improved the bioavailability of CaIHP to tobacco plants, but there was no difference in plant growth response due to Gcd function. Gcd function is required for the mineralization of CaIHP in vitro; however, further studies will be needed to quantify the relative contribution of specific organic anions such as gluconate to plant growth promotion by soil pseudomonads.

  10. Role of transpiration and metabolism in translocation and accumulation of cadmium in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiwei; Wang, Haiyun; Ma, Yibing; Wang, Haohao; Shi, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Tobacco plants grown in pots and in hydroponic culture accumulated cadmium (Cd) particularly: the Cd content of tobacco leaves exceeded 100 mg/kg and the enrichment factor (the ratio of Cd in leaves to that in soil) was more than 4. These high levels of accumulation identify tobacco as a hyperaccumulator of Cd. Two transpiration inhibitors (paraffin or CaCl2) and shade decreased the Cd content of tobacco leaves, and the decrease showed a linear relationship with the leaf transpiration rate. A metabolism inhibitor, namely 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), and low temperature (4 °C) also lowered the Cd content of tobacco leaves, but the inhibitory effect of low temperature was greater. In the half number of leaves that were shaded, the Cd content decreased to 26.5% of that in leaves that were not shaded in the same tobacco plants. These results suggests that translocation of Cd from the medium to the leaves is driven by the symplastic and the apoplastic pathways. Probably, of the two crucial steps in the translocation of Cd in tobacco plants, one, namely uptake from the medium to the xylem, is energy-dependent whereas the other, namely the transfer from the xylem to the leaves, is driven mainly by transpiration.

  11. Genome-wide identification of chromium stress-responsive micro RNAs and their target genes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) roots.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Asad Hussain; Shang, Shenghua; Zhang, Mian; Zheng, Weite; Zhang, Guoping; Wang, Ting-Zhang; Shamsi, Imran Haider; Wu, Feibo

    2015-11-01

    Tobacco easily accumulates certain heavy metals in leaves and thus poses a potential threat to human health. To systematically dissect Cr-responsive microRNAs (miRNAs) and their targets at the global level, 4 small RNA libraries were constructed from the roots of Cr-treated (Cr) and Cr-free (control) for 2 contrasting tobacco genotypes,Yunyan2 (Cr-sensitive) and Guiyan1 (Cr-tolerant). Using high-throughput-sequencing-technology, the authors identified 53 conserved and 29 novel miRNA families. Comparative genomic analysis of 41 conserved Cr-responsive miRNA families revealed that 11 miRNA families showed up-regulation in Guiyan1 but unaltered in Yunyan2, and 17 miRNA families were up-regulated only in Yunyan2 under Cr stress. Only 1 family, miR6149, was down-regulated in Yunyan2 but remained unchanged in Guiyan1. Of the 29 novel miRNA families, 14 expressed differently in the 2 genotypes under Cr stress. Based on a high-throughput degradome sequencing homology search, potential targets were predicted for the 41 conserved and 14 novel Cr-responsive miRNA families. Clusters of Orthologous Groups functional category analysis revealed that some of these predicted target transcripts of miRNAs are responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses. Furthermore, the expression patterns of many Cr-responsive miRNAs were validated by stem-loop real-time transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study provide valuable information and a framework for understanding the function of miRNAs in Cr tolerance.

  12. Role of transpiration and metabolism in translocation and accumulation of cadmium in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiwei; Wang, Haiyun; Ma, Yibing; Wang, Haohao; Shi, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Tobacco plants grown in pots and in hydroponic culture accumulated cadmium (Cd) particularly: the Cd content of tobacco leaves exceeded 100 mg/kg and the enrichment factor (the ratio of Cd in leaves to that in soil) was more than 4. These high levels of accumulation identify tobacco as a hyperaccumulator of Cd. Two transpiration inhibitors (paraffin or CaCl2) and shade decreased the Cd content of tobacco leaves, and the decrease showed a linear relationship with the leaf transpiration rate. A metabolism inhibitor, namely 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), and low temperature (4 °C) also lowered the Cd content of tobacco leaves, but the inhibitory effect of low temperature was greater. In the half number of leaves that were shaded, the Cd content decreased to 26.5% of that in leaves that were not shaded in the same tobacco plants. These results suggests that translocation of Cd from the medium to the leaves is driven by the symplastic and the apoplastic pathways. Probably, of the two crucial steps in the translocation of Cd in tobacco plants, one, namely uptake from the medium to the xylem, is energy-dependent whereas the other, namely the transfer from the xylem to the leaves, is driven mainly by transpiration. PMID:26547876

  13. Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase overexpression modifies antioxidant defense against heat, drought and their combination in Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Lubovská, Zuzana; Dobrá, Jana; Storchová, Helena; Wilhelmová, Naďa; Vanková, Radomíra

    2014-11-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) as well as the antioxidant enzyme system (AES) play important roles in plant stress responses. The expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes (AE) were determined in drought, heat and combination of both stresses, comparing the response of tobacco plants overexpressing the main cytokinin degrading enzyme, cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase, under the control of root-specific WRKY6 promoter (W6:CKX1 plants) or constitutive promoter (35S:CKX1 plants) and the corresponding wild-type (WT). Expression levels as well as activities of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase, catalase 3, and cytosolic superoxide dismutase were low under optimal conditions and increased after heat and combined stress in all genotypes. Unlike catalase 3, two other peroxisomal enzymes, catalase 1 and catalase 2, were transcribed extensively under control conditions. Heat stress, in contrast to drought or combined stress, increased catalase 1 and reduced catalase 2 expression in WT and W6:CKX1 plants. In 35S:CKX1, catalase 1 expression was enhanced by heat or drought, but not under combined stress conditions. Mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression was generally higher in 35S:CKX1 plants than in WT. Genes encoding for chloroplastic AEs, stromatal ascorbate peroxidase, thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase and chloroplastic superoxide dismutase, were strongly transcribed under control conditions. All stresses down-regulated their expression in WT and W6:CKX1, whereas more stress-tolerant 35S:CKX1 plants maintained high expression during drought and heat. The achieved data show that the effect of down-regulation of CK levels on AES may be mediated by altered habit, resulting in improved stress tolerance, which is associated with diminished stress impact on photosynthesis, and changes in source/sink relations.

  14. Effect of calcium carbonate on cadmium and nutrients uptake in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) planted on contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Ai; Li, Fan; Zhou, Hang; Qin, Xiao-Li; Zou, Zi-Jin; Tian, Tao; Zeng, Min; Liao, Bo-Han

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was applied to Cd-contaminated soil at rates of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 g kg(-1). The effect of CaCO3 on soil pH, organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd and level of major nutrients in a tobacco field and on accumulation of various elements in tobacco plants was determined. The results showed that CaCO3 application significantly increased the pH level, available P and exchangeable Ca but decreased organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd, available heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) and available K in soil. Additionally, CaCO3 application substantially reduced Cd accumulation in tobacco roots, stems, upper leaves, middle leaves and lower leaves, with maximum decrease of 22.3%, 32.1%, 24.5%, 22.0% and 18.2%, respectively. There were large increase in total Ca and slight increases in total N and K but decrease to varying degrees in total Fe, Cu and Zn due to CaCO3 application. CaCO3 had little effect on total P and Mn levels in tobacco leaves. PMID:26930875

  15. RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Transcriptomic Variations in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Leaves Affected by Climate, Soil, and Tillage Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Bo; Lu, Kun; Ding, Fuzhang; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Yi; Zhao, Huina; Zhang, Lin; Ren, Zhu; Qu, Cunmin; Guo, Wenjing; Wang, Jing; Pan, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    The growth and development of plants are sensitive to their surroundings. Although numerous studies have analyzed plant transcriptomic variation, few have quantified the effect of combinations of factors or identified factor-specific effects. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis on tobacco leaves derived from 10 treatment combinations of three groups of ecological factors, i.e., climate factors (CFs), soil factors (SFs), and tillage factors (TFs). We detected 4980, 2916, and 1605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that were affected by CFs, SFs, and TFs, which included 2703, 768, and 507 specific and 703 common DEGs (simultaneously regulated by CFs, SFs, and TFs), respectively. GO and KEGG enrichment analyses showed that genes involved in abiotic stress responses and secondary metabolic pathways were overrepresented in the common and CF-specific DEGs. In addition, we noted enrichment in CF-specific DEGs related to the circadian rhythm, SF-specific DEGs involved in mineral nutrient absorption and transport, and SF- and TF-specific DEGs associated with photosynthesis. Based on these results, we propose a model that explains how plants adapt to various ecological factors at the transcriptomic level. Additionally, the identified DEGs lay the foundation for future investigations of stress resistance, circadian rhythm and photosynthesis in tobacco. PMID:24733065

  16. Effects of dermal exposure to Nicotiana tabacum (Jean Nicot, 1560) leaves in mouse evaluated by multiple methods and tissues.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Fernanda R; Erdtmann, Bernardo; Dalpiaz, Tiago; Nunes, Emilene; Da Rosa, Darlan P; Porawski, Marilene; Bona, Sílvia; Simon, Caroline F; Da C Allgayer, Mariangela; Da Silva, Juliana

    2010-09-01

    Tobacco farmers are routinely exposed to complex mixtures of the compounds present in tobacco leaves, including organic and inorganic pesticides. Penetration through skin is the most significant route of uptake in occupational exposure to chemicals, including dust and liquids containing toxic and carcinogenic substances. This study evaluates the genotoxic effect of tobacco leaves with and without dermal exposure to flumetralin in Mus musculus, determining cell damage by the micronucleus test and the Comet assay as well as antioxidant enzyme activities and hematologic parameters. Nicotine was used as positive control. Blood samples were collected for 0, 3, 24 and 48 h exposure periods, and DNA damage by Comet assay and micronucleus test was evaluated for all these periods. Bone marrow and liver cells were also evaluated for the 48 h exposure period. Significant differences between Comet assay results in blood cells from animals exposed to tobacco leaves with and without pesticide were found in 24 and 48 h exposure periods in relation to negative control. Bone marrow cells from the group exposed to leaves with pesticide (48 h) also demonstrated significant increase in DNA damage. Concerning the micronucleus test, only animals exposed to tobacco leaves without pesticide (24 h) showed increase in frequency of micronuclei when compared to the negative control. Oxidative stress activities also were demonstrated for different groups. The results demonstrate the injury effect caused by tobacco leaves in different Mus musculus tissues, suggesting that the effects of dermal exposure to tobacco leaves are caused by complex mixtures present in the plant, but mainly by nicotine. PMID:20684553

  17. Isolation and compositional analysis of a CP12-associated complex of calvin cycle enzymes from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Marri, Lucia; Sparla, Francesca; Salvucci, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Two Calvin Cycle enzymes, NAD(P)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) form a multiprotein complex with CP12, a small intrinsically-unstructured protein. Under oxidizing conditions, association with CP12 confers redox-sensitivity to the otherwise redox-insensitive A isoform of GAPDH (GapA) and provides an additional level of down-regulation to the redox-regulated PRK. To determine if CP12-mediated regulation is specific for GAPDH and PRK in vivo, a high molecular weight complex containing CP12 was isolated from tobacco chloroplasts and leaves and its protein composition was characterized. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analyses after separation of stromal proteins by size fractionation verified that the GAPDH (both isoforms) and PRK co-migrated with CP12 in dark- but not light-adapted chloroplasts. Nano-liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry of the isolated complex identified only CP12, GAPDH and PRK. Since nearly all of the CP12 from darkened chloroplasts migrates with GADPH and PRK as a high molecular mass species, these data indicate that the tight association of tobacco CP12 with GAPDH and PRK is specific and involves no other Calvin Cycle enzymes.

  18. Effects of Lead (Pb) on the Systemic Movement of RNA Viruses in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Turkish)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effect of different lead (Pb) concentrations on the systemic movement of RNA viruses was examined in tobacco plants. Prior to inoculation, plants were grown hydroponically for six days in Hoagland's solution supplemented with five concentrations of lead nitrate [Pb(NO3)2]:0.0 (control), 10 uM, 15 u...

  19. Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase overexpression modifies antioxidant defense against heat, drought and their combination in Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Lubovská, Zuzana; Dobrá, Jana; Storchová, Helena; Wilhelmová, Naďa; Vanková, Radomíra

    2014-11-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) as well as the antioxidant enzyme system (AES) play important roles in plant stress responses. The expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes (AE) were determined in drought, heat and combination of both stresses, comparing the response of tobacco plants overexpressing the main cytokinin degrading enzyme, cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase, under the control of root-specific WRKY6 promoter (W6:CKX1 plants) or constitutive promoter (35S:CKX1 plants) and the corresponding wild-type (WT). Expression levels as well as activities of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase, catalase 3, and cytosolic superoxide dismutase were low under optimal conditions and increased after heat and combined stress in all genotypes. Unlike catalase 3, two other peroxisomal enzymes, catalase 1 and catalase 2, were transcribed extensively under control conditions. Heat stress, in contrast to drought or combined stress, increased catalase 1 and reduced catalase 2 expression in WT and W6:CKX1 plants. In 35S:CKX1, catalase 1 expression was enhanced by heat or drought, but not under combined stress conditions. Mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression was generally higher in 35S:CKX1 plants than in WT. Genes encoding for chloroplastic AEs, stromatal ascorbate peroxidase, thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase and chloroplastic superoxide dismutase, were strongly transcribed under control conditions. All stresses down-regulated their expression in WT and W6:CKX1, whereas more stress-tolerant 35S:CKX1 plants maintained high expression during drought and heat. The achieved data show that the effect of down-regulation of CK levels on AES may be mediated by altered habit, resulting in improved stress tolerance, which is associated with diminished stress impact on photosynthesis, and changes in source/sink relations. PMID:25171514

  20. An Interspecific Nicotiana Hybrid as a Useful and Cost-Effective Platform for Production of Animal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Huai-Yian; Edwards, Aaron M.; Gantier, Michael P.; DeBoer, Kathleen D.; Neale, Alan D.; Hamill, John D.; Walmsley, Amanda M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of transgenic plants to produce novel products has great biotechnological potential as the relatively inexpensive inputs of light, water, and nutrients are utilised in return for potentially valuable bioactive metabolites, diagnostic proteins and vaccines. Extensive research is ongoing in this area internationally with the aim of producing plant-made vaccines of importance for both animals and humans. Vaccine purification is generally regarded as being integral to the preparation of safe and effective vaccines for use in humans. However, the use of crude plant extracts for animal immunisation may enable plant-made vaccines to become a cost-effective and efficacious approach to safely immunise large numbers of farm animals against diseases such as avian influenza. Since the technology associated with genetic transformation and large-scale propagation is very well established in Nicotiana, the genus has attributes well-suited for the production of plant-made vaccines. However the presence of potentially toxic alkaloids in Nicotiana extracts impedes their use as crude vaccine preparations. In the current study we describe a Nicotiana tabacum and N. glauca hybrid that expresses the HA glycoprotein of influenza A in its leaves but does not synthesize alkaloids. We demonstrate that injection with crude leaf extracts from these interspecific hybrid plants is a safe and effective approach for immunising mice. Moreover, this antigen-producing alkaloid-free, transgenic interspecific hybrid is vigorous, with a high capacity for vegetative shoot regeneration after harvesting. These plants are easily propagated by vegetative cuttings and have the added benefit of not producing viable pollen, thus reducing potential problems associated with bio-containment. Hence, these Nicotiana hybrids provide an advantageous production platform for partially purified, plant-made vaccines which may be particularly well suited for use in veterinary immunization programs. PMID:22539991

  1. Inhibition of cereal rust fungi by both class I and II defensins derived from the flowers of Nicotiana alata.

    PubMed

    Dracatos, Peter M; van der Weerden, Nicole L; Carroll, Kate T; Johnson, Elizabeth D; Plummer, Kim M; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    Defensins are a large family of small, cysteine-rich, basic proteins, produced by most plants and plant tissues. They have a primary function in defence against fungal disease, although other functions have been described. This study reports the isolation and characterization of a class I secreted defensin (NaD2) from the flowers of Nicotiana alata, and compares its antifungal activity with the class II defensin (NaD1) from N. alata flowers, which is stored in the vacuole. NaD2, like all other class I defensins, lacks the C-terminal pro-peptide (CTPP) characteristic of class II defensins. NaD2 is most closely related to Nt-thionin from N. tabacum (96% identical) and shares 81% identity with MtDef4 from alfalfa. The concentration required to inhibit in vitro fungal growth by 50% (IC50 ) was assessed for both NaD1 and NaD2 for the biotrophic basidiomycete fungi Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae (Pca) and P. sorghi (Ps), the necrotrophic pathogenic ascomycetes Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov), F. graminearum (Fgr), Verticillium dahliae (Vd) and Thielaviopsis basicola (Tb), and the saprobe Aspergillus nidulans. NaD1 was a more potent antifungal molecule than NaD2 against both the biotrophic and necrotrophic fungal pathogens tested. NaD2 was 5-10 times less effective at killing necrotrophs, but only two-fold less effective on Puccinia species. A new procedure for testing antifungal proteins is described in this study which is applicable to pathogens with spores that are not amenable to liquid culture, such as rust pathogens. Rusts are the most damaging fungal pathogens of many agronomically important crop species (wheat, barley, oats and soybean). NaD1 and NaD2 inhibited urediniospore germination, germ tube growth and germ tube differentiation (appressoria induction) of both Puccinia species tested. NaD1 and NaD2 were fungicidal on Puccinia species and produced stunted germ tubes with a granular cytoplasm. When NaD1 and NaD2 were sprayed onto susceptible oat

  2. Emerging antibody products and Nicotiana manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Kevin J; Hiatt, Andrew; Zeitlin, Larry

    2011-03-01

    Antibody based products are not widely available to address multiple global health challenges due to high costs, limited manufacturing capacity, and long manufacturing lead times. Nicotiana-based manufacturing of antibody products may now begin to address these challenges as a result of revolutionary advances in transient expression and altered glycosylation pathways. This review provides examples of emerging antibody-based products (mucosal and systemic) that could be competitive and commercially viable when the attributes of Nicotiana-based manufacturing (large scale, versatile, rapid, low cost) are utilized.

  3. Plant oxidosqualene metabolism: cycloartenol synthase-dependent sterol biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ(5)-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis.

  4. Plant Oxidosqualene Metabolism: Cycloartenol Synthase–Dependent Sterol Biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J.; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ5-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis. PMID:25343375

  5. Ozone, sulfur dioxide, and ultraviolet B have similar effects on mRNA accumulation of antioxidant genes in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L.

    SciTech Connect

    Willekens, H.; Van Camp, W.; Van Montagu, M.; Inze, D.; Langebartels, C.; Sandermann, H. Jr. |

    1994-11-01

    We have studied the expression of antioxidant genes in response to near ambient conditions of O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and ultraviolet B (UV-B) in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L. The genes analyzed encode four different superoxide dismutases (SODs), three catalases (Cat1, Cat2, and Cat3), the cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (cyt APx), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). The experimental setup for each treatment was essentially the same and caused no visible damage, thus allowing direct comparison of the different stress responses. Our data showed that the effects of O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and UV-B on the antioxidant genes are very similar, although the response to SO{sub 2} is generally less pronounced and delayed. The effects of the different stresses are characterized by a decline in Cat1, a moderate increase in Cat3, and a strong increase in Cat2 and GPx. Remarkably, SODs and cyt APx were not affected. Analysis of SOD and APx expression in the ozone-sensitive Nicotiana tabacum L. cv PBD6 revealed that induction of the cytosolic copper/zinc SOD and cyt APx occurs only with the onset of visible damage. It is proposed that alterations in mRNA levels of catalases and GPx, but not of SODs and cyt APx, form part of the initial antioxidant response to O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, and UV-B in Nicotiana. 57 refs., 4 figs.

  6. A glycoside of Nicotina tabacum affects mouse dopaminergic behavior.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Ohnuma, S; Kawagoe, M; Sugiyama, T

    2003-01-01

    Climbing in the forced swimming test is considered a dopaminergic-specific behavior. A substance of Nicotina tabacum affecting dopamine neuronal activity was investigated using the mouse behavioral system. The substance was found to be a glycoside with the peripheral sugar chain structures Fuc alpha 1-2Gal, Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc and GalNAc alpha 1-3GalNAc and with basic polymannoses. The glycoside dose-dependently increased behavior via D2 neuronal activity, but not D1 activity. This suggests that smoking can affect human brain function not only via the nicotinic cholinergic neuron, but also via the D2 neuron.

  7. In Defence of the Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  8. Plant surface reactions: an ozone defence mechanism impacting atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, W.; Fischer, L.; Canaval, E.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Tissier, A.; Hansel, A.

    2015-07-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. Plant injuries have been linked to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative damage of the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: how much ozone effectively enters the plant through open stomata and how much is lost by chemical reactions at the plant surface? In this laboratory study we could show that semi-volatile organic compounds exuded by the glandular trichomes of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties are an efficient ozone sink at the plant surface. In our experiments, different diterpenoid compounds were responsible for a strongly variety dependent ozone uptake of plants under dark conditions, when stomatal pores are almost closed. Surface reactions of ozone were accompanied by prompt release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be linked to the corresponding precursor compounds: ozonolysis of cis-abienol (C20H34O) - a diterpenoid with two exocyclic double bonds - caused emissions of formaldehyde (HCHO) and methyl vinyl ketone (C4H6O). The ring-structured cembratrien-diols (C20H34O2) with three endocyclic double bonds need at least two ozonolysis steps to form volatile carbonyls such as 4-oxopentanal (C5H8O2), which we could observe in the gas phase, too. Fluid dynamic calculations were used to model ozone distribution in the diffusion limited leaf boundary layer under daylight conditions. In the case of an ozone-reactive leaf surface, ozone gradients in the vicinity of stomatal pores are changed in such a way, that ozone flux through the open stomata is strongly reduced. Our results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at the plant surface should be considered as a source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, impacting gas phase chemistry, as well as efficient ozone sink improving the ozone tolerance of plants.

  9. Morphology of Females and Cysts of Globodera tabacum tabacum, G. t. virginiae, and G. t. solanacearum (Nemata: Heteroderinae)

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Manuel M.; Eisenback, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed morphological comparisons with light and scanning electron microscopy were made of white females and cysts of several isolates of Globodera tabacum sspp. tabacum (GTT), virginiae (GTV), and solanacearum (GTS). Observations focused on body shape, anterior region including head shape, lip pattern, stylet morphology, and the terminal area in females; and body shape and terminal area of cysts. The most useful characters to separate the three subspecies were forms of the female body, cyst, stylet knobs, tail region, perineal tubercles, anal-fenestral ridge patterns, and the distinctiveness of the anus. GTT is characterized by having round females and cysts, sharply back sloped stylet knobs, clumped perineal tubercles in the vulval region, tight parallel ridges in the cyst anal-fenestral region, and a uniformly conoid tail region. GTV is characterized by its ovoid to ellipsoid female and cyst shape, the "Dutch shoe" shape of the dorsal stylet knob, the more dispersed perineal tubercles, a maze-like pattern of ridges in the anal-fenestral region, and an indistinct anus. GTS is characterized by its ovoid to ellipsoid female and cyst shape, moderately backward sloped stylet knobs, more widely separated ridges, a distinct anus, and a usually crescent shaped tail region. Much variability in shape and patterns is visible among all the isolates of the different subspecies. Tubercles in the neck, as well as bullae, are reported, and their taxonomic value is discussed. PMID:19279752

  10. Enzymatic, expression and structural divergences among carboxyl O-methyltransferases after gene duplication and speciation in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Hippauf, Frank; Michalsky, Elke; Huang, Ruiqi; Preissner, Robert; Barkman, Todd J; Piechulla, Birgit

    2010-02-01

    Methyl salicylate and methyl benzoate have important roles in a variety of processes including pollinator attraction and plant defence. These compounds are synthesized by salicylic acid, benzoic acid and benzoic acid/salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferases (SAMT, BAMT and BSMT) which are members of the SABATH gene family. Both SAMT and BSMT were isolated from Nicotiana suaveolens, Nicotiana alata, and Nicotiana sylvestris allowing us to discern levels of enzyme divergence resulting from gene duplication in addition to species divergence. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Nicotiana SAMTs and BSMTs evolved in separate clades and the latter can be differentiated into the BSMT1 and the newly established BSMT2 branch. Although SAMT and BSMT orthologs showed minimal change coincident with species divergences, substantial evolutionary change of enzyme activity and expression patterns occurred following gene duplication. After duplication, the BSMT enzymes evolved higher preference for benzoic acid (BA) than salicylic acid (SA) whereas SAMTs maintained ancestral enzymatic preference for SA over BA. Expression patterns are largely complementary in that BSMT transcripts primarily accumulate in flowers, leaves and stems whereas SAMT is expressed mostly in roots. A novel enzyme, nicotinic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (NAMT), which displays a high degree of activity with nicotinic acid was discovered to have evolved in N. gossei from an ancestral BSMT. Furthermore a SAM-dependent synthesis of methyl anthranilate via BSMT2 is reported and contrasts with alternative biosynthetic routes previously proposed. While BSMT in flowers is clearly involved in methyl benzoate synthesis to attract pollinators, its function in other organs and tissues remains obscure.

  11. The psychiatric defence and international criminal law.

    PubMed

    Tobin, John

    2007-01-01

    Following the development of the International Criminal Court (ICC) the mental state of the perpetrators of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes will become a more important issue in regard to defence and mitigating factors. This article examines how the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in particular has dealt with the mental illness defence to date, and how its judgements can serve as guidance for the ICC as it becomes the major international court of the future. The absence of a mental health defence in the Statutes of the ICTY and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda has led to a reliance on the Rules of Procedure and Evidence of the two tribunals. There are major difficulties in using the mental health defence as it is defined in the Statutes of the ICC because of a requirement for the destruction of mental capacity as a valid defence. Fitness to plead and the defence of intoxication are also examined.

  12. Pollination in Nicotiana alata stimulates synthesis and transfer to the stigmatic surface of NaStEP, a vacuolar Kunitz proteinase inhibitor homologue

    PubMed Central

    Busot, Grethel Yanet; McClure, Bruce; Ibarra-Sánchez, Claudia Patricia; Jiménez-Durán, Karina; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia; Cruz-García, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    After landing on a wet stigma, pollen grains hydrate and germination generally occurs. However, there is no certainty of the pollen tube growth through the style to reach the ovary. The pistil is a gatekeeper that evolved in many species to recognize and reject the self-pollen, avoiding endogamy and encouraging cross-pollination. However, recognition is a complex process, and specific factors are needed. Here the isolation and characterization of a stigma-specific protein from N. alata, NaStEP (N. alata Stigma Expressed Protein), that is homologous to Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors, are reported. Activity gel assays showed that NaStEP is not a functional serine proteinase inhibitor. Immunohistochemical and protein blot analyses revealed that NaStEP is detectable in stigmas of self-incompatible (SI) species N. alata, N. forgetiana, and N. bonariensis, but not in self-compatible (SC) species N. tabacum, N. plumbaginifolia, N. benthamiana, N. longiflora, and N. glauca. NaStEP contains the vacuolar targeting sequence NPIVL, and immunocytochemistry experiments showed vacuolar localization in unpollinated stigmas. After self-pollination or pollination with pollen from the SC species N. tabacum or N. plumbaginifolia, NaStEP was also found in the stigmatic exudate. The synthesis and presence in the stigmatic exudate of this protein was strongly induced in N. alata following incompatible pollination with N. tabacum pollen. The transfer of NaStEP to the stigmatic exudate was accompanied by perforation of the stigmatic cell wall, which appeared to release the vacuolar contents to the apoplastic space. The increase in NaStEP synthesis after pollination and its presence in the stigmatic exudates suggest that this protein may play a role in the early pollen–stigma interactions that regulate pollen tube growth in Nicotiana. PMID:18689443

  13. Expressing foreign genes in the pistil: a comparison of S-RNase constructs in different Nicotiana backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Murfett, J; McClure, B A

    1998-06-01

    Transgenic plant experiments have great potential for extending our understanding of the role of specific genes in controlling pollination. Often, the intent of such experiments is to over-express a gene and test for effects on pollination. We have examined the efficiency of six different S-RNase constructs in Nicotiana species and hybrids. Each construct contained the coding region, intron, and downstream sequences from the Nicotiana alata S(A2)-RNase gene. Among the six expression constructs, two utilized the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter with duplicated enhancer, and four utilized promoters from genes expressed primarily in pistils. The latter included promoters from the tomato Chi2;1 and 9612 genes, a promoter from the N. alata S(A2)-RNase gene, and a promoter from the Brassica SLG-13 gene. Some or all of the constructs were tested in N. tabacum, N. plumbaginifolia, N. plumbaginifolia x SI N. alata S(C10)S(c10) hybrids, N. langsdorffii, and N. langsdorffii x SC N. alata hybrids. Stylar specific RNase activities and S(A2)-RNase transcript levels were determined in transformed plants. Constructs including the tomato Chi2;1 gene promoter or the Brassica SLG-13 promoter provided the highest levels of S(A2)-RNase expression. Transgene expression patterns were tightly regulated, the highest level of expression was observed in post-anthesis styles. Expression levels of the S(A2)-RNase transgenes was dependent on the genetic background of the host. Higher levels of S(A2)-RNase expression were observed in N. plumbaginifolia x SC N. alata hybrids than in N. plumbaginifolia.

  14. Compensation for a Mutated Auxin Biosynthesis Gene of Agrobacterium Ti Plasmid A66 in Nicotiana glutinosa Does Not Result from Increased Auxin Accumulation 1

    PubMed Central

    Campell, Bruce R.; Su, Ling-Yuan; Pengelly, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Nicotiana glutinosa compensated for a mutated tumor-morphology-shooty (tms) (auxin biosynthesis) locus of Agrobacterlum tumefaciens strain A66 and showed the same virulent tumor response to infection by strain A66 or the wild-type strain A6. Cloned cell lines transformed by strains A6 or A66 were fully hormone independent in culture and grew rapidly as friable, unorganized tissues on hormone-free growth medium. Growth of N. glutinosa tumor cells was inhibited by addition of α-naphthaleneacetic acid to the growth medium, and A6- and A66-transformed cells showed similar dose responses to this auxin. On the other hand, A6-transformed cells contained much higher levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) than A66-transformed cells. Differences in IAA and ACC levels in N. glutinosa tumor lines were consistent with the expected activity of the tms locus and were quantitatively similar to results obtained previously with A6- and A66-transformed cells of Nicotiana tabacum, which does not compensate for mutated tms genes. Thus, compensation for mutated tms genes in N. glutinosa did not result from increased auxin accumulation and did not appear to be related to the capacity of this host for auxin biosynthesis. PMID:16666706

  15. Ovipositional response of tobacco budworm moths (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to cuticular labdanes and sucrose esters from the green leaves ofNicotiana glutinosa L. (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Jackson, D M; Severson, R F; Sisson, V A; Stephenson, M G

    1991-12-01

    Field plots of three accessions ofNicotiana glutinosa L. (Nicotiana species accessions 24, 24A, and 24B) at Oxford, North Carolina and Tifton, Georgia were heavily damaged by natural populations of tobacco budworms,Heliothis virescens (F.), during 1985-1989. Experiments in outdoor screen cages demonstrated that all accessions ofN. glutinosa were as prone to oviposition byH. virescens moths as was NC 2326, a commercial cultivar of flue-cured tobacco,N. tabacum L. However, in greenhouse experiments, tobacco budworm larvae did not survive or grow as well when placed on plants ofN. glutinosa as they did when placed on plants of NC 2326. Four labdane diterpenes (manool, 2-hydroxymanool, a mixture of sclareols, and labda-13-ene-8α,15-diol [labdenediol]) and two sucrose ester fractions (2,3,4-tri-O-acyl-3'-O-acetyl-sucrose [G-SE-I] and 2,3,4,-tri-O-acyl-sucrose [G-SE-II]) were isolated from green leaves of the three accessions ofN. glutinosa. These components were bioassayed for their effects on the ovipositional behavior of tobacco budworm moths using small screen cages in a greenhouse at Oxford, North Carolina. Labdenediol, manool, and both sucrose ester fractions stimulated tobacco budworm moths to oviposit on a tobacco budworm-resistant Tobacco Introduction, TI 1112 (PI 124166), when these materials were sprayed onto a leaf. PMID:24258642

  16. Induction of a small heat shock protein and its functional roles in Nicotiana plants in the defense response against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Maimbo, Milimo; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2007-12-01

    In tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), Ralstonia solanacearum OE1-1 (RsOE1-1) is pathogenic, whereas R. solanacearum 8107 (Rs8107) is nonpathogenic and induces the hypersensitive response (HR). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of plant-R. solanacearum interactions, we used differential display to isolate a cDNA fragment, A6, regulated in tobacco by inoculation with RsOE1-1. The deduced amino acid sequence predicted from full-length A6-cDNA showed similarity to small heat shock proteins from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; hypothetical protein), Medicago truncatula, and Cucumis melo; we therefore designated A6 to correspond to Ntshsp17 (for tobacco small heat shock protein 17). Recombinant Ntshsp17 overproduced in Escherichia coli exhibited molecular chaperone function. Expression of Ntshsp17 was increased in tobacco leaves inoculated with both RsOE1-1 and Rs8107. Expression was induced by heat treatment and by treatment with aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid, hydrogen peroxide, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid. Ntshsp17 expression was induced by inoculation with a HR and pathogenicity gene mutant of Rs8107 that does not induce the HR, but not by Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of INF1, an HR elicitor. In Nbshsp17-silenced plants (an Ntshsp17 ortholog in Nicotiana benthamiana), expression of ETHYLENE-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN, PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1a (PR1a), and PR4 genes was compromised, but expression of ELONGATION FACTOR1alpha was scarcely affected. Appearance of the HR was not affected in the silenced plants. In the silenced plants, growth of Rs8107 was accelerated. Bacterial growth and wilt symptoms elicited by RsOE1-1 were also accelerated in the silenced plants. These results indicate that this small heat shock protein might have a role in HR-independent defenses in Nicotiana plants. PMID:17965181

  17. Human influence on the dispersal and genetic structure of French Globodera tabacum populations.

    PubMed

    Alenda, Charline; Montarry, Josselin; Grenier, Eric

    2014-10-01

    The dispersal abilities and the population genetic structure of nematodes living in soils are poorly known. In the present study, we have pursued these issues in the tobacco cyst nematode, Globodera tabacum, which is responsible of significant yield reductions. Nine microsatellites markers were used to explore the dispersal and genetic structure of 18 French G. tabacum populations. All the populations sampled belong to the "tabacum" subspecies and low level of gene flow was observed among G. tabacum populations in France. Bayesian genetic assignments revealed two distinct genetic groups that matched with the geographic limits of two agricultural cooperative societies. An important part of the genetic variability was observed between these agricultural cooperative societies and also within populations. Those results highlight the impact of the human organization of agricultural practices on the genetic structure of G. tabacum populations and complement previous results obtained on other cyst nematodes, showing the major contribution of human activities and soil transports during harvest in the passive dispersion of these organisms.

  18. Glutamine Synthetase of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia1

    PubMed Central

    Tingey, Scott V.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.

    1987-01-01

    We have characterized the distinct forms of glutamine synthetase (GS) which are present in leaves and roots of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Mature leaves contain a single GS polypeptide (44 kilodaltons in size) which is localized to the stroma of intact chloroplasts. In contrast, the GS polypeptide in roots is distinct in size (38 kilodaltons) and charge. A lectin stain of leaf soluble protein indicates that the size difference of these mature GS polypeptides is not the result of posttranslational glycosylation. cDNA clones encoding a GS mRNA of N. plumbaginifolia were characterized and used as molecular probes to examine GS transcripts in leaves and roots. GS mRNA hybrid-selected from leaves or roots translated in vitro into distinct GS primary translation products (49 or 38 kilodaltons). The 49 kilodalton GS primary translation product, specific to leaf poly(A)RNA is proposed to be a precursor to the mature 44 kilodalton chloroplast stromal GS polypeptide. The 38 kilodalton GS primary translation product encoded by root GS mRNA, corresponds in size to the polypeptide encoded by the GS cDNA clones characterized. Southern blot analysis of nuclear DNA indicates that there are several different genomic fragments encoding GS in N. plumbaginifolia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:16665445

  19. Platelets: at the nexus of antimicrobial defence.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Platelets have traditionally been viewed as fragmentary mediators of coagulation. However, recent molecular and cellular evidence suggests that they have multiple roles in host defence against infection. From first-responders that detect pathogens and rapidly deploy host-defence peptides, to beacons that recruit and enhance leukocyte functions in the context of infection, to liaisons that facilitate the T cell-B cell crosstalk that is required in adaptive immunity, platelets represent a nexus at the intersection of haemostasis and antimicrobial host defence. In this Review, I consider recent insights into the antimicrobial roles of platelets, which are mediated both directly and indirectly to integrate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens.

  20. Altruistic defence behaviours in aphids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Altruistic anti-predatory behaviours pose an evolutionary problem because they are costly to the actor and beneficial to the recipients. Altruistic behaviours can evolve through indirect fitness benefits when directed toward kin. The altruistic nature of anti-predatory behaviours is often difficult to establish because the actor can obtain direct fitness benefits, or the behaviour could result from selfish coercion by others, especially in eusocial animals. Non-eusocial parthenogenetically reproducing aphids form colonies of clone-mates, which are ideal to test the altruistic nature of anti-predatory defence behaviours. Many aphids release cornicle secretions when attacked by natural enemies such as parasitoids. These secretions contain an alarm pheromone that alerts neighbours (clone-mates) of danger, thereby providing indirect fitness benefits to the actor. However, contact with cornicle secretions also hampers an attacker and could provide direct fitness to the actor. Results We tested the hypothesis that cornicle secretions are altruistic by assessing direct and indirect fitness consequences of smearing cornicle secretions onto an attacker, and by manipulating the number of clone-mates that could benefit from the behaviour. We observed parasitoids, Aphidius rhopalosiphi, foraging singly in patches of the cereal aphid Sitobion avenae of varied patch size (2, 6, and 12 aphids). Aphids that smeared parasitoids did not benefit from a reduced probability of parasitism, or increase the parasitoids' handling time. Smeared parasitoids, however, spent proportionately more time grooming and less time foraging, which resulted in a decreased host-encounter and oviposition rate within the host patch. In addition, individual smearing rate increased with the number of clone-mates in the colony. Conclusions Cornicle secretions of aphids were altruistic against parasitoids, as they provided no direct fitness benefits to secretion-releasing individuals, only indirect

  1. GhWRKY68 Reduces Resistance to Salt and Drought in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haihong; Wang, Chen; Wang, Fang; Liu, Shuchang; Li, Guilin; Guo, Xingqi

    2015-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factors modulate numerous physiological processes, including plant growth, development and responses to various environmental stresses. Currently, our understanding of the functions of the majority of the WRKY family members and their possible roles in signalling crosstalk is limited. In particular, very few WRKYs have been identified and characterised from an economically important crop, cotton. In this study, we characterised a novel group IIc WRKY gene, GhWRKY68, which is induced by different abiotic stresses and multiple defence-related signalling molecules. The β-glucuronidase activity driven by the GhWRKY68 promoter was enhanced after exposure to drought, salt, abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2. The overexpression of GhWRKY68 in Nicotiana benthamiana reduced resistance to drought and salt and affected several physiological indices. GhWRKY68 may mediate salt and drought responses by modulating ABA content and enhancing the transcript levels of ABA-responsive genes. GhWRKY68-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced tolerance to oxidative stress after drought and salt stress treatments, which correlated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced enzyme activities, elevated malondialdehyde (MDA) content and altered ROS-related gene expression. These results indicate that GhWRKY68 is a transcription factor that responds to drought and salt stresses by regulating ABA signalling and modulating cellular ROS. PMID:25793865

  2. GhWRKY68 reduces resistance to salt and drought in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haihong; Wang, Chen; Wang, Fang; Liu, Shuchang; Li, Guilin; Guo, Xingqi

    2015-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factors modulate numerous physiological processes, including plant growth, development and responses to various environmental stresses. Currently, our understanding of the functions of the majority of the WRKY family members and their possible roles in signalling crosstalk is limited. In particular, very few WRKYs have been identified and characterised from an economically important crop, cotton. In this study, we characterised a novel group IIc WRKY gene, GhWRKY68, which is induced by different abiotic stresses and multiple defence-related signalling molecules. The β-glucuronidase activity driven by the GhWRKY68 promoter was enhanced after exposure to drought, salt, abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2. The overexpression of GhWRKY68 in Nicotiana benthamiana reduced resistance to drought and salt and affected several physiological indices. GhWRKY68 may mediate salt and drought responses by modulating ABA content and enhancing the transcript levels of ABA-responsive genes. GhWRKY68-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced tolerance to oxidative stress after drought and salt stress treatments, which correlated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced enzyme activities, elevated malondialdehyde (MDA) content and altered ROS-related gene expression. These results indicate that GhWRKY68 is a transcription factor that responds to drought and salt stresses by regulating ABA signalling and modulating cellular ROS. PMID:25793865

  3. A Phytophthora sojae cytoplasmic effector mediates disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meixiang; Ahmed Rajput, Nasir; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Peng; Zeng, Wentao; Liu, Tingli; Juma Mafurah, Joseph; Dou, Daolong

    2015-06-03

    Each oomycete pathogen encodes a large number of effectors. Some effectors can be used in crop disease resistance breeding, such as to accelerate R gene cloning and utilisation. Since cytoplasmic effectors may cause acute physiological changes in host cells at very low concentrations, we assume that some of these effectors can serve as functional genes for transgenic plants. Here, we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that express a Phytophthora sojae CRN (crinkling and necrosis) effector, PsCRN115. We showed that its expression did not significantly affect the growth and development of N. benthamiana, but significantly improved disease resistance and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Furthermore, we found that expression of heat-shock-protein and cytochrome-P450 encoding genes were unregulated in PsCRN115-transgenic N. benthamiana based on digital gene expression profiling analyses, suggesting the increased plant defence may be achieved by upregulation of these stress-related genes in transgenic plants. Thus, PsCRN115 may be used to improve plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  4. UK photonics in defence and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracie, C.; Tooley, I.; Wilson, A.

    2008-10-01

    The UK is globally recognised as strong in Photonics. However its Photonics sector is fragmented and the size and sectors of interest have not previously been established. The UK government has instigated the formation of the Photonics Knowledge Transfer Network (PKTN) to bring the Photonics community together. The UK features in Defence & Security; Communications; Measurement; Medical Technology; Lighting; Solar Energy; Information Technology and Flat Panels. This expertise is scattered through out the UK in geographic areas each with a breadth of Photonic interests. The PKTN has mapped the UK capability in all Photonics sectors. This paper will present the capability of the Companies, Research Institutions and Infrastructure making up the Defence & Security Photonics scene in the UK. Large Defence companies in the UK are well known throughout the world. However, there are a large number of SMEs, which may not be as well known in the supply chain. These are being actively encouraged by the UK MoD to engage with the Defence & Security Market and shall be discussed here. The presentation will reference a number of organisations which help to fund and network the community, such as the Defence Technology Centres. In addition the Roadmap for Defence & Security in the UK, produced for the UK Photonics Strategy (July 2006) by the Scottish Optoelectronics Association will be described and the plans in taking it forward under the PKTN will be revealed.

  5. Phylogenetic fragrance patterns in Nicotiana sections Alatae and Suaveolentes.

    PubMed

    Raguso, Robert A; Schlumpberger, Boris O; Kaczorowski, Rainee L; Holtsford, Timothy P

    2006-09-01

    We analyzed floral volatiles from eight tobacco species (Nicotiana; Solanaceae) including newly discovered Brazilian taxa (Nicotiana mutabilis and "Rastroensis") in section Alatae. Eighty-four compounds were found, including mono- and sesquiterpenoids, nitrogenous compounds, benzenoid and aliphatic alcohols, aldehydes and esters. Floral scent from recent accessions of Nicotiana alata, Nicotiana bonariensis and Nicotiana langsdorffii differed from previously published data, suggesting intraspecific variation in scent composition at the level of biosynthetic class. Newly discovered taxa in Alatae, like their relatives, emit large amounts of 1,8-cineole and smaller amounts of monoterpenes on a nocturnal rhythm, constituting a chemical synapomorphy for this lineage. Fragrance data from three species of Nicotiana sect. Suaveolentes, the sister group of Alatae, (two Australian species: N. cavicola, N. ingulba; one African species: N. africana), were compared to previously reported data from their close relative, N. suaveolens. Like N. suaveolens, N. cavicola and N. ingulba emit fragrances dominated by benzenoids and phenylpropanoids, whereas the flowers of N. africana lacked a distinct floral scent and instead emitted only small amounts of an aliphatic methyl ester from foliage. Interestingly, this ester also is emitted from foliage of N. longiflora and N. plumbaginifolia (both in section Alatae s.l.), which share a common ancestor with N. africana. This result, combined with the synapomorphic pattern of 1,8 cineole emission in Alatae s.s., suggests that phylogenetic signal explains a major component of fragrance composition among tobacco species in sections Alatae and Suaveolentes. At the intraspecific level, interpopulational scent variation is widespread in sect. Alatae, and may reflect edaphic specialization, introgression, local pollinator shifts, genetic drift or artificial selection in cultivation. Further studies with genetically and geographically well

  6. Ethylene Response Factor TERF1, Regulated by ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-like Factors, Functions in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Scavenging in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Ang; Zhang, Zhijin; Huang, Zejun; Lu, Pingli; Zhang, Dingyu; Liu, Xinmin; Zhang, Zhong-Feng; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene plays a crucial role in the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants under stress conditions. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are important ethylene-signaling regulators functioning in plant defense responses against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the roles of ERFs during plant adapting to ROS stress have not yet been well documented. Our studies previously reported that a tomato ERF transcription factor TERF1 functions in the regulation of plant ethylene responses and stress tolerance. Here, we report our findings regarding the roles of TERF1 in ROS scavenging. In this study, we revealed that the transcription of TERF1 is regulated by upstream EIN3-like (EIN3, ethylene-insensitive 3) regulators LeEIL3 and LeEIL4 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and is also inducible by exogenous applied ROS-generating reagents. Ectopic expression of TERF1 in tobacco promoted the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress responses, including carbonic anhydrase functioning in hypersensitive defense, catalase and glutathione peroxidase catalyzing oxidative reactions, and GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase functioning in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, reduced the ROS content induced by ethylene treatment, and enhanced stress tolerance of tobacco seedlings to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cumulatively, these findings suggest that TERF1 is an ethylene inducible factor regulating ROS scavenging during stress responses. PMID:27435661

  7. Increased Nicotiana tabacum fitness through positive regulation of carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways promoted by Daucus carota lycopene β-cyclase (Dclcyb1) expression.

    PubMed

    Moreno, J C; Cerda, A; Simpson, K; Lopez-Diaz, I; Carrera, E; Handford, M; Stange, C

    2016-04-01

    Carotenoids, chlorophylls and gibberellins are derived from the common precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). One of the enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis is lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) that catalyzes the conversion of lycopene into β-carotene. In carrot, Dclcyb1 is essential for carotenoid synthesis in the whole plant. Here we show that when expressed in tobacco, increments in total carotenoids, β-carotene and chlorophyll levels occur. Furthermore, photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced in transgenic lines. Interestingly, and contrary to previous observations where overexpression of a carotenogenic gene resulted in the inhibition of the synthesis of gibberellins, we found raised levels of active GA4 and the concommitant increases in plant height, leaf size and whole plant biomass, as well as an early flowering phenotype. Moreover, a significant increase in the expression of the key carotenogenic genes, Ntpsy1, Ntpsy2 and Ntlcyb, as well as those involved in the synthesis of chlorophyll (Ntchl), gibberellin (Ntga20ox, Ntcps and Ntks) and isoprenoid precursors (Ntdxs2 and Ntggpps) was observed. These results indicate that the expression of Dclcyb1 induces a positive feedback affecting the expression of isoprenoid gene precursors and genes involved in carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways leading to an enhancement in fitness measured as biomass, photosynthetic efficiency and carotenoid/chlorophyll composition. PMID:26893492

  8. CbCBF from Capsella bursa-pastoris enhances cold tolerance and restrains growth in Nicotiana tabacum by antagonizing with gibberellin and affecting cell cycle signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingqi; Xu, Ming; Wu, Lihua; Shen, Chen; Ma, Hong; Lin, Juan

    2014-06-01

    Plant cells respond to cold stress via a regulatory mechanism leading to enhanced cold acclimation accompanied by growth retardation. The C-repeat binding factor (CBF) signaling pathway is essential for cold response of flowering plants. Our previously study documented a novel CBF-like gene from the cold-tolerant Capsella bursa-pastoris named CbCBF, which was responsive to chilling temperatures. Here, we show that CbCBF expression is obviously responsive to chilling, freezing, abscisic acid, gibberellic acid (GA), indoleacetic acid or methyl jasmonate treatments and that the CbCBF:GFP fusion protein was localized to the nucleus. In addition, CbCBF overexpression conferred to the cold-sensitive tobacco plants enhanced tolerance to chilling and freezing, as well as dwarfism and delayed flowering. The leaf cells of CbCBF overexpression tobacco lines attained smaller sizes and underwent delayed cell division with reduced expression of cyclin D genes. The dwarfism of CbCBF transformants can be partially restored by GA application. Consistently, CbCBF overexpression reduced the bioactive gibberellin contents and disturbed the expression of gibberellin metabolic genes in tobacco. Meanwhile, cold induced CbCBF expression and cold tolerance in C. bursa-pastoris are reduced by GA. We conclude that CbCBF confers cold resistance and growth inhibition to tobacco cells by interacting with gibberellin and cell cycle pathways, likely through activation of downstream target genes.

  9. Increased Nicotiana tabacum fitness through positive regulation of carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways promoted by Daucus carota lycopene β-cyclase (Dclcyb1) expression.

    PubMed

    Moreno, J C; Cerda, A; Simpson, K; Lopez-Diaz, I; Carrera, E; Handford, M; Stange, C

    2016-04-01

    Carotenoids, chlorophylls and gibberellins are derived from the common precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). One of the enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis is lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) that catalyzes the conversion of lycopene into β-carotene. In carrot, Dclcyb1 is essential for carotenoid synthesis in the whole plant. Here we show that when expressed in tobacco, increments in total carotenoids, β-carotene and chlorophyll levels occur. Furthermore, photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced in transgenic lines. Interestingly, and contrary to previous observations where overexpression of a carotenogenic gene resulted in the inhibition of the synthesis of gibberellins, we found raised levels of active GA4 and the concommitant increases in plant height, leaf size and whole plant biomass, as well as an early flowering phenotype. Moreover, a significant increase in the expression of the key carotenogenic genes, Ntpsy1, Ntpsy2 and Ntlcyb, as well as those involved in the synthesis of chlorophyll (Ntchl), gibberellin (Ntga20ox, Ntcps and Ntks) and isoprenoid precursors (Ntdxs2 and Ntggpps) was observed. These results indicate that the expression of Dclcyb1 induces a positive feedback affecting the expression of isoprenoid gene precursors and genes involved in carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways leading to an enhancement in fitness measured as biomass, photosynthetic efficiency and carotenoid/chlorophyll composition.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) suspension cultured cells and involvement of Ca(2+) and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Gong, Ming; Xie, Hong; Yang, Lan; Li, Jing

    2012-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is considered as a new emerging cell signal in higher plants. Hydrogen sulfide donor, sodium hydrosulfide, pretreatment significantly increased survival percentage of tobacco suspension cultured cells under heat stress and regrowth ability after heat stress, and alleviated decrease in vitality of cells, increase in electrolyte leakage and accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance was markedly strengthened by application of exogenous Ca(2+) and its ionophore A23187, respectively, while this heat tolerance was weakened by addition of Ca(2+) chelator ethylene glycol-bis(b-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), plasma membrane channel blocker La(3+), as well as calmodulin (CaM) antagonists chlorpromazine (CPZ) and trifluoperazine (TFP), respectively, but intracellular channel blocker ruthenium red (RR) did not. These results suggested that sodium hydrosulfide pretreatment could improve heat tolerance in tobacco suspension cultured cells and the acquisition of this heat tolerance requires the entry of extracellular Ca(2+) into cells across the plasma membrane and the mediation of intracellular CaM.

  11. Overexpression of the PAP1 Transcription Factor Reveals a Complex Regulation of Flavonoid and Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Nicotiana tabacum Plants Attacked by Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Mitsunami, Tomoko; Nishihara, Masahiro; Galis, Ivan; Alamgir, Kabir Md; Hojo, Yuko; Fujita, Kohei; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Nemoto, Keichiro; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Arimura, Gen-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanin pigments and associated flavonoids have demonstrated antioxidant properties and benefits for human health. Consequently, current plant bioengineers have focused on how to modify flavonoid metabolism in plants. Most of that research, however, does not consider the role of natural biotic stresses (e.g., herbivore attack). To understand the influence of herbivore attack on the metabolic engineering of flavonoids, we examined tobacco plants overexpressing the Arabidopsis PAP1 gene (encoding an MYB transcription factor), which accumulated anthocyanin pigments and other flavonoids/phenylpropanoids. In comparison to wild-type and control plants, transgenic plants exhibited greater resistance to Spodoptera litura. Moreover, herbivory suppressed the PAP1-induced increase of transcripts of flavonoid/phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes (e.g., F3H) and the subsequent accumulation of these genes' metabolites, despite the unaltered PAP1 mRNA levels after herbivory. The instances of down-regulation were independent of the signaling pathways mediated by defense-related jasmonates but were relevant to the levels of PAP1-induced and herbivory-suppressed transcription factors, An1a and An1b. Although initially F3H transcripts were suppressed by herbivory, after the S. litura feeding was interrupted, F3H transcripts increased. We hypothesize that in transgenic plants responding to herbivory, there is a complex mechanism regulating enriched flavonoid/phenylpropanoid compounds, via biotic stress signals. PMID:25268129

  12. RNA interference of the nicotine demethylase gene CYP82E4v1 reduces nornicotine content and enhances Myzus persicae resistance in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Qin, Li-Jun; Zhao, De-Gang

    2016-10-01

    The CYP82E4v1 gene was identified to encode nicotine demethylase, which catalyzed the conversion of nicotine to nornicotine. In this study, we constructed CYP82E4v1-RNAi vector and genetically transformed tobacco variety K326. The determination results of nicotine and nornicotine content via HPLC demonstrated that there was significant increase of nicotine content and reduction of nornicotine content in transgenic plants compared with those in wild-type plants. Exogenous application of IAA or GA3 could reduce the nicotine content in tobaccos, while ABA or 6-BA could increase the content of nicotine. And the more significant difference of nicotine content change in transgenic plants. Aphid-inoculation experiment demonstrated the number of aphid population in transgenic plants was significantly lower than wild-type plants at 12 d after aphid-inoculation. Meanwhile, the activity of AOEs and PAL in transgenic and wild-type tobacco plants after aphid-inoculation was measured. At 3 d after aphid-inoculation, both AOEs and PAL activity were significantly higher than controls, including wild-type plants with aphid-inoculation and transgenic plants with mock-inoculation. Also, the relative expression of these genes involved in salicylic acid/jasmonic acid (SA/JA) signaling pathways was analyzed at different stages after aphid-inoculation and the results demonstrated that there was significantly higher expression of JA-induced LOX gene in both transgenic and wild-type plants inoculated by aphid than the non-inoculated ones while no significant difference in the expression of SA-induced PR-1a gene among them was found, which indicated the JA-mediated resistance response was activated during aphid infestation. Moreover, although the expression level of BGL (another JA-induced gene) was less significant between the two inoculated tobaccos, it was significantly higher than the plant without inoculation, which was 1.4 and 2.2 folds higher than the non-inoculated controls respectively. To sum up, the improvement of aphid-resistance in transgenic tobaccos was based on nicotine accumulation which might cause nerve and antifeed toxicity and JA-mediated resistance response by enhancing the activities of AOEs and PAL. PMID:27314515

  13. Silencing S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Decarboxylase (SAMDC) in Nicotiana tabacum Points at a Polyamine-Dependent Trade-Off between Growth and Tolerance Responses.

    PubMed

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Moschou, Panagiotis N; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Pankou, Chryssa; Gėmes, Katalin; Valassakis, Chryssanthi; Andronis, Efthimios A; Beris, Despoina; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Roussis, Andreas; Karamanoli, Aikaterini; Matsi, Theodora; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos; Constantinidou, Helen-Isis; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are nitrogenous molecules that are indispensable for cell viability and with an agreed-on role in the modulation of stress responses. Tobacco plants with downregulated SAMDC (AS-SAMDC) exhibit reduced PAs synthesis but normal levels of PA catabolism. We used AS-SAMDC to increase our understanding on the role of PAs in stress responses. Surprisingly, at control conditions AS-SAMDC plants showed increased biomass and altered developmental characteristics, such as increased height and leaf number. On the contrary, during salt stress AS-SAMDC plants showed reduced vigor when compared to the WT. During salt stress, the AS-SAMDC plants although showing compensatory readjustments of the antioxidant machinery and of photosynthetic apparatus, they failed to sustain their vigor. AS-SAMDC sensitivity was accompanied by inability to effectively control H2O2 levels and concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations. In accordance with these findings, we suggest that PAs may regulate the trade-off between growth and tolerance responses. PMID:27064210

  14. Silencing S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Decarboxylase (SAMDC) in Nicotiana tabacum Points at a Polyamine-Dependent Trade-Off between Growth and Tolerance Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Moschou, Panagiotis N.; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E.; Pankou, Chryssa; Gėmes, Katalin; Valassakis, Chryssanthi; Andronis, Efthimios A.; Beris, Despoina; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Roussis, Andreas; Karamanoli, Aikaterini; Matsi, Theodora; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos; Constantinidou, Helen-Isis; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are nitrogenous molecules that are indispensable for cell viability and with an agreed-on role in the modulation of stress responses. Tobacco plants with downregulated SAMDC (AS-SAMDC) exhibit reduced PAs synthesis but normal levels of PA catabolism. We used AS-SAMDC to increase our understanding on the role of PAs in stress responses. Surprisingly, at control conditions AS-SAMDC plants showed increased biomass and altered developmental characteristics, such as increased height and leaf number. On the contrary, during salt stress AS-SAMDC plants showed reduced vigor when compared to the WT. During salt stress, the AS-SAMDC plants although showing compensatory readjustments of the antioxidant machinery and of photosynthetic apparatus, they failed to sustain their vigor. AS-SAMDC sensitivity was accompanied by inability to effectively control H2O2 levels and concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations. In accordance with these findings, we suggest that PAs may regulate the trade-off between growth and tolerance responses. PMID:27064210

  15. Alternative splicing of basic chitinase gene PR3b in the low-nicotine mutants of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Burley 21

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Haoran; Wang, Feng; Wang, Wenjing; Yin, Guoying; Zhang, Dingyu; Ding, Yongqiang; Timko, Michael P.; Zhang, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Two unlinked semi-dominant loci, A (NIC1) and B (NIC2), control nicotine and related alkaloid biosynthesis in Burley tobaccos. Mutations in either or both loci (nic1 and nic2) lead to low nicotine phenotypes with altered environmental stress responses. Here we show that the transcripts derived from the pathogenesis-related (PR) protein gene PR3b are alternatively spliced to a greater extent in the nic1 and nic2 mutants of Burley 21 tobacco and the nic1nic2 double mutant. The alternative splicing results in a deletion of 65 nucleotides and introduces a premature stop codon into the coding region of PR3b that leads to a significant reduction of PR3b specific chitinase activity. Assays of PR3b splicing in F2 individuals derived from crosses between nic1 and nic2 mutants and wild-type plants showed that the splicing phenotype is controlled by the NIC1 and NIC2 loci, even though NIC1 and NIC2 are unlinked loci. Moreover, the transcriptional analyses showed that the splicing patterns of PR3b in the low-nicotine mutants were differentially regulated by jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET). These data suggest that the NIC1 and NIC2 loci display differential roles in regulating the alternative splicing of PR3b in Burley 21. The findings in this study have provided valuable information for extending our understanding of the broader effects of the low-nicotine mutants of Burley 21 and the mechanism by which JA and ET signalling pathways post-transcriptionally regulate the activity of PR3b protein. PMID:27664270

  16. Ethylene Response Factor TERF1, Regulated by ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-like Factors, Functions in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Scavenging in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Ang; Zhang, Zhijin; Huang, Zejun; Lu, Pingli; Zhang, Dingyu; Liu, Xinmin; Zhang, Zhong-Feng; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene plays a crucial role in the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants under stress conditions. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are important ethylene-signaling regulators functioning in plant defense responses against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the roles of ERFs during plant adapting to ROS stress have not yet been well documented. Our studies previously reported that a tomato ERF transcription factor TERF1 functions in the regulation of plant ethylene responses and stress tolerance. Here, we report our findings regarding the roles of TERF1 in ROS scavenging. In this study, we revealed that the transcription of TERF1 is regulated by upstream EIN3-like (EIN3, ethylene-insensitive 3) regulators LeEIL3 and LeEIL4 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and is also inducible by exogenous applied ROS-generating reagents. Ectopic expression of TERF1 in tobacco promoted the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress responses, including carbonic anhydrase functioning in hypersensitive defense, catalase and glutathione peroxidase catalyzing oxidative reactions, and GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase functioning in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, reduced the ROS content induced by ethylene treatment, and enhanced stress tolerance of tobacco seedlings to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cumulatively, these findings suggest that TERF1 is an ethylene inducible factor regulating ROS scavenging during stress responses. PMID:27435661

  17. Influence of electrical fields (AC and DC) on phytoremediation of metal polluted soils with rapeseed (Brassica napus) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Bi, Ran; Schlaak, Michael; Siefert, Eike; Lord, Richard; Connolly, Helen

    2011-04-01

    The combined use of electrokinetic remediation and phytoremediation to decontaminate soil polluted with heavy metals has been demonstrated in a laboratory-scale experiment. The plants species selected were rapeseed and tobacco. Three kinds of soil were used: un-contaminated soil from forest area (S1), artificially contaminated soil with 15mgkg(-1) Cd (S2) and multi-contaminated soil with Cd, Zn and Pb from an industrial area (S3). Three treatment conditions were applied to the plants growing in the experimental vessels: control (no electrical field), alternating current electrical field (AC, 1Vcm(-1)) and direct current electrical field (DC, 1Vcm(-1)) with switching polarity every 3h. The electrical fields were applied for 30d for rapeseed and 90d for tobacco, each experiment had three replicates. After a total of 90d growth for rapeseed and of 180d for tobacco, the plants were harvested. The pH variation from anode to cathode was eliminated by switching the polarity of the DC field. The plants reacted differently under the applied electrical field. Rapeseed biomass was enhanced under the AC field and no negative effect was found under DC field. However, no enhancement of the tobacco biomass under the AC treatment was found. The DC field had a negative influence on biomass production on tobacco plants. In general, Cd content was higher in both species growing in S2 treated with AC field compared to the control. Metal uptake (Cd, Cu, Zn and Pb) per rapeseed plant shoot was enhanced by the application of AC field in all soils. PMID:21237480

  18. Alternation of light/dark period priming enhances clomazone tolerance by increasing the levels of ascorbate and phenolic compounds and ROS detoxification in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plantlets.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Majd; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; Vidal, Véronique; El Maâtaoui, Mohamed; Sallanon, Huguette

    2015-07-01

    The effect of the alternation of light/dark periods (AL) (16/8 min light/dark cycles and a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 50 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) for three days) to clarify the mechanisms involved in the clomazone tolerance of tobacco plantlets primed with AL was studied. Clomazone decreased PSII activity, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), and the ascorbate and total polyphenol contents and increased H2O2 and starch grain accumulation and the number of the cells that underwent programmed cell death (PCD). The pretreatment with AL reduced the inhibitory effect of clomazone on the PSII activity and photosynthesis, as indicated by the decreases in the H2O2 and starch grain accumulation and the PCD levels, and increased the content of ascorbate and certain phenolic compounds, such as chlorogenic acid, neochlorogenic acid and rutin. The AL treatment could promote photorespiration via post-illumination burst (PIB) effects. This alternative photorespiratory electron pathway may reduce H2O2 generation via the consumption of photochemical energy, such as NADH+H(+). At 10 days (D10) of AL treatment, this process induced moderate stress which stimulates H2O2 detoxification systems by increasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes and the biosynthesis of antioxidant components. Therefore, the PCD levels provoked by clomazone were noticeably decreased.

  19. Increased Nicotiana tabacum fitness through positive regulation of carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways promoted by Daucus carota lycopene β-cyclase (Dclcyb1) expression

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J.C.; Cerda, A.; Simpson, K.; Lopez-Diaz, I.; Carrera, E; Handford, M.; Stange, C.

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids, chlorophylls and gibberellins are derived from the common precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). One of the enzymes in carotenoid biosynthesis is lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) that catalyzes the conversion of lycopene into β-carotene. In carrot, Dclcyb1 is essential for carotenoid synthesis in the whole plant. Here we show that when expressed in tobacco, increments in total carotenoids, β-carotene and chlorophyll levels occur. Furthermore, photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced in transgenic lines. Interestingly, and contrary to previous observations where overexpression of a carotenogenic gene resulted in the inhibition of the synthesis of gibberellins, we found raised levels of active GA4 and the concommitant increases in plant height, leaf size and whole plant biomass, as well as an early flowering phenotype. Moreover, a significant increase in the expression of the key carotenogenic genes, Ntpsy1, Ntpsy2 and Ntlcyb, as well as those involved in the synthesis of chlorophyll (Ntchl), gibberellin (Ntga20ox, Ntcps and Ntks) and isoprenoid precursors (Ntdxs2 and Ntggpps) was observed. These results indicate that the expression of Dclcyb1 induces a positive feedback affecting the expression of isoprenoid gene precursors and genes involved in carotenoid, gibberellin and chlorophyll pathways leading to an enhancement in fitness measured as biomass, photosynthetic efficiency and carotenoid/chlorophyll composition. PMID:26893492

  20. Root-selective expression of "AtCAX4" and "AtCAX2" results in reduced lamina cadmium in field-grown "Nicotiana tabacum L"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assess the impact of enhanced root vacuole cadmium (Cd) sequestration on leaf Cd accumulation under a low Cd dose, as generally occurs in agriculture, leaf Cd accumulation was examined in field-grown tobacco plants expressing genes encoding the high-capacity-Cd, tonoplast-localized, divalent cati...

  1. CDPK1 from Ginger Promotes Salinity and Drought Stress Tolerance without Yield Penalty by Improving Growth and Photosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, transient changes in calcium concentrations of cytosol have been observed during stress conditions like high salt, drought, extreme temperature and mechanical disturbances. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in relaying these calcium signatures into downstream effects. In this study, a stress-responsive CDPK gene, ZoCDPK1 was isolated from a stress cDNA generated from ginger using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) – PCR technique and characterized its role in stress tolerance. An important aspect seen during the analysis of the deduced protein is a rare coupling between the presence of a nuclear localization sequence in the junction domain and consensus sequence in the EF-hand loops of calmodulin-like domain. ZoCDPK1 is abundantly expressed in rhizome and is rapidly induced by high-salt stress, drought, and jasmonic acid treatment but not by low temperature stress or abscissic acid treatment. The sub-cellular localization of ZoCDPK1-GFP fusion protein was studied in transgenic tobacco epidermal cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Over-expression of ginger CDPK1 gene in tobacco conferred tolerance to salinity and drought stress as reflected by the high percentage of seed germination, higher relative water content, expression of stress responsive genes, higher leaf chlorophyll content, increased photosynthetic efficiency and other photosynthetic parameters. In addition, transgenic tobacco subjected to salinity/drought stress exhibited 50% more growth during stress conditions as compared to wild type plant during normal conditions. T3 transgenic plants are able to grow to maturity, flowers early and set viable seeds under continuous salinity or drought stress without yield penalty. The ZoCDPK1 up-regulated the expression levels of stress-related genes RD21A and ERD1 in tobacco plants. These results suggest that ZoCDPK1 functions in the positive regulation of the signaling pathways that are involved in the response to salinity and drought stress in ginger and it is likely operating in a DRE/CRT independent manner. PMID:24194837

  2. The defence of therapeutic privilege in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mulheron, Rachael

    2003-11-01

    Therapeutic privilege is a defence that excuses a medical practitioner or other health professional from complying with the requirements of full disclosure to a patient in circumstances where it is reasonably considered that such disclosure would be harmful to that patient's health or welfare. Although the concept originated in the United States, the defence has been applied in Australia, and was specifically endorsed as part of Australian law by the High Court in Rogers v Whitaker (1992) 175 CLR 479. However, there has been negligible application of the defence since that endorsement. This article examines the doctrine of therapeutic privilege in the present Australian medico-legal environment. After an examination of the concept and its three constituetent elements, the article canvasses the limited instances of judicial approval of the defence prior to Rogers v Whitaker. The author then analyses, by reference to reported and unreported case law, why the defence has been so narrowly interpreted since, such that it has come to occupy an almost untenable position in Australia's medical jurisprudence.

  3. Pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase CaALDH1 interacts with Xanthomonas effector AvrBsT and promotes effector-triggered cell death and defence responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas type III effector AvrBsT induces hypersensitive cell death and defence responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum) and Nicotiana benthamiana. Little is known about the host factors that interact with AvrBsT. Here, we identified pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (CaALDH1) as an AvrBsT-interacting protein. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction between CaALDH1 and AvrBsT in planta. CaALDH1:smGFP fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. CaALDH1 expression in pepper was rapidly and strongly induced by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transient co-expression of CaALDH1 with avrBsT significantly enhanced avrBsT-triggered cell death in N. benthamiana leaves. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity was higher in leaves transiently expressing CaALDH1, suggesting that CaALDH1 acts as a cell death enhancer, independently of AvrBsT. CaALDH1 silencing disrupted phenolic compound accumulation, H2O2 production, defence response gene expression, and cell death during avirulent Xcv Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing CaALDH1 exhibited enhanced defence response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. These results indicate that cytoplasmic CaALDH1 interacts with AvrBsT and promotes plant cell death and defence responses. PMID:25873668

  4. Heterologous Expression of Moss Light-harvesting Complex Stress-related 1 (LHCSR1), the Chlorophyll a-Xanthophyll Pigment-protein Complex Catalyzing Non-photochemical Quenching, in Nicotiana sp.*

    PubMed Central

    Pinnola, Alberta; Ghin, Leonardo; Gecchele, Elisa; Merlin, Matilde; Alboresi, Alessandro; Avesani, Linda; Pezzotti, Mario; Capaldi, Stefano; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bassi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms evolved mechanisms for thermal dissipation of energy absorbed in excess to prevent formation of reactive oxygen species. The major and fastest component, called non-photochemical quenching, occurs within the photosystem II antenna system by the action of two essential light-harvesting complex (LHC)-like proteins, photosystem II subunit S (PSBS) in plants and light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) in green algae and diatoms. In the evolutionary intermediate Physcomitrella patens, a moss, both gene products are active. These proteins, which are present in low amounts, are difficult to purify, preventing structural and functional analysis. Here, we report on the overexpression of the LHCSR1 protein from P. patens in the heterologous systems Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum using transient and stable nuclear transformation. We show that the protein accumulated in both heterologous systems is in its mature form, localizes in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes, and is correctly folded with chlorophyll a and xanthophylls but without chlorophyll b, an essential chromophore for plants and algal LHC proteins. Finally, we show that recombinant LHCSR1 is active in quenching in vivo, implying that the recombinant protein obtained is a good material for future structural and functional studies. PMID:26260788

  5. Heterologous expression of moss light-harvesting complex stress-related 1 (LHCSR1), the chlorophyll a-xanthophyll pigment-protein complex catalyzing non-photochemical quenching, in Nicotiana sp.

    PubMed

    Pinnola, Alberta; Ghin, Leonardo; Gecchele, Elisa; Merlin, Matilde; Alboresi, Alessandro; Avesani, Linda; Pezzotti, Mario; Capaldi, Stefano; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bassi, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms evolved mechanisms for thermal dissipation of energy absorbed in excess to prevent formation of reactive oxygen species. The major and fastest component, called non-photochemical quenching, occurs within the photosystem II antenna system by the action of two essential light-harvesting complex (LHC)-like proteins, photosystem II subunit S (PSBS) in plants and light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) in green algae and diatoms. In the evolutionary intermediate Physcomitrella patens, a moss, both gene products are active. These proteins, which are present in low amounts, are difficult to purify, preventing structural and functional analysis. Here, we report on the overexpression of the LHCSR1 protein from P. patens in the heterologous systems Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum using transient and stable nuclear transformation. We show that the protein accumulated in both heterologous systems is in its mature form, localizes in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes, and is correctly folded with chlorophyll a and xanthophylls but without chlorophyll b, an essential chromophore for plants and algal LHC proteins. Finally, we show that recombinant LHCSR1 is active in quenching in vivo, implying that the recombinant protein obtained is a good material for future structural and functional studies. PMID:26260788

  6. Heterologous expression of moss light-harvesting complex stress-related 1 (LHCSR1), the chlorophyll a-xanthophyll pigment-protein complex catalyzing non-photochemical quenching, in Nicotiana sp.

    PubMed

    Pinnola, Alberta; Ghin, Leonardo; Gecchele, Elisa; Merlin, Matilde; Alboresi, Alessandro; Avesani, Linda; Pezzotti, Mario; Capaldi, Stefano; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bassi, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms evolved mechanisms for thermal dissipation of energy absorbed in excess to prevent formation of reactive oxygen species. The major and fastest component, called non-photochemical quenching, occurs within the photosystem II antenna system by the action of two essential light-harvesting complex (LHC)-like proteins, photosystem II subunit S (PSBS) in plants and light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) in green algae and diatoms. In the evolutionary intermediate Physcomitrella patens, a moss, both gene products are active. These proteins, which are present in low amounts, are difficult to purify, preventing structural and functional analysis. Here, we report on the overexpression of the LHCSR1 protein from P. patens in the heterologous systems Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum using transient and stable nuclear transformation. We show that the protein accumulated in both heterologous systems is in its mature form, localizes in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes, and is correctly folded with chlorophyll a and xanthophylls but without chlorophyll b, an essential chromophore for plants and algal LHC proteins. Finally, we show that recombinant LHCSR1 is active in quenching in vivo, implying that the recombinant protein obtained is a good material for future structural and functional studies.

  7. Probiotics: beneficial factors of the defence system.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Jean Michel

    2010-08-01

    Probiotics, defined as living micro-organisms that provide a health benefit to the host when ingested in adequate amounts, have been used traditionally as food components to help the body to recover from diarrhoea. They are commonly ingested as part of fermented foods, mostly in fresh fermented dairy products. They can interact with the host through different components of the gut defence systems. There is mounting clinical evidence that some probiotics, but not all, help the defence of the host as demonstrated by either a shorter duration of infections or a decrease in the host's susceptibility to pathogens. Different components of the gut barrier can be involved in the strengthening of the body's defences: the gut microbiota, the gut epithelial barrier and the immune system. Many studies have been conducted in normal free-living subjects or in subjects during common infections like the common cold and show that some probiotic-containing foods can improve the functioning of or strengthen the body's defence. Specific probiotic foods can be included in the usual balanced diet of consumers to help them to better cope with the daily challenges of their environment.

  8. In Defence of the Classroom Science Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrory, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Science demonstrations are often criticised for their passive nature, their gratuitous exploitation and their limited ability to develop scientific knowledge and understanding. This article is intended to present a robust defence of the use of demonstrations in the classroom by identifying some of their unique and powerful benefits--practical,…

  9. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ross

    The man-in-the-middle defence is all about rehabilitating Charlie. For 20 years we’ve worried about this guy in the middle, Charlie, who’s forever intercalating himself into the communications between Alice and Bob, and people have been very judgemental about poor Charlie, saying that Charlie is a wicked person. Well, we’re not entirely convinced.

  10. Malaysian Defence and E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhary, Jowati binti

    2005-01-01

    This paper begins with an analysis of the changing security scenario in the Asian region, with special focus on Malaysian defence strategies and foreign policies. Beginning in the mid 1990s, the Malaysian government shifted its attention away from the counter insurgency strategies of the early decades of independence to focus on wider questions of…

  11. Plant surface reactions: an opportunistic ozone defence mechanism impacting atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, W.; Fischer, L.; Canaval, E.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Tissier, A.; Hansel, A.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. Plant injuries have been linked to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative damage of the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: can surface reactions limit the stomatal uptake of ozone and therefore reduce its detrimental effects to plants?In this laboratory study we could show that semi-volatile organic compounds exuded by the glandular trichomes of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties are an efficient ozone sink at the plant surface. In our experiments, different diterpenoid compounds were responsible for a strongly variety-dependent ozone uptake of plants under dark conditions, when stomatal pores are almost closed. Surface reactions of ozone were accompanied by a prompt release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be linked to the corresponding precursor compounds: ozonolysis cis-abienol (C20H34O) - a diterpenoid with two exocyclic double bonds - caused emissions of formaldehyde (HCHO) and methyl vinyl ketone (C4H6O). The ring-structured cembratrien-diols (C20H34O2) with three endocyclic double bonds need at least two ozonolysis steps to form volatile carbonyls such as 4-oxopentanal (C5H8O2), which we could observe in the gas phase, too.Fluid dynamic calculations were used to model ozone distribution in the diffusion-limited leaf boundary layer under daylight conditions. In the case of an ozone-reactive leaf surface, ozone gradients in the vicinity of stomatal pores are changed in such a way that the ozone flux through the open stomata is strongly reduced.Our results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at the plant surface should be considered as a source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, impacting gas phase chemistry, as well as efficient ozone sink improving the ozone tolerance of plants.

  12. Reproduction of Globodera tabacum solanacearum in Seven Flue-Cured Tobacco-Producing Soils

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, S. L.; JOHNSON, C. S.; Eisenback, J. D.; Reed, T. D.

    2000-01-01

    The tobacco cyst nematode (Globodera tabacum solanacearum) continues to pose a serious threat to flue-cured tobacco production in Virginia and nearby states. Soils were sampled from five uninfested and two infested flue-cured tobacco-producing locations. Twenty-three edaphic factors were characterized to determine if any were correlated with G. t. solanacearum reproduction. Comparisons were also made between pasteurized and natural soils to determine if biological suppression of G. t. solanacearum reproduction might be occurring in currently uninfested areas. Differences in G. t. solanacearum reproduction were noted among the soils, but results were inconsistent across the three trials conducted in this study. Only soil pH correlated significantly with nematode reproduction, and then only in one of three trials. Globodera tabacum solanacearum reproduced with similar efficiency in natural and pasteurized soils. PMID:19270999

  13. Ozone and nitric oxide induce cGMP-dependent and -independent transcription of defence genes in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Stefania; Meier, Stuart; Gehring, Chris; Madeo, Laura; Fornaciari, Marco; Romano, Bruno; Ederli, Luisa

    2009-03-01

    Here, we analyse the temporal signatures of ozone (O3)-induced hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) and the role of the second messenger guanosine3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in transcriptional changes of genes diagnostic for biotic and abiotic stress responses. Within 90 min O3 induced H2O2 and NO peaks and we demonstrate that NO donors cause rapid H2O2 accumulation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf. Ozone also causes highly significant, late (> 2 h) and sustained cGMP increases, suggesting that the second messenger may not be required in all early (< 2 h) responses to O3,but is essential and sufficient for the induction of some O3-dependent pathways.This hypothesis was tested resolving the time course of O3-induced transcript accumulation of alternative oxidase (AOX1a), glutathione peroxidase (GPX),aminocyclopropancarboxylic acid synthase (ACS2) that is critical for the synthesis of ethylene, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PALa) and the pathogenesis-related protein PR1a.The data show that early O3 and NO caused transcriptional activation of the scavenger encoding proteins AOX1a, GPX and the induction of ethylene production through ACS2 are cGMP independent. By contrast, the early response of PALa and the late response of PR1a show critical dependence on cGMP.

  14. Characterization of Cercospora nicotianae Hypothetical Proteins in Cercosporin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Beseli, Aydin; Noar, Roslyn; Daub, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    The photoactivated toxin, cercosporin, produced by Cercospora species, plays an important role in pathogenesis of this fungus to host plants. Cercosporin has almost universal toxicity to cells due to its production of reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen. For that reason, Cercospora species, which are highly resistant to their own toxin, are good candidates to identify genes for resistance to cercosporin and to the reactive oxygen species it produces. In previous research, the zinc cluster transcription factor CRG1 (cercosporin resistance gene 1) was found to be crucial for Cercospora species’ resistance against cercosporin, and subtractive hybridization analysis identified 185 genes differentially expressed between Cercospora nicotianae wild type (wt) and a crg1 mutant. The focus of this work was to identify and characterize the hypothetical proteins that were identified in the Cercospora nicotianae subtractive library as potential resistance factors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the 20 genes encoding hypothetical proteins showed that two, 24cF and 71cR, were induced under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, suggesting a role in resistance. Transformation and expression of 24cF and 71cR in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus, Neurospora crassa, showed that 71cR provided increased resistance to cercosporin toxicity, whereas no significant increase was observed in 24cF transformants. Gene disruption was used to generate C. nicotianae 71cR mutants; these mutants did not differ from wt C. nicotianae in cercosporin resistance or production. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed induction of other resistance genes in the 71cR mutant that may compensate for the loss of 71cR. Analysis of 71cR conserved domains and secondary and tertiary structure identify the protein as having an NTF2-like superfamily DUF1348 domain with unknown function, to be intracellular and localized in the cytosol, and to have similarities to proteins in the steroid delta

  15. Intraspecific Variability within Globodera tabacum solanacearum Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Syracuse, A. J.; Johnson, C. S.; Eisenback, J. D.; Nessler, C. L.; Smith, E. P.

    2004-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs) were used to investigate the intraspecific variability among 19 geographic isolates of Globodera tabacum solanacearum from eight counties in Virginia and one county in North Carolina. Globodera tabacum tabacum, G. t. virginiae, and the Mexican cyst nematode (MCN) were included as outgroups. Six primers were used and 119 amplification products were observed. Each primer yielded reproducible differences in fragment patterns that differentiated the isolates and species. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to illustrate the relatedness among isolates and species. The average Jaccard's similarity index among isolates of G. t. solanacearum was 74%, possibly representing greater variation than that reported in the literature across different pathotypes of the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida, in studies where RAPD were also employed. The RAPD markers described here may be useful for the development of specific primers or probes that could improve the identification of TCN populations. Such improvements in the characterization of TCN genotypes would facilitate the effective deployment of existing and future resistant cultivars to control these economically important pests. PMID:19262823

  16. MADS1, a novel MADS-box protein, is involved in the response of Nicotiana benthamiana to bacterial harpin(Xoo).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huajian; Teng, Wenjun; Liang, Jingang; Liu, Xinyu; Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Zhengguang; Zheng, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factor genes are well known for their role in floral organ and seed development. In this study, a novel MADS-box-containing gene, designated NbMADS1, was isolated from leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. The full-length cDNA was 666 bp and encoded a putative polypeptide of 221 aa with a mass of 24.3 kDa. To assess the role of NbMADS1 in the defence response to bacterial harpin(Xoo), an elicitor of the hypersensitive response, a loss-of-function experiment was performed in N. benthamiana plants using virus-induced gene silencing. Analyses of electrolyte leakage revealed more extensive cell death in the control plants than in NbMADS1-silenced plants. The NbMADS1-silenced plants showed impaired harpin(Xoo)-induced stomatal closure, decreased harpin(Xoo)-induced production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in guard cells, and reduced harpin(Xoo)-induced resistance to Phytophthora nicotianae. The compromised stomatal closure observed in the NbMADS1-silenced plants was inhibited by the application of H2O2 and sodium nitroprusside (an NO donor). Taken together, these results demonstrate that the NbMADS1-H2O2-NO pathway mediates multiple harpin(Xoo)-triggered responses, including stomatal closure, hypersensitive cell death, and defence-related gene expression, suggesting that NbMADS1 plays an important role in regulating the response to harpin(Xoo) in N. benthamiana plants. PMID:26466663

  17. Immune defence under extreme ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Otto; Jokela, Jukka

    2011-02-23

    Owing to global climate change, the extreme weather conditions are predicted to become more frequent, which is suggested to have an even greater impact on ecological interactions than the gradual increase in average temperatures. Here, we examined whether exposure to high ambient temperature affects immune function of the great pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis). We quantified the levels of several immune traits from snails maintained in a non-stressful temperature (15°C) and in an extreme temperature (30°C) that occurs in small ponds during hot summers. We found that snails exposed to high temperature had weaker immune defence, which potentially predisposes them to infections. However, while phenoloxidase and antibacterial activity of snail haemolymph were reduced at high temperature, haemocyte concentration was not affected. This suggests that the effect of high temperature on snail susceptibility to infections may vary across different pathogens because different components of invertebrate immune defence have different roles in resistance.

  18. Peptides as triggers of plant defence.

    PubMed

    Albert, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Plants are confronted with several biotic stresses such as microbial pathogens and other herbivores. To defend against such attackers, plants possess an array of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that sense the danger and consequently initiate a defence programme that prevents further damage and spreading of the pest. Characteristic pathogenic structures, so-called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), serve as signals that allow the plant to sense invaders. Additionally, pathogens wound or damage the plant and the resulting release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) serves as a warning signal. This review focuses on peptides that serve as triggers or amplifiers of plant defence and thus follow the definition of a MAMP or a DAMP. PMID:24014869

  19. Overexpression of the Synthetic Chimeric Native-T-phylloplanin-GFP Genes Optimized for Monocot and Dicot Plants Renders Enhanced Resistance to Blue Mold Disease in Tobacco (N. tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Dipak K.; Hall, James T.; Maiti, Indu B.

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the natural plant resistance and to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of phylloplanin against blue mold, we have expressed a synthetic chimeric native-phylloplanin-GFP protein fusion in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. KY14, a cultivar that is highly susceptible to infection by Peronospora tabacina. The coding sequence of the tobacco phylloplanin gene along with its native signal peptide was fused with GFP at the carboxy terminus. The synthetic chimeric gene (native-phylloplanin-GFP) was placed between the modified Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter with duplicated enhancer domains and the terminator sequence from the rbcSE9 gene. The chimeric gene, expressed in transgenic tobacco, was stably inherited in successive plant generations as shown by molecular characterization, GFP quantification, and confocal fluorescent microscopy. Transgenic plants were morphologically similar to wild-type plants and showed no deleterious effects due to transgene expression. Blue mold-sensitivity assays of tobacco lines were performed by applying P. tabacina sporangia to the upper leaf surface. Transgenic lines expressing the fused synthetic native-phyllopanin-GFP gene in the leaf apoplast showed resistance to infection. Our results demonstrate that in vivo expression of a synthetic fused native-phylloplanin-GFP gene in plants can potentially achieve natural protection against microbial plant pathogens, including P. tabacina in tobacco. PMID:24778589

  20. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ross; Bond, Mike

    Eliminating middlemen from security protocols helps less than one would think. EMV electronic payments, for example, can be made fairer by adding an electronic attorney - a middleman which mediates access to a customer’s card. We compare middlemen in crypto protocols and APIs with those in the real world, and show that a man-in-the-middle defence is helpful in many circumstances. We suggest that the middleman has been unfairly demonised.

  1. Analysis of the antioxidant response of Nicotiana benthamiana to infection with two strains of Pepper mild mottle virus

    PubMed Central

    Hakmaoui, A.; Pérez-Bueno, M. L.; Barón, M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism in symptom development and pathogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana plants upon infection with two strains of Pepper mild mottle virus, the Italian (PMMoV-I) and the Spanish (PMMoV-S) strains. In this host, it has been shown that PMMoV-I is less virulent and plants show the capability to recover 21 d after inoculation. Analyses of oxidative stress biomarkers, ROS-scavenging enzyme activities, and antioxidant compounds were conducted in plants at different post-infection times. Only PMMoV-I stimulated a defence response through: (i) up-regulation of different superoxide dismutase isozymes; (ii) maintenance of adequate levels of three peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prx, Prx IIC, and Prx IIF); and (iii) adjustments in the glutathione pool to maintain the total glutathione content. Moreover, there was an increase in the level of oxidized glutathione and ascorbate in the recovery phase of PMMoV-I-infected plants. The antioxidant response and the extent of oxidative stress in N. benthamiana plants correlates to: (i) the severity of the symptoms elicited by either strain of PMMoV; and (ii) the high capacity of PMMoV-I-infected plants for symptom recovery and delayed senescence, compared with PMMoV-S-infected plants. PMID:22915745

  2. Possible involvement of maize Rop1 in the defence responses of plants to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanyong; Shi, Yan; Li, Yongqiang; Cheng, Yuqin; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Zaifeng

    2012-09-01

    The expression of host genes can be altered during the process of viral infection. To investigate the viral infection-induced up-regulated gene expression changes of maize at different time intervals post-inoculation with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library was constructed. A total of 454 cDNA clones were identified to be viral infection-induced up-regulated genes. The influence of Rop1 on the infection of maize by SCMV was investigated. The results showed that transient silencing of the ZmRop1 gene through virus-induced gene silencing enhanced the accumulation and systemic infection of SCMV and another potyvirus (Pennisetum mosaic virus) in maize plants, whereas transient over-expression of ZmRop1 in maize protoplasts reduced SCMV accumulation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the heterologous expression of ZmRop1 impaired Potato virus X infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. These data suggest that ZmRop1 may play a role in plant defence responses to viral infection.

  3. Genetic analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae populations from different hosts using microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two hundred thirty-one isolates of P. nicotianae representing 14 populations from different host genera, including agricultural crops (Citrus, Nicotiana, and Lycopersicon), potted ornamental species in nurseries (Lavandula, Convolvulus, Myrtus, Correa and Ruta) and other plant genera of lesser econo...

  4. Immune defence against Candida fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B; van der Meer, Jos W M; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; van de Veerdonk, Frank L

    2015-10-01

    The immune response to Candida species is shaped by the commensal character of the fungus. There is a crucial role for discerning between colonization and invasion at mucosal surfaces, with the antifungal host defence mechanisms used during mucosal or systemic infection with Candida species differing substantially. Here, we describe how innate sensing of fungi by pattern recognition receptors and the interplay of immune cells (both myeloid and lymphoid) with non-immune cells, including platelets and epithelial cells, shapes host immunity to Candida species. Furthermore, we discuss emerging data suggesting that both the innate and adaptive immune systems display memory characteristics after encountering Candida species.

  5. Revenge of the phages: defeating bacterial defences.

    PubMed

    Samson, Julie E; Magadán, Alfonso H; Sabri, Mourad; Moineau, Sylvain

    2013-10-01

    Bacteria and their viral predators (bacteriophages) are locked in a constant battle. In order to proliferate in phage-rich environments, bacteria have an impressive arsenal of defence mechanisms, and in response, phages have evolved counter-strategies to evade these antiviral systems. In this Review, we describe the various tactics that are used by phages to overcome bacterial resistance mechanisms, including adsorption inhibition, restriction-modification, CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) systems and abortive infection. Furthermore, we consider how these observations have enhanced our knowledge of phage biology, evolution and phage-host interactions. PMID:23979432

  6. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis. PMID:27573580

  7. In Defence of Multimodal Re-Signification: A Response to Havard Skaar's "In Defence of Writing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adami, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Responding to "In defence of writing" by Havard Skaar, published in issue 43.1 of this journal (April 2009), the present article argues that (1) compared with text production "from scratch," producing texts through copy-and-paste requires a different type of--rather than less--semiotic work, and that (2) digitally produced writing may involve the…

  8. Large-scale detection and application of expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhou, D; Wang, S; Yang, L

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widespread in the Nicotiana genome. Using an alignment and variation detection method, we developed 20,607,973 SNPs, based on the expressed sequence tag sequences of 10 Nicotiana species. The replacement rate was much higher than the transversion rate in the SNPs, and SNPs widely exist in the Nicotiana. In vitro verification indicated that all of the SNPs were high quality and accurate. Evolutionary relationships between 15 varieties were investigated by polymerase chain reaction with a special primer; the specific 302 locus of these sequence results clearly indicated the origin of Zhongyan 100. A database of Nicotiana SNPs (NSNP) was developed to store and search for SNPs in Nicotiana. NSNP is a tool for researchers to develop SNP markers of sequence data. PMID:26214460

  9. Large-scale detection and application of expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhou, D; Wang, S; Yang, L

    2015-07-14

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widespread in the Nicotiana genome. Using an alignment and variation detection method, we developed 20,607,973 SNPs, based on the expressed sequence tag sequences of 10 Nicotiana species. The replacement rate was much higher than the transversion rate in the SNPs, and SNPs widely exist in the Nicotiana. In vitro verification indicated that all of the SNPs were high quality and accurate. Evolutionary relationships between 15 varieties were investigated by polymerase chain reaction with a special primer; the specific 302 locus of these sequence results clearly indicated the origin of Zhongyan 100. A database of Nicotiana SNPs (NSNP) was developed to store and search for SNPs in Nicotiana. NSNP is a tool for researchers to develop SNP markers of sequence data.

  10. Science and outreach for planetary defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, M.

    2011-10-01

    The recent IAA Planetary Defence Conference held in Romania, focused on a hot topic: from Threat to Action. It is true that we ought to protect the planet but also educate the population in this direction. Increasing rumours about pseudo-scientific issues, such as the impact with asteroids, comets or debris of spatial missions, the effects of the growing solar activity, the displacement of the terrestrial rotation axis following major earthquakes, let alone spreading news about the end-of-the-world, show how crucial it is to prepare people to understand what is going on in the universe and, in particular, on our planet, and how to deal with inevitable events. Another central question is in order: who should be in charge of this education? Perhaps the journalists, but they lack the necessary preparation to present correct and updated information to the public. Or the scientists, but they are extremely busy and concentrated on their projects aimed at defending the planet and at answering the vast array of questions that their research stirs up. Our goal is to answer the following question: to what extent is it the scientist's responsibility and to what extent the journalist's to educate people for the planetary defence? In addition, we shall suggest how they can effectively co-ordinate efforts to solve the current problems of a society submerged in increasingly sophisticated but decreasingly informed technologies.

  11. Insect-plant interactions: endocrine defences.

    PubMed

    Bowers, W S

    1984-01-01

    It is the inevitable consequence of evolution that competitive species living together in a restricted space must try to exclude each other. Plants and insects are prime examples of this eternal competition, and although neither of these is in danger of extinction, their mutual defensive strategies are of compelling interest to the human race. Plant defences based on the insecticidal activity of certain of their secondary chemicals are readily apparent. Only through research into the fundamentals of insect physiology and biochemistry are more subtle defensive mechanisms revealed, linked to the disruption of the insect endocrine system. A diverse number of chemical structures are found in plants, which interfere with hormone-mediated processes in insects. Examples include: mimics of the insect's juvenile hormones such as juvabione from the balsam fir and the juvocimenes from sweet basil, which lethally disrupt insect development, and the precocenes found in Ageratum species, which act as anti-juvenile hormonal agents. The latter appear to serve as 'suicide substrates', undergoing activation into cytotoxins when acted on by specialized enzymes resident in the insect endocrine gland (corpus allatum) that is responsible for juvenile hormone biosynthesis and secretion. Consideration of these plant defensive strategies, which have been reached through aeons of evolutionary experimentation, may assist the human race in its defences against its principal competitors for food, fibre and health.

  12. Cooperation in defence against a predator.

    PubMed

    Garay, József

    2009-03-01

    The origin and the evolutionary stability of cooperation between unrelated individuals is one of the key problems of evolutionary biology. In this paper, a cooperative defence game against a predator is introduced which is based on Hamilton's selfish herd theory and Eshel's survival game models. Cooperation is altruistic in the sense that the individual, which is not the target of the predator, helps the members of the group attacked by the predator and during defensive action the helper individual may also die in any attack. In order to decrease the long term predation risk, this individual has to carry out a high risk action. Here I show that this kind of cooperative behaviour can evolve in small groups. The reason for the emergence of cooperation is that if the predator does not kill a mate of a cooperative individual, then the survival probability of the cooperative individual will increase in two cases. If the mate is non-cooperative, then-according to the dilution effect, the predator confusion effect and the higher predator vigilance-the survival probability of the cooperative individual increases. The second case is when the mate is cooperative, because a cooperative individual has a further gain, the active help in defence during further predator attacks. Thus, if an individual can increase the survival rate of its mates (no matter whether the mate is cooperative or not), then its own predation risk will decrease.

  13. Aggregation, defence and warning signals: the evolutionary relationship.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Sherratt, Thomas N

    2006-10-01

    In a seminal contribution, Fisher argued how distastefulness could incrementally evolve in a prey species that was distributed in family groups. Many defended prey species occur in aggregations, but did aggregation facilitate the evolution of defence as Fisher proposed or did the possession of a defence allow individuals to enjoy the benefits of group living? Contemporary theory suggests that it can work both ways: pre-existing defences can make the evolution of gregariousness easier, but gregariousness can also aid the evolution of defence and warning signals. Unfortunately, the key phylogenetic analyses to elucidate the ordering of events have been hampered by the relative rarity of gregarious species, which in itself indicates that aggregation is not a pre-requisite for defence. Like the underlying theory, experimental studies have not given a definitive answer to the relative timing of the evolution of defence and aggregation, except to demonstrate that both orderings are possible. Conspicuous signals are unlikely to have evolved in the absence of a defence and aggregated undefended prey are likely to be vulnerable to predation in the absence of satiation effects. It therefore seems most likely that defence generally preceded the evolution of both aggregation and signalling, but alternative routes may well be possible.

  14. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    SciTech Connect

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-26

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT and E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  15. Costs of inducible defence along a resource gradient.

    PubMed

    Brönmark, Christer; Lakowitz, Thomas; Nilsson, P Anders; Ahlgren, Johan; Lennartsdotter, Charlotte; Hollander, Johan

    2012-01-01

    In addition to having constitutive defence traits, many organisms also respond to predation by phenotypic plasticity. In order for plasticity to be adaptive, induced defences should incur a benefit to the organism in, for example, decreased risk of predation. However, the production of defence traits may include costs in fitness components such as growth, time to reproduction, or fecundity. To test the hypothesis that the expression of phenotypic plasticity incurs costs, we performed a common garden experiment with a freshwater snail, Radix balthica, a species known to change morphology in the presence of molluscivorous fish. We measured a number of predator-induced morphological and behavioural defence traits in snails that we reared in the presence or absence of chemical cues from fish. Further, we quantified the costs of plasticity in fitness characters related to fecundity and growth. Since plastic responses may be inhibited under limited resource conditions, we reared snails in different densities and thereby levels of competition. Snails exposed to predator cues grew rounder and thicker shells, traits confirmed to be adaptive in environments with fish. Defence traits were consistently expressed independent of density, suggesting strong selection from predatory molluscivorous fish. However, the expression of defence traits resulted in reduced growth rate and fecundity, particularly with limited resources. Our results suggest full defence in predator related traits regardless of resource availability, and costs of defence consequently paid in traits related to fitness. PMID:22291961

  16. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  17. Comparative analysis of passive defences in spiders (Araneae).

    PubMed

    Pekár, Stano

    2014-07-01

    Being frequent prey of many predators, including especially wasps and birds, spiders have evolved a variety of defence mechanisms. Here I studied patterns of passive defences, namely anachoresis, crypsis, masquerade, aposematism and Batesian mimicry, in spiders. Using published information pertaining more than 1000 spider species, the phylogenetic pattern of different passive defences (i.e. defences that decrease the risk of an encounter with the predator) was investigated. Furthermore, I studied the effect of foraging guild, geographical distribution and diel activity on the frequency of defences as these determine the predators diversity, presence and perception. I found that crypsis (background matching) combined with anachoresis (hiding) was the most frequent defence confined mainly to families/genera at the base of the tree. Aposematism (warning coloration) and Batesian mimicry (imitation of noxious/dangerous model) were found in taxa that branched later in the tree, and masquerade (imitation of inedible objects) was confined to families at intermediate positions of the tree. Aposematism and Batesian mimicry were restricted to a few lineages. Masquerade was used particularly by web-building species with nocturnal activity. Aposematism was rare but mainly used by web-building diurnal species. Batesian mimicry was frequently observed in cursorial species with diurnal activity. Cryptic species were more common in temperate zones, whereas aposematic and mimetic species were more common in the tropics. Here I show that the evolution of passive defences in spiders was influenced by the ecology of species. Then, I discuss the evolutionary significance of the particularly defences.

  18. Ionomic profiling of Nicotiana langsdorffii wild-type and mutant genotypes exposed to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Ardini, Francisco; Soggia, Francesco; Abelmoschi, Maria Luisa; Magi, Emanuele; Grotti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    To provide a new insight into the response of plants to abiotic stresses, the ionomic profiles of Nicotiana langsdorffii specimens have been determined before and after exposure to toxic metals (chromium) or drought conditions. The plants were genetically transformed with the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or the gene for Agrobacterium rhizogenes rolC, because these modifications are known to produce an imbalance in phytohormone equilibria and a significant change in the defence response of the plant. Elemental profiles were obtained by developing and applying analytical procedures based on inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry (ICP-AES/MS). In particular, the removal of isobaric interferences affecting the determination of Cr and V by ICP-MS was accomplished by use of a dynamic reaction cell, after optimization of the relevant conditions. The combined use of ICP atomic emission and mass spectrometry enabled the determination of 29 major and trace elements (Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Eu, Fe, Ga, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, P, Pb, Pt, Rb, S, Sb, Sn, Sr, Te, V, W, Y, and Zn) in different parts of the plants (roots, stems, and leaves), with high accuracy and precision. Multivariate data processing and study of element distribution patterns provided new information about the ionomic response of the target organism to chemical treatment or water stress. Genetic modification mainly affected the distribution of Bi, Cr, Mo, Na, and S, indicating that these elements were involved in biochemical processes controlled by the GR or rolC genes. Chemical stress strongly affected accumulation of several elements (Ba, Ca, Fe, Ga, K, Li, Mn, Mo, Na, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sn, Te, V, and Zn) in different ways; for Ca, Fe, K, Mn, Na, and P the effect was quite similar to that observed in other studies after treatment with other transition elements, for example Cu and Cd. The effect of water deficit was less evident, mainly consisting in a decrease of Ba, Cr, Na, and Sr

  19. Asymmetric selection and the evolution of extraordinary defences

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Mark C.; Bürger, Reinhard; Bolnick, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists typically predict future evolutionary responses to natural selection by analyzing evolution on an adaptive landscape. Much theory assumes symmetric fitness surfaces even though many stabilizing selection gradients deviate from symmetry. Here we revisit Lande's adaptive landscape and introduce novel analytical theory that includes asymmetric selection. Asymmetric selection and the resulting skewed trait distributions bias equilibrium mean phenotypes away from fitness peaks, usually toward the flatter shoulder of the individual fitness surface. We apply this theory to explain a longstanding paradox in biology and medicine: the evolution of excessive defences against enemies. These so-called extraordinary defences can evolve in response to asymmetrical selection when marginal risks of insufficient defence exceed marginal costs of excessive defence. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks between population abundances and asymmetric selection further exaggerate these defences. Recognizing the effect of asymmetrical selection on evolutionary trajectories will improve the accuracy of predictions and suggest novel explanations for apparent sub-optimality. PMID:23820378

  20. Ecological mechanisms for the coevolution of mating systems and defence.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Stuart A

    2015-02-01

    The diversity of flowering plants is evident in two seemingly unrelated aspects of life history: sexual reproduction, exemplified by the stunning variation in flower form and function, and defence, often in the form of an impressive arsenal of secondary chemistry. Researchers are beginning to appreciate that plant defence and reproduction do not evolve independently, but, instead, may have reciprocal and interactive (coevolutionary) effects on each other. Understanding the mechanisms for mating-defence interactions promises to broaden our understanding of how ecological processes can generate these two rich sources of angiosperm diversity. Here, I review current research on the role of herbivory as a driver of mating system evolution, and the role of mating systems in the evolution of defence strategies. I outline different ecological mechanisms and processes that could generate these coevolutionary patterns, and summarize theoretical and empirical support for each. I provide a conceptual framework for linking plant defence with mating system theory to better integrate these two research fields.

  1. A saponin-detoxifying enzyme mediates suppression of plant defences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouarab, K.; Melton, R.; Peart, J.; Baulcombe, D.; Osbourn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Plant disease resistance can be conferred by constitutive features such as structural barriers or preformed antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Additional defence mechanisms are activated in response to pathogen attack and include localized cell death (the hypersensitive response). Pathogens use different strategies to counter constitutive and induced plant defences, including degradation of preformed antimicrobial compounds and the production of molecules that suppress induced plant defences. Here we present evidence for a two-component process in which a fungal pathogen subverts the preformed antimicrobial compounds of its host and uses them to interfere with induced defence responses. Antimicrobial saponins are first hydrolysed by a fungal saponin-detoxifying enzyme. The degradation product of this hydrolysis then suppresses induced defence responses by interfering with fundamental signal transduction processes leading to disease resistance.

  2. Kin recognition affects plant communication and defence.

    PubMed

    Karban, Richard; Shiojiri, Kaori; Ishizaki, Satomi; Wetzel, William C; Evans, Richard Y

    2013-04-01

    The ability of many animals to recognize kin has allowed them to evolve diverse cooperative behaviours; such ability is less well studied for plants. Many plants, including Artemisia tridentata, have been found to respond to volatile cues emitted by experimentally wounded neighbours to increase levels of resistance to herbivory. We report that this communication was more effective among A. tridentata plants that were more closely related based on microsatellite markers. Plants in the field that received cues from experimentally clipped close relatives experienced less leaf herbivory over the growing season than those that received cues from clipped neighbours that were more distantly related. These results indicate that plants can respond differently to cues from kin, making it less likely that emitters will aid strangers and making it more likely that receivers will respond to cues from relatives. More effective defence adds to a growing list of favourable consequences of kin recognition for plants.

  3. Triage in the defence medical services.

    PubMed

    Horne, Simon T; Vassallo, J

    2015-06-01

    Triage of patients into categories according to their need for intervention is a core part of military medical practice. This article reviews how triage has evolved in the Defence Medical Services and how it might develop in the context of recent research. In particular, a simple model demonstrates that the ideal sensitivity and specificity of a triage system depends upon the availability of transport and the capacity of the receiving units. As a result, we may need to fundamentally change the way we approach triage in order to optimise outcomes-especially if casualty evacuation timelines become longer and smaller medical units more prevalent on future operations. Some pragmatic options for change are discussed. Finally, other areas of current research around triage are highlighted, perhaps showing where triage may go next.

  4. Specificity in Mesograzer-Induced Defences in Seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Crego, Begoña; Arteaga, Pedro; Ueber, Alexandra; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Santos, Rui; Molis, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Grazing-induced plant defences that reduce palatability to herbivores are widespread in terrestrial plants and seaweeds, but they have not yet been reported in seagrasses. We investigated the ability of two seagrass species to induce defences in response to direct grazing by three associated mesograzers. Specifically, we conducted feeding-assayed induction experiments to examine how mesograzer-specific grazing impact affects seagrass induction of defences within the context of the optimal defence theory. We found that the amphipod Gammarus insensibilis and the isopod Idotea chelipes exerted a low-intensity grazing on older blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa, which reflects a weak grazing impact that may explain the lack of inducible defences. The isopod Synischia hectica exerted the strongest grazing impact on C. nodosa via high-intensity feeding on young blades with a higher fitness value. This isopod grazing induced defences in C. nodosa as indicated by a consistently lower consumption of blades previously grazed for 5, 12 and 16 days. The lower consumption was maintained when offered tissues with no plant structure (agar-reconstituted food), but showing a reduced size of the previous grazing effect. This indicates that structural traits act in combination with chemical traits to reduce seagrass palatability to the isopod. Increase in total phenolics but not in C:N ratio and total nitrogen of grazed C. nodosa suggests chemical defences rather than a modified nutritional quality as primarily induced chemical traits. We detected no induction of defences in Zostera noltei, which showed the ability to replace moderate losses of young biomass to mesograzers via compensatory growth. Our study provides the first experimental evidence of induction of defences against meso-herbivory that reduce further consumption in seagrasses. It also emphasizes the relevance of grazer identity in determining the level of grazing impact triggering resistance and compensatory

  5. Cotton GhMKK5 affects disease resistance, induces HR-like cell death, and reduces the tolerance to salt and drought stress in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Li, Yuzhen; Lu, Wenjing; Meng, Fei; Wu, Chang-ai; Guo, Xingqi

    2012-06-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are involved in various processes from plant growth and development to biotic and abiotic stress responses. MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), which link MAPKs and MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), play crucial roles in MAPK cascades to mediate a variety of stress responses in plants. However, few MAPKKs have been functionally characterized in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). In this study, a novel gene, GhMKK5, from cotton belonging to the group C MAPKKs was isolated and characterized. The expression of GhMKK5 can be induced by pathogen infection, abiotic stresses, and multiple defence-related signal molecules. The overexpression of GhMKK5 in Nicotiana benthamiana enhanced the plants' resistance to the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum by elevating the expression of pathogen resistance (PR) genes, including PR1a, PR2, PR4, PR5, and NPR1, but increased the plants' sensitivity to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae Tucker. Importantly, GhMKK5-overexpressing plants displayed markedly elevated expression of reactive oxygen species-related and cell death marker genes, such as NtRbohA and NtCDM, and resulted in hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death characterized by the accumulation of H(2)O(2). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that GhMKK5 overexpression in plants reduced their tolerance to salt and drought stresses, as determined by statistical analysis of seed germination, root length, leaf water loss, and survival rate. Drought obviously accelerated the cell death phenomenon in GhMKK5-overexpressing plants. These results suggest that GhMKK5 may play an important role in pathogen infection and the regulation of the salt and drought stress responses in plants.

  6. Non-immunological defence mechanisms of the gut.

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, S A; Gyr, K

    1992-01-01

    Non-immunological defence mechanisms represent an important line of intestinal defence in addition to humoral and cellular immunity. This review summarises the evidence for the role of the non-immunological defence system. Protective factors that have been amply documented are gastric juice, intestinal motility, and intestinal flora. Components of pancreatic juice, lysozyme, and epithelial cell turnover may also be involved. Special attention is given to gastric acid, infection with Helicobacter pylori, and hypochlorhydria and their association with infectious diarrhoea. Epidemic hypochlorhydria is discussed since this increases sensitivity to intestinal infections in third world countries. PMID:1644343

  7. Nicotiana plumbaginifolia hlg mutants have a mutation in a PHYB-type phytochrome gene: they have elongated hypocotyls in red light, but are not elongated as adult plants.

    PubMed

    Hudson, M; Robson, P R; Kraepiel, Y; Caboche, M; Smith, H

    1997-11-01

    Two new allelic mutants of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia have been isolated which display a hypocotyl which is long (hlg) when seedlings are grown in continuous white light (W). This can be accounted for by the decreased response to red light (R) of the hypocotyl elongation rate in these mutants. Responses to other wavelengths are unaffected in the mutants. When grown in white light, mature hlg mutants are not elongated with respect to the wild-type; they also bolt and flower later. The shade-avoidance responses to red/far red ratio (R:FR) are intact in these mutants. Both mutants are deficient in phyB-like polypeptide that is immunodetectable in the wild-type; both have wild-type levels of a phyA-like polypeptide. These alleles are inherited in a partially dominant manner, and correspond to single-base missense mutations in a gene highly homologous to N. tabacum PHYB, which codes for a phytochrome B-type photoreceptor. One allele, hlg-1, has an introduced amino acid substitution; this may define a residue essential for phytochrome protein stability. The other allele, hlg-2, has a stop codon introduced C-terminal to the chromophore binding domain. As these phyB mutants are unaffected in shade-avoidance responses, but deficient in perception of R, it is concluded that the phyB absent in these mutants is responsible for R perception in the N. plumbaginifolia seedling, but is not a R:FR sensor in light-grown plants.

  8. L-type lectin receptor kinases in Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato and their role in Phytophthora resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Weide, Rob; Govers, Francine; Bouwmeester, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-bound receptors play crucial roles as sentinels of plant immunity against a large variety of invading microbes. One class of receptors known to be involved in self/non-self-surveillance and plant resistance comprises the L-type lectin receptor kinases (LecRKs). Previously, we reported that several Arabidopsis LecRKs play a role in resistance to Phytophthora pathogens. In this study, we determined whether homologues of these LecRKs from the Solanaceous plants Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) play similar roles in defence against Phytophthora. In genome-wide screenings, a total of 38 (Nb)LecRKs were identified in N. benthamiana and 22 (Sl)LecRKs in tomato, each consisting of both a lectin and a kinase domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that, in contrast to Arabidopsis, which has a LecRK family comprising nine clades, Solanaceous species have just five of these nine clades (i.e. IV, VI, VII, VIII, and IX), plus four additional clades that lack Arabidopsis homologues. Several of the Solanaceous LecRKs were selected for functional analysis using virus-induced gene silencing. Infection assays with Phytophthora capsici and Phytophthora infestans on LecRK-silenced plants revealed that N. benthamiana and tomato homologues in clade IX play a role in Phytophthora resistance similar to the two Arabidopsis LecRKs in this clade, suggesting conserved functions of clade IX LecRKs across different plant families. This study provides a first insight into the diversity of Solanaceous LecRKs and their role in plant immunity, and shows the potential of LecRKs for Phytophthora resistance breeding. PMID:26248665

  9. L-type lectin receptor kinases in Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato and their role in Phytophthora resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Weide, Rob; Govers, Francine; Bouwmeester, Klaas

    2015-11-01

    Membrane-bound receptors play crucial roles as sentinels of plant immunity against a large variety of invading microbes. One class of receptors known to be involved in self/non-self-surveillance and plant resistance comprises the L-type lectin receptor kinases (LecRKs). Previously, we reported that several Arabidopsis LecRKs play a role in resistance to Phytophthora pathogens. In this study, we determined whether homologues of these LecRKs from the Solanaceous plants Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) play similar roles in defence against Phytophthora. In genome-wide screenings, a total of 38 (Nb)LecRKs were identified in N. benthamiana and 22 (Sl)LecRKs in tomato, each consisting of both a lectin and a kinase domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that, in contrast to Arabidopsis, which has a LecRK family comprising nine clades, Solanaceous species have just five of these nine clades (i.e. IV, VI, VII, VIII, and IX), plus four additional clades that lack Arabidopsis homologues. Several of the Solanaceous LecRKs were selected for functional analysis using virus-induced gene silencing. Infection assays with Phytophthora capsici and Phytophthora infestans on LecRK-silenced plants revealed that N. benthamiana and tomato homologues in clade IX play a role in Phytophthora resistance similar to the two Arabidopsis LecRKs in this clade, suggesting conserved functions of clade IX LecRKs across different plant families. This study provides a first insight into the diversity of Solanaceous LecRKs and their role in plant immunity, and shows the potential of LecRKs for Phytophthora resistance breeding.

  10. L-type lectin receptor kinases in Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato and their role in Phytophthora resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Weide, Rob; Govers, Francine; Bouwmeester, Klaas

    2015-11-01

    Membrane-bound receptors play crucial roles as sentinels of plant immunity against a large variety of invading microbes. One class of receptors known to be involved in self/non-self-surveillance and plant resistance comprises the L-type lectin receptor kinases (LecRKs). Previously, we reported that several Arabidopsis LecRKs play a role in resistance to Phytophthora pathogens. In this study, we determined whether homologues of these LecRKs from the Solanaceous plants Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) play similar roles in defence against Phytophthora. In genome-wide screenings, a total of 38 (Nb)LecRKs were identified in N. benthamiana and 22 (Sl)LecRKs in tomato, each consisting of both a lectin and a kinase domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that, in contrast to Arabidopsis, which has a LecRK family comprising nine clades, Solanaceous species have just five of these nine clades (i.e. IV, VI, VII, VIII, and IX), plus four additional clades that lack Arabidopsis homologues. Several of the Solanaceous LecRKs were selected for functional analysis using virus-induced gene silencing. Infection assays with Phytophthora capsici and Phytophthora infestans on LecRK-silenced plants revealed that N. benthamiana and tomato homologues in clade IX play a role in Phytophthora resistance similar to the two Arabidopsis LecRKs in this clade, suggesting conserved functions of clade IX LecRKs across different plant families. This study provides a first insight into the diversity of Solanaceous LecRKs and their role in plant immunity, and shows the potential of LecRKs for Phytophthora resistance breeding. PMID:26248665

  11. Elicitation of hypersensitive responses in Nicotiana glutinosa by the suppressor of RNA silencing protein P0 from poleroviruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ken-Der; Empleo, Roman; Nguyen, Tan Tri V; Moffett, Peter; Sacco, Melanie Ann

    2015-06-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) proteins that confer resistance to viruses recognize viral gene products with diverse functions, including viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs). The P0 protein from poleroviruses is a VSR that targets the ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) protein for degradation, thereby disrupting RNA silencing and antiviral defences. Here, we report resistance against poleroviruses in Nicotiana glutinosa directed against Turnip yellows virus (TuYV) and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV). The P0 proteins from TuYV (P0(T) (u) ), PLRV (P0(PL) ) and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (P0(CA) ) were found to elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in N. glutinosa accession TW59, whereas other accessions recognized P0(PL) only. Genetic analysis showed that recognition of P0(T) (u) by a resistance gene designated RPO1 (Resistance to POleroviruses 1) is inherited as a dominant allele. Expression of P0 from a Potato virus X (PVX) expression vector transferred recognition to the recombinant virus on plants expressing RPO1, supporting P0 as the unique Polerovirus factor eliciting resistance. The induction of HR required a functional P0 protein, as P0(T) (u) mutants with substitutions in the F-box motif that abolished VSR activity were unable to elicit HR. We surmised that the broad P0 recognition seen in TW59 and the requirement for the F-box protein motif could indicate detection of P0-induced AGO1 degradation and disruption of RNA silencing; however, other viral silencing suppressors, including the PVX P25 that also causes AGO1 degradation, failed to elicit HR in N. glutinosa. Investigation of P0 elicitation of RPO1 could provide insight into P0 activities within the cell that trigger resistance.

  12. Role of Host-Defence Peptides in Eye Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kolar, Satya S.; McDermott, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    The eye and its associated tissues including the lacrimal system and lids have evolved several defence mechanisms to prevent microbial invasion. Included among this armory are several host-defence peptides. These multifunctional molecules are being studied not only for their endogenous antimicrobial properties but also for their potential therapeutic effects. Here the current knowledge of host-defence peptide expression in the eye will be summarized. The role of these peptides in eye disease will be discussed with the primary focus being on infectious keratitis, inflammatory conditions including dry eye and wound healing. Finally the potential of using host-defence peptides and their mimetics/derivatives for the treatment and prevention of eye diseases is addressed. PMID:21584809

  13. Between-Population Outbreeding Affects Plant Defence

    PubMed Central

    Leimu, Roosa; Fischer, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Between-population crosses may replenish genetic variation of populations, but may also result in outbreeding depression. Apart from direct effects on plant fitness, these outbreeding effects can also alter plant-herbivore interactions by influencing plant tolerance and resistance to herbivory. We investigated effects of experimental within- and between-population outbreeding on herbivore resistance, tolerance and plant fitness using plants from 13 to 19 Lychnis flos-cuculi populations. We found no evidence for outbreeding depression in resistance reflected by the amount of leaf area consumed. However, herbivore performance was greater when fed on plants from between-population compared to within-population crosses. This can reflect outbreeding depression in resistance and/or outbreeding effects on plant quality for the herbivores. The effects of type of cross on the relationship between herbivore damage and plant fitness varied among populations. This demonstrates how between-population outbreeding effects on tolerance range from outbreeding depression to outbreeding benefits among plant populations. Finally, herbivore damage strengthened the observed outbreeding effects on plant fitness in several populations. These results raise novel considerations on the impact of outbreeding on the joint evolution of resistance and tolerance, and on the evolution of multiple defence strategies. PMID:20838662

  14. Middle Devonian liverwort herbivory and antiherbivore defence.

    PubMed

    Labandeira, Conrad C; Tremblay, Susan L; Bartowski, Kenneth E; VanAller Hernick, Linda

    2014-04-01

    To test the extent of herbivory in early terrestrial ecosystems, we examined compression-impression specimens of the late Middle Devonian liverwort Metzgeriothallus sharonae, from the Catskill Delta deposit of eastern New York state. Shale fragments of field-collected specimens were processed by applying liquid nitrocellulose on exposed surfaces. After drying, the film coatings were lifted off and mounted on microscope slides for photography. Unprocessed fragments were photographed under cedarwood oil for enhanced contrast. An extensive repertoire of arthropodan-mediated herbivory was documented, representing three functional feeding groups and nine subordinate plant-arthropod damage types (DTs). The herbivory is the earliest occurrence of external foliage-feeding and galling in the terrestrial fossil record. Our evidence indicates that thallus oil body cells, similar to the terpenoid-containing oil bodies of modern liverworts, were probably involved in the chemical defence of M. sharonae against arthropod herbivores. Based on damage patterns of terrestrial plants and an accompanying but sparse body-fossil record, Devonian arthropodan herbivores were significantly smaller compared to those of the later Palaeozoic. These data collectively suggest that a broad spectrum herbivory may have had a more important role in early terrestrial ecosystems than previously thought.

  15. Simulation, human factors and defence anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mercer, S J; Whittle, C; Siggers, B; Frazer, R S

    2010-12-01

    Simulation in healthcare has come a long way since it's beginnings in the 1960s. Not only has the sophistication of simulator design increased, but the educational concepts of simulation have become much clearer. One particularly important area is that of non-technical skills (NTS) which has been developed from similar concepts in the aviation and nuclear industries. NTS models have been developed for anaesthetists and more recently for surgeons too. This has clear value for surgical team working and the recently developed Military Operational Surgical Training (MOST) course uses simulation and NTS to improve such team working. The scope for simulation in Defence medicine and anaesthesia does not stop here. Uses of simulation include pre-deployment training of hospital teams as well as Medical Emergency Response Team (MERT) and Critical Care Air Support Team (CCAST) staff. Future projects include developing Role 1 pre-deployment training. There is enormous scope for development in this important growth area of education and training. PMID:21302658

  16. Salinity change impairs pipefish immune defence.

    PubMed

    Birrer, Simone C; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Roth, Olivia

    2012-12-01

    Global change is associated with fast and severe alterations of environmental conditions. Superimposed onto existing salinity variations in a semi-enclosed brackish water body such as the Baltic Sea, a decrease in salinity is predicted due to increased precipitation and freshwater inflow. Moreover, we predict that heavy precipitation events will accentuate salinity fluctuations near shore. Here, we investigated how the immune function of the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle), an ecologically important teleost with sex-role reversal, is influenced by experimentally altered salinities (control: 18 PSU, lowered: 6 PSU, increased: 30 PSU) upon infection with bacteria of the genus Vibrio. Salinity changes resulted in increased activity and proliferation of immune cells. However, upon Vibrio infection, individuals at low salinity were unable to mount specific immune response components, both in terms of monocyte and lymphocyte cell proliferation and immune gene expression compared to pipefish kept at ambient salinities. We interpret this as resource allocation trade-off, implying that resources needed for osmoregulation under salinity stress are lacking for subsequent activation of the immune defence upon infection. Our data suggest that composition of small coastal fish communities may change due to elevated environmental stress levels and the incorporated consequences thereof. PMID:22982326

  17. Salinity change impairs pipefish immune defence.

    PubMed

    Birrer, Simone C; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Roth, Olivia

    2012-12-01

    Global change is associated with fast and severe alterations of environmental conditions. Superimposed onto existing salinity variations in a semi-enclosed brackish water body such as the Baltic Sea, a decrease in salinity is predicted due to increased precipitation and freshwater inflow. Moreover, we predict that heavy precipitation events will accentuate salinity fluctuations near shore. Here, we investigated how the immune function of the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle), an ecologically important teleost with sex-role reversal, is influenced by experimentally altered salinities (control: 18 PSU, lowered: 6 PSU, increased: 30 PSU) upon infection with bacteria of the genus Vibrio. Salinity changes resulted in increased activity and proliferation of immune cells. However, upon Vibrio infection, individuals at low salinity were unable to mount specific immune response components, both in terms of monocyte and lymphocyte cell proliferation and immune gene expression compared to pipefish kept at ambient salinities. We interpret this as resource allocation trade-off, implying that resources needed for osmoregulation under salinity stress are lacking for subsequent activation of the immune defence upon infection. Our data suggest that composition of small coastal fish communities may change due to elevated environmental stress levels and the incorporated consequences thereof.

  18. Middle Devonian liverwort herbivory and antiherbivore defence.

    PubMed

    Labandeira, Conrad C; Tremblay, Susan L; Bartowski, Kenneth E; VanAller Hernick, Linda

    2014-04-01

    To test the extent of herbivory in early terrestrial ecosystems, we examined compression-impression specimens of the late Middle Devonian liverwort Metzgeriothallus sharonae, from the Catskill Delta deposit of eastern New York state. Shale fragments of field-collected specimens were processed by applying liquid nitrocellulose on exposed surfaces. After drying, the film coatings were lifted off and mounted on microscope slides for photography. Unprocessed fragments were photographed under cedarwood oil for enhanced contrast. An extensive repertoire of arthropodan-mediated herbivory was documented, representing three functional feeding groups and nine subordinate plant-arthropod damage types (DTs). The herbivory is the earliest occurrence of external foliage-feeding and galling in the terrestrial fossil record. Our evidence indicates that thallus oil body cells, similar to the terpenoid-containing oil bodies of modern liverworts, were probably involved in the chemical defence of M. sharonae against arthropod herbivores. Based on damage patterns of terrestrial plants and an accompanying but sparse body-fossil record, Devonian arthropodan herbivores were significantly smaller compared to those of the later Palaeozoic. These data collectively suggest that a broad spectrum herbivory may have had a more important role in early terrestrial ecosystems than previously thought. PMID:24372344

  19. Activation of defence reactions in Solanaceae: where is the specificity?

    PubMed

    Desender, Sabine; Andrivon, Didier; Val, Florence

    2007-01-01

    When a potential pathogen attempts to infect a plant, biochemical and molecular communication takes place and leads to the induction of plant defence mechanisms. In the case of efficient defence, visible symptoms are restricted and the pathogen does not multiply (incompatible interaction); when defence is inefficient, the plant becomes rapidly infected (compatible interaction). During the last 30 years, a growing body of knowledge on plant-pathogen interactions has been gathered, and a large number of studies investigate the induction of various plant defence reactions by pathogens or by pathogen-derived compounds. However, as most papers focus on incompatible interactions, there is still a lack of understanding about the similarities and differences between compatible and incompatible situations. This review targets the question of specificity in Solanaceae-pathogen interactions, by comparing defence patterns in plants challenged with virulent or avirulent pathogens (or with pathogen-associated molecular patterns from these). A special emphasis is made on analysing whether defence reactions in Solanaceae depend primarily on the type of elicitor, on the plant genotype/species, or on the type of interaction (compatible or incompatible).

  20. Induced plant defence responses: scientific and commercial development possibilities.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, R A; Lawton, K; Friedrich, L; Cade, R; Willits, M; Maleck, K

    1999-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that plants have endogenous defence mechanisms that can be induced as a response to attack by insects and pathogens. There are two well-studied examples of these induced defence responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) results in increased resistance to a broad spectrum of pathogens throughout a plant in response to localized necrosis caused by pathogen infection. The second example is the systemic induction of proteinase inhibitors to deter feeding by herbivores following an initial event of feeding. In addition, there is now preliminary evidence for other induced defence response pathways. By understanding the breadth of induced defence responses and the mechanisms used to control these pathways, novel plant protection strategies may be developed for use in agronomic settings. Rather than reducing crop losses caused by pests or pathogens by using chemicals that are designed to kill the offending organism, the plant's own defence mechanisms can be used to limit damage due to pests. Novel crop protection strategies based on genetic or chemical regulation of these induced responses show great potential. The first example of a crop protection product that acts by inducing an endogenous defence response pathway is now on the market. Bion reduces the level of pathogen infection in plants by activating SAR.

  1. Effects of the suicide inhibitors of arginine and ornithine decarboxylase activities on organogenesis, growth, free polyamine and hydroxycinnamoyl putrescine levels in leaf explants of Nicotiana xanthi N.C. Cultivated in vitro in a medium producing callus formation.

    PubMed

    Burtin, D; Martin-Tanguy, J; Paynot, M; Rossin, N

    1989-01-01

    We studied the effects of dl-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) and dl-alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), specific, irreversible inhibitors of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), respectively, on organogenesis growth and titers of free polyamines and conjugated putrescines (hydroxycinnamoyl putrescines) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi n.c.) calli. These results suggest that ADC and ODC regulate putrescine biosynthesis during early and later stages of tobacco callus development, respectively. ADC appears active in biosynthesis of large levels of free amines (agmatine and putrescine) while ODC appears active only in biosynthesis of large levels of putrescine conjugates (hydroxycinnamoyl putrescines). DFMA inhibits the fresh and dry weight increases of tobacco calli, whereas DFMO even promoted the fresh and dry weight increases, thus supporting the view that ADC is important for cell division and callus induction. Inhibition of ODC activity by DFMO resulting in an amide deficiency after 4 weeks of culture facilates the expression of differentiated cell functions. Formation of buds is associated with a significant decrease of hydroxycinnamoyl putrescines.

  2. Effects of the Suicide Inhibitors of Arginine and Ornithine Decarboxylase Activities on Organogenesis, Growth, Free Polyamine and Hydroxycinnamoyl Putrescine Levels in Leaf Explants of Nicotiana Xanthi n.c. Cultivated in Vitro in a Medium Producing Callus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Burtin, Daniel; Martin-Tanguy, Josette; Paynot, Michel; Rossin, Nadia

    1989-01-01

    We studied the effects of dl-α-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) and dl-α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), specific, irreversible inhibitors of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), respectively, on organogenesis growth and titers of free polyamines and conjugated putrescines (hydroxycinnamoyl putrescines) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi n.c.) calli. These results suggest that ADC and ODC regulate putrescine biosynthesis during early and later stages of tobacco callus development, respectively. ADC appears active in biosynthesis of large levels of free amines (agmatine and putrescine) while ODC appears active only in biosynthesis of large levels of putrescine conjugates (hydroxycinnamoyl putrescines). DFMA inhibits the fresh and dry weight increases of tobacco calli, whereas DFMO even promoted the fresh and dry weight increases, thus supporting the view that ADC is important for cell division and callus induction. Inhibition of ODC activity by DFMO resulting in an amide deficiency after 4 weeks of culture facilates the expression of differentiated cell functions. Formation of buds is associated with a significant decrease of hydroxycinnamoyl putrescines. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16666499

  3. Differential contributions of plant Dicer-like proteins to antiviral defences against potato virus X in leaves and roots.

    PubMed

    Andika, Ida Bagus; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Sun, Liying; Kondo, Hideki; Tamada, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Members of the plant Dicer-like (DCL) protein family are the critical components of the RNA-silencing pathway that mediates innate antiviral defence. The distinct antiviral role of each individual DCL protein has been established with mostly based on observations of aerial parts of plants. Thus, although the roots are closely associated with the life cycle of many plant viruses, little is known about the antiviral activities of DCL proteins in roots. We observed that antiviral silencing strongly inhibits potato virus X (PVX) replication in roots of some susceptible Solanaceae species. Silencing of the DCL4 homolog in Nicotiana benthamiana partially elevated PVX replication levels in roots. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which was originally considered a non-host plant of PVX, high levels of PVX accumulation in inoculated leaves were achieved by inactivation of DCL4, while in the upper leaves and roots, it required the additional inactivation of DCL2. In transgenic A. thaliana carrying the PVX amplicon with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene insertion in the chromosome (AMP243 line), absence of DCL4 enabled high levels of PVX-GFP accumulation in various aerial organs but not in the roots, suggesting that DCL4 is critical for intracellular antiviral silencing in shoots but not in roots, where it can be functionally compensated by other DCL proteins. Together, the high level of functional redundancies among DCL proteins may contribute to the potent antiviral activities against PVX replication in roots.

  4. Efficacy of Chaetomium Species as Biological Control Agents against Phytophthora nicotianae Root Rot in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Wattanachai, Pongnak; Kasem, Soytong; Poeaim, Supattra

    2015-01-01

    Thailand is one of the largest citrus producers in Southeast Asia. Pathogenic infection by Phytophthora, however, has become one of major impediments to production. This study identified a pathogenic oomycete isolated from rotted roots of pomelo (Citrus maxima) in Thailand as Phytophthora nicotianae by the internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Then, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of Chaetomium globosum, Chaetomium lucknowense, Chaetomium cupreum and their crude extracts as biological control agents in controlling this P. nicotianae strain. Represent as antagonists in biculture test, the tested Chaetomium species inhibited mycelial growth by 50~56% and parasitized the hyphae, resulting in degradation of P. nicotianae mycelia after 30 days. The crude extracts of these Chaetomium species exhibited antifungal activities against mycelial growth of P. nicotianae, with effective doses of 2.6~101.4 µg/mL. Under greenhouse conditions, application of spores and methanol extracts of these Chaetomium species to pomelo seedlings inoculated with P. nicotianae reduced root rot by 66~71% and increased plant weight by 72~85% compared to that in the control. The method of application of antagonistic spores to control the disease was simple and economical, and it may thus be applicable for large-scale, highly effective biological control of this pathogen. PMID:26539045

  5. Defence and Security Research Coexistence, Coherence, and Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breant, Christian; Karock, Ulrich

    Defence and security research have coexisted at the European Union level since the inception of the European Defence Agency (EDA). The agency was established under a Joint Action of the Council of Ministers on 12 July 2004, "to support the Member States and the Council in their effort to improve European defence capabilities in the field of crisis management and to sustain the European Security and Defence Policy as it stands now and develops in the future".1 The political decision to create the EDA was taken at the Thessaloniki European Council on 19 and 20 June 2003. Heads of State or Government tasked the Council bodies to undertake the requisite actions, in the course of 2004, to create an intergovernmental agency in the field of defence capabilities development, research, acquisition and armaments. The EDA has been located in Brussels right from the start. It is an intergovernmental EU agency under the Council's authority within the single institutional framework of the Union. It performs its mission in close cooperation with its participating Member States (pMS) and the European institutional actors.

  6. Paenibacillus nicotianae sp. nov., isolated from a tobacco sample.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Qing; Zhou, Xing-Kui; Dang, Li-Zhi; Cheng, Juan; Hozzein, Wael N; Liu, Min-Jiao; Hu, Qun; Li, Wen-Jun; Duan, Yan-Qing

    2014-12-01

    A Gram-stain positive, facultative anaerobic endospore-forming bacterium, designated strain YIM h-19(T), was isolated from a tobacco sample. Cells were observed to be motile rods by means of peritrichous flagella and colonies were observed to be convex, yellow, circular and showed catalase-positive and oxidase-negative reactions. Strain YIM h-19(T) was able to grow at 4-45 °C, pH 6.0-8.0 and 0-3 % NaCl (w/v). The predominant respiratory quinone was identified as MK-7. Major fatty acids were identified as anteiso-C15:0, anteiso-C17:0 and C16:0. The polar lipids were found to be phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and two unidentified polar lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content was determined to be 54 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed the strain YIM h-19(T) was most closely related to Paenibacillus hordei RH-N24(T) and Paenibacillus hunanensis FeL05(T) with similarities of 98.30 and 94.64 % respectively. However, DNA-DNA hybridization data indicated that the isolate represented a novel genomic species with the genus Paenibacillus. All data from genotypic and phenotypic analyses support the conclusion that strain YIM h-19(T) represents a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus nicotianae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIM h-19(T) (=CGMCC1.12819(T) = NRRL B-59112(T)). PMID:25239270

  7. Transient Expression of Tetrameric Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Alkanaimsh, Salem; Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Guerrero, Andrés; Tu, Aye M; Hashimoto, Bryce; Hwang, Min Sook; Phu, My L; Arzola, Lucas; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Falk, Bryce W; Nandi, Somen; Rodriguez, Raymond L; McDonald, Karen A

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the expression, extraction and purification of plant-derived tetrameric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE), we describe the development and use of plant viral amplicon-based gene expression system; Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) RNA-based overexpression vector (TRBO) to express enzymatically active FLAG-tagged plant made recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rBChE) in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using transient agroinfiltration. Two gene expression cassettes were designed to express the recombinant protein in either the ER or to the apoplastic compartment. Leaf homogenization was used to isolate ER-retained recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE-ER) while apoplast-targeted rBChE was isolated by either leaf homogenization (prBChE) or vacuum-extraction of apoplastic wash fluid (prBChE-AWF). rBChE from apoplast wash fluid had a higher specific activity but lower enzyme yield than leaf homogenate. To optimize the isolation and purification of total recombinant protein from leaf homogenates, an acidic extraction buffer was used. The acidic extraction buffer yielded >95% enzymatically active tetrameric rBChE as verified by Coomassie stained and native gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, when compared to human butyrylcholinesterase, the prBChE was found to be similar in terms of tetramerization and enzyme kinetics. The N-linked glycan profile of purified prBChE-ER was found to be mostly high mannose structures while the N-linked glycans on prBChE-AWF were primarily complex. The glycan profile of the prBChE leaf homogenates showed a mixture of high mannose, complex and paucimannose type N-glycans. These findings demonstrate the ability of plants to produce rBChE that is enzymatically active and whose oligomeric state is comparable to mammalian butyrylcholinesterase. The process of plant made rBChE tetramerization and strategies for improving its pharmacokinetics properties are also discussed. PMID:27379103

  8. Nicotiana benthamiana as a Production Platform for Artemisinin Precursors

    PubMed Central

    van Herpen, Teun W. J. M.; Cankar, Katarina; Nogueira, Marilise; Bosch, Dirk; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Beekwilder, Jules

    2010-01-01

    Background Production of pharmaceuticals in plants provides an alternative for chemical synthesis, fermentation or natural sources. Nicotiana benthamiana is deployed at commercial scale for production of therapeutic proteins. Here the potential of this plant is explored for rapid production of precursors of artemisinin, a sesquiterpenoid compound that is used for malaria treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Biosynthetic genes leading to artemisinic acid, a precursor of artemisinin, were combined and expressed in N. benthamiana by agro-infiltration. The first committed precursor of artemisinin, amorpha-4,11-diene, was produced upon infiltration of a construct containing amorpha-4,11-diene synthase, accompanied by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Amorpha-4,11-diene was detected both in extracts and in the headspace of the N. benthamiana leaves. When the amorphadiene oxidase CYP71AV1 was co-infiltrated with the amorphadiene-synthesizing construct, the amorpha-4,11-diene levels strongly decreased, suggesting it was oxidized. Surprisingly, no anticipated oxidation products, such as artemisinic acid, were detected upon GC-MS analysis. However, analysis of leaf extracts with a non-targeted metabolomics approach, using LC-QTOF-MS, revealed the presence of another compound, which was identified as artemisinic acid-12-β-diglucoside. This compound accumulated to 39.5 mg.kg−1 fwt. Apparently the product of the heterologous pathway that was introduced, artemisinic acid, is further metabolized efficiently by glycosyl transferases that are endogenous to N. benthamiana. Conclusion/Significance This work shows that agroinfiltration of N. bentamiana can be used as a model to study the production of sesquiterpenoid pharmaceutical compounds. The interaction between the ectopically introduced pathway and the endogenous metabolism of the plant is discussed. PMID:21151979

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Bacteriophage Endolysin Produced in Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    PubMed

    Kovalskaya, Natalia; Foster-Frey, Juli; Donovan, David M; Bauchan, Gary; Hammond, Rosemarie W

    2016-01-01

    The increasing spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has raised the interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments. In our study, the functionally active gram-negative bacterium bacteriophage CP933 endolysin was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by a combination of transient expression and vacuole targeting strategies, and its antimicrobial activity was investigated. Expression of the cp933 gene in E. coli led to growth inhibition and lysis of the host cells or production of trace amounts of CP933. Cytoplasmic expression of the cp933 gene in plants using Potato virus X-based transient expression vectors (pP2C2S and pGR107) resulted in death of the apical portion of experimental plants. To protect plants against the toxic effects of the CP933 protein, the cp933 coding region was fused at its Nterminus to an N-terminal signal peptide from the potato proteinase inhibitor I to direct CP933 to the delta-type vacuoles. Plants producing the CP933 fusion protein did not exhibit the severe toxic effects seen with the unfused protein and the level of expression was 0.16 mg/g of plant tissue. Antimicrobial assays revealed that, in contrast to gram-negative bacterium E. coli (BL21(DE3)), the gram-positive plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis was more susceptible to the plant-produced CP933, showing 18% growth inhibition. The results of our experiments demonstrate that the combination of transient expression and protein targeting to the delta vacuoles is a promising approach to produce functionally active proteins that exhibit toxicity when expressed in plant cells. PMID:26403819

  10. Transient Expression of Tetrameric Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Alkanaimsh, Salem; Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Guerrero, Andrés; Tu, Aye M.; Hashimoto, Bryce; Hwang, Min Sook; Phu, My L.; Arzola, Lucas; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Falk, Bryce W.; Nandi, Somen; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; McDonald, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the expression, extraction and purification of plant-derived tetrameric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE), we describe the development and use of plant viral amplicon-based gene expression system; Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) RNA-based overexpression vector (TRBO) to express enzymatically active FLAG-tagged plant made recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rBChE) in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using transient agroinfiltration. Two gene expression cassettes were designed to express the recombinant protein in either the ER or to the apoplastic compartment. Leaf homogenization was used to isolate ER-retained recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (prBChE-ER) while apoplast-targeted rBChE was isolated by either leaf homogenization (prBChE) or vacuum-extraction of apoplastic wash fluid (prBChE-AWF). rBChE from apoplast wash fluid had a higher specific activity but lower enzyme yield than leaf homogenate. To optimize the isolation and purification of total recombinant protein from leaf homogenates, an acidic extraction buffer was used. The acidic extraction buffer yielded >95% enzymatically active tetrameric rBChE as verified by Coomassie stained and native gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, when compared to human butyrylcholinesterase, the prBChE was found to be similar in terms of tetramerization and enzyme kinetics. The N-linked glycan profile of purified prBChE-ER was found to be mostly high mannose structures while the N-linked glycans on prBChE-AWF were primarily complex. The glycan profile of the prBChE leaf homogenates showed a mixture of high mannose, complex and paucimannose type N-glycans. These findings demonstrate the ability of plants to produce rBChE that is enzymatically active and whose oligomeric state is comparable to mammalian butyrylcholinesterase. The process of plant made rBChE tetramerization and strategies for improving its pharmacokinetics properties are also discussed. PMID:27379103

  11. Isolation, sequence, and characterization of the Cercospora nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the Cercospora nicotianae gene for the carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme phytoene dehydrogenase. Analysis of the derived amino acid sequence revealed it has greater than 50% identity with its counterpart in Neurospora crassa and approximately 30% identity with prokaryotic phytoene dehydrogenases and is related, but more distantly, to phytoene dehydrogenases from plants and cyanobacteria. Our analysis confirms that phytoene dehydrogenase proteins fall into two groups: those from plants and cyanobacteria and those from eukaryotic and noncyanobacter prokaryotic microbes. Southern analysis indicated that the C. nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene is present in a single copy. Extraction of beta-carotene, the sole carotenoid accumulated by C. nicotianae, showed that both light- and dark-grown cultures synthesize carotenoids, but higher levels accumulate in the light. Northern (RNA) analysis of poly(A)+ RNA, however, showed no differential accumulation of phytoene dehydrogenase mRNA between light- and dark-grown fungal cultures. Images PMID:8085820

  12. Isolation, sequence, and characterization of the Cercospora nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1994-08-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the Cercospora nicotianae gene for the carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme phytoene dehydrogenase. Analysis of the derived amino acid sequence revealed it has greater than 50% identity with its counterpart in Neurospora crassa and approximately 30% identity with prokaryotic phytoene dehydrogenases and is related, but more distantly, to phytoene dehydrogenases from plants and cyanobacteria. Our analysis confirms that phytoene dehydrogenase proteins fall into two groups: those from plants and cyanobacteria and those from eukaryotic and noncyanobacter prokaryotic microbes. Southern analysis indicated that the C. nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene is present in a single copy. Extraction of beta-carotene, the sole carotenoid accumulated by C. nicotianae, showed that both light- and dark-grown cultures synthesize carotenoids, but higher levels accumulate in the light. Northern (RNA) analysis of poly(A)+ RNA, however, showed no differential accumulation of phytoene dehydrogenase mRNA between light- and dark-grown fungal cultures.

  13. Plant defence as a complex and changing phenotype throughout ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-López, Sofía; Villamil, Nora; Zedillo-Avelleyra, Paulina; Boege, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Ontogenetic changes in anti-herbivore defences are common and result from variation in resource availability and herbivore damage throughout plant development. However, little is known about the simultaneous changes of multiple defences across the entire development of plants, and how such changes affect plant damage in the field. The aim of this study was to assess if changes in the major types of plant resistance and tolerance can explain natural herbivore damage throughout plant ontogeny. Methods An assessment was made of how six defensive traits, including physical, chemical and biotic resistance, simultaneously change across the major transitions of plant development, from seedlings to reproductive stages of Turnera velutina growing in the greenhouse. In addition, an experiment was performed to assess how plant tolerance to artificial damage to leaves changed throughout ontogeny. Finally, leaf damage by herbivores was evaluated in a natural population. Key Results The observed ontogenetic trajectories of all defences were significantly different, sometimes showing opposite directions of change. Whereas trichome density, leaf toughness, extrafloral nectary abundance and nectar production increased, hydrogen cyanide and compensatory responses decreased throughout plant development, from seedlings to reproductive plants. Only water content was higher at the intermediate juvenile ontogenetic stages. Surveys in a natural population over 3 years showed that herbivores consumed more tissue from juvenile plants than from younger seedlings or older reproductive plants. This is consistent with the fact that juvenile plants were the least defended stage. Conclusions The results suggest that defensive trajectories are a mixed result of predictions by the Optimal Defence Theory and the Growth–Differentiation Balance Hypothesis. The study emphasizes the importance of incorporating multiple defences and plant ontogeny into further studies for a more

  14. Chloroform-induced insanity defence confounds lawyer Lincoln.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D; Suskind, P B

    1997-12-01

    During an 1857 trial, the defence claimed that the accused should be absolved of wilful murder because an overdose of chloroform during surgery induced insanity. In a rare appearance as a prosecutor, Abraham Lincoln tried the case for the State of Illinois. Expert medical witnesses testified about the side effects of chloroform and chloroform-induced insanity. Significantly, Lincoln was not knowledgeable about medical jurisprudence and overlooked potential sources of evidence and expert witnesses. Defence lawyers presented an impressive array of physicians to testify about insanity, about chloroform and about the results of an overdosage during anaesthesia. Considering the state of scientific knowledge at the time, the trial was notable.

  15. Comparative genomics tools applied to bioterrorism defence.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Tom; Kuczmarski, Tom; Ott, Linda; Torres, Clinton; Medeiros, Dan; Smith, Jason; Truitt, Brian; Mulakken, Nisha; Lam, Marisa; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Zemla, Adam; Zhou, Carol Ecale; Gardner, Shea

    2003-06-01

    Rapid advances in the genomic sequencing of bacteria and viruses over the past few years have made it possible to consider sequencing the genomes of all pathogens that affect humans and the crops and livestock upon which our lives depend. Recent events make it imperative that full genome sequencing be accomplished as soon as possible for pathogens that could be used as weapons of mass destruction or disruption. This sequence information must be exploited to provide rapid and accurate diagnostics to identify pathogens and distinguish them from harmless near-neighbours and hoaxes. The Chem-Bio Non-Proliferation (CBNP) programme of the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a large-scale effort of pathogen detection in early 2000 when it was announced that the DOE would be providing bio-security at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah. Our team at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) was given the task of developing reliable and validated assays for a number of the most likely bioterrorist agents. The short timeline led us to devise a novel system that utilised whole-genome comparison methods to rapidly focus on parts of the pathogen genomes that had a high probability of being unique. Assays developed with this approach have been validated by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). They were used at the 2002 Winter Olympics, have entered the public health system, and have been in continual use for non-publicised aspects of homeland defence since autumn 2001. Assays have been developed for all major threat list agents for which adequate genomic sequence is available, as well as for other pathogens requested by various government agencies. Collaborations with comparative genomics algorithm developers have enabled our LLNL team to make major advances in pathogen detection, since many of the existing tools simply did not scale well enough to be of practical use for this application. It is hoped that a discussion of a real-life practical application of

  16. Communal range defence in primates as a public goods dilemma.

    PubMed

    Willems, Erik P; Arseneau, T Jean M; Schleuning, Xenia; van Schaik, Carel P

    2015-12-01

    Classic socio-ecological theory holds that the occurrence of aggressive range defence is primarily driven by ecological incentives, most notably by the economic defendability of an area or the resources it contains. While this ecological cost-benefit framework has great explanatory power in solitary or pair-living species, comparative work on group-living primates has always found economic defendability to be a necessary, but not sufficient condition to account for the distribution of effective range defence across the taxon. This mismatch between theory and observation has recently been ascribed to a collective action problem among group members in, what is more informatively viewed as, a public goods dilemma: mounting effective defence of a communal range against intrusions by outgroup conspecifics. We here further develop this framework, and report on analyses at three levels of biological organization: across species, across populations within a single lineage and across groups and individuals within a single population. We find that communal range defence in primates very rarely involves collective action sensu stricto and that it is best interpreted as the outcome of opportunistic and strategic individual-level decisions. Whether the public good of a defended communal range is produced by solitary, joint or collective action is thus the outcome of the interplay between the unique characteristics of each individual, local and current socio-ecological conditions, and fundamental life-history traits of the species.

  17. A Strong Remedy to a Weak Ethical Defence of Homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Shaw, David

    2015-12-01

    In this article, I indicate and illustrate several flaws in a recent "ethical defence" of homeopathy. It transpires that the authors' arguments have several features in common with homeopathic remedies, including strong claims, a lack of logic or evidence, and no actual effect.

  18. Evolution of hosts paying manifold costs of defence

    PubMed Central

    Cressler, Clayton E.; Graham, Andrea L.; Day, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Hosts are expected to incur several physiological costs in defending against parasites. These include constitutive energetic (or other resource) costs of a defence system, facultative resource costs of deploying defences when parasites strike, and immunopathological costs of collateral damage. Here, we investigate the evolution of host recovery rates, varying the source and magnitude of immune costs. In line with previous work, we find that hosts paying facultative resource costs evolve faster recovery rates than hosts paying constitutive costs. However, recovery rate is more sensitive to changes in facultative costs, potentially explaining why constitutive costs are hard to detect empirically. Moreover, we find that immunopathology costs which increase with recovery rate can erode the benefits of defence, promoting chronicity of infection. Immunopathology can also lead to hosts evolving low recovery rate in response to virulent parasites. Furthermore, when immunopathology reduces fecundity as recovery rate increases (e.g. as for T-cell responses to urogenital chlamydiosis), then recovery and reproductive rates do not covary as predicted in eco-immunology. These results suggest that immunopathological and resource costs have qualitatively different effects on host evolution and that embracing the complexity of immune costs may be essential for explaining variability in immune defence in nature. PMID:25740895

  19. Landscape settings as part of earth wall systems for defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk

    2013-04-01

    Remnants of earth wall systems from different periods are preserved in many European countries. They were built for different functions, such as defence, demarcating ownership or keeping wild animals or cattle in or out a terrain, and often changed function over time. Earth walls date from a past in which man had limited access to man- and horsepower. In the case of defence systems, our ancestors made use of the landscape settings to improve the strength. The poster gives an overview of landscape settings used for this purpose, from prehistoric up to medieval age, for building round and linear earth wall defence systems. Round earth walls systems are found on: • High viewpoints along a river, often in combination with marshland at its feet, • Almost completely cut-off meanders of antecedent rivers. This natural setting offered an ideal defence. It allowed an almost 360 degree view and exposed the enemy for a long time when passing the river, while the steep slopes and narrow entrance made the hill fort difficult to access, • Islands in lakes, • Bordering a lake at one side, • Confluences of rivers, • Hills near the sea and a natural harbour with possibilities for defence, • High flat hill tops of medium size with steep sides. Of each situation examples are presented. Linear earth wall defence systems For linear defence earth walls no overview of landscape settings can be given, for lack of sufficient data. The Celtic, 10 m steep Beech Bottom Dyke earth wall system from around 20 A.D. connects two steeply incised river valleys. For building the Hadrian Wall (UK) the Romans made use of earth walls paralleling the steepest cuesta of the Cheviot hills. The Viking Danewerk (Ger), was built on push moraines and used the coastal marsh lands at their feet for defence. And the defence of the earth wall around the Velder (NL, probably 13th century) made use of the many small streams crossing this marshy coversand landscape, by diverting them into a canal

  20. Genetic characterization of Phytophthora nicotianae by the analysis of polymorphic regions of the mitochondrial DNA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new method based on the analysis of mitochondrial intergenic regions characterized by intraspecific variation in DNA sequences was developed and applied to the study of the plant pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two regions flanked by genes trny and rns and trnw and cox2 were identified by compa...

  1. Genetic Analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae Populations from Different Hosts Using Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Biasi, Antonio; Martin, Frank N; Cacciola, Santa O; di San Lio, Gaetano Magnano; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Schena, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    In all, 231 isolates of Phytophthora nicotianae representing 14 populations from different host genera, including agricultural crops (Citrus, Nicotiana, and Lycopersicon), potted ornamental species in nurseries (Lavandula, Convolvulus, Myrtus, Correa, and Ruta), and other plant genera were characterized using simple-sequence repeat markers. In total, 99 multilocus genotypes (MLG) were identified, revealing a strong association between genetic grouping and host of recovery, with most MLG being associated with a single host genus. Significant differences in the structure of populations were revealed but clonality prevailed in all populations. Isolates from Citrus were found to be genetically related regardless of their geographic origin and were characterized by high genetic uniformity and high inbreeding coefficients. Higher variability was observed for other populations and a significant geographical structuring was determined for isolates from Nicotiana. Detected differences were related to the propagation and cultivation systems of different crops. Isolates obtained from Citrus spp. are more likely to be distributed worldwide with infected plant material whereas Nicotiana and Lycopersicon spp. are propagated by seed, which would not contribute to the spread of the pathogen and result in a greater chance for geographic isolation of lineages. With regard to ornamental species in nurseries, the high genetic variation is likely the result of the admixture of diverse pathogen genotypes through the trade of infected plant material from various geographic origins, the presence of several hosts in the same nursery, and genetic recombination through sexual reproduction of this heterothallic species. PMID:27111805

  2. Physiological and molecular changes during opening and senescence of Nicotiana mutabilis flowers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flowers of Nicotiana mutabilis, a tobacco species recently discovered in southern Brazil, have petals that undergo a striking colour change from white through pink to red as they open and senesce over a typical 7-d lifespan. Colouration in petals was associated with an increase in chalcone synt...

  3. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR CHANGES DURING OPENING AND SENESCENCE OF NICOTIANA MUTABILIS FLOWERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flowers of Nicotiana mutabilis, a tobacco species recently discovered in southern Brazil, have petals that undergo a striking colour change from white through pink to red as they open and senesce over a typical 7-d lifespan. Colouration in petals was associated with an increase in chalcone synt...

  4. Effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation and CO2 stress on Phytophthora nicotianae zoospore survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan was used as a model pathogen to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation, and aeration with CO2 or breathable air on the survival of Phytophthora zoospores in water. Injecting CO2 into 2 liters of zoospore-infested water for 5 min at 110.4 ml ...

  5. Infection of Citrus Roots by Tylenchulus semipenetrans Reduces Root Infection by Phytophthora nicotianae

    PubMed Central

    El-Borai, F. E.; Duncan, L. W.; Graham, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Bioassays and whole-plant experiments were conducted to investigate the interaction between Tylenchulus semipenetrans and Phytophthora nicotianae. Both organisms are parasites of the citrus fibrous root cortex. Nematode-infected and non-infected root segments were excised from naturally infected field roots and placed on water agar in close proximity to agar plugs of P. nicotianae and then transferred to a Phytophthora-selective medium. At 10 and 12 days, 50% fewer nematode-infected segments were infected by P. nicotianae than non-infected segments. In whole-plant experiments in glass test tubes, sour orange seedlings were inoculated with two densities (8,000 or 80,000 eggs and second-stage juveniles) of T. semipenetrans, and after establishment of infection were inoculated with two densities (9,000 and 90,000 zoospores) of P. nicotianae. In the first experiment, fungal protein was 53% to 65% lower in the roots infected by both organisms than in roots infected by the fungus only. Compared to plants infected only by P. nicotianae, shoot weights were 33% to 50% greater (P ≤ 0.05) in plants infected by both parasites, regardless of inoculum density. Fibrous and tap root weights were 5% to 23% and 19% to 34% greater (P ≤ 0.05), respectively, in nematode-fungus combination treatments compared to the fungus alone. A second experiment was conducted, where plants were infected by the fungus, the nematode, both organisms, or neither organism. The soil mixture pH for 50% of the plants was adjusted from 4.5 to 7.0 to favor nematode infection. A higher rate of nematode infection of plants growing at pH 7.0 compared to pH 4.5 resulted in greater suppression of fungal development and greater inhibition of fungal damage to the plant. Compared to plants infected only by P. nicotianae, shoot and root weights were 37% and 33% greater (P ≤ 0.05), respectively, in plants infected by both parasites. These experiments have revealed antagonism between T. semipenetrans and P

  6. A Comparative Analysis of Sonic Defences in Bombycoidea Caterpillars

    PubMed Central

    Bura, Veronica L.; Kawahara, Akito Y.; Yack, Jayne E.

    2016-01-01

    Caterpillars have long been used as models for studying animal defence. Their impressive armour, including flamboyant warning colours, poisonous spines, irritating sprays, and mimicry of plant parts, snakes and bird droppings, has been extensively documented. But research has mainly focused on visual and chemical displays. Here we show that some caterpillars also exhibit sonic displays. During simulated attacks, 45% of 38 genera and 33% of 61 species of silk and hawkmoth caterpillars (Bombycoidea) produced sounds. Sonic caterpillars are found in many distantly-related groups of Bombycoidea, and have evolved four distinct sound types- clicks, chirps, whistles and vocalizations. We propose that different sounds convey different messages, with some designed to warn of a chemical defence and others, to startle predators. This research underscores the importance of exploring acoustic communication in juvenile insects, and provides a model system to explore how different signals have evolved to frighten, warn or even trick predators. PMID:27510510

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Sonic Defences in Bombycoidea Caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Bura, Veronica L; Kawahara, Akito Y; Yack, Jayne E

    2016-08-11

    Caterpillars have long been used as models for studying animal defence. Their impressive armour, including flamboyant warning colours, poisonous spines, irritating sprays, and mimicry of plant parts, snakes and bird droppings, has been extensively documented. But research has mainly focused on visual and chemical displays. Here we show that some caterpillars also exhibit sonic displays. During simulated attacks, 45% of 38 genera and 33% of 61 species of silk and hawkmoth caterpillars (Bombycoidea) produced sounds. Sonic caterpillars are found in many distantly-related groups of Bombycoidea, and have evolved four distinct sound types- clicks, chirps, whistles and vocalizations. We propose that different sounds convey different messages, with some designed to warn of a chemical defence and others, to startle predators. This research underscores the importance of exploring acoustic communication in juvenile insects, and provides a model system to explore how different signals have evolved to frighten, warn or even trick predators.

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Sonic Defences in Bombycoidea Caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Bura, Veronica L; Kawahara, Akito Y; Yack, Jayne E

    2016-01-01

    Caterpillars have long been used as models for studying animal defence. Their impressive armour, including flamboyant warning colours, poisonous spines, irritating sprays, and mimicry of plant parts, snakes and bird droppings, has been extensively documented. But research has mainly focused on visual and chemical displays. Here we show that some caterpillars also exhibit sonic displays. During simulated attacks, 45% of 38 genera and 33% of 61 species of silk and hawkmoth caterpillars (Bombycoidea) produced sounds. Sonic caterpillars are found in many distantly-related groups of Bombycoidea, and have evolved four distinct sound types- clicks, chirps, whistles and vocalizations. We propose that different sounds convey different messages, with some designed to warn of a chemical defence and others, to startle predators. This research underscores the importance of exploring acoustic communication in juvenile insects, and provides a model system to explore how different signals have evolved to frighten, warn or even trick predators. PMID:27510510

  9. Effects of myosmine on antioxidative defence in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Simeonova, Rumyana; Vitcheva, Vessela; Gorneva, Galina; Mitcheva, Mitka

    2012-03-01

    Myosmine [3-(1-pyrrolin-2-yl) pyridine] is an alkaloid structurally similar to nicotine, which is known to induce oxidative stress. In this study we investigated the effects of myosmine on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidative defence in rat liver. Wistar rats received a single i.p. injection of 19 mg kg-1 of myosmine and an oral dose of 190 mg kg-1 by gavage. Nicotine was used as a positive control. Through either route of administration, myosmine altered the hepatic function by decreasing the levels of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase activities on one hand and by increasing malondialdehyde, catalase, and glutathione reductase activity on the other. Compared to control, both routes caused significant lipid peroxidation in the liver and altered hepatic enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidative defences. The pro-oxidant effects of myosmine were comparable with those of nicotine. PMID:22450200

  10. Screening micro-organisms for cadmium absorption from aqueous solution and cadmium absorption properties of Arthrobacter nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Takehiko; Umenai, Daishi; Hatano, Tomonobu; Hirajima, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    To obtain basic information on how microbial cells absorb cadmium from aqueous solution, we examined cadmium absorption in various micro-organisms. Of 51 micro-organism strains tested, we found that some Gram-positive bacteria, such as, Arthrobacter nicotianae and Bacillus subtilis, and some actinomycetes, such as, Streptomyces flavoviridis and S. levoris were highly capable of absorbing cadmium from an aqueous solution. A. nicotianae absorbed the largest amount of cadmium, over 800 μmol cadmium per gram of dry wt. cells. However, cadmium absorption by A. nicotianae was affected by the solution pH, cadmium concentration, and cell density. The absorption of cadmium was very rapid. Some factors that affected cadmium absorption by A. nicotianae cells were also discussed.

  11. Anosognosia as motivated unawareness: the 'defence' hypothesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Oliver H; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini; Solms, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Anosognosia for hemiplegia has seen a century of almost continuous research, yet a definitive understanding of its mechanism remains elusive. Essentially, anosognosic patients hold quasi-delusional beliefs about their paralysed limbs, in spite of all the contrary evidence, repeated questioning, and logical argument. We review a range of findings suggesting that emotion and motivation play an important role in anosognosia. We conclude that anosognosia involves (amongst other things) a process of psychological defence. This conclusion stems from a wide variety of clinical and experimental investigations, including data on implicit awareness of deficit, fluctuations in awareness over time, and dramatic effects upon awareness of psychological interventions such as psychotherapy, reframing of the emotional consequences of the paralysis, and first versus third person perspectival manipulations. In addition, we review and refute the (eight) arguments historically raised against the 'defence' hypothesis, including the claim that a defence-based account cannot explain the lateralised nature of the disorder. We argue that damage to a well-established right-lateralised emotion regulation system, with links to psychological processes that appear to underpin allocentric spatial cognition, plays a key role in anosognosia (at least in some patients). We conclude with a discussion of implications for clinical practice. PMID:25481464

  12. The protein quality control system manages plant defence compound synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pollier, Jacob; Moses, Tessa; González-Guzmán, Miguel; De Geyter, Nathan; Lippens, Saskia; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Marhavý, Peter; Kremer, Anna; Morreel, Kris; Guérin, Christopher J; Tava, Aldo; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Thevelein, Johan M; Campos, Narciso; Goormachtig, Sofie; Goossens, Alain

    2013-12-01

    Jasmonates are ubiquitous oxylipin-derived phytohormones that are essential in the regulation of many development, growth and defence processes. Across the plant kingdom, jasmonates act as elicitors of the production of bioactive secondary metabolites that serve in defence against attackers. Knowledge of the conserved jasmonate perception and early signalling machineries is increasing, but the downstream mechanisms that regulate defence metabolism remain largely unknown. Here we show that, in the legume Medicago truncatula, jasmonate recruits the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) quality control system to manage the production of triterpene saponins, widespread bioactive compounds that share a biogenic origin with sterols. An ERAD-type RING membrane-anchor E3 ubiquitin ligase is co-expressed with saponin synthesis enzymes to control the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the supply of the ubiquitous terpene precursor isopentenyl diphosphate. Thus, unrestrained bioactive saponin accumulation is prevented and plant development and integrity secured. This control apparatus is equivalent to the ERAD system that regulates sterol synthesis in yeasts and mammals but that uses distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases, of the HMGR degradation 1 (HRD1) type, to direct destruction of HMGR. Hence, the general principles for the management of sterol and triterpene saponin biosynthesis are conserved across eukaryotes but can be controlled by divergent regulatory cues.

  13. Complement in disease: a defence system turning offensive.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2016-07-01

    Although the complement system is primarily perceived as a host defence system, a more versatile, yet potentially more harmful side of this innate immune pathway as an inflammatory mediator also exists. The activities that define the ability of the complement system to control microbial threats and eliminate cellular debris - such as sensing molecular danger patterns, generating immediate effectors, and extensively coordinating with other defence pathways - can quickly turn complement from a defence system to an aggressor that drives immune and inflammatory diseases. These host-offensive actions become more pronounced with age and are exacerbated by a variety of genetic factors and autoimmune responses. Complement can also be activated inappropriately, for example in response to biomaterials or transplants. A wealth of research over the past two decades has led to an increasingly finely tuned understanding of complement activation, identified tipping points between physiological and pathological behaviour, and revealed avenues for therapeutic intervention. This Review summarizes our current view of the key activating, regulatory, and effector mechanisms of the complement system, highlighting important crosstalk connections, and, with an emphasis on kidney disease and transplantation, discusses the involvement of complement in clinical conditions and promising therapeutic approaches.

  14. The circadian clock and defence signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayank; Bhatt, Deepesh

    2015-02-01

    The circadian clock is the internal time-keeping machinery in higher organisms. Cross-talk between the circadian clock and a diverse range of physiological processes in plants, including stress acclimatization, hormone signalling, photomorphogenesis and defence signalling, is currently being explored. Recent studies on circadian clock genes and genes involved in defence signalling have indicated a possible reciprocal interaction between the two. It has been proposed that the circadian clock shapes the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions. In this review, we highlight the studies carried out so far on two model plant pathogens, namely Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, and the involvement of the circadian clock in gating effector-triggered immunity and pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. We focus on how the circadian clock gates the expression of various stress-related transcripts in a prolific manner to enhance plant fitness. An understanding of this dynamic relationship between clock and stress will open up new avenues in the understanding of endogenous mechanisms of defence signalling in plants.

  15. Anosognosia as motivated unawareness: the 'defence' hypothesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Oliver H; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini; Solms, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Anosognosia for hemiplegia has seen a century of almost continuous research, yet a definitive understanding of its mechanism remains elusive. Essentially, anosognosic patients hold quasi-delusional beliefs about their paralysed limbs, in spite of all the contrary evidence, repeated questioning, and logical argument. We review a range of findings suggesting that emotion and motivation play an important role in anosognosia. We conclude that anosognosia involves (amongst other things) a process of psychological defence. This conclusion stems from a wide variety of clinical and experimental investigations, including data on implicit awareness of deficit, fluctuations in awareness over time, and dramatic effects upon awareness of psychological interventions such as psychotherapy, reframing of the emotional consequences of the paralysis, and first versus third person perspectival manipulations. In addition, we review and refute the (eight) arguments historically raised against the 'defence' hypothesis, including the claim that a defence-based account cannot explain the lateralised nature of the disorder. We argue that damage to a well-established right-lateralised emotion regulation system, with links to psychological processes that appear to underpin allocentric spatial cognition, plays a key role in anosognosia (at least in some patients). We conclude with a discussion of implications for clinical practice.

  16. Focal accumulation of defences at sites of fungal pathogen attack

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, William; Somerville, Shauna C.

    2008-01-01

    Plants resist attack by haustorium-forming biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic fungi through fortification of the cell wall to prevent penetration through the wall and the subsequent establishment of haustorial feeding structures by the fungus. While the existence of cell wall-based defences has been known for many years, only recently have the molecular components contributing to such defences been identified. Forward genetic screens identified Arabidopsis mutants impaired in penetration resistance to powdery mildew fungi that were normally halted at the cell wall. Several loci contributing to penetration resistance have been identified and a common feature is the striking focal accumulation of proteins associated with penetration resistance at sites of interaction with fungal appressoria and penetration pegs. The focal accumulation of defence-related proteins and the deposition of cell wall reinforcements at sites of attempted fungal penetration represent an example of cell polarization and raise many questions of relevance, not only to plant pathology but also to general cell biology. PMID:18703493

  17. DspA/E, a type III effector of Erwinia amylovora, is required for early rapid growth in Nicotiana benthamiana and causes NbSGT1-dependent cell death.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Sik; Martin, Gregory B; Beer, Steven V

    2007-05-01

    SUMMARY DspA/E is a pathogenicity factor of Erwinia amylovora that is translocated into the plant cell cytoplasm through an Hrp type III secretion system. Transient expression of dspA/E in Nicotiana benthamiana or yeast induced cell death, as it does in N. tabacum and apple as described previously. DspA/E-induced cell death in N. benthamiana was not inhibited by coexpression of AvrPtoB of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, which inhibits programmed cell death (PCD) induced by several other elicitors in plants. Silencing of NbSGT1, the expression of which is required for PCD mediated by several resistance proteins of plants, prevented DspA/E-induced cell death in N. benthamiana. However, silencing of NbRAR1, or two MAP kinase kinase genes, which are required for PCD associated with many resistance genes in plants, did not prevent cell death induced by DspA/E. Silencing of NbSGT1 also compromised non-host resistance against E. amylovora. E. amylovora grew rapidly within the first 24 h after infiltration in N. benthamiana, and DspA/E was required for this early rapid growth. However, bacterial cell numbers decreased after 24 h in TRV-vector-transformed plants, whereas a dspA/E mutant strain grew to high populations in NbSGT1-silenced plants. Our results indicate that DspA/E enhances virulence of E. amylovora in N. benthamiana, but the bacteria are then recognized by the plant, resulting in PCD and death of bacterial cells or restriction of bacterial cell growth. PMID:20507497

  18. The N-terminal fragment of the tomato torrado virus RNA1-encoded polyprotein induces a hypersensitive response (HR)-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2016-07-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a defence reaction observed during incompatible plant-pathogen interactions in plants infected with a wide range of fungi, bacteria and viruses. Here, we show that an N-terminal polyprotein fragment encoded by tomato torrado virus RNA1, located between the first ATG codon and the protease cofactor (ProCo) motif, induces an HR-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of the first 105 amino acids (the calculated molecular weight of the fragment was ca. 11.33 kDa, hereafter refered to as the 11K domain) from ToTV RNA1 induced an HR-like phenotype in infiltrated leaves. To investigate whether the 11K domain could influence the virulence and pathogenicity of a recombinant virus, we created a potato virus X (PVX) with the 11K coding sequence inserted under a duplicated coat protein promoter. We found that 11K substantially increased the virulence of the recombinant virus. Disease phenotype induced in N. benthamiana by PVX-11K was characterized by strong local and systemic necrosis. This was not observed when the 11K domain was expressed from PVX in an antisense orientation. Further analyses revealed that the 11K domain could not suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the N. benthamiana 16c line. In silico analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 11K domain indicated the presence of two putative helices that are highly conserved in tomato-infecting representatives of the genus Torradovirus. PMID:27072852

  19. Identification and genome organization of saponin pathway genes from a wild crucifer, and their use for transient production of saponins in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Khakimov, Bekzod; Kuzina, Vera; Erthmann, Pernille Ø; Fukushima, Ery Odette; Augustin, Jörg M; Olsen, Carl Erik; Scholtalbers, Jelle; Volpin, Hanne; Andersen, Sven Bode; Hauser, Thure P; Muranaka, Toshiya; Bak, Søren

    2015-11-01

    The ability to evolve novel metabolites has been instrumental for the defence of plants against antagonists. A few species in the Barbarea genus are the only crucifers known to produce saponins, some of which make plants resistant to specialist herbivores, like Plutella xylostella, the diamondback moth. Genetic mapping in Barbarea vulgaris revealed that genes for saponin biosynthesis are not clustered but are located in different linkage groups. Using co-location with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance, transcriptome and genome sequences, we identified two 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclases that form the major triterpenoid backbones. LUP2 mainly produces lupeol, and is preferentially expressed in insect-susceptible B. vulgaris plants, whereas LUP5 produces β-amyrin and α-amyrin, and is preferentially expressed in resistant plants; β-amyrin is the backbone for the resistance-conferring saponins in Barbarea. Two loci for cytochromes P450, predicted to add functional groups to the saponin backbone, were identified: CYP72As co-localized with insect resistance, whereas CYP716As did not. When B. vulgaris sapogenin biosynthesis genes were transiently expressed by CPMV-HT technology in Nicotiana benthamiana, high levels of hydroxylated and carboxylated triterpenoid structures accumulated, including oleanolic acid, which is a precursor of the major resistance-conferring saponins. When the B. vulgaris gene for sapogenin 3-O-glucosylation was co-expressed, the insect deterrent 3-O-oleanolic acid monoglucoside accumulated, as well as triterpene structures with up to six hexoses, demonstrating that N. benthamiana further decorates the monoglucosides. We argue that saponin biosynthesis in the Barbarea genus evolved by a neofunctionalized glucosyl transferase, whereas the difference between resistant and susceptible B. vulgaris chemotypes evolved by different expression of oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs).

  20. Identification and genome organization of saponin pathway genes from a wild crucifer, and their use for transient production of saponins in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Khakimov, Bekzod; Kuzina, Vera; Erthmann, Pernille Ø; Fukushima, Ery Odette; Augustin, Jörg M; Olsen, Carl Erik; Scholtalbers, Jelle; Volpin, Hanne; Andersen, Sven Bode; Hauser, Thure P; Muranaka, Toshiya; Bak, Søren

    2015-11-01

    The ability to evolve novel metabolites has been instrumental for the defence of plants against antagonists. A few species in the Barbarea genus are the only crucifers known to produce saponins, some of which make plants resistant to specialist herbivores, like Plutella xylostella, the diamondback moth. Genetic mapping in Barbarea vulgaris revealed that genes for saponin biosynthesis are not clustered but are located in different linkage groups. Using co-location with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance, transcriptome and genome sequences, we identified two 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclases that form the major triterpenoid backbones. LUP2 mainly produces lupeol, and is preferentially expressed in insect-susceptible B. vulgaris plants, whereas LUP5 produces β-amyrin and α-amyrin, and is preferentially expressed in resistant plants; β-amyrin is the backbone for the resistance-conferring saponins in Barbarea. Two loci for cytochromes P450, predicted to add functional groups to the saponin backbone, were identified: CYP72As co-localized with insect resistance, whereas CYP716As did not. When B. vulgaris sapogenin biosynthesis genes were transiently expressed by CPMV-HT technology in Nicotiana benthamiana, high levels of hydroxylated and carboxylated triterpenoid structures accumulated, including oleanolic acid, which is a precursor of the major resistance-conferring saponins. When the B. vulgaris gene for sapogenin 3-O-glucosylation was co-expressed, the insect deterrent 3-O-oleanolic acid monoglucoside accumulated, as well as triterpene structures with up to six hexoses, demonstrating that N. benthamiana further decorates the monoglucosides. We argue that saponin biosynthesis in the Barbarea genus evolved by a neofunctionalized glucosyl transferase, whereas the difference between resistant and susceptible B. vulgaris chemotypes evolved by different expression of oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs). PMID:26333142

  1. BABA and Phytophthora nicotianae Induce Resistance to Phytophthora capsici in Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, Rio A.; Holguin, Omar; Dungan, Barry; Schaub, Tanner; Sanogo, Soumaila; Goldberg, Natalie; Randall, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance in plants is a systemic response to certain microorganisms or chemicals that enhances basal defense responses during subsequent plant infection by pathogens. Inoculation of chile pepper with zoospores of non-host Phytophthora nicotianae or the chemical elicitor beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) significantly inhibited foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici. Tissue extract analyses by GC/MS identified conserved change in certain metabolite concentrations following P. nicotianae or BABA treatment. Induced chile pepper plants had reduced concentrations of sucrose and TCA cycle intermediates and increased concentrations of specific hexose-phosphates, hexose-disaccharides and amino acids. Galactose, which increased significantly in induced chile pepper plants, was shown to inhibit growth of P. capsici in a plate assay. PMID:26020237

  2. BABA and Phytophthora nicotianae Induce Resistance to Phytophthora capsici in Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Stamler, Rio A; Holguin, Omar; Dungan, Barry; Schaub, Tanner; Sanogo, Soumaila; Goldberg, Natalie; Randall, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance in plants is a systemic response to certain microorganisms or chemicals that enhances basal defense responses during subsequent plant infection by pathogens. Inoculation of chile pepper with zoospores of non-host Phytophthora nicotianae or the chemical elicitor beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) significantly inhibited foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici. Tissue extract analyses by GC/MS identified conserved change in certain metabolite concentrations following P. nicotianae or BABA treatment. Induced chile pepper plants had reduced concentrations of sucrose and TCA cycle intermediates and increased concentrations of specific hexose-phosphates, hexose-disaccharides and amino acids. Galactose, which increased significantly in induced chile pepper plants, was shown to inhibit growth of P. capsici in a plate assay.

  3. Transgressive phenotypes and generalist pollination in the floral evolution of Nicotiana polyploids.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W; Chase, Mark W; Knapp, Sandra; Litt, Amy; Leitch, Andrew R; Le Comber, Steven C

    2016-08-08

    Polyploidy is an important driving force in angiosperm evolution, and much research has focused on genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomic responses to allopolyploidy. Nicotiana is an excellent system in which to study allopolyploidy because half of the species are allotetraploids of different ages, allowing us to examine the trajectory of floral evolution over time. Here, we study the effects of allopolyploidy on floral morphology in Nicotiana, using corolla tube measurements and geometric morphometrics to quantify petal shape. We show that polyploid morphological divergence from the intermediate phenotype expected (based on progenitor morphology) increases with time for floral limb shape and tube length, and that most polyploids are distinct or transgressive in at least one trait. In addition, we show that polyploids tend to evolve shorter and wider corolla tubes, suggesting that allopolyploidy could provide an escape from specialist pollination via reversion to more generalist pollination strategies.

  4. Transgressive phenotypes and generalist pollination in the floral evolution of Nicotiana polyploids.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W; Chase, Mark W; Knapp, Sandra; Litt, Amy; Leitch, Andrew R; Le Comber, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidy is an important driving force in angiosperm evolution, and much research has focused on genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomic responses to allopolyploidy. Nicotiana is an excellent system in which to study allopolyploidy because half of the species are allotetraploids of different ages, allowing us to examine the trajectory of floral evolution over time. Here, we study the effects of allopolyploidy on floral morphology in Nicotiana, using corolla tube measurements and geometric morphometrics to quantify petal shape. We show that polyploid morphological divergence from the intermediate phenotype expected (based on progenitor morphology) increases with time for floral limb shape and tube length, and that most polyploids are distinct or transgressive in at least one trait. In addition, we show that polyploids tend to evolve shorter and wider corolla tubes, suggesting that allopolyploidy could provide an escape from specialist pollination via reversion to more generalist pollination strategies. PMID:27501400

  5. Identification and validation of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae populations.

    PubMed

    Biasi, Antonio; Martin, Frank; Schena, Leonardo

    2015-03-01

    A large number of SSR loci were screened in the genomic assemblies of 14 different isolates of Phytophthora nicotianae and primers were developed for amplification of 17 markers distributed among different contigs. These loci were highly polymorphic and amplified from genetically distant isolates of the pathogen. Among these, nine were further validated using a multiplexed genotyping assay with differentially labeled primers (FAM or HEX) to allow for duplex PCR amplification. The use of reverse primers with a 5' PIG tail was important to increase the quality and reliability of the analyses. A total of 46 alleles were detected in 5 tester isolates of P. nicotianae representing the breadth of diversity in the species. Furthermore, a high incidence of heterozygosity was determined with two alleles detected in 67% of the primer/isolate combinations. Three different alleles where detected for a single locus/isolate combination, indicating variation in ploidy. These markers represent a valuable new tool for the characterization of populations of P. nicotianae.

  6. Neutrophils: Between Host Defence, Immune Modulation, and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Philipp; Saffarzadeh, Mona; Weber, Alexander N. R.; Rieber, Nikolaus; Radsak, Markus; von Bernuth, Horst; Benarafa, Charaf; Roos, Dirk; Skokowa, Julia; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant human immune cells, are rapidly recruited to sites of infection, where they fulfill their life-saving antimicrobial functions. While traditionally regarded as short-lived phagocytes, recent findings on long-term survival, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, heterogeneity and plasticity, suppressive functions, and tissue injury have expanded our understanding of their diverse role in infection and inflammation. This review summarises our current understanding of neutrophils in host-pathogen interactions and disease involvement, illustrating the versatility and plasticity of the neutrophil, moving between host defence, immune modulation, and tissue damage. PMID:25764063

  7. Analysis of direct punch velocity in professional defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapkova, Dora; Adamek, Milan

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on analysis of a direct punch. Nowadays, professional defence is basic part of effective protection of people and property. There are many striking techniques and the goal of this research was to analyze the direct punch. The analysis is aimed to measure the velocity with help of high speed camera Olympus i-Speed 2 and then find the dependences of this velocity on input parameters. For data analysis two pieces of software were used - i-Speed Control Software and MINITAB. 111 participants took part in this experiment. The results are presented in this paper - especially dependence of mean velocity on time and difference in velocity between genders.

  8. Photosynthesis, photorespiration, and light signalling in defence responses.

    PubMed

    Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Neukermans, Jenny; Li, Shengchun; Aro, Eva-Mari; Noctor, Graham

    2012-02-01

    Visible light is the basic energetic driver of plant biomass production through photosynthesis. The constantly fluctuating availability of light and other environmental factors means that the photosynthetic apparatus must be able to operate in a dynamic fashion appropriate to the prevailing conditions. Dynamic regulation is achieved through an array of homeostatic control mechanisms that both respond to and influence cellular energy and reductant status. In addition, light availability and quality are continuously monitored by plants through photoreceptors. Outside the laboratory growth room, it is within the context of complex changes in energy and signalling status that plants must regulate pathways to deal with biotic challenges, and this can be influenced by changes in the highly energetic photosynthetic pathways and in the turnover of the photosynthetic machinery. Because of this, defence responses are neither simple nor easily predictable, but rather conditioned by the nutritional and signalling status of the plant cell. This review discusses recent data and emerging concepts of how recognized defence pathways interact with and are influenced by light-dependent processes. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential roles of the chloroplast, photorespiration, and photoreceptor-associated pathways in regulating the outcome of interactions between plants and pathogenic organisms.

  9. Mutualistic ants as an indirect defence against leaf pathogens.

    PubMed

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Kaltenpoth, Martin; Boland, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Mutualistic ants are commonly considered as an efficient indirect defence against herbivores. Nevertheless, their indirect protective role against plant pathogens has been scarcely investigated. We compared the protective role against pathogens of two different ant partners, a mutualistic and a parasitic ant, on the host plant Acacia hindsii (Fabaceae). The epiphytic bacterial community on leaves was evaluated in the presence and absence of both ant partners by cultivation and by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Pathogen-inflicted leaf damage, epiphytic bacterial abundance (colony-forming units) and number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were significantly higher in plants inhabited by parasitic ants than in plants inhabited by mutualistic ants. Unifrac unweighted and weighted principal component analyses showed that the bacterial community composition on leaves changed significantly when mutualistic ants were removed from plants or when plants were inhabited by parasitic ants. Direct mechanisms provided by ant-associated bacteria would contribute to the protective role against pathogens. The results suggest that the indirect defence of mutualistic ants also covers the protection from bacterial plant pathogens. Our findings highlight the importance of considering bacterial partners in ant-plant defensive mutualisms, which can contribute significantly to ant-mediated protection from plant pathogens.

  10. Converting old shore protection structures into softer defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranzini, Enzo

    2010-05-01

    Beach erosion has been affecting several developed countries since the middle of 19th century, which led to the construction of many different protection structures. These frequently proved to be ineffective locally, while being negative for downdrift coastal segments. In addition, such defence structures modified the coastal morphology, often transforming a sandy beach into a rocky coast. Softer shore protection projects have been developed in the past years, mostly accompanied by beach nourishment that uses quarried material or shelf sediments. This proved to be efficient in defending the beach, without negative fallouts on unprotected sectors. These techniques can be easily applied to beaches where no "archeaostructures" had been realized before. On the other hand, difficulties arise when such "old style" structures are to be replaced with softer techniques, since traditional hard defences usually cause such changes to beach profile that innovative ones become "too soft". Due to profile deepening in front of reflective structures, wave shoaling is reduced and energy dissipation concentrated in a narrow beach band. Restoring a milder profile needs a large amount of sediments and fine sands are not stable under those conditions. The new challenge for coastal engineers, coastal geomorphologists and coastal planners is managing the transition from old archaeostructures to new soft shore protection techniques. This process requires years of progressive adaptation - an unsuitable timing for politicians who demand fast results to be sold during the next elections. In Italy, along the Tuscany coast, where more than two kilometres of breakwaters protect each kilometre of coast, such a process has been initiated after a long phase of stakeholder participation in order to overcome public scepticism towards "invisible" defences. Detached breakwaters were lowered below sea level at Follonica and Marina di Pisa, while the number of groins is to be reduced at Marina di Massa

  11. To Gain the Academic Capital: The Conflict and Solution in the Dissertation Proposal Defence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ningning, Zhao

    2006-01-01

    Doctor candidates get the academic identity and academic capital in his field by the thesis writing. The dissertation proposal defence hold on the public field promotes the state of academic and legalizes the discipline of the academic community. During the dissertation proposal defence, doctor candidates may face three conflicts. The first is…

  12. An Exploratory Study of the Defence Mechanisms Used in Psychotherapy by Adults Who Have Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, D. W.; Beail, N.

    2010-01-01

    Problem: A significant concept in psychodynamic theory and practice is that of defence mechanisms. The identifications of defences is a key task of the therapist and these are then used in the formulation and form part of the therapist's interventions. Case studies of psychotherapy with adults who have intellectual disabilities (IDs) suggest that…

  13. Specific expression of an extensin-like gene in the style of Nicotiana alata.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C G; Cornish, E C; Clarke, A E

    1992-01-01

    cDNAs and corresponding genomic clones encoding a putative proline-rich protein (NaPRP3) were isolated from libraries prepared from Nicotiana alata style mRNA and genomic DNA. The predicted NaPRP3 protein is structurally similar to extensin in containing six copies of the characteristic extensin sequence Ser-Pro4, but differs in being smaller (151 residues compared with greater than 300 residues) and lacking Tyr residues. In contrast to most extensin genes, the NaPRP3 gene is not induced by mechanical wounding, and its expression is restricted to cells of the transmitting tract of the style. PMID:1392608

  14. Identification of plant defence genes in canola using Arabidopsis cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Schenk, P M; Thomas-Hall, S R; Nguyen, A V; Manners, J M; Kazan, K; Spangenberg, G

    2008-09-01

    We report the identification of novel defence genes in canola by using a cDNA microarray from Arabidopsis. We examined changes that occur in the abundance of transcripts corresponding to 2375 Arabidopsis expressed sequence tags (selected for defence gene identification) following inoculation of canola plants with the fungal necrotrophic leaf pathogen, Alternaria brassicicola. Microarray data obtained from this cross-hybridisation experiment were compared to expression profiles previously obtained from the equivalent Arabidopsis experiment. Homology searches using a canola expressed sequence tag database with approximately 6000 unique clones led to identification of canola defence genes. Pathogen-responsive transcripts included those associated to known defence genes, reactive oxygen species metabolism, disease resistance and regulatory genes, and cell maintenance/metabolism genes. Using specific primers for quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, gene expression profiles in canola were obtained that demonstrated coordinated defence responses, including systemic responses in distal tissue and salicylic acid- and methyl jasmonate-mediated signalling against A. brassicicola.

  15. Intensity of nest defence is related to offspring sex ratio in the great tit Parus major.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, A N; Blakey, J K

    2000-01-01

    Nest-defence behaviour of passerines is a form of parental investment. Parents are selected, therefore, to vary the intensity of their nest defence with respect to the value of their offspring. Great tit, Parus major, males were tested for their defence response to both a nest predator and playback of a great tit chick distress call. The results from the two trials were similar; males gave more alarm calls and made more perch changes if they had larger broods and if they had a greater proportion of sons in their brood. This is the first evidence for a relationship between nest-defence intensity and offspring sex ratio. Paternal quality, size, age and condition, lay date and chick condition did not significantly influence any of the measured nest-defence parameters. PMID:10787154

  16. Differential phenotypic and genetic expression of defence compounds in a plant–herbivore interaction along elevation

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Ana L.; Suchan, Tomasz; Pellissier, Loïc; Rasmann, Sergio; Ducrest, Anne-Lyse

    2016-01-01

    Elevation gradients impose large differences in abiotic and biotic conditions over short distances, in turn, likely driving differences in gene expression more than would genetic variation per se, as natural selection and drift are less likely to fix alleles at such a narrow spatial scale. As elevation increases, the pressure exerted on plants by herbivores and on arthropod herbivores by predators decreases, and organisms spanning the elevation gradient are thus expected to show lower levels of defence at high elevation. The alternative hypothesis, based on the optimal defence theory, is that defence allocation should be higher in low-resource habitats such as those at high elevation, due to higher costs associated with tissue replacement. In this study, we analyse variation with elevation in (i) defence compound content in the plant Lotus corniculatus and (ii) gene expression associated with defence against predators in the specific phytophagous moth, Zygaena filipendulae. Both species produce cyanogenic glycosides (CNglcs) such as lotaustralin and linamarin as defence mechanisms, with the moth, in addition, being able to sequester CNglcs from its host plant. Specifically, we tested the assumption that the defence-associated phenotype in plants and the gene expression in the insect herbivore should covary between low- and high-elevation environments. We found that L. corniculatus accumulated more CNglcs at high elevation, a result in agreement with the optimal defence theory. By contrast, we found that the levels of expression in the defence genes of Z. filipendulae larvae were not related to the CNglc content of their host plant. Overall, expression levels were not correlated with elevation either, with the exception of the UGT33A1 gene, which showed a marginally significant trend towards higher expression at high elevation when using a simple statistical framework. These results suggest that the defence phenotype of plants against herbivores, and subsequent

  17. Plant defence against aphids: the PAD4 signalling nexus.

    PubMed

    Louis, Joe; Shah, Jyoti

    2015-02-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4) functions as a key player in modulating defence against the phloem sap-feeding aphid Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), an important pest of a wide variety of plants. PAD4 controls antibiosis and antixenosis against the GPA. In addition, PAD4 deters aphid feeding from sieve elements on Arabidopsis. In the past few years, substantial progress has been made in dissecting the role of PAD4 and its interaction with other signalling components in limiting aphid infestation. Several key genes/mechanisms involved in providing aphid resistance/susceptibility in Arabidopsis regulate the aphid infestation-stimulated expression of PAD4. Together, PAD4 and its interacting signalling partners provide a critical barrier to curtail GPA colonization of Arabidopsis.

  18. Mother-son incest as a defence against psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, K M; Bossi, J

    1993-09-01

    In the following, a case of mother-adult son incest is described and explained from a psychoanalytical viewpoint. Two theories are put forward: (a) Mother-son incest may occur as a defence against psychosis, and (b) the incest represents an unconscious search for triangulation, a process in which external authorities (such as, for example, a court of law) may function as surrogates for persons who have been missed in the pre-oedipal past. It is therefore possible to understand mother-son incest symbolically as an indicator of pre-oedipal needs of the son and of the mother's longing for the absent partner. The incest is, however, not only a cry for help; it is also to be regarded as an attempt to solve the problem for both people involved. Looked at in this way, new ways of understanding and new possibilities for therapy emerge.

  19. Potato skin proteome is enriched with plant defence components

    PubMed Central

    Barel, Gilli; Ginzberg, Idit

    2008-01-01

    Periderm is a tissue of secondary origin that replaces damaged epidermis. It can be found in underground plant organs, as an above-ground tissue of woody species (cork), and as a wound-healing tissue. Its outer layers are composed of phellem cells with suberized walls that constitute a protective barrier, preventing pathogen invasion and fluid loss. In potato, a model for periderm studies, periderm tissue replaces the epidermis early in tuber development and the suberized phellems constitute the tuber's skin. To identify factors involved in phellem/skin development and that play a role in its defensive characteristics, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to compare the skin and parenchymatic flesh proteomes of young developing tubers. Proteins exhibiting differentially high signal intensity in the skin were sorted by functional categories. As expected, the differential skin proteome was enriched in proteins whose activity is characteristic of actively dividing tissues such as cell proliferation, C1 metabolism, and the oxidative respiratory chain. Interestingly, the major functional category consisted of proteins (63%) involved in plant defence responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. This group included three isozymes of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase and five isozymes of peroxidase that may play a role in suberization processes. The differential expression of these proteins in the skin was further verified by RT-PCR of their corresponding transcripts in skin and tuber flesh samples. The results presented here shed light on the early events in skin development and further expand the concept of the periderm as a protective tissue containing an array of plant defence components. PMID:18653692

  20. Brood parasitism selects for no defence in a cuckoo host.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Oliver

    2011-09-22

    In coevolutionary arms races, like between cuckoos and their hosts, it is easy to understand why the host is under selection favouring anti-parasitism behaviour, such as egg rejection, which can lead to parasites evolving remarkable adaptations to 'trick' their host, such as mimetic eggs. But what about cases where the cuckoo egg is not mimetic and where the host does not act against it? Classically, such apparently non-adaptive behaviour is put down to evolutionary lag: given enough time, egg mimicry and parasite avoidance strategies will evolve. An alternative is that absence of egg mimicry and of anti-parasite behaviour is stable. Such stability is at first sight highly paradoxical. I show, using both field and experimental data to parametrize a simulation model, that the absence of defence behaviour by Cape bulbuls (Pycnonotus capensis) against parasitic eggs of the Jacobin cuckoo (Clamator jacobinus) is optimal behaviour. The cuckoo has evolved massive eggs (double the size of bulbul eggs) with thick shells, making it very hard or impossible for the host to eject the cuckoo egg. The host could still avoid brood parasitism by nest desertion. However, higher predation and parasitism risks later in the season makes desertion more costly than accepting the cuckoo egg, a strategy aided by the fact that many cuckoo eggs are incorrectly timed, so do not hatch in time and hence do not reduce host fitness to zero. Selection will therefore prevent the continuation of any coevolutionary arms race. Non-mimetic eggs and absence of defence strategies against cuckoo eggs will be the stable, if at first sight paradoxical, result.

  1. Silicon-based plant defences, tooth wear and voles.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Ivan; Zub, Karol; Szafrańska, Paulina A; Zalewski, Andrzej; Merceron, Gildas

    2016-02-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are hypothesized to drive vole population cycles through the grazing-induced production of phytoliths in leaves. Phytoliths act as mechanical defences because they deter herbivory and lower growth rates in mammals. However, how phytoliths impair herbivore performance is still unknown. Here, we tested whether the amount of phytoliths changes tooth wear patterns. If confirmed, abrasion from phytoliths could play a role in population crashes. We applied dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) to laboratory and wild voles. Lab voles were fed two pelleted diets with differing amounts of silicon, which produced similar dental textures. This was most probably due to the loss of food mechanical properties through pelletization and/or the small difference in silicon concentration between diets. Wild voles were trapped in Poland during spring and summer, and every year across a population cycle. In spring, voles feed on silica-rich monocotyledons, while in the summer they also include silica-depleted dicotyledons. This was reflected in the results; the amount of silica therefore leaves a traceable record in the dental microwear texture of voles. Furthermore, voles from different phases of population cycles have different microwear textures. We tentatively propose that these differences result from grazing-induced phytolith concentrations. We hypothesize that the high amount of phytoliths in response to intense grazing in peak years may result in malocclusion and other dental abnormalities, which would explain how these silicon-based plant defences help provoke population crashes. DMTA could then be used to reconstruct vole population dynamics using teeth from pellets or palaeontological material. PMID:26889000

  2. L-Homoserylaminoethanol, a novel dipeptide alcohol inhibitor of eukaryotic DNA polymerase from a plant cultured cells, Nicotina tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Isoko; Asano, Naoki; Kato, Ikuo; Oshige, Masahiko; Sugino, Akio; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2004-03-01

    We found a novel inhibitor specific to eukaryotic DNA polymerase epsilon(pol epsilon) from plant cultured cells, Nicotina tabacum L. The compound (compound 1) was a dipeptide alcohol, L-homoserylaminoethanol. The 50% inhibition of pol epsilon activity by the compound was 43.6 microg/mL, and it had almost no effect on the activities of the other eukaryotic DNA polymerases such as alpha, beta, gamma and delta, prokaryotic DNA polymerases, nor DNA metabolic enzymes such as human telomerase, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, T7 RNA polymerase, human DNA topoisomerase I and II, T4 polynucleotide kinase and bovine deoxyribonuclease I. Kinetic studies showed that inhibition of pol epsilon by the compound was non-competitive with respect to both template-primer DNA and nucleotide substrate. We succeeded in chemically synthesizing the stereoisomers, L-homoserylaminoethanol and D-homoserylaminoethanol, and found both were effective to the same extent. The IC(50) values of L- and D-homoserylaminoethanols for pol epsilon were 42.0 and 41.5 microg/mL, respectively. This represents the second discovery of a pol epsilon-specific inhibitor, and the first report on a water-soluble peptide-like compound as the inhibitor, which is required in biochemical studies of pol epsilon.

  3. Evolution of proteinase inhibitor defenses in North American allopolyploid species of Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianqiang; Hettenhausen, Christian; Baldwin, Ian T

    2006-09-01

    We studied the jasmonate (JA)-elicited trypsin-proteinase inhibitor (TPI) anti-herbivore defense system in North American Nicotiana to understand how complex polygenetic traits evolve after allopolyploidy speciation. N. quadrivalvis (Nq) and N. clevelandii (Nc) are allotetraploid descendant species of the ancestors of the diploid species N. attenuata (Na) and N. obtusifolia (No). From cDNA, intron and promoter sequence analyses, and Southern blotting, we deduced that only the maternally derived No TPI genes were retained in the tetraploid genomes (Nq, Nc), whereas the sequences of the paternal Na ancestor were deleted. The number of TPI repeats in different Nicotiana taxa was independent of phylogenetic associations. In Na, TPI activity and mRNA transcript accumulation as well as JA levels increased dramatically above wound-induced levels when the oral secretions (OS) from Manduca sexta larvae were introduced into wounds. This OS-mediated amplification of defense signaling and downstream response was also found in the tetraploid genomes but was absent from No; in No, OS treatment suppresses TPI mRNA accumulation and activity and does not increase JA accumulation. Hence, the tetraploids retained components of Na's signaling system, but lost Na's TPI genes and used No's TPI genes to retain a functional TPI defense system, underscoring the genomic flexibility that enables complex polygenic traits to be retained in allopolyploid species.

  4. Mechanisms and ecological consequences of plant defence induction and suppression in herbivore communities

    PubMed Central

    Kant, M. R.; Jonckheere, W.; Knegt, B.; Lemos, F.; Liu, J.; Schimmel, B. C. J.; Villarroel, C. A.; Ataide, L. M. S.; Dermauw, W.; Glas, J. J.; Egas, M.; Janssen, A.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Schuurink, R. C.; Sabelis, M. W.; Alba, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plants are hotbeds for parasites such as arthropod herbivores, which acquire nutrients and energy from their hosts in order to grow and reproduce. Hence plants are selected to evolve resistance, which in turn selects for herbivores that can cope with this resistance. To preserve their fitness when attacked by herbivores, plants can employ complex strategies that include reallocation of resources and the production of defensive metabolites and structures. Plant defences can be either prefabricated or be produced only upon attack. Those that are ready-made are referred to as constitutive defences. Some constitutive defences are operational at any time while others require activation. Defences produced only when herbivores are present are referred to as induced defences. These can be established via de novo biosynthesis of defensive substances or via modifications of prefabricated substances and consequently these are active only when needed. Inducibility of defence may serve to save energy and to prevent self-intoxication but also implies that there is a delay in these defences becoming operational. Induced defences can be characterized by alterations in plant morphology and molecular chemistry and are associated with a decrease in herbivore performance. These alterations are set in motion by signals generated by herbivores. Finally, a subset of induced metabolites are released into the air as volatiles and function as a beacon for foraging natural enemies searching for prey, and this is referred to as induced indirect defence. Scope The objective of this review is to evaluate (1) which strategies plants have evolved to cope with herbivores and (2) which traits herbivores have evolved that enable them to counter these defences. The primary focus is on the induction and suppression of plant defences and the review outlines how the palette of traits that determine induction/suppression of, and resistance/susceptibility of herbivores to, plant defences can

  5. Evolution of behavioural and cellular defences against parasitoid wasps in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Z R; Schlenke, T A; de Roode, J C

    2016-05-01

    It may be intuitive to predict that host immune systems will evolve to counter a broad range of potential challenges through simultaneous investment in multiple defences. However, this would require diversion of resources from other traits, such as growth, survival and fecundity. Therefore, ecological immunology theory predicts that hosts will specialize in only a subset of possible defences. We tested this hypothesis through a comparative study of a cellular immune response and a putative behavioural defence used by eight fruit fly species against two parasitoid wasp species (one generalist and one specialist). Fly larvae can survive infection by melanotically encapsulating wasp eggs, and female flies can potentially reduce infection rates in their offspring by laying fewer eggs when wasps are present. The strengths of both defences varied significantly but were not negatively correlated across our chosen host species; thus, we found no evidence for a trade-off between behavioural and cellular immunity. Instead, cellular defences were significantly weaker against the generalist wasp, whereas behavioural defences were similar in strength against both wasps and positively correlated between wasps. We investigated the adaptive significance of wasp-induced oviposition reduction behaviour by testing whether wasp-exposed parents produce offspring with stronger cellular defences, but we found no support for this hypothesis. We further investigated the sensory basis of this behaviour by testing mutants deficient in either vision or olfaction, both of which failed to reduce their oviposition rates in the presence of wasps, suggesting that both senses are necessary for detecting and responding to wasps.

  6. Collective defence portfolios of ant hosts shift with social parasite pressure

    PubMed Central

    Jongepier, Evelien; Kleeberg, Isabelle; Job, Sylwester; Foitzik, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Host defences become increasingly costly as parasites breach successive lines of defence. Because selection favours hosts that successfully resist parasitism at the lowest possible cost, escalating coevolutionary arms races are likely to drive host defence portfolios towards ever more expensive strategies. We investigated the interplay between host defence portfolios and social parasite pressure by comparing 17 populations of two Temnothorax ant species. When successful, collective aggression not only prevents parasitation but also spares host colonies the cost of searching for and moving to a new nest site. However, once parasites breach the host's nest defence, host colonies should resort to flight as the more beneficial resistance strategy. We show that under low parasite pressure, host colonies more likely responded to an intruding Protomognathus americanus slavemaker with collective aggression, which prevented the slavemaker from escaping and potentially recruiting nest-mates. However, as parasite pressure increased, ant colonies of both host species became more likely to flee rather than to fight. We conclude that host defence portfolios shift consistently with social parasite pressure, which is in accordance with the degeneration of frontline defences and the evolution of subsequent anti-parasite strategies often invoked in hosts of brood parasites. PMID:25100690

  7. Tasting the difference: do multiple defence chemicals interact in Müllerian mimicry?

    PubMed

    Skelhorn, John; Rowe, Candy

    2005-02-01

    Müllerian mimicry, where two unpalatable species share a warning pattern, is classically believed to be a form of mutualism, where the species involved share the cost of predator education. The evolutionary dynamics of Müllerian mimicry have recently become a controversial subject, after mathematical models have shown that if minor alterations are made to assumptions about the way in which predators learn and forget about unpalatable prey, this textbook case of mutualism may not be mutualistic at all. An underlying assumption of these models is that Müllerian mimics possess the same defence chemical. However, some Müllerian mimics are known to possess different defence chemicals. Using domestic chicks as predators and coloured crumbs flavoured with either the same or different unpalatable chemicals as prey, we provide evidence that two defence chemicals can interact to enhance predator learning and memory. This indicates that Müllerian mimics that possess different defence chemicals are better protected than those that share a single defence chemical. These data provide insight into how multiple defence chemicals are perceived by birds,and how they influence the way birds learn and remember warningly coloured prey. They highlight the importance of considering how different toxins in mimicry rings can interact in the evolution and maintenance of Müllerian mimicry and could help to explain the remarkable variation in chemical defences found within and between species.

  8. Metabolomic Assessment of Induced and Activated Chemical Defence in the Invasive Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    PubMed Central

    Nylund, Göran M.; Weinberger, Florian; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In comparison with terrestrial plants the mechanistic knowledge of chemical defences is poor for marine macroalgae. This restricts our understanding in the chemically mediated interactions that take place between algae and other organisms. Technical advances such as metabolomics, however, enable new approaches towards the characterisation of the chemically mediated interactions of organisms with their environment. We address defence responses in the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla using mass spectrometry based metabolomics in combination with bioassays. Being invasive in the north Atlantic this alga is likely to possess chemical defences according to the prediction that well-defended exotics are most likely to become successful invaders in systems dominated by generalist grazers, such as marine macroalgal communities. We investigated the effect of intense herbivore feeding and simulated herbivory by mechanical wounding of the algae. Both processes led to similar changes in the metabolic profile. Feeding experiments with the generalist isopod grazer Idotea baltica showed that mechanical wounding caused a significant increase in grazer resistance. Structure elucidation of the metabolites of which some were up-regulated more than 100 times in the wounded tissue, revealed known and novel eicosanoids as major components. Among these were prostaglandins, hydroxylated fatty acids and arachidonic acid derived conjugated lactones. Bioassays with pure metabolites showed that these eicosanoids are part of the innate defence system of macroalgae, similarly to animal systems. In accordance with an induced defence mechanism application of extracts from wounded tissue caused a significant increase in grazer resistance and the up-regulation of other pathways than in the activated defence. Thus, this study suggests that G. vermiculophylla chemically deters herbivory by two lines of defence, a rapid wound-activated process followed by a slower inducible defence. By unravelling

  9. Metabolomic assessment of induced and activated chemical defence in the invasive red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla.

    PubMed

    Nylund, Göran M; Weinberger, Florian; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In comparison with terrestrial plants the mechanistic knowledge of chemical defences is poor for marine macroalgae. This restricts our understanding in the chemically mediated interactions that take place between algae and other organisms. Technical advances such as metabolomics, however, enable new approaches towards the characterisation of the chemically mediated interactions of organisms with their environment. We address defence responses in the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla using mass spectrometry based metabolomics in combination with bioassays. Being invasive in the north Atlantic this alga is likely to possess chemical defences according to the prediction that well-defended exotics are most likely to become successful invaders in systems dominated by generalist grazers, such as marine macroalgal communities. We investigated the effect of intense herbivore feeding and simulated herbivory by mechanical wounding of the algae. Both processes led to similar changes in the metabolic profile. Feeding experiments with the generalist isopod grazer Idotea baltica showed that mechanical wounding caused a significant increase in grazer resistance. Structure elucidation of the metabolites of which some were up-regulated more than 100 times in the wounded tissue, revealed known and novel eicosanoids as major components. Among these were prostaglandins, hydroxylated fatty acids and arachidonic acid derived conjugated lactones. Bioassays with pure metabolites showed that these eicosanoids are part of the innate defence system of macroalgae, similarly to animal systems. In accordance with an induced defence mechanism application of extracts from wounded tissue caused a significant increase in grazer resistance and the up-regulation of other pathways than in the activated defence. Thus, this study suggests that G. vermiculophylla chemically deters herbivory by two lines of defence, a rapid wound-activated process followed by a slower inducible defence. By unravelling

  10. The cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity: structural determinants of host defence

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Serge; Shenoy, Avinash R.

    2016-01-01

    Host cells use antimicrobial proteins, pathogen-restrictive compartmentalization and cell death in their defence against intracellular pathogens. Recent work has revealed that four components of the cytoskeleton — actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments and septins, which are well known for their roles in cell division, shape and movement — have important functions in innate immunity and cellular self-defence. Investigations using cellular and animal models have shown that these cytoskeletal proteins are crucial for sensing bacteria and for mobilizing effector mechanisms to eliminate them. In this Review, we highlight the emerging roles of the cytoskeleton as a structural determinant of cell-autonomous host defence. PMID:26292640

  11. Chronic ozone exacerbates the reduction in photosynthesis and acceleration of senescence caused by limited N availability in Nicotiana sylvestris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated ozone (O3) and limiting soil nitrogen (N) availability both negatively affect crop performance. However, little is known about how the combination of elevated O3 and limiting N affect crop growth and metabolism. In this study, we grew tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) in ambient and elevated O...

  12. In vitro cytotoxicity of Nicotiana gossei leaves, used in the Australian Aboriginal smokeless tobacco known as pituri or mingkulpa.

    PubMed

    Moghbel, Nahid; Ryu, BoMi; Cabot, Peter J; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2016-07-01

    The Aboriginal population of Central Australia use endemic Nicotiana species to make a smokeless tobacco product known usually as pituri or mingkulpa. Nicotiana leaves are masticated with wood ash into a 'quid' that is chewed/sucked for absorption of nicotine. In addition to nicotine, smokeless tobacco products contain a spectrum of biologically active compounds that may contribute to effects on health. The objective of this study was to quantify nicotine, and related alkaloids and tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), in Nicotiana leaves used in pituri, and compare in vitro toxicity of pure nicotine with Nicotiana leaf extract at the same concentration of nicotine. An aqueous extract of dry leaves of Nicotiana gossei and a reference smokeless tobacco (CORESTA CRP2) were quantified for major pyridine alkaloids and TSNAs using HPLC-UV and LC-MS/MS. A range of extract concentrations and corresponding concentrations of nicotine standard were tested using an MTS assay to measure human lung epithelium cell (A549) survival. Cells treated for 24h with the maximum concentration of 1.5mg/ml of nicotine resulted in 77% viability. In contrast, extracts from N. gossei leaves and CRP2 containing a similar concentration of nicotine (1.3mg/ml) resulted in remarkably lower viability of 1.5 and 6%, respectively. Comparison of cytotoxicity of pure nicotine with that of the extracts revealed that nicotine was not the source of their cytotoxicity. Other biologically active compounds such as the known carcinogens NNK and NNN, derived from nicotine and nornicotine and found to be present in the smokeless tobacco extracts, may be responsible.

  13. In vitro cytotoxicity of Nicotiana gossei leaves, used in the Australian Aboriginal smokeless tobacco known as pituri or mingkulpa.

    PubMed

    Moghbel, Nahid; Ryu, BoMi; Cabot, Peter J; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2016-07-01

    The Aboriginal population of Central Australia use endemic Nicotiana species to make a smokeless tobacco product known usually as pituri or mingkulpa. Nicotiana leaves are masticated with wood ash into a 'quid' that is chewed/sucked for absorption of nicotine. In addition to nicotine, smokeless tobacco products contain a spectrum of biologically active compounds that may contribute to effects on health. The objective of this study was to quantify nicotine, and related alkaloids and tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), in Nicotiana leaves used in pituri, and compare in vitro toxicity of pure nicotine with Nicotiana leaf extract at the same concentration of nicotine. An aqueous extract of dry leaves of Nicotiana gossei and a reference smokeless tobacco (CORESTA CRP2) were quantified for major pyridine alkaloids and TSNAs using HPLC-UV and LC-MS/MS. A range of extract concentrations and corresponding concentrations of nicotine standard were tested using an MTS assay to measure human lung epithelium cell (A549) survival. Cells treated for 24h with the maximum concentration of 1.5mg/ml of nicotine resulted in 77% viability. In contrast, extracts from N. gossei leaves and CRP2 containing a similar concentration of nicotine (1.3mg/ml) resulted in remarkably lower viability of 1.5 and 6%, respectively. Comparison of cytotoxicity of pure nicotine with that of the extracts revealed that nicotine was not the source of their cytotoxicity. Other biologically active compounds such as the known carcinogens NNK and NNN, derived from nicotine and nornicotine and found to be present in the smokeless tobacco extracts, may be responsible. PMID:27178269

  14. BjMYB1, a transcription factor implicated in plant defence through activating BjCHI1 chitinase expression by binding to a W-box-like element

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Jia, Shuangwei; Wang, Chunlian; Wang, Fujun; Wang, Fajun; Zhao, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified the W-box-like-4 (Wbl-4) element (GTAGTGACTCAT), one of six Wbl elements in the BjC-P promoter of the unusual chitinase gene BjCHI1 from Brassica juncea, as the core element responsive to fungal infection. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the cognate transcription factor interacting with the Wbl-4 element. Using Wbl-4 as a target, we performed yeast one-hybrid screening of a B. juncea cDNA library and isolated an R2R3-MYB transcription factor designated as BjMYB1. BjMYB1 was localized in the nucleus of plant cells. EMSA assays confirmed that BjMYB1 binds to the Wbl-4 element. Transiently expressed BjMYB1 up-regulated the activity of the BjC-P promoter through its binding to the Wbl-4 element in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves. In B. juncea, BjMYB1 displayed a similar induced expression pattern as that of BjCHI1 upon infection by the fungus Botrytis cinerea. Moreover, heterogeneous overexpression of BjMYB1 significantly elevated the resistance of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana to the fungus B. cinerea. These results suggest that BjMYB1 is potentially involved in host defence against fungal attack through activating the expression of BjCHI1 by binding to the Wbl-4 element in the BjC-P promoter. This finding demonstrates a novel DNA target of plant MYB transcription factors. PMID:27353280

  15. Predator avoidance and immune defence: costs and trade-offs in snails.

    PubMed

    Rigby, M C; Jokela, J

    2000-01-22

    Organisms are often confronted by both predators and pathogens. Defending against such widely divergent enemies requires more than one type of defence. Multiple defences, however, raise the possibility of trade-offs among defences. We tested for such trade-offs by manipulating the level of predator-avoidance behaviour and immune function in the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda: Pulmonata). Our results show that predator avoidance and immune function had clear costs in terms of reproduction and survival. Further, we show that increased levels of predator-avoidance behaviour reduced the snails' ability to defend against potential pathogens. Predator-avoidance behaviour may thus have the additional indirect cost of reduced immunocompetence and increased susceptibility to pathogens. Our results suggest that ecological factors (e.g. predator density) may considerably modify the expression and costs of immune defences.

  16. Psychic skin: psychotic defences, borderline process and delusions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, I apply the concept of psychic skin to analytic work with people suffering from personality disorders and psychoses. When psychoses emerge, the defensive skin which protects the ego is breached and violent unconscious forces rip through the personality. Some of the patients diagnosed as schizophrenic with whom I work have identified with archetypal characters such as Christ, Satan, John Lennon and the Queen. I attempt to show how the adoption of these inflated personas can serve as secondary psychic skins. Such delusional identifications can provide a protective shield to hide the denuded self and prevent intrusion from the external world. Through clinical example, I try to demonstrate how these archetypal 'second skins' can preserve life until internal and external conditions make it possible for the self to emerge. I contrast such psychotic identifications with 'thin-skinned' and 'thick-skinned' narcissism as well as 'defences of the self' in borderline states where the psychic skin may be damaged but does not disintegrate. I also look at the ways in which Jung's own personal experience was different from this and how he managed to avert psychotic breakdown.

  17. Caterpillar hairs as an anti-parasitoid defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Azusa; Sugiura, Shinji

    2016-10-01

    Caterpillar hairs are thought to act as a physical barrier against natural enemies, including parasitoids. However, very few studies have experimentally demonstrated how hairs protect caterpillars from parasitoid oviposition. To clarify the importance of caterpillar hairs as an anti-parasitoid defence, we observed the generalist endoparasitoid Meteorus pulchricornis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) attacking both smooth and hairy caterpillars under laboratory conditions. A female Meteorus pulchricornis uses its ovipositor to inject venom and lay a single egg inside host larvae. We placed a smooth Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) caterpillar or a hairy Lymantria dispar japonica (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) caterpillar in front of parasitoid females. We observed that 100 % and 84 % of the parasitoids could successfully stab their ovipositors into the smooth larvae of S. litura and first instars of the hairy caterpillar L. dispar japonica, respectively. However, only 24 % of parasitoids could successfully stab their ovipositors into second-instar L. dispar japonica. A higher rate of successful stabs (94 %) by parasitoids was obtained by cutting the hairs of second instar L. dispar japonica much shorter than the parasitoid ovipositor. The results demonstrate that the long, thick hairs of second and later instars of L. dispar japonica function as a physical barrier against parasitoid oviposition.

  18. "Sleights of mind": delusions, defences, and self-deception.

    PubMed

    McKay, Ryan; Langdon, Robyn; Coltheart, Max

    2005-08-01

    Two different modes of theorising about delusions are explored. On the one hand is the motivational approach, which regards delusions as serving a defensive, palliative, even potentially adaptive function. On the other, is the cognitive deficit approach, which conceptualises delusions as explicitly pathological, involving abnormalities in ordinary cognitive processes. The former approach, prominently exemplified by the psychoanalytic tradition, was predominant historically, but has been challenged in recent years by the latter. Some grievances against psychoanalytic theory are briefly discussed, and it is argued that although the reasons for psychoanalysis falling into scientific disrepute are partly justified, the psychodynamic notion that motivation has access to the mechanisms of belief formation is of potentially crucial theoretical utility. A variety of possible syntheses of the two theoretical modes are therefore explored, in the belief that the most comprehensive account of delusions will involve a theoretical unification of both styles of explanation. Along the way, an attempt is made to locate the notions delusion, defence, and self-deception in a shared theoretical space. PMID:16571464

  19. Trained immunity: A smart way to enhance innate immune defence.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Riksen, Niels; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-11-01

    The innate arm of the immune system is generally viewed as primitive and non-specific and - in contrast to the adaptive immune arm - not to possess memory. However in plants and invertebrate animals that lack adaptive immunity, innate immunity will exhibit a prolonged enhanced functional state after adequate priming. A similar enhancement of function of the innate immunity has occasionally been described in vertebrates, including humans. Over the past few years we have studied this phenomenon in greater detail and we have coined the term 'Trained (innate) immunity' (TI). TI can be induced by a variety of stimuli, of which we have studied BCG and β-glucan in greater detail. The non-specific protective effects of BCG that have been observed in vaccination studies in the literature are probably due to TI. Monocytes and macrophages are among the main cells of the innate immune arm that can be trained. We have discovered that both BCG (via NOD2 signalling) and β-glucan (via dectin-1) induce epigenetic reprogramming, in particular stable changes in histone trimethylation at H3K4. These epigenetic changes lead to cellular activation, enhanced cytokine production and a change in the metabolic state of the cell with a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. TI is not only important for host defence and vaccine responses, but most probably also for diseases like atherosclerosis. Modulation of TI is a promising area for new treatments.

  20. Faba bean forisomes can function in defence against generalist aphids.

    PubMed

    Medina-Ortega, Karla J; Walker, Gregory P

    2015-06-01

    Phloem sieve elements have shut-off mechanisms that prevent loss of nutrient-rich phloem sap when the phloem is damaged. Some phloem proteins such as the proteins that form forisomes in legume sieve elements are one such mechanism and in response to damage, they instantly form occlusions that stop the flow of sap. It has long been hypothesized that one function of phloem proteins is defence against phloem sap-feeding insects such as aphids. This study provides the first experimental evidence that aphid feeding can induce phloem protein occlusion and that the aphid-induced occlusions inhibit phloem sap ingestion. The great majority of phloem penetrations in Vicia faba by the generalist aphids Myzus persicae and Macrosiphum euphorbiae triggered forisome occlusion and the aphids eventually withdrew their stylets without ingesting phloem sap. This contrasts starkly with a previous study on the legume-specialist aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, where penetration of faba bean sieve elements did not trigger forisome occlusion and the aphids readily ingested phloem sap. Next, forisome occlusion was demonstrated to be the cause of failed phloem ingestion attempts by M. persicae: when occlusion was inhibited by the calcium channel blocker lanthanum, M. persicae readily ingested faba bean phloem sap.

  1. Psychic skin: psychotic defences, borderline process and delusions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, I apply the concept of psychic skin to analytic work with people suffering from personality disorders and psychoses. When psychoses emerge, the defensive skin which protects the ego is breached and violent unconscious forces rip through the personality. Some of the patients diagnosed as schizophrenic with whom I work have identified with archetypal characters such as Christ, Satan, John Lennon and the Queen. I attempt to show how the adoption of these inflated personas can serve as secondary psychic skins. Such delusional identifications can provide a protective shield to hide the denuded self and prevent intrusion from the external world. Through clinical example, I try to demonstrate how these archetypal 'second skins' can preserve life until internal and external conditions make it possible for the self to emerge. I contrast such psychotic identifications with 'thin-skinned' and 'thick-skinned' narcissism as well as 'defences of the self' in borderline states where the psychic skin may be damaged but does not disintegrate. I also look at the ways in which Jung's own personal experience was different from this and how he managed to avert psychotic breakdown. PMID:22288539

  2. Symbiotic bacteria enable olive fly larvae to overcome host defences.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yosef, Michael; Pasternak, Zohar; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Yuval, Boaz

    2015-07-01

    Ripe fruit offer readily available nutrients for many animals, including fruit fly larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their associated rot-inducing bacteria. Yet, during most of their ontogeny, fruit remain chemically defended and effectively suppress herbivores and pathogens by high levels of secondary metabolites. Olive flies (Bactrocera oleae) are uniquely able to develop in unripe olives. Unlike other frugivorous tephritids, the larvae maintain bacteria confined within their midgut caeca. We examined the interaction between larvae, their associated bacteria, and fruit chemical defence, hypothesizing that bacterial contribution to larval development is contingent on the phenology of fruit defensive chemistry. We demonstrate that larvae require their natural complement of bacteria (Candidatus Erwinia dacicola: Enterobacteriaceae) in order to develop in unripe olives. Conversely, when feeding on ripe fruit, larval development proceeds independently of these bacteria. Our experiments suggest that bacteria counteract the inhibitory effect of oleuropein-the principal phenolic glycoside in unripe olives. In light of these results, we suggest that the unique symbiosis in olive flies, compared with other frugivorous tephritids, is understood by considering the relationship between the fly, bacteria and fruit chemistry. When applied in an evolutionary context, this approach may also point out the forces which shaped symbioses across the Tephritidae.

  3. An overview of the Defence Research Agency photovoltaic programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodbody, C.; Davies, M. A. H.

    1993-01-01

    The Defense Research Agency (DRA) has been active in the photovoltaic field since the early 1960's, then as the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE). The early work was aimed at developing silicon cells, solar panels, and light-weight flexible arrays in support of the 'UK' and 'X' series of British scientific and technology satellites, for which the RAE was either the design authority or technical advisor. The X3 satellite - Prospero, launched in 1971 test flew 50 micron wrap-round silicon cells. The X4 satellite - Miranda, launched in 1974 test flew a deployable flexible silicon array which was developed at the DRA. During this period an extensive range of test equipment was developed which was maintained, modernized, and extended to date. Following a period of reduced activity in the late 1970's and early 1980's the current program evolved. The programs that have been undertaken since 1983 are briefly summarized. These range from various cell developments, new types of coverglasses, flight experiments, radiation testing, primary cell calibration, and environmental testing. The current photovoltaic program is mainly funded by the UK Ministry of Defence and by the Department of Trade and Industry through the British National Space Center (BNSC). The program is aimed at research and development, both internally and with industry, to meet the customer's technical objectives and requirements and to provide them with technical advice. The facilities are also being used on contract work for various national and international organizations.

  4. PLANT OLIGOSACCHARIDES ENHANCE WHEAT DEFENCE RESPONSE AGAINST SEPTORIA LEAF BLOTCH.

    PubMed

    Somai-Jemmali, L; Siah, A; Randoux, B; Reignault, Ph; Halama, P; Rodriguez, R; Hamada, W

    2015-01-01

    Our work provides the first evidence for elicitation and protection effects of preventive treatments with oligosaccharides (20%)-based new formulation (Oligos) against Mycosphaerella graminicola, a major pathogen of bread wheat (BW) and durum wheat (DW). In planta Oligos treatment led to strongly reduced hyphal growth, penetration, mesophyll colonization and fructification. During the necrotrophic phase, Oligos also drastically decreased the production of M. graminicola CWDE activities, such as xylanase and glucanase as well as protease activity in both wheat species, suggesting their correlation with disease severity. Concerning plant defence markers, PR2, Chi 4 precursor-, Per- and LOX-1-encoding genes were up-regulated, while glucanase (GLUC), catalase (CAT) and lipoxygenase (LOX) activities and total phenolic compound (PC) accumulation were induced in both (non-inoculated and inoculated contexts. In inoculated context, a localized accumulation of H2O2 and PC at fungal penetration sites and a specific induction of phenylalanine ammonia-Lyase (PAL) enzymatic activity were observed. Moreover, our experiment exhibited some similarities and differences in both wheat species responses. GLUC and CAT activities and H2O2 accumulation were more responsive in DW leaves, while LOX and PAL activities and PC accumulation occurred earlier and to a stronger extent in BW leaves. The tested Oligos formulation showed an interesting resistance induction activity characterized by a high and stable efficiency whatever the wheat species, suggesting it integration in common control strategies against STB on both DW and BW. PMID:27141743

  5. Thermal Imaging And Its Application In Defence Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akula, Aparna; Ghosh, Ripul; Sardana, H. K.

    2011-10-01

    Thermal imaging is a boon to the armed forces namely army, navy and airforce because of its day night working capability and ability to perform well in all weather conditions. Thermal detectors capture the infrared radiation emitted by all objects above absolute zero temperature. The temperature variations of the captured scene are represented as a thermogram. With the advent of infrared detector technology, the bulky cooled thermal detectors having moving parts and demanding cryogenic temperatures have transformed into small and less expensive uncooled microbolometers having no moving parts, thereby making systems more rugged requiring less maintenance. Thermal imaging due to its various advantages has a large number of applications in military and defence. It is popularly used by the army and navy for border surveillance and law enforcement. It is also used in ship collision avoidance and guidance systems. In the aviation industry it has greatly mitigated the risks of flying in low light and night conditions. They are widely used in military aviation to identify, locate and target the enemy forces. Recently, they are also being incorporated in civil aviation for health monitoring of aircrafts.

  6. A transcriptional reference map of defence hormone responses in potato

    PubMed Central

    Wiesel, Lea; Davis, Jayne L.; Milne, Linda; Redondo Fernandez, Vanesa; Herold, Miriam B.; Middlefell Williams, Jill; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E.; Harrower, Brian; Newton, Adrian C.; Birch, Paul R. J.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Hein, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are involved in diverse aspects of plant life including the regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction, as well as governing biotic and abiotic stress responses. We have generated a comprehensive transcriptional reference map of the early potato responses to exogenous application of the defence hormones abscisic acid, brassinolides (applied as epibrassinolide), ethylene (applied as the ethylene precursor aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid), salicylic acid and jasmonic acid (applied as methyl jasmonate). Of the 39000 predicted genes on the microarray, a total of 2677 and 2473 genes were significantly differentially expressed at 1 h and 6 h after hormone treatment, respectively. Specific marker genes newly identified for the early hormone responses in potato include: a homeodomain 20 transcription factor (DMG400000248) for abscisic acid; a SAUR gene (DMG400016561) induced in epibrassinolide treated plants; an osmotin gene (DMG400003057) specifically enhanced by aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid; a gene weakly similar to AtWRKY40 (DMG402007388) that was induced by salicylic acid; and a jasmonate ZIM-domain protein 1 (DMG400002930) which was specifically activated by methyl jasmonate. An online database has been set up to query the expression patterns of potato genes represented on the microarray that can also incorporate future microarray or RNAseq-based expression studies. PMID:26477733

  7. Polypeptide synthesis induced in Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by infection with raspberry ringspot nepovirus.

    PubMed

    Acosta, O; Mayo, M A

    1993-01-01

    Infection of Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by raspberry ringspot nepovirus resulted in the accumulation of about 24 polypeptides that differed in M(r) and pI from polypeptides accumulating in mock-inoculated protoplasts. Similar polypeptides accumulated in protoplasts infected with the S and E strains of RRV but different infection-specific polypeptides were detected in protoplasts infected with tobacco ringspot nepovirus. The M(r) of RRV-specific polypeptides ranged from 210,000 to 18,000 and most are presumed to be derived from others by proteolytic cleavage. No evidence was found for marked changes in polypeptide abundance with time after inoculation or for any virus-specific polypeptide becoming disproportionately abundant in the medium during culture.

  8. The transcriptome of Verticillium dahliae-infected Nicotiana benthamiana determined by deep RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Faino, Luigi; de Jonge, Ronnie; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2012-09-01

    Verticillium wilt disease is caused by fungi of the Verticillium genus that occur on a wide range of host plants, including Solanaceous species such as tomato and tobacco. Currently, the well characterized Ve1 gene of tomato is the only Verticillium wilt resistance gene cloned. During experiments to identify the Verticillium molecule that activates Ve1 resistance in tomato, RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of Verticillium-infected Nicotiana benthamiana was performed. In total, over 99% of the obtained reads were derived from N. benthamiana. Here, we report the assembly and annotation of the N. benthamiana transcriptome. In total, 142,738 transcripts > 100 bp were obtained, amounting to a total transcriptome size of 38.7 Mbp, which is comparable to the Arabidopsis transcriptome. About 30,282 transcripts could be annotated based on homology to Arabidopsis genes. By assembly of the N. benthamiana transcriptome, we provide a catalogue of transcripts of a Solanaceous model plant under pathogen stress.

  9. Maternal synthesis of abscisic acid controls seed development and yield in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    PubMed

    Frey, Anne; Godin, Béatrice; Bonnet, Magda; Sotta, Bruno; Marion-Poll, Annie

    2004-04-01

    The role of maternally derived abscisic acid (ABA) during seed development has been studied using ABA-deficient mutants of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Viviani. ABA deficiency induced seed abortion, resulting in reduced seed yield, and delayed growth of the remaining embryos. Mutant grafting onto wild-type stocks and reciprocal crosses indicated that maternal ABA, synthesized in maternal vegetative tissues and translocated to the seed, promoted early seed development and growth. Moreover ABA deficiency delayed both seed coat pigmentation and capsule dehiscence. Mutant grafting did not restore these phenotypes, indicating that ABA synthesized in the seed coat and capsule envelope may have a positive effect on capsule and testa maturation. Together these results shed light on the positive role of maternal ABA during N. plumbaginifolia seed development.

  10. Polypeptide synthesis induced in Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by infection with raspberry ringspot nepovirus.

    PubMed

    Acosta, O; Mayo, M A

    1993-01-01

    Infection of Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by raspberry ringspot nepovirus resulted in the accumulation of about 24 polypeptides that differed in M(r) and pI from polypeptides accumulating in mock-inoculated protoplasts. Similar polypeptides accumulated in protoplasts infected with the S and E strains of RRV but different infection-specific polypeptides were detected in protoplasts infected with tobacco ringspot nepovirus. The M(r) of RRV-specific polypeptides ranged from 210,000 to 18,000 and most are presumed to be derived from others by proteolytic cleavage. No evidence was found for marked changes in polypeptide abundance with time after inoculation or for any virus-specific polypeptide becoming disproportionately abundant in the medium during culture. PMID:8470949

  11. Wax esters of different compositions produced via engineering of leaf chloroplast metabolism in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Selcuk; Sun, Chuanxin; Leonova, Svetlana; Dutta, Paresh; Dörmann, Peter; Domergue, Frédéric; Stymne, Sten; Hofvander, Per

    2014-09-01

    In a future bio-based economy, renewable sources for lipid compounds at attractive cost are needed for applications where today petrochemical derivatives are dominating. Wax esters and fatty alcohols provide diverse industrial uses, such as in lubricant and surfactant production. In this study, chloroplast metabolism was engineered to divert intermediates from de novo fatty acid biosynthesis to wax ester synthesis. To accomplish this, chloroplast targeted fatty acyl reductases (FAR) and wax ester synthases (WS) were transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Wax esters of different qualities and quantities were produced providing insights to the properties and interaction of the individual enzymes used. In particular, a phytyl ester synthase was found to be a premium candidate for medium chain wax ester synthesis. Catalytic activities of FAR and WS were also expressed as a fusion protein and determined functionally equivalent to the expression of individual enzymes for wax ester synthesis in chloroplasts.

  12. Trade-off among different anti-herbivore defence strategies along an altitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Dostálek, Tomáš; Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Maršík, Petr; Rezek, Jan; Skuhrovec, Jiří; Pavela, Roman; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    The type and intensity of plant-herbivore interactions are likely to be altered under climate change as a consequence of differential dispersal rates of plants and their herbivores. Here, we studied variation in herbivore damage on Salvia nubicola in the field and compared its growth and defence strategies against herbivores in controlled conditions using seeds from populations along a broad altitudinal gradient. Our work is one of the first studies to simultaneously measure complex intraspecific variation in plant growth, direct and indirect defences as well as plant tolerance (ability to regrow) as a consequence of herbivore attack simulated by clipping. In the field, we found that plants experienced higher herbivore pressure in lower altitudes. In the greenhouse, plants grown from seeds collected in lower-altitude populations grew better and produced a higher content of phenolic compounds (direct defence) and volatile organic compounds (indirect defence) in response to simulated herbivory. However, there were no differences in tolerance and effect of S. nubicola extracts on the model generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis (direct defence) along the altitudinal gradient. Although we found that S. nubicola developed a range of defence strategies, the strategies do not seem to be used simultaneously in all populations even though most of them are correlated with altitudinal gradient. Our finding is in agreement with the current knowledge that co-expression of multiple defences might be costly for a plant, since investment in defensive traits is assumed to reduce the resource availability for growth and reproduction. Our study thus shows the importance of simultaneous study of different defence strategies since understanding these trade-offs could be necessary for detecting the mechanisms by which plants are able to cope with future climate change. PMID:27169609

  13. Trade-off among different anti-herbivore defence strategies along an altitudinal gradient

    PubMed Central

    Dostálek, Tomáš; Rokaya, Maan Bahadur; Maršík, Petr; Rezek, Jan; Skuhrovec, Jiří; Pavela, Roman; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    The type and intensity of plant–herbivore interactions are likely to be altered under climate change as a consequence of differential dispersal rates of plants and their herbivores. Here, we studied variation in herbivore damage on Salvia nubicola in the field and compared its growth and defence strategies against herbivores in controlled conditions using seeds from populations along a broad altitudinal gradient. Our work is one of the first studies to simultaneously measure complex intraspecific variation in plant growth, direct and indirect defences as well as plant tolerance (ability to regrow) as a consequence of herbivore attack simulated by clipping. In the field, we found that plants experienced higher herbivore pressure in lower altitudes. In the greenhouse, plants grown from seeds collected in lower-altitude populations grew better and produced a higher content of phenolic compounds (direct defence) and volatile organic compounds (indirect defence) in response to simulated herbivory. However, there were no differences in tolerance and effect of S. nubicola extracts on the model generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis (direct defence) along the altitudinal gradient. Although we found that S. nubicola developed a range of defence strategies, the strategies do not seem to be used simultaneously in all populations even though most of them are correlated with altitudinal gradient. Our finding is in agreement with the current knowledge that co-expression of multiple defences might be costly for a plant, since investment in defensive traits is assumed to reduce the resource availability for growth and reproduction. Our study thus shows the importance of simultaneous study of different defence strategies since understanding these trade-offs could be necessary for detecting the mechanisms by which plants are able to cope with future climate change. PMID:27169609

  14. Contrasting ontogenetic trajectories for phenolic and terpenoid defences in Eucalyptus froggattii

    PubMed Central

    Goodger, Jason Q. D.; Heskes, Allison M.; Woodrow, Ian E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant defence metabolites are considered costly due to diversion of energy and nutrients away from growth. These costs combined with changes in resource availability and herbivory throughout plant ontogeny are likely to promote changes in defence metabolites. A comprehensive understanding of plant defence strategy requires measurement of lifetime ontogenetic trajectories – a dynamic component largely overlooked in plant defence theories. This study aimed to compare ontogenetic trajectories of foliar phenolics and terpenoids. Phenolics are predicted to be inexpensive to biosynthesize, whereas expensive terpenoids also require specialized, non-photosynthetic secretory structures to avoid autotoxicity. Based on these predicted costs, it is hypothesized that phenolics would be maximally deployed early in ontogeny, whereas terpenoids would be maximally deployed later, once the costs of biosynthesis and foregone photosynthesis could be overcome by enhanced resource acquisition. Methods Leaves were harvested from a family of glasshouse-grown Eucalyptus froggattii seedlings, field-grown saplings and the maternal parent tree, and analysed for total terpenoids and phenolics. Key Results Foliar phenolics were highest in young seedlings and lowest in the adult tree. Indeed the ratio of total phenolics to total terpenoids decreased in a significantly exponential manner with plant ontogeny. Most individual terpene constituents increased with plant ontogeny, but some mono- and sesquiterpenes remained relatively constant or even decreased in concentration as plants aged. Conclusions Plant ontogeny can influence different foliar defence metabolites in directionally opposite ways, and the contrasting trajectories support our hypothesis that phenolics would be maximally deployed earlier than terpenoids. The results highlight the importance of examining ontogenetic trajectories of defence traits when developing and testing theories of plant defence, and

  15. Metabolomic analysis of wild and transgenic Nicotiana langsdorffii plants exposed to abiotic stresses: unraveling metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Scalabrin, Elisa; Radaelli, Marta; Rizzato, Giovanni; Bogani, Patrizia; Buiatti, Marcello; Gambaro, Andrea; Capodaglio, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Nicotiana langsdorffii plants, wild and transgenic for the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rol C gene and the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, were exposed to different abiotic stresses (high temperature, water deficit, and high chromium concentrations). An untargeted metabolomic analysis was carried out in order to investigate the metabolic effects of the inserted genes in response to the applied stresses and to obtain a comprehensive profiling of metabolites induced during abiotic stresses. High-performance liquid chromatography separation (HPLC) coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enabled the identification of more than 200 metabolites, and statistical analysis highlighted the most relevant compounds for each plant treatment. The plants exposed to heat stress showed a unique set of induced secondary metabolites, some of which were known while others were not previously reported for this kind of stress; significant changes were observed especially in lipid composition. The role of trichome, as a protection against heat stress, is here suggested by the induction of both acylsugars and glykoalkaloids. Water deficit and Cr(VI) stresses resulted mainly in enhanced antioxidant (HCAs, polyamine) levels and in the damage of lipids, probably as a consequence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, the ability of rol C expression to prevent oxidative burst was confirmed. The results highlighted a clear influence of GR modification on plant stress response, especially to water deficiency-a phenomenon whose applications should be further investigated. This study provides new insights into the field of system biology and demonstrates the importance of metabolomics in the study of plant functioning. Graphical Abstract Untargeted metabolomic analysis was applied to wild type, GR and RolC modified Nicotiana Langsdorffii plants exposed to heat, water and Cr(VI) stresses. The key metabolites, highly affected by stress application, were identified

  16. High-level diterpene production by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Characterization of plant terpene synthases is typically done by production of recombinant enzymes in Escherichia coli. This is often difficult due to solubility and codon usage issues. Furthermore, plant terpene synthases which are targeted to the plastids, such as diterpene synthases, have to be shortened in a more or less empirical approach to improve expression. We report here an optimized Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assay in Nicotiana benthamiana for plant diterpene synthase expression and product analysis. Results Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of plant diterpene synthases in N. benthamiana led to the accumulation of diterpenes within 3 days of infiltration and with a maximum at 5 days. Over 50% of the products were exported onto the leaf surface, thus considerably facilitating the analysis by reducing the complexity of the extracts. The robustness of the method was tested by expressing three different plant enzymes, cembratrien-ol synthase from Nicotiana sylvestris, casbene synthase from Ricinus communis and levopimaradiene synthase from Gingko biloba. Furthermore, co-expression of a 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase from tomato and a geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase from tobacco led to a 3.5-fold increase in the amount of cembratrien-ol produced, with maximum yields reaching 2500 ng/cm2. Conclusion With this optimized method for diterpene synthase expression and product analysis, a single infiltrated leaf of N. benthamiana would be sufficient to produce quantities required for the structure elucidation of unknown diterpenes. The method will also be of general use for gene function discovery, pathway reconstitution and metabolic engineering of diterpenoid biosynthesis in plants. PMID:24330621

  17. A functional genomics screen identifies diverse transcription factors that regulate alkaloid biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrea T; Liu, Enwu; Polvi, Sandra L; Pammett, Robert T; Page, Jonathan E

    2010-05-01

    Biosynthesis of the alkaloid nicotine in Nicotiana species is induced by insect damage and jasmonate application. To probe the transcriptional regulation of the nicotine pathway, we constructed two subtracted cDNA libraries from methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-treated Nicotiana benthamiana roots directly in a viral vector suitable for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Sequencing of cDNA inserts produced a data set of 3271 expressed sequence tags (ESTs; 1898 unigenes), which were enriched in jasmonate-responsive genes, and included 69 putative transcription factors (TFs). After a VIGS screen to determine their effect on nicotine metabolism, six TFs from three different TF families altered constitutive and MeJA-induced leaf nicotine levels. VIGS of a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) TF, NbbHLH3, and an auxin response factor TF, NbARF1, increased nicotine content compared with control plants; silencing the bHLH family members, NbbHLH1 and NbbHLH2, an ethylene response factor TF, NbERF1, and a homeobox domain-like TF, NbHB1, reduced nicotine levels. Transgenic N. benthamiana plants overexpressing NbbHLH1 or NbbHLH2 showed increased leaf nicotine levels compared with vector controls. RNAi silencing led to both reduced nicotine and decreased levels of transcript encoding of enzymes of the nicotine pathway. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant NbbHLH1 and NbbHLH2 directly bind G-box elements identified from the putrescine N-methyltransferase promoter. We conclude that NbbHLH1 and NbbHLH2 function as positive regulators in the jasmonate activation of nicotine biosynthesis. PMID:20202168

  18. Metabolomic analysis of wild and transgenic Nicotiana langsdorffii plants exposed to abiotic stresses: unraveling metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Scalabrin, Elisa; Radaelli, Marta; Rizzato, Giovanni; Bogani, Patrizia; Buiatti, Marcello; Gambaro, Andrea; Capodaglio, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Nicotiana langsdorffii plants, wild and transgenic for the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rol C gene and the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, were exposed to different abiotic stresses (high temperature, water deficit, and high chromium concentrations). An untargeted metabolomic analysis was carried out in order to investigate the metabolic effects of the inserted genes in response to the applied stresses and to obtain a comprehensive profiling of metabolites induced during abiotic stresses. High-performance liquid chromatography separation (HPLC) coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enabled the identification of more than 200 metabolites, and statistical analysis highlighted the most relevant compounds for each plant treatment. The plants exposed to heat stress showed a unique set of induced secondary metabolites, some of which were known while others were not previously reported for this kind of stress; significant changes were observed especially in lipid composition. The role of trichome, as a protection against heat stress, is here suggested by the induction of both acylsugars and glykoalkaloids. Water deficit and Cr(VI) stresses resulted mainly in enhanced antioxidant (HCAs, polyamine) levels and in the damage of lipids, probably as a consequence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, the ability of rol C expression to prevent oxidative burst was confirmed. The results highlighted a clear influence of GR modification on plant stress response, especially to water deficiency-a phenomenon whose applications should be further investigated. This study provides new insights into the field of system biology and demonstrates the importance of metabolomics in the study of plant functioning. Graphical Abstract Untargeted metabolomic analysis was applied to wild type, GR and RolC modified Nicotiana Langsdorffii plants exposed to heat, water and Cr(VI) stresses. The key metabolites, highly affected by stress application, were identified

  19. Hijacking common mycorrhizal networks for herbivore-induced defence signal transfer between tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuan Yuan; Ye, Mao; Li, Chuanyou; He, Xinhua; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Wang, Rui Long; Su, Yi Juan; Luo, Shi Ming; Zeng, Ren Sen

    2014-01-01

    Common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) link multiple plants together. We hypothesized that CMNs can serve as an underground conduit for transferring herbivore-induced defence signals. We established CMN between two tomato plants in pots with mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae, challenged a ‘donor' plant with caterpillar Spodoptera litura, and investigated defence responses and insect resistance in neighbouring CMN-connected ‘receiver' plants. After CMN establishment caterpillar infestation on ‘donor' plant led to increased insect resistance and activities of putative defensive enzymes, induction of defence-related genes and activation of jasmonate (JA) pathway in the ‘receiver' plant. However, use of a JA biosynthesis defective mutant spr2 as ‘donor' plants resulted in no induction of defence responses and no change in insect resistance in ‘receiver' plants, suggesting that JA signalling is required for CMN-mediated interplant communication. These results indicate that plants are able to hijack CMNs for herbivore-induced defence signal transfer and interplant defence communication. PMID:24468912

  20. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed

    PubMed Central

    Rasher, Douglas B.; Hay, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral–seaweed–herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence. PMID:24403332

  1. Parental risk management in relation to offspring defence: bad news for kids

    PubMed Central

    Mahr, Katharina; Riegler, Georg; Hoi, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Do parents defend their offspring whenever necessary, and do self-sacrificing parents really exist? Studies recognized that parent defence is dynamic, mainly depending on the threat predators pose. In this context, parental risk management should consider the threat to themselves and to their offspring. Consequently, the observed defence should be a composite of both risk components. Surprisingly, no study so far has determined the influence of these two threat components on parental decision rules. In a field experiment, we investigated parental risk taking in relation to the threat posed to themselves and their offspring. To disentangle the two threat components, we examined defence behaviours of parent blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus towards three different predators and during different nestling developmental stages. Nest defence strategies in terms of alarm call intensity and nearest predator approach differed between the three predators. Defence intensity was only partly explained by threat level. Most importantly, parental risk management varied in relation to their own, but not offspring risk. Parent defence investment was independent of nestling risk when parents followed a high-risk strategy. However, parents considered nestling as well as parental risk when following a low-risk strategy. Our findings could have general implications for the economy of risk management and decision-making strategies in living beings, including humans. PMID:25392467

  2. Defence strategies against a parasitoid wasp in Drosophila: fight or flight?

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Thierry; de Roode, Jacobus C; Kacsoh, Balint Z; Schlenke, Todd A

    2012-04-23

    Hosts may defend themselves against parasitism through a wide variety of defence mechanisms, but due to finite resources, investment in one defence mechanism may trade-off with investment in another mechanism. We studied resistance strategies against the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi in two Drosophila species. We found that D. melanogaster had significantly lower physiological resistance against L. boulardi than D. simulans, and hypothesized that D. melanogaster might instead invest more heavily in other forms of defence, such as behavioural defence. We found that when given a choice between clean oviposition sites and sites infested with wasps, both D. melanogaster and D. simulans detected and avoided infested sites, which presumably limits later exposure of their offspring to infection. Unlike D. simulans, however, D. melanogaster laid significantly fewer eggs than controls in the forced presence of wasps. Our findings suggest that D. melanogaster relies more heavily on behavioural avoidance as defence against wasp parasitism than D. simulans, and that this may compensate for a lack of physiological defence.

  3. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed.

    PubMed

    Rasher, Douglas B; Hay, Mark E

    2014-02-22

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral-seaweed-herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence. PMID:24403332

  4. Uncoupling of reactive oxygen species accumulation and defence signalling in the metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Fones, Helen N; Eyles, Chris J; Bennett, Mark H; Smith, J Andrew C; Preston, Gail M

    2013-09-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens is protected from disease by the accumulation of high concentrations of metals in its aerial tissues, which are toxic to many pathogens. As these metals can lead to the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), metal hyperaccumulator plants have developed highly effective ROS tolerance mechanisms, which might quench ROS-based signals. We therefore investigated whether metal accumulation alters defence signalling via ROS in this plant. We studied the effect of zinc (Zn) accumulation by N. caerulescens on pathogen-induced ROS production, salicylic acid accumulation and downstream defence responses, such as callose deposition and pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression, to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. The accumulation of Zn caused increased superoxide production in N. caerulescens, but inoculation with P. syringae did not elicit the defensive oxidative burst typical of most plants. Defences dependent on signalling through ROS (callose and PR gene expression) were also modified or absent in N. caerulescens, whereas salicylic acid production in response to infection was retained. These observations suggest that metal hyperaccumulation is incompatible with defence signalling through ROS and that, as metal hyperaccumulation became effective as a form of elemental defence, normal defence responses became progressively uncoupled from ROS signalling in N. caerulescens. PMID:23758201

  5. Fiber Bragg Grating Temperature Sensor for Defence and Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebru, Haftay Abadi; Padhy, B. B.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the design and development of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor suitable for naval applications like temperature monitoring of onboard ships. The Bragg gratings used here have a reflection Bragg wavelength of 1550 nm and are inscribed by phase mask technique using ultraviolet (UV) laser beam at 255.3 nm. The high-resolution temperature sensor has been designed and developed based on the principle of converting the strain to temperature. This is achieved by using bimetallic configuration. Here lead and tungsten metals are used. The expansion of lead is concentrated on the Bragg grating, thus imparting strain on it. The wavelength shift with change of temperature is recorded with optical spectrum analyzer. The minimum temperature that could be measured accurately by the sensor with repeatability is of the order of 10-2. We have achieved thermal sensitivity of 46 pm/°C and 72 pm/°C for sensor lengths (length of the metallic strips) of 60 mm and 100 mm respectively. The thermal sensitivity achieved is approximately 3.5 times and 5.5 times that of bare FBG with thermal sensitivity of 13 pm/°C for the respective sensor lengths. This type of sensor can play vital role in defence and industrial applications like monitoring fresh water/lubricating oil temperatures of machinery in onboard ships, temperature monitoring of airframe of the aircraft, aircraft engine control system sensors, temperature measurement of hot gases from propellant combustion to protect the rocket motor casing, monitoring and control of temperature of copper bars of the power generators etc.

  6. Neisseria meningitidis, pathogenetic mechanisms to overcome the human immune defences.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Panatto, D

    2012-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is hosted only by humans and colonizes the nasopharynx; it survives in the human body by reaching an equilibrium with its exclusive host. Indeed, while cases of invasive disease are rare, the number of asymptomatic Neisseria meningitides carriers is far higher. The aim of this paper is to summarize the current knowledge of survival strategies of Neisseria meningitides against the human immune defences. Neisseria meningitidis possesses a variety of adaptive characteristics which enable it to avoid being killed by the immune system, such as the capsule, the lipopolysaccharide, groups of proteins that block the action of the antimicrobial proteins (AMP), proteins that inhibit the complement system, and components that prevent both the maturation and the perfect functioning of phagocytes. The main means of adhesion of Neisseria meningitides to the host cells are Pili, constituted by several proteins of whom the most important is Pilin E. Opacity-associated proteins (Opa) and (Opc) are two proteins that make an important contribution to the process of adhesion to the cell. Porins A and B contribute to neisserial adhesion and penetration into the cells, and also inhibit the complement system. Factor H binding protein (fhbp) binds factor H, allowing the bacteria to survive in the blood. Neisserial adhesin A (NadA) is a minor adhesin that is expressed by 50% of the pathogenic strains. NadA is known to be involved in cell adhesion and invasion and in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines. Neisserial heparin binding antigen (NHBA) binds heparin, thus increasing the resistance of the bacterium in the serum.

  7. Lichen palatability depends on investments in herbivore defence.

    PubMed

    Gauslaa, Yngvar

    2005-03-01

    Lichens are well-suited organisms for experimental herbivory studies because their secondary compounds, assumed to deter grazing, can be non-destructively extracted. Thalli of 17 lichen species from various habitats were cut in two equal parts; compounds were extracted from one part by acetone, the other served as a control. These two pieces were offered as a paired choice to the generalist herbivore snail Cepaea hortensis. Control thalli of all lichens were consumed at a low rate regardless of their investments in acetone-extractable lichen compounds; naturally compound-deficient lichen species were not preferred compared to those with high contents. However, for extracted thalli, there was a highly significant positive correlation between rate of consumption and the extracted compound contents. These data imply that herbivore defence has evolved in different directions in different lichens. Studied members of Parmeliaceae, common in oligotrophic habitats, have high contents of carbon-rich acetone-soluble compounds; these lichens became highly palatable to snails subsequent to acetone rinsing. Extracted lichen compounds were applied to pieces of filter paper and fed to snails. Extracts from members of the Parmeliaceae significantly deterred feeding on paper. Such data suggest that generalist herbivores may have shaped evolution in the widespread and highly diverse Parmeliaceae towards high investments in lichen compounds. On the other hand, lichens belonging to the Physciaceae and Teloschistales, common in nutrient-enriched habitats, are deficient in, or have low concentrations of, lichen compounds. Such lichens did not become more palatable after acetone rinsing. The orange anthraquinone compound parietin, restricted to the Teloschistales, and which has previously been found to protect against excess light, did not deter grazing.

  8. Evolution of behavioural and cellular defences against parasitoid wasps in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Z R; Schlenke, T A; de Roode, J C

    2016-05-01

    It may be intuitive to predict that host immune systems will evolve to counter a broad range of potential challenges through simultaneous investment in multiple defences. However, this would require diversion of resources from other traits, such as growth, survival and fecundity. Therefore, ecological immunology theory predicts that hosts will specialize in only a subset of possible defences. We tested this hypothesis through a comparative study of a cellular immune response and a putative behavioural defence used by eight fruit fly species against two parasitoid wasp species (one generalist and one specialist). Fly larvae can survive infection by melanotically encapsulating wasp eggs, and female flies can potentially reduce infection rates in their offspring by laying fewer eggs when wasps are present. The strengths of both defences varied significantly but were not negatively correlated across our chosen host species; thus, we found no evidence for a trade-off between behavioural and cellular immunity. Instead, cellular defences were significantly weaker against the generalist wasp, whereas behavioural defences were similar in strength against both wasps and positively correlated between wasps. We investigated the adaptive significance of wasp-induced oviposition reduction behaviour by testing whether wasp-exposed parents produce offspring with stronger cellular defences, but we found no support for this hypothesis. We further investigated the sensory basis of this behaviour by testing mutants deficient in either vision or olfaction, both of which failed to reduce their oviposition rates in the presence of wasps, suggesting that both senses are necessary for detecting and responding to wasps. PMID:26859227

  9. Simultaneous Detection and Quantification of Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum, and Distribution Analyses in Strawberry Greenhouses by Duplex Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingzhu; Inada, Minoru; Watanabe, Hideki; Suga, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum cause Phytophthora rot of strawberry. A duplex real-time PCR technique for simultaneous detection and quantification of the two pathogens was developed. Species-specific primers for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum were designed based on the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of rDNA and the ras-related protein gene Ypt1, respectively. TaqMan probes were labeled with FAM for P. nicotianae and HEX for P. cactorum. Specificities were demonstrated using 52 isolates, including various soil-borne pathogens. Sensitivities for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum DNAs were 10 fg and 1 pg, respectively. The technique was applied to naturally infested soil and root samples; the two pathogens were detected and the target DNA concentrations were quantified. Significant correlations of DNA quantities in roots and the surrounding soils were found. The minimum soil DNA concentration predicting the development of disease symptoms was estimated as 20 pg (g soil)−1. In three strawberry greenhouses examined, the target DNA concentrations ranged from 1 to 1,655 pg (g soil)−1 for P. nicotianae and from 13 to 233 pg (g soil)−1 for P. cactorum. The method proved fast and reliable, and provides a useful tool to monitor P. nicotianae and P. cactorum in plants or soils. PMID:23614901

  10. Simultaneous detection and quantification of Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum, and distribution analyses in strawberry greenhouses by duplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhu; Inada, Minoru; Watanabe, Hideki; Suga, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum cause Phytophthora rot of strawberry. A duplex real-time PCR technique for simultaneous detection and quantification of the two pathogens was developed. Species-specific primers for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum were designed based on the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of rDNA and the ras-related protein gene Ypt1, respectively. TaqMan probes were labeled with FAM for P. nicotianae and HEX for P. cactorum. Specificities were demonstrated using 52 isolates, including various soil-borne pathogens. Sensitivities for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum DNAs were 10 fg and 1 pg, respectively. The technique was applied to naturally infested soil and root samples; the two pathogens were detected and the target DNA concentrations were quantified. Significant correlations of DNA quantities in roots and the surrounding soils were found. The minimum soil DNA concentration predicting the development of disease symptoms was estimated as 20 pg (g soil)(-1). In three strawberry greenhouses examined, the target DNA concentrations ranged from 1 to 1,655 pg (g soil)(-1) for P. nicotianae and from 13 to 233 pg (g soil)(-1) for P. cactorum. The method proved fast and reliable, and provides a useful tool to monitor P. nicotianae and P. cactorum in plants or soils.

  11. Predator-induced defences in Daphnia longicephala: location of kairomone receptors and timeline of sensitive phases to trait formation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Linda C; Leimann, Julian; Tollrian, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    The freshwater crustacean Daphnia adapts to changing predation risks by forming inducible defences. These are only formed when they are advantageous, saving associated costs when the defence is superfluous. However, in order to be effective, the time lag between the onset of predation and the defence formation has to be short. Daphnia longicephala develop huge protective crests upon exposure to chemical cues (kairomones) from its predator the heteropteran backswimmer Notonecta glauca. To analyse time lags, we determined kairomone-sensitive stages and the developmental time frames of inducible defences. Moreover, we looked at additive effects that could result from the summation of prolonged kairomone exposure. Kairomones are perceived by chemoreceptors and integrated by the nervous system, which alters the developmental program leading to defence formation. The underlying neuronal and developmental pathways are not thoroughly described and surprisingly, the location of the kairomone receptors is undetermined. We show that D. longicephala start to sense predator cues at the onset of the second juvenile instar, defences develop with a time lag of one instar and prolonged kairomone exposure does not impact the magnitude of the defence. By establishing a method to reversibly impair chemosensors, we show the first antennae as the location of kairomone-detecting chemoreceptors. This study provides fundamental information on kairomone perception, kairomone-sensitive stages, developmental time frames and lag times of inducible defences in D. longicephala that will greatly contribute to the further understanding of the neuronal and developmental mechanisms of predator-induced defences in Daphnia.

  12. Predator-induced defences in Daphnia longicephala: location of kairomone receptors and timeline of sensitive phases to trait formation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Linda C.; Leimann, Julian; Tollrian, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The freshwater crustacean Daphnia adapts to changing predation risks by forming inducible defences. These are only formed when they are advantageous, saving associated costs when the defence is superfluous. However, in order to be effective, the time lag between the onset of predation and the defence formation has to be short. Daphnia longicephala develop huge protective crests upon exposure to chemical cues (kairomones) from its predator the heteropteran backswimmer Notonecta glauca. To analyse time lags, we determined kairomone-sensitive stages and the developmental time frames of inducible defences. Moreover, we looked at additive effects that could result from the summation of prolonged kairomone exposure. Kairomones are perceived by chemoreceptors and integrated by the nervous system, which alters the developmental program leading to defence formation. The underlying neuronal and developmental pathways are not thoroughly described and surprisingly, the location of the kairomone receptors is undetermined. We show that D. longicephala start to sense predator cues at the onset of the second juvenile instar, defences develop with a time lag of one instar and prolonged kairomone exposure does not impact the magnitude of the defence. By establishing a method to reversibly impair chemosensors, we show the first antennae as the location of kairomone-detecting chemoreceptors. This study provides fundamental information on kairomone perception, kairomone-sensitive stages, developmental time frames and lag times of inducible defences in D. longicephala that will greatly contribute to the further understanding of the neuronal and developmental mechanisms of predator-induced defences in Daphnia. PMID:26400980

  13. Comparison of cleft palate induction by Nicotiana glauca in goats and sheep.

    PubMed

    Panter, K E; Weinzweig, J; Gardner, D R; Stegelmeier, B L; James, L F

    2000-03-01

    The induction of cleft palate by Nicotiana glauca (wild tree tobacco) during the first trimester of pregnancy was compared between Spanish-type goats and crossbred western-type sheep. Cleft palate was induced in 100% of the embryonic/fetal goats when their pregnant mothers were gavaged with N. glauca plant material or with anabasine-rich extracts from the latter, during gestation days 32-41. Seventy-five percent of newborn goats had cleft palate after maternal dosing with N. glauca during gestation days 35-41, while no cleft palates were induced when dosing periods included days 36-40, 37-39, or day 38 only. The induced cleft palates were bilateral, involving the entire secondary palates with complete detachment of the vomer. Eleven percent of the newborn goats from does gavaged during gestation days 32-41 had extracranial abnormalities, most often contractures of the metacarpal joints. Most of these contractures resolved spontaneously by 4-6 weeks postpartum. One newborn kid also had an asymmetric skull due to apparent fetal positioning. No cleft palates were induced in lambs whose mothers were gavaged with N. glauca plant or anabasine-rich extracts during gestation days 34-41, 35-40, 35-41, 36-41, 35-51, or 37-50. Only one of five lambs born to three ewes gavaged with N. glauca plant material during gestation days 34-55 had a cleft palate, but all five of these lambs had moderate to severe contractures in the metacarpal joints. The slight to moderate contracture defects resolved spontaneously by 4-6 weeks postpartum, but the severe contractures resolved only partially. Embryonic/fetal death and resorption (determined by ultrasound) occurred in 25% of pregnant goats fed N. glauca compared to only 4% of pregnant sheep. Nicotiana glauca plant material contained the teratogenic alkaloid anabasine at 0.175% to 0.23%, dry weight, demonstrating that Spanish-type goats are susceptible to cleft palate induction by the natural toxin anabasine, while crossbred western

  14. Light acclimation, retrograde signalling, cell death and immune defences in plants.

    PubMed

    Karpiński, Stanisław; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wituszyńska, Weronika; Burdiak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    This review confronts the classical view of plant immune defence and light acclimation with recently published data. Earlier findings have linked plant immune defences to nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-dependent recognition of pathogen effectors and to the role of plasma membrane-localized NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase (AtRbohD), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA). However, recent results suggest that plant immune defence also depends on the absorption of excessive light energy and photorespiration. Rapid changes in light intensity and quality often cause the absorption of energy, which is in excess of that required for photosynthesis. Such excessive light energy is considered to be a factor triggering photoinhibition and disturbance in ROS/hormonal homeostasis, which leads to cell death in foliar tissues. We highlight here the tight crosstalk between ROS- and SA-dependent pathways leading to light acclimation, and defence responses leading to pathogen resistance. We also show that LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) regulates and integrates these processes. Moreover, we discuss the role of plastid-nucleus signal transduction, photorespiration, photoelectrochemical signalling and 'light memory' in the regulation of acclimation and immune defence responses. All of these results suggest that plants have evolved a genetic system that simultaneously regulates systemic acquired resistance (SAR), cell death and systemic acquired acclimation (SAA).

  15. An inducible morphological defence is a passive by-product of behaviour in a marine snail

    PubMed Central

    Bourdeau, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Many organisms have evolved inducible defences in response to spatial and temporal variability in predation risk. These defences are assumed to incur large costs to prey; however, few studies have investigated the mechanisms and costs underlying these adaptive responses. I examined the proximate cause of predator-induced shell thickening in a marine snail (Nucella lamellosa) and tested whether induced thickening leads to an increase in structural strength. Results indicate that although predators (crabs) induce thicker shells, the response is a passive by-product of reduced feeding and somatic growth rather than an active physiological response to predation risk. Physical tests indicate that although the shells of predator-induced snails are significantly stronger, the increase in performance is no different than that of snails with limited access to food. Increased shell strength is attributable to an increase in the energetically inexpensive microstructural layer rather than to material property changes in the shell. This mechanism suggests that predator-induced shell defences may be neither energetically nor developmentally costly. Positive correlations between antipredator behaviour and morphological defences may explain commonly observed associations between growth reduction and defence production in other systems and could have implications for the evolutionary potential of these plastic traits. PMID:19846462

  16. "New Sport" in the street: self-defence, security and space in belle epoque Paris.

    PubMed

    Freundschuh, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Near the turn of the twentieth century, traditional self-defence methods (for example, jiu-jitsu) were revamped into a more accessible and practical set of techniques and tactics for everyday use in urban public space. Framed as a "new sport" with broad public utility, early urban self-defence developed against the backdrop of heightening fears of violent crime and a burgeoning politics of security, as well as tensions provoked by the increasingly common appearance of unchaperoned, middle-class women in public. Self-defence masters pitched their innovations in an inclusive rhetoric, always with separate lessons for men and women and their respective spaces of risk. This article places modern self-defence practices in tension with historical transformations in the urban landscape, arguing that urban self-defence posited a certain subjective relation to the city that tapped simultaneously into the desire for empowerment, fantasies of criminal danger and a law-and-order tone that shaded into urban vigilantism. PMID:20737722

  17. Leaf Colour as a Signal of Chemical Defence to Insect Herbivores in Wild Cabbage (Brassica oleracea)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Lucas; Osorio, Daniel; Hartley, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf colour has been proposed to signal levels of host defence to insect herbivores, but we lack data on herbivory, leaf colour and levels of defence for wild host populations necessary to test this hypothesis. Such a test requires measurements of leaf spectra as they would be sensed by herbivore visual systems, as well as simultaneous measurements of chemical defences and herbivore responses to leaf colour in natural host-herbivore populations. In a large-scale field survey of wild cabbage (Brassica oleracea) populations, we show that variation in leaf colour and brightness, measured according to herbivore spectral sensitivities, predicts both levels of chemical defences (glucosinolates) and abundance of specialist lepidopteran (Pieris rapae) and hemipteran (Brevicoryne brassicae) herbivores. In subsequent experiments, P. rapae larvae achieved faster growth and greater pupal mass when feeding on plants with bluer leaves, which contained lower levels of aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucosinolate-mediated effects on larval performance may thus contribute to the association between P. rapae herbivory and leaf colour observed in the field. However, preference tests found no evidence that adult butterflies selected host plants based on leaf coloration. In the field, B. brassicae abundance varied with leaf brightness but greenhouse experiments were unable to identify any effects of brightness on aphid preference or performance. Our findings suggest that although leaf colour reflects both levels of host defences and herbivore abundance in the field, the ability of herbivores to respond to colour signals may be limited, even in species where performance is correlated with leaf colour. PMID:26353086

  18. Targeted predation of extrafloral nectaries by insects despite localized chemical defences.

    PubMed

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2015-10-01

    Extrafloral (EF) nectaries recruit carnivorous arthropods that protect plants from herbivory, but they can also be exploited by nectar thieves. We studied the opportunistic, targeted predation (and destruction) of EF nectaries by insects, and the localized chemical defences that plants presumably use to minimize this effect. In field and laboratory experiments, we identified insects that were possibly responsible for EF nectary predation in Vicia faba (fava bean) and determined the extent and accuracy of the feeding damage done to the EF nectaries by these insects. We also performed biochemical analyses of plant tissue samples in order to detect microscale distribution patterns of chemical defences in the area of the EF nectary. We observed selective, targeted feeding on EF nectaries by several insect species, including some that are otherwise not primarily herbivorous. Biochemical analyses revealed high concentrations of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, a non-protein amino acid that is toxic to insects, near and within the EF nectaries. These results suggest that plants allocate defences to the protection of EF nectaries from predation, consistent with expectations of optimal defence theory, and that this may not be entirely effective, as insects limit their exposure to these defences by consuming only the secreting tissue of the nectary.

  19. Natural selection on quantitative immune defence traits: a comparison between theory and data.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, O

    2015-01-01

    Parasites present a threat for free-living species and affect several ecological and evolutionary processes. Immune defence is the main physiological barrier against infections, and understanding its evolution is central for predicting disease dynamics. I review theoretical predictions and empirical data on natural selection on quantitative immune defence traits in the wild. Evolutionary theory predicts immune traits to be under stabilizing selection owing to trade-offs between immune function and life-history traits. Empirical data, however, support mainly positive directional selection, but also show variation in the form of selection among study systems, immune traits and fitness components. I argue that the differences between theory and empirical data may at least partly arise from methodological difficulties in testing stabilizing selection as well as measuring fitness. I also argue that the commonness of positive directional selection and the variation in selection may be caused by several biological factors. First, selection on immune function may show spatial and temporal variation as epidemics are often local/seasonal. Second, factors affecting the range of phenotypic variation in immune traits could alter potential for selection. Third, different parasites may impose different selective pressures depending on their characteristics. Fourth, condition dependence of immune defence can obscure trade-offs related to it, thus possibly modifying observed selection gradients. Fifth, nonimmunological defences could affect the form of selection by reducing the benefits of strong immune function. To comprehensively understand the evolution of immune defence, the role of above factors should be considered in future studies.

  20. Leaf Colour as a Signal of Chemical Defence to Insect Herbivores in Wild Cabbage (Brassica oleracea).

    PubMed

    Green, Jonathan P; Foster, Rosie; Wilkins, Lucas; Osorio, Daniel; Hartley, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    Leaf colour has been proposed to signal levels of host defence to insect herbivores, but we lack data on herbivory, leaf colour and levels of defence for wild host populations necessary to test this hypothesis. Such a test requires measurements of leaf spectra as they would be sensed by herbivore visual systems, as well as simultaneous measurements of chemical defences and herbivore responses to leaf colour in natural host-herbivore populations. In a large-scale field survey of wild cabbage (Brassica oleracea) populations, we show that variation in leaf colour and brightness, measured according to herbivore spectral sensitivities, predicts both levels of chemical defences (glucosinolates) and abundance of specialist lepidopteran (Pieris rapae) and hemipteran (Brevicoryne brassicae) herbivores. In subsequent experiments, P. rapae larvae achieved faster growth and greater pupal mass when feeding on plants with bluer leaves, which contained lower levels of aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucosinolate-mediated effects on larval performance may thus contribute to the association between P. rapae herbivory and leaf colour observed in the field. However, preference tests found no evidence that adult butterflies selected host plants based on leaf coloration. In the field, B. brassicae abundance varied with leaf brightness but greenhouse experiments were unable to identify any effects of brightness on aphid preference or performance. Our findings suggest that although leaf colour reflects both levels of host defences and herbivore abundance in the field, the ability of herbivores to respond to colour signals may be limited, even in species where performance is correlated with leaf colour.

  1. Rapid evolution of antioxidant defence in a natural population of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Oexle, S; Jansen, M; Pauwels, K; Sommaruga, R; De Meester, L; Stoks, R

    2016-07-01

    Natural populations can cope with rapid changes in stressors by relying on sets of physiological defence mechanisms. Little is known onto what extent these physiological responses reflect plasticity and/or genetic adaptation, evolve in the same direction and result in an increased defence ability. Using resurrection ecology, we studied how a natural Daphnia magna population adjusted its antioxidant defence to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) during a period with increasing incident UVR reaching the water surface. We demonstrate a rapid evolution of the induction patterns of key antioxidant enzymes under UVR exposure in the laboratory. Notably, evolutionary changes strongly differed among enzymes and mainly involved the evolution of UV-induced plasticity. Whereas D. magna evolved a strong plastic up-regulation of glutathione peroxidase under UVR, it evolved a lower plastic up-regulation of glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase and a plastic down-regulation of catalase. The differentially evolved antioxidant strategies were collectively equally effective in dealing with oxidative stress because they resulted in the same high levels of oxidative damage (to lipids, proteins and DNA) and lowered fitness (intrinsic growth rate) under UVR exposure. The lack of better protection against UVR may suggest that the UVR exposure did not increase between both periods. Predator-induced evolution to migrate to lower depths that occurred during the same period may have contributed to the evolved defence strategy. Our results highlight the need for a multiple trait approach when focusing on the evolution of defence mechanisms. PMID:27018861

  2. A herbivorous mite down-regulates plant defence and produces web to exclude competitors.

    PubMed

    Sarmento, Renato A; Lemos, Felipe; Dias, Cleide R; Kikuchi, Wagner T; Rodrigues, Jean C P; Pallini, Angelo; Sabelis, Maurice W; Janssen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Herbivores may interact with each other through resource competition, but also through their impact on plant defence. We recently found that the spider mite Tetranychus evansi down-regulates plant defences in tomato plants, resulting in higher rates of oviposition and population growth on previously attacked than on unattacked leaves. The danger of such down-regulation is that attacked plants could become a more profitable resource for heterospecific competitors, such as the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Indeed, T. urticae had an almost 2-fold higher rate of oviposition on leaf discs on which T. evansi had fed previously. In contrast, induction of direct plant defences by T. urticae resulted in decreased oviposition by T. evansi. Hence, both herbivores affect each other through induced plant responses. However, when populations of T. evansi and T. urticae competed on the same plants, populations of the latter invariably went extinct, whereas T. evansi was not significantly affected by the presence of its competitor. This suggests that T. evansi can somehow prevent its competitor from benefiting from the down-regulated plant defence, perhaps by covering it with a profuse web. Indeed, we found that T. urticae had difficulties reaching the leaf surface to feed when the leaf was covered with web produced by T. evansi. Furthermore, T. evansi produced more web when exposed to damage or other cues associated with T. urticae. We suggest that the silken web produced by T. evansi serves to prevent competitors from profiting from down-regulated plant defences.

  3. Synergistic effects of direct and indirect defences on herbivore egg survival in a wild crucifer.

    PubMed

    Fatouros, Nina E; Pineda, Ana; Huigens, Martinus E; Broekgaarden, Colette; Shimwela, Methew M; Figueroa Candia, Ilich A; Verbaarschot, Patrick; Bukovinszky, Tibor

    2014-08-22

    Evolutionary theory of plant defences against herbivores predicts a trade-off between direct (anti-herbivore traits) and indirect defences (attraction of carnivores) when carnivore fitness is reduced. Such a trade-off is expected in plant species that kill herbivore eggs by exhibiting a hypersensitive response (HR)-like necrosis, which should then negatively affect carnivores. We used the black mustard (Brassica nigra) to investigate how this potentially lethal direct trait affects preferences and/or performances of specialist cabbage white butterflies (Pieris spp.), and their natural enemies, tiny egg parasitoid wasps (Trichogramma spp.). Both within and between black mustard populations, we observed variation in the expression of Pieris egg-induced HR. Butterfly eggs on plants with HR-like necrosis suffered lower hatching rates and higher parasitism than eggs that did not induce the trait. In addition, Trichogramma wasps were attracted to volatiles of egg-induced plants that also expressed HR, and this attraction depended on the Trichogramma strain used. Consequently, HR did not have a negative effect on egg parasitoid survival. We conclude that even within a system where plants deploy lethal direct defences, such defences may still act with indirect defences in a synergistic manner to reduce herbivore pressure. PMID:25009068

  4. Targeted predation of extrafloral nectaries by insects despite localized chemical defences.

    PubMed

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2015-10-01

    Extrafloral (EF) nectaries recruit carnivorous arthropods that protect plants from herbivory, but they can also be exploited by nectar thieves. We studied the opportunistic, targeted predation (and destruction) of EF nectaries by insects, and the localized chemical defences that plants presumably use to minimize this effect. In field and laboratory experiments, we identified insects that were possibly responsible for EF nectary predation in Vicia faba (fava bean) and determined the extent and accuracy of the feeding damage done to the EF nectaries by these insects. We also performed biochemical analyses of plant tissue samples in order to detect microscale distribution patterns of chemical defences in the area of the EF nectary. We observed selective, targeted feeding on EF nectaries by several insect species, including some that are otherwise not primarily herbivorous. Biochemical analyses revealed high concentrations of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, a non-protein amino acid that is toxic to insects, near and within the EF nectaries. These results suggest that plants allocate defences to the protection of EF nectaries from predation, consistent with expectations of optimal defence theory, and that this may not be entirely effective, as insects limit their exposure to these defences by consuming only the secreting tissue of the nectary. PMID:26446809

  5. Synergistic effects of direct and indirect defences on herbivore egg survival in a wild crucifer

    PubMed Central

    Fatouros, Nina E.; Pineda, Ana; Huigens, Martinus E.; Broekgaarden, Colette; Shimwela, Methew M.; Figueroa Candia, Ilich A.; Verbaarschot, Patrick; Bukovinszky, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary theory of plant defences against herbivores predicts a trade-off between direct (anti-herbivore traits) and indirect defences (attraction of carnivores) when carnivore fitness is reduced. Such a trade-off is expected in plant species that kill herbivore eggs by exhibiting a hypersensitive response (HR)-like necrosis, which should then negatively affect carnivores. We used the black mustard (Brassica nigra) to investigate how this potentially lethal direct trait affects preferences and/or performances of specialist cabbage white butterflies (Pieris spp.), and their natural enemies, tiny egg parasitoid wasps (Trichogramma spp.). Both within and between black mustard populations, we observed variation in the expression of Pieris egg-induced HR. Butterfly eggs on plants with HR-like necrosis suffered lower hatching rates and higher parasitism than eggs that did not induce the trait. In addition, Trichogramma wasps were attracted to volatiles of egg-induced plants that also expressed HR, and this attraction depended on the Trichogramma strain used. Consequently, HR did not have a negative effect on egg parasitoid survival. We conclude that even within a system where plants deploy lethal direct defences, such defences may still act with indirect defences in a synergistic manner to reduce herbivore pressure. PMID:25009068

  6. Targeted predation of extrafloral nectaries by insects despite localized chemical defences

    PubMed Central

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.

    2015-01-01

    Extrafloral (EF) nectaries recruit carnivorous arthropods that protect plants from herbivory, but they can also be exploited by nectar thieves. We studied the opportunistic, targeted predation (and destruction) of EF nectaries by insects, and the localized chemical defences that plants presumably use to minimize this effect. In field and laboratory experiments, we identified insects that were possibly responsible for EF nectary predation in Vicia faba (fava bean) and determined the extent and accuracy of the feeding damage done to the EF nectaries by these insects. We also performed biochemical analyses of plant tissue samples in order to detect microscale distribution patterns of chemical defences in the area of the EF nectary. We observed selective, targeted feeding on EF nectaries by several insect species, including some that are otherwise not primarily herbivorous. Biochemical analyses revealed high concentrations of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, a non-protein amino acid that is toxic to insects, near and within the EF nectaries. These results suggest that plants allocate defences to the protection of EF nectaries from predation, consistent with expectations of optimal defence theory, and that this may not be entirely effective, as insects limit their exposure to these defences by consuming only the secreting tissue of the nectary. PMID:26446809

  7. Insect herbivory elicits genome-wide alternative splicing responses in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Wenwu; Baldwin, Ian T; Xu, Shuqing

    2015-10-01

    Changes in gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) are involved in many responses to abiotic and biotic stresses in eukaryotic organisms. In response to attack and oviposition by insect herbivores, plants elicit rapid changes in gene expression which are essential for the activation of plant defenses; however, the herbivory-induced changes in AS remain unstudied. Using mRNA sequencing, we performed a genome-wide analysis on tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) feeding-induced AS in both leaves and roots of Nicotiana attenuata. Feeding by M. sexta for 5 h reduced total AS events by 7.3% in leaves but increased them in roots by 8.0% and significantly changed AS patterns in leaves and roots of existing AS genes. Feeding by M. sexta also resulted in increased (in roots) and decreased (in leaves) transcript levels of the serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins that are involved in the AS machinery of plants and induced changes in SR gene expression that were jasmonic acid (JA)-independent in leaves but JA-dependent in roots. Changes in AS and gene expression elicited by M. sexta feeding were regulated independently in both tissues. This study provides genome-wide evidence that insect herbivory induces changes not only in the levels of gene expression but also in their splicing, which might contribute to defense against and/or tolerance of herbivory. PMID:26306554

  8. Shifting Nicotiana attenuata's diurnal rhythm does not alter its resistance to the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Herden, Jasmin; Meldau, Stefan; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kunert, Grit; Joo, Youngsung; Baldwin, Ian T; Schuman, Meredith C

    2016-07-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants are less resistant to attack by the generalist lepidopteran herbivore Trichoplusia ni when plants and herbivores are entrained to opposite, versus identical diurnal cycles and tested under constant conditions. This effect is associated with circadian fluctuations in levels of jasmonic acid, the transcription factor MYC2, and glucosinolate contents in leaves. We tested whether a similar effect could be observed in a different plant-herbivore system: the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata and its co-evolved specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta. We measured larval growth on plants under both constant and diurnal conditions following identical or opposite entrainment, profiled the metabolome of attacked leaf tissue, quantified specific metabolites known to reduce M. sexta growth, and monitored M. sexta feeding activity under all experimental conditions. Entrainment did not consistently affect M. sexta growth or plant defense induction. However, both were reduced under constant dark conditions, as was M. sexta feeding activity. Our data indicate that the response induced by M. sexta in N. attenuata is robust to diurnal cues and independent of plant or herbivore entrainment. We propose that while the patterns of constitutive or general damage-induced defense may undergo circadian fluctuation, the orchestration of specific induced responses is more complex. PMID:26699809

  9. Reduced Susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri in Transgenic Citrus Expressing the FLS2 Receptor From Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guixia; Pitino, Marco; Duan, Yongping; Stover, Ed

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of plant pattern-recognition receptors by genetic engineering provides a novel approach to enhance plant immunity and broad-spectrum disease resistance. Citrus canker disease associated with Xanthomonas citri is one of the most important diseases damaging citrus production worldwide. In this study, we cloned the FLS2 gene from Nicotiana benthamiana cDNA and inserted it into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS to transform Hamlin sweet orange and Carrizo citrange. Transgene presence was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene expression of NbFLS2 was compared by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to flg22Xcc was detected in transgenic Hamlin but not in nontransformed controls. Low or no ROS production was detected from nontransformed Hamlin seedlings challenged with flg22Xcc. Transgenic plants highly expressing NbFLS2 were selected and were evaluated for resistance to canker incited by X. citri 3213. Our results showed that the integration and expression of the NbFLS2 gene in citrus can increase canker resistance and defense-associated gene expression when challenged with X. citri. These results suggest that canker-susceptible Citrus genotypes lack strong basal defense induced by X. citri flagellin and the resistance of these genotypes can be enhanced by transgenic expression of the flagellin receptor from a resistant species. PMID:26554734

  10. In vivo effects of NbSiR silencing on chloroplast development in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yong-Won; Lee, Jae-Yong; Jeon, Young; Cheong, Gang-Won; Kim, Moonil; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2010-04-01

    Sulfite reductase (SiR) performs dual functions, acting as a sulfur assimilation enzyme and as a chloroplast (cp-) nucleoid binding protein. In this study, we examined the in vivo effects of SiR deficiency on chloroplast development in Nicotiana benthamiana. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbSiR resulted in leaf yellowing and growth retardation phenotypes, which were not rescued by cysteine supplementation. NbSiR:GFP fusion protein was targeted to chloroplasts and colocalized with cp-nucleoids. Recombinant full-length NbSiR protein and the C-terminal half of NbSiR possessed cp-DNA compaction activities in vitro, and expression of full-length NbSiR in E. coli caused condensation of genomic DNA. NbSiR silencing differentially affected expression of plastid-encoded genes, inhibiting expression of several genes more severely than others. In the later stages, depletion of NbSiR resulted in chloroplast ablation. In NbSiR-silenced plants, enlarged cp-nucleoids containing an increased amount of cp-DNA were observed in the middle of the abnormal chloroplasts, and the cp-DNAs were predominantly of subgenomic sizes based on pulse field gel electrophoresis. The abnormal chloroplasts developed prolamellar body-like cubic lipid structures in the light without accumulating NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase proteins. Our results suggest that NbSiR plays a role in cp-nucleoid metabolism, plastid gene expression, and thylakoid membrane development. PMID:20047069

  11. S1 domain-containing STF modulates plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung; Park, Youn-Il; Lee, Soon Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2012-01-01

    • In this study, we examined the biochemical and physiological functions of Nicotiana benthamiana S1 domain-containing Transcription-Stimulating Factor (STF) using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), cosuppression, and overexpression strategies. • STF : green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein colocalized with sulfite reductase (SiR), a chloroplast nucleoid-associated protein also present in the stroma. Full-length STF and its S1 domain preferentially bound to RNA, probably in a sequence-nonspecific manner. • STF silencing by VIGS or cosuppression resulted in severe leaf yellowing caused by disrupted chloroplast development. STF deficiency significantly perturbed plastid-encoded multimeric RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent transcript accumulation. Chloroplast transcription run-on assays revealed that the transcription rate of PEP-dependent plastid genes was reduced in the STF-silenced leaves. Conversely, the exogenously added recombinant STF protein increased the transcription rate, suggesting a direct role of STF in plastid transcription. Etiolated seedlings of STF cosuppression lines showed defects in the light-triggered transition from etioplasts to chloroplasts, accompanied by reduced light-induced expression of plastid-encoded genes. • These results suggest that STF plays a critical role as an auxiliary factor of the PEP transcription complex in the regulation of plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in higher plants. PMID:22050604

  12. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a putative sulfite oxidase (SO) ortholog from Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Su, Xinhong; Wu, Jianyu; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Hua

    2012-03-01

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) catalyzes the oxidation of sulfite to sulfate and thus has important roles in diverse metabolic processes. However, systematic molecular and functional investigations on the putative SO from tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) have hitherto not been reported. In this work, a full-length cDNA encoding putative sulfite oxidase from N. benthamiana (NbSO) was isolated. The deduced NbSO protein shares high homology and typical structural features with other species SOs. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that NbSO cDNA clone encodes a tobacco SO isoform. Southern blot analysis suggests that NbSO is a single-copy gene in the N. benthamiana genome. The NbSO transcript levels were higher in aerial tissues and were up-regulated in N. benthamiana during sulfite stress. Reducing the SO expression levels through virus-induced gene silencing caused a substantial accumulation in sulfite content and less sulfate accumulation in N. benthamiana leaves when exposed to sulfite stress, and thus resulted in decreased tolerance to sulfite stress. Taken together, this study improves our understanding on the molecular and functional properties of plant SO and provides genetic evidence on the involvement of SO in sulfite detoxification in a sulfite-oxidizing manner in N. benthamiana plants. PMID:21667106

  13. WRKY Transcription Factors Phosphorylated by MAPK Regulate a Plant Immune NADPH Oxidase in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Nakano, Takaaki; Miyagawa, Noriko; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Yoshioka, Miki; Katou, Yuri; Yaeno, Takashi; Shirasu, Ken; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    Pathogen attack sequentially confers pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) after sensing of pathogen patterns and effectors by plant immune receptors, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play pivotal roles in PTI and ETI as signaling molecules. Nicotiana benthamiana RBOHB, an NADPH oxidase, is responsible for both the transient PTI ROS burst and the robust ETI ROS burst. Here, we show that RBOHB transactivation mediated by MAPK contributes to R3a/AVR3a-triggered ETI (AVR3a-ETI) ROS burst. RBOHB is markedly induced during the ETI and INF1-triggered PTI (INF1-PTI), but not flg22-tiggered PTI (flg22-PTI). We found that the RBOHB promoter contains a functional W-box in the R3a/AVR3a and INF1 signal-responsive cis-element. Ectopic expression of four phospho-mimicking mutants of WRKY transcription factors, which are MAPK substrates, induced RBOHB, and yeast one-hybrid analysis indicated that these mutants bind to the cis-element. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated direct binding of the WRKY to the cis-element in plants. Silencing of multiple WRKY genes compromised the upregulation of RBOHB, resulting in impairment of AVR3a-ETI and INF1-PTI ROS bursts, but not the flg22-PTI ROS burst. These results suggest that the MAPK-WRKY pathway is required for AVR3a-ETI and INF1-PTI ROS bursts by activation of RBOHB. PMID:26373453

  14. Replication-independent long-distance trafficking by viral RNAs in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Kodetham; Kao, C Cheng

    2007-04-01

    Viruses with separately encapsidated genomes could have their genomes introduced into different leaves of a plant, thus necessitating long-distance trafficking of the viral RNAs for successful infection. To examine this possibility, individual or combinations of genome segments from the tripartite Brome mosaic virus (BMV) were transiently expressed in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana plants using engineered Agrobacterium tumefaciens. BMV RNA3 was found to traffic from the initial site of expression to other leaves of the plant, as detected by RNA gel blot analyses and also by the expression of an endoplasmic reticulum-targeted green fluorescent protein. When RNA3 trafficked into leaves containing the BMV replication enzymes, RNA replication, transcription, and virion production were observed. RNA3 trafficking occurred even when it did not encode the movement or capsid proteins. However, coexpression of the movement protein increased the trafficking of BMV RNAs. BMV RNA1 and RNA2 could also traffic throughout the plant, but less efficiently than RNA3. All three BMV RNAs trafficked bidirectionally to sink leaves near the apical meristem as well as to the source leaves at the bottom of the stem, suggesting that trafficking used the phloem. These results demonstrate that BMV RNAs can use a replication-independent mechanism to traffic in N. benthamiana.

  15. Pathway for the biosynthesis of 4-methyl-1-hexanol volatilized from petal tissue of Nicotiana sylvestris.

    PubMed

    Kandra, Lili; Wagner, George J.

    1998-11-20

    Compounds volatilized from plant tissues play important roles in plant-insect and plant-herbivore interactions and are important to food quality/preference, and to the perfume and flavorant industries. While the chemistry of plant volatiles is well understood, less is known about the biosynthesis of this diverse group of compounds. This is particularly the case for non-terpenoid components such as volatile acyclic alcohols and their esters. Here we have studied metabolic pathways leading to formation of the anteiso-branched alcohol 4-methyl-1-hexanol volatilized by petal tissue of Nicotiana sylvestris. Evidence presented supports the involvement of steps in the pathways of both biosynthesis and degradation of isoleucine to form 2-oxo-3-methylvaleric acid then 2-methylbutyryl CoA. Results indicate that 2-methylbutyryl CoA is then elongated by addition of one acetate molecule via fatty acid synthase, followed by reduction to yield 4-methyl-1-hexanol. This pathway is in contrast to elongation of 2-oxo-3-methylvaleric acid via alpha-keto acid elongation leading to the formation of 4-methylhexanoyl acyl groups of tobacco leaf-trichome-secreted sugar esters.

  16. Insect herbivory elicits genome-wide alternative splicing responses in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Wenwu; Baldwin, Ian T; Xu, Shuqing

    2015-10-01

    Changes in gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) are involved in many responses to abiotic and biotic stresses in eukaryotic organisms. In response to attack and oviposition by insect herbivores, plants elicit rapid changes in gene expression which are essential for the activation of plant defenses; however, the herbivory-induced changes in AS remain unstudied. Using mRNA sequencing, we performed a genome-wide analysis on tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) feeding-induced AS in both leaves and roots of Nicotiana attenuata. Feeding by M. sexta for 5 h reduced total AS events by 7.3% in leaves but increased them in roots by 8.0% and significantly changed AS patterns in leaves and roots of existing AS genes. Feeding by M. sexta also resulted in increased (in roots) and decreased (in leaves) transcript levels of the serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins that are involved in the AS machinery of plants and induced changes in SR gene expression that were jasmonic acid (JA)-independent in leaves but JA-dependent in roots. Changes in AS and gene expression elicited by M. sexta feeding were regulated independently in both tissues. This study provides genome-wide evidence that insect herbivory induces changes not only in the levels of gene expression but also in their splicing, which might contribute to defense against and/or tolerance of herbivory.

  17. Transient fusion and selective secretion of vesicle proteins in Phytophthora nicotianae zoospores

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Blackman, Leila M.

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of pathogen proteins is crucial for the establishment of disease in animals and plants. Typically, early interactions between host and pathogen trigger regulated secretion of pathogenicity factors that function in pathogen adhesion and host penetration. During the onset of plant infection by spores of the Oomycete, Phytophthora nicotianae, proteins are secreted from three types of cortical vesicles. Following induction of spore encystment, two vesicle types undergo full fusion, releasing their entire contents onto the cell surface. However, the third vesicle type, so-called large peripheral vesicles, selectively secretes a small Sushi domain-containing protein, PnCcp, while retaining a large glycoprotein, PnLpv, before moving away from the plasma membrane. Selective secretion of PnCcp is associated with its compartmentalization within the vesicle periphery. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin function, purportedly in vesicle fission, by dynasore treatment provides evidence that selective secretion of PnCcp requires transient fusion of the large peripheral vesicles. This is the first report of selective protein secretion via transient fusion outside mammalian cells. Selective secretion is likely to be an important aspect of plant infection by this destructive pathogen. PMID:24392285

  18. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling. PMID:26838475

  19. Population genetic structure of Myzus persicae nicotianae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in China by microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Yang, X M; Tang, S H; Xu, P J; Bian, W J; Wang, X F; Wang, X W; Ren, G W

    2015-12-17

    The tobacco aphid, Myzus persicae nicotianae (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an important agricultural pest that feeds on host plants and transmits plant viruses in China. To effectively control this pest, we investigated the genetic variation and genetic structure of 54 populations of tobacco aphids collected in China, using five microsatellite loci. An average of 7 alleles with effective number ranging from 1.5 to 6.6 was detected using these five loci, and the average polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.652, suggesting that the five selected microsatellite loci were polymorphic and suitable for the study of population genetics. The expected heterozygosities in the populations studied ranged from 0.128 and 0.653, with an average value of 0.464. However, the observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.250 and 0.942 (average = 0.735), revealing a high genetic variability and heterozygosity excess in the Chinese tobacco aphid populations. The global fixation index (F(ST)) and mean gene flow (N(m)) were 0.34 (P < 0.0001) and 0.50, respectively, suggesting the high genetic differentiation among Chinese populations. The 54 populations of tobacco aphids were classified into two groups. The populations did not cluster geographically, as populations from the same provinces were usually present in different clusters. This was also confirmed by the Mantel test, which showed no significant correlation between the genetic distance and geographical distance or altitude. Long distance migration might be responsible for the lack of distance-related isolation.

  20. β-Carboxysomal proteins assemble into highly organized structures in Nicotiana chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Myat T; Occhialini, Alessandro; Andralojc, P John; Devonshire, Jean; Hines, Kevin M; Parry, Martin A J; Hanson, Maureen R

    2014-07-01

    The photosynthetic efficiency of C3 plants suffers from the reaction of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) with O2 instead of CO2 , leading to the costly process of photorespiration. Increasing the concentration of CO2 around Rubisco is a strategy used by photosynthetic prokaryotes such as cyanobacteria for more efficient incorporation of inorganic carbon. Engineering the cyanobacterial CO2 -concentrating mechanism, the carboxysome, into chloroplasts is an approach to enhance photosynthesis or to compartmentalize other biochemical reactions to confer new capabilities on transgenic plants. We have chosen to explore the possibility of producing β-carboxysomes from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, a model freshwater cyanobacterium. Using the agroinfiltration technique, we have transiently expressed multiple β-carboxysomal proteins (CcmK2, CcmM, CcmL, CcmO and CcmN) in Nicotiana benthamiana with fusions that target these proteins into chloroplasts, and that provide fluorescent labels for visualizing the resultant structures. By confocal and electron microscopic analysis, we have observed that the shell proteins of the β-carboxysome are able to assemble in plant chloroplasts into highly organized assemblies resembling empty microcompartments. We demonstrate that a foreign protein can be targeted with a 17-amino-acid CcmN peptide to the shell proteins inside chloroplasts. Our experiments establish the feasibility of introducing carboxysomes into chloroplasts for the potential compartmentalization of Rubisco or other proteins.

  1. Fluorescent labelling reveals spatial separation of potyvirus populations in mixed infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christof; Maiss, Edgar

    2003-10-01

    The distribution of potyviruses in mixed infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants was investigated by using green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP, DsRed). Full-length cDNA clones of Plum pox virus (PPV-NAT-AgfpS; PPV-NAT-red), Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV-gfp; TVMV-red) and Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV-GFP) expressing fluorescent proteins, referred to here as labelled viruses, were used to characterize the distribution of different potyviral populations (e.g. TVMV-gfp/PPV-NAT-red), as well as populations of identical, but differently labelled potyviruses (e.g. PPV-NAT-AgfpS/PPV-NAT-red) or in mixed infections of potyviruses with labelled Potato virus X (PVX). Plants infected by any of the PVX/potyvirus combinations exhibited synergistic symptoms and large numbers of cells were doubly infected. In contrast, co-infections of differently labelled potyvirus populations appeared non-synergistic and remained predominantly separate in the infected plants, independent of whether different viruses or identical but differently labelled viruses were co-infecting. Contact of differently labelled virus populations that exhibited spatial separation was restricted to a small number of cells at the border of different fluorescent cell clusters.

  2. Unpredictability of nectar nicotine promotes outcrossing by hummingbirds in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Danny; Bhattacharya, Samik; Diezel, Celia; Rothe, Eva; Gase, Klaus; Schöttner, Matthias; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-08-01

    Many plants use sophisticated strategies to maximize their reproductive success via outcrossing. Nicotiana attenuata flowers produce nectar with nicotine at concentrations that are repellent to hummingbirds, increasing the number of flowers visited per plant. In choice tests using native hummingbirds, we show that these important pollinators learn to tolerate high-nicotine nectar but prefer low-nicotine nectar, and show no signs of nicotine addiction. Nectar nicotine concentrations, unlike those of other vegetative tissues, are unpredictably variable among flowers, not only among populations, but also within populations, and even among flowers within an inflorescence. To evaluate whether variations in nectar nicotine concentrations increase outcrossing, polymorphic microsatellite markers, optimized to evaluate paternity in native N. attenuata populations, were used to compare outcrossing in plants silenced for expression of a biosynthetic gene for nicotine production (Napmt1/2) and in control empty vector plants, which were antherectomized and transplanted into native populations. When only exposed to hummingbird pollinators, seeds produced by flowers with nicotine in their nectar had a greater number of genetically different sires, compared to seeds from nicotine-free flowers. As the variation in nectar nicotine levels among flowers in an inflorescence decreased in N. attenuata plants silenced in various combinations of three Dicer-like (DCL) proteins, small RNAs are probably involved in the unpredictable variation in nectar nicotine levels within a plant.

  3. Detection of Nicotiana DNA in Tobacco Products Using a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Korchinski, Katie L; Land, Adrian D; Craft, David L; Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    Establishing that a product contains tobacco is a requirement for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation and/or prosecution of tobacco products. Therefore, a multiplex real-time PCR method was designed to determine if Nicotiana (tobacco) DNA is present in tobacco products. The PCR method simultaneously amplifies a 73 bp fragment of the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase CYP82E4 gene and 66 bp fragment in the nia-1 gene for nitrate reductase, which are detected using dual-labeled TaqMan probes. The assay is capable of detecting approximately 7.8 pg purified tobacco DNA, with a similar sensitivity for either gene target while incorporating an internal positive control (IPC). DNA was extracted from prepared tobacco products-including chewing tobacco, pipe tobacco, and snuff-or from the cut fill (no wrapper) of cigarettes and cigars. Of the 13 products analyzed, 12 were positive for both tobacco-specific markers and the IPC. DNA was also extracted from the fill of five varieties of herbal cigarettes, which were negative for both tobacco-specific gene targets and positive for the IPC. Our method expands on current assays by introducing a multiplex reaction, targeting two sequences in two different genes of interest, incorporating an IPC into the reaction, and lowering the LOD and LOQ while increasing the efficiency of the PCR. PMID:27143320

  4. Opportunistic out-crossing in Nicotiana attenuata (Solanaceae), a predominantly self-fertilizing native tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Sime, Karen R; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-01-01

    Background Although Nicotiana attenuata is entirely self-compatible, chemical and other floral traits suggest selection for the maintenance of advertisement for moth pollinators. Results Experimental exclusions of pollinators from plants with emasculated flowers in natural populations in southern Utah during an outbreak of the hawkmoth Hyles lineata revealed that 24% of the seed set could be attributed to insect pollination, and eliminated wind pollination and apomixis as contributing to seed set. Hence these moths can mediate gene flow when self-pollen is unavailable. To quantify gene flow when self-pollen is available, plants were transformed with two marker genes: hygromycin-B resistance and β-glucuronidase. The utility of these genetic markers to measure gene flow between plants was examined by mixing pollen from plants homozygous for both genes with self-pollen in different ratios and hand-pollinating emasculated flowers of plants growing in a natural population. The proportion of transformed seeds was positively correlated with the amount of transformed pollen applied to stigmas. In glasshouse experiments with the hawkmoth Manduca sexta and experimental arrays of transformed and wild-type plants, pollination mediated by moths accounted for 2.5% of the seed set. Conclusions Even though moth pollination is rare and highly variable for this largely selfing plant, N. attenuata opportunistically employs a mixed-mating system. PMID:12866951

  5. Salivary proteins of spider mites suppress defenses in Nicotiana benthamiana and promote mite reproduction.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Carlos A; Jonckheere, Wim; Alba, Juan M; Glas, Joris J; Dermauw, Wannes; Haring, Michel A; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Schuurink, Robert C; Kant, Merijn R

    2016-04-01

    Spider mites (Tetranychidae sp.) are widely occurring arthropod pests on cultivated plants. Feeding by the two-spotted spider mite T. urticae, a generalist herbivore, induces a defense response in plants that mainly depends on the phytohormones jasmonic acid and salicylic acid (SA). On tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), however, certain genotypes of T. urticae and the specialist species T. evansi were found to suppress these defenses. This phenomenon occurs downstream of phytohormone accumulation via an unknown mechanism. We investigated if spider mites possess effector-like proteins in their saliva that can account for this defense suppression. First we performed an in silico prediction of the T. urticae and the T. evansi secretomes, and subsequently generated a short list of candidate effectors based on additional selection criteria such as life stage-specific expression and salivary gland expression via whole mount in situ hybridization. We picked the top five most promising protein families and then expressed representatives in Nicotiana benthamiana using Agrobacterium tumefaciens transient expression assays to assess their effect on plant defenses. Four proteins from two families suppressed defenses downstream of the phytohormone SA. Furthermore, T. urticae performance on N. benthamiana improved in response to transient expression of three of these proteins and this improvement was similar to that of mites feeding on the tomato SA accumulation mutant nahG. Our results suggest that both generalist and specialist plant-eating mite species are sensitive to SA defenses but secrete proteins via their saliva to reduce the negative effects of these defenses. PMID:26946468

  6. Characterization of in vivo functions of Nicotiana benthamiana RabE1.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Han, Jeong-A; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the gene expression, subcellular localization, and in vivo functions of a Nicotiana benthamiana small GTPase belonging to the RabE family, designated NbRabE1. The NbRabE1 promoter drove strong β-glucuronidase reporter expression in young tissues containing actively dividing cells and in stomata guard cells. GFP fusion proteins of NbRabE1 and its dominant-negative and constitutively active mutants were all localized to the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane but showed different affinities for membrane attachment. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbRabE1 resulted in pleiotropic phenotypes, including growth arrest, premature senescence, and abnormal leaf development. At the cellular level, the leaves in which NbRabE1 was silenced contained abnormal stomata that lacked pores or contained incomplete ventral walls, suggesting that NbRabE1 deficiency leads to defective guard cell cytokinesis. Ectopic expression of the dominant-negative mutant of NbRabE1 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in retardation of shoot and root growth accompanied by defective root hair formation. These developmental defects are discussed in conjunction with proposed functions of RabE GTPases in polarized secretory vesicle trafficking.

  7. Recombinant-antibody-mediated resistance against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a geminivirus species whose members cause severe crop losses in the tropics and subtropics. We report the expression of a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody that protected Nicotiana benthamiana plants from a prevalent Iranian isolate of the virus (TYLCV-Ir). Two recombinant antibodies (scFv-ScRep1 and scFv-ScRep2) interacting with the multifunctional replication initiator protein (Rep) were obtained from phage display libraries and expressed in plants, both as stand-alone proteins and as N-terminal GFP fusions. Initial results indicated that both scFvs and both fusions accumulated to a detectable level in the cytosol and nucleus of plant cells. Transgenic plants challenged with TYLCV-Ir showed that the scFv-ScRep1, but more so the fusion proteins, were able to suppress TYLCV-Ir replication. These results show that expression of a scFv-ScRep1-GFP fusion protein can attenuate viral DNA replication and prevent the development of disease symptoms. The present article describes the first successful application of a recombinant antibody-mediated resistance approach against a plant DNA virus. PMID:19234665

  8. Reduced Susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri in Transgenic Citrus Expressing the FLS2 Receptor From Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guixia; Pitino, Marco; Duan, Yongping; Stover, Ed

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of plant pattern-recognition receptors by genetic engineering provides a novel approach to enhance plant immunity and broad-spectrum disease resistance. Citrus canker disease associated with Xanthomonas citri is one of the most important diseases damaging citrus production worldwide. In this study, we cloned the FLS2 gene from Nicotiana benthamiana cDNA and inserted it into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS to transform Hamlin sweet orange and Carrizo citrange. Transgene presence was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene expression of NbFLS2 was compared by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to flg22Xcc was detected in transgenic Hamlin but not in nontransformed controls. Low or no ROS production was detected from nontransformed Hamlin seedlings challenged with flg22Xcc. Transgenic plants highly expressing NbFLS2 were selected and were evaluated for resistance to canker incited by X. citri 3213. Our results showed that the integration and expression of the NbFLS2 gene in citrus can increase canker resistance and defense-associated gene expression when challenged with X. citri. These results suggest that canker-susceptible Citrus genotypes lack strong basal defense induced by X. citri flagellin and the resistance of these genotypes can be enhanced by transgenic expression of the flagellin receptor from a resistant species.

  9. An efficient Potato virus X -based microRNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinping; Liu, Qingtao; Hu, Pu; Jia, Qi; Liu, Na; Yin, Kangquan; Cheng, Ye; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping; Liu, Yule

    2016-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in many biological processes. Although many miRNAs have been identified in various plant species, the functions of these miRNAs remain largely unknown due to the shortage of effective genetic tools to block their functional activity. Recently, miRNA target mimic (TM) technologies have been applied to perturb the activity of specific endogenous miRNA or miRNA families. We previously reported that Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based TM expression can successfully mediate virus-based miRNA silencing/suppression (VbMS) in plants. In this study, we show the Potato virus X (PVX)-based TM expression causes strong miRNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana. The PVX-based expression of short tandem target mimic (STTMs) against miR165/166 and 159 caused the corresponding phenotype in all infected plants. Thus, a PVX-based VbMS is a powerful method to study miRNA function and may be useful for high-throughput investigation of miRNA function in N. benthamiana. PMID:26837708

  10. Salivary proteins of spider mites suppress defenses in Nicotiana benthamiana and promote mite reproduction.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Carlos A; Jonckheere, Wim; Alba, Juan M; Glas, Joris J; Dermauw, Wannes; Haring, Michel A; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Schuurink, Robert C; Kant, Merijn R

    2016-04-01

    Spider mites (Tetranychidae sp.) are widely occurring arthropod pests on cultivated plants. Feeding by the two-spotted spider mite T. urticae, a generalist herbivore, induces a defense response in plants that mainly depends on the phytohormones jasmonic acid and salicylic acid (SA). On tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), however, certain genotypes of T. urticae and the specialist species T. evansi were found to suppress these defenses. This phenomenon occurs downstream of phytohormone accumulation via an unknown mechanism. We investigated if spider mites possess effector-like proteins in their saliva that can account for this defense suppression. First we performed an in silico prediction of the T. urticae and the T. evansi secretomes, and subsequently generated a short list of candidate effectors based on additional selection criteria such as life stage-specific expression and salivary gland expression via whole mount in situ hybridization. We picked the top five most promising protein families and then expressed representatives in Nicotiana benthamiana using Agrobacterium tumefaciens transient expression assays to assess their effect on plant defenses. Four proteins from two families suppressed defenses downstream of the phytohormone SA. Furthermore, T. urticae performance on N. benthamiana improved in response to transient expression of three of these proteins and this improvement was similar to that of mites feeding on the tomato SA accumulation mutant nahG. Our results suggest that both generalist and specialist plant-eating mite species are sensitive to SA defenses but secrete proteins via their saliva to reduce the negative effects of these defenses.

  11. Arabinogalactan-Proteins of the Female Sexual Tissue of Nicotiana alata

    PubMed Central

    Gell, Andrew C.; Bacic, Antony; Clarke, Adrienne E.

    1986-01-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs), isolated from the pistils of Nicotiana alata, an ornamental tobacco, are developmentally regulated. Both the total amount and concentration of AGP in the stigma increase during flower development, reaching 10 micrograms AGP/stigma at maturity. In contrast, AGP concentration in the style remains constant throughout the maturation period reaching 12 micrograms AGP/style at maturity. The classes of AGP present in the stigma and style during flower development, separated according to their charge by crossed-electrophoresis, are different and change during development. Pollination of flowers of N. alata with compatible or incompatible pollen results in a significant and reproducible increase in the amount of AGPs in the stigma, but not the style, compared with control unpollinated pistils. Pollination with ethanol vapor inactivated pollen also results in an increase in the amount of AGP in the stigma, but this is less than half that observed following pollination with viable pollen. There are no significant differences in the classes of AGP, based on crossed-electrophoresis, present in the pistil following pollination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:16665162

  12. Transient Expression of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Effector Induces Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Pitino, Marco; Armstrong, Cheryl M.; Cano, Liliana M.; Duan, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus “Las” is a phloem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Although, the complete sequence of the Las genome provides the basis for studying functional genomics of Las and molecular mechanisms of Las-plant interactions, the functional characterization of Las effectors remains a slow process since remains to be cultured. Like other plant pathogens, Las may deliver effector proteins into host cells and modulate a variety of host cellular functions for their infection progression. In this study, we identified 16 putative Las effectors via bioinformatics, and transiently expressed them in Nicotiana benthamiana. Diverse subcellular localization with different shapes and aggregation patterns of the effector candidates were revealed by UV- microscopy after transient expression in leaf tissue. Intriguingly, one of the 16 candidates, Las5315mp (mature protein), was localized in the chloroplast and induced cell death at 3 days post inoculation (dpi) in N. benthamiana. Moreover, Las5315mp induced strong callose deposition in plant cells. This study provides new insights into the localizations and potential roles of these Las effectors in planta. PMID:27458468

  13. Transient Expression of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Effector Induces Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Pitino, Marco; Armstrong, Cheryl M; Cano, Liliana M; Duan, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus "Las" is a phloem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Although, the complete sequence of the Las genome provides the basis for studying functional genomics of Las and molecular mechanisms of Las-plant interactions, the functional characterization of Las effectors remains a slow process since remains to be cultured. Like other plant pathogens, Las may deliver effector proteins into host cells and modulate a variety of host cellular functions for their infection progression. In this study, we identified 16 putative Las effectors via bioinformatics, and transiently expressed them in Nicotiana benthamiana. Diverse subcellular localization with different shapes and aggregation patterns of the effector candidates were revealed by UV- microscopy after transient expression in leaf tissue. Intriguingly, one of the 16 candidates, Las5315mp (mature protein), was localized in the chloroplast and induced cell death at 3 days post inoculation (dpi) in N. benthamiana. Moreover, Las5315mp induced strong callose deposition in plant cells. This study provides new insights into the localizations and potential roles of these Las effectors in planta. PMID:27458468

  14. The alternative respiratory pathway is involved in brassinosteroid-induced environmental stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs), plant steroid hormones, play essential roles in modulating cell elongation, vascular differentiation, senescence, and stress responses. However, the mechanisms by which BRs regulate plant mitochondria and resistance to abiotic stress remain largely unclear. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) is involved in the plant response to a variety of environmental stresses. In this report, the role of AOX in BR-induced tolerance against cold, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and high-light stresses was investigated. Exogenous applied brassinolide (BL, the most active BR) induced, while brassinazole (BRZ, a BR biosynthesis inhibitor) reduced alternative respiration and AOX1 expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Chemical scavenging of H2O2 and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of NbRBOHB compromised the BR-induced alternative respiratory pathway, and this result was further confirmed by NbAOX1 promoter analysis. Furthermore, inhibition of AOX activity by chemical treatment or a VIGS-based approach decreased plant resistance to environmental stresses and compromised BR-induced stress tolerance. Taken together, our results indicate that BR-induced AOX capability might contribute to the avoidance of superfluous reactive oxygen species accumulation and the protection of photosystems under stress conditions in N. benthamiana. PMID:26175355

  15. Transient fusion and selective secretion of vesicle proteins in Phytophthora nicotianae zoospores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Blackman, Leila M; Hardham, Adrienne R

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of pathogen proteins is crucial for the establishment of disease in animals and plants. Typically, early interactions between host and pathogen trigger regulated secretion of pathogenicity factors that function in pathogen adhesion and host penetration. During the onset of plant infection by spores of the Oomycete, Phytophthora nicotianae, proteins are secreted from three types of cortical vesicles. Following induction of spore encystment, two vesicle types undergo full fusion, releasing their entire contents onto the cell surface. However, the third vesicle type, so-called large peripheral vesicles, selectively secretes a small Sushi domain-containing protein, PnCcp, while retaining a large glycoprotein, PnLpv, before moving away from the plasma membrane. Selective secretion of PnCcp is associated with its compartmentalization within the vesicle periphery. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin function, purportedly in vesicle fission, by dynasore treatment provides evidence that selective secretion of PnCcp requires transient fusion of the large peripheral vesicles. This is the first report of selective protein secretion via transient fusion outside mammalian cells. Selective secretion is likely to be an important aspect of plant infection by this destructive pathogen. PMID:24392285

  16. Detection of Nicotiana DNA in Tobacco Products Using a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Korchinski, Katie L; Land, Adrian D; Craft, David L; Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    Establishing that a product contains tobacco is a requirement for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulation and/or prosecution of tobacco products. Therefore, a multiplex real-time PCR method was designed to determine if Nicotiana (tobacco) DNA is present in tobacco products. The PCR method simultaneously amplifies a 73 bp fragment of the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase CYP82E4 gene and 66 bp fragment in the nia-1 gene for nitrate reductase, which are detected using dual-labeled TaqMan probes. The assay is capable of detecting approximately 7.8 pg purified tobacco DNA, with a similar sensitivity for either gene target while incorporating an internal positive control (IPC). DNA was extracted from prepared tobacco products-including chewing tobacco, pipe tobacco, and snuff-or from the cut fill (no wrapper) of cigarettes and cigars. Of the 13 products analyzed, 12 were positive for both tobacco-specific markers and the IPC. DNA was also extracted from the fill of five varieties of herbal cigarettes, which were negative for both tobacco-specific gene targets and positive for the IPC. Our method expands on current assays by introducing a multiplex reaction, targeting two sequences in two different genes of interest, incorporating an IPC into the reaction, and lowering the LOD and LOQ while increasing the efficiency of the PCR.

  17. The alternative respiratory pathway is involved in brassinosteroid-induced environmental stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2015-10-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs), plant steroid hormones, play essential roles in modulating cell elongation, vascular differentiation, senescence, and stress responses. However, the mechanisms by which BRs regulate plant mitochondria and resistance to abiotic stress remain largely unclear. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) is involved in the plant response to a variety of environmental stresses. In this report, the role of AOX in BR-induced tolerance against cold, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and high-light stresses was investigated. Exogenous applied brassinolide (BL, the most active BR) induced, while brassinazole (BRZ, a BR biosynthesis inhibitor) reduced alternative respiration and AOX1 expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Chemical scavenging of H2O2 and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of NbRBOHB compromised the BR-induced alternative respiratory pathway, and this result was further confirmed by NbAOX1 promoter analysis. Furthermore, inhibition of AOX activity by chemical treatment or a VIGS-based approach decreased plant resistance to environmental stresses and compromised BR-induced stress tolerance. Taken together, our results indicate that BR-induced AOX capability might contribute to the avoidance of superfluous reactive oxygen species accumulation and the protection of photosystems under stress conditions in N. benthamiana.

  18. Large-scale development of PIP and SSR markers and their complementary applied in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Cao, H; Yang, L; Yu, Yu; Wang, Yu

    2013-08-01

    PIP (Potential Intron Polymorphism) and SSR (Simple Sequence Repeats) were used in many species, but large-scale development and combined use of these two markers have not been reported in tobacco. In this study, a total of 12,388 PIP and 76,848 SSR markers were designed and uploaded to a web-accessible database (http://yancao.sdau.edu.cn/tgb/). E-PCR analysis showed that PIP and SSR rarely overlapped and were strongly complementary in the tobacco genome. The density was 3.07 PIP and 1.72 SSR markers per 10 kb of the known sequences. A total of 153 and 166 alleles were detectedby 22 PIP and 22 SSR markers in 64 Nicotiana accessions. SSR produced higher PIC (polymorphism information content) values and identified more alleles than PIP, whereas PIP could identify larger numbers of rare alleles. Mantel testing demonstrated a high correlation coefficient (r = 0.949, P < 0.001) between PIP and SSR. The UPGMA dendrogram created from the combined PIP and SSR markers was clearer and more reliable than the individual PIP or SSR dendrograms. It suggested that PIP and SSR can make up the deficiency of molecular markers not only in tobacco but other plant.

  19. A mathematical model of the defence mechanism of a bombardier beetle

    PubMed Central

    James, Alex; Morison, Ken; Todd, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of bombardier beetles have shown that some species have a continuous discharge while others exhibit a pulsed discharge. Here, a mathematical model of the defence mechanism of the bombardier beetle is developed and the hypothesis that almost all bombardiers' defences have some sort of cyclic behaviour at frequencies much higher than previously thought is put forward. The observation of pulses arises from secondary lower frequency cycles that appear for some parameter values. For realistic parameter values, the model can exhibit all the characteristics seen in the various species of bombardier. The possibility that all bombardiers have the same underlying defence mechanism gives weight to the theory that all bombardiers' explosive secretory mechanisms have diversified from a common ancestral mechanism. PMID:23173197

  20. Overtopping failure analysis of coastal flood defences affected by climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahari Mehrabani, Mehrdad; Chen, Hua-Peng; Stevenson, Morris W.

    2015-07-01

    Sea defence structures are expected to protect coasts for a long period, hence requiring reliable performance assessment strategies, in order to ensure their integrity and functionality. It has been demonstrated that rising sea level together with changing wave height can lead to increase risks of the failure to coastal defence structures. This paper presents a method for assessing the risk of wave overtopping failure, analysing the joint probability of sea water level and significant wave height under future hydraulic conditions due to climate change. Monte Carlo simulations are utilised to analyse the time-dependant overtopping failure probability of a seawall in the UK subjected to sea level rise. The numerical results for the flood defence example show that the seawall subjected to the sea level rise with high emission scenario could face to a significant increase of the frequency and the rate of overtopping discharge in comparison with the present date conditions without consideration of seawall crest settlement.

  1. Can genetically based clines in plant defence explain greater herbivory at higher latitudes?

    PubMed

    Anstett, Daniel N; Ahern, Jeffrey R; Glinos, Julia; Nawar, Nabanita; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-12-01

    Greater plant defence is predicted to evolve at lower latitudes in response to increased herbivore pressure. However, recent studies question the generality of this pattern. In this study, we tested for genetically based latitudinal clines in resistance to herbivores and underlying defence traits of Oenothera biennis. We grew plants from 137 populations from across the entire native range of O. biennis. Populations from lower latitudes showed greater resistance to multiple specialist and generalist herbivores. These patterns were associated with an increase in total phenolics at lower latitudes. A significant proportion of the phenolics were driven by the concentrations of two major ellagitannins, which exhibited opposing latitudinal clines. Our analyses suggest that these findings are unlikely to be explained by local adaptation of herbivore populations or genetic variation in phenology. Rather greater herbivory at high latitudes can be explained by latitudinal clines in the evolution of plant defences.

  2. Immigration of susceptible hosts triggers the evolution of alternative parasite defence strategies.

    PubMed

    Chabas, Hélène; van Houte, Stineke; Høyland-Kroghsbo, Nina Molin; Buckling, Angus; Westra, Edze R

    2016-08-31

    Migration of hosts and parasites can have a profound impact on host-parasite ecological and evolutionary interactions. Using the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 and its phage DMS3vir, we here show that immigration of naive hosts into coevolving populations of hosts and parasites can influence the mechanistic basis underlying host defence evolution. Specifically, we found that at high levels of bacterial immigration, bacteria switched from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) to surface modification-mediated defence. This effect emerges from an increase in the force of infection, which tips the balance from CRISPR to surface modification-based defence owing to the induced and fixed fitness costs associated with these mechanisms, respectively. PMID:27581884

  3. Voluntariness, intention, and the defence of mental disorder: toward a rational approach.

    PubMed

    McSherry, Bernadette

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses how mental disorder may be used in common law countries to negate the requirements of voluntariness and intention in serious criminal offences as well as to provide the basis for current versions of the insanity defence. The notion that mental disorder can cause conduct to become completely involuntary or unintentional is questionable, given current thinking in the behavioral sciences. This article argues that different forms of mental disorder should be subsumed within a separate defence of mental disorder. Providing that a range of dispositional options is available, the law in this complex area would be simplified and brought into line with current psychological notions of goal-directed behavior.

  4. Sentenced in sorrow: the role of asylum in the Jean Gianini murder defence.

    PubMed

    Gelb, S A

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the role played by the notion of asylum in the legal battle over confessed murderer Jean Gianini's mental competence and commitment. Gianini was a 16 year old who murdered his former teacher in a small upstate New York town in 1914. His trial was the first in the US to employ the Binet-Simon intelligence test as a defence and featured a clash of expert witnesses whose credibility was based upon their residence and work in asylums. The verdict of 'not guilty due to criminal imbecility' was due to the defence team's successful portrayal of the asylum as a punishing prison from which the defendant would never be released.

  5. Interactions between nutritional approaches and defences against microbial diseases in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Caroprese, M; Giannenas, I; Fthenakis, G C

    2015-12-14

    Objective of this review is to discuss the role of small ruminant diet in the defence of these animals against microbial diseases, in relation to different experimental approaches and various stressors acting on animals. The effects of various diets in immune reactions and animal defences are presented. Also, effects in relation to the species studied and the type of stressors acting on animals are discussed. Evidence is provided about the significance of the diet in enhancing immune responses of small ruminants during specific conditions, e.g., around parturition, during lactation, as well as in growing lambs or kids.

  6. Degradation of the plant defence hormone salicylic acid by the biotrophic fungus Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Franziska; Ajami-Rashidi, Ziba; Doehlemann, Gunther; Kahmann, Regine; Djamei, Armin

    2013-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key plant defence hormone which plays an important role in local and systemic defence responses against biotrophic pathogens like the smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Here we identified Shy1, a cytoplasmic U. maydis salicylate hydroxylase which has orthologues in the closely related smuts Ustilago hordei and Sporisorium reilianum. shy1 is transcriptionally induced during the biotrophic stages of development but not required for virulence during seedling infection. Shy1 activity is needed for growth on plates with SA as a sole carbon source. The trigger for shy1 transcriptional induction is SA, suggesting the possibility of a SA sensing mechanism in this fungus.

  7. Sex-related differences in growth and carbon allocation to defence in Populus tremula as explained by current plant defence theories.

    PubMed

    Randriamanana, Tendry R; Nybakken, Line; Lavola, Anu; Aphalo, Pedro J; Nissinen, Katri; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2014-05-01

    Plant defence theories have recently evolved in such a way that not only the quantity but also the quality of mineral nutrients is expected to influence plant constitutive defence. Recently, an extended prediction derived from the protein competition model (PCM) suggested that nitrogen (N) limitation is more important for the production of phenolic compounds than phosphorus (P). We aimed at studying sexual differences in the patterns of carbon allocation to growth and constitutive defence in relation to N and P availability in Populus tremula L. seedlings. We compared the gender responses in photosynthesis, growth and whole-plant allocation to phenolic compounds at different combination levels of N and P, and studied how they are explained by the main plant defence theories. We found no sexual differences in phenolic concentrations, but interestingly, slow-growing females had higher leaf N concentration than did males, and genders differed in their allocation priority. There was a trade-off between growth and the production of flavonoid-derived phenylpropanoids on one hand, and between the production of salicylates and flavonoid-derived phenylpropanoids on the other. Under limited nutrient conditions, females prioritized mineral nutrient acquisition, flavonoid and condensed tannin (CT) production, while males invested more in above-ground biomass. Salicylate accumulation followed the growth differentiation balance hypothesis as low N mainly decreased the production of leaf and stem salicylate content while the combination of both low N and low P increased the amount of flavonoids and CTs allocated to leaves and to a lesser extent stems, which agrees with the PCM. We suggest that such a discrepancy in the responses of salicylates and flavonoid-derived CTs is linked to their clearly distinct biosynthetic origins and/or their metabolic costs.

  8. Down-regulation of plant defence in a resident spider mite species and its effect upon con- and heterospecifics.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Diogo P; Janssen, Arne; Dias, Teresa; Cruz, Cristina; Magalhães, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Herbivorous spider mites occurring on tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cope with plant defences in various manners: the invasive Tetranychus evansi reduces defences below constitutive levels, whereas several strains of T. urticae induce such defences and others suppress them. In the Mediterranean region, these two species co-occur on tomato plants with T. ludeni, another closely related spider mite species. Unravelling how this third mite species affects plant defences is thus fundamental to understanding the outcome of herbivore interactions in this system. To test the effect of T. ludeni on tomato plant defences, we measured (1) the activity of proteinase inhibitors, indicating the induction of plant defences, in those plants, and (2) mite performance on plants previously infested with each mite species. We show that the performance of T. evansi and T. ludeni on plants previously infested with T. ludeni or T. evansi was better than on clean plants, indicating that these two mite species down-regulate plant defences. We also show that plants attacked by these mite species had lower activity of proteinase inhibitors than clean plants, whereas herbivory by T. urticae increased the activity of these proteins and resulted in reduced spider mite performance. This study thus shows that the property of down-regulation of plant defences below constitutive levels also occurs in T. ludeni.

  9. The production of human glucocerebrosidase in glyco-engineered Nicotiana benthamiana plants.

    PubMed

    Limkul, Juthamard; Iizuka, Sayoko; Sato, Yohei; Misaki, Ryo; Ohashi, Takao; Ohashi, Toya; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2016-08-01

    For the production of therapeutic proteins in plants, the presence of β1,2-xylose and core α1,3-fucose on plants' N-glycan structures has been debated for their antigenic activity. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was used to down-regulate the endogenous N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GNTI) expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. One glyco-engineered line (NbGNTI-RNAi) showed a strong reduction of plant-specific N-glycans, with the result that as much as 90.9% of the total N-glycans were of high-mannose type. Therefore, this NbGNTI-RNAi would be a promising system for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins in plants. The NbGNTI-RNAi plant was cross-pollinated with transgenic N. benthamiana expressing human glucocerebrosidase (GC). The recombinant GC, which has been used for enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher's disease, requires terminal mannose for its therapeutic efficacy. The N-glycan structures that were presented on all of the four occupied N-glycosylation sites of recombinant GC in NbGNTI-RNAi plants (GC(gnt1) ) showed that the majority (ranging from 73.3% up to 85.5%) of the N-glycans had mannose-type structures lacking potential immunogenic β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose epitopes. Moreover, GC(gnt1) could be taken up into the macrophage cells via mannose receptors, and distributed and taken up into the liver and spleen, the target organs in the treatment of Gaucher's disease. Notably, the NbGNTI-RNAi line, producing GC, was stable and the NbGNTI-RNAi plants were viable and did not show any obvious phenotype. Therefore, it would provide a robust tool for the production of GC with customized N-glycan structures.

  10. Glyphosate inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthease from suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.L.; Gaines, C.G.; Jensen, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    Treatment of isogenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris Speg, et Comes with glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) led to elevated levels of intracellular shikimate (364-fold increase by 1.0 millimolar glyphosate). In the presence of glyphosate, it is likely that most molecules of shikimate originate from the action of 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase-Mn since this isozyme, in contrast to the DAHP synthase-Co isozyme, is insensitive to inhibition by glyphosate. 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (EC 2.5.1.19) from N. silvestris was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of glyphosate and possessed a single inhibitor binding site. Rigorous kinetic studies of EPSP synthase required resolution from the multiple phosphatase activities present in crude extracts, a result achieved by ion-exchange column chromatography. Although EPSP synthase exhibited a broad pH profile (50% of maximal activity between pH 6.2 and 8.5), sensitivity to glyphosate increased dramatically with increasing pH within this range. In accordance with these data and the pK/sub a/ values of glyphosate, it is likely that the ionic form of glyphosate inhibiting EPSP synthase is COO/sup -/CH/sub 2/NH/sub 2//sup +/CH/sub 2/PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and that a completely ionized phosphono group is essential for inhibition. At pH 7.0, inhibition was competitive with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (K/sub i/ = 1.25 micromolar) and uncompetitive with respect to shikimate-3-P (K/sub i/ = 18.3 micromolar). All data were consistent with a mechanism of inhibition in which glyphosate competes with PEP for binding to an (enzyme:shikimate-3-P) complex and ultimately forms the dead-end complex of (enzyme:shikimate-3-P:glyphosate). 36 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  11. Expression of Aspergillus nidulans phy Gene in Nicotiana benthamiana Produces Active Phytase with Broad Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tae-Kyun; Oh, Sung; Kim, Seongdae; Park, Jae Sung; Vinod, Nagarajan; Jang, Kyung Min; Kim, Sei Chang; Choi, Chang Won; Ko, Suk-Min; Jeong, Dong Kee; Udayakumar, Rajangam

    2014-01-01

    A full-length phytase gene (phy) of Aspergillus nidulans was amplified from the cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and it was introduced into a bacterial expression vector, pET-28a. The recombinant protein (rPhy-E, 56 kDa) was overexpressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli culture, purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions and injected into rats as an immunogen. To express A. nidulans phytase in a plant, the full-length of phy was cloned into a plant expression binary vector, pPZP212. The resultant construct was tested for its transient expression by Agrobacterium-infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Compared with a control, the agro-infiltrated leaf tissues showed the presence of phy mRNA and its high expression level in N. benthamiana. The recombinant phytase (rPhy-P, 62 kDa) was strongly reacted with the polyclonal antibody against the nonglycosylated rPhy-E. The rPhy-P showed glycosylation, two pH optima (pH 4.5 and pH 5.5), an optimum temperature at 45~55 °C, thermostability and broad substrate specificities. After deglycosylation by peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F), the rPhy-P significantly lost the phytase activity and retained 1/9 of the original activity after 10 min of incubation at 45 °C. Therefore, the deglycosylation caused a significant reduction in enzyme thermostability. In animal experiments, oral administration of the rPhy-P at 1500 U/kg body weight/day for seven days caused a significant reduction of phosphorus excretion by 16% in rat feces. Besides, the rPhy-P did not result in any toxicological changes and clinical signs. PMID:25192284

  12. Reduced gravitropic sensitivity in roots of a starch-deficient mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in seedlings of Nicotiana sylvestris Speg. et Comes wild-type (WT) and mutant NS 458 which has a defective plastid phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1.). Starch was greatly reduced in NS 458 compared to the WT, but small amounts of starch were detected in rootcap columella cells in NS 458 by light and electron microscopy. The roots of WT are more sensitive to gravity than mutant NS 458 roots since: (1) in mutant roots, curvature was reduced and delayed in the time course of curvature; (2) curvature of mutant roots was 24-56% that of WT roots over the range of induction periods tested; (3) in intermittent-stimulation experiments, curvature of mutant roots was 37% or less than that of WT roots in all treatments tested. The perception time, determined by intermittent-stimulation experiments, was < or = 5 s for WT roots and 30-60 s for mutant roots. The growth rates for WT and NS 458 roots were essentially equal. These results and our previous results with WT and starchless mutant Arabidopsis roots (Kiss et al. 1989, Planta 177, 198-206) support the conclusions that a full complement of starch is necessary for full gravitropic sensitivity and that amyloplasts function in gravity perception. Since a presumed relatively small increase in plastid buoyant mass (N. sylvestris mutant versus Arabidopsis mutant) significantly improves the orientation of the N. sylvestris mutant roots, we suggest that plastids are the likeliest candidates to be triggering gravity perception in roots of both mutants.

  13. HSPRO controls early Nicotiana attenuata seedling growth during interaction with the fungus Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Stefan; Camehl, Iris; Gilardoni, Paola A; Oelmueller, Ralf; Baldwin, Ian T; Bonaventure, Gustavo

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study aimed at identifying regulators of Nicotiana attenuata responses against chewing insects, a 26-nucleotide tag matching the HSPRO (ORTHOLOG OF SUGAR BEET Hs1(pro)(-)(1)) gene was found to be strongly induced after simulated herbivory (Gilardoni et al., 2010). Here we characterized the function of HSPRO during biotic interactions in transgenic N. attenuata plants silenced in its expression (ir-hspro). In wild-type plants, HSPRO expression was not only induced during simulated herbivory but also when leaves were inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and roots with the growth-promoting fungus Piriformospora indica. Reduced HSPRO expression did not affect the regulation of direct defenses against Manduca sexta herbivory or P. syringae pv tomato DC3000 infection rates. However, reduced HSPRO expression positively influenced early seedling growth during interaction with P. indica; fungus-colonized ir-hspro seedlings increased their fresh biomass by 30% compared with the wild type. Grafting experiments demonstrated that reduced HSPRO expression in roots was sufficient to induce differential growth promotion in both roots and shoots. This effect was accompanied by changes in the expression of 417 genes in colonized roots, most of which were metabolic genes. The lack of major differences in the metabolic profiles of ir-hspro and wild-type colonized roots (as analyzed by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry) suggested that accelerated metabolic rates were involved. We conclude that HSPRO participates in a whole-plant change in growth physiology when seedlings interact with P. indica. PMID:22892352

  14. Sebacina vermifera promotes the growth and fitness of Nicotiana attenuata by inhibiting ethylene signaling.

    PubMed

    Barazani, Oz; von Dahl, Caroline C; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-06-01

    Sebacina vermifera, a growth-promoting endophytic fungus, significantly increases Nicotiana attenuata's growth but impairs both its herbivore resistance and its accumulation of the costly, jasmonic acid (JA)-regulated defense protein, trypsin proteinase inhibitor (TPI). To determine if the fungi's growth-promoting effects can be attributed to lower TPI-related defense costs, we inoculated transformed N. attenuata plants silenced in their ability to synthesize JA, JA-isoleucine, and TPI by antisense (lipoxygenase 3 [as-lox3] and Thr deaminase [as-td]) and inverted repeat (ir-tpi) expression, and found that inoculation promoted plant growth as in untransformed wild-type plants. Moreover, herbivore-elicited increases in JA and JA-isoleucine concentrations did not differ between inoculated and uninoculated wild-type plants. However, inoculation significantly reduced the morphological effect of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid on wild-type seedlings in a triple response assay, suggesting that ethylene signaling was impaired. Furthermore, S. vermifera failed to promote the growth of N. attenuata plants transformed to silence ethylene production (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase [ir-aco]). Inoculating wild-type plants with S. vermifera decreased the ethylene burst elicited by applying Manduca sexta oral secretions to mechanical wounds. Accordingly, oral secretion-elicited transcript levels of the ethylene synthesis genes NaACS3, NaACO1, and NaACO3 in inoculated plants were significantly lower compared to these levels in uninoculated wild-type plants. Inoculation accelerated germination in wild-type seeds; however, uninoculated wild-type seeds germinated as rapidly as inoculated seeds in the presence of the ethylene scrubber KMnO(4). In contrast, neither inoculation nor KMnO(4) exposure influenced the germination of ir-aco seeds. We conclude that S. vermifera increases plant growth by impairing ethylene production independently of JA signaling and TPI

  15. Reconstitution of the Costunolide Biosynthetic Pathway in Yeast and Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Cankar, Katarina; Goedbloed, Miriam; Charnikhova, Tatsiana; Verstappen, Francel W. A.; de Vos, Ric C. H.; Beekwilder, Jules; van der Krol, Sander; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2011-01-01

    The sesquiterpene costunolide has a broad range of biological activities and is the parent compound for many other biologically active sesquiterpenes such as parthenolide. Two enzymes of the pathway leading to costunolide have been previously characterized: germacrene A synthase (GAS) and germacrene A oxidase (GAO), which together catalyse the biosynthesis of germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid. However, the gene responsible for the last step toward costunolide has not been characterized until now. Here we show that chicory costunolide synthase (CiCOS), CYP71BL3, can catalyse the oxidation of germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid to yield costunolide. Co-expression of feverfew GAS (TpGAS), chicory GAO (CiGAO), and chicory COS (CiCOS) in yeast resulted in the biosynthesis of costunolide. The catalytic activity of TpGAS, CiGAO and CiCOS was also verified in planta by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Mitochondrial targeting of TpGAS resulted in a significant increase in the production of germacrene A compared with the native cytosolic targeting. When the N. benthamiana leaves were co-infiltrated with TpGAS and CiGAO, germacrene A almost completely disappeared as a result of the presence of CiGAO. Transient expression of TpGAS, CiGAO and CiCOS in N. benthamiana leaves resulted in costunolide production of up to 60 ng.g−1 FW. In addition, two new compounds were formed that were identified as costunolide-glutathione and costunolide-cysteine conjugates. PMID:21858047

  16. Allometric analysis of the induced flavonols on the leaf surface of wild tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata).

    PubMed

    Roda, Amy L; Oldham, Neil J; Svatos, Ales; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-02-01

    Trichomes excrete secondary metabolites that may alter the chemical composition of the leaf surface, reducing damage caused by herbivores, pathogens and abiotic stresses. We examined the surface exudates produced by Nicotiana attenuata Torr. Ex Wats., a plant known to contain and secrete a number of secondary metabolites that are toxic or a deterrent to herbivorous insects. Extractions specific to the leaf surface, the trichomes, and the laminar components demonstrated the localization of particular compounds. Diterpene glycosides occurred exclusively in leaf mesophyll, whereas nicotine was found in both the trichomes and mesophyll. Neither rutin nor nicotine was found on the leaf surface. Quercetin and 7 methylated derivatives were found in the glandular trichomes and appeared to be excreted onto the leaf surface. We examined the elicitation of these flavonols on the leaf surface with a surface-area allometric analysis, which measures changes in metabolites independent of the effects of leaf expansion. The flavonols responded differently to wounding, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), herbivore attack and UV-C radiation, and the response patterns corresponded to their compound-specific allometries. Finding greater amounts of quercetin on younger leaves and reduced amounts after herbivore feeding and MeJA treatment, we hypothesized that quercetin may function as an attractant, helping the insects locate a preferred feeding site. Consistent with this hypothesis, mirids (Tupiocoris notatus) were found more often on mature leaves sprayed with quercetin at a concentration typical of young leaves than on unsupplemented mature leaves. The composition of metabolites on the leaf surface of N. attenuata changes throughout leaf development and in response to herbivore attack or environmental stress, and these changes are mediated in part by responses of the glandular trichomes.

  17. Unbiased Transcriptional Comparisons of Generalist and Specialist Herbivores Feeding on Progressively Defenseless Nicotiana attenuata Plants

    PubMed Central

    Govind, Geetha; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Griebel, Thasso; Allmann, Silke; Böcker, Sebastian; Baldwin, Ian Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background Herbivore feeding elicits dramatic increases in defenses, most of which require jasmonate (JA) signaling, and against which specialist herbivores are thought to be better adapted than generalist herbivores. Unbiased transcriptional analyses of how neonate larvae cope with these induced plant defenses are lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings We created cDNA microarrays for Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens separately, by spotting normalized midgut-specific cDNA libraries created from larvae that fed for 24 hours on MeJA-elicited wild-type (WT) Nicotiana attenuata plants. These microarrays were hybridized with labeled probes from neonates that fed for 24 hours on WT and isogenic plants progressively silenced in JA-mediated defenses (N: nicotine; N/PI: N and trypsin protease inhibitors; JA: all JA-mediated defenses). H. virescens neonates regulated 16 times more genes than did M. sexta neonates when they fed on plants silenced in JA-mediated defenses, and for both species, the greater the number of defenses silenced in the host plant (JA > N/PI > N), the greater were the number of transcripts regulated in the larvae. M. sexta larvae tended to down-regulate while H. virescens larvae up- and down-regulated transcripts from the same functional categories of genes. M. sexta larvae regulated transcripts in a diet-specific manner, while H. virescens larvae regulated a similar suite of transcripts across all diet types. Conclusions/Significance The observations are consistent with the expectation that specialists are better adapted than generalist herbivores to the defense responses elicited in their host plants by their feeding. While M. sexta larvae appear to be better adapted to N. attenuata's defenses, some of the elicited responses remain effective defenses against both herbivore species. The regulated genes provide novel insights into larval adaptations to N. attenuata's induced defenses, and represent potential targets for plant-mediated RNAi to

  18. Multiplexed, targeted gene editing in Nicotiana benthamiana for glyco-engineering and monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Stoddard, Thomas J; Demorest, Zachary L; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Luo, Song; Clasen, Benjamin M; Cedrone, Frederic; Ray, Erin E; Coffman, Andrew P; Daulhac, Aurelie; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Biopharmaceutical glycoproteins produced in plants carry N-glycans with plant-specific residues core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose, which can significantly impact the activity, stability and immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we have employed sequence-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knock out two α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT) and the two β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) genes within Nicotiana benthamiana to generate plants with improved capacity to produce glycoproteins devoid of plant-specific residues. Among plants regenerated from N. benthamiana protoplasts transformed with TALENs targeting either the FucT or XylT genes, 50% (80 of 160) and 73% (94 of 129) had mutations in at least one FucT or XylT allele, respectively. Among plants regenerated from protoplasts transformed with both TALEN pairs, 17% (18 of 105) had mutations in all four gene targets, and 3% (3 of 105) plants had mutations in all eight alleles comprising both gene families; these mutations were transmitted to the next generation. Endogenous proteins expressed in the complete knockout line had N-glycans that lacked β(1,2)-xylose and had a significant reduction in core α(1,3)-fucose levels (40% of wild type). A similar phenotype was observed in the N-glycans of a recombinant rituximab antibody transiently expressed in the homozygous mutant plants. More importantly, the most desirable glycoform, one lacking both core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose residues, increased in the antibody from 2% when produced in the wild-type line to 55% in the mutant line. These results demonstrate the power of TALENs for multiplexed gene editing. Furthermore, the mutant N. benthamiana lines provide a valuable platform for producing highly potent biopharmaceutical products.

  19. Vascular invasion routes and systemic accumulation patterns of tobacco mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Cheng, N H; Su, C L; Carter, S A; Nelson, R S

    2000-08-01

    Plant viruses must enter the host vascular system in order to invade the young growing parts of the plant rapidly. Functional entry sites into the leaf vascular system for rapid systemic infection have not been determined for any plant/virus system. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) entry into minor, major and transport veins from non-vascular cells of Nicotiana benthamiana in source tissue and its exit from veins in sink tissue was studied using a modified virus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using a surgical procedure that isolated specific leaf and stem tissues from complicating vascular tissues, we determined that TMV could enter minor, major or transport veins directly from non-vascular cells to produce a systemic infection. TMV first accumulated in abaxial or external phloem-associated cells in major veins and petioles of the inoculated leaf and stems below the inoculated leaf. It also initially accumulated exclusively in internal or adaxial phloem-associated cells in stems above the inoculated leaf and petioles or major veins of sink leaves. This work shows the functional equivalence of vein classes in source leaves for entry of TMV, and the lack of equivalence of vein classes in sink leaves for exit of TMV. Thus, the specialization of major veins for transport rather than loading of photoassimilates in source tissue does not preclude virus entry. During transport, the virus initially accumulates in specific vascular-associated cells, indicating that virus accumulation in this tissue is highly regulated. These findings have important implications for studies on the identification of symplasmic domains and host macromolecule vascular transport. PMID:10929128

  20. A Multifunctional Protein Encoded by Turk