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Sample records for nih ceccr slu

  1. NIH Quickfinder

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov 1-800-352-9424 National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) www.ninr.nih.gov (301) 496-0207 Centers & Offices National Library of Medicine (NLM) www.nlm.nih.gov 1-888 FIND NLM Center for Information Technology (CIT) www.cit.nih.gov (301) 594-6248 ...

  2. Splicing regulator SLU7 is essential for maintaining liver homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Elizalde, María; Urtasun, Raquel; Azkona, María; Latasa, María U.; Goñi, Saioa; García-Irigoyen, Oihane; Uriarte, Iker; Segura, Victor; Collantes, María; Di Scala, Mariana; Lujambio, Amaia; Prieto, Jesús; Ávila, Matías A.; Berasain, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    A precise equilibrium between cellular differentiation and proliferation is fundamental for tissue homeostasis. Maintaining this balance is particularly important for the liver, a highly differentiated organ with systemic metabolic functions that is endowed with unparalleled regenerative potential. Carcinogenesis in the liver develops as the result of hepatocellular de-differentiation and uncontrolled proliferation. Here, we identified SLU7, which encodes a pre-mRNA splicing regulator that is inhibited in hepatocarcinoma, as a pivotal gene for hepatocellular homeostasis. SLU7 knockdown in human liver cells and mouse liver resulted in profound changes in pre-mRNA splicing and gene expression, leading to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, refractoriness to key metabolic hormones, and reversion to a fetal-like gene expression pattern. Additionally, loss of SLU7 also increased hepatocellular proliferation and induced a switch to a tumor-like glycolytic phenotype. Slu7 governed the splicing and/or expression of multiple genes essential for hepatocellular differentiation, including serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (Srsf3) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (Hnf4α), and was critical for cAMP-regulated gene transcription. Together, out data indicate that SLU7 is central regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence. PMID:24865429

  3. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov (301) 443-1124 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) www.niehs.nih.gov (919) 541- ... Public Liaison, NIH Christine Bruske , National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Vicky Cahan , National Institute on Aging Kym ...

  4. NIH Loses a Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. NIH Loses a Friend Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Donald ... changingthefaceofmedicine/ . Sincerely, Donald West King, M.D., Chairman Friends of the National Library of Medicine Let Us ...

  5. NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... who have disabilities from a TBI. NIH Studies TBI/PTSD Links Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is ... are studying the relationships between traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and PTSD. Fall 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number ...

  6. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group Past Issues / Winter 2016 ... ORWH) orwh.od.nih.gov (301) 402-1770 NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group Marin P. Allen, Ph.D., ...

  7. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... information 1-800-438-4380 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) www.niaaa.nih.gov (301) ... Public Liaison, NIH Shuly Babitz, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Joyce Backus, National Library of Medicine ( ...

  8. Doing business with the NIH

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Menachem, Gil; Ferguson, Steven M; Balakrishnan, Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Young biotech startups can benefit hugely from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), not least because of the agency's non-dilutive funding, guidance, and opportunities for collaboration. Increasingly, however, there is a fair bit of misunderstanding about what the NIH can and cannot do for a biotech entrepreneur. PMID:16475248

  9. Splicing Functions and Global Dependency on Fission Yeast Slu7 Reveal Diversity in Spliceosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shataparna; Khandelia, Piyush; Melangath, Geetha; Bashir, Samirul; Nagampalli, Vijaykrishna

    2013-01-01

    The multiple short introns in Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes with degenerate cis sequences and atypically positioned polypyrimidine tracts make an interesting model to investigate canonical and alternative roles for conserved splicing factors. Here we report functions and interactions of the S. pombe slu7+ (spslu7+) gene product, known from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human in vitro reactions to assemble into spliceosomes after the first catalytic reaction and to dictate 3′ splice site choice during the second reaction. By using a missense mutant of this essential S. pombe factor, we detected a range of global splicing derangements that were validated in assays for the splicing status of diverse candidate introns. We ascribe widespread, intron-specific SpSlu7 functions and have deduced several features, including the branch nucleotide-to-3′ splice site distance, intron length, and the impact of its A/U content at the 5′ end on the intron's dependence on SpSlu7. The data imply dynamic substrate-splicing factor relationships in multiintron transcripts. Interestingly, the unexpected early splicing arrest in spslu7-2 revealed a role before catalysis. We detected a salt-stable association with U5 snRNP and observed genetic interactions with spprp1+, a homolog of human U5-102k factor. These observations together point to an altered recruitment and dependence on SpSlu7, suggesting its role in facilitating transitions that promote catalysis, and highlight the diversity in spliceosome assembly. PMID:23754748

  10. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 301) 46-0357 Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) http://obssr.od.nih.gov (301) 402- ... officio) Christine Bruske, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences ... Research Mary Beth Kester, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging ...

  11. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Dennis Rodrigues , Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIH Chris Thomsen , National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Larry Thompson , National Human Genome Research Institute Anne Thurn, Ph.D ., Office ...

  12. Latest NIH Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Quit Smoking Latest NIH Research Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table ... with chest X-rays. Clinical Trials Related to Smoking Clinical trials are scientific studies that try to ...

  13. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... 370-2943 National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) www.nidcd.nih.gov 1-800-241- ... Lonnie Lisle , National Institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders Ann London , National Institute of Allergy and Infectious ...

  14. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 370-2943 National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) www.nidcd.nih.gov 1-800-241- ... Lonnie Lisle, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Ann London, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious ...

  15. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... 226-4267) National Institute of Biological Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov (301) 451-6772 ... Guay-Broder , National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Susan Johnson , National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial ...

  16. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  17. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... 451-6772 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx ... Ph.D. , National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Gregory Roa , National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and ...

  18. Memory and Forgetfulness: NIH Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Memory & Forgetfulness NIH Research Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... agency for research on Alzheimer's disease and related memory research. An analysis funded by the NIA finds ...

  19. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents To Find Out More MedlinePlus: Allergy medlineplus.gov/allergy.html MedlinePlus: Hay Fever medlineplus. ...

  20. NIH Clinical Research Trials and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Apply About Grants Policy & Compliance Grants News/Blog Contracts Loan Repayment More » Search the NIH Guide Quick Links RePORT eRA Commons NIH Common Fund NIH and the American Recovery Act News & Events News Releases Videos Images Events Social Media & Outreach More » Quick Links NIH News in ...

  1. Basic Science and The NIH

    PubMed Central

    Varmus, Harold

    1994-01-01

    The following is an edited version of the Keynote Speech delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology by Harold Varmus, Director of the National Institutes of Health. The address, entitled Basic Science and the NIH, was given at the opening of the meeting in New Orleans on December 11, 1993. It was Varmus' first public policy talk as NIH Director. PMID:8049519

  2. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Richard

    Biomedical imaging, and in particular MRI and CT, is often identified as among the top 10 most significant advances in healthcare in the 20th century. This presentation will describe some of the recent advances in medical physics and imaging being funded by NIH in this century and current funding opportunities. The presentation will also highlight the role of multidisciplinary research in bringing concepts from the physical sciences and applying them to challenges in biological and biomedical research.. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging.

  3. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 370-2943 National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) www.nidcd.nih.gov 1-800-241- ... Lonnie Lisle, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Ann London, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious ...

  4. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... information 1-800-438-4380 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) www.niaaa.nih.gov (301) ... and Skin Diseases Mark Siegal, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Ann Taubenheim, National Heart, Lung, and ...

  5. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22NIAMS (1-877-226-4267) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov ( ... General Medical Sciences Raymond MacDougall, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering John Ohab, National Human Genome ...

  6. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22NIAMS (1-877-226-4267) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov ( ... National Cancer Institute Thomas Johnson, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Kathy Kranzfelder, National Institute of ...

  7. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov (301) 443-1124 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) www.niehs.nih.gov (919) 541-3345 ... Supplements Christine Bruske Flowers, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Peter Garrett, National Cancer Institute Lenora Johnson, National ...

  8. NIH Consensus Conference. Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    1998-11-04

    for comment. Thereafter, the panel resolved conflicting recommendations and released a revised statement at the end of the conference. The panel finalized the revisions within a few weeks after the conference. The draft statement was made available on the World Wide Web immediately following its release at the conference and was updated with the panel's final revisions within a few weeks of the conference. The statement is available at http://consensus.nih.gov. Acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention is widely practiced in the United States. Although there have been many studies of its potential usefulness, many of these studies provide equivocal results because of design, sample size, and other factors. The issue is further complicated by inherent difficulties in the use of appropriate controls, such as placebos and sham acupuncture groups. However, promising results have emerged, for example, showing efficacy of acupuncture in adult postoperative and chemotherapy nausea and vomiting and in postoperative dental pain. There are other situations, such as addiction, stroke rehabilitation, headache, menstrual cramps, tennis elbow, fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, osteoarthritis, low back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and asthma, in which acupuncture may be useful as an adjunct treatment or an acceptable alternative or be included in a comprehensive management program. Further research is likely to uncover additional areas where acupuncture interventions will be useful.

  9. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... please call or go online as noted below: Institutes National Library of Medicine (NLM) www.nlm.nih.gov 1-888-FIND- ... Institute on Aging Kym Collins-Lee, National Eye Institute Kathleen Cravedi, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) Kate Egan, National Institute of Mental ...

  10. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... report promising results in prevention and treatment of Ebola virus disease (from left) NIH Director Dr. Francis ... Gallin exit the Clinical Center with recently discharged Ebola patient Nina Pham (next to Dr. Fauci). NIH's ...

  11. Back Cover: NIH MedlinePlus Salud

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues NIH MedlinePlus Salud Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. ¡A su salud! Los Institutos Nacionales de la Salud (NIH, por ...

  12. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH's National Human Genome Research Institute and the Smithsonian Institution developed the exhibition. Photo courtesy of Maggie Bartlett, ... NIH's National Human Genome Research Institute and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History developed the exhibition. ...

  13. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... cathepsin B. Working in the lab, Hyo Youl Moon and Henriette van Praag of NIH's National Institute ... sickness." This nausea and vomiting may be positive news. A recent NIH study links morning sickness to ...

  14. Thermal modeling of NiH2 batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponthus, Agnes-Marie; Alexandre, Alain

    1994-01-01

    The following are discussed: NiH2 battery mission and environment; NiH2 cell heat dissipation; Nodal software; model development general philosophy; NiH2 battery model development; and NiH2 experimental developments.

  15. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please call or go online as noted below: Institutes National Library of Medicine (NLM) www.nlm.nih.gov 1-888-FIND- ... Institute on Aging Kym Collins-Lee, National Eye Institute Kathleen Cravedi, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) Kate Egan, National Institute of Mental ...

  16. Demystifying the NIH Grant Application Process

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Karina M.; Gill, Thomas M.; Brown, Arleen F.; Zerzan, Judy; Elmore, Joann G.

    2007-01-01

    The process of applying to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for grant funding can be daunting. The objective of this article is to help investigators successfully navigate the NIH grant application process. We focus on the practical aspects of this process, which are commonly learned through trial and error. Our target audience is generalist faculty and fellows who are applying for NIH funding to support their career development or a clinical research project. PMID:17687616

  17. Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents NIH-Sponsored Research Asthma in the Inner City: Recognizing that asthma severity ...

  18. The Children's Inn at NIH Anniversary Key Messages | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Anniversary Key Messages Playground and Park at The Children's Inn at NIH. Photo courtesy of Mahan ...

  19. NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Concussion NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents Dr. ... chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). "Boxing, Football and the Brain" One study, funded in part by NIH, is ...

  20. Estimating the NIH Efficient Frontier

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is among the world’s largest investors in biomedical research, with a mandate to: “…lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability.” Its funding decisions have been criticized as insufficiently focused on disease burden. We hypothesize that modern portfolio theory can create a closer link between basic research and outcome, and offer insight into basic-science related improvements in public health. We propose portfolio theory as a systematic framework for making biomedical funding allocation decisions–one that is directly tied to the risk/reward trade-off of burden-of-disease outcomes. Methods and Findings Using data from 1965 to 2007, we provide estimates of the NIH “efficient frontier”, the set of funding allocations across 7 groups of disease-oriented NIH institutes that yield the greatest expected return on investment for a given level of risk, where return on investment is measured by subsequent impact on U.S. years of life lost (YLL). The results suggest that NIH may be actively managing its research risk, given that the volatility of its current allocation is 17% less than that of an equal-allocation portfolio with similar expected returns. The estimated efficient frontier suggests that further improvements in expected return (89% to 119% vs. current) or reduction in risk (22% to 35% vs. current) are available holding risk or expected return, respectively, constant, and that 28% to 89% greater decrease in average years-of-life-lost per unit risk may be achievable. However, these results also reflect the imprecision of YLL as a measure of disease burden, the noisy statistical link between basic research and YLL, and other known limitations of portfolio theory itself. Conclusions Our analysis is intended to serve as a proof-of-concept and starting point for applying quantitative methods to allocating biomedical research funding that are objective, systematic, transparent

  1. Estimating the NIH efficient frontier.

    PubMed

    Bisias, Dimitrios; Lo, Andrew W; Watkins, James F

    2012-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is among the world's largest investors in biomedical research, with a mandate to: "…lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability." Its funding decisions have been criticized as insufficiently focused on disease burden. We hypothesize that modern portfolio theory can create a closer link between basic research and outcome, and offer insight into basic-science related improvements in public health. We propose portfolio theory as a systematic framework for making biomedical funding allocation decisions-one that is directly tied to the risk/reward trade-off of burden-of-disease outcomes. Using data from 1965 to 2007, we provide estimates of the NIH "efficient frontier", the set of funding allocations across 7 groups of disease-oriented NIH institutes that yield the greatest expected return on investment for a given level of risk, where return on investment is measured by subsequent impact on U.S. years of life lost (YLL). The results suggest that NIH may be actively managing its research risk, given that the volatility of its current allocation is 17% less than that of an equal-allocation portfolio with similar expected returns. The estimated efficient frontier suggests that further improvements in expected return (89% to 119% vs. current) or reduction in risk (22% to 35% vs. current) are available holding risk or expected return, respectively, constant, and that 28% to 89% greater decrease in average years-of-life-lost per unit risk may be achievable. However, these results also reflect the imprecision of YLL as a measure of disease burden, the noisy statistical link between basic research and YLL, and other known limitations of portfolio theory itself. Our analysis is intended to serve as a proof-of-concept and starting point for applying quantitative methods to allocating biomedical research funding that are objective, systematic, transparent, repeatable, and expressly designed to reduce the burden of

  2. The NIH Human Microbiome Project.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jane; Garges, Susan; Giovanni, Maria; McInnes, Pamela; Wang, Lu; Schloss, Jeffery A; Bonazzi, Vivien; McEwen, Jean E; Wetterstrand, Kris A; Deal, Carolyn; Baker, Carl C; Di Francesco, Valentina; Howcroft, T Kevin; Karp, Robert W; Lunsford, R Dwayne; Wellington, Christopher R; Belachew, Tsegahiwot; Wright, Michael; Giblin, Christina; David, Hagit; Mills, Melody; Salomon, Rachelle; Mullins, Christopher; Akolkar, Beena; Begg, Lisa; Davis, Cindy; Grandison, Lindsey; Humble, Michael; Khalsa, Jag; Little, A Roger; Peavy, Hannah; Pontzer, Carol; Portnoy, Matthew; Sayre, Michael H; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Zakhari, Samir; Read, Jennifer; Watson, Bracie; Guyer, Mark

    2009-12-01

    The Human Microbiome Project (HMP), funded as an initiative of the NIH Roadmap for Biomedical Research (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov), is a multi-component community resource. The goals of the HMP are: (1) to take advantage of new, high-throughput technologies to characterize the human microbiome more fully by studying samples from multiple body sites from each of at least 250 "normal" volunteers; (2) to determine whether there are associations between changes in the microbiome and health/disease by studying several different medical conditions; and (3) to provide both a standardized data resource and new technological approaches to enable such studies to be undertaken broadly in the scientific community. The ethical, legal, and social implications of such research are being systematically studied as well. The ultimate objective of the HMP is to demonstrate that there are opportunities to improve human health through monitoring or manipulation of the human microbiome. The history and implementation of this new program are described here.

  3. The NIH Human Microbiome Project

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jane; Garges, Susan; Giovanni, Maria; McInnes, Pamela; Wang, Lu; Schloss, Jeffery A.; Bonazzi, Vivien; McEwen, Jean E.; Wetterstrand, Kris A.; Deal, Carolyn; Baker, Carl C.; Di Francesco, Valentina; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Karp, Robert W.; Lunsford, R. Dwayne; Wellington, Christopher R.; Belachew, Tsegahiwot; Wright, Michael; Giblin, Christina; David, Hagit; Mills, Melody; Salomon, Rachelle; Mullins, Christopher; Akolkar, Beena; Begg, Lisa; Davis, Cindy; Grandison, Lindsey; Humble, Michael; Khalsa, Jag; Little, A. Roger; Peavy, Hannah; Pontzer, Carol; Portnoy, Matthew; Sayre, Michael H.; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Zakhari, Samir; Read, Jennifer; Watson, Bracie; Guyer, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Human Microbiome Project (HMP), funded as an initiative of the NIH Roadmap for Biomedical Research (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov), is a multi-component community resource. The goals of the HMP are: (1) to take advantage of new, high-throughput technologies to characterize the human microbiome more fully by studying samples from multiple body sites from each of at least 250 “normal” volunteers; (2) to determine whether there are associations between changes in the microbiome and health/disease by studying several different medical conditions; and (3) to provide both a standardized data resource and new technological approaches to enable such studies to be undertaken broadly in the scientific community. The ethical, legal, and social implications of such research are being systematically studied as well. The ultimate objective of the HMP is to demonstrate that there are opportunities to improve human health through monitoring or manipulation of the human microbiome. The history and implementation of this new program are described here. PMID:19819907

  4. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Spring - Summer 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov (301) 443-1124 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) www.niehs.nih.gov (919) 541-3345 ... Medicine (ex-officio) Christine Bruske, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Vicky Cahan, National Institute on Aging Kym Collins- ...

  5. Regulation of transcription of the RNA splicing factor hSlu7 by Elk-1 and Sp1 affects alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Alberstein, Moti; Amit, Maayan; Vaknin, Keren; O'Donnell, Amanda; Farhy, Chen; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Shomron, Noam; Shaham, Ohad; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Ast, Gil

    2007-11-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in transcriptome diversity and plasticity, but it is largely unknown how tissue-specific and embryogenesis-specific alternative splicing is regulated. The highly conserved splicing factor Slu7 is involved in 3' splice site selection and also regulates alternative splicing. We show that Slu7 has a unique spatial pattern of expression among human and mouse embryonic and adult tissues. We identified several functional Ets binding sites and GC-boxes in the human Slu7 (hSlu7) promoter region. The Ets and GC-box binding transcription factors, Elk-1 and Sp1, respectively, exerted opposite effects on hSlu7 transcription: Sp1 protein enhances and Elk-1 protein represses transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Sp1 protein bound to the hSlu7 promoter in vivo, and depletion of Sp1 by RNA interference (RNAi) repressed hSlu7 expression. Elk-1 protein bound to the hSlu7 promoter in vivo, and depletion of Elk-1 by RNAi caused an increase in the endogenous level of hSlu7 mRNA. Further, depletion of either Sp1 or Elk-1 affected alternative splicing. Our results provide indications of a complex transcription regulation mechanism that controls the spatial and temporal expression of Slu7, presumably allowing regulation of tissue-specific alternative splicing events.

  6. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. Among those attending the NIH MedlinePlus magazine launch on Capitol Hill were (l-r) NIH ...

  7. NIH Research: Children Research Volunteers Receive Care and Help Advance Knowledge | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. NIH Research: Children Research Volunteers Receive Care and Help Advance Knowledge Past ... NIH Clinical Center. Photo: NIH Clinical Center Children research volunteers receive care and help advance knowledge I ...

  8. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Fall 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents For more information or ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Fall 2010 Issue: Volume 5 Number 3 Page 29

  9. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Winter 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  10. NIH Study Finds Regular Aspirin Use May Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH ... National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is ...

  11. Key Collaborations | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    DCCPS builds bridges across NIH and with other organizations by fostering partnerships on initiatives that emphasize and promote transdisciplinary team science, stretching across multiple disciplines and levels of analysis.

  12. NIH/NSF accelerate biomedical research innovations

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration between the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health will give NIH-funded researchers training to help them evaluate their scientific discoveries for commercial potential, with the aim of accelerating biomedical in

  13. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a healthy weight. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and NIH have partnered to add the ... charge of their weight and their health." Promising Method for Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer Nearly 50, ...

  14. Vasculitis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Vasculitis Vasculitis Past Issues / Fall 2016 Table of Contents A ... NIH Clinical Center. Photo: Ernie Branson What Is Vasculitis? It is a condition that involves inflammation in ...

  15. RACE, ETHNICITY, AND NIH RESEARCH AWARDS

    PubMed Central

    Ginther, Donna K.; Schaffer, Walter T.; Schnell, Joshua; Masimore, Beth; Liu, Faye; Haak, Laurel L.; Kington, Raynard

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between a U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 applicant’s self-identified race or ethnicity and the probability of receiving an award by using data from the NIH IMPAC II grant database, the Thomson Reuters Web of Science, and other sources. Although proposals with strong priority scores were equally likely to be funded regardless of race, we find that Asians are 4 percentage points and black or African-American applicants are 13 percentage points less likely to receive NIH investigator-initiated research funding compared with whites. After controlling for the applicant’s educational background, country of origin, training, previous research awards, publication record, and employer characteristics, we find that black or African-American applicants remain 10 percentage points less likely than whites to be awarded NIH research funding. Our results suggest some leverage points for policy intervention. PMID:21852498

  16. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/digitalprojects.html. Photo courtesy of NIH From DNA to Beer: A Unique Look at the Mighty ... drink we consume. The exhibition is called From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry. ...

  17. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  18. Skin Cancer: NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... making a person immune to his or her skin cancer cells. Another method is to train a person's ...

  19. Healthline | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of yoga. New Video Explores the Science of Yoga A new video from the NIH's National Center ... unique look at the increasingly popular practice of yoga. It highlights research that examines how yoga works, ...

  20. Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus magazine!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus magazine! Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... Produced by the National Institutes of Health, the magazine and its companion Web site medlineplus.gov are ...

  1. NIH Institutes and MLN MedlinePlus Advisory Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [1.9 mb] ... nih.gov (301) 496-7301 National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) www.nimh.nih.gov 1-866- ...

  2. NIH Institutes and MLN MedlinePlus Advisory Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [4.3 mb] ... nih.gov (301) 496-7301 National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) www.nimh.nih.gov 1-866- ...

  3. Monsanto may bypass NIH in microbe test.

    PubMed

    Sun, Marjorie

    1985-01-11

    The Monsanto Company is planning to ask the Environmental Protection Agency for clearance to field test a genetically engineered microbial pesticide, bypassing the traditional approval process of the National Institutes of Health. Although only federally funded institutions are required to obtain NIH approval for genetic engineering tests, Monsanto is the first company to bypass the NIH regulatory process, which has become mired in a lawsuit brought by Jeremy Rifkin.

  4. Pain assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Winnie; Griffith, James W.; Morrison, M. Tracy; Tanquary, Jennifer; Sabata, Dory; Victorson, David; Carey, Leeanne M.; MacDermid, Joy C.; Dudgeon, Brian J.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pain is an important component of health and function, and chronic pain can be a problem in its own right. The purpose of this report is to review the considerations surrounding pain measurement in the NIH Toolbox, as well as to describe the measurement tools that were adopted for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox assessment battery. Methods: Instruments to measure pain in the NIH Toolbox were selected on the basis of scholarly input from a diverse group of experts, as well as review of existing instruments, which include verbal rating scales, numerical rating scales, and graphical scales. Results: Brief self-report measures of pain intensity and pain interference were selected for inclusion in the core NIH Toolbox for use with adults. A 0 to 10 numerical rating scale was recommended for measuring pain intensity, and a 6-item Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) short form for measuring pain interference. The 8-item PROMIS Pediatric Pain Interference measure was recommended as a supplemental measure. No specific measure was recommended for measuring pain intensity in children. Conclusions: Core and supplemental measures were recommended for the NIH Toolbox. Additional measures were reviewed for investigators who seek tools for measuring pain intensity in pediatric samples. PMID:23479545

  5. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH "… deep compassion for those in need." ...

  6. From The Director | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... caught my attention came from the NIH-funded Diabetes Prevention Program trial, which found the combination of increased ... developed signs of pre-diabetes, the principles of diabetes prevention were firmly laid down by this NIH study. ...

  7. Clinical Research Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Clinical Study Find You How does clinical research work? Visit our website and click on New National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Research Awareness Website The NIH Clinical Center has joined ...

  8. The NIH-EPA Chemical Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Herbert J.; Andrews, Lawrence C.

    1979-01-01

    The NIH-EPA Chemical Information System (CIS) provides facilities useful for the characterization and identification of chemical substances in industrial, academic, regulatory, and emergency response environments. It is comprised of a variety of data bases, retrieval programs, and related processing and display programs with on-line interactive…

  9. NIH Extends Support for Genomics Catalog.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    Earlier this month the NIH announced plans to expand the scope of its Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project, better known as ENCODE. The new funds will support efforts to characterize gene regulatory elements in various cell types. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Research Initiatives | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides detailed information about currently funded RFA initiatives both led by DCCPS, and those led by other NIH Institutes and Centers (I/Cs) that include DCCPS as a partner. Each initiative includes a table of funded grants and a map that shows the location of funded institutions.

  11. Norming plans for the NIH Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Jennifer L; Havlik, Richard; Cook, Karon F; Hays, Ron D; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Korper, Samuel P; Lai, Jin-Shei; Nord, Christine; Zill, Nicholas; Choi, Seung; Yost, Kathleen J; Ustsinovich, Vitali; Brouwers, Pim; Hoffman, Howard J; Gershon, Richard

    2013-03-12

    The NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH Toolbox) is a comprehensive battery of brief assessment tools. The purpose of this article is to describe plans to establish normative reference values for the NIH Toolbox measures. A large sample will be obtained from the US population for the purpose of calculating normative values. The sample will be stratified by age (ages 3-85 years), sex, and language preference (English or Spanish) and have a total sample size of at least 4,205. The sample will include a minimum of 25-100 individuals in each targeted demographic and language subgroup. Norming methods will include poststratification adjustment calculated using iterative proportional fitting, also known as raking, so that the weighted sample will have the same distribution on key demographic variables as the US population described in the 2010 Census. As with any set of norms, users should be mindful of the reference population and make conclusions consistent with the limitations of normative sampling, since it is not a probability-based sample. However, the NIH Toolbox norming study has been designed to minimize bias and maximize representativeness and precision of estimates. The availability of a "toolbox" of normed measures will be an important foundation for addressing critical research questions in neurologic and behavioral health.

  12. Motor assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Magasi, Susan; McCreath, Heather E.; Bohannon, Richard W.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Bubela, Deborah J.; Rymer, William Z.; Beaumont, Jennifer; Rine, Rose Marie; Lai, Jin-Shei; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Motor function involves complex physiologic processes and requires the integration of multiple systems, including neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, and cardiopulmonary, and neural motor and sensory-perceptual systems. Motor-functional status is indicative of current physical health status, burden of disease, and long-term health outcomes, and is integrally related to daily functioning and quality of life. Given its importance to overall neurologic health and function, motor function was identified as a key domain for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH Toolbox). We engaged in a 3-stage developmental process to: 1) identify key subdomains and candidate measures for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox, 2) pretest candidate measures for feasibility across the age span of people aged 3 to 85 years, and 3) validate candidate measures against criterion measures in a sample of healthy individuals aged 3 to 85 years (n = 340). Based on extensive literature review and input from content experts, the 5 subdomains of dexterity, strength, balance, locomotion, and endurance were recommended for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox motor battery. Based on our validation testing, valid and reliable measures that are simultaneously low-cost and portable have been recommended to assess each subdomain, including the 9-hole peg board for dexterity, grip dynamometry for upper-extremity strength, standing balance test, 4-m walk test for gait speed, and a 2-minute walk test for endurance. PMID:23479547

  13. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Fall 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For more information or ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Fall 2009 Issue: Volume 4 Number 4 Page 29

  14. The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Medical Mysteries The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program Past Issues / Spring 2011 ... D. Green, M.D., Ph.D., director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The National ...

  15. The Children's Inn at NIH turns 25 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH turns 25 Past Issues / ... home …" for all families! What to Expect at The Children's Inn The Children's Inn enhances opportunities for ...

  16. The Children's Inn at NIH - Three Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH - Three Stories Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Kristal Nemeroff—The Patient Kristal Nemeroff, age 2, at the Children's ...

  17. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table ... Study of Allergic Diseases: This National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) program is to identify ...

  18. NIH Research on Treating Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Chronic Pain NIH Research on Treating Pain Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents Among the many research projects related to chronic pain that are under ...

  19. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Summer 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For an enhanced version ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Summer 2009 Issue: Volume 4 Number 3 Page 29

  20. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Winter 2011

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  1. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine | NIH ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents MLA ... From You We want your feedback on the magazine and ideas for future issues, as well as ...

  2. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers the...

  3. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers the...

  4. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers the...

  5. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers the...

  6. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers the...

  7. How to Write an NIH R13 Conference Grant Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonis, Jeffrey H.; Triffleman, Elisa; King, Lynda; King, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to provide recommendations for writing a successful R13 conference grant proposal for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Methods: The authors reviewed successful NIH conference grant proposal abstracts. They also reflect on their own experience in writing an NIH conference grant proposal and…

  8. How to Write an NIH R13 Conference Grant Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonis, Jeffrey H.; Triffleman, Elisa; King, Lynda; King, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to provide recommendations for writing a successful R13 conference grant proposal for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Methods: The authors reviewed successful NIH conference grant proposal abstracts. They also reflect on their own experience in writing an NIH conference grant proposal and…

  9. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the magazine NIH MedlinePlus the magazine is published quarterly, in print and on the ... up for a free subscription to NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Librarians may order this magazine in bulk . Please ...

  10. The Promise and Payoff of Rare Diseases Research, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. The Promise and Payoff of Rare Diseases Research, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past Issues / ... a critical role in funding the necessary applied research.” — NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins Any other diseases ...

  11. When it's cutback time at NIH...

    PubMed

    Siegel, B

    1985-01-01

    It's no secret that federal funds for any kind of social program are evaporating. But it's still hard to truly grasp the impact of it all until your own program has the rug pulled out from under it. Here's the story of a team of five research scientists that was close to developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease and other conditions when the National Institutes of Health (NIH), responding to Reagan Administration cutbacks, denied the project funds that had already been informally approved. Not only is it an object lesson for all nonprofit organizations and individual grantseekers--even those with no intention of applying to NIH for funds--but it also provides some behind-the-scenes looks at the human side of federal funding decisions.

  12. ADAMHA and NIH Research Grants to Psychologists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    psychology. The present study should therefore be of value in providing more detailed information on ADAMHA and NIH support for psychology research , in... psychology research policy. - V " SUMMARY This study examines trends in research grants to psychologists awarded by the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental...need for a consistent national policy toward psychology research , based on an objective appraisal of needs and priorities and the potential contribution

  13. Politicizing NIH funding: a bridge to nowhere.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Jonathan A

    2011-09-01

    We live in a time of increased spending, mounting debt, and few remedies for balancing the federal budget that have bipartisan support. Unfortunately, one recent target for decreased allocations of the federal budget is the NIH; the discussion of the awarded grants and the grant funding process has been skewed and altered to present medical research in an unfriendly light, and this can have very damaging repercussions. Politicizing this process could ultimately challenge human health, technology, and economic growth.

  14. Seeking NIH funding: Defining the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekim, Lana

    2003-04-01

    The presentation will provide a brief introduction to the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) with emphasis on the Voice and Speech program in the Division of Extramural Research. The process of seeking NIH funding will be outlined and a number of funding mechanisms will be described. The peer review process and the time course of a grant application will be highlighted.

  15. Young transplant surgeons and NIH funding.

    PubMed

    Englesbe, M J; Sung, R S; Segev, D L

    2011-02-01

    Transplant surgeons have historically been instrumental in advancing the science of transplantation. However, research in the current environment inevitably requires external funding, and the classic career development pathway for a junior investigator is the NIH K award. We matched transplant surgeons who completed fellowships between 1998 and 2004 with the NIH funding database, and also queried them regarding research effort and attitudes. Of 373 surgeons who completed a fellowship, only 6 (1.8%) received a K award; of these, 3 subsequently obtained R-level funding. An additional 5 individuals received an R-level grant within their first 5 years as faculty without a K award, 3 of whom had received a prior ASTS-sponsored award. Survey respondents reported extensive research experience during their training (78.8% spent median 24 months), a high proportion of graduate research degrees (36%), and a strong desire for more research time (78%). However, they reported clinical burdens and lack of mentorship as their primary perceived barriers to successful research careers. The very low rate of NIH funding for young transplant surgeons, combined with survey results that indicate their desire to participate in research, suggest institutional barriers to access that may warrant attention by the ASTS and the transplant surgery community. ©2010 The Authors Journal compilation©2010 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Cognition assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Dikmen, Sureyya S.; Heaton, Robert K.; Tulsky, David S.; Zelazo, Philip D.; Bauer, Patricia J.; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Fox, Nathan A.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Mungas, Dan; Nowinski, Cindy J.; Richler, Jennifer; Deocampo, Joanne A.; Anderson, Jacob E.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Borosh, Beth; Havlik, Richard; Conway, Kevin; Edwards, Emmeline; Freund, Lisa; King, Jonathan W.; Moy, Claudia; Witt, Ellen; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition is 1 of 4 domains measured by the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH-TB), and complements modules testing motor function, sensation, and emotion. On the basis of expert panels, the cognition subdomains identified as most important for health, success in school and work, and independence in daily functioning were Executive Function, Episodic Memory, Language, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Attention. Seven measures were designed to tap constructs within these subdomains. The instruments were validated in English, in a sample of 476 participants ranging in age from 3 to 85 years, with representation from both sexes, 3 racial/ethnic categories, and 3 levels of education. This report describes the development of the Cognition Battery and presents results on test-retest reliability, age effects on performance, and convergent and discriminant construct validity. The NIH-TB Cognition Battery is intended to serve as a brief, convenient set of measures to supplement other outcome measures in epidemiologic and longitudinal research and clinical trials. With a computerized format and national standardization, this battery will provide a “common currency” among researchers for comparisons across a wide range of studies and populations. PMID:23479546

  17. The Impact of NIH Postdoctoral Training Grants on Scientific Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Brian A.; Lefgren, Lars

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate the impact of receiving an NIH postdoctoral training grant on subsequent publications and citations. Our sample consists of all applications for NIH postdoctoral training grants (unsuccessful as well as successful) from 1980 to 2000. Both ordinary least squares and regression discontinuity estimates show that receipt of an NIH postdoctoral fellowship leads to about one additional publication over the next five years, which reflects a 20 percent increase in research productivity. PMID:21860538

  18. The Impact of NIH Postdoctoral Training Grants on Scientific Productivity.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Brian A; Lefgren, Lars

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we estimate the impact of receiving an NIH postdoctoral training grant on subsequent publications and citations. Our sample consists of all applications for NIH postdoctoral training grants (unsuccessful as well as successful) from 1980 to 2000. Both ordinary least squares and regression discontinuity estimates show that receipt of an NIH postdoctoral fellowship leads to about one additional publication over the next five years, which reflects a 20 percent increase in research productivity.

  19. The NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program data resource.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Lisa Helbling

    2012-06-01

    The NIH Roadmap Reference Epigenome Mapping Consortium is developing a community resource of genome-wide epigenetic maps in a broad range of human primary cells and tissues. There are large amounts of data already available, and a number of different options for viewing and analyzing the data. This report will describe key features of the websites where users will find data, protocols and analysis tools developed by the consortium, and provide a perspective on how this unique resource will facilitate and inform human disease research, both immediately and in the future.

  20. The NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program data resource

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Lisa Helbling

    2012-01-01

    The NIH Roadmap Reference Epigenome Mapping Consortium is developing a community resource of genome-wide epigenetic maps in a broad range of human primary cells and tissues. There are large amounts of data already available, and a number of different options for viewing and analyzing the data. This report will describe key features of the websites where users will find data, protocols and analysis tools developed by the consortium, and provide a perspective on how this unique resource will facilitate and inform human disease research, both immediately and in the future. PMID:22690667

  1. 77 FR 54584 - Final Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... nature, i.e., they are degraded within days. They recognized that the review of gene transfer protocols... current criteria for determining whether an experiment requires review under Section III-A-1-a are being... with NIH/OBA regarding a specific experiment that does not meet the criteria for review under Section...

  2. Studies Evaluating NIH Training Grant and Fellowship Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmstron, Engin I.

    The study describes current utilization of National Institute of Health (NIH) and National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) graduate training support of institutions, departments, and individuals; it also assesses the impact of possible or actual changes in funding mechanisms. Statistical data show that NIH average contributions vary from 8 to…

  3. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating and...

  4. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating and...

  5. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating and...

  6. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating and...

  7. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating and...

  8. Publishing Practices of NIH-Funded Faculty at MIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Courtney; Duranceau, Ellen Finnie; Gabridge, Tracy A.; Green, Remlee S.; Kajosalo, Erja; Noga, Michael M.; Silver, Howard J.; Stout, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Faculty and researchers who receive substantial funding from NIH were interviewed about their publication practices. Qualitative data was collected from interviews of eleven faculty members and one researcher representing six academic departments who received NIH funding. Interview responses were analyzed to identify a representative publication…

  9. Assessment of NIH Minority Research and Training Programs: Phase 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of NIH's programs for increasing the participation in biomedical science of individuals from underrepresented minority groups. The report examines, using available data and the results of a survey of NIH trainees, the characteristics and outcomes of programs at the undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral, and…

  10. NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine: Health, Medical & Wellness Articles

    MedlinePlus

    ... ve handled their health challenges. Sometimes it's the famous, like Nick Jonas, Randy Jackson or Mary Tyler Moore. But mostly, it's regular people who have turned to NIH for care and want to share their stories. Often, too, NIH scientists will write about their efforts to cure disease. ...

  11. The 50 Ah NiH2 CPV qualification tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, J. C.; Barnes, Wilbert L.; Hickman, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) started a program to qualify a large diameter common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) batteries for use on future Navy/NRL spacecraft electrical power subsystems. NRL's involvement with the qualification of CPV NiH2 batteries dates back to 1988 when COMSAT and Johnson Controls, Inc. initiated a joint effort to fly the first ever NiH2 CPV in space. A later NRL-JCI cooperative research and development agreement led to the launch of a space experiment in 1993 and to the use of a single NiH2 CPV battery on the BMDO Clementine spacecraft in 1994. NRL initiated procurement of two, 50 Ah CPV NiH2 batteries in the Fall of 1992. The two batteries were delivered to NRL in June 1994. NiH2 CPV batteries have almost 2x the specific energy (Wh/kg) of nickel cadium batteries and 2x the energy density (Wh/l) of individual pressure vessel NiH2 CPV's. This presentation discusses the results of electrical and mechanical qualification tests conducted at NRL. The tests included electrical characterization, standard capacity, random vibration, peak load, and thermal vacuum. The last slides of the presentation show initial results from the life cycle tests of the second NiH2 CPV battery at 40% depth of discharge and a temperature of 10 C.

  12. Congress OKs $2 Billion Boost for the NIH.

    PubMed

    2017-07-01

    President Donald Trump last week signed a $1.1 trillion spending bill for fiscal year 2017, including a welcome $2 billion boost for the NIH that will support former Vice President Joe Biden's Cancer Moonshot initiative, among other priorities. However, researchers who rely heavily on NIH grant funding remain concerned about proposed cuts for 2018. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  14. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  15. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  16. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  17. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  18. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  19. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  20. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  1. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  2. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  3. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - NIH MedlinePlus magazine Summer 2017

    MedlinePlus

    ... edition of NIH MedlinePlus magazine covers genetic testing, food allergies, as well as Alzheimer's disease. The cover features ... NIH is pursuing research to better understand how food allergies develop and progress. NIH MedlinePlus magazine explains food ...

  4. Gender differences in successful NIH grant funding in otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Kovalerchik, Olga; Baredes, Soly; Kalyoussef, Evelyne; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate gender differences in NIH funding among faculty in otolaryngology departments and discuss potential reasons for these differences. Analysis of NIH funding data available on the online NIH RePORTER system. Fiscal year 2011 and 2012 NIH funding awards to principal investigators (PIs) in otolaryngology departments were obtained and used to examine faculty listings from otolaryngology departments for academic rank and gender. The Scopus database was used to determine publication range of these faculty members. Individual mean NIH awards to men ($362,946 ± $21,247 standard error of mean) were higher than those to women ($287,188 ± $38,029). Male PIs were found to have higher mean NIH funding totals (aggregating grants for PIs with multiple awards) than female PIs ($498,593 vs $359,276). Upon organization by academic rank and years active, men had significantly higher funding levels at both the level of assistant professor and at 10 to 20 years of experience. Of all NIH grants awarded, men had a higher percentage of the more prestigious R-series grants (76.2%) than did women (63.4%). Male faculty members have higher NIH funding levels than their female colleagues, a disparity that exists separate from career longevity, as it is true both at the rank of assistant professor and for those with 10 to 20 years of research experience. The larger proportion of R-series NIH grants awarded to male faculty may contribute to this finding. This discrepancy in percentage and dollars of funding exists despite the increasing percentages of women in higher ranks.

  5. Be an NIH Reviewer: Contribute to Multidisciplinary Research.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Melinda L

    2017-07-01

    One of the best ways to contribute to multidisciplinary research and to improve your own knowledge of the review process at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is to serve as a peer reviewer for research, traineeship, and small business innovation research proposals. Proactive targeted outreach to Scientific Review Officers (SROs) at NIH will increase your chances to become a reviewer. Reviewers with nursing expertise are especially welcome as multidisciplinary research is becoming more prevalent. Steps to identify a likely study section, contact the correct SRO, and review responsibly are described in this article, written by an experienced NIH review officer.

  6. The Relationship Between OREF Grants and Future NIH Funding Success.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Vishal; Johansen, Daniel; Park, Howard Y; Zoller, Stephen D; Hamad, Christopher; Bernthal, Nicholas M

    2017-08-16

    The Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF) is the leading specialty-specific nongovernmental organization providing orthopaedic funding in the United States. As extramural research funding has become increasingly difficult to acquire, one mission of the OREF is to support investigators to generate data needed to secure larger extramural funding from agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the rate of translating OREF faculty-level grants into subsequent NIH funding and to determine if there are identifiable factors that increase the rate of converting an OREF grant into NIH funding. This is a retrospective review of OREF grants awarded to full-time faculty orthopaedic surgeons between 1994 and 2014. Grants were analyzed on the basis of award type and were categorized as basic science, clinical, or epidemiological. Sex, individual scholarly productivity, and publication experience were evaluated. All awardees were assessed for subsequent NIH funding using the NIH RePORTER web site. One hundred and twenty-six faculty-level OREF grants were awarded to 121 individuals. Twenty-seven OREF grant awardees (22%) received NIH funding at a mean of 6.3 years after OREF funding. Nineteen (46%) of 41 Career Development Grant winners later received NIH funding compared with 10 (12%) of 85 other award winners. OREF grants for basic science projects were awarded more often (58%) and were more than 4 times as likely to result in NIH funding than non-basic science projects (odds ratio, 4.70 [95% confidence interval, 1.66 to 13.33]; p = 0.0036). Faculty who later received NIH funding had higher scholarly productivity and publication experience (p < 0.05). The OREF grant awardee conversion rate of 22% and, particularly, the 46% for Career Development Grant winners compares favorably with the overall NIH funding success rate (18% in 2014). Faculty-level OREF grants appear to achieve their purpose of

  7. Vestibular function assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Michael C.; Whitney, Susan L.; Roberts, Dale; Redfern, Mark S.; Musolino, Mark C.; Roche, Jennica L.; Steed, Daniel P.; Corbin, Bree; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Marchetti, Greg F.; Beaumont, Jennifer; Carey, John P.; Shepard, Neil P.; Jacobson, Gary P.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Furman, Gabriel; Slotkin, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Development of an easy to administer, low-cost test of vestibular function. Methods: Members of the NIH Toolbox Sensory Domain Vestibular, Vision, and Motor subdomain teams collaborated to identify 2 tests: 1) Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA), and 2) the Balance Accelerometry Measure (BAM). Extensive work was completed to identify and develop appropriate software and hardware. More than 300 subjects between the ages of 3 and 85 years, with and without vestibular dysfunction, were recruited and tested. Currently accepted gold standard measures of static visual acuity, vestibular function, dynamic visual acuity, and balance were performed to determine validity. Repeat testing was performed to examine reliability. Results: The DVA and BAM tests are affordable and appropriate for use for individuals 3 through 85 years of age. The DVA had fair to good reliability (0.41–0.94) and sensitivity and specificity (50%–73%), depending on age and optotype chosen. The BAM test was moderately correlated with center of pressure (r = 0.42–0.48) and dynamic posturography (r = −0.48), depending on age and test condition. Both tests differentiated those with and without vestibular impairment and the young from the old. Each test was reliable. Conclusion: The newly created DVA test provides a valid measure of visual acuity with the head still and moving quickly. The novel BAM is a valid measure of balance. Both tests are sensitive to age-related changes and are able to screen for impairment of the vestibular system. PMID:23479540

  8. 2013 Awards Gala Event | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the National Library of Medicine 2013 Awards Gala Event Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents Capitol ... courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH 2013 Awards Gala Event! On September 10, the Friends held its annual ...

  9. 2014 Awards Gala Event | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the National Library of Medicine 2014 Awards Gala Event Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents Capitol ... courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH 2014 Awards Gala Event! On September 9, the Friends held its annual ...

  10. NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives Past Issues / Spring 2008 ... on. From childbirth to end-of-life care, nursing research is aimed at helping patients across the ...

  11. Diabetes Complications | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Complications Tailoring Diabetes Treatment to the Patient Past Issues / Fall 2012 ... been reported for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. How was the NIH involved? These are guidelines ...

  12. Cracking the Genetic Code | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Cracking the Genetic Code, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past ... moment in science in 2000: Cracking of the genetic code raised the prospect of pinpointing the root ...

  13. Mentoring In Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... school science student start a career at the National Institutes of Health? The answers to these and other questions were revealed at a lively all-day event, "Science Pathfinders at NLM/NIH," September 26, 2014, on ...

  14. Hope for Aphasia Patients | NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). NIH MedlinePlus magazine caught up with the ... Out More National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke ( ...

  15. Preventing Falls | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing Falls Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... next to your bed Free NIH Videos About Osteoporosis The NIHSeniorHealth Web site features five brief, informative ...

  16. Precision Medicine In Action | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Precision Medicine In Action Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of ... Dishman "I am totally motivated to support precision medicine because I am one of the early prototype ...

  17. Transforming Discovery into Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... behavioral and social sciences research initiative. Shortening the Pathway to Health Whatever the disease, be it depression, ... opportunities for NIH to shorten and straighten the pathway from discovery to health. This expectation is grounded ...

  18. Feature: Controlling Seasonal Allergies | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to allergens, helping to prevent allergic reactions. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Allergen and T-Cell Reagent Resources for the Study of Allergic Diseases: This National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases ( ...

  19. The NIH experience in first advancing fMRI.

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert

    2012-08-15

    The introduction of functional MRI at NIH in 1992 was the outcome of research goals first formulated by Turner in 1983. Between 1988 and 1990, Turner worked at NIH on actively-shielded gradient coils and the implementation of EPI-based techniques, especially diffusion-weighted EPI. His work on hypoxia in cat brain in 1990 directly inspired Ken Kwong's demonstration of BOLD contrast in humans at MGH in May 1991. Turner collaborated actively with this MGH team, the first group to map entirely noninvasively human brain activity due to visual stimulation. He introduced BOLD fMRI at NIH in February 1992. This paper reviews the steps that led up to BOLD EPI, and Turner's initial applications of BOLD fMRI at NIH.

  20. Protect Yourself Against HPV | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and his NIH colleague Dr. John Schiller. Both HPV vaccines, called Gardasil and Cervarix, protect against the two ... part of the throat (the oropharynx). Thus, the HPV vaccines should protect against all these forms of cancer. ...

  1. Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions Past Issues / ... Drug Abuse during their first Drug Facts Chat Day. Photo courtesy of NIDA The questions poured in… ...

  2. Understanding Food Allergy | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... recently took place in the United Kingdom. This led to changes in food allergy guidelines from NIH. ... a followup study, LEAP-ON, an expert panel led by NIAID reviewed the available evidence and recommended ...

  3. Symptoms, Treatment and Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects more than two million Americans," observes Mark Johnson, professor of biomedical and mechanical engineering at Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science. Johnson led the research, supported by NIH and other ...

  4. Total NIH support to US dental schools, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Lipton, J A; Kinane, D F

    2011-03-01

    This study compared total NIH research funding across US dental institutions from 2005 to 2009. Utilizing the online NIH RePORT, we obtained comprehensive award data for US dental schools by funding NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs). Fifty dental schools were awarded a total of $974.393 million, 69.3% from NIDCR and 30.7% from 21 other ICs. These provided the majority of support to 12 schools. Greater than 50% of non-NIDCR support came from 4 ICs. The median dental school NIH portfolio was $14.572 million, with a minimum of $0.241 million and a maximum of $88.609 million. Forty-six schools received $544.899 million for R01 awards. Thirty-five schools were awarded $100 million in research training and career development grants. Several dramatic differences are found for dental schools' rankings based on total NIH dollars compared with NIDCR-only support. Dollars from ICs other than NIDCR increased 34.6% between 2005 and 2009. Grants to US dental institutions comprised 50% or less of total NIDCR awards globally from 2005 through 2009. Funds received from all NIH ICs are an objective metric for evaluation of the research performance of dental schools. NIDCR has played a diminishing role in funding research at US dental schools between 2005 and 2009.

  5. New NIH-funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around the World | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New NIH-funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around ... on applying these devices," says Dr. Thomenius. "The new targets are primary care doctors, anesthesiologists, interventionalists, and ...

  6. Latest Research from NIH's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Oral Health Latest Research from NIH's National Institute of Dental ... on the full spectrum of topics related to oral health, including oral cancer, chronic pain conditions, salivary gland ...

  7. NIH Clinical Center: There’s No Other Hospital Like It | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH Clinical Center: There’s No Other Hospital Like It Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents The ... 600 laboratories that conduct clinical and basic research. It has seen more than 400,000 patients since ...

  8. Mobile Technology and Health Care, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Mobile Technology and Health Care, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Mobile health, or mHealth for short, uses mobile technologies for ...

  9. Friends of the National Library of Medicine, Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus, the magazine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contents Dear Readers, WELCOME to NIH MedlinePlus , the magazine. The purpose of NIH MedlinePlus , the magazine, is to provide you with a FREE , trusted ... medical information. Published four times a year, the magazine showcases the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) latest ...

  10. NIH Precision Medicine Initiative: Implications for Diabetes Research.

    PubMed

    Fradkin, Judith E; Hanlon, Mary C; Rodgers, Griffin P

    2016-07-01

    In his January 2015 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama announced a new Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) to personalize approaches toward improving health and treating disease (www.whitehouse.gov/precision-medicine). He stated that the goal of such an initiative was "to bring us closer to curing diseases like cancer and diabetes, and to give all of us access to the personalized information we need to keep ourselves and our families healthier." Since that time, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has taken a leadership role in implementing the President's vision related to biomedical research (www.nih.gov/precisionmedicine). Here, we discuss the NIH component of the PMI, related ongoing diabetes research, and near-term research that could position the diabetes field to take full advantage of the opportunities that stem from the PMI.

  11. NIH Precision Medicine Initiative: Implications for Diabetes Research

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Mary C.; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2016-01-01

    In his January 2015 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama announced a new Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) to personalize approaches toward improving health and treating disease (www.whitehouse.gov/precision-medicine). He stated that the goal of such an initiative was “to bring us closer to curing diseases like cancer and diabetes, and to give all of us access to the personalized information we need to keep ourselves and our families healthier.” Since that time, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has taken a leadership role in implementing the President’s vision related to biomedical research (www.nih.gov/precisionmedicine). Here, we discuss the NIH component of the PMI, related ongoing diabetes research, and near-term research that could position the diabetes field to take full advantage of the opportunities that stem from the PMI. PMID:27289128

  12. Hubble Space Telescope NiH2 six battery test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Thomas H.; Lanier, J. Roy

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of the test are: (1) to get a better understanding of the operating characteristics of the NiH2 batteries in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Electric Power Subsystem (EPS) by simulating every aspect of the expected operating environment; (2) to determine the optimum charge level and charge scheme for the NiH2 batteries in the HST EPS; (3) to predict the performance of the actual HST EPS; (4) to observe the aging characteristics of the batteries; and (5) to test different EPS anomalies before experiencing the anomalies on the actual HST.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope NiH2 six battery test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Thomas H.; Lanier, J. Roy

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of the test are: (1) to get a better understanding of the operating characteristics of the NiH2 batteries in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Electric Power Subsystem (EPS) by simulating every aspect of the expected operating environment; (2) to determine the optimum charge level and charge scheme for the NiH2 batteries in the HST EPS; (3) to predict the performance of the actual HST EPS; (4) to observe the aging characteristics of the batteries; and (5) to test different EPS anomalies before experiencing the anomalies on the actual HST.

  14. NIH Study Provides Clarity on Supplements for Protection Against Blinding Eye Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Act News & Events News Releases Videos Images Events Social Media & Outreach More » Quick Links NIH News in Health ... with Us Contact Us Bookmark & Share Email Updates Social Media & Outreach Twitter Facebook YouTube Footer NIH Home En ...

  15. New NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Medical Research That Benefits Everyone's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Medical Research ... Our goal is to advance biomedical research in new, innovative ways that will benefit everyone's health." — NIH ...

  16. Despite the Shutdown, Rescheduled NIH Research Festival Brings Science to the Forefront | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Although it was delayed by almost a month because of the federal shutdown, the NIH Research Festival still took place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., and attendance was high.

  17. Despite the Shutdown, Rescheduled NIH Research Festival Brings Science to the Forefront | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Although it was delayed by almost a month because of the federal shutdown, the NIH Research Festival still took place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., and attendance was high.

  18. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  19. 78 FR 50424 - NIH Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Program: Invitation To Solicit Nonclinical and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Program: Invitation To Solicit Nonclinical and Clinical Research Proposals From NIH Intramural Research Program... organizations); public and private foundations and nonprofit organizations to solicit research proposals from...

  20. To Your Health: NLM Update transcript - NIH MedlinePlus magazine Winter 2017

    MedlinePlus

    ... To Your Health: NLM Update Transcript NIH MedlinePlus magazine Winter 2017 : 03/06/2017 To use the ... weekly topics. The new edition of NIH MedlinePlus magazine covers pain management, breast cancer, as well as ...

  1. From the lab - Diet’s Role in Disease Risk | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [4.3 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  2. Questions and Answers about Psoriasis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [1.9 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  3. NIH Mulls Ways to Lure Back Veteran Peer Reviewers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Not long ago, academic scientists welcomed calls from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) asking them to volunteer as peer reviewers. Many were glad for the opportunity to help distribute billions of dollars in federal biomedical-research grants even though the service required a big time commitment--the equivalent of one month a year to…

  4. I. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): introduction and pediatric data.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Sandra; Bauer, Patricia J; Zelazo, Philip David; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Dikmen, Sureyya S; Heaton, Robert K; Tulsky, David S; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David L; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Havlik, Richard J; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Mungas, Dan; Manly, Jennifer J; Borosh, Beth G; Nowinski, Cindy J; Gershon, Richard C

    2013-08-01

    This monograph presents the pediatric portion of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB) of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function. The NIH Toolbox is an initiative of the Neuroscience Blueprint, a collaborative framework through which 16 NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices jointly support neuroscience-related research, to accelerate discoveries and reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. The CB is one of four modules that measure cognitive, emotional, sensory, and motor health across the lifespan. The CB is unique in its continuity across childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, and old age, and in order to help create a common currency among disparate studies, it is also available at low cost to researchers for use in large-scale longitudinal and epidemiologic studies. This chapter describes the evolution of the CB; methods for selecting cognitive subdomains and instruments; the rationale for test design; and a validation study in children and adolescents, ages 3-15 years. Subsequent chapters feature detailed discussions of each test measure and its psychometric properties (Chapters 2-6), the factor structure of the test battery (Chapter 7), the effects of age and education on composite test scores (Chapter 8), and a final summary and discussion (Chapter 9). As the chapters in this monograph demonstrate, the CB has excellent psychometric properties, and the validation study provided evidence for the increasing differentiation of cognitive abilities with age.

  5. How Is Psoriasis Treated? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Living with Psoriasis How Is Psoriasis Treated? Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents ... nih.gov/ Clinical Trials — www.clinicaltrials.gov National Psoriasis Foundation — www.psoriasis.org American Academy of Dermatology — ...

  6. The NIH and bioethics: what should be done?

    PubMed

    Emanuel, Ezekiel

    2008-06-01

    Despite the National Institute of Health's (NIH's) long tradition of engagement with and support of bioethics, the current support for bioethics is very small. Accordingly, trained bioethics researchers and bioethicists are in short supply, and fundamental ethical issues that relate to the NIH's mission go unexplored or insufficiently explored. A bioethics initiative with clearly articulated goals is needed, to increase the number and quality of "producer" bioethicists who would undertake innovative research and educate future generations of bioethicists and biomedical investigators. The author articulates a fourfold strategy for increased NIH support of bioethics: (1) educate and mentor sufficient numbers of producer bioethicists in well-designed postdoctoral programs; (2) support junior researchers with an increase in established K awards targeted at bioethics; (3) commit sufficient resources to ensure high-quality empirical and analytical bioethics research; and (4) develop dedicated study sections composed of qualified bioethicists to review bioethics-related grant proposals. An office, center, or authoritative body within the NIH accountable for bioethics-related activities is recommended by the author, to develop a strategic plan and to be accountable for generating high-quality research and scholarship.

  7. An NIH/Columbia University Information System Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Eskenazi, Solomon

    1976-01-01

    In this information system, sponsored research information is routinely forwarded, in machine-readable form, from NIH to Columbia, to the benefit of each. The promotion of future systems development is enhanced through the adoption of standardized data element designations and definitions. (LBH)

  8. Metrics associated with NIH funding: a high-level view

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective To introduce the availability of grant-to-article linkage data associated with National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and to perform a high-level analysis of the publication outputs and impacts associated with those grants. Design Articles were linked to the grants they acknowledge using the grant acknowledgment strings in PubMed using a parsing and matching process as embodied in the NIH Scientific Publication Information Retrieval & Evaluation System system. Additional data from PubMed and citation counts from Scopus were added to the linkage data. The data comprise 2 572 576 records from 1980 to 2009. Results The data show that synergies between NIH institutes are increasing over time; 29% of current articles acknowledge grants from multiple institutes. The median time lag to publication for a new grant is 3 years. Each grant contributes to approximately 1.7 articles per year, averaged over all grant types. Articles acknowledging US Public Health Service (PHS, which includes NIH) funding are cited twice as much as US-authored articles acknowledging no funding source. Articles acknowledging both PHS funding and a non-US government funding source receive on average 40% more citations that those acknowledging PHS funding sources alone. Conclusion The US PHS is effective at funding research with a higher-than-average impact. The data are amenable to further and much more detailed analysis. PMID:21527408

  9. Ni-H2 cell characterization for INTELSAT programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunnet, Andrew F.; Earl, Martin W.

    1994-01-01

    Various Ni/H2 cell designs manufactured for INTELSAT Programs during the past decade have been characterized electrically as a function of temperature. The resulting data for these INTELSAT V, VI, VII and VIIA cells are assembled in a manner which allows ready comparison of performance. Also included is a detailed description of each design.

  10. NIH Turns Blind Eye to Academics' Financial Conflicts, Audit Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Hundreds of financial conflicts of interest among university researchers have not been investigated by the National Institutes of Health, an agency that should police them, according to a new audit report. The report, by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services--NIH's parent agency--describes a dysfunctional system that…

  11. NIH funding in Radiation Oncology – A snapshot

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Michael; McBride, William H.; Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Currently, pay lines for NIH grants are at a historical low. In this climate of fierce competition knowledge about the funding situation in a small field like Radiation Oncology becomes very important for career planning and recruitment of faculty. Unfortunately, this data cannot be easily extracted from the NIH s database because it does not discriminate between Radiology and Radiation Oncology Departments. At the start of fiscal year 2013, we extracted records for 952 individual grants, which were active at the time of analysis from the NIH database. Proposals originating from Radiation Oncology Departments were identified manually. Descriptive statistics were generated using the JMP statistical software package. Our analysis identified 197 grants in Radiation Oncology. These proposals came from 134 individual investigators in 43 academic institutions. The majority of the grants (118) were awarded to PIs at the Full Professor level and 122 PIs held a PhD degree. In 79% of the grants the research topic fell into the field of Biology, in 13 % into the field of Medical Physics. Only 7.6% of the proposals were clinical investigations. Our data suggests that the field of Radiation Oncology is underfunded by the NIH, and that the current level of support does not match the relevance of Radiation Oncology for cancer patients or the potential of its academic work force. PMID:23523324

  12. NIH Turns Blind Eye to Academics' Financial Conflicts, Audit Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Hundreds of financial conflicts of interest among university researchers have not been investigated by the National Institutes of Health, an agency that should police them, according to a new audit report. The report, by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services--NIH's parent agency--describes a dysfunctional system that…

  13. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  14. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  15. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  16. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  17. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  18. NIH Casts Critical Eye on How It Gives Grants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health's methods for reviewing and financing academic research proposals are often praised as the gold standard. Some American scientists, though, have recently offered less flattering descriptions, like "broken" and "arbitrary." NIH officials have heard both arguments, and plenty in between, in recent months. They have…

  19. NIH Peer Review: Scored Review Criteria and Overall Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Mark D.; Vancea, Adrian; Chen, Mei-Ching; Chacko, George

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest source of funding for biomedical research in the world. Funding decisions are made largely based on the outcome of a peer review process that is intended to provide a fair, equitable, timely, and unbiased review of the quality, scientific merit, and potential impact of the research. There have…

  20. NIH Casts Critical Eye on How It Gives Grants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health's methods for reviewing and financing academic research proposals are often praised as the gold standard. Some American scientists, though, have recently offered less flattering descriptions, like "broken" and "arbitrary." NIH officials have heard both arguments, and plenty in between, in recent months. They have…

  1. I. NIH TOOLBOX COGNITION BATTERY (CB): INTRODUCTION AND PEDIATRIC DATA*

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Sandra; Bauer, Patricia J.; Zelazo, Philip David; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Dikmen, Sureyya S.; Heaton, Robert K.; Tulsky, David S.; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David L.; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Havlik, Richard J.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Mungas, Dan; Manly, Jennifer J.; Borosh, Beth G.; Nowinski, Cindy J.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    This monograph presents the pediatric portion of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB) of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function. The NIH Toolbox is an initiative of the Neuroscience Blueprint, a collaborative framework through which 16 NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices jointly support neuroscience-related research, to accelerate discoveries and reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. The CB is one of four modules that measure cognitive, emotional, sensory, and motor health across the lifespan. The CB is unique in its continuity across childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, and old age, and in order to help create a common currency among disparate studies, it is also available at low cost to researchers for use in large-scale longitudinal and epidemiologic studies. This chapter describes the evolution of the CB; methods for selecting cognitive subdomains and instruments; the rationale for test design; and a validation study in children and adolescents, ages 3–15 years. Subsequent chapters feature detailed discussions of each test measure and its psychometric properties (Chapters 2–6), the factor structure of the test battery (Chapter 7), the effects of age and education on composite test scores (Chapter 8), and a final summary and discussion (Chapter 9). As the chapters in this monograph demonstrate, the CB has excellent psychometric properties, and the validation study provided evidence for the increasing differentiation of cognitive abilities with age. PMID:23952199

  2. NIH researchers complete whole-exome sequencing of skin cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A team led by researchers at NIH is the first to systematically survey the landscape of the melanoma genome, the DNA code of the deadliest form of skin cancer. The researchers have made surprising new discoveries using whole-exome sequencing, an approach that decodes the 1-2 percent of the genome that contains protein-coding genes.

  3. NIH Peer Review: Scored Review Criteria and Overall Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Mark D.; Vancea, Adrian; Chen, Mei-Ching; Chacko, George

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest source of funding for biomedical research in the world. Funding decisions are made largely based on the outcome of a peer review process that is intended to provide a fair, equitable, timely, and unbiased review of the quality, scientific merit, and potential impact of the research. There have…

  4. NIH Health Disparities Strategic Plan, Fiscal Years 2004-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Human Genome Research Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) led the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) contribution to the International Human Genome Project, whose primary goal was the sequencing of the human genome. This project was successfully completed in April 2003. Now, the NHGRI's mission is focused on a broad range of studies aimed at…

  5. NiH2 Battery Reconditioning for LEO Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, J. D.; Hafen, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes reasons for and benefits of reconditioning nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) batteries used for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) applications. NiH2 battery cells do not have the classic discharge voltage problems more commonly associated with nickel-cadmium (NiCd) cells. This is due, in part, to use of hydrogen electrodes in place of cadmium electrodes. The nickel electrode, however, does have a similar discharge voltage signature for both cell designs. This can have an impact on LEO applications where peak loads at higher relative depths of discharge can impact operations. Periodic reconditioning provides information which can be used for analyzing long term performance trends to predict usable capacity to a specified voltage level. The reconditioning process described herein involves discharging NiH2 batteries at C/20 rates or less, to an average cell voltage of 1.0 volts or less. Recharge is performed at nominal C/5 rates to specified voltage/temperature (V/T) charge levels selected to restore required capacity with minimal overcharge. Reconditioning is a process of restoring reserve capacity lost on cycling, which is commonly called the memory effect in NiCd cells. This effect is characterized by decreases in the discharge voltage curve with operational life and cycling. The end effect of reconditioning NiH2 cells may be hidden in the versatility, of that design over the NiCd cell design and its associated negative electrode fading problem. The process of deep discharge at lower rates by way of reconditioning tends to redistribute electrolyte and water in the NiH2 cell electrode stack, while improving utilization and charge efficiency. NiH2 battery reconditioning effects on life are considered beneficial and may, in fact. extend life based on NiCd experience. In any case, usable capacity data obtained from reconditioning is required for performance evaluation and trend analysis. Characterization and life tests have provided the historical data base used to

  6. Predictors of negotiated NIH indirect rates at US institutions.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S Claiborne; Desmond-Hellmann, Susan; Hauser, Stewart; Vermillion, Eric; Mia, Nilo

    2015-01-01

    The United States (US) Department of Health and Human Services and the Office of Naval Research negotiate institutional rates for payments of overhead costs associated with administration and space usage, commonly known as indirect rates. Such payments account for a large proportion of spending by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Little has been published about differences in rates and their predictors. Negotiated indirect rates for on-campus research grants were requested from the Council on Governmental Relations for the 100 institutions with greatest NIH funding in 2010. NIH funding, cost of living (ACCRA Index for 2008), public vs. private status, negotiating governmental organization (Department of Health and Human Services or Office of Naval Research), US Census Region, and year were assessed as predictors of institutional indirect rates using generalized estimating equations with all variables included in the model. Overall, 72 institutions participated, with 207 reported indirect rates for the years 2006, 2008, and 2010. Indirect rates ranged from 36.3% to 78%, with an average of 54.5%. Mean rates increased from 53.6% in 2006 to 55.4% in 2010 (p<0.001). In multivariable models, private institutions had 6.2% (95% CI 3.7%-8.7%; p<0.001) higher indirect rates than public institutions. Rates in the Northeast were highest (Midwest 4.0% lower; West 4.9% lower; South 5.2% lower). Greater NIH funding (p = 0.025) and cost of living (p = 0.034) also predicted indirect rates while negotiating governmental organization did not (p = 0.414). Negotiated indirect rates for governmental research grants to academic centers vary widely. Although the association between indirect rates and cost of living may be justified, the cause of variation in rates by region, public-private status, and NIH funding levels is unclear.

  7. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) ACTION: Notice of consideration of proposed...- vector system may be certified only after review by the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and...

  8. NIH workshop summary: shaping the development of an iodine research initiative for the U.S.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at NIH sponsored a workshop May 12–13, 2011, to bring together representatives from various NIH Institutes and Centers as a first step in developing an NIH iodine initiative. The workshop also provided an opportunity to identify research needs that would infor...

  9. Perspective: is NIH funding the "best science by the best scientists"? A critique of the NIH R01 research grant review policies.

    PubMed

    Costello, Leslie C

    2010-05-01

    Clinical and experimental biomedical research provides the foundation for advances in medicine, health, and the welfare of the public. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the major agency providing funding for biomedical research. The stated objectives of the NIH for funding research grants (R01s) are to "fund the best science, by the best scientists" and "to see that NIH grant applications receive fair, independent, expert, and timely reviews-free from inappropriate influences-so NIH can fund the most promising research." The NIH recently reviewed and identified issues involved with the study section peer review process that compromise the achievement of these laudable and important objectives. Consequently, the NIH has and continues to issue new guidelines and requirements relating to the R01 grant review process. The author argues that some of these NIH directives conflict with and counteract the achievement of the NIH's stated objectives. The author further contends that the directives introduce discrimination into the review process. Such conditions impede the funding of the best science by the best scientists, while funding lesser-quality research. The NIH should eliminate all directives that prevent R01 grants from being awarded solely to the highest-quality research. This is in the best interest of the biomedical community and the health and welfare of the public at large.

  10. Managing the electronic NIH-guide for grants and contracts.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P R; Gottesman, S; Jones, W K

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a suite of computer programs to manage and provide access to a database containing the electronic documents that constitute the NIH-Guide that is distributed by the NIH on a weekly basis. The software consists of a management program that reads, processes, and stores the incoming documents and performs erratum updates on existing documents; an alerting program that sends selected information to users who have registered their information needs; a viewer that can be used on the local computer to read these documents; and a World-Wide-Web (WWW) server that can distribute the guide to computers that run WWW client software. The design of the documentation annotations, the management software, and the WWW server are expected to constitute valuable models for similar projects in the future. PMID:7743321

  11. Reliability study of the NiH2 strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Glenn C.; Rash, Donald E., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes a joint study by Gates Aerospace Batteries (GAB) and the Reliability Analysis Center (RAC). This study characterizes the reliability and robustness of the temperature compensated strain gages currently specified for sensing of internal pressure of NiH2 cells. These strain gages are characterized as fully encapsulated, metallic foil grids with known resistance that varies with deformation. The measurable deformation, when typically installed on the hemispherical portion of a NiH2 cell, is proportional to the material stresses as generated by internal cell pressures. The internal pressure sensed in this manner is calibrated to indicate the state-of-charge for the cell. This study analyzes and assesses both robustness and reliability for the basic design of the strain gage, the installation of the strain gage, and the circuitry involved.

  12. III. NIH TOOLBOX COGNITION BATTERY (CB): MEASURING EPISODIC MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Dikmen, Sureyya S.; Heaton, Robert K.; Mungas, Dan; Slotkin, Jerry; Beaumont, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant domains of cognition is episodic memory, which allows for rapid acquisition and long-term storage of new information. For purposes of the NIH Toolbox, we devised a new test of episodic memory. The nonverbal NIH Toolbox Picture Sequence Memory Test (TPSMT) requires participants to reproduce the order of an arbitrarily ordered sequence of pictures presented on a computer. To adjust for ability, sequence length varies from 6 to 15 pictures. Multiple trials are administered to increase reliability. Pediatric data from the validation study revealed the TPSMT to be sensitive to age-related changes. The task also has high test– retest reliability and promising construct validity. Steps to further increase the sensitivity of the instrument to individual and age-related variability are described. PMID:23952201

  13. Dietary supplement research portfolio at the NIH, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cazarin, Mary L; Wambogo, Edwina A; Regan, Karen S; Davis, Cindy D

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. dietary supplement market increased by 7.5% in 2012 compared with 2011, reaching $32.5 billion in sales. Therefore, federally supported research on dietary supplements is important to determine their health effects, safety, and efficacy. A portfolio analysis was performed across the NIH and the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) for fiscal years (FYs) 2009-2011 by using the databases Human Nutrition Research Information Management (HNRIM) and Computer Access to Research on Dietary Supplements (CARDS). The results indicated that total NIH dietary supplement-related funding for FYs 2009-2011 was $855 million ($295 million in 2009, $311 million in 2010, and $249 million in 2011). The institutes and centers with the highest investment in dietary supplement research were as follows: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ($135 million); the National Cancer Institute ($188 million); the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine ($99 million); the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases ($68 million); the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences ($58 million); and the ODS ($32 million). The dietary supplement ingredients receiving the most funding were botanicals (22%), vitamins (20%), lipids (14%), and minerals and trace elements (10%). The top 3 outcome research areas were cancer (61% of total dietary supplement investment), cardiovascular disease (47%), and women's reproductive health (38%). In FYs 2009, 2010, and 2011, the ODS provided 3.5%, 3.6%, and 4.1%, respectively, of the NIH investment in dietary supplement research. ODS funding focused on cellular, enzymatic, or molecular mechanisms (64% of total ODS funding). This portfolio analysis demonstrates that the NIH has committed substantial funding to dietary supplement research in an effort to expand the scientific knowledge base on the efficacy and safety of dietary supplements.

  14. Dietary Supplement Research Portfolio at the NIH, 2009–201112

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Cazarin, Mary L.; Wambogo, Edwina A.; Regan, Karen S.; Davis, Cindy D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. dietary supplement market increased by 7.5% in 2012 compared with 2011, reaching $32.5 billion in sales. Therefore, federally supported research on dietary supplements is important to determine their health effects, safety, and efficacy. A portfolio analysis was performed across the NIH and the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) for fiscal years (FYs) 2009–2011 by using the databases Human Nutrition Research Information Management (HNRIM) and Computer Access to Research on Dietary Supplements (CARDS). The results indicated that total NIH dietary supplement–related funding for FYs 2009–2011 was $855 million ($295 million in 2009, $311 million in 2010, and $249 million in 2011). The institutes and centers with the highest investment in dietary supplement research were as follows: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ($135 million); the National Cancer Institute ($188 million); the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine ($99 million); the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases ($68 million); the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences ($58 million); and the ODS ($32 million). The dietary supplement ingredients receiving the most funding were botanicals (22%), vitamins (20%), lipids (14%), and minerals and trace elements (10%). The top 3 outcome research areas were cancer (61% of total dietary supplement investment), cardiovascular disease (47%), and women’s reproductive health (38%). In FYs 2009, 2010, and 2011, the ODS provided 3.5%, 3.6%, and 4.1%, respectively, of the NIH investment in dietary supplement research. ODS funding focused on cellular, enzymatic, or molecular mechanisms (64% of total ODS funding). This portfolio analysis demonstrates that the NIH has committed substantial funding to dietary supplement research in an effort to expand the scientific knowledge base on the efficacy and safety of dietary supplements. PMID:24523489

  15. The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program: Insights into Rare Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gahl, William A.; Markello, Thomas C.; Toro, Camilo; Fajardo, Karin Fuentes; Sincan, Murat; Gill, Fred; Carlson-Donohoe, Hannah; Gropman, Andrea; Pierson, Tyler Mark; Golas, Gretchen; Wolfe, Lynne; Groden, Catherine; Godfrey, Rena; Nehrebecky, Michele; Wahl, Colleen; Landis, Dennis M. D.; Yang, Sandra; Madeo, Anne; Mullikin, James C; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Tifft, Cynthia J.; Adams, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This report describes the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP), details the Program's application of genomic technology to establish diagnoses, and details the Program's success rate over its first two years. Methods Each accepted study participant was extensively phenotyped. A subset of participants and selected family members (29 patients and 78 unaffected family members) was subjected to an integrated set of genomic analyses including high-density SNP arrays and whole exome or genome analysis. Results Of 1191 medical records reviewed, 326 patients were accepted and 160 were admitted directly to the NIH Clinical Center on the UDP service. Of those, 47% were children, 55% were females, and 53% had neurological disorders. Diagnoses were reached on 39 participants (24%) on clinical, biochemical, pathological, or molecular grounds; 21 diagnoses involved rare or ultra-rare diseases. Three disorders were diagnosed based upon SNP array analysis and three others using WES and filtering of variants. Two new disorders were discovered. Analysis of the SNP-array study cohort revealed that large stretches of homozygosity were more common in affected participants relative to controls. Conclusions The NIH UDP addresses an unmet need, i.e., the diagnosis of patients with complex, multisystem disorders. It may serve as a model for the clinical application of emerging genomic technologies, and is providing insights into the characteristics of diseases that remain undiagnosed after extensive clinical workup. PMID:22237431

  16. Writing a Successful NIH Mentored Career Development Grant (K Award)

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Surgery is a labor-intensive, time-consuming profession. Young faculty members in surgery are saddled with many clinical time constraints that often allow precious few moments for academic pursuits. Consequently, K award submissions from surgeons trail nonsurgeons. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), however, is actively trying to encourage participation of surgeons in basic science research, translational research, clinical outcomes research, and even in prevention/control research. But, at the same time, the NIH has newly implemented a policy that has made the grant review process more restrictive by only allowing 2 submissions of any grant application. It is imperative, therefore, for junior faculty surgeons to learn “grantsmanship” and have the ability to construct succinct, competitive K award grants. Although most of this information is public knowledge and made available by the NIH itself, many of the practical points presented here are tailored to the special needs of clinically active surgical researchers. Often, these “hints” are buried on expansive websites that require considerable time to read and navigate. The authors have a long combined experience on a study section dedicated to adjudicating K awards. The goal of this review is to present concise, useful information about common errors, research plan dos and don’ts, template examples of superior mentored letters, and many other suggestions that may assist any first-time candidate for these awards. PMID:20485135

  17. Technologies and experimental approaches in the NIH Botanical Research Centers

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Stephen; Birt, Diane F; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cefalu, William T; Chilton, Floyd H; Farnsworth, Norman R; Raskin, Ilya; van Breemen, Richard B; Weaver, Connie M

    2009-01-01

    There are many similarities between research on combinatorial chemistry and natural products and research on dietary supplements and botanicals in the NIH Botanical Research Centers. The technologies in the centers are similar to those used by other NIH-sponsored investigators. All centers rigorously examine the authenticity of botanical dietary supplements and determine the composition and concentrations of the phytochemicals therein, most often by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Several of the centers specialize in fractionation and high-throughput evaluation to identify the individual bioactive agent or a combination of agents. Some centers are using DNA microarray analyses to determine the effects of botanicals on gene transcription with the goal of uncovering the important biochemical pathways they regulate. Other centers focus on bioavailability and uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of the phytochemicals as for all xenobiotics. Because phytochemicals are often complex molecules, synthesis of isotopically labeled forms is carried out by plant cells in culture, followed by careful fractionation. These labeled phytochemicals allow the use of accelerator mass spectrometry to trace the tissue distribution of 14C-labeled proanthocyanidins in animal models of disease. State-of-the-art proteomics and mass spectrometry are also used to identify proteins in selected tissues whose expression and posttranslational modification are influenced by botanicals and dietary supplements. In summary, the skills needed to carry out botanical centers’ research are extensive and may exceed those practiced by most NIH investigators. PMID:18258642

  18. NIH oversight of human gene transfer research involving retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated virus vectors and the role of the NIH recombinant DNA advisory committee.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Marina; Shipp, Allan; Rosenthal, Eugene; Jambou, Robert; Shih, Tom; Montgomery, Maureen; Gargiulo, Linda; Patterson, Amy; Corrigan-Curay, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    In response to public and scientific concerns regarding human gene transfer research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) developed a transparent oversight system that extends to human gene transfer protocols that are either conducted with NIH funding or conducted at institutions that receive NIH funding for recombinant DNA research. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) has been the primary advisory body to NIH regarding the conduct of this research. Human gene transfer research proposals that are subject to the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) must be submitted to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA), and protocols that raise novel scientific, safety, medical, ethical, or social issues are publicly discussed at the RAC's quarterly public meetings. OBA also convenes gene transfer safety symposia and policy conferences to provide a public forum for scientific experts to discuss emerging issues in the field. This transparent system of review promotes the rapid exchange of important scientific information and dissemination of data. The goal is to optimize the conduct of individual research protocols and to advance gene transfer research generally. This process has fostered the development of retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vector mediated gene delivery.

  19. Calculation of thermodynamic, electronic, and optical properties of monoclinic Mg2NiH4

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.R.; Richardson, T.J.; Rubin, M.D.; Wang, L-W.

    2001-10-01

    Ab initio total-energy density functional theory is used to investigate the low temperature (LT) monoclinic form of Mg2NiH4. The calculated minimum energy geometry of LT Mg2NiH4 is close to that determined from neutron diffraction data, and the NiH4 complex is close to a regular tetrahedron. The enthalpies of the phase change to high temperature (HT) pseudo-cubic Mg2NiH4 and of hydrogen absorption by Mg2Ni are calculated and compared with experimental values. LT Mg2NiH4 is found to be a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 1.4 eV. The optical dielectric function of LT Mg2NiH4 differs somewhat from that of the HT phase. A calculated thin film transmittance spectrum is consistent with an experimental spectrum.

  20. Examining the Predictive Validity of NIH Peer Review Scores.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Mark D; Nakamura, Richard K

    2015-01-01

    The predictive validity of peer review at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has not yet been demonstrated empirically. It might be assumed that the most efficient and expedient test of the predictive validity of NIH peer review would be an examination of the correlation between percentile scores from peer review and bibliometric indices of the publications produced from funded projects. The present study used a large dataset to examine the rationale for such a study, to determine if it would satisfy the requirements for a test of predictive validity. The results show significant restriction of range in the applications selected for funding. Furthermore, those few applications that are funded with slightly worse peer review scores are not selected at random or representative of other applications in the same range. The funding institutes also negotiate with applicants to address issues identified during peer review. Therefore, the peer review scores assigned to the submitted applications, especially for those few funded applications with slightly worse peer review scores, do not reflect the changed and improved projects that are eventually funded. In addition, citation metrics by themselves are not valid or appropriate measures of scientific impact. The use of bibliometric indices on their own to measure scientific impact would likely increase the inefficiencies and problems with replicability already largely attributed to the current over-emphasis on bibliometric indices. Therefore, retrospective analyses of the correlation between percentile scores from peer review and bibliometric indices of the publications resulting from funded grant applications are not valid tests of the predictive validity of peer review at the NIH.

  1. The Pilot Phase of the NIH Chemical Genomics Center

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Craig J.; Auld, Douglas S.; Huang, Ruili; Huang, Wenwei; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Leister, William; Maloney, David J.; Marugan, Juan J.; Michael, Sam; Simeonov, Anton; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    The NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC) was the inaugural center of the Molecular Libraries and Screening Center Network (MLSCN). Along with the nine other research centers of the MLSCN, the NCGC was established with a primary goal of bringing industrial technology and experience to empower the scientific community with small molecule compounds for use in their research. We intend this review to serve as 1) an introduction to the NCGC standard operating procedures, 2) an overview of several of the lessons learned during the pilot phase and 3) a review of several of the innovative discoveries reported during the pilot phase of the MLSCN. PMID:19807664

  2. TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF TRANSLATING SERVICE AT NIH.

    PubMed

    MARTIN, J A; EVERHARDY, W H; ROGERS, P R

    1965-07-01

    The growth of the Translating Unit of the National Institutes of Health Library, founded in 1938, was slow until 1950, when seventeen translators and clerical assistants comprised its staff. Today eleven staff members translate, type, and distribute translations from eighteen European languages. Contract service is arranged for those languages for which the Unit has little or no competency. Three recent innovations have improved the translating service: (1) production standards, (2) fee for service, and (3) microfilmed translations. A monthly bulletin, Recent Translations, a Selected List, includes those articles translated by the Translating Unit of the NIH Library. An author index to all translations cited in the Selected List is now available upon request.

  3. Language measures of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Richard C; Cook, Karon F; Mungas, Dan; Manly, Jennifer J; Slotkin, Jerry; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Weintraub, Sandra

    2014-07-01

    Language facilitates communication and efficient encoding of thought and experience. Because of its essential role in early childhood development, in educational achievement and in subsequent life adaptation, language was included as one of the subdomains in the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB). There are many different components of language functioning, including syntactic processing (i.e., morphology and grammar) and lexical semantics. For purposes of the NIHTB-CB, two tests of language--a picture vocabulary test and a reading recognition test--were selected by consensus based on literature reviews, iterative expert input, and a desire to assess in English and Spanish. NIHTB-CB's picture vocabulary and reading recognition tests are administered using computer adaptive testing and scored using item response theory. Data are presented from the validation of the English versions in a sample of adults ages 20-85 years (Spanish results will be presented in a future publication). Both tests demonstrated high test-retest reliability and good construct validity compared to corresponding gold-standard measures. Scores on the NIH Toolbox measures were consistent with age-related expectations, namely, growth in language during early development, with relative stabilization into late adulthood.

  4. Space Station Freedom NiH2 cell testing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Bruce; Frate, Dave

    1994-01-01

    Testing for the Space Station Freedom Nickel Hydrogen Cell Test Program began in 1990 at Crave Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center. The program has included receipt inspection, random vibration, acceptance, characterization, and life cycle testing of Ni-H2 cells in accordance with the NASA LeRC Interagency Order C-31001-J. A total of 400 Ni-H2 cells have been received at NAVSURFWARCENDIV Crane from three separate manufacturers; Yardney Technical Products (Yardney), Eagle Picher Industries (Eagle Picher), and Gates Energy Products (Gates). Of those, 308 cells distributed among 39 packs have undergone life cycle testing under a test regime simulating low earth orbit conditions. As of 30 September 1993, there are 252 cells assembled into 32 packs still on life cycle test. Since the beginning of the program, failed cells have been detected in all phases of testing. The failures include the following; seven 65 AmpHr and 81 AmpHr Yardney cells were found to be leaking KOH on receipt, one 65 AmpHr Eagle Picher cell failed the acceptance test, one 65 AmpHr Gates cell failed during the characterization test, and six 65 AmpHr Gates cells failed the random vibration test. Of the 39 life cycle packs, testing on seven packs, 56 cells, has been suspended because of low end of discharge voltages. All of the failed life cycle packs were cycled at 60% depth of discharge.

  5. Language Measures of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Richard C.; Cook, Karon F.; Mungas, Dan; Manly, Jennifer J.; Slotkin, Jerry; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Weintraub, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Language facilitates communication and efficient encoding of thought and experience. Because of its essential role in early childhood development, in educational achievement and in subsequent life adaptation, language was included as one of the subdomains in the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB). There are many different components of language functioning, including syntactic processing (i.e., morphology and grammar) and lexical semantics. For purposes of the NIHTB-CB, two tests of language—a picture vocabulary test and a reading recognition test—were selected by consensus based on literature reviews, iterative expert input, and a desire to assess in English and Spanish. NIHTB-CB’s picture vocabulary and reading recognition tests are administered using computer adaptive testing and scored using item response theory. Data are presented from the validation of the English versions in a sample of adults ages 20–85 years (Spanish results will be presented in a future publication). Both tests demonstrated high test–retest reliability and good construct validity compared to corresponding gold-standard measures. Scores on the NIH Toolbox measures were consistent with age-related expectations, namely, growth in language during early development, with relative stabilization into late adulthood. PMID:24960128

  6. NIH Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers: the power of centralized phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Kent Lloyd, K. C.; Cline, Gary W.; Wasserman, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers (MMPCs) were founded in 2001 by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to advance biomedical research by providing the scientific community with standardized, high-quality phenotyping services for mouse models of diabetes, obesity, and their complications. The intent is to allow researchers to take optimum advantage of the many new mouse models produced in labs and in high-throughput public efforts. The six MMPCs are located at universities around the country and perform complex metabolic tests in intact mice and hormone and analyte assays in tissues on a fee-for-service basis. Testing is subsidized by the NIH in order to reduce the barriers for mouse researchers. Although data derived from these tests belong to the researcher submitting mice or tissues, these data are archived after publication in a public database run by the MMPC Coordinating and Bioinformatics Unit. It is hoped that data from experiments performed in many mouse models of metabolic diseases, using standard protocols, will be useful in understanding the nature of these complex disorders. The current areas of expertise include energy balance and body composition, insulin action and secretion, whole-body and tissue carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular and renal function, and metabolic pathway kinetics. In addition to providing services, the MMPC staff provides expertise and advice to researchers, and works to develop and refine test protocols to best meet the community’s needs in light of current scientific developments. Test technology is disseminated by publications and through annual courses. PMID:22940748

  7. The NIH-NIAID Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Michelle L.; Griffiths, Kathryn G.; Williams, Steven A.; Kaplan, Ray M.; Moorhead, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Filarial worms cause a variety of tropical diseases in humans; however, they are difficult to study because they have complex life cycles that require arthropod intermediate hosts and mammalian definitive hosts. Research efforts in industrialized countries are further complicated by the fact that some filarial nematodes that cause disease in humans are restricted in host specificity to humans alone. This potentially makes the commitment to research difficult, expensive, and restrictive. Over 40 years ago, the United States National Institutes of Health–National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH-NIAID) established a resource from which investigators could obtain various filarial parasite species and life cycle stages without having to expend the effort and funds necessary to maintain the entire life cycles in their own laboratories. This centralized resource (The Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center, or FR3) translated into cost savings to both NIH-NIAID and to principal investigators by freeing up personnel costs on grants and allowing investigators to divert more funds to targeted research goals. Many investigators, especially those new to the field of tropical medicine, are unaware of the scope of materials and support provided by the FR3. This review is intended to provide a short history of the contract, brief descriptions of the fiilarial species and molecular resources provided, and an estimate of the impact the resource has had on the research community, and describes some new additions and potential benefits the resource center might have for the ever-changing research interests of investigators. PMID:22140585

  8. The NIH's Funding to US Dental Institutions from 2005 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Ferland, C L; O'Hayre, M; Knosp, W M; Fox, C H; Horsford, D J

    2017-01-01

    This study examines funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to US dental institutions between 2005 and 2014 based on publicly available data from the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools. Over the 10-y span, 56 US dental institutions received approximately $2.2 billion from 20 Institutes, Centers, and Offices at the NIH. The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) is the largest NIH supporter of dental institutions, having invested 70% of the NIH total, about $1.5 billion. The NIDCR is also the primary supporter of research training and career development, as it has invested $177 million, which represents 92% of the total NIH investment of $192 million. Over the past 10 y, about half of the NIDCR's extramural award dollars have gone to dental schools, while the NIH has invested about 1%. There has been an approximately 10% net decrease in extramural dollars awarded to dental institutions over the past decade; however, given the year-to-year variability in support to dental institutions, it is unclear if this net decline reflects a long-term trend. In addition, there was an overall reduction in the extramural dollars awarded by the NIDCR and by the NIH. For example, from 2005 to 2014, the total NIDCR budget for extramural research decreased by roughly 4%, which represents a decrease of $20 million to dental institutions. After adjusting for inflation, the decline in funding to dental institutions from the NIDCR and NIH was approximately 30%. Although the NIDCR and NIH continue to invest in dental institutions, if the current decline were to continue, it could negatively affect the research conducted at dental institutions. Therefore, we discuss opportunities for dental institutions to increase NIDCR and NIH support and improve their capacity for research, research training, and career development.

  9. NIH Research: Dr. Anthony S. Fauci: "An AIDS-free generation is closer than we might think" | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. NIH Research: Dr. Anthony S. Fauci: "An AIDS-free generation is closer than we might think" ... Washington Post . What's the current state of the AIDS epidemic? The number of people contracting HIV infection ...

  10. The Brain Takes Center Stage at 2014 NIH Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer The 2014 NIH Research Festival, Sept. 22–24, focused on the human brain for two, very specific, reasons: to coincide with the White House BRAIN Initiative and to highlight the John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center, which opened earlier this year on the NIH campus.

  11. The Brain Takes Center Stage at 2014 NIH Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer The 2014 NIH Research Festival, Sept. 22–24, focused on the human brain for two, very specific, reasons: to coincide with the White House BRAIN Initiative and to highlight the John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center, which opened earlier this year on the NIH campus.

  12. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  13. 75 FR 382 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH's Roadmap Interdisciplinary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ...; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH's Roadmap Interdisciplinary Research Work Group Initiatives... be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed... requests a three-year clearance for the ``Process Evaluation of the NIH Roadmap Interdisciplinary...

  14. 42 CFR 68.8 - What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants? 68.8 Section 68.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.8 What do...

  15. 42 CFR 68.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the NIH LRPs? 68.7 Section 68.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT...

  16. 42 CFR 68.8 - What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants? 68.8 Section 68.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.8 What do...

  17. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68.15 Section 68.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN...

  18. 42 CFR 68.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs? 68.6 Section 68.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) §...

  19. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68.15 Section 68.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN...

  20. 42 CFR 68.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs? 68.6 Section 68.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) §...

  1. 42 CFR 68.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the NIH LRPs? 68.7 Section 68.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT...

  2. NIH Seeks Input on Prioritizing Renewable Affinity Reagents | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is seeking community input on a priority list for renewable affinity reagents for human transcription factors. For more information or to provide input, please visit, http://commonfund.nih.gov/proteincapture/reagents/index.aspx.

  3. Hubris in Grantland: Languor and Laissez-faire Greet Conflict of Interest at the NIH

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    New rules are coming for sanitizing conflicts of interest in research financed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), dispenser of the government's biggest budget for civilian science, some $31 billion this year. The conflicted need not fear. The draft rules, soon to be made final, continue the NIH's longtime practice of trust but don't…

  4. NIH's "Family Inn" Lets Out-of-Town Youngsters Stay "Home."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Sylvia

    1993-01-01

    The Children's Inn, on the grounds of the National Institutes for Health (NIH) near Washington, DC, serves as a national model of the value of family-centered homes for pediatric patients and their families. When parents bring their child to NIH from a distant place, they can stay in the inn with their child while the child is receiving treatment.…

  5. From the lab - Progress Against Zika | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Puerto Rico, Brazil, Peru, Costa Rica, Panama, and Mexico. It is expected to finish in 2019. Stay tuned to NIH MedlinePlus magazine and NIAID’s website. Source: www.niaid.nih.gov Summer 2017 Issue: Volume 12 Number 2 Page 28 MedlinePlus ...

  6. Beyond Patents and Royalties: Perception and Reality of Doing Business with the NIH.

    PubMed

    Ben-Menachem, Gil; Ferguson, Steven M; Balakrishnan, Krishna

    2006-01-01

    Young, and mid size biotech companies can benefit hugely from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), not least because of the agency's non-dilutive funding, guidance, and opportunities for collaboration. Increasingly, however, there is a fair bit of misunderstanding about what the NIH can and cannot do for a biotech entrepreneur.

  7. Behavioral assessment of NIH Swiss mice acutely intoxicated with tetramethylenedisulfotetramine.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Brenna M; Silverman, Jill L; Bruun, Donald A; Puhger, Kyle R; McCoy, Mark R; Hammock, Bruce D; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is a potent convulsant poison that is thought to trigger seizures by inhibiting the function of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAAR). Acute intoxication with TETS can cause vomiting, convulsions, status epilepticus (SE) and even death. Clinical case reports indicate that individuals who survive poisoning may exhibit long-term neuropsychological issues and cognitive deficits. Therefore, the objective of this research was to determine whether a recently described mouse model of acute TETS intoxication exhibits persistent behavioral deficits. Young adult male NIH Swiss mice received a seizure-inducing dose of TETS (0.15mg/kg, ip) and then were rescued from lethality by administration of diazepam (5mg/kg, ip) approximately 20min post-TETS-exposure. TETS-intoxicated mice typically exhibited 2 clonic seizures prior to administration of diazepam with no subsequent seizures post-diazepam injection as assessed using behavioral criteria. Seizures lasted an average of 72s. Locomotor activity, anxiety-like and depression-relevant behaviors and cognition were assessed at 1week, 1month and 2months post-TETS exposure using open field, elevated-plus maze, light↔dark transitions, tail suspension, forced swim and novel object recognition tasks. Interestingly, preliminary validation tests indicated that NIH Swiss mice do not respond to the shock in fear conditioning tasks. Subsequent evaluation of hot plate and tail flick nociception tasks revealed that this strain exhibits significantly decreased pain sensitivity relative to age- and sex-matched C57BL/6J mice, which displayed normal contextual fear conditioning. NIH Swiss mice acutely intoxicated with TETS exhibited no significant anxiety-related, depression-relevant, learning or memory deficits relative to vehicle controls at any of the time points assessed with the exception of significantly increased locomotor activity at 2months post-TETS intoxication. The general absence

  8. An Update: NIH Research Funding For Palliative Medicine 2011-2015.

    PubMed

    Brown, Elizabeth; Morrison, R Sean; Gelfman, Laura P

    2017-08-09

    The evidence base to support palliative care clinical practice is inadequate and opportunities to improve the palliative care evidence base remain despite the field's rapid growth. To examine current NIH funding of palliative medicine research, changes since our 2013 report, and trends since our 2008 report. We sought to identify NIH funding of palliative medicine from 2011 to 2015 in two stages: (I) we searched the NIH grants database "RePorter" for grants with key words "palliative care," "end-of-life care," "hospice," and "end of life" and (II) we identified palliative care researchers likely to have secured NIH funding using three strategies. We abstracted (1) the first and last authors' names from original investigations published in major palliative medicine journals from 2013 to 2015; (2) these names from a PubMed-generated list of original articles published in major medicine, nursing, and subspecialty journals using the above key words; and (3) palliative medicine journal editorial board members and key members of palliative medicine initiatives. We crossmatched the pooled names against NIH grants funded from 2011 to 2015. The author and NIH RePorter search identified 854 and 419 grants, respectively. The 461 grants categorized as relevant to palliative medicine represented 334 unique PIs. Compared to 2006-2010, the number of NIH-funded junior career development awards nearly doubled (6.1%-10%), articles published in nonpalliative care specialty journals tripled (13%-37%), published palliative care researchers increased by 2.5-fold (839-2120), and NIH-funded original palliative medicine research articles doubled (21%-39%). Despite the challenging NIH funding climate, NIH funding to palliative care remained stable. The increase in early stage career development funding, palliative care investigators, and palliative medicine research published in nonpalliative medicine journals reflects important advances to address the workforce and evidence gaps. Further

  9. Tightening conflict-of-interest policies: the impact of 2005 ethics rules at the NIH.

    PubMed

    Zinner, Darren E; DesRoches, Catherine M; Bristol, Steffanie J; Clarridge, Brian; Campbell, Eric G

    2010-11-01

    To determine both the intended and unintended effects of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) 2005 ethics rules by examining changes in publishing rates and the frequency of external relationships among NIH scientists. After identifying eligible intramural scientists and administrators from institutes' Web pages and central directories, a mailed survey was administered to 900 NIH research faculty between October 2008 and January 2009 (response rate 70.1%). Eighty percent of respondents believed the NIH ethics rules were too restrictive. Whereas 45% of respondents believed the rules positively impacted the public's trust in the NIH, 77% believed the rules hindered the NIH's ability to complete its mission. Implementation of the ethics rules significantly decreased self-reported government-industry relationships among NIH faculty (from 51.8% to 33.2%, P < .01), including significant drops in consulting (33.1% to 7.8%, P < .01) and scientific advisory board membership (31.5% to 16.0%, P < .01), both of which may be allowed under the new regulations in restricted situations with increased oversight. The policy had limited impact on NIH faculty participation in nonindustrial professional service roles and had no detectable change in publishing behavior (5.29 articles per researcher per year from 2002-2005 versus 5.26 from 2005-2008, P = .88). The NIH ethics rules accomplished much of what they were intended to do, limiting relationships with industry while maintaining NIH researchers' association with external scientific and professional organizations. However, the rules negatively affected personnel morale and the perceived progress of research.

  10. Characteristics of NIH- and industry-sponsored head and neck cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Devaiah, Anand; Murchison, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Compare U.S. clinical trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and industry, especially with regard to trial design, interventions studied, and results reporting rates. U.S. head and neck cancer clinical trials. We used information from ClinicalTrials.gov to compare NIH- and industry-sponsored head and neck cancer clinical trials, specifically analyzing differences in trial design and interventions studied. We examined publication rates and positive results rates using PubMed.gov. About 50% of NIH- and industry-sponsored clinical trials have their results reported in peer-reviewed literature. Industry-sponsored trials had higher rates of positive results than NIH-sponsored trials. NIH- and industry-sponsored clinical trials had similar trial designs, although industry-sponsored trials had significantly lower rates of randomization. Industry trials utilized radiation in 19% of trials and surgery in 2% of trials. NIH trials also had low utilization of both radiation and surgery (27% and 12% of trials, respectively). NIH- and industry-sponsored trials published their results in journals with comparable impact factors. There is significant underreporting of results in U.S. head and neck cancer clinical trials, whether sponsored by NIH or industry. Industry trials have significantly higher rates of positive results, although it is unclear what contributes to this. Both NIH- and industry-sponsored trials underutilize surgery and radiation as treatment modalities, despite the fact that these are standard-of-care therapies for head and neck cancer. We recommend that the NIH and industry report all results from clinical trials and use surgery and radiation as treatment arms in order to arrive at more balanced therapeutic recommendations. N/A. Laryngoscope, 126:E300-E303, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Twenty-five Years of Translating Service at NIH

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jess A.; Everhardy, William H.; Rogers, Phillip R.

    1965-01-01

    The growth of the Translating Unit of the National Institutes of Health Library, founded in 1938, was slow until 1950, when seventeen translators and clerical assistants comprised its staff. Today eleven staff members translate, type, and distribute translations from eighteen European languages. Contract service is arranged for those languages for which the Unit has little or no competency. Three recent innovations have improved the translating service: (1) production standards, (2) fee for service, and (3) microfilmed translations. A monthly bulletin, Recent Translations, a Selected List, includes those articles translated by the Translating Unit of the NIH Library. An author index to all translations cited in the Selected List is now available upon request. PMID:14306030

  12. The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test: Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Tulsky, David S.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed. While initial validation work provides preliminary support for this test in both children and adults, more work is needed to ensure dependability and generalizability. Thus, this replication study examines descriptive data (including age effects), test–retest reliability, and construct validity in n = 4,859 participants ages 3–85 years (matched to 2010 census data). Although the Pattern Comparison was not appropriate for all 3 and 4 years old, by ages 5 and 6, more meaningful scores were apparent. There was evidence for convergent and discriminant validity. There was also a moderate practice effect (i.e., increase of 5.5 points) over a 1-week time frame. Pattern Comparison exhibits a number of strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages 5–85), it is short and easy to administer, and there is support for construct validity. PMID:26025230

  13. 75 FR 54640 - Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel The purpose of this notice is to inform the public about a meeting of the NIH Blue Ribbon..., at any time, members of the public may file written comments to the following address: NIH Blue...

  14. Responsiveness of the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI).

    PubMed

    Propert, K J; Litwin, M S; Wang, Y; Alexander, R B; Calhoun, E; Nickel, J C; O'Leary, M P; Pontari, M; McNaughton-Collins, M

    2006-03-01

    The NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) was developed to assess symptoms and quality of life in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). We assessed the responsiveness of the NIH-CPSI to change over time and defined thresholds for changes perceptible to patients. We studied 174 men with CP/CPPS who participated in a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. Changes from baseline to six weeks in the NIH-CPSI total score and pain, urinary, and quality of life subscores were compared to a global response assessment (GRA). Effect sizes and Guyatt statistics were calculated to evaluate responsiveness; 95% confidence intervals were produced using bootstrapping. All scores decreased over time with the largest decrease in subjects who reported on the GRA that they were markedly improved. The NIH-CPSI total, pain, and quality of life scores were highly responsive in the improved groups; the urinary score showed minimal responsiveness. There was no evidence of responsiveness among those subjects who worsened on the trial. ROC curves identified a 6-point decline in the NIH-CPSI total score as the optimal threshold to predict treatment response. The NIH-CPSI total score and pain and quality of life subscores are responsive to change over time.

  15. Commentary: new guidelines for NIH peer review: improving the system or undermining it?

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Allen M

    2010-05-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) peer review system has been viewed as the best way to guarantee the scientific independence of biomedical research in the United States, and it has been emulated internationally. The system, however, is subject to a variety of stresses, and these have always been exacerbated at times of flat NIH funding, as in the past five years. To address several of these stresses, NIH first conducted a "diagnostic self-study" of the peer review system and then implemented a number of changes. Costello, in a Perspective in this issue of Academic Medicine, argues that two of these changes, special consideration for new investigators and emphasis of the criterion of "innovation," undermine the stated goal of funding the "best science by the best scientists." In this commentary on Costello's Perspective article, the author examines the issue of NIH funding of new investigators from a historical perspective, in the context of overall NIH priority setting in resource allocation. The related issue of innovation as a criterion in NIH peer review is also addressed, and the commentary concludes with an affirmation of the need to measure outcomes in assessing the impact of changes in the NIH peer review system.

  16. Tightening Conflict-of-Interest Policies: The Impact of 2005 Ethics Rules at the NIH

    PubMed Central

    Zinner, Darren E.; DesRoches, Catherine M.; Bristol, Steffanie J.; Clarridge, Brian; Campbell, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine both the intended and unintended effects of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) 2005 ethics rules by examining changes in publishing rates and the frequency of external relationships among NIH scientists. Method After identifying eligible intramural scientists and administrators from institute’s web pages and central directories, a mailed survey was administered to 900 NIH research faculty between October 2008 and January 2009 (response rate 70.1%).A Results Eighty percent of respondents believed the NIH ethics rules were too restrictive. While nearly half (45%) of respondents believed the rules positively impacted the public’s trust in the NIH, over three-quarters (77%) believed the rules hindered the NIH’s ability to complete its mission. Implementation of the ethics rules significantly decreased self-reported GIRs among NIH faculty (from 51.8% to 33.2%, P<.01), including significant drops in consulting (33.1% to 7.8%, P<.01) and scientific advisory board membership (31.5% to 16.0%, P<.01). The policy had limited impact on NIH faculty participation in non-industrial professional service roles and had no detectable change in publishing behavior (5.29 articles per researcher per year from 2002–2005 vs. 5.26 from 2005–2008, P = .88). Conclusions The NIH ethics rules accomplished much of what they were intended to do, limiting relationships with industry while maintaining NIH researchers’ association with external scientific and professional organizations. However, the rules negatively affected personnel morale and the perceived progress of research. PMID:20852402

  17. Effect of Handling, Storage and Cycling on Ni-H2 Cells: Second Plateau Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2001-01-01

    Proper handling of Ni-H2 cells/batteries in storage, during I&T, and at launch site is very important to preserve the useful energy and to extend the mission life. Cell reversal test is not a prudent test to verify or quantify the nickel pre-charge in Ni-H2 cells/batteries. The second plateau is due to the formation of Ni(+3) that is electrochemically inactive. Gas analysis of the cell, and chemical analysis of the positive plate are confirmatory tests to determine the nature of pre-charge in Ni-H2 cells.

  18. NIH consensus development conference statement: Lactose intolerance and health.

    PubMed

    Suchy, Frederick J; Brannon, Patsy M; Carpenter, Thomas O; Fernandez, Jose R; Gilsanz, Vicente; Gould, Jeffrey B; Hall, Karen; Hui, Siu L; Lupton, Joanne; Mennella, Julie; Miller, Natalie J; Osganian, Stavroula Kalis; Sellmeyer, Deborah E; Wolf, Marshall A

    2010-02-24

    To provide health care providers, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of currently available data on lactose intolerance and health. A non-DHHS, nonadvocate 14-member panel representing the fields of internal medicine, pediatrics, pediatric and adult endocrinology, gastroenterology, hepatology, neonatology and perinatology, geriatrics, racial/ethnic disparities, radiology, maternal and fetal nutrition, vitamin and mineral metabolism, nutritional sciences, bone health, preventive medicine, biopsychology, biostatistics, statistical genetics, epidemiology, and a public representative. In addition, 22 experts from pertinent fields presented data to the panel and conference audience. Presentations by experts and a systematic review of the literature prepared by the University of Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center, through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Scientific evidence was given precedence over anecdotal experience. The panel drafted its statement based on scientific evidence presented in open forum and on published scientific literature. The draft statement was presented on the final day of the conference and circulated to the audience for comment. The panel released a revised statement later that day at http://consensus.nih.gov. This statement is an independent report of the panel and is not a policy statement of the NIH or the Federal Government. • Lactose intolerance is a real and important clinical syndrome, but its true prevalence is not known. • The majority of people with lactose malabsorption do not have clinical lactose intolerance. Many individuals who think they are lactose intolerant are not lactose malabsorbers. • Many individuals with real or perceived lactose intolerance avoid dairy and ingest inadequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D, which may predispose them to decreased bone accrual, osteoporosis, and other adverse health outcomes. In most cases, individuals do not need to eliminate dairy

  19. Summary statements of the NIH Nursing Research Grant Applications.

    PubMed

    Fuller, E O; Hasselmeyer, E G; Hunter, J C; Abdellah, F G; Hinshaw, A S

    1991-01-01

    Summary statements from the Nursing Research Study Section, Division of Research Grants, NIH, between October, 1986 and June, 1988 were used to identify reasons for recommending approval or disapproval of grant applications with RO1 and R29 activity codes. The 917 comments (25 +/- 4 per critique), sorted into one of nine categories (Aims, Significance, Investigator, Budget, Resources, Design, Sample, Techniques, Data Analysis) for analysis, were classified as Strengths (positive comments) or Weaknesses (negative comments). The weaknesses of approved applications were confined mostly to the categories of Design and Techniques. Disapproved applications had few strengths and many weaknesses in Design, Sample, Techniques, and Data Analysis. Critiques of First Award (R29) and traditional research project grant applications (RO1) were similar. The approved applications addressed meaningful problems, had well-synthesized literature reviews, and were solvable by available techniques. The research plans were consonant with stated aims, and the methods sections reflected understanding of the principles underlying the techniques to be used. A supportive environment and adequate research resources, including access to the study population were common to these applications. Disapproved applications provided poor synthesis of the literature, methods inconsistent with the aims, and often reflected inadequate understanding of techniques to be used.

  20. Thermal modeling of a Ni-H2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Si-Ok; Dewitt, K. J.; Keith, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    The nickel-hydrogen secondary battery has many desirable features which make it attractive for satellite power systems. It can provide a significant improvement over the energy density of present spacecraft nickel-cadnium batteries, combined with longer life, tolerance to overcharge and possibility of state-of-charge indication. However, to realize these advantages, accurate thermal modeling of nickel-hydrogen cells is required in order to properly design the battery pack so that it operates within a specified temperature range during the operation. Maintenance of a low operating temperature and a uniform temperature profile within the cell will yield better reliability, improved cycle life and better charge/discharge efficiencies. This research has the objective of developing and testing a thermal model which can be used to characterize battery operation. Primarily, temperature distribution with the heat generation rates as a function of position and time will be evaluated for a Ni-H2 cell in the three operating modes: (1) charge cycle, (2) discharge cycle, and (3) overcharge condition, if applicable. Variables to be examined include charging current, discharge rates, state of charge, pressure and temperature. Once the thermal model has been developed, this resulting model will predict the actual operating temperature and temperature gradient for the specific cell geometry to be used.

  1. Advances in Patient-Reported Outcomes: The NIH PROMIS® Measures

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; Crane, Paul K.; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are questionnaire measures of patients’ symptoms, functioning, and health-related quality of life. They are designed to provide important clinical information that generally cannot be captured with objective medical testing. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health launched a research initiative to improve the clinical research enterprise by developing state-of-the-art PROs. The NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) and Assessment Center are the products of that initiative. Adult, pediatric, and parent-proxy item banks have been developed by using contemporary psychometric methods, yielding rapid, accurate measurements. PROMIS currently provides tools for assessing physical, mental, and social health using short-form and computer-adaptive testing methods. The PROMIS tools are being adopted for use in clinical trials and translational research. They are also being introduced in clinical medicine to assess a broad range of disease outcomes. Recent legislative developments in the United States support greater efforts to include patients’ reports of health experience in order to evaluate treatment outcomes, engage in shared decision-making, and prioritize the focus of treatment. PROs have garnered increased attention by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for evaluating drugs and medical devices. Recent calls for comparative effectiveness research favor inclusion of PROs. PROs could also potentially improve quality of care and disease outcomes, provide patient-centered assessment for comparative effectiveness research, and enable a common metric for tracking outcomes across providers and medical systems. PMID:25848562

  2. Ni-H2 cell separator matrix engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    This project was initiated to develop alternative separator materials to the previously used asbestos matrices which were removed from the market for health and environmental reasons. The objective of the research was to find a material or combination of materials that had the following characteristics: (1) resistant to the severe conditions encountered in Ni-H2 cells; (2) satisfactory electrical, electrolyte management, and thermal management properties to function properly; (3) environmentally benign; and (4) capable of being manufactured into a separator matrix. During the course of the research it was discovered that separators prepared from wettable polyethylene fibers along and in combination with potassium titanate pigment performed satisfactory in preliminary characterization tests. Further studies lead to the optimization of the separator composition and manufacturing process. Single ply separator sheets were manufactured with 100 percent polyethylene fibers and also with a combination of polyethylene fibers and potassium titanate pigment (PKT) in the ratio of 60 percent PKT and 40 percent fibers. A pilot paper machine was used to produce the experimental separator material by a continuous, wet laid process. Both types of matrices were produced at several different area densities (grams/sq m).

  3. Safe Use of Complementary Health Products and Practices for Anxiety | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... mask anxiety symptoms or make them worse. Research studies funded by the NIH's National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) have investigated several natural products and mind and body practices for anxiety. As with any ...

  4. NIH Institutes and Centers Served by TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    TTC services the NCI Intramural Research laboratories as well as nine other NIH institutes a range of services--NIDA, NIA, NIMHD, NICHD, NLM, CIT, NCCIH, Clinical Center, NEI. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  5. Approaching Health Disparities from a Population Perspective: The NIH Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Addressing health disparities has been a national challenge for decades. The NIH-sponsored Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHDs) represent the first federal initiative to support transdisciplinary multilevel research on the determinants of health disparities. Using preliminar...

  6. Researching and Reducing the Health Burden of Stroke | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS NIH Research: A Q&A with Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D., Deputy Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Dr. Walter J. Koroshetz is deputy director of the National Institute ...

  7. We’re All in This Together | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... All in This Together Follow us We’re All in This Together NIH-supported research aims to ... have damage. Another difference is ADNI immediately shares all the data collected from clinical trials and posts ...

  8. When Memories Disappear | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. To Find Out More To learn about support groups, services, research centers, research studies, and publications about ... agencies, and private industry: www.ClinicalTrials.gov NIH Senior Health: nihseniorhealth.gov/alzheimersdisease/toc.html The National ...

  9. 76 FR 13648 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... lessons learned that might be useful to other research programs of the Agency. To reduce response bias and... Policy and Communications, NIH/NIDA, NSC-- Neuroscience Center, 5229, 6001 ] Executive Blvd.,...

  10. 76 FR 30178 - Submission for OMB review; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... learned that might be useful to other research programs of the Agency. To reduce response bias and to make... Policy and ] Communications, NIH/NIDA, NSC--Neuroscience Center, 5229, 6001 Executive Blvd.,...

  11. ASD: What Are Autism Spectrum Disorders? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the parents/caregivers, teachers, school psychologists, and other child development specialists work together to design an Individualized Education ... search box. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) booklets: www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/ ...

  12. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... participated in an NIH-sponsored clinical trial. Photo: Dr. Wesley Fowler "My father in-law, John Spencer, is ... here at the University of North Carolina," says Dr. Wesley Fowler, a professor in UNC's School of Medicine. ...

  13. Understanding Asthma from the Inside Out | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Inside Out Follow us Understanding Asthma from the Inside Out NIH study looks at the microbiome’s ... which is based in North Carolina. What are the goals of the NHALES study? There are two ...

  14. Psoriasis: On the Road to Discovery | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... issue contents Features: Psoriasis Follow us Psoriasis: On the Road to Discovery Research advances are resulting in improved treatments Advances in genetic knowledge are providing the keys to unlock new treatments. NIH-supported researcher ...

  15. "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... For more info, videos, and other resources on biotechnology and medical imaging, visit www.nibib.nih.gov " ... web tool showcasing the latest research advances in biotechnology. It features fourteen technologies being developed by NIBIB- ...

  16. NIH study uncovers new mechanism of action for class of chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NIH researchers have discovered a significant new mechanism of action for a class of chemotherapy drugs known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, or PARP inhibitors. They have also identified differences in the toxic capabilities of three drugs in

  17. Methods and management: NIH administrators, federal oversight, and the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sejal S

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the 1965 controversy over the Framingham Heart Study in the midst of growing oversight into the management of science at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It describes how, beginning in the early 1960s, federal overseers demanded that NIH administrators adopt particular management styles in administering programs and how these growing pressures led administrators to favor investigative pursuits that allowed for easy prospective accounting of program payoffs, especially those based on experimental methods designed to examine discrete interventions or outcomes of interest. In light of this changing managerial culture within the NIH, the Framingham study and other population laboratories-with their bases in observation and in open-ended study designs-became harder for NIH administrators to justify and defend.

  18. Risk Factors, Treatment and Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Fighting Gum Disease Risk Factors, Treatment and Research Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Risk ... out whether it offers this service. Latest NIH Research Researchers supported by the National Institute of Dental ...

  19. A pressure based charge control system for the DSPSE NiH2 CPV battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Chris; Barnes, W.; Hickman, G.

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: the Electrical Power Subsystem; the Eclipse Energy Requirements; the NiH2 CPV battery; and the battery pressure transducer. The discussion is presented in viewgraph format.

  20. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents ... cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/Taking-Part-in-Cancer-Treatment-Research-Studies NIH Senior Health http://nihseniorhealth.gov/breastcancer/ ...

  1. Coping with Vasculitis and Contributing to Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Vasculitis Coping with Vasculitis and Contributing to Research Past Issues / Fall 2016 Table of Contents Meteorologist ... vasculitis. She takes part in NIH-supported clinical research. Photo: Dusty Volkel/ © Lockheed Martin A Personal Journey ...

  2. [Effects of garlicin on NIH3T3 cell proliferation and collagen synthesis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Xiao; Shi, Zai-Xiang; Jia, Hai-Zhong

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the effects of garlicin on fibroblasts proliferation and type I collagen synthesis and explore its anti-fibrosis mechanism. Garlicin was added into the culture fluid of NIH3T3 cell, taking Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae as the control medicine. The spiking of H3-thymidine DNA was detected, also the hydroxyproline (HOP) concentration in the culture fluid by alkali digestion method and the protein expression of type I collagen in NIH3T3 cells by immunofluorescent staining. The NIH3T3 cell growth and proliferation rate were obviously reduced after garlicin treatment concentration-dependently in range of 0.2 - 5 microg/mL; HOP level and protein expression of type I collagen also lowered. Garlicin could inhibit NIH3T3 cell proliferation, reduce the synthesis and protein expression of type I collagen so as to exert the anti-fibrosis effect.

  3. Braving Breast Cancer: Just Do It! | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Braving Breast Cancer: Just Do It! Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of Contents Breast cancer survivor Jana Brightwell, pictured here on the NIH ...

  4. Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Careers Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents ... to technicians and therapists. The NIH Office of Science Education has a Web site that lists and ...

  5. Five Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents It ... anniversary of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), known to many as NIH's "basic research ...

  6. NIH-Supported Trials Test Hormonal Therapy in Older Men with Low Testosterone Levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the first three of seven double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. A high proportion of older men ... NIH. Additional funding, and the study drug and placebo, were provided by AbbVie Pharmaceuticals. “...there has been ...

  7. HealthLines - Plan to Get Your Flu Shot | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements with an anti-inflammatory drug and a placebo (or dummy pill). Researchers say people who took ... of the treatments was significantly better than the placebo. Two components of NIH funded the study, which ...

  8. Developing Safe and Effective Medicines for Children | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). She is also helping to make drugs ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is the lead NIH agency helping to ...

  9. Alcohol Use Disorders, Research Findings | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... health web site and downloadable booklet Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders web page www.niaaa.nih.gov/research/major-initiatives/fetal-alcohol-spectrum-disorders . Spectrum e-zine story: Underage drinking: One ...

  10. Go4Life:Success Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who participated in an aerobic exercise or resistance exercise program reported less pain and better function than those assigned to a health education program only. Preventing diabetes: The NIH-sponsored Diabetes ...

  11. The National Library of Medicine: 175 Years of Innovation | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... recent contributions. In coming issues of NIH MedlinePlus magazine, we will highlight other significant milestones in the ... We hope you find this issue of the magazine both informative and useful. Sincerely, Donald West King, ...

  12. The Match of Her Life | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... answer questions for this issue of NIH MedlinePlus magazine about her breast cancer. You discovered you had ... way of healing. As this issue of the magazine went to press, Navratilova was receiving radiation therapy ...

  13. NIGMS Researcher Explores Skin Cities | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... coming to NIH to tackle bacterial genomics. Beneficial Bacteria Bacteria aren't all bad. Many are harmless, and ... protect us by taking up space where harmful bacteria would otherwise live. It might sound unhealthy or ...

  14. NLM MedlinePlus Magazine Team | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current issue contents Magazine Team Follow us Magazine Team National Library of Medicine at the National ... MLS, MA TREASURER Dennis Cryer, MD NIH MedlinePlus magazine is published by Friends of the NLM in ...

  15. Building Paths to Health Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Selected articles from past issues of NIH MedlinePlus magazine will be a part of the course content. ... enjoy and learn from this issue of the magazine. And please consider joining FNLM to support all ...

  16. Is NIH funding predictive of greater research productivity and impact among academic otolaryngologists?

    PubMed

    Svider, Peter F; Mauro, Kevin M; Sanghvi, Saurin; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2013-01-01

    The h-index is an accurate and reliable indicator of scholarly productivity that takes into account relevance, significance, and influence of research contributions. As such, it is an effective, objective bibliometric that can be used to evaluate academic otolaryngologists for decisions regarding appointment and advancement. In this study, we evaluate the impact of NIH funding on scholarly productivity in otolaryngology. Analysis of bibliometric data of academic otolaryngologists. Funding data for the 20 otolaryngology departments with the largest aggregate total of NIH grants for the fiscal years (FY) 2011 and 2012 was obtained using the National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools Expenditures and Reports (RePORTER) Database. H-indices were calculated using the Scopus online database, and then compared to funding data at both the departmental and individual level. Faculty members in otolaryngology departments who received NIH funding had significantly greater research productivity and impact, as measured by the h-index, than their nonfunded peers. H-indices increased with greater NIH funding levels, and investigators with MD degrees tended to have higher mean NIH funding levels than those with PhDs. While there was no correlation between average h-index and NIH funding totals at the level of departments, there was greater correlation upon examination of NIH funding levels of individual investigators. The h-index has a strong relationship with, and may be predictive of, grant awards of NIH-funded faculty members in otolaryngology departments. This bibliometric may be useful in decisions regarding appointment and advancement of faculty members within academic otolaryngology departments. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. WE-G-BRB-01: The Importance of NIH Funding in Innovation in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Deye, J.

    2015-06-15

    Over the past 20 years the NIH has funded individual grants, program projects grants, and clinical trials which have been instrumental in advancing patient care. The ways that each grant mechanism lends itself to the different phases of translating research into clinical practice will be described. Major technological innovations, such as IMRT and proton therapy, have been advanced with R01-type and P01-type funding and will be discussed. Similarly, the role of program project grants in identifying and addressing key hypotheses on the potential of 3D conformal therapy, normal tissue-guided dose escalation and motion management will be described. An overview will be provided regarding how these technological innovations have been applied to multi-institutional NIH-sponsored trials. Finally, the panel will discuss regarding which research questions should be funded by the NIH to inspire the next advances in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the different funding mechanisms of the NIH Learn about research advances that have led to innovation in delivery Review achievements due to NIH-funded program project grants in radiotherapy over the past 20 years Understand example advances achieved with multi-institutional clinical trials NIH.

  18. Sex Differences in Application, Success, and Funding Rates for NIH Extramural Programs

    PubMed Central

    Pohlhaus, Jennifer Reineke; Jiang, Hong; Wagner, Robin M.; Schaffer, Walter T.; Pinn, Vivian W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The authors provide an analysis of sex differences in National Institutes of Health (NIH) award programs to inform potential initiatives for promoting diversity in the research workforce. Method In 2010, the authors retrieved data for NIH extramural grants in the electronic Research Administration Information for Management, Planning, and Coordination II database, and used statistical analysis to determine any sex differences in securing NIH funding, as well as subsequent success of researchers who had already received independent NIH support. Results Success and funding rates for men and women were not significantly different in most award programs. Furthermore, in programs where participation was lower for women than men, the disparity was primarily related to a lower percentage of women applicants compared to men, rather than decreased success rates or funding rates. However, for subsequent grants, both application and funding rates were generally higher for men than for women. Conclusions Cross-sectional analysis showed that women and men were generally equally successful at all career stages, but longitudinal analysis showed that men with previous experience as NIH grantees had higher application and funding rates than women at similar career points. On average, although women received larger R01 awards than men, men had more R01 awards than women at all points in their careers. Therefore, while greater participation of women in NIH programs is underway, further action will be required to eradicate remaining sex differences. PMID:21512358

  19. 78 FR 39741 - Announcement of Agency Decision: Recommendations on the Use of Chimpanzees in NIH-Supported Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...This notice announces the responses to public comments and decisions of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) regarding the use of chimpanzees in research. In February 2012, the NIH charged a working group of the Council of Councils, a federal advisory committee, to provide advice on implementing recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Use of Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research in its 2011 report, Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research: Assessing the Necessity. On January 22, 2013, the NIH Council of Councils (Council) accepted recommendations presented by the Working Group on the Use of Chimpanzees in NIH-Supported Research and provided these recommendations to the NIH. The NIH subsequently issued a request for comments to obtain broad public input on the 28 Council recommendations that the NIH is considering as it determines how to implement the IOM Committee's recommendations. This notice summarizes the comments received in response to the request for comments and announces the agency's decisions with respect to the Council recommendations. The NIH plans to prepare subsequent procedural guidance and technical assistance, as appropriate, to implement some of these decisions. Investigators should continue to follow existing guidance (see NOT-OD-12-025 at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/ notice-files/NOT-OD-12-025.html) regarding the submission of applications, proposals, or protocols for research involving chimpanzees until the NIH announces the procedural guidance.

  20. Trans-NIH neuroscience initiatives on mouse phenotyping and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Moldin, S O; Farmer, M E; Chin, H R; Battey, J F

    2001-08-01

    In the post-genomic era, the laboratory mouse will excel as a premier mammalian system to study normal and disordered biological processes, in part because of low cost, but largely because of the rich opportunities that exist for exploiting genetic tools and technologies in the mouse to systematically determine mammalian gene function. Many robust models of human disease may therefore be developed, and these in turn will provide critical clues to understanding gene function. The full potential of the mouse for understanding many of the neural and behavioral phenotypes of relevance to neuroscientists has yet to be realized. With the full anatomy of the mouse genome at hand, researchers for the first time will be able to move beyond traditional gene-by-gene approaches and take a global view of gene expression patterns crucial for neurobiological processes. In response to an action plan for mouse genomics developed on the basis of recommendations from the scientific community, seven institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiated in 1999 a mouse genetics research program that specifically focused on neurobiology and complex behavior. The specific goals of these neuroscience initiatives are to develop high-throughput phenotyping assays and to initiate genome-wide mutagenesis projects to identify hundreds of mutant strains with heritable abnormalities of high relevance to neuroscientists. Assays and mutants generated in these efforts will be made widely available to the scientific community, and such resources will provide neuroscientists unprecedented opportunities to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of neural function and complex behavior. Such research tools ultimately will permit the manipulation and analysis of the mouse genome, as a means of gaining insight into the genetic bases of the mammalian nervous system and its complex disorders.

  1. Barriers to racial/ethnic minority application and competition for NIH research funding.

    PubMed Central

    Shavers, Vickie L.; Fagan, Pebbles; Lawrence, Deirdre; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; McDonald, Paige; Browne, Doris; McLinden, Dan; Christian, Michaele; Trimble, Edward

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite recognition of the need to increase the pool of racial/ethnic minority investigators, racial/ethnic minority representation among National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded investigators remains low. Racial/ethnic minority investigators bring unique perspectives and experiences that enhance the potential for understanding factors that underlie racial/ethnic variation in health and health status. Identification of barriers to successful minority competition for NIH funding and suggestions for strategies to overcome them were obtained from a concept mapping project and a meeting of minority investigators and investigators at minority-serving institutions. METHODS: Concept mapping, a mixed-methods planning approach that integrates common data collection processes with multivariate statistical analyses, was used in this exploratory project. The concept mapping approach generated a series of related "concept maps" that were used for data interpretation and meeting discussions. RESULTS: Barriers to minority investigator competition for NIH funding identified by concept mapping participants include: (1) inadequate research infrastructure, training and development; (2) barriers to development as independent researchers; (3) inadequate mentoring; (4) insensitivity, misperceptions and miscommunication about the specific needs of investigators involved in research with minority communities; (5) institutional bias in NIH policies; (6) unfair competitive environment; (7) lack of institutional support; (8) lack of support for research topics/methods relevant to research with minority communities; and (9) social, cultural and environmental barriers. DISCUSSION: Data from both the concept mapping and the meeting discussions suggest the need to use a multilevel approach to increase minority representation among funded NIH investigators. Specifically, the NIH should use strategies that overcome barriers at the home institution, within NIH and at the investigator

  2. Educational attainment and life expectancy: a perspective from the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research.

    PubMed

    Spittel, Michael L; Riley, William T; Kaplan, Robert M

    2015-02-01

    The NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) furthers the mission of the NIH by stimulating behavioral and social sciences research throughout NIH and integrating these areas of research more fully into the NIH health research enterprise, thereby improving our understanding, treatment, and prevention of disease. OBSSR accomplishes this mission through several strategic priorities: (1) supporting the next generation of basic behavioral and social sciences research, (2) facilitating interdisciplinary research, (3) promoting a multi-level systems perspective of health and behavior, and (4) encouraging a problem-focused perspective on population health.

  3. The NIH 3D Print Exchange: A Public Resource for Bioscientific and Biomedical 3D Prints.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Meghan F; Hurt, Darrell E; Weber, Nick; Mtingwa, Makazi; Fincher, Erin C; Alekseyev, Vsevelod; Chen, David T; Yun, Alvin; Gizaw, Metasebia; Swan, Jeremy; Yoo, Terry S; Huyen, Yentram

    2014-09-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, an online portal for discovering and creating bioscientifically relevant 3D models suitable for 3D printing, to provide both researchers and educators with a trusted source to discover accurate and informative models. There are a number of online resources for 3D prints, but there is a paucity of scientific models, and the expertise required to generate and validate such models remains a barrier. The NIH 3D Print Exchange fills this gap by providing novel, web-based tools that empower users with the ability to create ready-to-print 3D files from molecular structure data, microscopy image stacks, and computed tomography scan data. The NIH 3D Print Exchange facilitates open data sharing in a community-driven environment, and also includes various interactive features, as well as information and tutorials on 3D modeling software. As the first government-sponsored website dedicated to 3D printing, the NIH 3D Print Exchange is an important step forward to bringing 3D printing to the mainstream for scientific research and education.

  4. The NIH 3D Print Exchange: A Public Resource for Bioscientific and Biomedical 3D Prints

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, Meghan F.; Hurt, Darrell E.; Weber, Nick; Mtingwa, Makazi; Fincher, Erin C.; Alekseyev, Vsevelod; Chen, David T.; Yun, Alvin; Gizaw, Metasebia; Swan, Jeremy; Yoo, Terry S.; Huyen, Yentram

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, an online portal for discovering and creating bioscientifically relevant 3D models suitable for 3D printing, to provide both researchers and educators with a trusted source to discover accurate and informative models. There are a number of online resources for 3D prints, but there is a paucity of scientific models, and the expertise required to generate and validate such models remains a barrier. The NIH 3D Print Exchange fills this gap by providing novel, web-based tools that empower users with the ability to create ready-to-print 3D files from molecular structure data, microscopy image stacks, and computed tomography scan data. The NIH 3D Print Exchange facilitates open data sharing in a community-driven environment, and also includes various interactive features, as well as information and tutorials on 3D modeling software. As the first government-sponsored website dedicated to 3D printing, the NIH 3D Print Exchange is an important step forward to bringing 3D printing to the mainstream for scientific research and education. PMID:28367477

  5. NIH and USDA Funding of Dietary Supplement Research, 1999–20071

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Karen S.; Wambogo, Edwina A.; Haggans, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Over one-half of U.S. adults use dietary supplements, so federally supported research into the safety and effectiveness of these compounds is important for the health of many Americans. Data collected in the Computer Access to Research on Dietary Supplements database, which compiles federally sponsored dietary supplement-related research, are useful to scientists in determining the type of dietary supplement research that federal agencies are currently funding and where research gaps exist. This article describes the dietary supplement-related research funded by the NIH and the USDA. Between fiscal years 1999 and 2007, the number of research projects and funding for dietary supplement research more than doubled. During that period, NIH funded 6748 dietary supplement-related projects at a cost of $1.9 billion and the USDA funded 2258 projects at a cost of $347 million. The top funded dietary supplement ingredient categories were vitamins and minerals, botanicals, phytochemicals, and fatty acids. Cancer was by far the most frequent health outcome in dietary supplement research funding, nearly double the next closest health outcome category. Other health outcomes with the greatest funding were cellular and molecular mechanisms, cardiovascular health, women’s reproductive health, and immune function. The greatest number of dietary supplement research projects are funded by the NIH National Cancer Institute, the NIH National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, and the USDA Agricultural Research Service. PMID:21106929

  6. NIH Consensus Statement on Management of Hepatitis C: 2002.

    PubMed

    To provide health care providers, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of currently available data regarding the management and treatment of hepatitis C. A non-Federal, nonadvocate, 12-member panel representing the fields of infectious diseases, gastroenterology, medical oncology, molecular genetics, geriatrics, internal medicine, and the public. In addition, experts in these same fields presented data to the panel and to a conference audience of approximately 300. Presentations by experts; a systematic review of the medical literature provided by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; and an extensive bibliography of hepatitis C research papers, prepared by the National Library of Medicine. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. Answering predefined questions, the panel drafted a statement based on the scientific evidence presented in open forum and the scientific literature. The draft statement was read in its entirety on the final day of the conference and circulated to the experts and the audience for comment. The panel then met in executive session to consider these comments and released a revised statement at the end of the conference. The statement was made available on the World Wide Web at http://consensus.nih.gov immediately after the conference. This statement is an independent report of the panel and is not a policy statement of the NIH or the Federal Government. The incidence of newly acquired hepatitis C infection has diminished in the United States. This decline is largely due to a decrease in cases among IDUs for reasons that are unclear and, to a lesser extent, to testing of blood donors for HCV. The virus is transmitted by blood and such transmission now occurs primarily through injection drug use, sex with an infected partner or multiple partners, and occupational exposure. The majority of infections become chronic, and therefore the prevalence of HCV infections is high

  7. Distributed Cognition and Process Management Enabling Individualized Translational Research: The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program Experience.

    PubMed

    Links, Amanda E; Draper, David; Lee, Elizabeth; Guzman, Jessica; Valivullah, Zaheer; Maduro, Valerie; Lebedev, Vlad; Didenko, Maxim; Tomlin, Garrick; Brudno, Michael; Girdea, Marta; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Haendel, Melissa A; Mungall, Christopher J; Smedley, Damian; Hochheiser, Harry; Arnold, Andrew M; Coessens, Bert; Verhoeven, Steven; Bone, William; Adams, David; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Gahl, William A; Sincan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH UDP) applies translational research systematically to diagnose patients with undiagnosed diseases. The challenge is to implement an information system enabling scalable translational research. The authors hypothesized that similar complex problems are resolvable through process management and the distributed cognition of communities. The team, therefore, built the NIH UDP integrated collaboration system (UDPICS) to form virtual collaborative multidisciplinary research networks or communities. UDPICS supports these communities through integrated process management, ontology-based phenotyping, biospecimen management, cloud-based genomic analysis, and an electronic laboratory notebook. UDPICS provided a mechanism for efficient, transparent, and scalable translational research and thereby addressed many of the complex and diverse research and logistical problems of the NIH UDP. Full definition of the strengths and deficiencies of UDPICS will require formal qualitative and quantitative usability and process improvement measurement.

  8. Xplor-NIH for molecular structure determination from NMR and other data sources.

    PubMed

    Schwieters, Charles D; Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius

    2017-08-02

    Xplor-NIH is a popular software package for biomolecular structure determination from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and other data sources. Here, some of Xplor-NIH's most useful data-associated energy terms are reviewed, including newer alternative options for using residual dipolar coupling data in structure calculations. Further, we discuss new developments in the implementation of strict symmetry for the calculation of symmetric homo-oligomers, and in the representation of the system as an ensemble of structures to account for motional effects. Finally, the different available force fields are presented, among other Xplor-NIH capabilities. © 2017 This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. The NIH-3 immunodeficient mouse is a model for Lyme borreliosis myositis and carditis.

    PubMed Central

    Defosse, D. L.; Duray, P. H.; Johnson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental infection of immunodeficient NIH-3 (N:NIH-bg-nu-xid) mice with Borrelia burgdorferi was found to result in multisystem histopathologic lesions. In addition to T-cell deficiency due to the nude mutation, these mice have an x-linked defect affecting the B-cell maturation and the beige mutation resulting in the absence of NK cells. NIH-3 mice were susceptible to progressive infection with B. burgdorferi resulting in pancarditis, synovitis, and skeletal interstitial myositis whereas controls remained normal. Cardiomyopathy was characterized by inflammatory mononuclear infiltration and fibrillar necrosis. Synovial hyperplasia and inflammation were seen in the tibiotarsal and ulna-carpal joints. Advanced myositis was observed in peripheral skeletal muscle. Gastrointestinal submucosa, heart, and skeletal muscle were heavily colonized with B. burgdorferi. This mouse is proposed as a model for Lyme borreliosis carditis, synovitis, and myositis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1632468

  10. Distributed Cognition and Process Management Enabling Individualized Translational Research: The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program Experience

    PubMed Central

    Links, Amanda E.; Draper, David; Lee, Elizabeth; Guzman, Jessica; Valivullah, Zaheer; Maduro, Valerie; Lebedev, Vlad; Didenko, Maxim; Tomlin, Garrick; Brudno, Michael; Girdea, Marta; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Haendel, Melissa A.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Smedley, Damian; Hochheiser, Harry; Arnold, Andrew M.; Coessens, Bert; Verhoeven, Steven; Bone, William; Adams, David; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Gahl, William A.; Sincan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH UDP) applies translational research systematically to diagnose patients with undiagnosed diseases. The challenge is to implement an information system enabling scalable translational research. The authors hypothesized that similar complex problems are resolvable through process management and the distributed cognition of communities. The team, therefore, built the NIH UDP integrated collaboration system (UDPICS) to form virtual collaborative multidisciplinary research networks or communities. UDPICS supports these communities through integrated process management, ontology-based phenotyping, biospecimen management, cloud-based genomic analysis, and an electronic laboratory notebook. UDPICS provided a mechanism for efficient, transparent, and scalable translational research and thereby addressed many of the complex and diverse research and logistical problems of the NIH UDP. Full definition of the strengths and deficiencies of UDPICS will require formal qualitative and quantitative usability and process improvement measurement. PMID:27785453

  11. Calculated electric dipole moment of NiH X2Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    A calculated dipole moment of 2.39 D at R sub e = 2.79 a sub 0 is reported, obtained from complete active space SCF/configuration interaction calculations plus one natural orbital iteration. The calculation is in good agreement with the experimental value of 2.4 + or - 0.1 D measured for the lowest vibrational level. In agreement with Gray et al. (1985), it is found that the dipole moment is strongly correlated with the 3d electron population; the good agreement with experiment thus provides verification of the mixed state model of NiH. It is concluded that the electric dipole moment of NiH is a sensitive test of the quality of the NiH wave function.

  12. The INTELSAT Experience with Reconditioning of NiH2 Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalici, Frank; Dunnet, Andrew; Xu, Daphne

    1997-01-01

    INTELSAT has been reconditioning NiH2 batteries since 1983 when the INTELSAT V F-6 geosynchronous communications satellite was launched. This was the first commercial use of NiH2 batteries. INTELSAT has continued this practice on all 46 NiH2 batteries it has operated in-orbit. The batteries are of several types including the classic INTELSAT cell, the HAC re-circulating design, and the Gates Mantech design. Reconditioning is performed twice each year, prior to the Eclipse Season. At this time Water Migration problems, if present, are dealt with. Temperature limits are imposed for the discharge and charge cycles as a safety precaution. In support of in-orbit operations, it is INTELSAT's practice to perform ground based life tests. In-orbit data and ground tests results are presented and the benefits of reconditioning noted.

  13. An analysis of the NIH-supported sickle cell disease research portfolio.

    PubMed

    Gavini, Nara; Hoots, W Keith; Mensah, George A; Hanspal, Manjit

    2015-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), an inherited blood disorder is due to a single amino acid substitution on the beta chain of hemoglobin, and is characterized by anemia, severe infections, acute and chronic pain, and multi-organ damage. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is dedicated to support basic, translational and clinical science research to improve care and ultimately, to find a cure for SCD that causes such suffering. This report provides a detailed analysis of grants funded by the NIH for SCD research in Fiscal Years 2007 through 2013. During this period, the NIH supported 247 de novo grants totaling $272,210,367 that address various aspects of SCD. 83% of these funds supported research project grants investigating the following 5 scientific themes: Pathology of Sickle Red Blood Cells; Globin Gene Expression; Adhesion and Vascular Dysfunction; Neurological Complications and Organ-specific Dysfunction; and Pain Management and Intervention. The remaining 17% of total funds supported career development and training grants; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants; large Center grants; and Conference grants. Further analysis showed that the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is the largest funder of SCD research within NIH with 67% of total grants, contributing 77% of total funds; followed by the National Institute for Digestive Diseases and Kidney (NIDDK) that is funding 19% of grants, contributing 13% of total funds. The remaining 14% of grants totaling 10% of the funds were supported by all other NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs) combined. In summary, the NIH is using multiple funding mechanisms to support a sickle cell disease research agenda that is intended to advance the detection, treatment, and cure of this debilitating genetic disease.

  14. NIH and NCI grant-related changes during fiscal years 2014 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 fiscal year (FY) continued to be a challenging one for all federal agencies despite the many Congressional strategies proposed to address the U.S. budget deficit. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 passed by the House and Senate in December 2013 approved a two-year spending bill which cancelled the FY2014 and FY2015 required sequestration cuts (i.e., 4-5% National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget reduction initiated on March 1, 2013), but extended the sequestration period through FY2023. This bill passage helped minimize any further budget reductions and resulted in a final FY2014 NIH budget of 29.9 billion and a NCI budget of 4.9 billion. Both NIH and NCI worked hard to maintain awarding the same number of NIH/NCI investigator-initiated R01 and exploratory R21 grants funded in FY2014 and similar to the level seen in FY2013 and previous years (see Tables 1 and 2). Since Congress only recently passed the 2015 spending bill in December 16, 2014, the final NIH and NCI budget appropriations for FY2015 remains unknown at this time and most likely will be similar to the FY2014 budget level. The NCI overall success and funding rates for unsolicited investigator-initiated R01 applications remained at 15%, while the success rate for exploratory R21 applications was 12% in FY2014 with similar rates seen in FY2013 (see Tables 1 and 2). The success rate for biomedical research applications in the Photodynamic Therapy and laser research field will be provided for the past few years. NIH provides numerous resources to help inform the extramural biomedical research community of new and current grant applicants about new grant policy changes and the grant submission and review processes.

  15. Recent advances in Ni-H2 technology at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalezsanabria, O. D.; Britton, D. L.; Smithrick, J. J.; Reid, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has concentrated its efforts on advancing the Ni-H2 system technology for low Earth orbit applications. Component technology as well as the design principles were studied in an effort to understand the system behavior and failure mechanisms in order to increase performance and extend cycle life. The design principles were previously addressed. The component development is discussed, in particular the separator and nickel electrode and how these efforts will advance the Ni-H2 system technology.

  16. Characteristics of storage related capacity loss in Ni/H2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari

    1993-01-01

    The changes in the capacity, voltage and pressure profile of flight configuration Ni/H2 cells when they are stored for extended periods is examined. The Ni/H2 cells exhibit capacity fade phenomenon regardless of their design when they are stored at room temperature. Capacity loss also occurs if old cells (5 years old) are stored in a very low rate trickle charge (C/200 rate) condition. A periodic recharge technique leads to pressure rise in the cells. Conventional trickle charge (C/100 rate) helps in minimizing or eliminating the second plateau which is one of the characteristics of the capacity fade phenomenon.

  17. Morrison Receives NIH Award for Major Ras/Raf Breakthroughs | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Deborah Morrison, Ph.D., laboratory chief, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research (CCR), received an NIH Director’s Award in June “for major breakthroughs in elucidating the mechanisms of Ras/Raf signaling that will be critical for diagnosis and treatment of disease,” according to the NIH Director’s Awards Ceremony brochure. She was nominated by Ira Daar, Ph.D., senior investigator, Developmental Signal Transduction Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, CCR.

  18. Morrison Receives NIH Award for Major Ras/Raf Breakthroughs | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Deborah Morrison, Ph.D., laboratory chief, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research (CCR), received an NIH Director’s Award in June “for major breakthroughs in elucidating the mechanisms of Ras/Raf signaling that will be critical for diagnosis and treatment of disease,” according to the NIH Director’s Awards Ceremony brochure. She was nominated by Ira Daar, Ph.D., senior investigator, Developmental Signal Transduction Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, CCR.

  19. National Institutes of Health, Rodent 4 (NIH.R4); Calcium Metabolism and Vascular Function After Spaceflight: A Collaborative Series with NASA and NIH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Steele, Marianne; Aquillina, Rudy; Savage, Paul D. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NIH.R4 payload was a collaborative experiment conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This middeck payload was the fourth in a series of experiments focusing on developmental biology and the effects of microgravity on mammalian systems. The NIH.R4 payload was flown onboard STS-80, which launched November 19, 1996, and landed at Kennedy Space Center on December 7, 1996, and was the longest shuttle mission to date. Fourteen male Spontaneously Hypertensive rats (SHR) were flown; seven in each of two Animal Enclosure Modules (AEM) in the shuttle middeck. The flight animals were exposed to 18 days of microgravity. Two synchronous control groups were utilized for this study in addition to an asynchronous post-flight AEM control study conducted at the PI lab. The animals were fed two different calcium diets in the NASA food bar (2.0% and 0.2%) three weeks prior to launch and insight. Blood pressures were taken at pre-determined intervals and were the basis for flight selection. Upon recovery Dwight animals blood pressure was measured and a variety of tissues were collected. Project testing and data will be presented.

  20. 75 FR 3243 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Decline; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... causes and potential treatments for Alzheimer's and other dementias, researchers are focused on finding... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's... the ``NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Decline''...

  1. 75 FR 39954 - Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health; Notice of a Conference Call of the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ...; Notice of a Conference Call of the NIH Scientific Management Review Board Pursuant to section 10(a) of... call meeting of the Scientific Management Review Board. The NIH Reform Act of 2006 (Pub. L. 109-482... terminating such units. The purpose of the Scientific Management Review Board (also referred to as SMRB or...

  2. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will NIH...

  3. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will NIH...

  4. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will NIH...

  5. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will NIH...

  6. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will NIH...

  7. 76 FR 61719 - Notice of a meeting of a working group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of a meeting of a working group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel The purpose of this notice is to inform the public about a meeting of the NIH Blue Ribbon... Regency Bethesda, 7400 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814 from approximately 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. This...

  8. Findings and Implications of the Survey of Graduate Science Student Support from an NIH Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jean Anne M.

    To the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the federal agency primarily responsible for the conduct of biomedical research, the Survey of Graduate Science Student Support and Postdoctorals is important because it provides information concerning bioscience research manpower projections. To policymakers in NIH, the two main components of the survey…

  9. 76 FR 47216 - Expediting Research Tools to NIH Licensees Through the Use of Pay.gov for Rapid Processing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: NIH licensees can now expedite the receipt of research... is not trivial since waiting too long to secure research materials or tools can delay or sink a... looking to save time on their royalty transactions with NIH can easily pay royalties on Pay.gov by going...

  10. Patterns of Recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) Funding to Diagnostic Radiology Departments: Analysis Using the NIH RePORTER System.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Ana M; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to characterize recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding for diagnostic radiology departments at US medical schools. This retrospective study did not use private identifiable information and thus did not constitute human subjects research. The public NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools Expenditure and Results system was used to extract information regarding 887 NIH awards in 2015 to departments of "Radiation-Diagnostic/Oncology." Internet searches were conducted to identify each primary investigator (PI)'s university web page, which was used to identify the PI's departmental affiliation, gender, degree, and academic rank. A total of 649 awards to diagnostic radiology departments, based on these web searches, were included; awards to radiation oncology departments were excluded. Characteristics were summarized descriptively. A total of 61 unique institutions received awards. The top five funded institutions represented 33.6% of all funding. The most common institutes administering these awards were the National Cancer Institute (29.0%) and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (21.6%). Women received 15.9% of awards and 13.3% of funding, with average funding per award of $353,512 compared to $434,572 for men. PhDs received 77.7% of all awards, with average funding per award of $457,413 compared to $505,516 for MDs. Full professors received 51.2% of awards (average funding per award of $532,668), compared to assistant professors who received 18.4% of awards ($260,177). Average funding was $499,859 for multiple-PI awards vs. $397,932 for single-PI awards. Common spending categories included "neurosciences," "cancer," "prevention," and "aging." NIH funding for diagnostic radiology departments has largely been awarded to senior-ranking male PhD investigators, commonly at large major academic medical centers. Initiatives are warranted to address such disparities and promote greater diversity in NIH funding

  11. 75 FR 43535 - NIH Consensus Development Conference on Inhaled Nitric Oxide Therapy for Premature Infants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH Consensus Development Conference on Inhaled Nitric..., brain development, and brain function. Nitric oxide is a chemical compound in gas form that is sometimes..., thereby reducing progression to bronchopulmonary dysplasia and improving long-term lung health and...

  12. 75 FR 42114 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... rodents that may be housed under biosafety level (BL) 1 conditions and allows the work to proceed... conditions be exempt from the NIH Guidelines. The rationale is that these experiments pose little if any... appropriate to be maintained under BL1 conditions. The rationale is that three decades of experience...

  13. NIH Director's Award Recognizes Rapid Response to Avert Potential Health Crisis | FNLCR

    Cancer.gov

    In July 2012, members of a multidisciplinary research team of both SAIC-Frederick and NCI Center for Cancer Research scientists were recognized with the NIH Director’s Award for their outstanding work to rapidly evaluate a potential threat to the n

  14. 75 FR 46945 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; the Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  15. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Pena, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this…

  16. Effect of Handling, Storage and Cycling on Ni-H2 Cells: Second Plateau Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the effects of handling, storing, and cycling of NiH2 cells, particularly the second plateau phenomenon. Details are given on the criteria for cell selection, cell history, the second plateau capacity at C/2 discharge, and cell reversal test conditions. Tables display a gas analysis and nickel precharge.

  17. Playing Fair?: Minority Research Institutions Call for NIH to Address Funding Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    When Ph.D. science and health researchers are seeking financial support for their health science studies, more often than not they apply to the federal government's National Institutes of Health (NIH) for an RO1 research grant, which boosts a project's standing in the research community as well as the career of the applicant. Even before the NIH…

  18. 77 FR 41191 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Effectiveness of the NIH Curriculum Supplements Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ...)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the Office of Science Education, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will publish... in presenting science in a more engaging and interactive way. The supplements help K-12...

  19. The NIH R03 Award: An Initial Funding Step for Social Work Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langhorst, Diane M.; Svikis, Dace S.

    2007-01-01

    Social workers in academic and agency settings have the opportunity to do funded research using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) R03 small grant mechanism designed for discrete, clearly defined projects that can be completed within a 1- to 2-year time period with limited funding. This article describes the R03 mechanism and provides a guide…

  20. Life after the NIH: After a Flawed Policy, What's next for Librarians and Open Access?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2005-01-01

    On January 15, 2005, a standing-room-only crowd of librarians listened as a panel of experts, moderated by Columbia University's Jim Neal, voiced support for the National Institute of Health's (NIH) proposal to mandate free online access to the research it funds. This article briefly discusses some personal accounts where open access would have…

  1. From the NIH: A Systems Approach to Increasing the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Lund, P. Kay; Gammie, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to attracting, developing, and supporting the best scientists from all groups as an integral part of excellence in training. Biomedical research workforce diversity, capitalizing on the full spectrum of skills, talents, and viewpoints, is essential for solving complex human health challenges.…

  2. DCP Leading NIH Glycoscience Common Fund Program; Funding Opportunities Open | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Division of Cancer Prevention is a leading participant for a key initiative in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Glycoscience Common Fund program. This program supports development of accessible and affordable new tools and technologies for studying the role complex carbohydrates in health and disease. |

  3. Why NIH Scientists Need to Report an Invention | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    As an NIH scientist, you must report new inventions, including improvements of previously reported inventions, to the Technology Transfer Manager assigned to your Laboratory. If you do not know the name of your TTM, please call or email the Technology Transfer Center.  | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  4. Married...with Food Allergies | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Food Allergies Married...with Food Allergies Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents ... married life together and a common problem—severe food allergies. NIH MedlinePlus magazine’s Naomi Miller caught up ...

  5. Playing Fair?: Minority Research Institutions Call for NIH to Address Funding Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    When Ph.D. science and health researchers are seeking financial support for their health science studies, more often than not they apply to the federal government's National Institutes of Health (NIH) for an RO1 research grant, which boosts a project's standing in the research community as well as the career of the applicant. Even before the NIH…

  6. From the NIH: A Systems Approach to Increasing the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Lund, P. Kay; Gammie, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to attracting, developing, and supporting the best scientists from all groups as an integral part of excellence in training. Biomedical research workforce diversity, capitalizing on the full spectrum of skills, talents, and viewpoints, is essential for solving complex human health challenges.…

  7. NIH Courts Younger Researchers, Even as It Debates How Far to Go

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, a gathering held for young research faculty last week at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory was a clear expression of determination by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to help them compete for grants. The agency fears that continued Congressional budget cuts, combined with the growing number of scientists who work later into…

  8. National Institutes of Health Research Plan on Rehabilitation: NIH Medical Rehabilitation Coordinating Committee.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Ann; Rowland, Julia H; Greenwell, Thomas N; Wiggs, Cheri L; Fleg, Jerome; Joseph, Lyndon; McGowan, Joan; Panagis, James S; Washabaugh, Charles; Peng, Grace C Y; Bray, Rosalina; Cernich, Alison N; Cruz, Theresa H; Marden, Sue; Michel, Mary Ellen; Nitkin, Ralph; Quatrano, Louis; Spong, Catherine Y; Shekim, Lana; Jones, Teresa L Z; Juliano-Bult, Denise; Panchinson, David M; Chen, Daofen; Jakeman, Lyn; Knebel, Ann; Tully, Lois A; Chan, Leighton; Damiano, Diane; Tian, Biao; McInnes, Pamela; Khalsa, Partap; Reider, Eve; Shurtleff, David; Elwood, William; Ballard, Rachel; Ershow, Abby G; Begg, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    One in five Americans experiences disability that affects their daily function because of impairments in mobility, cognitive function, sensory impairment, or communication impairment. The need for rehabilitation strategies to optimize function and reduce disability is a clear priority for research to address this public health challenge. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a Research Plan on Rehabilitation that provides a set of priorities to guide the field over the next 5 years. The plan was developed with input from multiple Institutes and Centers within the NIH, the National Advisory Board for Medical Rehabilitation Research, and the public. This article provides an overview of the need for this research plan, an outline of its development, and a listing of six priority areas for research. The NIH is committed to working with all stakeholder communities engaged in rehabilitation research to track progress made on these priorities and to work to advance the science of medical rehabilitation.This article is being published almost simultaneously in the following six journals: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Physical Therapy, and Rehabilitation Psychology. Citation information is as follows: NIH Medical Rehabilitation Coordinating Committee. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2017;97(4):404-407. Copyright © Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. 2017.

  9. Guidance from an NIH workshop on designing,implementing, and reporting clinical studies of soy interventions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The NIH sponsored a scientific workshop, “Soy Protein/Isoflavone Research: Challenges in Designing and Evaluating Intervention Studies,” July 28–29, 2009. The workshop goal was to provide guidance for the next generation of soy protein/isoflavone human research. Session topics included population ex...

  10. Trusted Health Information for the Public | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... debuted on October 22, 1998, with 22 “health topic” pages—collections of links to reliable information on subjects ... twitter.com/medlineplus4you ). MedlinePlus contains: Nearly 900 health topics pages that link to health information from NIH and ...

  11. The Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with criticism of the NIH Roadmap.

    PubMed

    Crowley, William; Courtney, John; Jameson, Larry; Pardes, Herbert; Moskowitz, Jay; Orringer, Eugene; Rubenstein, Arthur; Wood, Alastair; Rettig, Richard; Ausiello, Dennis; Brenner, David; Collins, Francis; Elias, Jack; Greene, Warner; Horowitz, Ralph; Jameson, Larry; Kieff, Elliott; Thompson, Craig; Swain, Judith L

    2006-08-01

    As representatives of 50 leading academic medical centers focusing on clinical research and many of academic medicine's scientific leaders, the Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with the JCI's recent editorials on the NIH Roadmap, Elias Zerhouni's leadership, and the future directions of biomedical research.

  12. Increased association of dynamin II with myosin II in ras transformed NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yoo, Jiyun; Han, Mi-Young; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Heung-Joong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Choi, Baik-Dong; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2006-08-01

    Dynamin has been implicated in the formation of nascent vesicles through both endocytic and secretory pathways. However, dynamin has recently been implicated in altering the cell membrane shape during cell migration associated with cytoskeleton-related proteins. Myosin II has been implicated in maintaining cell morphology and in cellular movement. Therefore, reciprocal immunoprecipitation was carried out to identify the potential relationship between dynamin II and myosin II. The dynamin II expression level was higher when co-expressed with myosin II in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells than in normal NIH3T3 cells. Confocal microscopy also confirmed the interaction between these two proteins. Interestingly, exposing the NIH3T3 cells to platelet-derived growth factor altered the interaction and localization of these two proteins. The platelet-derived growth factor treatment induced lamellipodia and cell migration, and dynamin II interacted with myosin II. Grb2, a 24 kDa adaptor protein and an essential element of the Ras signaling pathway, was found to be associated with dynamin II and myosin II gene expression in the Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest that dynamin II acts as an intermediate messenger in the Ras signal transduction pathway leading to membrane ruffling and cell migration.

  13. NIH Fiscal Policy for Grant Awards in FY 2013 Released | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This Notice provides guidance about the NIH Fiscal Operations for the remainder of FY 2013 in light of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 (P.L. 113-6), signed by President Obama on March 26, 2013, and the sequestration provisions of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act, as amended, 2 U.S.C. |

  14. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Pena, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this…

  15. A Conversation with Sanjay Gupta, M.D.| NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... What You Can Do to Protect Children from Environmental Risks yosemite.epa.gov/ochp/ochpweb.nsf/content/tips.htm Health and Human Development www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/Pages/index.aspx Summer 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number 2 Page 6-8

  16. Precision Medicine: Healthcare Tailored to You | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... now the right time to begin this ambitious project," says NIH Director Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD. "Americans are engaging in improving their health and participating in health research more than ever before, electronic health records have been widely adopted, genomic analysis ...

  17. NIH Courts Younger Researchers, Even as It Debates How Far to Go

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, a gathering held for young research faculty last week at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory was a clear expression of determination by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to help them compete for grants. The agency fears that continued Congressional budget cuts, combined with the growing number of scientists who work later into…

  18. Drinking Diet Beverages During Pregnancy Linked to Child Obesity, NIH Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017 Drinking diet beverages during pregnancy linked to child obesity, NIH study suggests Children born to women who had gestational diabetes and ... who substituted water for sweetened beverages reduced their children’s obesity risk at age 7 by 17 percent. It ...

  19. Isolation and characterization of NIH 3T3 cells expressing polyomavirus small T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, T.; Satake, M.; Robins, T.; Ito, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The polyomavirus small T-antigen gene, together with the polyomavirus promoter, was inserted into retrovirus vector pGV16 which contains the Moloney sarcoma virus long terminal repeat and neomycin resistance gene driven by the simian virus 40 promoter. This expression vector, pGVST, was packaged into retrovirus particles by transfection of PSI2 cells which harbor packaging-defective murine retrovirus genome. NIH 3T3 cells were infected by this replication-defective retrovirus containing pGVST. Of the 15 G418-resistant cell clones, 8 express small T antigen at various levels as revealed by immunoprecipitation. A cellular protein with an apparent molecular weight of about 32,000 coprecipitates with small T antigen. Immunofluorescent staining shows that small T antigen is mainly present in the nuclei. Morphologically, cells expressing small T antigen are indistinguishable from parental NIH 3T3 cells and have a microfilament pattern similar to that in parental NIH 3T3 cells. Cells expressing small T antigen form a flat monolayer but continue to grow beyond the saturation density observed for parental NIH 3T3 cells and eventually come off the culture plate as a result of overconfluency. There is some correlation between the level of expression of small T antigen and the growth rate of the cells. Small T-antigen-expressing cells form small colonies in soft agar. However, the proportion of cells which form these small colonies is rather small. A clone of these cells tested did not form tumors in nude mice within 3 months after inoculation of 10/sup 6/ cells per animal. Thus, present studies establish that the small T antigen of polyomavirus is a second nucleus-localized transforming gene product of the virus (the first one being large T antigen) and by itself has a function which is to stimulate the growth of NIH 3T3 cells beyond their saturation density in monolayer culture.

  20. Human c-fgr induces a monocyte-specific enzyme in NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kazushi; Akiyama, Tetsu; Toyoshima, Kumao ); Wongsasant, Budsaba )

    1991-12-01

    The mutant c-fgr protein (p58{sup c-fgr/F523}) containing Phe-523 instead of Tyr-523 exhibited transforming activity in NIH 3T3 cells like other protein-tyrosine kinases of the src family, but normal p58{sup c-fgr} (p58{sup c-fgr/wt}) did not. The mutant protein showed tyrosine kinase activity threefold higher than that of the normal protein in vitro. Surprisingly, transfection of the normal c-fgr gene into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in induction of sodium fluoride (NaF)-sensitive {alpha}-naphthyl butyrate esterase ({alpha}-NBE), marker enzyme of cells of monocytic origin, which was not induced in v-src-, v-fgr-, or lyn-transfected NIH 3T3 cells. The NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE induced in c-fgr transfectants was shown by isoelectric focusing to have a pI of 5.2 to 5.4, a range which was the same as those for thioglycolate-induced murine peritoneal macrophages and 1{alpha}, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-treated WEHI-3B cells. Immunoblotting studies with antophosphotyrosine antibodies revealed that 58-, 62-, 75-, 120-, 200-, and 230-kDa proteins were commonly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in cells transfected with the mutated c-fgr. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of specific cellular substrate proteins is important in induction of NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE and cell transformation by p58{sup c-fgr}.

  1. Synthetic peptide TEKKRRETVEREKE derived from ezrin induces differentiation of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chulkina, Marina; Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Lebedeva, Ekaterina; Pichugin, Aleksey; Mazurov, Dmitriy; Ataullakhanov, Ravshan; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson

    2017-09-15

    Synthetic 14 AA peptide (Gepon) derived from the hinge region of ezrin, a protein that links cell surface molecules to intracellular actin filaments, accelerates and facilitates wound and ulcer healing in clinical applications. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon and involved in enhanced healing of wounds with Gepon are not yet understood. The purpose of current study was to investigate intracellular signaling pathways involved in the effect of this peptide on wild type and genetically modified (CD44 KO) NIH/3T3 embryonic mouse fibroblasts. Gepon treatment of NIH/3T3 cells resulted in morphological and biochemical changes, characteristic of differentiated fibroblasts. While treatment of NIH/3T3 cells with TGF-β1 triggered the activation of both canonical and non-canonical signaling pathways, exposure of fibroblasts to Gepon activated only the ERK1/2 dependent pathway without modulating SMAD dependent signaling pathway. Knocking out hyaluronic acid CD44 receptor did not change Gepon or TGF-β1 dependent activation of intracellular signaling pathways and assembling of α-SMA-positive filaments. Gepon dependent differentiation of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts is based on activation of ERK1/2 kinase, non-canonical intracellular signaling pathway. Our data suggest that the treatment of fibroblasts with Gepon triggers activation of the non-canonical (SMAD independent) intracellular signaling pathway that involves ERK1/2kinase phosphorylation. Activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and the increase in formation of α-SMA containing stress filaments induced by Gepon were independent on presence of CD44 receptor in NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Thus, our observation designates the significance and sufficiency of MAPK pathway mediated activation of fibroblasts with Gepon for healing of erosion, ulcers and wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating the Productivity of VA, NIH, and AHRQ Health Services Research Career Development Awardees.

    PubMed

    Finney, John W; Amundson, Erin O; Bi, Xiaoyu; Cucciare, Michael A; Eisen, Seth A; Finlay, Andrea K; Halvorson, Max A; Hayashi, Ko; Owens, Douglas K; Maisel, Natalya C; Timko, Christine; Weitlauf, Julie C; Cronkite, Ruth C

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the academic advancement and productivity of Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Career Development Award (CDA) program recipients, National Institutes of Health (NIH) K awardees in health services research (HSR), and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) K awardees. In all, 219 HSR&D CDA recipients from fiscal year (FY) 1991 through FY2010; 154 NIH K01, K08, and K23 awardees FY1991-FY2010; and 69 AHRQ K01 and K08 awardees FY2000-FY2010 were included. Most data were obtained from curricula vitae. Academic advancement, publications, grants, recognition, and mentoring were compared after adjusting for years since award, and personal characteristics, training, and productivity prior to the award. No significant differences emerged in covariate-adjusted tenure-track academic rank, number of grants as primary investigator (PI), major journal articles as first/sole author, Hirsch h-index scores, likelihood of a journal editorship position or membership in a major granting review panel, or mentoring postgraduate researchers between the HSR&D CDA and NIH K awardees from FY1991-FY2010, or among the three groups of awardees from FY2000 or later. Among those who reported grant funding levels, HSR&D CDAs from FY1991-2010 had been PI on more grants of $100,000 than NIH K awardees. HSR&D CDAs had a higher mean number of major journal articles than NIH K awardees from FY1991-2010. Findings show that all three HSR career development programs are successfully selecting and mentoring awardees, ensuring additional HSR capacity to improve the quality and delivery of high-value care.

  3. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS FROM DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUNDS (CR-LRP) § 68a.1 What is the scope and purpose of the NIH...

  4. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS FROM DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUNDS (CR-LRP) § 68a.1 What is the scope and purpose of the NIH...

  5. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS FROM DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUNDS (CR-LRP) § 68a.1 What is the scope and purpose of the NIH...

  6. Sensitivities of NIH/3T3-derived clonal cell lines to ionizing radiation: Significance for gene transfer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kasid, U.N.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Brennan, T.; Mark, G.E.; Dritschilo, A. )

    1989-06-15

    Rodent cells are frequently used as recipients in experiments involving gene transfer, isolation, and characterization. The present studies were designed to investigate the clonal responses to ionizing radiation of NIH/3T3 cells subjected to DNA-mediated gene transfer. Radiation sensitivity (D0) values were determined for the parental NIH/3T3 cell strain, six clonal cell lines transfected with DNA from radiation-resistant human tumor cells, and six nontransfected clonal cell lines. The radiation sensitivities of four transfected and two nontransfected clonal cell lines differed significantly from parental NIH/3T3 cells (P less than 0.05). Detailed karyotype analysis of two nontransfected clonal cell lines with differing radiation sensitivities showed variation in chromosomal composition. Specifically, a minute chromosome was observed to segregate consistently (in 49 of 50 metaphases) with the genome of one NIH/3T3 clone (D0 2.07 Gy) and was completely absent (from 50 metaphases) in another NIH/3T3 clone (D0 1.06 Gy). In the parental NIH/3T3 strain (D0 2.02 Gy) 10% of cells (3 of 30 metaphases) had such minute chromosomes. These findings demonstrate that the clonal cellular heterogeneity of NIH/3T3 cells is characterized by genotypic and phenotypic variations which must be considered in the experimental design involving gene transfer and expression.

  7. Using small angle solution scattering data in Xplor-NIH structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Schwieters, Charles D; Clore, G Marius

    2014-07-01

    This contribution describes the use of small and wide angle X-ray and small angle neutron scattering for biomolecular structure calculation using the program Xplor-NIH, both with and without NMR data. The current algorithms used for calculating scattering curves are described, and the use of scattering data as a structural restraint is given concrete form as a fragment of an Xplor-NIH structure calculation script. We review five examples of the use of scattering data in structure calculation, including the treatment of single domain proteins, nucleic acids, structure determination of large proteins, and the use of ensemble representations to characterize small and large amplitude motions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA-induced malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumoto, S.; Burkhardt, A.L.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    A biological function for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) DNA was demonstrated by transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. HPV 16 DNA has been found frequently in genital cancer and has been classified as a papillomavirus on the basis of DNA homology. A recombinant HPV 16 DNA (pSHPV16d), which contains a head-to-tail dimer of the full-length HPV 16 genome, induced morphologic transformation; the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. Expression of transforming activity was unique because of the long latency period (more than 4 weeks) required for induction of morphologic transformation and because the transfected DNA existed primarily in a multimeric form with some rearrangement. Furthermore, virus-specific RNAs were expressed in the transformants. The transformation of NIH 3T3 cells provides a model for analyzing the functions of HPV 16, which is associated with cervical carcinomas.

  9. Pharmacogenomic incidental findings in 308 families: The NIH Undiagnosed Disease Program experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elizabeth M.J.; Xu, Karen; Mosbrook, Emma; Links, Amanda; Guzman, Jessica; Adams, David R.; Flynn, Elise; Valkanas, Elise; Toro, Camillo; Tifft, Cynthia J.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Gahl, William A.; Sincan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Using SNP chip and exome sequence data from individuals participating in the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP), we evaluated the number and therapeutic informativeness of incidental pharmacogenetic variants. METHODS Pharmacogenomics Knowledgebase (PharmGKB) annotated sequence variants were identified in 1,101 individuals. Medication records of participants were used to identify individuals prescribed medications for which a genetic variant might alter efficacy. RESULTS 395 sequence variants, including 19 PharmGKB 1A and 1B variants, were identified in SNP chip sequence data and 388 variants, including 21 PharmGKB 1A and 1B variants, were identified in the exome sequence data. Nine participants had incidental pharmacogenetic variants associated with altered efficacy of a prescribed medication. CONCLUSIONS Despite the small size of the NIH UDP patient cohort, we identified pharmacogenetic incidental findings potentially useful for guiding therapy. Consequently, groups conducting clinical genomic studies might consider reporting of pharmacogenetic incidental findings. PMID:27253732

  10. Understanding the NIH review process: a brief guide to writing grant proposals in neurotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Burbacher, T; Guilarte, T R; Laughlin, N K; Lopachin, R; Suszkiw, J; Tilson, H

    1999-02-01

    During the past two years, the National Institutes of Health have made significant changes in the review process for investigator-initiated research grant applications in neurotoxicology. First, study sections that formerly dealt with toxicology and alcohol, respectively, have been merged. Neurotoxicology grant applications are now reviewed by ALTX-3, a study section in which the majority of members have expertise in the neuronal, biochemical or behavioral effects of alcohol, but usually not other neurotoxicants. Second, the NIH has instituted new review criteria, in which significance, approach, innovation, investigator expertise, and research environment must all be explicitly addressed by the reviews. In this article, past and present members of the ALTX-3 study section describe the NIH review process, with emphasis on how neurotoxicology applications are handled, and provide guidelines for preparing competitive applications.

  11. From the NIH: A Systems Approach to Increasing the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Lund, P. Kay; Gammie, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to attracting, developing, and supporting the best scientists from all groups as an integral part of excellence in training. Biomedical research workforce diversity, capitalizing on the full spectrum of skills, talents, and viewpoints, is essential for solving complex human health challenges. Over the past few decades, the biomedical research workforce has benefited from NIH programs aimed at enhancing diversity. However, there is considerable room for improvement, particularly at the level of independent scientists and within scientific leadership. We provide a rationale and specific opportunities to develop and sustain a diverse biomedical research workforce through interventions that promote the successful transitions to different stages on the path toward completion of training and entry into the biomedical workforce. PMID:27587850

  12. Expression of Nanog gene promotes NIH3T3 cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jingyu; Wang Xia; Chen Bing; Suo Guangli; Zhao Yanhong; Duan Ziyuan; Dai Jianwu . E-mail: jwdai@genetics.ac.cn

    2005-12-16

    Cells are the functional elements in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A large number of cells are usually needed for these purposes. However, there are numbers of limitations for in vitro cell proliferation. Nanog is an important self-renewal determinant in embryonic stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether Nanog will influence the cell cycle and cell proliferation of mature cells. In this study, we expressed Nanog in NIH3T3 cells and showed that expression of Nanog in NIH3T3 promoted cells to enter into S phase and enhanced cell proliferation. This suggests that Nanog gene might function in a similar fashion in mature cells as in ES cells. In addition, it may provide an approach for in vitro cell expansion.

  13. The Science of Eliminating Health Disparities: Summary and Analysis of the NIH Summit Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyu B.; Williams, Kester; Sanchez, Idalia; Sy, Francisco S.; Stinson, Nathaniel; Ruffin, John

    2010-01-01

    In December 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored the first NIH Summit showcasing its investment and contribution to health disparities research and unveiling a framework for moving this important field forward. The Summit, titled “The Science of Eliminating Health Disparities,” drew on extensive experience of experts leading health disparities research transformation in diverse fields. The Summit also provided a historic educational opportunity to contribute to health care reform. The theme, addressing disparities through integration of science, practice, and policy, introduced a paradigm for advancing research through transformational, translational, and transdisciplinary research. Engaging active participation throughout the Summit generated recommendations bridging science, practice, and policy, including action on social determinants of health, community engagement, broad partnerships, capacity-building, and media outreach. PMID:20147660

  14. The science of eliminating health disparities: summary and analysis of the NIH summit recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dankwa-Mullan, Irene; Rhee, Kyu B; Williams, Kester; Sanchez, Idalia; Sy, Francisco S; Stinson, Nathaniel; Ruffin, John

    2010-04-01

    In December 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored the first NIH Summit showcasing its investment and contribution to health disparities research and unveiling a framework for moving this important field forward. The Summit, titled "The Science of Eliminating Health Disparities," drew on extensive experience of experts leading health disparities research transformation in diverse fields. The Summit also provided a historic educational opportunity to contribute to health care reform. The theme, addressing disparities through integration of science, practice, and policy, introduced a paradigm for advancing research through transformational, translational, and transdisciplinary research. Engaging active participation throughout the Summit generated recommendations bridging science, practice, and policy, including action on social determinants of health, community engagement, broad partnerships, capacity-building, and media outreach.

  15. Sizing the Problem of Improving Discovery and Access to NIH-Funded Data: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study informs efforts to improve the discoverability of and access to biomedical datasets by providing a preliminary estimate of the number and type of datasets generated annually by research funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). It focuses on those datasets that are “invisible” or not deposited in a known repository. Methods We analyzed NIH-funded journal articles that were published in 2011, cited in PubMed and deposited in PubMed Central (PMC) to identify those that indicate data were submitted to a known repository. After excluding those articles, we analyzed a random sample of the remaining articles to estimate how many and what types of invisible datasets were used in each article. Results About 12% of the articles explicitly mention deposition of datasets in recognized repositories, leaving 88% that are invisible datasets. Among articles with invisible datasets, we found an average of 2.9 to 3.4 datasets, suggesting there were approximately 200,000 to 235,000 invisible datasets generated from NIH-funded research published in 2011. Approximately 87% of the invisible datasets consist of data newly collected for the research reported; 13% reflect reuse of existing data. More than 50% of the datasets were derived from live human or non-human animal subjects. Conclusion In addition to providing a rough estimate of the total number of datasets produced per year by NIH-funded researchers, this study identifies additional issues that must be addressed to improve the discoverability of and access to biomedical research data: the definition of a “dataset,” determination of which (if any) data are valuable for archiving and preservation, and better methods for estimating the number of datasets of interest. Lack of consensus amongst annotators about the number of datasets in a given article reinforces the need for a principled way of thinking about how to identify and characterize biomedical datasets. PMID:26207759

  16. Partnering with the NIH: Now part of the “Value Proposition” for start-ups

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    With its “value proposition” statement a start-up company needs to convince potential investors or pharma partners how it will add more value or solve a problem better than others. High value, low cost assets such as those from the NIH ranging from technology to funding to assistance provide such biomedical firms an excellent jump-start in reaching their goals. PMID:23476116

  17. Better Accountability Procedures Needed in NSF and NIH Research Grant Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-30

    research at colleges and universities. Peer review (expert advice of selected researchers) is the primary component of the research grant scientific...and found that the peer review and internal review systems are working reasonably well. Although the systems are basically the same at the two...agencies, the procedures differ. GAO found that some of the NIH peer review procedures have advantages over those at NSF, but believes that changes are

  18. Bonding and stability of the hydrogen storage material Mg(2)NiH(4).

    PubMed

    Häussermann, Ulrich; Blomqvist, Helen; Noréus, Dag

    2002-07-15

    Structural stability and bonding properties of the hydrogen storage material Mg(2)NiH(4) (monoclinic, C2/c, Z = 8) were investigated and compared to those of Ba(2)PdH(4) (orthorhombic, Pnma, Z = 8) using ab initio density functional calculations. Both compounds belong to the family of complex transition metal hydrides. Their crystal structures contain discrete tetrahedral 18 electron complexes T(0)H(4)(4-) (T = Ni, Pd). However, the bonding situation in the two systems was found to be quite different. For Ba(2)PdH(4), the electronic density of states mirrors perfectly the molecular states of the complex PdH(4)(4-), whereas for Mg(2)NiH(4) a clear relation between molecular states of TH(4)(4-) and the density of states of the solid-state compound is missing. Differences in bonding of Ba(2)PdH(4) and Mg(2)NiH(4) originate in the different strength of the T-H interactions (Pd[bond]H interactions are considerably stronger than Ni[bond]H ones) and in the different strength of the interaction between the alkaline-earth metal component and H (Ba[bond]H interactions are substantially weaker than Mg[bond]H ones). To lower the hydrogen desorption temperature of Mg(2)NiH(4), it is suggested to destabilize this compound by introducing defects in the counterion matrix surrounding the tetrahedral Ni(0)H(4)(4-) complexes. This might be achieved by substituting Mg for Al.

  19. NIH Common Fund - Disruptive Proteomics Technologies - Challenges and Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    This Request for Information (RFI) is directed toward determining how best to accelerate research in disruptive proteomics technologies. The Disruptive Proteomics Technologies (DPT) Working Group of the NIH Common Fund wishes to identify gaps and opportunities in current technologies and methodologies related to proteome-wide measurements.  For the purposes of this RFI, “disruptive” is defined as very rapid, very significant gains, similar to the "disruptive" technology development that occurred in DNA sequencing technology.

  20. From the lab - New Discovery About Middle-Age Weight Gain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Middle-Age Weight Gain Follow us Photo: AdobeStock New Discovery About Middle-Age Weight Gain A TEAM ... findings could lead to the development of a new type of weight-loss medication. SOURCE: NIH Research ...

  1. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 Film | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 ... of Medicine To view Medical Movies on the Web, go to: www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/collections/ ...

  2. Then & Now: Research Pays Off for All Americans Back to the Future: Slimming Down the Old-Fashioned Way | NIH ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pays Off for All Americans Back to the Future: Slimming Down the Old-Fashioned Way Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of Contents Fast Facts According to the NIH: Globally, more than 1 billion adults are ...

  3. NIH-IEEE 2015 Strategic Conference on Healthcare Innovations and Point-of-Care Technologies for Prec

    Cancer.gov

    NIH and the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (IEEE/EMBS) hosted the third iteration of the Healthcare Innovations and Point-of-Care Technologies Conference last week.

  4. Dr. George Koob: "Alcohol use disorders are a major problem …" | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Dr. George Koob: "Alcohol use disorders are a major problem …" Past Issues / ... is Director of the NIH's National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. A renowned expert on how ...

  5. 77 FR 10758 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Application for Collaboration With the NIH Center for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Application for collaboration with the NIH Center... development, screening, hit to lead chemistry, lead optimization, chemical biology studies, drug development... moving promising therapeutics into human clinical trials. NCTT uses an application and evaluation...

  6. Welcome from Library Director Donald A.B. Lindberg, M.D. | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Welcome to the NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Donald ... about their efforts to cure disease. Lastly, the magazine's lively graphics, fun quizzes and practical tips have ...

  7. Drinking water disinfection byproduct iodoacetic acid induces tumorigenic transformation of NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Weiwei; Wang, Xia; Liu, Xiaolin; Jiang, Songhui; Pi, Jingbo; Zheng, Yuxin; He, Gengsheng; Qu, Weidong

    2013-06-04

    Iodoacetic acid (IAA) and iodoform (IF) are unregulated iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) found in drinking water. Their presence in the drinking water of China has not been documented. Recently, the carcinogenic potential of IAA and IF has been a concern because of their mutagenicity in bacteria and genotoxicity in mammalian cells. Therefore, we measured their concentrations in Shanghai drinking water and assessed their cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and ability to transform NIH3T3 cells to tumorigenic lines. The concentrations of IAA and IF in Shanghai drinking water varied between summer and winter with maximum winter levels of 2.18 μg/L IAA and 0.86 μg/L IF. IAA with a lethal concentration 50 (LC50) of 2.77 μM exhibited more potent cytotoxicity in NIH3T3 cells than IF (LC50 = 83.37 μM). IAA, but not IF, induced a concentration-dependent DNA damage measured by γ-H2AX staining and increased tail moment in single-cell gel electrophoresis. Neither IAA nor IF increased micronucleus frequency. Prolonged exposure of NIH3T3 cells to IAA increased the frequencies of transformed cells with anchorage-independent growth and agglutination with concanavalin A. IAA-transformed cells formed aggressive fibrosarcomas after inoculation into Balb/c nude mice. This study demonstrated that IAA has a biological activity that is consistent with a carcinogen and human exposure should be of concern.

  8. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Howard H.; Deschamps, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Physician scientists (researchers with either M.D. or M.D.-Ph.D. degrees) have the unique potential to combine clinical perspectives with scientific insight, and their participation in biomedical research has long been an important topic for policymakers and educators. Given the recent changes in the research environment, an update and extension of earlier studies of this population was needed. Our findings show that physician scientists are less likely to take a major role in biomedical research than they were in the past. The number of physician scientists receiving postdoctoral research training and career development awards is at an all-time low. Physician scientists today, on average, receive their first major research award (R01 equivalent) at a later age than in the 1980s. The number of first-time R01-equivalent awards to physicians is at the same level as it was 30 yr ago, but physicians now represent a smaller percentage of the grant recipients. The long-term decline in the number of physicians entering research careers was temporarily halted during the period of substantial U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget growth (1998–2003). These gains are lost, however, in the subsequent years when NIH budgets failed to keep pace with rising costs.— Garrison, H. H., Deschamps, A. M. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century. PMID:24297696

  9. Engineering behaviour change in an epidemic: the epistemology of NIH-funded HIV prevention science.

    PubMed

    Green, Adam; Kolar, Kat

    2015-05-01

    Social scientific and public health literature on National Institutes of Health-funded HIV behavioural prevention science often assumes that this body of work has a strong biomedical epistemological orientation. We explore this assumption by conducting a systematic content analysis of all NIH-funded HIV behavioural prevention grants for men who have sex with men between 1989 and 2012. We find that while intervention research strongly favours a biomedical orientation, research into the antecedents of HIV risk practices favours a sociological, interpretive and structural orientation. Thus, with respect to NIH-funded HIV prevention science, there exists a major disjunct in the guiding epistemological orientations of how scientists understand HIV risk, on the one hand, and how they engineer behaviour change in behavioural interventions, on the other. Building on the extant literature, we suggest that the cause of this disjunct is probably attributable not to an NIH-wide positivist orientation, but to the specific standards of evidence used to adjudicate HIV intervention grant awards, including randomised controlled trials and other quantitative measures of intervention efficacy.

  10. Are we studying what matters? Health priorities and NIH-funded biomedical engineering research.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Jessica B; Paltiel, A David; Saltzman, W Mark

    2010-07-01

    With the founding of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in 1999, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) made explicit its dedication to expanding research in biomedical engineering. Ten years later, we sought to examine how closely federal funding for biomedical engineering aligns with U.S. health priorities. Using a publicly accessible database of research projects funded by the NIH in 2008, we identified 641 grants focused on biomedical engineering, 48% of which targeted specific diseases. Overall, we found that these disease-specific NIH-funded biomedical engineering research projects align with national health priorities, as quantified by three commonly utilized measures of disease burden: cause of death, disability-adjusted survival losses, and expenditures. However, we also found some illnesses (e.g., cancer and heart disease) for which the number of research projects funded deviated from our expectations, given their disease burden. Our findings suggest several possibilities for future studies that would serve to further inform the allocation of limited research dollars within the field of biomedical engineering.

  11. Global climate change and health: developing a research agenda for the NIH.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Joshua P; Jessup, Christine M

    2009-01-01

    Global climate change is receiving worldwide attention because of its anticipated impacts on the Earth's physical and biological systems. Through its effects on natural and human environments, climate change will likely impact economic viability and human health and well-being. The impact of climate change on human health is likely to be complex and significant, including effects on cancers, cardiovascular and respiratory disease, food-, water-, and vector-borne diseases, heat-related illness, mental and social well-being, nutrition, trauma, and vulnerable demographic sectors. Most assessments predict that these effects will disproportionately affect the poor, the elderly and the young, especially those living in Africa and Southeast Asia, where environmental conditions are poor, health infrastructure is weak and the burden of disease is great. Enormous efforts are underway to plan and finance climate change adaptation programs within national governments (including multiple U.S. agencies), United Nations organizations and private philanthropies. However, these endeavors are proceeding with a relatively poor understanding of the nature and magnitude of probable effects of climate change on health. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) already funds a portfolio of projects that are indirectly related to the concerns posed by global climate change. At the NIH, we have recently established an agency-wide planning group to assess the research questions in health and medicine that climate change presents, to link this agenda to parallel activities across other agencies of the U.S. Government (USG), and to advance a NIH research agenda in this area.

  12. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Matthieu, Monica M; Bellamy, Jennifer L; Peña, Juan B; Scott, Lionel D

    2008-12-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this article describes the authors' perspectives regarding the considerations to accept postdocs, key elements in their training programs, lessons learned, and outcomes from training. To provide an overview of the funding mechanism and distribution of funds to institutes and centers relevant to social work, data were obtained from databases that list NIH training grants awarded each year. Study results showed a limited amount of variation in fellows' training plans. The majority of training time was spent building skill in manuscript preparation, grant development, and socialization to the NIH culture. Above all other themes, the desire for advanced research training was a critically important factor in accepting a postdoctoral training position. Finally, the outcomes of training may have a profound effect on professional development, yet the long-term trajectory of postdoctoral fellows in academic positions as compared with people without postdoctoral training in social work programs requires further study.

  13. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Peña, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this article describes the authors' perspectives regarding the considerations to accept postdocs, key elements in their training programs, lessons learned, and outcomes from training. To provide an overview of the funding mechanism and distribution of funds to institutes and centers relevant to social work, data were obtained from databases that list NIH training grants awarded each year. Study results showed a limited amount of variation in fellows' training plans. The majority of training time was spent building skill in manuscript preparation, grant development, and socialization to the NIH culture. Above all other themes, the desire for advanced research training was a critically important factor in accepting a postdoctoral training position. Finally, the outcomes of training may have a profound effect on professional development, yet the long-term trajectory of postdoctoral fellows in academic positions as compared with people without postdoctoral training in social work programs requires further study. PMID:28316462

  14. Building integrated approaches for the proteomics of complex, dynamic systems: NIH programs in technology and infrastructure development.

    PubMed

    Sheeley, Douglas M; Breen, Joseph J; Old, Susan E

    2005-01-01

    Proteomics technology and methods remain inadequate. Technological constraints contribute to an artificially static view of complex biological systems and a barrier between quantitative and interaction studies. Several NIH programs combine proteomics technology development with research on challenging biological problems to drive progress. A new initiative of the NIH Roadmap focuses on characterization of dynamic systems. The success of these programs will be judged by their impact on relevant biological problems.

  15. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  16. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  17. WE-G-BRB-00: NIH-Funded Research: Instrumental in the Pursuit of Clinical Trials and Technological Innovations

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Over the past 20 years the NIH has funded individual grants, program projects grants, and clinical trials which have been instrumental in advancing patient care. The ways that each grant mechanism lends itself to the different phases of translating research into clinical practice will be described. Major technological innovations, such as IMRT and proton therapy, have been advanced with R01-type and P01-type funding and will be discussed. Similarly, the role of program project grants in identifying and addressing key hypotheses on the potential of 3D conformal therapy, normal tissue-guided dose escalation and motion management will be described. An overview will be provided regarding how these technological innovations have been applied to multi-institutional NIH-sponsored trials. Finally, the panel will discuss regarding which research questions should be funded by the NIH to inspire the next advances in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the different funding mechanisms of the NIH Learn about research advances that have led to innovation in delivery Review achievements due to NIH-funded program project grants in radiotherapy over the past 20 years Understand example advances achieved with multi-institutional clinical trials NIH.

  18. Resistance to oncogenic transformation in revertant R1 of human ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzumaki, N.; Ogiso, Y.; Oda, A.; Fujita, H.; Suzuki, H.; Sato, C.; Mullauer, L.

    1989-05-01

    A flat revertant, R1, was isolated from human activated c-Ha-ras-1 (hu-ac-Ha-ras) gene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells (EJ-NIH 3T3) treated with mutagens. R1 contained unchanged transfected hu-ac-Ha-ras DNA and expressed high levels of hu-ac-Ha-ras-specific mRNA and p21 protein. Transfection experiments revealed that NIH 3T3 cells could be transformed by DNA from R1 cells but R1 cells could not be retransformed by Kirsten sarcoma virus, DNA from EJ-NIH 3T3 cells, hu-ac-Ha-ras, v-src, v-mos, simian virus 40 large T antigen, or polyomavirus middle T antigen. Somatic cell hybridization studies showed that R1 was not retransformed by fusion with NIH 3T3 cells and suppressed anchorage independence of EJ-NIH 3T3 and hu-ac-Ha-ras gene-transformed rat W31 cells in soft agar. These results suggest that the reversion and resistance to several oncogenes in R1 is due n not to cellular defects in the production of the transformed phenotype but rather to enhancement of cellular mechanisms that suppress oncogenic transformation.

  19. Prolonged Induction Activates Cebpα Independent Adipogenesis in NIH/3T3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Wu, Kuan-Sju; Hee, Siow-Wey; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Yeh, Jih-I

    2013-01-01

    Background 3T3-L1 cells are widely used to study adipogenesis and insulin response. Their adipogenic potential decreases with time in the culture. Expressing exogenous genes in 3T3-L1 cells can be challenging. This work tries to establish and characterize an alternative model of cultured adipocytes that is easier to work with than the 3T3-L1 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Induced cells were identified as adipocytes based on the following three characteristics: (1) Accumulation of triglyceride droplets as demonstrated by oil red O stain. (2) Transport rate of 2-deoxyglucose increased after insulin stimulation. (3) Expression of fat specific genes such as Fabp4 (aP2), Slc2a4 (Glut4) and Pparg (PPARγ). Among the cell lines induced under different conditions in this study, only NIH/3T3 cells differentiated into adipocytes after prolonged incubation in 3T3-L1 induction medium containing 20% instead of 10% fetal bovine serum. Rosiglitazone added to the induction medium shortened the incubation period from 14 to 7 days. The PI3K/AKT pathway showed similar changes upon insulin stimulation in these two adipocytes. C/EBPα mRNA was barely detectable in NIH/3T3 adipocytes. NIH/3T3 adipocytes induced in the presence of rosiglitazone showed higher 2-deoxyglucose transport rate after insulin stimulation, expressed less Agt (angiotensinogen) and more PPARγ. Knockdown of C/EBPα using shRNA blocked 3T3-L1 but not NIH/3T3 cell differentiation. Mouse adipose tissues from various anatomical locations showed comparable levels of C/EBPα mRNA. Conclusions/Significance NIH/3T3 cells were capable of differentiating into adipocytes without genetic engineering. They were an adipocyte model that did not require the reciprocal activation between C/EBPα and PPARγ to differentiate. Future studies in the C/EBPα independent pathways leading to insulin responsiveness may reveal new targets to diabetes treatment. PMID:23326314

  20. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Inflammatory (NIH-IV) Prostatitis in Chinese Men

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunlei; Zhang, Zhifu; Lu, Zheng; Liao, Ming; Zhang, Youjie; Xie, Yuanliang; Guo, Xuefeng; Yu, Xiaoxiang; Yang, Xiaobo; Gao, Yong; Tan, Aihua; Mo, Zengnan

    2013-01-01

    Background While many investigators have studied symptomatic prostatitis, little research has been done with regard to asymptomatic (NIH-IV) prostatitis. Purpose To describe the prevalence of and risk factors for NIH-IV prostatitis among a large male population. Methods The study population was comprised of 1,868 men at the second phase recruitment of a population-based cohort in China. Asymptomatic and symptomatic men were defined by the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis (CP) Symptom Index. Meanwhile, EPS specimens and their leukocyte count were collected. Lifestyle and demographic characteristics were obtained through a questionnaire. Results Prevalence of NIH-IV prostatitis was 21.1% among 1,868 asymptomatic men aged 19–78 years and increased with age. After adjusteing for potential confounding variables (age, smoking habits, alcohol drinking habits, education, physical activity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes), age remained a significant factor for NIH-IV prostatitis (OR = 1.35; 95% CI = 1.06–1.71; P = 0.01) and the risk of NIH-IV prostatitis was significantly higher in smokers≧15 pack/years than non-smokers (OR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.01–1.75; P = 0.03). In addition, compared with non-drinkers, the OR of NIH-IV prostatitis in drinkers ≧1 drinks/week was 1.35 (95% CI = 1.03, 1.77, p = 0.02) after adjusting for the other variables above. In addition, having less than a college education may be a risk factor for NIH-IV prostatitis, although a statistically significant difference did not exist in our data (OR = 1.22; 95% CI = 0.97–1.52; P = 0.08). Conclusions Our findings suggest that NIH-IV prostatitis is prevalent in China. Age, smoking, drinking and lower education levels were associated with an increased risk of NIH-IV prostatitis. The prevalence of NIH-IV prostatitis should be taken into account when estimating the total prevalence of CP in future studies. PMID:23967188

  1. Regulation of Na+-H+ exchange in normal NIH-3T3 cells and in NIH-3T3 cells expressing the ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, N.E.; Knapik, J.; Strebel, F.; Tarpley, W.G.; Gorman, R.R.

    1989-04-01

    Our laboratory and others have demonstrated that Na+-H+ exchange can be regulated by two different pathways; one that is mediated by an inositol trisphosphate-stimulated increase in intracellular calcium activity, and one that is mediated by an increase in protein kinase C activity. To determine whether one of these pathways is more important than the other, or whether one pathway is physiologically relevant, we employed normal NIH-3T3 cells (3T3 cells) and NIH-3T3 cells expressing the EJ human bladder ras oncogene (EJ cells). The EJ cells were chosen because they provide a genetic model that does not exhibit serum- or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated inositol trisphosphate release or Ca2+ mobilization. It was found that serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange was more pronounced in EJ cells than in control 3T3 cells. As expected, serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in 3T3 cells was inhibited by chelating intracellular Ca2+ with the intracellular Ca2+ chelator quin2, by the intracellular Ca2+ antagonist 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8), and by the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine. In contrast, these agents did not inhibit serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells. Activators of protein kinase C (e.g., 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol or biologically active phorbol esters) were found to stimulate Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells to the same extent as serum. However, these agents were considerably less effective than serum in control 3T3 cells. Despite these findings, PDGF did not stimulate diacylglycerol levels in EJ cells.

  2. Developing Entrepreneurial and Technology Commercialization Policies to Promote Cooperative Ventures Between NIH and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossomando, Edward F.

    2001-03-01

    The NIH has had a great influence in guiding the biological research agenda for the last half of the 20th century. This may change if the increases in research funding from the private sector that occurred in the last ten years continue into the 21st century. Ten years ago, industry supplied 55% of the US R&D funds. In 2000, industry support of R&D had increased to 76%, with industry carrying out 70% of the nations applied and 91% of its development research. Given this shift, one of the biggest challenges that NIH may face in coming years is sharing control of America's research agenda with industry. For this to occur policies that encourage cooperative ventures with industry are needed. In a unique experiment, I was invited to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), one of the 25 NIH Institutes and Centers, to develop programs and policies that would promote interactions with industry. This talk will introduce the strategy and programs developed to commercialize products and technologies from basic science discoveries and introducing an entrepreneurial atmosphere within the Institute. The results of this experiment will be discussed by comparing differences between discovery-driven and customer-driven innovation. One outcome of this experience is a greater appreciation of the obstacles to introducing disruptive technologies into the market place and of the paradigms that serve as barriers to commercialization. One recommendation is that the NIDCR consider a policy that allows for some participation by industry in setting the research and training agenda of the Institute, and that a mechanism for industry input be introduced into its administrative organization.

  3. Interpreting Patterns of Low Scores on the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery.

    PubMed

    Holdnack, James A; Tulsky, David S; Brooks, Brian L; Slotkin, Jerry; Gershon, Richard; Heinemann, Allen W; Iverson, Grant L

    2017-08-01

    The National Institutes of Health Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function Cognition Battery is comprised of seven cognitive tests, including two tests measuring crystallized cognitive ability (i.e., vocabulary and reading) and five tests measuring fluid cognitive functioning (i.e., working memory, memory, speed of processing, and executive functioning). This study presents comprehensive base rate tables for the frequency of low scores in adults and older adults from the normative sample. Participants were 843 adults, ages 20-85, from the NIH Toolbox standardization sample who completed all seven cognition tests. Rates of low scores were derived for standard age-adjusted and fully-demographically-adjusted scores at multiple cut-scores. Base rates were stratified by education, crystallized intellectual ability, and cognitive domain. Using the five demographically-adjusted fluid cognitive test scores, 45.9% of adults obtained one or more scores at or below the 16th percentile, and 16.8% obtained one or more score at or below the 5th percentile, which is consistent with findings from other neurocognitive test batteries. Based on the study findings, nearly 50% of adults in the general population would meet psychometric criteria for a diagnosis of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Mild Neurocognitive Disorder (MND). We developed new psychometric criteria for identifying MND using the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery that reduce the false positive rate. Knowing these multivariate normative base rates will help researchers and clinicians interpret NIH Toolbox scores in people with neurodevelopmental, psychiatric, medical, neurological, and neurodegenerative disorders that affect cognitive functioning.

  4. Radiation Oncology and Online Patient Education Materials: Deviating From NIH and AMA Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Arpan V; Hansberry, David R; Agarwal, Nitin; Clump, David A; Heron, Dwight E

    2016-11-01

    Physicians encourage patients to be informed about their health care options, but much of the online health care-related resources can be beneficial only if patients are capable of comprehending it. This study's aim was to assess the readability level of online patient education resources for radiation oncology to conclude whether they meet the general public's health literacy needs as determined by the guidelines of the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Medical Association (AMA). Radiation oncology-related internet-based patient education materials were downloaded from 5 major professional websites (American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American Brachytherapy Society, RadiologyInfo.org, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group). Additional patient education documents were downloaded by searching for key radiation oncology phrases using Google. A total of 135 articles were downloaded and assessed for their readability level using 10 quantitative readability scales that are widely accepted in the medical literature. When all 10 assessment tools for readability were taken into account, the 135 online patient education articles were written at an average grade level of 13.7 ± 2.0. One hundred nine of the 135 articles (80.7%) required a high school graduate's comprehension level (12th-grade level or higher). Only 1 of the 135 articles (0.74%) met the AMA and NIH recommendations for patient education resources to be written between the third-grade and seventh-grade levels. Radiation oncology websites have patient education material written at an educational level above the NIH and AMA recommendations; as a result, average American patients may not be able to fully understand them. Rewriting radiation oncology patient education resources would likely contribute to the patients' understanding of their health and treatment options, making each physician-patient interaction more productive

  5. Development of the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Gastrointestinal Symptom Scales

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Brennan M.R.; Hays, Ron D.; Bolus, Roger; Melmed, Gil Y.; Chang, Lin; Whitman, Cynthia; Khanna, Puja P.; Paz, Sylvia H.; Hays, Tonya; Reise, Steve; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) is a standardized set of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) that cover physical, mental, and social health. The aim of this study was to develop the NIH PROMIS gastrointestinal (GI) symptom measures. METHODS We first conducted a systematic literature review to develop a broad conceptual model of GI symptoms. We complemented the review with 12 focus groups including 102 GI patients. We developed PROMIS items based on the literature and input from the focus groups followed by cognitive debriefing in 28 patients. We administered the items to diverse GI patients (irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and other common GI disorders) and a census-based US general population (GP) control sample. We created scales based on confirmatory factor analyses and item response theory modeling, and evaluated the scales for reliability and validity. RESULTS A total of 102 items were developed and administered to 865 patients with GI conditions and 1,177 GP participants. Factor analyses provided support for eight scales: gastroesophageal reflux (13 items), disrupted swallowing (7 items), diarrhea (5 items), bowel incontinence/soilage (4 items), nausea and vomiting (4 items), constipation (9 items), belly pain (6 items), and gas/bloat/flatulence (12 items). The scales correlated significantly with both generic and disease-targeted legacy instruments, and demonstrate evidence of reliability. CONCLUSIONS Using the NIH PROMIS framework, we developed eight GI symptom scales that can now be used for clinical care and research across the full range of GI disorders. PMID:25199473

  6. The Michigan Clinical Research Collaboratory: following the NIH Roadmap to the community.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Thomas L; Green, Lee A

    2006-01-01

    This case study describes a successful National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap application that has created a new and innovative translational science partnership at the University of Michigan. We describe the institution within which the grant application was developed, the role played by the Department of Family Medicine, the role of prior successes in translational and community-based research, the associated infrastructure development, the application development process, and some features of the final project. A partnership among 2 clinical and research centers of excellence at the University of Michigan, 3 practice-based research networks, and a clinical research center was created as the platform to support an NIH Roadmap. The result was a funded 3.3 million dollar, 3-year project supporting the creation of the Michigan Clinical Research Collaboratory (MCRC), a research infrastructure that will support the design, conduct, and dissemination of community-based clinical translation research. The MCRC depends to a considerable degree on the experience, expertise, and infrastructure in community-based translational research of the Department of Family Medicine. The successful funding of the MCRC grant will support influential translational research programs of high impact and visibility that would not otherwise have occurred. The MCRC grant is an acknowledgment of the important research to be done in the community, the critical nature of infrastructure investment and prior work in competing successfully for such funding, and the personnel and information technology investments required for success. Collaboration between practice-based family medicine investigators and traditional clinical investigators at the University of Michigan has led to successful competition for an NIH Roadmap grant, which has led in turn to greater institutional recognition for the importance and legitimacy of community-based translational research.

  7. NiH2 Reliability Impact Upon Hubble Space Telescope Battery Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was designed to be deployed and later serviced for maintenance and upgrades, as required, by the space shuttle fleet, with a Goodyear mission life for the batteries. HST was deployed 380 miles above the Earth, from Space Shuttle Discovery, on April 25, 1990. Four servicing missions, (SM1, SM2, SM3A, AND SM3B) have been performed. Astronauts have replaced or modified optics, solar arrays, a power control unit, and various science packages. A fifth Servicing Mission, SM4 scheduled for early 2004, is planned to replace the batteries for the first time. The HST is powered by solar array wings and nickel hydrogen (NiH2) Duracell batteries, which are grouped into two parallel battery modules of three parallel batteries each. With a design life of 7 years at launch, these batteries have surpassed 12 years in orbit, which gives HST the highest number of charge/discharge cycles of any NiH2 battery currently in low earth orbit (LEO) application. Being in a LEO orbit, HST has a 45-minute umbra period, during which spacecraft power requirements normally force the batteries into discharge, and a 60-minute sun period, which is available for battery recharge. The intent of this paper is to address the issue of NiH2 battery reliability and how battery capacity degradation can impact scheduling of a Servicing Mission to bring replacement batteries to HST, and extend mission life till deployment of Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), planned for 2008 at the earliest.

  8. Report of the NIH Task Force on Research Standards for Chronic Low Back Pain†

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Dworkin, Samuel F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Andersson, Gunnar; Borenstein, David; Carragee, Eugene; Carrino, John; Chou, Roger; Cook, Karon; DeLitto, Anthony; Goertz, Christine; Khalsa, Partap; Loeser, John; Mackey, Sean; Panagis, James; Rainville, James; Tosteson, Tor; Turk, Dennis; Von Korff, Michael; Weiner, Debra K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite rapidly increasing intervention, functional disability due to chronic low back pain (cLBP) has increased in recent decades. We often cannot identify mechanisms to explain the major negative impact cLBP has on patients’ lives. Such cLBP is often termed non-specific, and may be due to multiple biologic and behavioral etiologies. Researchers use varied inclusion criteria, definitions, baseline assessments, and outcome measures, which impede comparisons and consensus. The NIH Pain Consortium therefore charged a Research Task Force (RTF) to draft standards for research on cLBP. The resulting multidisciplinary panel recommended using 2 questions to define cLBP; classifying cLBP by its impact (defined by pain intensity, pain interference, and physical function); use of a minimal data set to describe research participants (drawing heavily on the PROMIS methodology); reporting “responder analyses” in addition to mean outcome scores; and suggestions for future research and dissemination. The Pain Consortium has approved the recommendations, which investigators should incorporate into NIH grant proposals. The RTF believes these recommendations will advance the field, help to resolve controversies, and facilitate future research addressing the genomic, neurologic, and other mechanistic substrates of chronic low back pain. We expect the RTF recommendations will become a dynamic document, and undergo continual improvement. Perspective A Task Force was convened by the NIH Pain Consortium, with the goal of developing research standards for chronic low back pain. The results included recommendations for definitions, a minimal dataset, reporting outcomes, and future research. Greater consistency in reporting should facilitate comparisons among studies and the development of phenotypes. PMID:26388962

  9. REPORT OF THE NIH TASK FORCE ON RESEARCH STANDARDS FOR CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Dworkin, Samuel F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Andersson, Gunnar; Borenstein, David; Carragee, Eugene; Carrino, John; Chou, Roger; Cook, Karon; DeLitto, Anthony; Goertz, Christine; Khalsa, Partap; Loeser, John; Mackey, Sean; Panagis, James; Rainville, James; Tosteson, Tor; Turk, Dennis; Von Korff, Michael; Weiner, Debra K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite rapidly increasing intervention, functional disability due to chronic low back pain (cLBP) has increased in recent decades. We often cannot identify mechanisms to explain the major negative impact cLBP has on patients’ lives. Such cLBP is often termed non-specific, and may be due to multiple biologic and behavioral etiologies. Researchers use varied inclusion criteria, definitions, baseline assessments, and outcome measures, which impede comparisons and consensus. The NIH Pain Consortium therefore charged a Research Task Force (RTF) to draft standards for research on cLBP. The resulting multidisciplinary panel recommended using 2 questions to define cLBP; classifying cLBP by its impact (defined by pain intensity, pain interference, and physical function); use of a minimal data set to describe research participants (drawing heavily on the PROMIS methodology); reporting “responder analyses” in addition to mean outcome scores; and suggestions for future research and dissemination. The Pain Consortium has approved the recommendations, which investigators should incorporate into NIH grant proposals. The RTF believes these recommendations will advance the field, help to resolve controversies, and facilitate future research addressing the genomic, neurologic, and other mechanistic substrates of chronic low back pain. We expect the RTF recommendations will become a dynamic document, and undergo continual improvement. Perspective A Task Force was convened by the NIH Pain Consortium, with the goal of developing research standards for chronic low back pain. The results included recommendations for definitions, a minimal dataset, reporting outcomes, and future research. Greater consistency in reporting should facilitate comparisons among studies and the development of phenotypes. PMID:24787228

  10. The Michigan Clinical Research Collaboratory: Following the NIH Roadmap to the Community

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Thomas L.; Green, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE This case study describes a successful National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap application that has created a new and innovative translational science partnership at the University of Michigan. METHODS We describe the institution within which the grant application was developed, the role played by the Department of Family Medicine, the role of prior successes in translational and community-based research, the associated infrastructure development, the application development process, and some features of the final project. RESULTS A partnership among 2 clinical and research centers of excellence at the University of Michigan, 3 practice-based research networks, and a clinical research center was created as the platform to support an NIH Roadmap. The result was a funded $3.3 million, 3-year project supporting the creation of the Michigan Clinical Research Collaboratory (MCRC), a research infrastructure that will support the design, conduct, and dissemination of community-based clinical translation research. The MCRC depends to a considerable degree on the experience, expertise, and infrastructure in community-based translational research of the Department of Family Medicine. CONCLUSIONS The successful funding of the MCRC grant will support influential translational research programs of high impact and visibility that would not otherwise have occurred. The MCRC grant is an acknowledgment of the important research to be done in the community, the critical nature of infrastructure investment and prior work in competing successfully for such funding, and the personnel and information technology investments required for success. Collaboration between practice-based family medicine investigators and traditional clinical investigators at the University of Michigan has led to successful competition for an NIH Roadmap grant, which has led in turn to greater institutional recognition for the importance and legitimacy of community-based translational research. PMID

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Ni/H2 and Li-Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John W.; White, Ralph E.; Dougal, Roger A.

    2001-01-01

    The modelling effort outlined in this viewgraph presentation encompasses the following topics: 1) Electrochemical Deposition of Nickel Hydroxide; 2) Deposition rates of thin films; 3) Impregnation of porous electrodes; 4) Experimental Characterization of Nickel Hydroxide; 5) Diffusion coefficients of protons; 6) Self-discharge rates (i.e., oxygen-evolution kinetics); 7) Hysteresis between charge and discharge; 8) Capacity loss on cycling; 9) Experimental Verification of the Ni/H2 Battery Model; 10) Mathematical Modeling Li-Ion Batteries; 11) Experimental Verification of the Li-Ion Battery Model; 11) Integrated Power System Models for Satellites; and 12) Experimental Verification of Integrated-Systems Model.

  12. Community resources and technologies developed through the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program.

    PubMed

    Satterlee, John S; Beckel-Mitchener, Andrea; McAllister, Kim; Procaccini, Dena C; Rutter, Joni L; Tyson, Frederick L; Chadwick, Lisa Helbling

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes resources and technologies generated by the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program that may be useful to epigenomics researchers investigating a variety of diseases including cancer. Highlights include reference epigenome maps for a wide variety of human cells and tissues, the development of new technologies for epigenetic assays and imaging, the identification of novel epigenetic modifications, and an improved understanding of the role of epigenetic processes in a diversity of human diseases. We also discuss future needs in this area including exploration of epigenomic variation between individuals, single-cell epigenomics, environmental epigenomics, exploration of the use of surrogate tissues, and improved technologies for epigenome manipulation.

  13. Potentiostatic and ac impedance studies of the hydrogen electrodes used in Ni/H2 batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Helloco, Jean-Guy; Bojkov, Hristo; Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    In a study of electrode activity for hydrogen evolution and hydrogen ionization, knowledge of the detailed kinetics and of the surface coverage by adsorbed hydrogen is essential. In the Ni/H2 battery, the hydrogen electrode is subjected to high hydrogen pressure; elucidation of the variation of kinetic parameters with hydrogen pressure is therefore of interest. Potentiostatic and ac impedance spectroscopic techniques were used in the present study. The equivalent circuit of the reaction, the kinetic parameters, and their pressure dependence have been determined.

  14. Linking the NIH strategic plan to the research agenda for social workers in health and aging.

    PubMed

    Raveis, Victoria H; Gardner, Daniel S; Berkman, Barbara; Harootyan, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Although social work has a long and distinctive tradition of practice-relevant research aimed at enhancing the health and well-being of older adults, the profession has been underrepresented among the ranks of academic researchers and the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) scientific endeavors. In this article, the inherent capacities of social workers to generate and disseminate empirical health-related knowledge are discussed and recent developments in social work's geriatric research infrastructure are described. Emerging domains for advancing the profession's contribution to practice-relevant geriatric research on the federal level are identified and the next steps toward advancing the field's research agenda are posed.

  15. Impedances of Ni electrodes and Ni/H2 cells from different manufacturers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The consistency of impedance measurements within each group of flightweigth Ni/H2 cells being tested for Space Station Freedom confirms that impedance measurements are reproducible provided that the same conditions of cycling and storage are maintained. However, electrodes and cells from different manufacturers vary widely, even with the same cycling and storage conditions. Measurements on cells from two manufacturers that have been cycled for 500-800 cycles show that there are not only major changes upon cycling, but there are substantial differences in the behavior of cells from different manufacturers with cycling.

  16. Cognitive functioning in socially anxious adults: insights from the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery

    PubMed Central

    Troller-Renfree, Sonya V.; Barker, Tyson V.; Pine, Daniel S.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Theory suggests that individuals with social anxiety manifest unique patterns of cognition with less efficient fluid cognition and unperturbed crystallized cognition; however, empirical support for these ideas remains inconclusive. The heterogeneity of past findings may reflect unreliability in cognitive assessments or the influence of confounding variables. The present study examined the relations among social anxiety and performance on the reliable, newly established NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery. Results indicate that high socially anxious adults performed as well as low anxious participants on all measures of fluid cognition. However, high socially anxious adults demonstrated enhanced crystallized cognitive abilities relative to a low socially anxious comparison group. PMID:26106346

  17. A relevant in vitro ELISA test in alternative to the in vivo NIH test for human rabies vaccine batch release.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Richard; Alberti, Monique; Poirier, Bertrand; Jallet, Corinne; Tordo, Noël; Morgeaux, Sylvie

    2013-12-05

    To assess the quality of vaccine batches before release, international regulation requires the control of potency of each lot of human rabies vaccines by the in vivo NIH challenge test. Meanwhile, the 3Rs strategy for animal testing encourages the replacement of the in vivo potency test by an in vitro assay. Consequently, since more than 10 years, an ELISA method has been implemented by ANSM in parallel to the NIH test for rabies vaccines lots. It consists in the evaluation of the glycoprotein content using a monoclonal antibody recognizing the trimeric native form of the glycoprotein. This ELISA method is able 1) to monitor the consistency of production with a similar profile than the NIH; 2) to detect a low quantity of glycoprotein in vaccines and 3) to agree with the manufacturer's NIH results by declaring a non compliant batch. This ELISA which characterizes the immunogenic form of the glycoprotein formulated in vaccines seems to be relevant to replace the NIH test and is a promising candidate to be standardized by a collaborative study.

  18. Comparing cutaneous research funded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) with the US skin disease burden.

    PubMed

    Hagstrom, Erika L; Patel, Shivani; Karimkhani, Chante; Boyers, Lindsay N; Williams, Hywel C; Hay, Roderick J; Weinstock, Martin A; Armstrong, April W; Dunnick, Cory A; Margolis, David J; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2015-09-01

    Disease burden should be an important component for guiding research funding. We sought to examine the relationship between dermatologic research funded from 2012 to 2013 by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and US skin disease burden as measured by disability-adjusted life years in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study. A cross-sectional analysis was independently performed by 2 researchers who matched projects from the 2012 to 2013 NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools with 15 skin conditions and their respective disability-adjusted life years from Global Burden of Disease 2010. The NIH funded 1108 projects spanning the 15 skin conditions. Melanoma received almost half of the total skin condition budget (49.5%). Melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer, and leprosy were funded above what would be suggested by their disease burden, whereas dermatitis, acne vulgaris, pruritus, urticaria, decubitus ulcer, fungal skin diseases, alopecia areata, cellulitis, and scabies appeared underfunded. Bacterial skin diseases, viral skin diseases, and psoriasis were well matched with disease burden. Disease burden is one of many factors that may be used to guide priority-setting decisions. Skin disease burden measured by disability-adjusted life year metrics partially correlates with NIH funding prioritization. Comparing US disease burden with NIH funding suggests possible underfunded and overfunded skin diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The NIH Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats Program: overview and special challenges.

    PubMed

    Jett, David A

    2016-06-01

    Intentional exposures to toxic chemicals can stem from terrorist attacks, such as the release of sarin in the Tokyo subway system in 1995, as well as from toxic industrial accidents that are much more common. Developing effective medical interventions is a critical component of the overall strategy to overcome the challenges of chemical emergencies. These challenges include the rapid and lethal mode of action of many toxic chemicals that require equally fast-acting therapies, the large number of chemicals that are considered threats, and the diverse demographics and vulnerabilities of those who may be affected. In addition, there may be long-term deleterious effects in survivors of a chemical exposure. Several U.S. federal agencies are invested in efforts to improve preparedness and response capabilities during and after chemical emergencies. For example, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) Program supports investigators who are developing therapeutics to reduce mortality and morbidity from chemical exposures. The program awards grants to individual laboratories and includes contract resource facilities and interagency agreements with Department of Defense laboratories. The range of high-quality research within the NIH CounterACT Program network is discussed.

  20. Assessment of self-reported negative affect in the NIH Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Pilkonis, Paul A; Choi, Seung W; Salsman, John M; Butt, Zeeshan; Moore, Tara L; Lawrence, Suzanne M; Zill, Nicholas; Cyranowski, Jill M; Kelly, Morgen A R; Knox, Sarah S; Cella, David

    2013-03-30

    We report on the selection of self-report measures for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox that are suitable for assessing the full range of negative affect including sadness, fear, and anger. The Toolbox is intended to serve as a "core battery" of assessment tools for cognition, sensation, motor function, and emotional health that will help to overcome the lack of consistency in measures used across epidemiological, observational, and intervention studies. A secondary goal of the NIH Toolbox is the identification of measures that are flexible, efficient, and precise, an agenda best fulfilled by the use of item banks calibrated with models from item response theory (IRT) and suitable for adaptive testing. Results from a sample of 1763 respondents supported use of the adult and pediatric item banks for emotional distress from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS(®)) as a starting point for capturing the full range of negative affect in healthy individuals. Content coverage for the adult Toolbox was also enhanced by the development of a scale for somatic arousal using items from the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ) and scales for hostility and physical aggression using items from the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Howard H; Deschamps, Anne M

    2014-03-01

    Physician scientists (researchers with either M.D. or M.D.-Ph.D. degrees) have the unique potential to combine clinical perspectives with scientific insight, and their participation in biomedical research has long been an important topic for policymakers and educators. Given the recent changes in the research environment, an update and extension of earlier studies of this population was needed. Our findings show that physician scientists are less likely to take a major role in biomedical research than they were in the past. The number of physician scientists receiving postdoctoral research training and career development awards is at an all-time low. Physician scientists today, on average, receive their first major research award (R01 equivalent) at a later age than in the 1980s. The number of first-time R01-equivalent awards to physicians is at the same level as it was 30 yr ago, but physicians now represent a smaller percentage of the grant recipients. The long-term decline in the number of physicians entering research careers was temporarily halted during the period of substantial U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget growth (1998-2003). These gains are lost, however, in the subsequent years when NIH budgets failed to keep pace with rising costs.

  2. Steering a New Course for Stem Cell Research: NIH's Intramural Center for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Francis S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The phenomenal progress made in stem cell biology in the past few years has infused the field of regenerative medicine with a great deal of scientific enthusiasm. However, along with the excitement of discovery comes a new sense of translational urgency. The prospect of using embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell tools and technologies to produce cell-based therapies and other treatments is no longer a distant dream; it is a very real opportunity that demands our attention today. As with most new fields, regenerative medicine has experienced some significant growing pains, and we have identified a number of key obstacles to progress. Given our role as the lead U.S. biomedical research agency and the world's largest supporter of medical research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has a responsibility to find ways to reduce or remove many of these obstacles and, consequently, has—and continues—to respond to these challenges in a variety of ways. In this brief essay, we will review our progress and highlight a new development: the founding of a Center for Regenerative Medicine on the NIH campus. PMID:23197635

  3. VII. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): factor structure for 3 to 15 year olds.

    PubMed

    Mungas, Dan; Widaman, Keith; Zelazo, Philip David; Tulsky, David; Heaton, Robert K; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David L; Gershon, Richard C

    2013-08-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used the evaluate the dimensional structure underlying the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB) and the measures chosen to serve as concurrent validity criteria for the NIH Toolbox CB. These results were used to evaluate the convergent and discriminant validity of the CB in children ranging from 3 to 15 years of age. Results were evaluated separately for a 3- to 6-year-old group and a 8- to 15-year-old group because different validation measures were used in these age groups. Three distinct dimensions were found for the 3- to 6-year-old group: Vocabulary, Reading, and Fluid Abilities. Five dimensions were found for 8-15 year olds: Vocabulary, Reading, Episodic Memory, Working Memory, and Executive Function/Processing Speed. CB measures and their validation analogues consistently defined common factors in a pattern that broadly supported the convergent and discriminant validity of the CB, but results showed higher intercorrelation and less differentiation of cognitive dimensions in younger than in older children and in older children compared with adults. Age was strongly related to the cognitive dimensions underlying test performance in both groups of children and results are consistent with broader literature showing increasing differentiation of cognitive abilities associated with the rapid brain development that occurs from early childhood into adulthood.

  4. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): Validation of Executive Function Measures in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zelazo, Philip David; Anderson, Jacob E.; Richler, Jennifer; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Conway, Kevin P.; Gershon, Richard; Weintraub, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This study describes psychometric properties of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) executive function measures in an adult sample. The NIHTB-CB was designed for use in epidemiologic studies and clinical trials for ages 3 to 85. A total of 268 self-described healthy adults were recruited at four university-based sites, using stratified sampling guidelines to target demographic variability for age (20–85 years), gender, education and ethnicity. The NIHTB-CB contains two computer-based instruments assessing executive function: the Dimensional Change Card Sort (a measure of cognitive flexibility) and a flanker task (a measure of inhibitory control and selective attention). Participants completed the NIHTB-CB, corresponding gold standard convergent and discriminant measures, and sociodemographic questionnaires. A subset of participants (N = 89) was retested 7 to 21 days later. Results reveal excellent sensitivity to age-related changes during adulthood, excellent test–retest reliability, and adequate to good convergent and discriminant validity. The NIH Toolbox EF measures can be used effectively in epidemiologic and clinical studies. PMID:24960301

  5. Oxidative changes and apoptosis induced by 1800-MHz electromagnetic radiation in NIH/3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qingxia; Wang, Minglian; Wu, Shuicai; Ma, Xuemei; An, Guangzhou; Liu, Huan; Xie, Fei

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the potential adverse effects of mobile phone radiation, we studied reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) after intermittent exposure (5 min on/10 min off, for various durations from 0.5 to 8 h) to an 1800-MHz GSM-talk mode electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at an average specific absorption rate of 2 W/kg. A 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate fluorescence probe was used to detect intracellular ROS levels, immunofluorescence was used to detect γH2AX foci as a marker for DNA damage, and flow cytometry was used to measure apoptosis. Our results showed a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels after EMR exposure and it reached the highest level at an exposure time of 1 h (p < 0.05) followed by a slight decrease when the exposure continued for as long as 8 h. No significant effect on the number of γH2AX was detected after EMR exposure. The percentage of late-apoptotic cells in the EMR-exposed group was significantly higher than that in the sham-exposed groups (p < 0.05). These results indicate that an 1800-MHz EMR enhances ROS formation and promotes apoptosis in NIH/3T3 cells.

  6. A screen of the NIH Clinical Collection small molecule library identifies potential anti-coronavirus drugs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianzhong; Forrest, J Craig; Zhang, Xuming

    2015-02-01

    With the recent emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus in humans and the outbreak of devastating porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus in swine, therapeutic intervention is urgently needed. However, anti-coronavirus drugs currently are not available. In an effort to assist rapid development of anti-coronavirus drugs, here we screened the NIH Clinical Collection in cell culture using a luciferase reporter-expressing recombinant murine coronavirus. Of the 727 compounds screened, 84 were found to have a significant anti-coronavirus effect. Further experiments revealed that 51 compounds blocked virus entry while 19 others inhibited viral replication. Additional validation studies with the top 3 inhibitors (hexachlorophene, nitazoxanide and homoharringtonine) demonstrated robust anti-coronavirus activities (a reduction of 6 to 8log10 in virus titer) with an IC50 ranging from 11nM to 1.2μM. Furthermore, homoharringtonine and hexachlorophene exhibited broad antiviral activity against diverse species of human and animal coronaviruses. Since the NIH Clinical Collection consists of compounds that have already been through clinical trials, these small molecule inhibitors have a great potential for rapid development as anti-coronavirus drugs.

  7. Alteration of glycolipids in ras-transfected NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, G.R.; Aaronson, S.A.; Brady, R.O.; Fishman, P.H.

    1987-09-01

    Glycosphingolipid alterations upon viral transformation are well documented. Transformation of mouse 3T3 cells with murine sarcoma viruses results in marked decreases in the levels of gangliosides GM1 and GD1a and an increase in gangliotriaosylceramide. The transforming oncogenes of these viruses have been identified as members of the ras gene family. The authors analyzed NIH 3T3 cells transfected with human H-, K- and N-ras oncogenes for their glycolipid composition and expression of cell surface gangliosides. Using conventional thin-layer chromatographic analysis, they found that the level of GM3 was increased and that of GD1a was slightly decreased or unchanged, and GM1 was present but not in quantifiable levels. Cell surface levels of GM1 were determined by /sup 125/I-labeled cholera toxin binding to intact cells. GD1a was determined by cholera toxin binding to cells treated with sialidase prior to toxin binding. All ras-transfected cells had decreased levels of surface GM1 and GD1 as compared to logarithmically growing normal NIH 3T3 cells. Levels of GM1 and, to a lesser extent, GD1a increased as the latter cells became confluent. Using a monoclonal antibody assay, they found that gangliotriaosylceramide was present in all ras-transfected cells studied but not in logarithmically growing untransfected cells. These results indicated that ras oncogenes derived form human tumors are capable of inducing alterations in glycolipid composition.

  8. Assessment of self-reported negative affect in the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Pilkonis, Paul A.; Choi, Seung W.; Salsman, John; Butt, Zeeshan; Moore, Tara L.; Lawrence, Suzanne M.; Zill, Nicholas; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Kelly, Morgen A. R.; Knox, Sarah S.; Cella, David

    2012-01-01

    We report on the selection of self-report measures for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox that are suitable for assessing the full range of negative affect including sadness, fear, and anger. The Toolbox is intended to serve as a “core battery” of assessment tools for cognition, sensation, motor function, and emotional health that will help to overcome the lack of consistency in measures used across epidemiological, observational, and intervention studies. A secondary goal of the NIH Toolbox is the identification of measures that are flexible, efficient, and precise, an agenda best fulfilled by the use of item banks calibrated with models from item response theory (IRT) and suitable for adaptive testing. Results from a sample of 1,763 respondents supported use of the adult and pediatric item banks for emotional distress from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) as a starting point for capturing the full range of negative affect in healthy individuals. Content coverage for the adult Toolbox was also enhanced by the development of a scale for somatic arousal using items from the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ) and scales for hostility and physical aggression using items from the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ). PMID:23083918

  9. Ethics in Psychiatric Research: A Review of 25 Years of NIH-funded Empirical Research Projects

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, James; Bante, Holly; Hadley, Whitney B.

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper reviews the past 25 years of empirical research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on matters of ethics in psychiatric research. Methods Using the NIH RePORTER and Medline databases, we identified 43 grants and 77 publications that involved the empirical study of a matter of ethics in research involving mental health service users. Results These articles provide original and useful information on important topics, most especially the capacity to consent and the voluntariness of consent. For example, participants who share a diagnosis vary widely in levels of cognitive impairment that correlate with decisional capacity, and capacity to consent can be enhanced easily using iterative consent processes. Few articles address matters of justice or benefits in research, particularly from the perspectives of participants. No articles address matters of privacy, confidentiality, or researcher professionalism. Conclusions Despite the usefulness of data from the studies conducted to date, current research on research ethics in psychiatry does not adequately address the concerns of service users as expressed in recent publications. PMID:23259152

  10. From the NIH: A Systems Approach to Increasing the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce.

    PubMed

    Valantine, Hannah A; Lund, P Kay; Gammie, Alison E

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to attracting, developing, and supporting the best scientists from all groups as an integral part of excellence in training. Biomedical research workforce diversity, capitalizing on the full spectrum of skills, talents, and viewpoints, is essential for solving complex human health challenges. Over the past few decades, the biomedical research workforce has benefited from NIH programs aimed at enhancing diversity. However, there is considerable room for improvement, particularly at the level of independent scientists and within scientific leadership. We provide a rationale and specific opportunities to develop and sustain a diverse biomedical research workforce through interventions that promote the successful transitions to different stages on the path toward completion of training and entry into the biomedical workforce. © 2016 H. A. Valantine et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Evaluation and the NIH clinical and translational science awards: a "top ten" list.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Harold Alan; Abedin, Zainab; Blank, Arthur E; Mazmanian, Paul E

    2013-12-01

    Since 2006, a total of 61 Clinical and Translational Science Institutes (CTSAs) have been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), with the aim of reducing translation time from a bench discovery to when it impacts patients. This special issue of Evaluation & the Health Professions focuses on evaluation within and across the large, complex system of the CTSA Program of NIH. Through insights gained by reading the articles in this special edition and the experience of the authors, a "top ten" list of lessons learned and insights gained is presented. The list outlines issues that face those who evaluate the influence of the CTSA Program, as they work to anticipate what will be needed for continuing success. Themes include (1) considering the needs of stakeholders, (2) the perspective of the evaluators, (3) the importance of service improvement, (4) the importance of teams and people, (5) costs and return on investments, (6) methodology considerations to evaluate the CTSA enterprise, (7) innovation in evaluation, (8) defining the transformation of research, (9) evaluating the long-term impact of the CTSAs on public health, and (10) contributing to science policy formulation and implementation. The establishment of the CTSA Program, with its mandated evaluation component, has not only influenced the infrastructure and nature of translational research but will continue to impact policy and management in science.

  12. The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program and Network: Applications to modern medicine.

    PubMed

    Gahl, William A; Mulvihill, John J; Toro, Camilo; Markello, Thomas C; Wise, Anastasia L; Ramoni, Rachel B; Adams, David R; Tifft, Cynthia J

    2016-04-01

    The inability of some seriously and chronically ill individuals to receive a definitive diagnosis represents an unmet medical need. In 2008, the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP) was established to provide answers to patients with mysterious conditions that long eluded diagnosis and to advance medical knowledge. Patients admitted to the NIH UDP undergo a five-day hospitalization, facilitating highly collaborative clinical evaluations and a detailed, standardized documentation of the individual's phenotype. Bedside and bench investigations are tightly coupled. Genetic studies include commercially available testing, single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis, and family exomic sequencing studies. Selected gene variants are evaluated by collaborators using informatics, in vitro cell studies, and functional assays in model systems (fly, zebrafish, worm, or mouse). In seven years, the UDP received 2954 complete applications and evaluated 863 individuals. Nine vignettes (two unpublished) illustrate the relevance of an undiagnosed diseases program to complex and common disorders, the coincidence of multiple rare single gene disorders in individual patients, newly recognized mechanisms of disease, and the application of precision medicine to patient care. The UDP provides examples of the benefits expected to accrue with the recent launch of a national Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN). The UDN should accelerate rare disease diagnosis and new disease discovery, enhance the likelihood of diagnosing known diseases in patients with uncommon phenotypes, improve management strategies, and advance medical research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Recruiting post-doctoral fellows into global health research: selecting NIH Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows.

    PubMed

    Heimburger, Douglas C; Warner, Tokesha L; Carothers, Catherine Lem; Blevins, Meridith; Thomas, Yolanda; Gardner, Pierce; Primack, Aron; Vermund, Sten H

    2014-08-01

    From 2008 to 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows Program (FICRF) provided 1-year mentored research training at low- and middle-income country sites for American and international post-doctoral health professionals. We examined the FICRF applicant pool, proposed research topics, selection process, and characteristics of enrollees to assess trends in global health research interest and factors associated with applicant competitiveness. The majority (58%) of 67 US and 57 international Fellows were women, and 83% of Fellows had medical degrees. Most applicants were in clinical fellowships (41%) or residencies (24%). More applicants proposing infectious disease projects were supported (59%) than applicants proposing non-communicable disease (NCD) projects (41%), although projects that combined both topic areas were most successful (69%). The numbers of applicants proposing research on NCDs and the numbers of these applicants awarded fellowships rose dramatically over time. Funding provided to the FICRF varied significantly among NIH Institutes and Centers and was strongly associated with the research topics awarded. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Recruiting Post-Doctoral Fellows into Global Health Research: Selecting NIH Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows

    PubMed Central

    Heimburger, Douglas C.; Warner, Tokesha L.; Carothers, Catherine Lem; Blevins, Meridith; Thomas, Yolanda; Gardner, Pierce; Primack, Aron; Vermund, Sten H.

    2014-01-01

    From 2008 to 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows Program (FICRF) provided 1-year mentored research training at low- and middle-income country sites for American and international post-doctoral health professionals. We examined the FICRF applicant pool, proposed research topics, selection process, and characteristics of enrollees to assess trends in global health research interest and factors associated with applicant competitiveness. The majority (58%) of 67 US and 57 international Fellows were women, and 83% of Fellows had medical degrees. Most applicants were in clinical fellowships (41%) or residencies (24%). More applicants proposing infectious disease projects were supported (59%) than applicants proposing non-communicable disease (NCD) projects (41%), although projects that combined both topic areas were most successful (69%). The numbers of applicants proposing research on NCDs and the numbers of these applicants awarded fellowships rose dramatically over time. Funding provided to the FICRF varied significantly among NIH Institutes and Centers and was strongly associated with the research topics awarded. PMID:24865678

  15. VII. NIH TOOLBOX COGNITION BATTERY (CB): FACTOR STRUCTURE FOR 3 TO 15 YEAR OLDS

    PubMed Central

    Mungas, Dan; Widaman, Keith; Zelazo, Philip David; Tulsky, David; Heaton, Robert K.; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David L.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used the evaluate the dimensional structure underlying the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB) and the measures chosen to serve as concurrent validity criteria for the NIH Toolbox CB. These results were used to evaluate the convergent and discriminant validity of the CB in children ranging from 3 to 15 years of age. Results were evaluated separately for a 3- to 6-year-old group and a 8- to 15-year-old group because different validation measures were used in these age groups. Three distinct dimensions were found for the 3- to 6-year-old group: Vocabulary, Reading, and Fluid Abilities. Five dimensions were found for 8–15 year olds: Vocabulary, Reading, Episodic Memory, Working Memory, and Executive Function/Processing Speed. CB measures and their validation analogues consistently defined common factors in a pattern that broadly supported the convergent and discriminant validity of the CB, but results showed higher intercorrelation and less differentiation of cognitive dimensions in younger than in older children and in older children compared with adults. Age was strongly related to the cognitive dimensions underlying test performance in both groups of children and results are consistent with broader literature showing increasing differentiation of cognitive abilities associated with the rapid brain development that occurs from early childhood into adulthood. PMID:23952205

  16. NIH Roundtable on Opportunities to Advance Research on Neurologic and Psychiatric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Gail; Jauch, Edward; Jagoda, Andrew; Allen, Michael H; Anglin, Deirdre; Barsan, William G; Berger, Rachel P; Bobrow, Bentley J; Boudreaux, Edwin D; Bushnell, Cheryl; Chan, Yu-Feng; Currier, Glenn; Eggly, Susan; Ichord, Rebecca; Larkin, Gregory L; Laskowitz, Daniel; Neumar, Robert W; Newman-Toker, David E; Quinn, James; Shear, Katherine; Todd, Knox H; Zatzick, Douglas

    2010-11-01

    The Institute of Medicine Committee on the Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System (2003) identified a need to enhance the research base for emergency care. As a result, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Task Force on Research in Emergency Medicine was formed to enhance NIH support for emergency care research. Members of the NIH Task Force and academic leaders in emergency care participated in 3 Roundtable discussions to prioritize current opportunities for enhancing and conducting emergency care research. We identify key research questions essential to advancing the science of emergency care and discuss the barriers and strategies to advance research by exploring the collaboration between NIH and the emergency care community. Experts from emergency medicine, neurology, psychiatry, and public health assembled to review critical areas in need of investigation, current gaps in knowledge, barriers, and opportunities. Neurologic emergencies included cerebral resuscitation, pain, stroke, syncope, traumatic brain injury, and pregnancy. Mental health topics included suicide, agitation and delirium, substances, posttraumatic stress, violence, and bereavement. Presentations and group discussion firmly established the need for translational research to bring basic science concepts into the clinical arena. A coordinated continuum of the health care system that ensures rapid identification and stabilization and extends through discharge is necessary to maximize overall patient outcomes. There is a paucity of well-designed, focused research on diagnostic testing, clinical decisionmaking, and treatments in the emergency setting. Barriers include the limited number of experienced researchers in emergency medicine, limited dedicated research funding, and difficulties of conducting research in chaotic emergency environments stressed by crowding and limited resources. Several themes emerged during the course of the roundtable discussion, including the need

  17. Spatial learning in the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock and RLA-I/RHA-I rats: revisiting the relationship with unconditioned and conditioned anxiety.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Membrives, Esther; López-Aumatell, Regina; Blázquez, Gloria; Cañete, Toni; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-05-15

    To characterize learning/memory profiles for the first time in the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock, and to examine whether these are associated with anxiety, we evaluated NIH-HS rats for spatial learning/memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) and in the following anxiety/fear tests: the elevated zero-maze (ZM; unconditioned anxiety), a context-conditioned fear test and the acquisition of two-way active avoidance (conditioned anxiety). NIH-HS rats were compared with the Roman High- (RHA-I) and Low-Avoidance (RLA-I) rat strains, given the well-known differences between the Roman strains/lines in anxiety-related behavior and in spatial learning/memory. The results show that: (i) As expected, RLA-I rats were more anxious in the ZM test, displayed more frequent context-conditioned freezing episodes and fewer avoidances than RHA-I rats. (ii) Scores of NIH-HS rats in these tests/tasks mostly fell in between those of the Roman rat strains, and were usually closer to the values of the RLA-I strain. (iii) Pigmented NIH-HS (only a small part of NIH-HS rats were albino) rats were the best spatial learners and displayed better spatial memory than the other three (RHA-I, RLA-I and NIH-HS albino) groups. (iv) Albino NIH-HS and RLA-I rats also showed better learning/memory than the RHA-I strain. (v) Within the NIH-HS stock, the most anxious rats in the ZM test presented the best learning and/or memory efficiency (regardless of pigmentation). In summary, NIH-HS rats display a high performance in spatial learning/memory tasks and a passive coping strategy when facing conditioned conflict situations. In addition, unconditioned anxiety in NIH-HS rats predicts better spatial learning/memory.

  18. Measurement Properties of the NIH-Minimal Dataset Dutch Language Version in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Boer, Annemarie; Dutmer, Alisa L; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Stewart, Roy E; Deyo, Richard A; Reneman, Michiel F; Soer, Remko

    2017-10-01

    Validation study with cross-sectional and longitudinal measurements. To translate the US National Institutes of Health (NIH)-minimal dataset for clinical research on chronic low back pain into the Dutch language and to test its validity and reliability among people with chronic low back pain. The NIH developed a minimal dataset to encourage more complete and consistent reporting of clinical research and to be able to compare studies across countries in patients with low back pain. In the Netherlands, the NIH-minimal dataset has not been translated before and measurement properties are unknown. Cross-cultural validity was tested by a formal forward-backward translation. Structural validity was tested with exploratory factor analyses (comparative fit index, Tucker-Lewis index, and root mean square error of approximation). Hypothesis testing was performed to compare subscales of the NIH dataset with the Pain Disability Index and the EurQol-5D (Pearson correlation coefficients). Internal consistency was tested with Cronbach α and test-retest reliability at 2 weeks was calculated in a subsample of patients with Intraclass Correlation Coefficients and weighted Kappa (κω). In total, 452 patients were included of which 52 were included for the test-retest study. factor analysis for structural validity pointed into the direction of a seven-factor model (Cronbach α = 0.78). Factors and total score of the NIH-minimal dataset showed fair to good correlations with Pain Disability Index (r = 0.43-0.70) and EuroQol-5D (r = -0.41 to -0.64). Reliability: test-retest reliability per item showed substantial agreement (κω=0.65). Test-retest reliability per factor was moderate to good (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient = 0.71). The Dutch language version measurement properties of the NIH-minimal were satisfactory. N/A.

  19. Room-temperature metal-hydride discharge source, with observations on NiH and FeH.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Raphaël; Ashworth, Stephen H; Crozet, Patrick; Field, Robert W; Forthomme, Damien; Harker, Heather; Richard, Cyril; Ross, Amanda J

    2009-11-26

    A metal sputtering source suitable for laboratory production of metal hydrides is described. Sputtering from pure nickel or iron in an Ar/H(2) discharge is analyzed at low resolution. High resolution laser excitation and dispersed fluorescence spectra of NiH have also been recorded. The source has been designed to operate with a ferromagnetic circuit for Zeeman spectroscopy. Signals from the source are strong enough to record dispersed fluorescence from NiH by Fourier transform interferometry in magnetic fields up to 1 T. We establish that FeH can also be formed in this source.

  20. Report of the NIH Task Force on Research Standards for Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Samuel F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Andersson, Gunnar; Borenstein, David; Carragee, Eugene; Carrino, John; Chou, Roger; Cook, Karon; Delitto, Anthony; Goertz, Christine; Khalsa, Partap; Loeser, John; Mackey, Sean; Panagis, James; Rainville, James; Tosteson, Tor; Turk, Dennis; Von Korff, Michael; Weiner, Debra K.

    2015-01-01

    Note from PTJ's Editor in Chief: Both investigators and readers get frustrated reading research on low back pain because of different definitions of “chronic” and different outcome measures. Lack of consensus on study methods makes it difficult to determine if contradictory findings are based on different methods or different interventions; lack of consensus also prevents synthesis across studies. Dr. Partap Khalsa, Deputy Director, National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, announced the release of Research Standards for Chronic Low Pain, and the hope is that future investigations will adopt them and reduce variability in research reporting. The task force on research standards was an international, multidisciplinary team including Anthony Delitto, PT, PhD, FAPTA. Its findings have been published in leading pain journals. PTJ is among the first professional journals to share the report with its readers. Despite rapidly increasing intervention, functional disability due to chronic low back pain (cLBP) has increased in recent decades. We often cannot identify mechanisms to explain the major negative impact cLBP has on patients' lives. Such cLBP is often termed non-specific and may be due to multiple biologic and behavioral etiologies. Researchers use varied inclusion criteria, definitions, baseline assessments, and outcome measures, which impede comparisons and consensus. Therefore, NIH Pain Consortium charged a Research Task Force (RTF) to draft standards for research on cLBP. The resulting multidisciplinary panel recommended using 2 questions to define cLBP; classifying cLBP by its impact (defined by pain intensity, pain interference, and physical function); use of a minimum dataset to describe research participants (drawing heavily on the PROMIS methodology); reporting “responder analyses” in addition to mean outcome scores; and suggestions for future research and dissemination. The Pain Consortium has approved the recommendations, which

  1. Sugars and risk of mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Tasevska, Natasha; Park, Yikyung; Jiao, Li; Hollenbeck, Albert; Subar, Amy F; Potischman, Nancy

    2014-05-01

    Although previous studies have linked intake of sugars with incidence of cancer and other chronic diseases, its association with mortality remains unknown. We investigated the association of total sugars, added sugars, total fructose, added fructose, sucrose, and added sucrose with the risk of all-cause, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other-cause mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. The participants (n = 353,751), aged 50-71 y, were followed for up to 13 y. Intake of individual sugars over the previous 12 mo was assessed at baseline by using a 124-item NIH Diet History Questionnaire. In fully adjusted models (fifth quartile compared with first quartile), all-cause mortality was positively associated with the intake of total sugars [HR (95% CI): 1.13 (1.06, 1.20); P-trend < 0.0001], total fructose [1.10 (1.04, 1.17); P-trend < 0.0001], and added fructose [1.07 (1.01, 1.13); P-trend = 0.005) in women and total fructose [1.06 (1.01, 1.10); P-trend = 0.002] in men. In men, a weak inverse association was found between other-cause mortality and dietary added sugars (P-trend = 0.04), sucrose (P-trend = 0.03), and added sucrose (P-trend = 0.006). Investigation of consumption of sugars by source showed that the positive association with mortality risk was confined only to sugars from beverages, whereas the inverse association was confined to sugars from solid foods. In this large prospective study, total fructose intake was weakly positively associated with all-cause mortality in both women and men, whereas added sugar, sucrose, and added sucrose intakes were inversely associated with other-cause mortality in men. In our analyses, intake of added sugars was not associated with an increased risk of mortality. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015.

  2. Immunolocalization of the cellular src protein in interphase and mitotic NIH c-src overexpresser cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The mouse mAb, mAb 327, that recognizes specifically both pp60v-src and pp60c-src in a wide variety of cells, has been used to determine precisely the various locations of pp60c-src in NIH c-src overexpresser cells, using the technique of immunofluorescence microscopy. In interphase cells, the protein exhibits two main distributions: one that appears uniform and in association with the cell surface and the other that is patchy and juxtanuclear and coincides with the centrosomes. The juxtanuclear aggregation of pp60c-src-containing patches depends on microtubules and does not seem to occur within the Golgi apparatus and the rough ER. At the G2-to-M-phase transition, a drastic change in the localization patterns of pp60c-src takes place. We also report experiments in which the NIH c-src overexpresser cells were exposed to Con A for various times to induce a redistribution of the cell surface Con A receptors. We show that, at each stage of the Con A-mediated endocytotic process, the Con A-receptor complexes redistribute into structures to which pp60c-src appears also to be associated: at first, into patches that form at the cell surface level and then, into a cap that stands at the cell center in a juxtanuclear position and that coincides with the Golgi apparatus. During this capping process, pp60c- src-containing vesicles continue to accumulate in a centriolar spot, as in interphase, Con A-untreated cells, from which Con A is excluded. The significance of the intracellular locations of pp60c-src to the possible functions of the protein is discussed. Also, the distribution patterns of the cellular protein in the NIH c-src overexpresser cells are compared with those of pp60v-src in RSV-transformed cells. The differences observed are discussed in relation with the differences in transforming capacities of the two proteins. Finally, the possible physiological significance of the association between pp60c-src and the structures generated after the binding of Con A to its

  3. Sugars and risk of mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study1234

    PubMed Central

    Tasevska, Natasha; Park, Yikyung; Jiao, Li; Hollenbeck, Albert; Subar, Amy F; Potischman, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although previous studies have linked intake of sugars with incidence of cancer and other chronic diseases, its association with mortality remains unknown. Objective: We investigated the association of total sugars, added sugars, total fructose, added fructose, sucrose, and added sucrose with the risk of all-cause, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other-cause mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Design: The participants (n = 353,751), aged 50–71 y, were followed for up to 13 y. Intake of individual sugars over the previous 12 mo was assessed at baseline by using a 124-item NIH Diet History Questionnaire. Results: In fully adjusted models (fifth quartile compared with first quartile), all-cause mortality was positively associated with the intake of total sugars [HR (95% CI): 1.13 (1.06, 1.20); P-trend < 0.0001], total fructose [1.10 (1.04, 1.17); P-trend < 0.0001], and added fructose [1.07 (1.01, 1.13); P-trend = 0.005) in women and total fructose [1.06 (1.01, 1.10); P-trend = 0.002] in men. In men, a weak inverse association was found between other-cause mortality and dietary added sugars (P-trend = 0.04), sucrose (P-trend = 0.03), and added sucrose (P-trend = 0.006). Investigation of consumption of sugars by source showed that the positive association with mortality risk was confined only to sugars from beverages, whereas the inverse association was confined to sugars from solid foods. Conclusions: In this large prospective study, total fructose intake was weakly positively associated with all-cause mortality in both women and men, whereas added sugar, sucrose, and added sucrose intakes were inversely associated with other-cause mortality in men. In our analyses, intake of added sugars was not associated with an increased risk of mortality. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015. PMID:24552754

  4. NIH State-of-the-Science Conference Statement on cesarean delivery on maternal request.

    PubMed

    To provide health care providers, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of currently available data on cesarean delivery on maternal request. A non-DHHS, nonadvocate 18-member panel representing the fields of obstetrics and gynecology, preventive medicine, biometrics, family planning and reproductive physiology, nurse midwifery, anesthesiology, patient safety, epidemiology, pediatrics, perinatal medicine, urology, urogynecology, general nursing, inner city public health sciences, law, psychiatry, and health services research. In addition, 18 experts from pertinent fields presented data to the panel and conference audience. Presentations by experts and a systematic review of the literature prepared by the RTI International-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center, through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Scientific evidence was given precedence over anecdotal experience. The panel drafted its statement based on scientific evidence presented in open forum and on published scientific literature. The draft statement was presented on the final day of the conference and circulated to the audience for comment. The panel released a revised statement later that day at http://consensus.nih.gov. This statement is an independent report of the panel and is not a policy statement of the NIH or the Federal Government. The incidence of cesarean delivery without medical or obstetric indications is increasing in the United States, and a component of this increase is cesarean delivery on maternal request. Given the tools available, the magnitude of this component is difficult to quantify. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate fully the benefits and risks of cesarean delivery on maternal request as compared to planned vaginal delivery, and more research is needed. Until quality evidence becomes available, any decision to perform a cesarean delivery on maternal request should be carefully individualized and consistent with

  5. NIH peer review percentile scores are poorly predictive of grant productivity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Peer review is widely used to assess grant applications so that the highest ranked applications can be funded. A number of studies have questioned the ability of peer review panels to predict the productivity of applications, but a recent analysis of grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US found that the percentile scores awarded by peer review panels correlated with productivity as measured by citations of grant-supported publications. Here, based on a re-analysis of these data for the 102,740 funded grants with percentile scores of 20 or better, we report that these percentile scores are a poor discriminator of productivity. This underscores the limitations of peer review as a means of assessing grant applications in an era when typical success rates are often as low as about 10%. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13323.001 PMID:26880623

  6. Summary of presentations at the NIH/NIAID New Humanized Rodent Models 2007 Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Harris

    2008-01-01

    It has long been recognized that a small animal model susceptible to HIV-1 infection with a functional immune system would be extremely useful in the study of HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and for the evaluation of vaccine and therapeutic strategies to combat this disease. By early 2007, a number of reports on various rodent models capable of being infected by and responding to HIV including some with a humanized immune system were published. The New Humanized Rodent Model Workshop, organized by the Division of AIDS (DAIDS), National Institute Allergy and Infection Diseases (NIAID), NIH, was held on September 24, 2007 at Bethesda for the purpose of bringing together key model developers and potential users. This report provides a synopsis of the presentations that discusses the current status of development and use of rodent models to evaluate the pathogenesis of HIV infection and to assess the efficacy of vaccine and therapeutic strategies including microbicides to prevent and/or treat HIVinfection. PMID:18237418

  7. Funding global emergency medicine research-from seed grants to NIH support.

    PubMed

    Hansoti, Bhakti; Levine, Adam; Ganti, Latha; Oteng, Rockefeller; DesRosiers, Taylor; Modi, Payal; Brown, Jeremy

    2016-12-01

    Funding for global health has grown significantly over the past two decades. Numerous funding opportunities for international development and research work exist; however, they can be difficult to navigate. The 2013 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on global health and emergency care identified the need to strengthen global emergency care research funding, solidify existing funding streams, and expand funding sources. This piece focuses on the various federal funding opportunities available to support emergency physicians conducting international research from seed funding to large institutional grants. In particular, we focus on the application and review processes for the Fulbright and Fogarty programs, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Career development awards, and the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), including tips and pathways through each application process. Lastly, the paper provides an index that may be used as a guide in determining whether the amount of funding provided by a grant is worth the effort in applying.

  8. Destructive physical analysis results of Ni/H2 cells cycled in LEO regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hong S.; Zelter, Gabriela R.; Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    Six 48-Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) Ni/H2 cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH electrolyte were life cycle tested in low Earth orbit. All three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed (3729, 4165, and 11,355 cycles), while those with 26 percent KOH were cycled over 14,000 times in the continuing test. Destructive physical analysis (DPA) of the failed cells included visual inspections, measurements of electrode thickness, scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte flooded cell. The cycling failure was due to a decrease of nickel electrode capacity. As possible causes of the capacity decrease, researchers observed electrode expansion, rupture, and corrosion of the nickel electrode substrate, active material redistribution, and accumulation of electrochemically undischargeable active material with cycling.

  9. Destructive physical analysis results of Ni/H2 cells cycled in LEO regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hong S.; Zelter, Gabriela R.; Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    Six 48-Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) Ni/H2 cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH electrolyte were life cycle tested in low earth orbit. All three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed (3729, 4165, and 11,355 cycles), while those with 26 percent KOH were cycled over 14,000 times in the continuing test. Destructive physical analysis (DPA) of the failed cells included visual inspections, measurements of electrode thickness, scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte flooded cell. The cycling failure was due to a decrease of nickel electrode capacity. As possible causes of the capacity decrease, researchers observed electrode expansion, rupture, and corrosion of the nickel electrode substrate, active material redistribution, and accumulation of electrochemically undischargeable active material with cycling.

  10. Transformation of human cells by DNAs ineffective in transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Bennett, P.B.; Freeman, A.G.; Moore, S.P.; Strickland, P.T.

    1985-04-01

    Neonatal human foreskin fibroblasts can be transformed to anchorage-independent growth by transfection with DNAs inefficient in transforming NIH 3T3 cells. Human cells transfected with DNA from GM 1312, a multiple myeloma cell line, or MOLT-4, a permanent lymphoblast line, grow without anchorage at a much higher frequency than do the parental cells and their DNAs can transform human cell recipients to anchorage-independent growth; they have extended but not indefinite life spans and are nontumorigenic. Human fibroblasts are also transformed by DNAs from two multiple myeloma lines that also transform 3T3 cells; however, restriction analysis suggests that different transforming genes in this DNA are acting in the human and murine systems. These results indicate that the human cell transfection system allows detection of transforming genes not effective in the 3T3 system and points out the possibility of detection of additional transforming sequences even in DNAs that do transform murine cells.

  11. Physical and chemical analysis of a Ni/H2 cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, H.; Earl, M. W.; Kirkendall, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    A cycled aerospace nickel hydrogen (Ni/H2) cell was subjected to destructive physical analysis to determine the reason for a capacity loss after 5,967 cycles at 60 percent depth of discharge. The positive plates in the cell were analyzed in terms of chemical composition, active material utilization, charge efficiency, and thickness increase. The microstructure of a cross section of the positive plate was determined by backscattered electron image analysis. The results suggest that the capacity loss in the cell is caused by low charge acceptance and low active material utilization at the positive plate. The oxidized nickel species content of the positive plate increased due to corrosion of the nickel sintered skeleton. This appears to circumvent the orderly reaction of the active material. Microstructural analysis has indicated that a new phase of active material is formed with cycling.

  12. Single Synonymous Mutations in KRAS Cause Transformed Phenotypes in NIH3T3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Andrew M.; Bagni, Rachel; Portugal, Franklin; Hartley, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Synonymous mutations in the KRAS gene are clustered at G12, G13, and G60 in human cancers. We constructed 9 stable NIH3T3 cell lines expressing KRAS, each with one of these synonymous mutations. Compared to the negative control cell line expressing the wild type human KRAS gene, all the synonymous mutant lines expressed more KRAS protein, grew more rapidly and to higher densities, and were more invasive in multiple assays. Three of the cell lines showed dramatic loss of contact inhibition, were more refractile under phase contrast, and their refractility was greatly reduced by treatment with trametinib. Codon usage at these glycines is highly conserved in KRAS compared to HRAS, indicating selective pressure. These transformed phenotypes suggest that synonymous mutations found in driver genes such as KRAS may play a role in human cancers. PMID:27684555

  13. Structural Discrimination via DFT: Monoclinic Mg2NiH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Jan; Hector, Louis, Jr.

    2009-03-01

    Mg2NiH4 is a semiconductor and forms an ordered low temperature monoclinic phase and a disordered high temperature cubic modification. Two distinct structures for the monoclinic phase from neutron diffraction studies of the deuterated analog, which we designate as LTI and LTII, are available in the published literature. We calculate the enthalpy of formation δH with density functional theory (DFT) for both using three different approximations for the exchange-correlation energy functional. Phonon spectra are calculated as well. DFT unequivocally identifies LTII as preferable since δH obtained for it is in better agreement with experiment and its phonon spectrum contains no anomalies. Structures approximating LTII derived from analyses of soft modes in LTI and in Mg-substituted CaMgNiH4 are also discussed.

  14. Structural discrimination via density functional theory and lattice dynamics: Monoclinic Mg2NiH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, J. F.; Hector, L. G., Jr.

    2009-04-01

    Two distinct crystal structures for the monoclinic, low-temperature phase of Mg2NiH4 , which we designate as LTI and LTII, are available in the published literature. We demonstrate that density functional theory and lattice dynamics can easily identify LTII as the preferable structure at two levels of inquiry. First, enthalpies of formation ΔH calculated using three different forms for the exchange-correlation energy functional are in better agreement with experiment for LTII. Second, the phonon spectrum calculated for LTII contains no anomalies while that for LTI exhibits a variety of soft modes. By analyzing the soft modes in LTI as well as those we find for the known CaMgNiH4 structure with Ca replaced by Mg we derive a crystal structure that closely approximates LTII.

  15. NIH Update: Translating Basic Behavioral Science into New Pediatric Obesity Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Czajkowski, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric obesity, which has risen substantially over the past 30 years, increases the risk of later-life obesity as well as the risk of chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Basic research to better understand the biological, behavioral, psychological and social factors associated with excessive weight gain in early life, and studies translating these basic research findings into novel preventive and therapeutic strategies, are essential to our ability to better prevent and treat childhood obesity. This overview describes several NIH efforts designed to stimulate basic and translational research in childhood obesity prevention and treatment and calls for further efforts in these areas. These examples demonstrate the value of research in early-phase translational pediatric obesity research and highlight some promising directions for this important area of research. PMID:27261541

  16. Two strikes: limited NIH R55 and R56 retooling funds and abolishment of the A2 grant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Omary, M Bishr; Offhaus, Heather; Kunkel, Steven L

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) are facing significant budgetary challenges as a result of the current economic climate. The recent sunset of investigator-initiated R01-type research grants after one revised submission, coupled with the present lack of an NIH retooling funding mechanism for such grant applicants, creates a concerning risk that talented and well-trained investigators may be forced to give up their research careers. Existing NIH retooling mechanisms include the R55 Shannon Award, which was established in 1991 and was essentially replaced in 2005 by the R56 award. There is an urgent need to either significantly expand the R55/R56 mechanisms and definition of NIH grant bridging/retooling support for unfunded meritorious proposals or introduce a new mechanism that provides specific support to investigators with competitive but unfunded R01 revised grants. An expanded retooling funding mechanism deserves implementation during continuing assessment of whether allowance of only one revision of research proposals has achieved its initial intended goals.

  17. 75 FR 80828 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The NIH-American Association for Retired Persons...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Collection: The Nutritional Epidemiology Branch of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics of the... the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to establish... Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS,...

  18. 78 FR 18613 - Notice of the Implementation of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Electronic Vendor Invoice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ...: Enhancements in processes are being made to the electronic payment system based on the lessons learned during... Health (NIH) Electronic Vendor Invoice Program (eVIP) SUMMARY: The purpose of this notice is to announce the future implementation of the Electronic Vendor Invoice Program (eVIP) at the National Institutes...

  19. 75 FR 51827 - Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... inform the public about a meeting of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel to Advise on the Risk Assessment of the... public meetings between the Blue Ribbon Panel and the National Research Council Committee on Technical... concerning this meeting, contact Ms. Kelly Fennington, Senior Health Policy Analyst, Office of Biotechnology...

  20. 76 FR 77238 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The SSA-NIH Collaboration to Improve the Disability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The SSA-NIH... allow the SSA to collect more relevant and precise data about human functioning in a faster, more... functional domains of Physical Demands and Interpersonal Interactions along with established...

  1. 76 FR 55690 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The SSA-NIH Collaboration To Improve the Disability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The SSA-NIH... could potentially allow the SSA to collect more relevant and precise data about human functioning in a... tools for the functional domains of Physical Demands and Interpersonal Interactions along...

  2. Challenges of Implementing the NIH Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a Minority-Serving University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The impacts and challenges of implementing an NIH/NICHD Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a private Minority-Serving-Institution (MSI) are examined. This article outlines efforts to gain institutional buy-in and challenges encountered in creating a functioning Office of Sponsored Research and implementing research policies…

  3. Chemicals, the Environment, and You: Explorations in Science and Human Health. Grades 7-8. NIH Curriculum Supplement Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Juliane; McQueen, Charlene A.; O'Connell, Josina Romero; Taylor, Shaun; Trush, Mike

    This curriculum supplement aims to bring cutting-edge medical science and basic research discoveries from the laboratories of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) into classrooms. The supplement was designed to complement existing life science curricula at both the state and local levels and to be consistent with the National Science Education…

  4. MUC4, a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein, induces oncogenic transformation of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Sangeeta; Singh, Ajay P; Moniaux, Nicolas; Eudy, James D; Meza, Jane L; Batra, Surinder K.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have established the association of MUC4 with the progression of cancer and metastasis. An aberrant expression of MUC4 is reported in precancerous lesions indicating its early involvement in the disease process; however, its precise role in cellular transformation has not been explored. MUC4 contains many unique domains and is proposed to impact on cell signaling pathways and behavior of the tumor cells. In the present study, to decipher its oncogenic potential of MUC4, we stably expressed the MUC4 mucin in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Stable ectopic expression of MUC4 resulted in increased growth, colony formation and motility of NIH3T3 cells in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice, when cells were injected subcutaneously. Microarray analysis demonstrated increased expression of several growth- and mitochondrial energy production-associated genes in MUC4-expressing NIH3T3 cells. In addition, expression of MUC4 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in enhanced levels of oncoprotein ErbB2 and its phosphorylated form (pY1248-ErbB2). In conclusion, our studies provide the first evidence that MUC4 alone induces cellular transformation and indicates a novel role of MUC4 in cancer biology. PMID:19010895

  5. Faculty experiences with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) public access policy, compliance issues, and copyright practices.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Deborah H; McGlone, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The research assessed faculty awareness of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) public access policy and faculty experiences with the copyright terms in their author agreements with publishers. During the fall of 2011, 198 faculty members receiving funding from NIH at a large urban academic institution were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. A total of 94 faculty members responded to the survey, representing a response rate of 47%. Thirty percent of the survey respondents were either unaware of or not familiar with the NIH policy. Further, a significant number of faculty members (97.8%) indicated that they usually signed their copyright forms "as is." The findings show that time, confusing instructions, and unclear journal policies are challenges experienced by NIH-funded faculty in complying with the federal mandate. There is a need to educate faculty with respect to the value of retaining their copyrights and self-archiving their publications to help advance public access and open access scholarship.

  6. Pregnancy Diet High in Refined Grains Could Increase Child Obesity Risk By Age 7, NIH Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy diet high in refined grains could increase child obesity risk by age 7, NIH study suggests danishc/ ... refined grains may have a higher risk of obesity by age 7, compared to children born to women with gestational diabetes who ate ...

  7. Isoform-specific translocation of PKC isoforms in NIH3T3 cells by TPA

    SciTech Connect

    Kazi, Julhash U.; Soh, Jae-Won

    2007-12-14

    Protein kinase C (PKC), a multi-gene family of enzymes, plays key roles in the pathways of signal transduction, growth control and tumorigenesis. Variations in the intracellular localization of the individual isoforms are thought to be an important mechanism for the isoform-specific regulation of enzyme activity and substrate specificity. To provide a dynamic method of analyzing the localization of the specific isoforms of PKC in living cells, we generated fluorescent fusion proteins of the various PKC isoforms by using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fluorescent marker at the carboxyl termini of these enzymes. The intracellular localization of the specific PKC isoforms was then examined by fluorescence microscopy after transient transfection of the respective PKC-GFP expression vector into NIH3T3 cells and subsequent TPA stimulation. We found that the specific isoforms of PKC display distinct localization patterns in untreated NIH3T3 cells. For example, PKC{alpha} is localized mainly in the cytoplasm while PKC{epsilon} is localized mainly in the Golgi apparatus. We also observed that PKC{alpha}, {beta}1, {beta}2, {gamma}, {delta}, {epsilon}, and {eta} translocate to the plasma membrane within 10 min of the start of TPA treatment, while the cellular localizations of PKC{zeta} and {iota} were not affected by TPA. Using a protein kinase inhibitor, we also showed that the kinase activity was not important for the translocation of PKC. These results suggest that specific PKC isoforms exert spatially distinct biological effects by virtue of their directed translocation to different intracellular sites.

  8. Regulation of p53 in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts following hyperosmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Ian Henry; Enghoff, Maria Stine; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this project was to analyze the regulation of p53 expression in NIH3T3 fibroblasts under the influence of increasing hyperosmotic stress. Expression of p53 showed a biphasic response pattern in NIH3T3 cells under increasing osmotic stress (337 mOsm to 737 mOsm) with a maximum at 587 mOsm. Under isotonic conditions p53 expression increased after addition of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 indicating that cellular p53 levels in unperturbed cells is kept low by proteasomal degradation. However, under hypertonic conditions p53 synthesis as well as p53 degradation were significantly reduced and it is demonstrated that the increase in p53 expression observed when tonicity is increased from 337 to 587 mOsm reflects that degradation is more inhibited than synthesis, whereas the decrease in p53 expression at higher tonicities reflects that synthesis is more inhibited than degradation. The activity of the p53 regulating proteins p38 MAP kinase and the ubiquitin ligase MDM2 were studied as a function of increasing osmolarity. MDM2 protein expression was unchanged at all osmolarities, whereas MDM2 phosphorylation (Ser166) increased at osmolarities up to 537 mOsm and remained constant at higher osmolarities. Phosphorylation of p38 increased at osmolarities up to 687 mOsm which correlated with an increased phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and the decreased p53 degradation. Caspase-3 activity increased gradually with hypertonicity and at 737 mOsm both Caspase-3 activity and annexin V binding are high even though p53 expression and activity are low, indicating that initiation of apoptosis under severe hypertonic conditions is not strictly controlled by p53. PMID:26056062

  9. Assessing Social Support, Companionship, and Distress: NIH Toolbox Adult Social Relationship Scales

    PubMed Central

    Cyranowski, Jill M.; Zill, Nicholas; Bode, Rita; Butt, Zeeshan; Kelly, Morgen A. R.; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Salsman, John M.; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    Objective The quality of our daily social interactions – including perceptions of support, feelings of loneliness, and distress stemming from negative social exchanges – influence physical health and well-being. Despite the importance of social relationships, brief yet precise, unidimensional scales that assess key aspects of social relationship quality are lacking. As part of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function, we developed brief self-report scales designed to assess aspects of social support, companionship, and social distress across age cohorts. This report details the development and psychometric testing of the adult NIH Toolbox Social Relationship scales. Methods Social relationship concepts were selected, and item sets were developed and revised based on expert feedback and literature review. Items were then tested across a community-dwelling U.S. internet panel sample of adults aged 18 and above (N=692) using traditional (classic) psychometric methods and item response theory (IRT) approaches to identify items for inclusion in 5–8 item unidimensional scales. Finally, concurrent validity of the newly-developed scales was evaluated with respect to their inter-relationships with classic social relationship validation instruments. Results Results provide support for the internal reliability and concurrent validity of resulting self-report scales assessing Emotional Support, Instrumental Support, Friendship, Loneliness, Perceived Rejection, and Perceived Hostility. Conclusion These brief social relationship scales provide the pragmatic utility and enhanced precision needed to promote future epidemiological and social neuroscience research on the impact of social relationships on physical and emotional health outcomes. PMID:23437856

  10. Reactive oxygen species regulate swelling-induced taurine efflux in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lambert, I H

    2003-03-01

    NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release taurine following exposure to hypotonic medium and to isotonic medium containing the lipase activator melittin. The swelling-induced taurine release is potentiated by H2O2, the calmodulin antagonist W7, and ATP, but inhibited by the antioxidant butulated hydroxytoluene (BHT), the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DI), and the iPLA2 inhibitor bromoenol lactone (BEL). The swelling-induced ROS production is also inhibited by BHT and BEL. H2O2 does not affect the volume set point for activation of the volume-sensitive taurine efflux. The 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitor ETH 615-139 impairs the swelling-induced taurine efflux in the absence as well as in the presence of H2O2. The melittin-induced taurine release is, in analogy with the swelling-induced taurine release, potentiated by H2O2 and inhibited by BHT, DI, BEL, ETH 615-139 and anion channel blockers. Thus, swelling- and melittin-induced cell signalling and taurine release involve joint elements. The swelling-induced taurine efflux is potentiated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate, and the potentiating effect of H2O2 and vanadate is impaired in the presence of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. It is suggested that (i) iPLA2 and 5-LO activity is required for the swelling-induced activation of taurine efflux from NIH3T3 cells, (ii) ROS are produced subsequent to the PLA2 activation by the NAD(P)H oxidase complex, and (iii) ROS inhibit a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B) causing a potentiation of the swelling-induced taurine release.

  11. Demographically Corrected Normative Standards for the Spanish Language Version of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery

    PubMed Central

    Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Umlauf, Anya; Marquine, Maria; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Mungas, Daniel; Gershon, Richard; Slotkin, Jerry; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Heaton, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnicity in the United States, yet there are limited well-validated neuropsychological tools in Spanish, and an even greater paucity of normative standards representing this population. The Spanish NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) is a novel neurocognitive screener; however, the original norms were developed combining Spanish- and English-versions of the battery. We developed normative standards for the Spanish NIHTB-CB, fully adjusting for demographic variables and based entirely on a Spanish-speaking sample. Methods A total of 408 Spanish-speaking neurologically healthy adults (ages 18–85 years) and 496 children (ages 3–7 years) completed the NIH Toolbox norming project. We developed three types of scores: uncorrected based on the entire Spanish-speaking cohort, age-corrected, and fully demographically corrected (age, education, sex) scores for each of the seven NIHTB-CB tests and three composites (Fluid, Crystallized, Total Composites). Corrected scores were developed using polynomial regression models. Demographic factors demonstrated medium-to-large effects on uncorrected NIHTB-CB scores in a pattern that differed from that observed on the English NIHTB-CB. For example, in Spanish-speaking adults, education was more strongly associated with Fluid scores, but showed the strongest association with Crystallized scores among English-speaking adults. Results Demographic factors were no longer associated with fully corrected scores. The original norms were not successful in eliminating demographic effects, overestimating children’s performances, and underestimating adults’ performances on the Spanish NIHTB-CB. Conclusions The disparate pattern of demographic associations on the Spanish versus English NIHTB-CB supports the need for distinct normative standards developed separately for each population. Fully adjusted scores presented here will aid in more accurately characterizing acquired brain dysfunction

  12. Demographically Corrected Normative Standards for the English Version of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery

    PubMed Central

    Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Umlauf, Anya; Beaumont, Jennifer; Gershon, Richard; Slotkin, Jerry; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Heaton, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Demographic factors impact neuropsychological test performances and accounting for them may help to better elucidate current brain functioning. The NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) is a novel neuropsychological tool, yet the original norms developed for the battery did not adequately account for important demographic/cultural factors known to impact test performances. We developed norms fully adjusting for all demographic variables within each language group (English and Spanish) separately. The current study describes the standards for individuals tested in English. Neurologically healthy adults (n = 1038) and children (n = 2917) who completed the NIH Toolbox norming project in English were included. We created uncorrected scores weighted to the 2010 Census demographics, and applied polynomial regression models to develop age-corrected and fully demographically adjusted (age, education, sex, race/ethnicity) scores for each NIHTB-CB test and composite (i.e., Fluid, Crystallized, and Total Composites). On uncorrected NIHTB-CB scores, age and education demonstrated significant, medium-to-large associations, while sex showed smaller, but statistically significant effects. In terms of race/ethnicity, a significant stair-step effect on uncorrected NIHTB-CB scores was observed (African American

  13. Radiation Risk Assessment of the Individual Astronaut: A Complement to Radiation Interests at the NIH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Predicting human risks following exposure to space radiation is uncertain in part because of unpredictable distribution of high-LET and low-dose-derived damage amongst cells in tissues, unknown synergistic effects of microgravity upon gene- and protein-expression, and inadequately modeled processing of radiation-induced damage within cells to produce rare and late-appearing malignant cancers. Furthermore, estimation of risks of radiogenic outcome within small numbers of astronauts is not possible using classic epidemiologic study. It therefore seems useful to develop strategies of risk-assessment based upon large datasets acquired from correlated biological models useful for resolving radiogenic risk-assessment for irradiated individuals. In this regard, it is suggested that sensitive cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the biomolecular risk of malignant transformation be developed in order to resolve these NASA-specific challenges. Multiparametric cellular biodosimeters could be developed using analyses of gene-expression and protein-expression whereby large datasets of cellular response to radiation-induced damage are analyzed for markers predictive for acute response as well as cancer-risk. A new paradigm is accordingly addressed wherein genomic and proteomic datasets are registered and interrogated in order to provide statistically significant dose-dependent risk estimation in individual astronauts. This evaluation of the individual for assessment of radiogenic outcomes connects to NIH program in that such a paradigm also supports assignment of a given patient to a specific therapy, the diagnosis of response of that patient to therapy, and the prediction of risks accumulated by that patient during therapy - such as risks incurred by scatter and neutrons produced during high-energy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

  14. Estimates of intakes and internal doses from ingestion of {sup 32}P at MIT and NIH

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    A researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) became internally contaminated with {sup 32}P, probably due to an intentional act. The incident occurred on or about 14 August 1995. Subsequent measurement of activity in urine and a single whole body count were used to estimate the individual`s intake, with the assumption of ingestion as the route of intake. Two separate Sets of urine data were analyzed-one supplied by MIT and one from independent analyses of urine samples conducted at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); the former data set contained 35 samples, the latter 49. In addition, the results of 35 whole body counts, provided by MIT from a chair-type counter calibrated for 32p, were used to obtain a separate estimate of intake. The kinetic model for 32P proposed in ICRP Publication 30 and implemented in NUREG/CR-4884 was used to interpret the data. The data were analyzed using both the weighted and unweighted least squares techniques. All of the intake estimates were in very good agreement with each other, ranging from 18-22 MBq. Based on the dose model in ICRP 30, this would indicate a committed effective dose equivalent of 38-46 mSv. The incident was helpful in assessing the value of the least squares techniques in determining estimates of intake and dose. The ICRP model tended to slightly overestimate the whole body retention data and underestimate the urinary excretion at later times. Further results obtained by visual best fit and development of an individual-specific kinetic and dose model will also be discussed. This incident was quite similar to another case of ingestion of 32p that occurred at the National Institute of Health (NIH) on 28 June 1995. Dose assessment for the NIH case will also be presented if the data are available for public release.

  15. Data mining a small molecule drug screening representative subset from NIH PubChem.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiang-Qun; Chen, Jian-Zhong

    2008-03-01

    PubChem is a scientific showcase of the NIH Roadmap Initiatives. It is a compound repository created to facilitate information exchange and data sharing among the NIH Roadmap-funded Molecular Library Screening Center Network (MLSCN) and the scientific community. However, PubChem has more than 10 million records of compound information. It will be challenging to conduct a drug screening of the whole database of millions of compounds. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to develop a data mining cheminformatics approach in order to construct a representative and structure-diverse sublibrary from the large PubChem database. In this study, a new chemical diverse representative subset, rePubChem, was selected by whole-molecule chemistry-space matrix calculation using the cell-based partition algorithm. The representative subset was generated and was then subjected to evaluations by compound property analyses based on 1D and 2D molecular descriptors. The new subset was also examined and assessed for self-similarity analysis based on 2D molecular fingerprints in comparing with the source compound library. The new subset has a much smaller library size (540K compounds) with minimum similarity and redundancy without loss of the structural diversity and basic molecular properties of its parent library (5.3 million compounds). The new representative subset library generated could be a valuable structure-diverse compound resource for in silico virtual screening and in vitro HTS drug screening. In addition, the established subset generation method of using the combined cell-based chemistry-space partition metrics with pairwised 2D fingerprint-based similarity search approaches will also be important to a broad scientific community interested in acquiring structurally diverse compounds for efficient drug screening, building representative virtual combinatorial chemistry libraries for syntheses, and data mining large compound databases like the PubChem library in general.

  16. Radiation Risk Assessment of the Individual Astronaut: A Complement to Radiation Interests at the NIH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Predicting human risks following exposure to space radiation is uncertain in part because of unpredictable distribution of high-LET and low-dose-derived damage amongst cells in tissues, unknown synergistic effects of microgravity upon gene- and protein-expression, and inadequately modeled processing of radiation-induced damage within cells to produce rare and late-appearing malignant cancers. Furthermore, estimation of risks of radiogenic outcome within small numbers of astronauts is not possible using classic epidemiologic study. It therefore seems useful to develop strategies of risk-assessment based upon large datasets acquired from correlated biological models useful for resolving radiogenic risk-assessment for irradiated individuals. In this regard, it is suggested that sensitive cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the biomolecular risk of malignant transformation be developed in order to resolve these NASA-specific challenges. Multiparametric cellular biodosimeters could be developed using analyses of gene-expression and protein-expression whereby large datasets of cellular response to radiation-induced damage are analyzed for markers predictive for acute response as well as cancer-risk. A new paradigm is accordingly addressed wherein genomic and proteomic datasets are registered and interrogated in order to provide statistically significant dose-dependent risk estimation in individual astronauts. This evaluation of the individual for assessment of radiogenic outcomes connects to NIH program in that such a paradigm also supports assignment of a given patient to a specific therapy, the diagnosis of response of that patient to therapy, and the prediction of risks accumulated by that patient during therapy - such as risks incurred by scatter and neutrons produced during high-energy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

  17. 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase regulate wound closure in NIH/3T3 fibroblast monolayers.

    PubMed

    Green, J Angelo; Stockton, Rebecca A; Johnson, Christopher; Jacobson, Bruce S

    2004-08-01

    Wound healing involves multiple cell signaling pathways, including those regulating cell-extracellular matrix adhesion. Previous work demonstrated that arachidonate oxidation to leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) signals fibroblast spreading on fibronectin, whereas cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-catalyzed prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) formation facilitates subsequent cell migration. We investigated arachidonate metabolite signaling in wound closure of perturbed NIH/3T3 fibroblast monolayers. We found that during initial stages of wound closure (0-120 min), all wound margin cells spread into the wound gap perpendicularly to the wound long axis. At regular intervals, between 120 and 300 min, some cells elongated to project across the wound and meet cells from the opposite margin, forming distinct cell bridges spanning the wound that act as foci for later wound-directed cell migration and resulting closure. 5-LOX inhibition by AA861 demonstrated a required LTB(4) signal for initial marginal cell spreading and bridge formation, both of which must precede wound-directed cell migration. 5-LOX inhibition effects were reversible by exogenous LTB(4). Conversely, COX inhibition by indomethacin reduced directed migration into the wound but enhanced early cell spreading and bridge formation. Exogenous PGE(2) reversed this effect and increased cell migration into the wound. The differential effects of arachidonic acid metabolites produced by LOX and COX were further confirmed with NIH/3T3 fibroblast cell lines constitutively over- and underexpressing the 5-LOX and COX-2 enzymes. These data suggest that two competing oxidative enzymes in arachidonate metabolism, LOX and COX, differentially regulate sequential aspects of fibroblast wound closure in vitro.

  18. Why the NIH Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) Should Be Abandoned

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Kimball C.; Woeckner, Elizabeth; Baratz, Robert S.; Sampson, Wallace I.

    2008-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) was begun in 2003 and is expected to be completed in 2009. It is a trial of office-based, intravenous disodium ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (Na2EDTA) as a treatment for coronary artery disease (CAD). A few case series in the 1950s and early 1960s had found Na2EDTA to be ineffective for CAD or peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Nevertheless, a few hundred physicians, almost all of whom advocate other dubious treatments, continued to peddle chelation as an office treatment. They claim that chelation dramatically improves symptoms and prolongs life in 80% to 90% of patients. In response, academics performed 4 controlled trials during the 1990s. None favored chelation, but chelationists repudiated those findings. We have investigated the method and the trial. We present our findings in 4 parts: history, origin and nature of the TACT, state of the evidence, and risks. We present evidence that chelationists and their organization, the American College for Advancement in Medicine, used political connections to pressure the NIH to fund the TACT. The TACT protocols justified the trial by misrepresenting case series and by ignoring evidence of risks. The trial employs nearly 100 unfit co-investigators. It conflates disodium EDTA and another, somewhat safer drug. It lacks precautions necessary to minimize risks. The consent form reflects those shortcomings and fails to disclose apparent proprietary interests. The trial's outcome will be unreliable and almost certainly equivocal, thus defeating its stated purpose. We conclude that the TACT is unethical, dangerous, pointless, and wasteful. It should be abandoned. PMID:18596934

  19. Reliability and Validity of Composite Scores from the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Robert K.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Tulsky, David; Mungas, Dan; Weintraub, Sandra; Dikmen, Sureyya; Beaumont, Jennifer; Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Conway, Kevin; Slotkin, Jerry; Gershon, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This study describes psychometric properties of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) Composite Scores in an adult sample. The NIHTB-CB was designed for use in epidemiologic studies and clinical trials for ages 3 to 85. A total of 268 self-described healthy adults were recruited at four university-based sites, using stratified sampling guidelines to target demographic variability for age (20–85 years), gender, education, and ethnicity. The NIHTB-CB contains seven computer-based instruments assessing five cognitive sub-domains: Language, Executive Function, Episodic Memory, Processing Speed, and Working Memory. Participants completed the NIHTB-CB, corresponding gold standard validation measures selected to tap the same cognitive abilities, and sociodemographic questionnaires. Three Composite Scores were derived for both the NIHTB-CB and gold standard batteries: “Crystallized Cognition Composite,” “Fluid Cognition Composite,” and “Total Cognition Composite” scores. NIHTB Composite Scores showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach’s alphas = 0.84 Crystallized, 0.83 Fluid, 0.77 Total), excellent test–retest reliability (r: 0.86–0.92), strong convergent (r: 0.78–0.90) and discriminant (r: 0.19–0.39) validities versus gold standard composites, and expected age effects (r = 0.18 crystallized, r = − 0.68 fluid, r = − 0.26 total). Significant relationships with self-reported prior school difficulties and current health status, employment, and presence of a disability provided evidence of external validity. The NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery Composite Scores have excellent reliability and validity, suggesting they can be used effectively in epidemiologic and clinical studies. PMID:24960398

  20. An NIH intramural percubator as a model of academic-industry partnerships: from the beginning of life through the valley of death.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2011-05-08

    In 2009 the NIH publicly announced five strategic goals for the institutes that included the critical need to translate research discoveries into public benefit at an accelerated pace, with a commitment to find novel ways to engage academic investigators in the process. The emphasis on moving scientific advancements from the laboratory to the clinic is an opportune time to discuss how the NIH intramural program in Bethesda, the largest biomedical research center in the world, can participate in this endeavor. Proposed here for consideration is a percolator-incubator program, a 'percubator' designed to enable NIH intramural investigators to develop new medical interventions as quickly and efficiently as possible.

  1. Use of PRECIS ratings in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karin E; Neta, Gila; Dember, Laura M; Coronado, Gloria D; Suls, Jerry; Chambers, David A; Rundell, Sean; Smith, David H; Liu, Benmei; Taplin, Stephen; Stoney, Catherine M; Farrell, Margaret M; Glasgow, Russell E

    2016-01-16

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory (NIH Collaboratory) seeks to produce generalizable knowledge about the conduct of pragmatic research in health systems. This analysis applied the PRECIS-2 pragmatic trial criteria to five NIH Collaboratory pragmatic trials to better understand 1) the pragmatic aspects of the design and implementation of treatments delivered in real world settings and 2) the usability of the PRECIS-2 criteria for assessing pragmatic features across studies and across time. Using the PRECIS-2 criteria, five pragmatic trials were each rated by eight raters. For each trial, we reviewed the original grant application and a required progress report written at the end of a 1-year planning period that included changes to the protocol or implementation approach. We calculated median scores and interrater reliability for each PRECIS domain and for the overall trial at both time points, as well as the differences in scores between the two time points. We also reviewed the rater comments associated with the scores. All five trials were rated to be more pragmatic than explanatory, with comments indicating that raters generally perceived them to closely mirror routine clinical care across multiple domains. The PRECIS-2 domains for which the trials were, on average, rated as most pragmatic on the 1 to 5 scale at the conclusion of the planning period included primary analysis (mean = 4.7 (range = 4.5 to 4.9)), recruitment (4.3 (3.6 to 4.8)), eligibility (4.1 (3.4 to 4.8)), setting (4.1 (4.0 to 4.4)), follow-up (4.1 (3.4 to 4.9)), and primary outcome (4.1 (3.5 to 4.9)). On average, the less pragmatic domains were organization (3.3 (2.6 to 4.4)), flexibility of intervention delivery (3.5 (2.1-4.5)), and flexibility of intervention adherence (3.8 (2.8-4.5)). Interrater agreement was modest but statistically significant for four trials (Gwet's AC1 statistic range 0.23 to 0.40) and the intraclass correlation

  2. MO-C-BRB-06: Translating NIH / NIBIB funding to clinical reality in quantitative diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, E.

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  3. [Effects of cinnamyl aldehyde on cell cycle and relafeol proteins expression in NIH3T3 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-xia; Li, Ping; Sheng, Xun; Liu, Xin; Liang, Dai-ying

    2007-08-01

    To observe the effects of Cinnamyl aldehyde (CA) on NIH3T3 cell cycle and explore the possible mechanism further. Flowcytometry was used for observing cell cycle distribution. Expressions of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Cyclin D1 protein in NIH3T3 cells were assessed by immunocytochemistry. After culture with CA for 24 hours, the percentage of populations of S phase was enhanced by 3% (P < 0.05) and cell proliferation index (PrI, S + G2/M) was increased by 3.5% (P < 0.01) , but G2/M phase had no obvious changes. The expressions of Cyclin D1 and PCNA proteins were improved markly by CA compared with controlgroup (P < 0.01). CA could promote more cells in G0/G1 phase into S phase, which may be related to the regulation of the expressions of PCNA and Cyclin D1.

  4. NIH initiative to balance sex of animals in preclinical studies: generative questions to guide policy, implementation, and metrics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In May of 2014, the NIH Director together with the Director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health announced plans to take a multi-dimensional approach to address the over reliance on male cells and animals in preclinical research. The NIH is engaging the scientific community in the development of policies to improve the sex balance in research. The present, past, and future presidents of the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences, in order to encourage thoughtful discussion among scientists, pose a series of questions to generate ideas in three areas: 1. research strategies, 2. educational strategies, and 3. strategies to monitor effectiveness of policies to improve the sex balance in research. By promoting discussion within the scientific community, a consensus will evolve that will move science forward in a productive and effective manner. PMID:25780556

  5. Electrochemical behavior of heavily cycled nickel electrodes in Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    A study has been made of charge and discharge voltage changes with cycling of Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations. A study has also been made of electrochemical behavior of the nickel electrodes from the cycled Ni/H2 cells as a function of overcharge amounts. Discharge voltages depressed gradually with cycling for cells having high KOH concentrations (31 to 36 percent), but the voltages increased for those having low KOH concentrations (21 to 26 percent). To determine if there was a crystallographic change of the active material due to cycling, electrochemical behavior of nickel electrodes was studied in an electrolyte flooded cell containing either 31 or 26 percent KOH electrolyte as a function of the amount of overcharge. The changes in discharge voltage appear to indicate crystal structure changes of active material from gamma-phase to beta-phase in low KOH concentrations, and vice versa in high KOH concentration.

  6. Failure Mechanisms of Ni-H2 and Li-Ion Batteries Under Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.; Lyons, F.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) batteries have yielded significant performance advantages for many industries, including the aerospace industry, and have been selected to replace nickel hydrogen (Ni-H2) batteries for the International Space Station (ISS) program to meet the energy storage demands. As the ISS uses its vast solar arrays to generate its power, the solar ar-rays meet their sunlit power demands and supply excess power to battery packs for power de-livery on the sun obscured phase of the approximate 90 minute low Earth orbit. These large battery packs are located on the exterior of the ISS, and as such, the battery packs are ex-posed to external environment threats like naturally occurring meteoroids and artificial orbital debris (MMOD). While the risks from these solid particle environments has been known and addressed to an acceptable risk of failure through shield design, it is not possible to completely eliminate the risk of loss of these assets on orbit due to MMOD, and as such, failure consequences to the ISS have been considered.

  7. NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery (NIHTB-CB): the NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test.

    PubMed

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Tulsky, David S; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Weintraub, Sandra; Conway, Kevin; Gershon, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    The NIH Toolbox (NIHTB) Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed within the NIHTB for the Assessment of Neurological Behavior and Function Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB). This study highlights validation data collected in adults ages 18-85 on this measure and reports descriptive data, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and preliminary work creating a composite index of processing speed. Results indicated good test-retest reliability. There was also evidence for both convergent and discriminant validity; the Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test demonstrated moderate significant correlations with other processing speed tests (i.e., WAIS-IV Coding, Symbol Search and Processing Speed Index), small significant correlations with measures of working memory (i.e., WAIS-IV Letter-Number Sequencing and PASAT), and non-significant correlations with a test of vocabulary comprehension (i.e., PPVT-IV). Finally, analyses comparing and combining scores on the NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test with other measures of simple reaction time from the NIHTB-CB indicated that a Processing Speed Composite score performed better than any test examined in isolation. The NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test exhibits several strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages, 3-85 years), it is short and easy to administer, and it has high construct validity.

  8. DoD–NCCAM/NIH Workshop on Acupuncture for Treatment of Acute Pain

    PubMed Central

    Belard, Jean Louis; Glowa, John; Khalsa, Partap; Weber, Wendy; Huntley, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Department of Defense (DoD) and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) cosponsored a workshop that explored the possible benefits of acupuncture treatment for acute pain. One goal of the workshop was to establish a roadmap to building an evidence base on that would indicate whether acupuncture is helpful for treating active-duty military personnel experiencing acute pain. The workshop highlighted brief presentations on the most current research on acupuncture and acute pain mechanisms. The impact of various modifiers (stress, genetics, population, phenotypes, etc.) on acute pain pathways and response to acupuncture treatment was discussed. Additional presentations focused on common neural mechanisms, an overview of real-world experience with using acupuncture to treat traumatic acute pain, and best tools and methods specific for acupuncture studies. Three breakout groups addressed the gaps, opportunities, and barriers to acupuncture use for acute pain in military and trauma settings. Different models of effectiveness research and optimal research designs for conducting trials in acute traumatic pain were also discussed. PMID:23020611

  9. Long life 80Ah standard IPV NiH2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, Jon D.; Waller, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    A standard Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) battery cell is needed to meet future low cost, high performance mission requirements for NASA, military, and civil space programs. A common or standard cell design has evolved from the heritage of HST, Milstar, and other Air Force Mantech cell designs with substantial flight experience, while incorporating some of the historical COMSAT cell design features described in a previous NASA publication. Key features include slurry process nickel electrodes having high strength, long life and high yield (lower cost), and dual layer zircar separators for improved KOH retention, uniformality, and longer life. The cell design will have a zirconium oxide wall wick inside the pressure vessel to redistribute electrolyte and extend life. The slurry electrode will be 35 mils thick to take advantage of qualified cell mechanical configurations and proven assembly and activation techniques developed by Eagle Picher Industries (EPI) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) RNH-90-3 and 'Generic HST' RNH-90-5 cell designs with back-to-back nickel electrodes produced by the dry sinter process. The 80Ah common cell design can be scaled to meet capacity requirements from 60Ah to 100Ah. Producibility, commonality, and long life performance will be enhanced with the robust cell design described herein.

  10. Assessing psychological well-being: self-report instruments for the NIH Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Salsman, John M; Lai, Jin-Shei; Hendrie, Hugh C; Butt, Zeeshan; Zill, Nicholas; Pilkonis, Paul A; Peterson, Christopher; Stoney, Catherine M; Brouwers, Pim; Cella, David

    2014-02-01

    Psychological well-being (PWB) has a significant relationship with physical and mental health. As a part of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function, we developed self-report item banks and short forms to assess PWB. Expert feedback and literature review informed the selection of PWB concepts and the development of item pools for positive affect, life satisfaction, and meaning and purpose. Items were tested with a community-dwelling US Internet panel sample of adults aged 18 and above (N = 552). Classical and item response theory (IRT) approaches were used to evaluate unidimensionality, fit of items to the overall measure, and calibrations of those items, including differential item function (DIF). IRT-calibrated item banks were produced for positive affect (34 items), life satisfaction (16 items), and meaning and purpose (18 items). Their psychometric properties were supported based on the results of factor analysis, fit statistics, and DIF evaluation. All banks measured the concepts precisely (reliability ≥0.90) for more than 98% of participants. These adult scales and item banks for PWB provide the flexibility, efficiency, and precision necessary to promote future epidemiological, observational, and intervention research on the relationship of PWB with physical and mental health.

  11. Assessing Psychological Well-Being: Self-Report Instruments for the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Salsman, John M.; Lai, Jin-Shei; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Butt, Zeeshan; Zill, Nicholas; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Peterson, Christopher; Stoney, Catherine M.; Brouwers, Pim; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychological well-being (PWB) has a significant relationship with physical and mental health. As part of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function, we developed self-report item banks and short forms to assess PWB. Study Design and Setting Expert feedback and literature review informed the selection of PWB concepts and the development of item pools for Positive Affect, Life Satisfaction, and Meaning and Purpose. Items were tested with a community-dwelling U.S. internet panel sample of adults aged 18 and above (N=552). Classical and item response theory (IRT) approaches were used to evaluate unidimensionality, fit of items to the overall measure, and calibrations of those items, including differential item function (DIF). Results IRT-calibrated item banks were produced for Positive Affect (34 items), Life Satisfaction (16 items), and Meaning and Purpose (18 items). Their psychometric properties were supported based on results of factor analysis, fit statistics, and DIF evaluation. All banks measured the concepts precisely (reliability ≥0.90) for more than 98% of participants. Conclusion These adult scales and item banks for PWB provide the flexibility, efficiency, and precision necessary to promote future epidemiological, observational, and intervention research on the relationship of PWB with physical and mental health. PMID:23771709

  12. Air-quality investigation in the NIH (National Institutes of Health) Radiation Oncology Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Persily, A.; Dols, W.S.; Nabinger, S.J.; VanBronkhorst, D.A.

    1989-08-01

    The Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) is located in the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The occupants of the ROB facility have expressed dissatisfaction with the air-quality within the facility for several years. To identify the sources of the air quality problems in the ROB facility and to obtain recommendations for their solution, the Center for Building Technology at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, formerly The National Bureau of Standards) conducted an indoor-quality investigation of the ROB facility. Results revealed several deficiencies in the design and current condition of the ROB ventilation system, such as significant differences between the design airflow rates and those recommended in current standards and guidelines. The airflow measurements showed many instances in which measured airflow rates were different from their design values and revealed the existence of airflows leading to the potential for pollutant transport within the building. The contaminant measurements fell generally well below the maximum values in the ASHRAE air-quality standard. Thermal-comfort measurements revealed instances when the temperature and relative humidity were outside of ASHRAE comfort limits. Recommendations are made to remedy the deficiencies noted and to control the conditions contributing to the building's air-quality problems.

  13. NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery (NIHTB-CB): The NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test

    PubMed Central

    Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Tulsky, David S.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Weintraub, Sandra; Conway, Kevin; Gershon, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    The NIH Toolbox (NIHTB) Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed within the NIHTB for the Assessment of Neurological Behavior and Function Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB). This study highlights validation data collected in adults ages 18–85 on this measure and reports descriptive data, test–retest reliability, construct validity, and preliminary work creating a composite index of processing speed. Results indicated good test–retest reliability. There was also evidence for both convergent and discriminant validity; the Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test demonstrated moderate significant correlations with other processing speed tests (i.e., WAIS-IV Coding, Symbol Search and Processing Speed Index), small significant correlations with measures of working memory (i.e., WAIS-IV Letter-Number Sequencing and PASAT), and non-significant correlations with a test of vocabulary comprehension (i.e., PPVT-IV). Finally, analyses comparing and combining scores on the NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test with other measures of simple reaction time from the NIHTB-CB indicated that a Processing Speed Composite score performed better than any test examined in isolation. The NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test exhibits several strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages, 3–85 years), it is short and easy to administer, and it has high construct validity. PMID:24960594

  14. Effects of Weightlessness on Vestibular Development: Summary of Research on NIH.R1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Bruce, L. L.

    1998-01-01

    In our original application we proposed to investigate the effects of gravity on the formation of connections between the gravity receptors of the ear and the brain in rat pups raised in space beginning at an age before these connections are made until near the time of birth, when they are to some extent functional. We used the neuronal tracer, Dil, which could be applied to tissue obtained immediately after landing of the space shuttle, thus minimizing changes due to the earth's gravity. We hoped to determine whether the vestibular system develops in two phases, as do other sensory systems (such as the visual system). In these other systems the first phase of development is controlled genetically and the second phase is controlled by environmental stimulation. Our data collected strongly supports the idea that the vestibular system has these same two phases of development. The tissue obtained from the NIH.R1 experiment was of exceptionally high quality for our analysis. Therefore, we expanded our investigation into the ultrastructural effects of microgravity on vestibular development. For the sake of clarity we will subdivide our summary into two categories: (1) analysis of the branching pattern of axons between the vestibular nerve and the gravistatic receptors of the ear in flight and control animals, and (2) analysis of the branching pattern of axons between the vestibular nerve and the brain in flight and control animals.

  15. Transformation of NIH 3T3 cells with cloned fragments of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J A; Fleckenstein, B; Galloway, D A; McDougall, J K

    1982-01-01

    NIH 3T3 cells were transfected with restriction endonuclease and cloned human cytomegalovirus DNA fragments to identify the transforming region(s). Cleavage of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 DNA with XbaI and HindIII left a transforming region intact whereas EcoRI inactivated this function. Transfection of cells with cosmids containing human cytomegalovirus DNA spanning the entire genome resulted in transformation by one cosmid, pCM1058, with the AD169 HindIII DNA fragments E, R, T, and a'. Cells were selected for their growth in 1.2% methylcellulose. The clones isolated had a significant replating efficiency and were oncogenic in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Transfection of cosmids and plasmids containing subsets of the viral sequences in pCM1058 identified a common region possessed by all of the transforming recombinant molecules. This region was in the HindIII E fragment with the left boundary defined by the EcoRI d-R junction and the right boundary defined by the HindIII E-T junction. Further mapping and transfection experiments determined that the transforming region was contained without a 2.9-kilobase fragment between map units 0.123 and 0.14 on the prototype molecule of the AD169 strain. Images PMID:6287019

  16. "Something of an adventure": postwar NIH research ethos and the Guatemala STD experiments.

    PubMed

    Spector-Bagdady, Kayte; Lombardo, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The STD experiments in Guatemala from 1946-1948 have earned a place of infamy in the history of medical ethics. But if the Guatemala STD experiments were so "ethically impossible," how did the U.S. government approve their funding? Although much of the literature has targeted the failings of Dr. John Cutler, we focus on the institutional context and research ethos that shaped the outcome of the research. After the end of WWII, Dr. Cassius Van Slyke reconstructed the federal research contracts process into a grant program. The inaugural NIH study section recommended approval of the Guatemala STD experiments at its first meeting. The funding and oversight process of the Guatemala research was marked with serious conflicts of interest and a lack of oversight, and it was this structure, as opposed to merely a maleficent individual, that allowed the Guatemala STD experiments to proceed. We conclude that while current research regulations are designed to prevent the abuses perpetrated on the subjects of the Guatemala STD experiments, it takes a comprehensive understanding of research ethics through professional education to achieve the longstanding ideal of the responsible investigator, and ensure ethical research under any regulatory scheme. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  17. IV. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): measuring language (vocabulary comprehension and reading decoding).

    PubMed

    Gershon, Richard C; Slotkin, Jerry; Manly, Jennifer J; Blitz, David L; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Schnipke, Deborah; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Gleason, Jean Berko; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Adams, Marilyn Jager; Weintraub, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    Mastery of language skills is an important predictor of daily functioning and health. Vocabulary comprehension and reading decoding are relatively quick and easy to measure and correlate highly with overall cognitive functioning, as well as with success in school and work. New measures of vocabulary comprehension and reading decoding (in both English and Spanish) were developed for the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB). In the Toolbox Picture Vocabulary Test (TPVT), participants hear a spoken word while viewing four pictures, and then must choose the picture that best represents the word. This approach tests receptive vocabulary knowledge without the need to read or write, removing the literacy load for children who are developing literacy and for adults who struggle with reading and writing. In the Toolbox Oral Reading Recognition Test (TORRT), participants see a letter or word onscreen and must pronounce or identify it. The examiner determines whether it was pronounced correctly by comparing the response to the pronunciation guide on a separate computer screen. In this chapter, we discuss the importance of language during childhood and the relation of language and brain function. We also review the development of the TPVT and TORRT, including information about the item calibration process and results from a validation study. Finally, the strengths and weaknesses of the measures are discussed.

  18. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  19. Challenges and opportunities in RSV vaccine development: Meeting report from FDA/NIH workshop.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jeffrey N; Graham, Barney S; Karron, Ruth A; Munoz, Flor M; Falsey, Ann R; Anderson, Larry J; Marshall, V; Kim, Sonnie; Beeler, Judy A

    2016-09-22

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of serious acute lower respiratory illness in infants and young children and a significant cause of disease burden in the elderly and immunocompromised. There are no licensed RSV vaccines to address this significant public health need. While advances in vaccine technologies have led to a recent resurgence in RSV vaccine development, the immune correlates of protection against RSV and the immunology of vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) remain poorly understood. FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) and NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) organized and co-sponsored an RSV Vaccines Workshop in Bethesda, Maryland on June 1 and 2, 2015. The goal of the conference was to convene scientists, regulators, and industry stakeholders to discuss approaches to RSV vaccine development within the context of three target populations - infants and children, pregnant women, and individuals >60years of age. The agenda included topics related to RSV vaccine development in general, as well as considerations specific to each target population, such as clinical and serological endpoints. The meeting focused on vaccine development for high income countries (HIC), because issues relevant to vaccine development for low and middle income countries (LMIC) have been discussed in other forums. This manuscript summarizes the discussion of clinical, scientific, and regulatory perspectives, research gaps, and lessons learned.

  20. Concurrent Validity and Reliability of Retrospective Scoring of the Pediatric NIH Stroke Scale

    PubMed Central

    Beslow, Lauren A.; Kasner, Scott E.; Smith, Sabrina E.; Mullen, Michael T.; Kirschen, Matthew P.; Bastian, Rachel A.; Dowling, Michael M.; Lo, Warren; Jordan, Lori C.; Bernard, Timothy J.; Friedman, Neil; deVeber, Gabrielle; Kirton, Adam; Abraham, Lisa; Licht, Daniel J.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Ellenberg, Jonas H.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Ichord, Rebecca N.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose The Pediatric National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (PedNIHSS), an adaptation of the adult NIH Stroke Scale, is a quantitative measure of stroke severity shown to be reliable when scored prospectively. The ability to calculate the PedNIHSS score retrospectively would be invaluable in the conduct of observational pediatric stroke studies. The study objective was to assess the concurrent validity and reliability of estimating the PedNIHSS score retrospectively from medical records. Methods Neurological examinations from medical records of 75 children enrolled in a prospective PedNIHSS validation study were photocopied. Four neurologists of varying training levels blinded to the prospective PedNIHSS scores reviewed the records and retrospectively assigned PedNIHSS scores. Retrospective scores were compared among raters and to the prospective scores. Results Total retrospective PedNIHSS scores correlated highly with total prospective scores (R2=0.76). Interrater reliability for the total scores was “excellent” (intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.94–0.97). Interrater reliability for individual test items was “substantial” or “excellent” for 14 of 15 items. Conclusions The PedNIHSS score can be scored retrospectively from medical records with a high degree of concurrent validity and reliability. This tool can be used to improve the quality of retrospective pediatric stroke studies. PMID:22076000

  1. Performance Comparison Between NiH2 Dry Sinter and Slurry Electrode Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, J. D.; Hafen, D. P.; Rao, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical and thermal performance of dry sinter and slurry process electrode cells manufactured for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) batteries have been characterized for a matrix of operating conditions over the temperature range from 14 to 86 F at various charge control levels. The dry sinter process electrode cells tested are similar to the onboard HST NiH2 cells. The slurry process electrode cells were developed to be less susceptible to electrode expansion and impedance changes with life. Both cell types were impregnated by the aqueous electrochemical process. Test conditions included standard capacity tests and electrical cycling using 96-minute cycling regimens incorporating gr depth-of-discharge (DOD) cycles. The dry sinter process electrodes have higher operating capacities to 1.20V/cell, but both electrode types have similar heat dissipation for the conditions tested. The results of the testing included cyclic heat generation during a typical 96-minute cycle, operating capacity data vs. cutoff voltage to generate a temperature-compensated voltage curve, and voltage characteristics suitable to develop a voltage prediction model. Analysis of data shows differences in the discharge voltage plateaus operating conditions evaluated. This is the basis for recommended changes in the battery charge control.

  2. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) component of the NIH MRI study of normal brain development (PedsDTI).

    PubMed

    Walker, Lindsay; Chang, Lin-Ching; Nayak, Amritha; Irfanoglu, M Okan; Botteron, Kelly N; McCracken, James; McKinstry, Robert C; Rivkin, Michael J; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Rumsey, Judith; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The NIH MRI Study of normal brain development sought to characterize typical brain development in a population of infants, toddlers, children and adolescents/young adults, covering the socio-economic and ethnic diversity of the population of the United States. The study began in 1999 with data collection commencing in 2001 and concluding in 2007. The study was designed with the final goal of providing a controlled-access database; open to qualified researchers and clinicians, which could serve as a powerful tool for elucidating typical brain development and identifying deviations associated with brain-based disorders and diseases, and as a resource for developing computational methods and image processing tools. This paper focuses on the DTI component of the NIH MRI study of normal brain development. In this work, we describe the DTI data acquisition protocols, data processing steps, quality assessment procedures, and data included in the database, along with database access requirements. For more details, visit http://www.pediatricmri.nih.gov. This longitudinal DTI dataset includes raw and processed diffusion data from 498 low resolution (3 mm) DTI datasets from 274 unique subjects, and 193 high resolution (2.5 mm) DTI datasets from 152 unique subjects. Subjects range in age from 10 days (from date of birth) through 22 years. Additionally, a set of age-specific DTI templates are included. This forms one component of the larger NIH MRI study of normal brain development which also includes T1-, T2-, proton density-weighted, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging data, and demographic, clinical and behavioral data. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Biocompatibility of bio based calcium carbonate nanocrystals aragonite polymorph on NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Kamba, Abdullahi Shafiu; Ismail, Maznah; Ibrahim, Tengku Azmi Tengku; Zakaria, Zuki Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there has been extensive research interest for inorganic nanocrystals such as calcium phosphate, iron oxide, silicone, carbon nanotube and layered double hydroxide as a drug delivery system especially in cancer therapy. However, toxicological screening of such particles is paramount importance before use as delivery carrier. In this study we examine the biocompatibility of CaCO3 nanocrystal on NIH 3T3 cell line. Transmission and field emission scanning electron microscopy (TEM and FESEM) were used for the characterisation of CaCO3 nanocrystals. Cytotoxicity and genotoxic effect of calcium carbonate nanocrystals in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH 3T3 cell line using various bioassays including MTT, and Neutral red/Trypan blue double-staining assays. LDH, BrdU and reactive oxygen species were used for toxicity analysis. Cellular morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal fluorescence microscope. The outcome of the analyses revealed a clear rod-shaped aragonite polymorph of calcium carbonate nanocrystal. The analysed cytotoxic and genotoxicity of CaCO3 nanocrystal on NIH 3T3 cells using different bioassays revealed no significance differences as compared to control. A slight decrease in cell viability was noticed when the cells were exposed to higher concentrations of 200 to 400 µg/ml, while increase in ROS generation and LDH released at 200 and 400 µg/ml was observed. The study has shown that CaCO3 nanocrystal is biocompatible and non toxic to NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. The analysed results offer a promising potential of CaCO3 nanocrystal for the development of intracellular drugs, genes and other macromolecule delivery systems.

  4. Genomewide Association Studies in Pharmacogenomics: Meeting Report of the NIH Pharmacogenomics Research Network-RIKEN (PGRN-RIKEN) Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Sook Wah; Momozawa, Yukihide; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Ratain, Mark J.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Kubo, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Genomewide association studies (GWAS) have resulted in the identification of many heritable genetic factors that underlie risk for human disease or variation in physiologic traits. In contrast, there are fewer GWAS of drug response phenotypes, despite extensive unexplained interindividual variability. To address this urgent need, the NIH Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN) and the Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) at RIKEN support a collaboration, PGRN-RIKEN, with the goal of accelerating GWAS of drug response phenotypes. PMID:27256705

  5. Quantitative fractography by digital image processing: NIH Image macro tools for stereo pair analysis and 3-D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hein, L R

    2001-10-01

    A set of NIH Image macro programs was developed to make qualitative and quantitative analyses from digital stereo pictures produced by scanning electron microscopes. These tools were designed for image alignment, anaglyph representation, animation, reconstruction of true elevation surfaces, reconstruction of elevation profiles, true-scale elevation mapping and, for the quantitative approach, surface area and roughness calculations. Limitations on time processing, scanning techniques and programming concepts are also discussed.

  6. Compensation for research-related injury in NIH-sponsored HIV/AIDS clinical trials in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mamotte, Nicole; Wassenaar, Douglas; Singh, Nivedhna

    2013-02-01

    Concern has been voiced in the research ethics literature that under U.S. federal regulations U.S. sponsors, particularly the NIH, are not required to provide compensation for the treatment of research-related injury for trial participants or to allow grant funds to be used by investigators for appropriate insurance. This is problematic in developing country contexts because most participants are unlikely to have health insurance, resulting in overburdened and under-resourced health systems in many developing countries being responsible for providing care and treatment for research-related injury. This study provides preliminary insight into how respondent principal investigators of NIH-sponsored HIV/AIDS clinical trials in Africa and African research ethics committees deal with compensation for research-related injury. The majority of PIs surveyed provided free treatment for research-related injury, but few provided other forms of financial reparation to participants. The study also found that half of the PIs surveyed indicated that NIH funds were used for compensation, highlighting a contradiction between literature and practice. The majority of REC chairs surveyed indicated that their RECs routinely reviewed compensation plans for research-related injury and that their ethics application forms specifically requested information on compensation. Findings from one southern African country revealed that NIH funds were not used to provide treatment and/or financial reparation for research-related injury. Instead, PIs from this country relied on the government or the individual research participant (and/or their medical aid/health insurer) to cover the costs of research-related injury. The findings are discussed in the light of the recent (December 2011) U.S. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethics report which recommends that research participants are morally entitled to compensation for research-related injury.

  7. Cloning and Expression of CD19, a Human B-Cell Marker in NIH-3T3 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Background CD19 is a pan B cell marker that is recognized as an attractive target for antibody-based therapy of B-cell disorders including autoimmune disease and hematological malignancies. The object of this study was to stably express the human CD19 antigen in the murine NIH-3T3 cell line aimed to be used as an immunogen in our future study. Methods Total RNA was extracted from Raji cells in which high expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry. Synthesized cDNA was used for CD19 gene amplification by conventional PCR method using Pfu DNA polymerase. PCR product was ligated to pGEM-T Easy vector and ligation mixture was transformed to DH5α competent bacteria. After blue/white selection, one positive white colony was subjected to plasmid extraction and direct sequencing. Then, CD19 cDNA was sub-cloned into pCMV6-Neo expression vector by double digestion using KpnI and HindIII enzymes. NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line was subsequently transfected by the construct using Jet-PEI transfection reagent. After 48 hours, surface expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry and stably transfected cells were selected by G418 antibiotic. Results Amplification of CD19 cDNA gave rise to 1701 bp amplicon confirmed by alignment to reference sequence in NCBI database. Flow cytometric analysis showed successful transient and stable expression of CD19 on NIH-3T3 cells (29 and 93%, respectively). Conclusion Stable cell surface expression of human CD19 antigen in a murine NIH-3T3 cell line may develop a proper immunogene which raises specific anti-CD19 antibody production in the mice immunized sera. PMID:25926951

  8. Author Disambiguation in PubMed: Evidence on the Precision and Recall of Author-ity among NIH-Funded Scientists.

    PubMed

    Lerchenmueller, Marc J; Sorenson, Olav

    2016-01-01

    We examined the usefulness (precision) and completeness (recall) of the Author-ity author disambiguation for PubMed articles by associating articles with scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In doing so, we exploited established unique identifiers-Principal Investigator (PI) IDs-that the NIH assigns to funded scientists. Analyzing a set of 36,987 NIH scientists who received their first R01 grant between 1985 and 2009, we identified 355,921 articles appearing in PubMed that would allow us to evaluate the precision and recall of the Author-ity disambiguation. We found that Author-ity identified the NIH scientists with 99.51% precision across the articles. It had a corresponding recall of 99.64%. Precision and recall, moreover, appeared stable across common and uncommon last names, across ethnic backgrounds, and across levels of scientist productivity.

  9. Colleagues Pay Tribute to Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, Retiring After Three Decades of NLM Leadership | NIH MedlinePlus ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Colleagues Pay Tribute to Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, Retiring After Three Decades of NLM Leadership ... of Contents Outgoing NLM Director Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg. Photo courtesy of Ernie Branson, NIH On ...

  10. WE-H-BRB-01: Overview of the ASTRO-NIH-AAPM 2015 Workshop On Exploring Opportunities for Radiation Oncology in the Era of Big Data.

    PubMed

    Benedict, S

    2016-06-01

    Big Data in Radiation Oncology: (1) Overview of the NIH 2015 Big Data Workshop, (2) Where do we stand in the applications of big data in radiation oncology?, and (3) Learning Health Systems for Radiation Oncology: Needs and Challenges for Future Success The overriding goal of this trio panel of presentations is to improve awareness of the wide ranging opportunities for big data impact on patient quality care and enhancing potential for research and collaboration opportunities with NIH and a host of new big data initiatives. This presentation will also summarize the Big Data workshop that was held at the NIH Campus on August 13-14, 2015 and sponsored by AAPM, ASTRO, and NIH. The workshop included discussion of current Big Data cancer registry initiatives, safety and incident reporting systems, and other strategies that will have the greatest impact on radiation oncology research, quality assurance, safety, and outcomes analysis.

  11. Inhibition of NIH 3T3 cell proliferation by a mutant ras protein with preferential affinity for GDP.

    PubMed Central

    Feig, L A; Cooper, G M

    1988-01-01

    Substitution of asparagine for serine at position 17 decreased the affinity of rasH p21 for GTP 20- to 40-fold without significantly affecting its affinity for GDP. Transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with a mammalian expression vector containing the Asn-17 rasH gene and a Neor gene under the control of the same promoter yielded only a small fraction of the expected number of G418-resistant colonies, indicating that expression of Asn-17 p21 inhibited cell proliferation. The inhibitory effect of Asn-17 p21 required its localization to the plasma membrane and was reversed by coexpression of an activated ras gene, indicating that the mutant p21 blocked the endogenous ras function required for NIH 3T3 cell proliferation. NIH 3T3 cells transformed by v-mos and v-raf, but not v-src, were resistant to inhibition by Asn-17 p21, indicating that the requirement for normal ras function can be bypassed by these cytoplasmic oncogenes. The Asn-17 mutant represents a novel reagent for the study of ras function by virtue of its ability to inhibit cellular ras activity in vivo. Since this phenotype is likely associated with the preferential affinity of the mutant protein for GDP, analogous mutations might also yield inhibitors of other proteins whose activities are regulated by guanine nucleotide binding. Images PMID:3145408

  12. Nickel-Refining Fumes Induced DNA Damage and Apoptosis of NIH/3T3 Cells via Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wang, Sheng-Yuan; Jia, Li; Zhang, Lin; Ba, Jing-Chong; Han, Dan; Yu, Cui-Ping; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Although there have been numerous studies examining the toxicity and carcinogenicity of nickel compounds in humans and animals, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In our research, NIH/3T3 cells were exposed to nickel-refining fumes at the concentrations of 0, 6.25, 12.50, 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL for 24 h. Cell viability, cell apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, the level of glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) level were detected. The exposure of NIH/3T3 cells to nickel-refining fumes significantly reduced cell viability and induced cell apoptotic death in a dose-dependent manner. Nickel-refining fumes significantly increased ROS levels and induced DNA damage. Nickel-refining fumes may induce the changes in the state of ROS, which may eventually initiate oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis of NIH/3T3 cells. PMID:27347984

  13. S-phase induction and transformation of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells by microinjection of phospholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.R.; Ryu, Sungho; Suh, Panghill; Rhee, Suegoo; Kung, Hsiangfu )

    1989-05-01

    Two inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes (PLC-I and -II) have been purified from bovine brain. When PLC-I or PLC-II was microinjected into quiescent NIH 3T3 cells, a time- and dose-dependent induction of DNA synthesis occurred, as demonstrated by ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into nuclear DNA. In addition, {approx} 8 hr after PLC injection, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts appeared spindle-shaped, refractile, and highly vacuolated, displaying a morphology similar to transformed cells. The morphologic transformation was apparent for 26-30 hr after which the injected cells reverted back to a normal phenotype. Microinjected PLC at a high concentration was cytotoxic, dissolving the cytoplasmic membrane and leaving behind cellular ghosts. PLC is a key regulatory enzyme involved in cellular membrane signal transduction. Introduction of exogenous PLC into NIH 3T3 cells by microinjection induced a growth and oncogenic potential, as demonstrated by the ability of microinjected PLC to override the cellular G{sub 0} block, inducing DNA synthesis and morphologic transformation of growth-arrested fibroblast cells.

  14. S-phase induction and transformation of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells by microinjection of phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Smith, M R; Ryu, S H; Suh, P G; Rhee, S G; Kung, H F

    1989-05-01

    Two inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes (PLC-I and -II) have been purified from bovine brain. When PLC-I or PLC-II was microinjected (100-700 micrograms/ml) into quiescent NIH 3T3 cells, a time- and dose-dependent induction of DNA synthesis occurred, as demonstrated by [3H]thymidine incorporation into nuclear DNA. In addition, approximately to 8 hr after PLC injection, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts appeared spindle-shaped, refractile, and highly vacuolated, displaying a morphology similar to transformed cells. The morphologic transformation was apparent for 26-30 hr after which the injected cells reverted back to a normal phenotype. Microinjected PLC at a high concentration (1 mg/ml) was cytotoxic, dissolving the cytoplasmic membrane and leaving behind cellular ghosts. PLC is a key regulatory enzyme involved in cellular membrane signal transduction. Introduction of exogenous PLC into NIH 3T3 cells by microinjection induced a growth and oncogenic potential, as demonstrated by the ability of microinjected PLC (approximately 10,000 molecules per cell) to override the cellular G0 block, inducing DNA synthesis and morphologic transformation of growth-arrested fibroblast cells.

  15. Ab initio study of the effects of transition metal doping of Mg2NiH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Setten, Michiel J.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, Geert

    2007-08-01

    Mg2NiH4 is a promising hydrogen storage material with fast (de)hydrogenation kinetics. Its hydrogen desorption enthalpy, however, is too large for practical applications. In this paper we study the effects of transition metal doping by first-principles density functional theory calculations. We show that the hydrogen desorption enthalpy can be reduced by ˜0.1eV/H2 if one in eight Ni atoms is replaced by Cu or Fe. Replacing Ni by Co atoms, however, increases the hydrogen desorption enthalpy. We study the thermodynamic stability of the dopants in the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated phases. Doping with Co or Cu leads to marginally stable compounds, whereas doping with Fe leads to an unstable compound. The optical response of Mg2NiH4 is also substantially affected by doping. The direct gap in Mg2NiH4 is ˜1.7eV . Doping with Co, Fe, or Cu leads to impurity bands that reduce the direct gap by up to 0.5eV .

  16. Phorbol esters enhance attachment of NIH/3T3 cells to laminin and type IV collagen substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Shigemi; Ben, T.L.; De Luca, L.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The effect of phorbol esters on the adhesive properties of NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts was investigated using plastic substrates precoated with the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagen, and laminin. Treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) enhanced NIH/3T3 cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates but had little or no effect on attachment to fibronectin and type I collagen substrates. The effect of PMA in enhancing cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates was dose dependent between 10{sup {minus}9} and 10{sup {minus}7} M. PMA was effective as early as 30 min; the effect reached a maximum at 2 h and decreased gradually. Phorbol 12, 13-dibenzoate and phorbol 12, 13-diacetate were effective but to a lesser extent and phorbol 12-myristate and phorbol 13-acetate showed little or no effect. These results suggest that PMA may enhance NIH/3T3 cell adhesion through effects on laminin and type IV collagen receptors. Retinoic acid, which itself requires at least 6 h to show an effect on attachment, did not have any effect on cell attachment in 2 h and, if anything, slightly inhibited PMA-enhanced cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates.

  17. A specific protein, p92, detected in flat revertants derived from NIH/3T3 transformed by human activated c-Ha-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Suzuki, H; Kuzumaki, N; Müllauer, L; Ogiso, Y; Oda, A; Ebisawa, K; Sakurai, T; Nonomura, Y; Kijimoto-Ochiai, S

    1990-01-01

    Total proteins from a mouse embryo fibroblast cell line NIH/3T3, NIH/3T3 cells transformed by human activated c-Ha-ras (EJ-ras) oncogene (EJ-NIH/3T3), and the two flat revertant cell lines, R1 and R2, were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (IEF and NEPHGE). Several hundred polypeptides were resolved as seen by silver staining. Common alterations in four polypeptide spots were observed in the revertants when compared with NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. In these alterations, a new polypeptide spot p92-5.7 (designated by molecular weight x 10(-3) and pI) was detected only in the revertants and not in NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of p92-5.7 seemed to be associated with the flat morphology and the reduced tumorigenicity of the revertants. Polypeptide p92-5.7 was also not detected in the total proteins extracted from BALB/3T3 cells, NIH Swiss mouse primary embryo fibroblasts, NRK (normal rat kidney) cells, and L6 (rat myoblast). Subcellular fractionation of total protein from R1 cells revealed that the p92-5.7 was present in the cytosol. Western blot analysis using an anti-gelsolin antibody demonstrated that the p92-5.7 might be a variant form of gelsolin which is thought to be an actin regulatory protein or a gelsolin-like polypeptide. These results may suggest that the expression of p92-5.7 detected only in the revertants is associated, at least in part, with the reversion. This may be the first demonstration of specific protein expression in the flat revertants.

  18. Summary of an NIH workshop to identify research needs to improve the monitoring of iodine status in the United States and to inform the DRI.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Christine A; Zimmermann, Michael B; Skeaff, Sheila; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Dwyer, Johanna T; Trumbo, Paula R; Zehaluk, Christina; Andrews, Karen W; Carriquiry, Alicia; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Egan, S Kathleen; Long, Stephen E; Bailey, Regan Lucas; Sullivan, Kevin M; Holden, Joanne M; Betz, Joseph M; Phinney, Karen W; Brooks, Stephen P J; Johnson, Clifford L; Haggans, Carol J

    2012-06-01

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the NIH sponsored a workshop on May 12-13, 2011, to bring together representatives from various NIH institutes and centers as a first step in developing an NIH iodine research initiative. The workshop also provided an opportunity to identify research needs that would inform the dietary reference intakes for iodine, which were last revised in 2001. Iodine is required throughout the life cycle, but pregnant women and infants are the populations most at risk of deficiency, because iodine is required for normal brain development and growth. The CDC monitors iodine status of the population on a regular basis, but the status of the most vulnerable populations remains uncertain. The NIH funds very little investigator-initiated research relevant to iodine and human nutrition, but the ODS has worked for several years with a number of other U.S. government agencies to develop many of the resources needed to conduct iodine research of high quality (e.g., validated analytical methods and reference materials for multiple types of samples). Iodine experts, scientists from several U.S. government agencies, and NIH representatives met for 2 d to identify iodine research needs appropriate to the NIH mission.

  19. Summary of an NIH Workshop to Identify Research Needs to Improve the Monitoring of Iodine Status in the United States and to Inform the DRI123

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Christine A.; Zimmermann, Michael B.; Skeaff, Sheila; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Dwyer, Johanna T.; Trumbo, Paula R.; Zehaluk, Christina; Andrews, Karen W.; Carriquiry, Alicia; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Egan, S. Kathleen; Long, Stephen E.; Bailey, Regan Lucas; Sullivan, Kevin M.; Holden, Joanne M.; Betz, Joseph M.; Phinney, Karen W.; Brooks, Stephen P. J.; Johnson, Clifford L.; Haggans, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the NIH sponsored a workshop on May 12–13, 2011, to bring together representatives from various NIH institutes and centers as a first step in developing an NIH iodine research initiative. The workshop also provided an opportunity to identify research needs that would inform the dietary reference intakes for iodine, which were last revised in 2001. Iodine is required throughout the life cycle, but pregnant women and infants are the populations most at risk of deficiency, because iodine is required for normal brain development and growth. The CDC monitors iodine status of the population on a regular basis, but the status of the most vulnerable populations remains uncertain. The NIH funds very little investigator-initiated research relevant to iodine and human nutrition, but the ODS has worked for several years with a number of other U.S. government agencies to develop many of the resources needed to conduct iodine research of high quality (e.g., validated analytical methods and reference materials for multiple types of samples). Iodine experts, scientists from several U.S. government agencies, and NIH representatives met for 2 d to identify iodine research needs appropriate to the NIH mission. PMID:22551802

  20. Suppression of lytic replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by autophagy during initial infection in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun-Hee; Lee, Jihui; Kim, Na-Yeon; Kim, Jae-Hyeon; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Han, Minsub; Ahn, Soon Kil; Kang, Hara; Lee, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the infectious cause of the angioproliferative neoplasm Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). We first confirmed the susceptibility of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts to KSHV by infecting them with BCP-1-derived KSHV. Lytic replication of KSHV was confirmed by PCR amplification of viral DNA isolated from culture supernatants of KSHV-infected cells. The template from KSHV-infected NIH 3T3 cells resulted in an intense viral DNA PCR product. A time course experiment revealed the disappearance of KSHV-specific DNA in culture supernatant of NIH 3T3 cells during a period between 48 h and 72 h postinfection. Furthermore, 3 days postinfection, infected NIH 3T3 cells showed no evidence of latent or lytic transcripts, including LANA, vFLIP, vCyclin, and vIL-6. These results imply that KSHV infection in NIH 3T3 cells is unstable and is rapidly lost on subsequent culturing. Additionally, we detected an enhancement of autophagy early in infection with KSHV. More interestingly, inhibition of autophagy by Beclin 1 siRNA or 3-methyladenine significantly increased the amount of KSHV-specific DNA in the culture supernatant of NIH 3T3 cells when compared to the group treated with KSHV infection alone, implying that autophagy prevents lytic replication of KSHV. Taken together, our data suggest that autophagy could be one of the cellular mechanisms utilized by host cells to promote viral clearance.