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Sample records for nih ceccr slu

  1. NIH Quickfinder

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents ... information or to contact any of the following NIH institutes, centers, and offices directly, please call or ...

  2. Splicing regulator SLU7 is essential for maintaining liver homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Elizalde, María; Urtasun, Raquel; Azkona, María; Latasa, María U.; Goñi, Saioa; García-Irigoyen, Oihane; Uriarte, Iker; Segura, Victor; Collantes, María; Di Scala, Mariana; Lujambio, Amaia; Prieto, Jesús; Ávila, Matías A.; Berasain, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    A precise equilibrium between cellular differentiation and proliferation is fundamental for tissue homeostasis. Maintaining this balance is particularly important for the liver, a highly differentiated organ with systemic metabolic functions that is endowed with unparalleled regenerative potential. Carcinogenesis in the liver develops as the result of hepatocellular de-differentiation and uncontrolled proliferation. Here, we identified SLU7, which encodes a pre-mRNA splicing regulator that is inhibited in hepatocarcinoma, as a pivotal gene for hepatocellular homeostasis. SLU7 knockdown in human liver cells and mouse liver resulted in profound changes in pre-mRNA splicing and gene expression, leading to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, refractoriness to key metabolic hormones, and reversion to a fetal-like gene expression pattern. Additionally, loss of SLU7 also increased hepatocellular proliferation and induced a switch to a tumor-like glycolytic phenotype. Slu7 governed the splicing and/or expression of multiple genes essential for hepatocellular differentiation, including serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (Srsf3) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (Hnf4α), and was critical for cAMP-regulated gene transcription. Together, out data indicate that SLU7 is central regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence. PMID:24865429

  3. Splicing Functions and Global Dependency on Fission Yeast Slu7 Reveal Diversity in Spliceosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shataparna; Khandelia, Piyush; Melangath, Geetha; Bashir, Samirul; Nagampalli, Vijaykrishna

    2013-01-01

    The multiple short introns in Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes with degenerate cis sequences and atypically positioned polypyrimidine tracts make an interesting model to investigate canonical and alternative roles for conserved splicing factors. Here we report functions and interactions of the S. pombe slu7+ (spslu7+) gene product, known from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human in vitro reactions to assemble into spliceosomes after the first catalytic reaction and to dictate 3′ splice site choice during the second reaction. By using a missense mutant of this essential S. pombe factor, we detected a range of global splicing derangements that were validated in assays for the splicing status of diverse candidate introns. We ascribe widespread, intron-specific SpSlu7 functions and have deduced several features, including the branch nucleotide-to-3′ splice site distance, intron length, and the impact of its A/U content at the 5′ end on the intron's dependence on SpSlu7. The data imply dynamic substrate-splicing factor relationships in multiintron transcripts. Interestingly, the unexpected early splicing arrest in spslu7-2 revealed a role before catalysis. We detected a salt-stable association with U5 snRNP and observed genetic interactions with spprp1+, a homolog of human U5-102k factor. These observations together point to an altered recruitment and dependence on SpSlu7, suggesting its role in facilitating transitions that promote catalysis, and highlight the diversity in spliceosome assembly. PMID:23754748

  4. Regulation of transcription of the RNA splicing factor hSlu7 by Elk-1 and Sp1 affects alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Alberstein, Moti; Amit, Maayan; Vaknin, Keren; O'Donnell, Amanda; Farhy, Chen; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Shomron, Noam; Shaham, Ohad; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Ast, Gil

    2007-11-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in transcriptome diversity and plasticity, but it is largely unknown how tissue-specific and embryogenesis-specific alternative splicing is regulated. The highly conserved splicing factor Slu7 is involved in 3' splice site selection and also regulates alternative splicing. We show that Slu7 has a unique spatial pattern of expression among human and mouse embryonic and adult tissues. We identified several functional Ets binding sites and GC-boxes in the human Slu7 (hSlu7) promoter region. The Ets and GC-box binding transcription factors, Elk-1 and Sp1, respectively, exerted opposite effects on hSlu7 transcription: Sp1 protein enhances and Elk-1 protein represses transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Sp1 protein bound to the hSlu7 promoter in vivo, and depletion of Sp1 by RNA interference (RNAi) repressed hSlu7 expression. Elk-1 protein bound to the hSlu7 promoter in vivo, and depletion of Elk-1 by RNAi caused an increase in the endogenous level of hSlu7 mRNA. Further, depletion of either Sp1 or Elk-1 affected alternative splicing. Our results provide indications of a complex transcription regulation mechanism that controls the spatial and temporal expression of Slu7, presumably allowing regulation of tissue-specific alternative splicing events.

  5. NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... who have disabilities from a TBI. NIH Studies TBI/PTSD Links Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is ... are studying the relationships between traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and PTSD. Fall 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number ...

  6. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group Past Issues / Winter 2016 ... ORWH) orwh.od.nih.gov (301) 402-1770 NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group Marin P. Allen, Ph.D., ...

  7. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... information 1-800-438-4380 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) www.niaaa.nih.gov (301) ... Public Liaison, NIH Shuly Babitz, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Joyce Backus, National Library of Medicine ( ...

  8. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  9. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... 226-4267) National Institute of Biological Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov (301) 451-6772 ... Guay-Broder , National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Susan Johnson , National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial ...

  10. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... 451-6772 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx ... Ph.D. , National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Gregory Roa , National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and ...

  11. NIH Clinical Research Trials and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Apply About Grants Policy & Compliance Grants News/Blog Contracts Loan Repayment More » Search the NIH Guide Quick Links RePORT eRA Commons NIH Common Fund NIH and the American Recovery Act News & Events News Releases Videos Images Events Social Media & Outreach More » Quick Links NIH News in ...

  12. Memory and Forgetfulness: NIH Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Memory & Forgetfulness NIH Research Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... agency for research on Alzheimer's disease and related memory research. An analysis funded by the NIA finds ...

  13. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table ... More "Managing Allergies" Articles How to Control Your Seasonal Allergies / Allergy Diagnosis and Treatment / Seasonal Allergy Research at ...

  14. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Richard

    Biomedical imaging, and in particular MRI and CT, is often identified as among the top 10 most significant advances in healthcare in the 20th century. This presentation will describe some of the recent advances in medical physics and imaging being funded by NIH in this century and current funding opportunities. The presentation will also highlight the role of multidisciplinary research in bringing concepts from the physical sciences and applying them to challenges in biological and biomedical research.. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging.

  15. Basic Science and The NIH

    PubMed Central

    Varmus, Harold

    1994-01-01

    The following is an edited version of the Keynote Speech delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology by Harold Varmus, Director of the National Institutes of Health. The address, entitled Basic Science and the NIH, was given at the opening of the meeting in New Orleans on December 11, 1993. It was Varmus' first public policy talk as NIH Director. PMID:8049519

  16. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov (301) 443-1124 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) www.niehs.nih.gov (919) 541-3345 ... Supplements Christine Bruske Flowers, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Peter Garrett, National Cancer Institute Lenora Johnson, National ...

  17. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22NIAMS (1-877-226-4267) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov ( ... General Medical Sciences Raymond MacDougall, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering John Ohab, National Human Genome ...

  18. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22NIAMS (1-877-226-4267) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) www.nibib.nih.gov ( ... National Cancer Institute Thomas Johnson, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Kathy Kranzfelder, National Institute of ...

  19. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... information 1-800-438-4380 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) www.niaaa.nih.gov (301) ... and Skin Diseases Mark Siegal, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Ann Taubenheim, National Heart, Lung, and ...

  20. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  1. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... please call or go online as noted below: Institutes National Library of Medicine (NLM) www.nlm.nih.gov 1-888-FIND- ... Institute on Aging Kym Collins-Lee, National Eye Institute Kathleen Cravedi, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) Kate Egan, National Institute of Mental ...

  2. NIH Quickfinder | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please call or go online as noted below: Institutes National Library of Medicine (NLM) www.nlm.nih.gov 1-888-FIND- ... Institute on Aging Kym Collins-Lee, National Eye Institute Kathleen Cravedi, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) Kate Egan, National Institute of Mental ...

  3. Back Cover: NIH MedlinePlus Salud

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues NIH MedlinePlus Salud Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. ¡A su salud! Los Institutos Nacionales de la Salud (NIH, por ...

  4. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... report promising results in prevention and treatment of Ebola virus disease (from left) NIH Director Dr. Francis ... Gallin exit the Clinical Center with recently discharged Ebola patient Nina Pham (next to Dr. Fauci). NIH's ...

  5. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... cathepsin B. Working in the lab, Hyo Youl Moon and Henriette van Praag of NIH's National Institute ... sickness." This nausea and vomiting may be positive news. A recent NIH study links morning sickness to ...

  6. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please call or go online as noted below: Institutes National Library of Medicine (NLM) www.nlm.nih.gov 1-888-FIND- ... Institute on Aging Kym Collins-Lee, National Eye Institute Kathleen Cravedi, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) Kate Egan, National Institute of Mental ...

  7. NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Concussion NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents Dr. ... chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). "Boxing, Football and the Brain" One study, funded in part by NIH, is ...

  8. Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents NIH-Sponsored Research Asthma in the Inner City: Recognizing that asthma severity ...

  9. Estimating the NIH Efficient Frontier

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is among the world’s largest investors in biomedical research, with a mandate to: “…lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability.” Its funding decisions have been criticized as insufficiently focused on disease burden. We hypothesize that modern portfolio theory can create a closer link between basic research and outcome, and offer insight into basic-science related improvements in public health. We propose portfolio theory as a systematic framework for making biomedical funding allocation decisions–one that is directly tied to the risk/reward trade-off of burden-of-disease outcomes. Methods and Findings Using data from 1965 to 2007, we provide estimates of the NIH “efficient frontier”, the set of funding allocations across 7 groups of disease-oriented NIH institutes that yield the greatest expected return on investment for a given level of risk, where return on investment is measured by subsequent impact on U.S. years of life lost (YLL). The results suggest that NIH may be actively managing its research risk, given that the volatility of its current allocation is 17% less than that of an equal-allocation portfolio with similar expected returns. The estimated efficient frontier suggests that further improvements in expected return (89% to 119% vs. current) or reduction in risk (22% to 35% vs. current) are available holding risk or expected return, respectively, constant, and that 28% to 89% greater decrease in average years-of-life-lost per unit risk may be achievable. However, these results also reflect the imprecision of YLL as a measure of disease burden, the noisy statistical link between basic research and YLL, and other known limitations of portfolio theory itself. Conclusions Our analysis is intended to serve as a proof-of-concept and starting point for applying quantitative methods to allocating biomedical research funding that are objective, systematic, transparent

  10. The NIH Human Microbiome Project.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jane; Garges, Susan; Giovanni, Maria; McInnes, Pamela; Wang, Lu; Schloss, Jeffery A; Bonazzi, Vivien; McEwen, Jean E; Wetterstrand, Kris A; Deal, Carolyn; Baker, Carl C; Di Francesco, Valentina; Howcroft, T Kevin; Karp, Robert W; Lunsford, R Dwayne; Wellington, Christopher R; Belachew, Tsegahiwot; Wright, Michael; Giblin, Christina; David, Hagit; Mills, Melody; Salomon, Rachelle; Mullins, Christopher; Akolkar, Beena; Begg, Lisa; Davis, Cindy; Grandison, Lindsey; Humble, Michael; Khalsa, Jag; Little, A Roger; Peavy, Hannah; Pontzer, Carol; Portnoy, Matthew; Sayre, Michael H; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Zakhari, Samir; Read, Jennifer; Watson, Bracie; Guyer, Mark

    2009-12-01

    The Human Microbiome Project (HMP), funded as an initiative of the NIH Roadmap for Biomedical Research (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov), is a multi-component community resource. The goals of the HMP are: (1) to take advantage of new, high-throughput technologies to characterize the human microbiome more fully by studying samples from multiple body sites from each of at least 250 "normal" volunteers; (2) to determine whether there are associations between changes in the microbiome and health/disease by studying several different medical conditions; and (3) to provide both a standardized data resource and new technological approaches to enable such studies to be undertaken broadly in the scientific community. The ethical, legal, and social implications of such research are being systematically studied as well. The ultimate objective of the HMP is to demonstrate that there are opportunities to improve human health through monitoring or manipulation of the human microbiome. The history and implementation of this new program are described here.

  11. The NIH Human Microbiome Project

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jane; Garges, Susan; Giovanni, Maria; McInnes, Pamela; Wang, Lu; Schloss, Jeffery A.; Bonazzi, Vivien; McEwen, Jean E.; Wetterstrand, Kris A.; Deal, Carolyn; Baker, Carl C.; Di Francesco, Valentina; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Karp, Robert W.; Lunsford, R. Dwayne; Wellington, Christopher R.; Belachew, Tsegahiwot; Wright, Michael; Giblin, Christina; David, Hagit; Mills, Melody; Salomon, Rachelle; Mullins, Christopher; Akolkar, Beena; Begg, Lisa; Davis, Cindy; Grandison, Lindsey; Humble, Michael; Khalsa, Jag; Little, A. Roger; Peavy, Hannah; Pontzer, Carol; Portnoy, Matthew; Sayre, Michael H.; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Zakhari, Samir; Read, Jennifer; Watson, Bracie; Guyer, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Human Microbiome Project (HMP), funded as an initiative of the NIH Roadmap for Biomedical Research (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov), is a multi-component community resource. The goals of the HMP are: (1) to take advantage of new, high-throughput technologies to characterize the human microbiome more fully by studying samples from multiple body sites from each of at least 250 “normal” volunteers; (2) to determine whether there are associations between changes in the microbiome and health/disease by studying several different medical conditions; and (3) to provide both a standardized data resource and new technological approaches to enable such studies to be undertaken broadly in the scientific community. The ethical, legal, and social implications of such research are being systematically studied as well. The ultimate objective of the HMP is to demonstrate that there are opportunities to improve human health through monitoring or manipulation of the human microbiome. The history and implementation of this new program are described here. PMID:19819907

  12. NIH-Supported Trials Test Hormonal Therapy in Older Men with Low Testosterone Levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH ... National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is ...

  13. NIH Study Finds Regular Aspirin Use May Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH ... National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is ...

  14. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Spring - Summer 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of Contents For more information or ... of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Spring / Summer 2010 Issue: Volume 5 Number 2 Page 29

  15. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Fall 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents For more information or ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Fall 2010 Issue: Volume 5 Number 3 Page 29

  16. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Winter 2010 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  17. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  18. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Mental Health; NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research Physical Activity May Reduce Risk of 13 Types of Cancer ... has shown that greater levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with a lower risk of developing ...

  19. Healthline | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of yoga. New Video Explores the Science of Yoga A new video from the NIH's National Center ... unique look at the increasingly popular practice of yoga. It highlights research that examines how yoga works, ...

  20. Focus on Communication: NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... grew new hair cells. Read More "Focus on Communication" Articles Living with Hearing Loss / Anatomy of the ...

  1. NIH/NSF accelerate biomedical research innovations

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration between the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health will give NIH-funded researchers training to help them evaluate their scientific discoveries for commercial potential, with the aim of accelerating biomedical in

  2. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... better socially," said James Griffin, PhD, of the Child Development and Behavior Branch at NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver ... interaction research program to support studies relevant to child development, health, and the therapeutic use of animals. A ...

  3. Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus magazine!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus magazine! Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... Produced by the National Institutes of Health, the magazine and its companion Web site medlineplus.gov are ...

  4. Health Lines | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... timetotalk . Remember This: Nutrients in Fish May Boost Memory If you want to stay sharp as you ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Two other NIH Institutes funded the ...

  5. Skin Cancer: NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... making a person immune to his or her skin cancer cells. Another method is to train a person's ...

  6. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/digitalprojects.html. Photo courtesy of NIH From DNA to Beer: A Unique Look at the Mighty ... drink we consume. The exhibition is called From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry. ...

  7. Key Collaborations | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    DCCPS builds bridges across NIH and with other organizations by fostering partnerships on initiatives that emphasize and promote transdisciplinary team science, stretching across multiple disciplines and levels of analysis.

  8. Monsanto may bypass NIH in microbe test.

    PubMed

    Sun, Marjorie

    1985-01-11

    The Monsanto Company is planning to ask the Environmental Protection Agency for clearance to field test a genetically engineered microbial pesticide, bypassing the traditional approval process of the National Institutes of Health. Although only federally funded institutions are required to obtain NIH approval for genetic engineering tests, Monsanto is the first company to bypass the NIH regulatory process, which has become mired in a lawsuit brought by Jeremy Rifkin.

  9. NIH Research on Treating Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a precise site in the pain-processing pathway. An NIH clinical trial is currently testing resiniferatoxin, a plant toxin, which specifically targets pain-transmitting nerves to treat severe pain in advanced cancer patients. NIH-funded research finds that small molecules ...

  10. Pain assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Winnie; Griffith, James W.; Morrison, M. Tracy; Tanquary, Jennifer; Sabata, Dory; Victorson, David; Carey, Leeanne M.; MacDermid, Joy C.; Dudgeon, Brian J.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pain is an important component of health and function, and chronic pain can be a problem in its own right. The purpose of this report is to review the considerations surrounding pain measurement in the NIH Toolbox, as well as to describe the measurement tools that were adopted for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox assessment battery. Methods: Instruments to measure pain in the NIH Toolbox were selected on the basis of scholarly input from a diverse group of experts, as well as review of existing instruments, which include verbal rating scales, numerical rating scales, and graphical scales. Results: Brief self-report measures of pain intensity and pain interference were selected for inclusion in the core NIH Toolbox for use with adults. A 0 to 10 numerical rating scale was recommended for measuring pain intensity, and a 6-item Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) short form for measuring pain interference. The 8-item PROMIS Pediatric Pain Interference measure was recommended as a supplemental measure. No specific measure was recommended for measuring pain intensity in children. Conclusions: Core and supplemental measures were recommended for the NIH Toolbox. Additional measures were reviewed for investigators who seek tools for measuring pain intensity in pediatric samples. PMID:23479545

  11. From The Director | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... caught my attention came from the NIH-funded Diabetes Prevention Program trial, which found the combination of increased ... developed signs of pre-diabetes, the principles of diabetes prevention were firmly laid down by this NIH study. ...

  12. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH Past Issues / Fall 2009 ... Human Development (NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH "… deep compassion for those ...

  13. From the NIH Director: A Global Health System

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. During his recent visit to India, NIH Director Dr. Elias Zerhouni (left) met with Manmohan Singh, Prime Minister of India, to discuss NIH's substantial medical research collaborations with ...

  14. Clinical Research Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Clinical Study Find You How does clinical research work? Visit our website and click on New National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Research Awareness Website The NIH Clinical Center has joined ...

  15. From the NIH Director: The Value of Medical Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues From the NIH Director: The Value of Medical Research Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents For ... Harris, or participating in clinical trials to advance medical research. Photo courtesy of NIH As director of the ...

  16. Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus, the magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to health professionals and patients alike. The Nation's Medical Research Agency With roots in the 19th century, the ... of Health (NIH) is the world's leader in medical research. Comprised of 27 separate Institutes and Centers, NIH ...

  17. Research Initiatives | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides detailed information about currently funded RFA initiatives both led by DCCPS, and those led by other NIH Institutes and Centers (I/Cs) that include DCCPS as a partner. Each initiative includes a table of funded grants and a map that shows the location of funded institutions.

  18. The NIH-EPA Chemical Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Herbert J.; Andrews, Lawrence C.

    1979-01-01

    The NIH-EPA Chemical Information System (CIS) provides facilities useful for the characterization and identification of chemical substances in industrial, academic, regulatory, and emergency response environments. It is comprised of a variety of data bases, retrieval programs, and related processing and display programs with on-line interactive…

  19. The Children's Inn at NIH - Three Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Children's Inn The Children's Inn at NIH - Three Stories Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Kristal Nemeroff—The Patient Kristal Nemeroff, age 2, at the Children's ...

  20. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Managing Allergies Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table ... Study of Allergic Diseases: This National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) program is to identify ...

  1. 10 New NIH Research Highlights | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Translational Sciences, and other NIH components. Researchers Identify Energy-Burning Fat Cells Humans have both white and brown fat cells. Brown fat burns energy and helps maintain body temperature, while white fat ...

  2. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Summer 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For an enhanced version ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Summer 2009 Issue: Volume 4 Number 3 Page 29

  3. 77 FR 54584 - Final Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... resistance into a microorganism must be reviewed by the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and approved... changes also clarify the criteria for determining whether an experiment to introduce drug resistance into... NIH/OBA the authority [[Page 54585

  4. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Fall 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. NIH Quickfinder Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For more information or ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Fall 2009 Issue: Volume 4 Number 4 Page 29

  5. NIH Quickfinder and NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group - Winter 2011

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx ... Ph.D., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Naomi Miller, National Library of Medicine (ex-officio) ...

  6. How to Write an NIH R13 Conference Grant Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonis, Jeffrey H.; Triffleman, Elisa; King, Lynda; King, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to provide recommendations for writing a successful R13 conference grant proposal for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Methods: The authors reviewed successful NIH conference grant proposal abstracts. They also reflect on their own experience in writing an NIH conference grant proposal and…

  7. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  8. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  9. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  10. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  11. 42 CFR 52a.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52a.5 Section 52a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) NIH considers...

  12. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the magazine NIH MedlinePlus the magazine is published quarterly, in print and on the ... up for a free subscription to NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Librarians may order this magazine in bulk . Please ...

  13. NIH Research: Children Research Volunteers Receive Care and Help Advance Knowledge | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center than at any other place in the world,” said Dr. John I. Gallin, NIH Clinical Center ... NIH Clinical Center, children are treated to a world-class staff of specialists and support services. A ...

  14. When it's cutback time at NIH...

    PubMed

    Siegel, B

    1985-01-01

    It's no secret that federal funds for any kind of social program are evaporating. But it's still hard to truly grasp the impact of it all until your own program has the rug pulled out from under it. Here's the story of a team of five research scientists that was close to developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease and other conditions when the National Institutes of Health (NIH), responding to Reagan Administration cutbacks, denied the project funds that had already been informally approved. Not only is it an object lesson for all nonprofit organizations and individual grantseekers--even those with no intention of applying to NIH for funds--but it also provides some behind-the-scenes looks at the human side of federal funding decisions.

  15. Seeking NIH funding: Defining the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekim, Lana

    2003-04-01

    The presentation will provide a brief introduction to the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) with emphasis on the Voice and Speech program in the Division of Extramural Research. The process of seeking NIH funding will be outlined and a number of funding mechanisms will be described. The peer review process and the time course of a grant application will be highlighted.

  16. Cognition assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Dikmen, Sureyya S.; Heaton, Robert K.; Tulsky, David S.; Zelazo, Philip D.; Bauer, Patricia J.; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Fox, Nathan A.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Mungas, Dan; Nowinski, Cindy J.; Richler, Jennifer; Deocampo, Joanne A.; Anderson, Jacob E.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Borosh, Beth; Havlik, Richard; Conway, Kevin; Edwards, Emmeline; Freund, Lisa; King, Jonathan W.; Moy, Claudia; Witt, Ellen; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition is 1 of 4 domains measured by the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH-TB), and complements modules testing motor function, sensation, and emotion. On the basis of expert panels, the cognition subdomains identified as most important for health, success in school and work, and independence in daily functioning were Executive Function, Episodic Memory, Language, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Attention. Seven measures were designed to tap constructs within these subdomains. The instruments were validated in English, in a sample of 476 participants ranging in age from 3 to 85 years, with representation from both sexes, 3 racial/ethnic categories, and 3 levels of education. This report describes the development of the Cognition Battery and presents results on test-retest reliability, age effects on performance, and convergent and discriminant construct validity. The NIH-TB Cognition Battery is intended to serve as a brief, convenient set of measures to supplement other outcome measures in epidemiologic and longitudinal research and clinical trials. With a computerized format and national standardization, this battery will provide a “common currency” among researchers for comparisons across a wide range of studies and populations. PMID:23479546

  17. The NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program data resource.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Lisa Helbling

    2012-06-01

    The NIH Roadmap Reference Epigenome Mapping Consortium is developing a community resource of genome-wide epigenetic maps in a broad range of human primary cells and tissues. There are large amounts of data already available, and a number of different options for viewing and analyzing the data. This report will describe key features of the websites where users will find data, protocols and analysis tools developed by the consortium, and provide a perspective on how this unique resource will facilitate and inform human disease research, both immediately and in the future.

  18. The Children's Inn at NIH turns 25 | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Woodmont House, can accommodate up to 64 patient-families while their children are being treated at the NIH Clinical Center. The Inn has a playroom, kids' computer room, bistro, game room, learning center, business center, reflection space, teen lounge, arts and crafts ...

  19. Precision Medicine: Healthcare Tailored to You | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Precision Medicine: Healthcare Tailored to You Past Issues / Fall 2015 ... NIH researchers and fellow scientists working on precision medicine efforts gather on the NIH campus in Bethesda, ...

  20. 76 FR 3150 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines...: The NIH Guidelines currently require that recombinant DNA experiments designed to create...

  1. Publishing Practices of NIH-Funded Faculty at MIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Courtney; Duranceau, Ellen Finnie; Gabridge, Tracy A.; Green, Remlee S.; Kajosalo, Erja; Noga, Michael M.; Silver, Howard J.; Stout, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Faculty and researchers who receive substantial funding from NIH were interviewed about their publication practices. Qualitative data was collected from interviews of eleven faculty members and one researcher representing six academic departments who received NIH funding. Interview responses were analyzed to identify a representative publication…

  2. Assessment of NIH Minority Research and Training Programs: Phase 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of NIH's programs for increasing the participation in biomedical science of individuals from underrepresented minority groups. The report examines, using available data and the results of a survey of NIH trainees, the characteristics and outcomes of programs at the undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral, and…

  3. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  4. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  5. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  6. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  7. 42 CFR 52b.5 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH evaluate applications? 52b.5 Section 52b.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.5 How will NIH evaluate applications? (a) In evaluating...

  8. Studies Evaluating NIH Training Grant and Fellowship Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmstron, Engin I.

    The study describes current utilization of National Institute of Health (NIH) and National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) graduate training support of institutions, departments, and individuals; it also assesses the impact of possible or actual changes in funding mechanisms. Statistical data show that NIH average contributions vary from 8 to…

  9. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  10. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  11. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  12. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  13. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  14. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  15. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  16. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  17. 42 CFR 63.5 - How will NIH make awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH make awards? 63.5 Section 63.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.5 How will NIH make awards? Subject to the regulations of this part, the Director may...

  18. 42 CFR 63.9 - How may NIH terminate awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How may NIH terminate awards? 63.9 Section 63.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING TRAINEESHIPS § 63.9 How may NIH terminate awards? The Director may terminate a traineeship at...

  19. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium.

    PubMed

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M; Brooks, Philip J; Dugan, Vivien G; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T Kevin; Kelley, Christine A; Kuo, Lillian S; Labosky, Patricia A; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S; Srinivas, Pothur R; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A; Tucker, Jessica M; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies,

  20. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Winter ... Zerhouni, Rep. Ralph Regula (R-OH), Mary Tyler Moore, former Rep. Paul Rogers, and NLM Director Dr. ...

  1. Symptoms, Treatment and Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects more than two million Americans," observes Mark Johnson, professor of biomedical and mechanical engineering at Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science. Johnson led the research, supported by NIH and other ...

  2. Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions Past Issues / ... Drug Abuse during their first Drug Facts Chat Day. Photo courtesy of NIDA The questions poured in… ...

  3. Feature: Controlling Seasonal Allergies | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Seasonal Allergies Controlling Seasonal Allergies Past Issues / Spring 2012 Table of Contents In ... response to allergens, helping to prevent allergic reactions. Seasonal Allergy Research at NIH Allergen and T-Cell Reagent ...

  4. What is Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. Women with Crohn's disease can have successful pregnancies. NIH Research The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition supports research ...

  5. Transforming Discovery into Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... behavioral and social sciences research initiative. Shortening the Pathway to Health Whatever the disease, be it depression, ... opportunities for NIH to shorten and straighten the pathway from discovery to health. This expectation is grounded ...

  6. The NIH experience in first advancing fMRI.

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert

    2012-08-15

    The introduction of functional MRI at NIH in 1992 was the outcome of research goals first formulated by Turner in 1983. Between 1988 and 1990, Turner worked at NIH on actively-shielded gradient coils and the implementation of EPI-based techniques, especially diffusion-weighted EPI. His work on hypoxia in cat brain in 1990 directly inspired Ken Kwong's demonstration of BOLD contrast in humans at MGH in May 1991. Turner collaborated actively with this MGH team, the first group to map entirely noninvasively human brain activity due to visual stimulation. He introduced BOLD fMRI at NIH in February 1992. This paper reviews the steps that led up to BOLD EPI, and Turner's initial applications of BOLD fMRI at NIH.

  7. Precision Medicine In Action | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Precision Medicine In Action Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of ... Dishman "I am totally motivated to support precision medicine because I am one of the early prototype ...

  8. NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives Past Issues / Spring 2008 ... on. From childbirth to end-of-life care, nursing research is aimed at helping patients across the ...

  9. Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical activity Find Out More To learn about support groups, services, research centers, research studies, and publications about ... agencies, and private industry: www.ClinicalTrials.gov NIH Senior Health: http://nihseniorhealth.gov/alzheimersdisease/toc.html The ...

  10. Treating Cataracts | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... her experience recently with NIH MedlinePlus magazine. What did you notice about your vision that told you ... how long it would take to recover. Where did you go for information about cataracts and surgery? ...

  11. 2013 Awards Gala Event | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the National Library of Medicine 2013 Awards Gala Event Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents Capitol ... courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH 2013 Awards Gala Event! On September 10, the Friends held its annual ...

  12. 2014 Awards Gala Event | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the National Library of Medicine 2014 Awards Gala Event Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents Capitol ... courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH 2014 Awards Gala Event! On September 9, the Friends held its annual ...

  13. The Zika Virus | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Infectious Diseases The Zika Virus Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table of Contents ... Photo Courtesy of NIH "You could have a Zika virus vaccine in large-scale clinical trials in ...

  14. Protect Yourself Against HPV | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and his NIH colleague Dr. John Schiller. Both HPV vaccines, called Gardasil and Cervarix, protect against the two ... part of the throat (the oropharynx). Thus, the HPV vaccines should protect against all these forms of cancer. ...

  15. NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Special Section NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Past Issues / Spring 2008 ... page please turn Javascript on. Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Fogarty scholar helps Zambians ...

  16. Cracking the Genetic Code | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Cracking the Genetic Code, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past ... moment in science in 2000: Cracking of the genetic code raised the prospect of pinpointing the root ...

  17. Diabetes Complications | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Complications Tailoring Diabetes Treatment to the Patient Past Issues / Fall 2012 ... been reported for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. How was the NIH involved? These are guidelines ...

  18. Preventing Falls | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing Falls Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... next to your bed Free NIH Videos About Osteoporosis The NIHSeniorHealth Web site features five brief, informative ...

  19. Mentoring In Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... school science student start a career at the National Institutes of Health? The answers to these and other questions were revealed at a lively all-day event, "Science Pathfinders at NLM/NIH," September 26, 2014, on ...

  20. What is COPD? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Challenge of COPD What is COPD? Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents COPD ... a walk, even washing and dressing. What Is COPD? Watch an animation at: NIH's COPD website How ...

  1. Vestibular function assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Michael C.; Whitney, Susan L.; Roberts, Dale; Redfern, Mark S.; Musolino, Mark C.; Roche, Jennica L.; Steed, Daniel P.; Corbin, Bree; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Marchetti, Greg F.; Beaumont, Jennifer; Carey, John P.; Shepard, Neil P.; Jacobson, Gary P.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Furman, Gabriel; Slotkin, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Development of an easy to administer, low-cost test of vestibular function. Methods: Members of the NIH Toolbox Sensory Domain Vestibular, Vision, and Motor subdomain teams collaborated to identify 2 tests: 1) Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA), and 2) the Balance Accelerometry Measure (BAM). Extensive work was completed to identify and develop appropriate software and hardware. More than 300 subjects between the ages of 3 and 85 years, with and without vestibular dysfunction, were recruited and tested. Currently accepted gold standard measures of static visual acuity, vestibular function, dynamic visual acuity, and balance were performed to determine validity. Repeat testing was performed to examine reliability. Results: The DVA and BAM tests are affordable and appropriate for use for individuals 3 through 85 years of age. The DVA had fair to good reliability (0.41–0.94) and sensitivity and specificity (50%–73%), depending on age and optotype chosen. The BAM test was moderately correlated with center of pressure (r = 0.42–0.48) and dynamic posturography (r = −0.48), depending on age and test condition. Both tests differentiated those with and without vestibular impairment and the young from the old. Each test was reliable. Conclusion: The newly created DVA test provides a valid measure of visual acuity with the head still and moving quickly. The novel BAM is a valid measure of balance. Both tests are sensitive to age-related changes and are able to screen for impairment of the vestibular system. PMID:23479540

  2. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M.; Brooks, Philip J.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Kelley, Christine A.; Kuo, Lillian S.; Labosky, Patricia A.; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A.; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A.; Tucker, Jessica M.; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c) identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d) demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e) developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators. PMID:26320938

  3. Total NIH support to US dental schools, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Lipton, J A; Kinane, D F

    2011-03-01

    This study compared total NIH research funding across US dental institutions from 2005 to 2009. Utilizing the online NIH RePORT, we obtained comprehensive award data for US dental schools by funding NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs). Fifty dental schools were awarded a total of $974.393 million, 69.3% from NIDCR and 30.7% from 21 other ICs. These provided the majority of support to 12 schools. Greater than 50% of non-NIDCR support came from 4 ICs. The median dental school NIH portfolio was $14.572 million, with a minimum of $0.241 million and a maximum of $88.609 million. Forty-six schools received $544.899 million for R01 awards. Thirty-five schools were awarded $100 million in research training and career development grants. Several dramatic differences are found for dental schools' rankings based on total NIH dollars compared with NIDCR-only support. Dollars from ICs other than NIDCR increased 34.6% between 2005 and 2009. Grants to US dental institutions comprised 50% or less of total NIDCR awards globally from 2005 through 2009. Funds received from all NIH ICs are an objective metric for evaluation of the research performance of dental schools. NIDCR has played a diminishing role in funding research at US dental schools between 2005 and 2009.

  4. NIH Clinical Center: There’s No Other Hospital Like It | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH Clinical Center: There’s No Other Hospital Like It Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents The ... 600 laboratories that conduct clinical and basic research. It has seen more than 400,000 patients since ...

  5. Mobile Technology and Health Care, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Mobile Technology and Health Care, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Mobile health, or mHealth for short, uses mobile technologies for ...

  6. Animal-Assisted Therapy for Patients Undergoing Treatment at NIH Clinical Center | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Therapy Dogs Animal-Assisted Therapy for Patients Undergoing Treatment at NIH ... is unlike any other." A self-described "huge animal lover," she coordinates 14 teams of trained and ...

  7. NIH Research: “The public wants diseases cured...” | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. NIH Research: “The public wants diseases cured...” Past Issues / Fall ... and rewards of medical research. What kind of research do you do and why is it important? ...

  8. Latest Research from NIH's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Oral Health Latest Research from NIH's National Institute of Dental ... on the full spectrum of topics related to oral health, including oral cancer, chronic pain conditions, salivary gland ...

  9. NIH Precision Medicine Initiative: Implications for Diabetes Research.

    PubMed

    Fradkin, Judith E; Hanlon, Mary C; Rodgers, Griffin P

    2016-07-01

    In his January 2015 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama announced a new Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) to personalize approaches toward improving health and treating disease (www.whitehouse.gov/precision-medicine). He stated that the goal of such an initiative was "to bring us closer to curing diseases like cancer and diabetes, and to give all of us access to the personalized information we need to keep ourselves and our families healthier." Since that time, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has taken a leadership role in implementing the President's vision related to biomedical research (www.nih.gov/precisionmedicine). Here, we discuss the NIH component of the PMI, related ongoing diabetes research, and near-term research that could position the diabetes field to take full advantage of the opportunities that stem from the PMI.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope NiH2 six battery test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Thomas H.; Lanier, J. Roy

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of the test are: (1) to get a better understanding of the operating characteristics of the NiH2 batteries in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Electric Power Subsystem (EPS) by simulating every aspect of the expected operating environment; (2) to determine the optimum charge level and charge scheme for the NiH2 batteries in the HST EPS; (3) to predict the performance of the actual HST EPS; (4) to observe the aging characteristics of the batteries; and (5) to test different EPS anomalies before experiencing the anomalies on the actual HST.

  11. Despite the Shutdown, Rescheduled NIH Research Festival Brings Science to the Forefront | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Although it was delayed by almost a month because of the federal shutdown, the NIH Research Festival still took place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., and attendance was high.

  12. New NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Medical Research That Benefits Everyone's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Medical Research ... Our goal is to advance biomedical research in new, innovative ways that will benefit everyone's health." — NIH ...

  13. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... added. Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP) Alzheimer's Disease The Partners Government NIH Industry AbbVie Biogen Idec GlaxoSmithKline Lilly ... Beene Foundation USAgainst Alzheimers Type 2 Diabetes The Partners Government NIH Industry Johnson & Johnson Lilly Merck Pfizer ...

  14. 75 FR 42114 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH... transgenic rodents by recombinant DNA technology must be registered with the Institutional...

  15. Ni-H2 cell characterization for INTELSAT programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunnet, Andrew F.; Earl, Martin W.

    1994-01-01

    Various Ni/H2 cell designs manufactured for INTELSAT Programs during the past decade have been characterized electrically as a function of temperature. The resulting data for these INTELSAT V, VI, VII and VIIA cells are assembled in a manner which allows ready comparison of performance. Also included is a detailed description of each design.

  16. NIH Casts Critical Eye on How It Gives Grants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health's methods for reviewing and financing academic research proposals are often praised as the gold standard. Some American scientists, though, have recently offered less flattering descriptions, like "broken" and "arbitrary." NIH officials have heard both arguments, and plenty in between, in recent months. They have…

  17. NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine: Health, Medical & Wellness Articles

    MedlinePlus

    ... many vital research initiatives. If you or your company can help to support and expand the Library's efforts by providing sponsorship and other charitable donations for NIH MedlinePlus magazine's publication and distribution, many more thousands of Americans will gain valuable, ...

  18. NIH Peer Review: Scored Review Criteria and Overall Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Mark D.; Vancea, Adrian; Chen, Mei-Ching; Chacko, George

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest source of funding for biomedical research in the world. Funding decisions are made largely based on the outcome of a peer review process that is intended to provide a fair, equitable, timely, and unbiased review of the quality, scientific merit, and potential impact of the research. There have…

  19. NIH Research Addresses Aging Issues and Disparities in Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging NIH Research Addresses Aging Issues and Disparities in Oral Health Past Issues / ... What types of research is NIDCR conducting on aging and oral health? We’re currently funding basic ...

  20. Metrics associated with NIH funding: a high-level view

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective To introduce the availability of grant-to-article linkage data associated with National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and to perform a high-level analysis of the publication outputs and impacts associated with those grants. Design Articles were linked to the grants they acknowledge using the grant acknowledgment strings in PubMed using a parsing and matching process as embodied in the NIH Scientific Publication Information Retrieval & Evaluation System system. Additional data from PubMed and citation counts from Scopus were added to the linkage data. The data comprise 2 572 576 records from 1980 to 2009. Results The data show that synergies between NIH institutes are increasing over time; 29% of current articles acknowledge grants from multiple institutes. The median time lag to publication for a new grant is 3 years. Each grant contributes to approximately 1.7 articles per year, averaged over all grant types. Articles acknowledging US Public Health Service (PHS, which includes NIH) funding are cited twice as much as US-authored articles acknowledging no funding source. Articles acknowledging both PHS funding and a non-US government funding source receive on average 40% more citations that those acknowledging PHS funding sources alone. Conclusion The US PHS is effective at funding research with a higher-than-average impact. The data are amenable to further and much more detailed analysis. PMID:21527408

  1. An NIH/Columbia University Information System Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Eskenazi, Solomon

    1976-01-01

    In this information system, sponsored research information is routinely forwarded, in machine-readable form, from NIH to Columbia, to the benefit of each. The promotion of future systems development is enhanced through the adoption of standardized data element designations and definitions. (LBH)

  2. NIH Turns Blind Eye to Academics' Financial Conflicts, Audit Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Hundreds of financial conflicts of interest among university researchers have not been investigated by the National Institutes of Health, an agency that should police them, according to a new audit report. The report, by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services--NIH's parent agency--describes a dysfunctional system that…

  3. The NIH and bioethics: what should be done?

    PubMed

    Emanuel, Ezekiel

    2008-06-01

    Despite the National Institute of Health's (NIH's) long tradition of engagement with and support of bioethics, the current support for bioethics is very small. Accordingly, trained bioethics researchers and bioethicists are in short supply, and fundamental ethical issues that relate to the NIH's mission go unexplored or insufficiently explored. A bioethics initiative with clearly articulated goals is needed, to increase the number and quality of "producer" bioethicists who would undertake innovative research and educate future generations of bioethicists and biomedical investigators. The author articulates a fourfold strategy for increased NIH support of bioethics: (1) educate and mentor sufficient numbers of producer bioethicists in well-designed postdoctoral programs; (2) support junior researchers with an increase in established K awards targeted at bioethics; (3) commit sufficient resources to ensure high-quality empirical and analytical bioethics research; and (4) develop dedicated study sections composed of qualified bioethicists to review bioethics-related grant proposals. An office, center, or authoritative body within the NIH accountable for bioethics-related activities is recommended by the author, to develop a strategic plan and to be accountable for generating high-quality research and scholarship.

  4. NIH Health Disparities Strategic Plan, Fiscal Years 2004-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Human Genome Research Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) led the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) contribution to the International Human Genome Project, whose primary goal was the sequencing of the human genome. This project was successfully completed in April 2003. Now, the NHGRI's mission is focused on a broad range of studies aimed at…

  5. How Is Psoriasis Treated? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Living with Psoriasis How Is Psoriasis Treated? Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents ... nih.gov/ Clinical Trials — www.clinicaltrials.gov National Psoriasis Foundation — www.psoriasis.org American Academy of Dermatology — ...

  6. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  7. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  8. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  9. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  10. 42 CFR 52e.6 - How will NIH evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 52e.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.6 How will NIH... the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases of...

  11. NIH funding in Radiation Oncology – A snapshot

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Michael; McBride, William H.; Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Currently, pay lines for NIH grants are at a historical low. In this climate of fierce competition knowledge about the funding situation in a small field like Radiation Oncology becomes very important for career planning and recruitment of faculty. Unfortunately, this data cannot be easily extracted from the NIH s database because it does not discriminate between Radiology and Radiation Oncology Departments. At the start of fiscal year 2013, we extracted records for 952 individual grants, which were active at the time of analysis from the NIH database. Proposals originating from Radiation Oncology Departments were identified manually. Descriptive statistics were generated using the JMP statistical software package. Our analysis identified 197 grants in Radiation Oncology. These proposals came from 134 individual investigators in 43 academic institutions. The majority of the grants (118) were awarded to PIs at the Full Professor level and 122 PIs held a PhD degree. In 79% of the grants the research topic fell into the field of Biology, in 13 % into the field of Medical Physics. Only 7.6% of the proposals were clinical investigations. Our data suggests that the field of Radiation Oncology is underfunded by the NIH, and that the current level of support does not match the relevance of Radiation Oncology for cancer patients or the potential of its academic work force. PMID:23523324

  12. I. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): introduction and pediatric data.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Sandra; Bauer, Patricia J; Zelazo, Philip David; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Dikmen, Sureyya S; Heaton, Robert K; Tulsky, David S; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David L; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Havlik, Richard J; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Mungas, Dan; Manly, Jennifer J; Borosh, Beth G; Nowinski, Cindy J; Gershon, Richard C

    2013-08-01

    This monograph presents the pediatric portion of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB) of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function. The NIH Toolbox is an initiative of the Neuroscience Blueprint, a collaborative framework through which 16 NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices jointly support neuroscience-related research, to accelerate discoveries and reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. The CB is one of four modules that measure cognitive, emotional, sensory, and motor health across the lifespan. The CB is unique in its continuity across childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, and old age, and in order to help create a common currency among disparate studies, it is also available at low cost to researchers for use in large-scale longitudinal and epidemiologic studies. This chapter describes the evolution of the CB; methods for selecting cognitive subdomains and instruments; the rationale for test design; and a validation study in children and adolescents, ages 3-15 years. Subsequent chapters feature detailed discussions of each test measure and its psychometric properties (Chapters 2-6), the factor structure of the test battery (Chapter 7), the effects of age and education on composite test scores (Chapter 8), and a final summary and discussion (Chapter 9). As the chapters in this monograph demonstrate, the CB has excellent psychometric properties, and the validation study provided evidence for the increasing differentiation of cognitive abilities with age.

  13. NIH Mulls Ways to Lure Back Veteran Peer Reviewers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Not long ago, academic scientists welcomed calls from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) asking them to volunteer as peer reviewers. Many were glad for the opportunity to help distribute billions of dollars in federal biomedical-research grants even though the service required a big time commitment--the equivalent of one month a year to…

  14. NiH2 Battery Reconditioning for LEO Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, J. D.; Hafen, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes reasons for and benefits of reconditioning nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) batteries used for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) applications. NiH2 battery cells do not have the classic discharge voltage problems more commonly associated with nickel-cadmium (NiCd) cells. This is due, in part, to use of hydrogen electrodes in place of cadmium electrodes. The nickel electrode, however, does have a similar discharge voltage signature for both cell designs. This can have an impact on LEO applications where peak loads at higher relative depths of discharge can impact operations. Periodic reconditioning provides information which can be used for analyzing long term performance trends to predict usable capacity to a specified voltage level. The reconditioning process described herein involves discharging NiH2 batteries at C/20 rates or less, to an average cell voltage of 1.0 volts or less. Recharge is performed at nominal C/5 rates to specified voltage/temperature (V/T) charge levels selected to restore required capacity with minimal overcharge. Reconditioning is a process of restoring reserve capacity lost on cycling, which is commonly called the memory effect in NiCd cells. This effect is characterized by decreases in the discharge voltage curve with operational life and cycling. The end effect of reconditioning NiH2 cells may be hidden in the versatility, of that design over the NiCd cell design and its associated negative electrode fading problem. The process of deep discharge at lower rates by way of reconditioning tends to redistribute electrolyte and water in the NiH2 cell electrode stack, while improving utilization and charge efficiency. NiH2 battery reconditioning effects on life are considered beneficial and may, in fact. extend life based on NiCd experience. In any case, usable capacity data obtained from reconditioning is required for performance evaluation and trend analysis. Characterization and life tests have provided the historical data base used to

  15. 75 FR 46945 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; the Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A... collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will... (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection Title: The Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH...

  16. NIH workshop summary: shaping the development of an iodine research initiative for the U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at NIH sponsored a workshop May 12–13, 2011, to bring together representatives from various NIH Institutes and Centers as a first step in developing an NIH iodine initiative. The workshop also provided an opportunity to identify research needs that would infor...

  17. 78 FR 27977 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... receive NIH funding for recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid research, then these sites should already... not receive NIH funding for recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid research. In this situation, because... the site does not receive funding from NIH for recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid research....

  18. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) ACTION: Notice of consideration of proposed...- vector system may be certified only after review by the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC)...

  19. 76 FR 27653 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... Kluyveromyces lactis as a host-vector 1 system has been reviewed by the NIH ] Recombinant DNA Advisory...

  20. Perspective: is NIH funding the "best science by the best scientists"? A critique of the NIH R01 research grant review policies.

    PubMed

    Costello, Leslie C

    2010-05-01

    Clinical and experimental biomedical research provides the foundation for advances in medicine, health, and the welfare of the public. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the major agency providing funding for biomedical research. The stated objectives of the NIH for funding research grants (R01s) are to "fund the best science, by the best scientists" and "to see that NIH grant applications receive fair, independent, expert, and timely reviews-free from inappropriate influences-so NIH can fund the most promising research." The NIH recently reviewed and identified issues involved with the study section peer review process that compromise the achievement of these laudable and important objectives. Consequently, the NIH has and continues to issue new guidelines and requirements relating to the R01 grant review process. The author argues that some of these NIH directives conflict with and counteract the achievement of the NIH's stated objectives. The author further contends that the directives introduce discrimination into the review process. Such conditions impede the funding of the best science by the best scientists, while funding lesser-quality research. The NIH should eliminate all directives that prevent R01 grants from being awarded solely to the highest-quality research. This is in the best interest of the biomedical community and the health and welfare of the public at large.

  1. 78 FR 18613 - Notice of the Implementation of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Electronic Vendor Invoice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Health (NIH) Electronic Vendor Invoice Program (eVIP) SUMMARY: The purpose of this notice is to announce... of Health (NIH) and the planned modification of NIH awards to require vendors to use the eVIP in....nih.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Electronic invoicing will enhance compliance with laws...

  2. III. NIH TOOLBOX COGNITION BATTERY (CB): MEASURING EPISODIC MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Dikmen, Sureyya S.; Heaton, Robert K.; Mungas, Dan; Slotkin, Jerry; Beaumont, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant domains of cognition is episodic memory, which allows for rapid acquisition and long-term storage of new information. For purposes of the NIH Toolbox, we devised a new test of episodic memory. The nonverbal NIH Toolbox Picture Sequence Memory Test (TPSMT) requires participants to reproduce the order of an arbitrarily ordered sequence of pictures presented on a computer. To adjust for ability, sequence length varies from 6 to 15 pictures. Multiple trials are administered to increase reliability. Pediatric data from the validation study revealed the TPSMT to be sensitive to age-related changes. The task also has high test– retest reliability and promising construct validity. Steps to further increase the sensitivity of the instrument to individual and age-related variability are described. PMID:23952201

  3. Dietary supplement research portfolio at the NIH, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cazarin, Mary L; Wambogo, Edwina A; Regan, Karen S; Davis, Cindy D

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. dietary supplement market increased by 7.5% in 2012 compared with 2011, reaching $32.5 billion in sales. Therefore, federally supported research on dietary supplements is important to determine their health effects, safety, and efficacy. A portfolio analysis was performed across the NIH and the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) for fiscal years (FYs) 2009-2011 by using the databases Human Nutrition Research Information Management (HNRIM) and Computer Access to Research on Dietary Supplements (CARDS). The results indicated that total NIH dietary supplement-related funding for FYs 2009-2011 was $855 million ($295 million in 2009, $311 million in 2010, and $249 million in 2011). The institutes and centers with the highest investment in dietary supplement research were as follows: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ($135 million); the National Cancer Institute ($188 million); the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine ($99 million); the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases ($68 million); the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences ($58 million); and the ODS ($32 million). The dietary supplement ingredients receiving the most funding were botanicals (22%), vitamins (20%), lipids (14%), and minerals and trace elements (10%). The top 3 outcome research areas were cancer (61% of total dietary supplement investment), cardiovascular disease (47%), and women's reproductive health (38%). In FYs 2009, 2010, and 2011, the ODS provided 3.5%, 3.6%, and 4.1%, respectively, of the NIH investment in dietary supplement research. ODS funding focused on cellular, enzymatic, or molecular mechanisms (64% of total ODS funding). This portfolio analysis demonstrates that the NIH has committed substantial funding to dietary supplement research in an effort to expand the scientific knowledge base on the efficacy and safety of dietary supplements.

  4. NIH oversight of human gene transfer research involving retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated virus vectors and the role of the NIH recombinant DNA advisory committee.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Marina; Shipp, Allan; Rosenthal, Eugene; Jambou, Robert; Shih, Tom; Montgomery, Maureen; Gargiulo, Linda; Patterson, Amy; Corrigan-Curay, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    In response to public and scientific concerns regarding human gene transfer research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) developed a transparent oversight system that extends to human gene transfer protocols that are either conducted with NIH funding or conducted at institutions that receive NIH funding for recombinant DNA research. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) has been the primary advisory body to NIH regarding the conduct of this research. Human gene transfer research proposals that are subject to the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) must be submitted to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA), and protocols that raise novel scientific, safety, medical, ethical, or social issues are publicly discussed at the RAC's quarterly public meetings. OBA also convenes gene transfer safety symposia and policy conferences to provide a public forum for scientific experts to discuss emerging issues in the field. This transparent system of review promotes the rapid exchange of important scientific information and dissemination of data. The goal is to optimize the conduct of individual research protocols and to advance gene transfer research generally. This process has fostered the development of retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vector mediated gene delivery.

  5. Calculation of thermodynamic, electronic, and optical properties of monoclinic Mg2NiH4

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.R.; Richardson, T.J.; Rubin, M.D.; Wang, L-W.

    2001-10-01

    Ab initio total-energy density functional theory is used to investigate the low temperature (LT) monoclinic form of Mg2NiH4. The calculated minimum energy geometry of LT Mg2NiH4 is close to that determined from neutron diffraction data, and the NiH4 complex is close to a regular tetrahedron. The enthalpies of the phase change to high temperature (HT) pseudo-cubic Mg2NiH4 and of hydrogen absorption by Mg2Ni are calculated and compared with experimental values. LT Mg2NiH4 is found to be a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 1.4 eV. The optical dielectric function of LT Mg2NiH4 differs somewhat from that of the HT phase. A calculated thin film transmittance spectrum is consistent with an experimental spectrum.

  6. The Pilot Phase of the NIH Chemical Genomics Center

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Craig J.; Auld, Douglas S.; Huang, Ruili; Huang, Wenwei; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Leister, William; Maloney, David J.; Marugan, Juan J.; Michael, Sam; Simeonov, Anton; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    The NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC) was the inaugural center of the Molecular Libraries and Screening Center Network (MLSCN). Along with the nine other research centers of the MLSCN, the NCGC was established with a primary goal of bringing industrial technology and experience to empower the scientific community with small molecule compounds for use in their research. We intend this review to serve as 1) an introduction to the NCGC standard operating procedures, 2) an overview of several of the lessons learned during the pilot phase and 3) a review of several of the innovative discoveries reported during the pilot phase of the MLSCN. PMID:19807664

  7. TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF TRANSLATING SERVICE AT NIH.

    PubMed

    MARTIN, J A; EVERHARDY, W H; ROGERS, P R

    1965-07-01

    The growth of the Translating Unit of the National Institutes of Health Library, founded in 1938, was slow until 1950, when seventeen translators and clerical assistants comprised its staff. Today eleven staff members translate, type, and distribute translations from eighteen European languages. Contract service is arranged for those languages for which the Unit has little or no competency. Three recent innovations have improved the translating service: (1) production standards, (2) fee for service, and (3) microfilmed translations. A monthly bulletin, Recent Translations, a Selected List, includes those articles translated by the Translating Unit of the NIH Library. An author index to all translations cited in the Selected List is now available upon request.

  8. Space Station Freedom NiH2 cell testing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Bruce; Frate, Dave

    1994-01-01

    Testing for the Space Station Freedom Nickel Hydrogen Cell Test Program began in 1990 at Crave Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center. The program has included receipt inspection, random vibration, acceptance, characterization, and life cycle testing of Ni-H2 cells in accordance with the NASA LeRC Interagency Order C-31001-J. A total of 400 Ni-H2 cells have been received at NAVSURFWARCENDIV Crane from three separate manufacturers; Yardney Technical Products (Yardney), Eagle Picher Industries (Eagle Picher), and Gates Energy Products (Gates). Of those, 308 cells distributed among 39 packs have undergone life cycle testing under a test regime simulating low earth orbit conditions. As of 30 September 1993, there are 252 cells assembled into 32 packs still on life cycle test. Since the beginning of the program, failed cells have been detected in all phases of testing. The failures include the following; seven 65 AmpHr and 81 AmpHr Yardney cells were found to be leaking KOH on receipt, one 65 AmpHr Eagle Picher cell failed the acceptance test, one 65 AmpHr Gates cell failed during the characterization test, and six 65 AmpHr Gates cells failed the random vibration test. Of the 39 life cycle packs, testing on seven packs, 56 cells, has been suspended because of low end of discharge voltages. All of the failed life cycle packs were cycled at 60% depth of discharge.

  9. The NIH-NIAID Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Michelle L.; Griffiths, Kathryn G.; Williams, Steven A.; Kaplan, Ray M.; Moorhead, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Filarial worms cause a variety of tropical diseases in humans; however, they are difficult to study because they have complex life cycles that require arthropod intermediate hosts and mammalian definitive hosts. Research efforts in industrialized countries are further complicated by the fact that some filarial nematodes that cause disease in humans are restricted in host specificity to humans alone. This potentially makes the commitment to research difficult, expensive, and restrictive. Over 40 years ago, the United States National Institutes of Health–National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH-NIAID) established a resource from which investigators could obtain various filarial parasite species and life cycle stages without having to expend the effort and funds necessary to maintain the entire life cycles in their own laboratories. This centralized resource (The Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center, or FR3) translated into cost savings to both NIH-NIAID and to principal investigators by freeing up personnel costs on grants and allowing investigators to divert more funds to targeted research goals. Many investigators, especially those new to the field of tropical medicine, are unaware of the scope of materials and support provided by the FR3. This review is intended to provide a short history of the contract, brief descriptions of the fiilarial species and molecular resources provided, and an estimate of the impact the resource has had on the research community, and describes some new additions and potential benefits the resource center might have for the ever-changing research interests of investigators. PMID:22140585

  10. NIH Research: Dr. Anthony S. Fauci: "An AIDS-free generation is closer than we might think" | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. NIH Research: Dr. Anthony S. Fauci: "An AIDS-free generation is closer than we might think" ... Washington Post . What's the current state of the AIDS epidemic? The number of people contracting HIV infection ...

  11. NIH's "Family Inn" Lets Out-of-Town Youngsters Stay "Home."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Sylvia

    1993-01-01

    The Children's Inn, on the grounds of the National Institutes for Health (NIH) near Washington, DC, serves as a national model of the value of family-centered homes for pediatric patients and their families. When parents bring their child to NIH from a distant place, they can stay in the inn with their child while the child is receiving treatment.…

  12. 42 CFR 68.8 - What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants? 68.8 Section 68.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.8 What do...

  13. 42 CFR 68.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the NIH LRPs? 68.7 Section 68.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT...

  14. 42 CFR 68.8 - What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What do the NIH LRPs provide to participants? 68.8 Section 68.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.8 What do...

  15. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68.15 Section 68.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN...

  16. 42 CFR 68.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs? 68.6 Section 68.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) §...

  17. 42 CFR 68.15 - When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When can an NIH LRP payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy? 68.15 Section 68.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN...

  18. 42 CFR 68.6 - How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How do individuals apply to participate in the NIH LRPs? 68.6 Section 68.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) §...

  19. 42 CFR 68.7 - How are applicants selected to participate in the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How are applicants selected to participate in the NIH LRPs? 68.7 Section 68.7 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT...

  20. 75 FR 382 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH's Roadmap Interdisciplinary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ...; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH's Roadmap Interdisciplinary Research Work Group Initiatives... be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed... requests a three-year clearance for the ``Process Evaluation of the NIH Roadmap Interdisciplinary...

  1. Hubris in Grantland: Languor and Laissez-faire Greet Conflict of Interest at the NIH

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    New rules are coming for sanitizing conflicts of interest in research financed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), dispenser of the government's biggest budget for civilian science, some $31 billion this year. The conflicted need not fear. The draft rules, soon to be made final, continue the NIH's longtime practice of trust but don't…

  2. 76 FR 62816 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... recombinant DNA research. OBA is also specifying the risk group for several viruses not previously listed...

  3. 76 FR 44339 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... attenuated strains of bacteria and viruses that are frequently used in recombinant DNA research. OBA is...

  4. The Brain Takes Center Stage at 2014 NIH Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer The 2014 NIH Research Festival, Sept. 22–24, focused on the human brain for two, very specific, reasons: to coincide with the White House BRAIN Initiative and to highlight the John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research Center, which opened earlier this year on the NIH campus.

  5. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  6. Beyond Patents and Royalties: Perception and Reality of Doing Business with the NIH.

    PubMed

    Ben-Menachem, Gil; Ferguson, Steven M; Balakrishnan, Krishna

    2006-01-01

    Young, and mid size biotech companies can benefit hugely from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), not least because of the agency's non-dilutive funding, guidance, and opportunities for collaboration. Increasingly, however, there is a fair bit of misunderstanding about what the NIH can and cannot do for a biotech entrepreneur.

  7. The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test: Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Tulsky, David S.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed. While initial validation work provides preliminary support for this test in both children and adults, more work is needed to ensure dependability and generalizability. Thus, this replication study examines descriptive data (including age effects), test–retest reliability, and construct validity in n = 4,859 participants ages 3–85 years (matched to 2010 census data). Although the Pattern Comparison was not appropriate for all 3 and 4 years old, by ages 5 and 6, more meaningful scores were apparent. There was evidence for convergent and discriminant validity. There was also a moderate practice effect (i.e., increase of 5.5 points) over a 1-week time frame. Pattern Comparison exhibits a number of strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages 5–85), it is short and easy to administer, and there is support for construct validity. PMID:26025230

  8. 75 FR 2552 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening Notice is hereby given by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the ``NIH State-of-the-Science...

  9. Effect of Handling, Storage and Cycling on Ni-H2 Cells: Second Plateau Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2001-01-01

    Proper handling of Ni-H2 cells/batteries in storage, during I&T, and at launch site is very important to preserve the useful energy and to extend the mission life. Cell reversal test is not a prudent test to verify or quantify the nickel pre-charge in Ni-H2 cells/batteries. The second plateau is due to the formation of Ni(+3) that is electrochemically inactive. Gas analysis of the cell, and chemical analysis of the positive plate are confirmatory tests to determine the nature of pre-charge in Ni-H2 cells.

  10. Alcohol Use Disorders, Research Findings | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... health web site and downloadable booklet Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders web page www.niaaa.nih.gov/research/major-initiatives/fetal-alcohol-spectrum-disorders . Spectrum e-zine story: Underage drinking: One ...

  11. A pressure based charge control system for the DSPSE NiH2 CPV battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Chris; Barnes, W.; Hickman, G.

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: the Electrical Power Subsystem; the Eclipse Energy Requirements; the NiH2 CPV battery; and the battery pressure transducer. The discussion is presented in viewgraph format.

  12. NIH Institutes and Centers Served by TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    TTC services the NCI Intramural Research laboratories as well as nine other NIH institutes a range of services--NIDA, NIA, NIMHD, NICHD, NLM, CIT, NCCIH, Clinical Center, NEI. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  13. When Memories Disappear | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. To Find Out More To learn about support groups, services, research centers, research studies, and publications about ... agencies, and private industry: www.ClinicalTrials.gov NIH Senior Health: nihseniorhealth.gov/alzheimersdisease/toc.html The National ...

  14. Building Paths to Health Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Selected articles from past issues of NIH MedlinePlus magazine will be a part of the course content. ... enjoy and learn from this issue of the magazine. And please consider joining FNLM to support all ...

  15. Approaching Health Disparities from a Population Perspective: The NIH Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addressing health disparities has been a national challenge for decades. The NIH-sponsored Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHDs) represent the first federal initiative to support transdisciplinary multilevel research on the determinants of health disparities. Using preliminar...

  16. Safe Use of Complementary Health Products and Practices for Anxiety | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... mask anxiety symptoms or make them worse. Research studies funded by the NIH's National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) have investigated several natural products and mind and body practices for anxiety. As with any ...

  17. Five Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents It ... anniversary of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), known to many as NIH's "basic research ...

  18. NIH study uncovers new mechanism of action for class of chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NIH researchers have discovered a significant new mechanism of action for a class of chemotherapy drugs known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, or PARP inhibitors. They have also identified differences in the toxic capabilities of three drugs in

  19. 76 FR 30178 - Submission for OMB review; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... learned that might be useful to other research programs of the Agency. To reduce response bias and to make... Policy and ] Communications, NIH/NIDA, NSC--Neuroscience Center, 5229, 6001 Executive Blvd.,...

  20. 76 FR 13648 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Process Evaluation of the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... lessons learned that might be useful to other research programs of the Agency. To reduce response bias and... Policy and Communications, NIH/NIDA, NSC-- Neuroscience Center, 5229, 6001 ] Executive Blvd.,...

  1. Dr. Lindberg's Legacy : Charting A New Course | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and a pioneer in applying computer and communications technology to biomedical research, health care, and the delivery of health information ... sequence data generated from evolving high-throughput sequencing ... results of research funded by NIH and many other organizations. While ...

  2. Risk Factors, Treatment and Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Fighting Gum Disease Risk Factors, Treatment and Research Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Risk ... out whether it offers this service. Latest NIH Research Researchers supported by the National Institute of Dental ...

  3. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... participated in an NIH-sponsored clinical trial. Photo: Dr. Wesley Fowler "My father in-law, John Spencer, is ... here at the University of North Carolina," says Dr. Wesley Fowler, a professor in UNC's School of Medicine. ...

  4. Developing Safe and Effective Medicines for Children | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). She is also helping to make drugs ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is the lead NIH agency helping to ...

  5. Ni-H2 cell separator matrix engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    This project was initiated to develop alternative separator materials to the previously used asbestos matrices which were removed from the market for health and environmental reasons. The objective of the research was to find a material or combination of materials that had the following characteristics: (1) resistant to the severe conditions encountered in Ni-H2 cells; (2) satisfactory electrical, electrolyte management, and thermal management properties to function properly; (3) environmentally benign; and (4) capable of being manufactured into a separator matrix. During the course of the research it was discovered that separators prepared from wettable polyethylene fibers along and in combination with potassium titanate pigment performed satisfactory in preliminary characterization tests. Further studies lead to the optimization of the separator composition and manufacturing process. Single ply separator sheets were manufactured with 100 percent polyethylene fibers and also with a combination of polyethylene fibers and potassium titanate pigment (PKT) in the ratio of 60 percent PKT and 40 percent fibers. A pilot paper machine was used to produce the experimental separator material by a continuous, wet laid process. Both types of matrices were produced at several different area densities (grams/sq m).

  6. Thermal modeling of a Ni-H2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Si-Ok; Dewitt, K. J.; Keith, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    The nickel-hydrogen secondary battery has many desirable features which make it attractive for satellite power systems. It can provide a significant improvement over the energy density of present spacecraft nickel-cadnium batteries, combined with longer life, tolerance to overcharge and possibility of state-of-charge indication. However, to realize these advantages, accurate thermal modeling of nickel-hydrogen cells is required in order to properly design the battery pack so that it operates within a specified temperature range during the operation. Maintenance of a low operating temperature and a uniform temperature profile within the cell will yield better reliability, improved cycle life and better charge/discharge efficiencies. This research has the objective of developing and testing a thermal model which can be used to characterize battery operation. Primarily, temperature distribution with the heat generation rates as a function of position and time will be evaluated for a Ni-H2 cell in the three operating modes: (1) charge cycle, (2) discharge cycle, and (3) overcharge condition, if applicable. Variables to be examined include charging current, discharge rates, state of charge, pressure and temperature. Once the thermal model has been developed, this resulting model will predict the actual operating temperature and temperature gradient for the specific cell geometry to be used.

  7. WE-G-BRB-01: The Importance of NIH Funding in Innovation in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Deye, J.

    2015-06-15

    Over the past 20 years the NIH has funded individual grants, program projects grants, and clinical trials which have been instrumental in advancing patient care. The ways that each grant mechanism lends itself to the different phases of translating research into clinical practice will be described. Major technological innovations, such as IMRT and proton therapy, have been advanced with R01-type and P01-type funding and will be discussed. Similarly, the role of program project grants in identifying and addressing key hypotheses on the potential of 3D conformal therapy, normal tissue-guided dose escalation and motion management will be described. An overview will be provided regarding how these technological innovations have been applied to multi-institutional NIH-sponsored trials. Finally, the panel will discuss regarding which research questions should be funded by the NIH to inspire the next advances in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the different funding mechanisms of the NIH Learn about research advances that have led to innovation in delivery Review achievements due to NIH-funded program project grants in radiotherapy over the past 20 years Understand example advances achieved with multi-institutional clinical trials NIH.

  8. Barriers to racial/ethnic minority application and competition for NIH research funding.

    PubMed Central

    Shavers, Vickie L.; Fagan, Pebbles; Lawrence, Deirdre; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; McDonald, Paige; Browne, Doris; McLinden, Dan; Christian, Michaele; Trimble, Edward

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite recognition of the need to increase the pool of racial/ethnic minority investigators, racial/ethnic minority representation among National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded investigators remains low. Racial/ethnic minority investigators bring unique perspectives and experiences that enhance the potential for understanding factors that underlie racial/ethnic variation in health and health status. Identification of barriers to successful minority competition for NIH funding and suggestions for strategies to overcome them were obtained from a concept mapping project and a meeting of minority investigators and investigators at minority-serving institutions. METHODS: Concept mapping, a mixed-methods planning approach that integrates common data collection processes with multivariate statistical analyses, was used in this exploratory project. The concept mapping approach generated a series of related "concept maps" that were used for data interpretation and meeting discussions. RESULTS: Barriers to minority investigator competition for NIH funding identified by concept mapping participants include: (1) inadequate research infrastructure, training and development; (2) barriers to development as independent researchers; (3) inadequate mentoring; (4) insensitivity, misperceptions and miscommunication about the specific needs of investigators involved in research with minority communities; (5) institutional bias in NIH policies; (6) unfair competitive environment; (7) lack of institutional support; (8) lack of support for research topics/methods relevant to research with minority communities; and (9) social, cultural and environmental barriers. DISCUSSION: Data from both the concept mapping and the meeting discussions suggest the need to use a multilevel approach to increase minority representation among funded NIH investigators. Specifically, the NIH should use strategies that overcome barriers at the home institution, within NIH and at the investigator

  9. Educational attainment and life expectancy: a perspective from the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research.

    PubMed

    Spittel, Michael L; Riley, William T; Kaplan, Robert M

    2015-02-01

    The NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) furthers the mission of the NIH by stimulating behavioral and social sciences research throughout NIH and integrating these areas of research more fully into the NIH health research enterprise, thereby improving our understanding, treatment, and prevention of disease. OBSSR accomplishes this mission through several strategic priorities: (1) supporting the next generation of basic behavioral and social sciences research, (2) facilitating interdisciplinary research, (3) promoting a multi-level systems perspective of health and behavior, and (4) encouraging a problem-focused perspective on population health.

  10. The NIH 3D Print Exchange: A Public Resource for Bioscientific and Biomedical 3D Prints

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, Meghan F.; Hurt, Darrell E.; Weber, Nick; Mtingwa, Makazi; Fincher, Erin C.; Alekseyev, Vsevelod; Chen, David T.; Yun, Alvin; Gizaw, Metasebia; Swan, Jeremy; Yoo, Terry S.; Huyen, Yentram

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, an online portal for discovering and creating bioscientifically relevant 3D models suitable for 3D printing, to provide both researchers and educators with a trusted source to discover accurate and informative models. There are a number of online resources for 3D prints, but there is a paucity of scientific models, and the expertise required to generate and validate such models remains a barrier. The NIH 3D Print Exchange fills this gap by providing novel, web-based tools that empower users with the ability to create ready-to-print 3D files from molecular structure data, microscopy image stacks, and computed tomography scan data. The NIH 3D Print Exchange facilitates open data sharing in a community-driven environment, and also includes various interactive features, as well as information and tutorials on 3D modeling software. As the first government-sponsored website dedicated to 3D printing, the NIH 3D Print Exchange is an important step forward to bringing 3D printing to the mainstream for scientific research and education. PMID:28367477

  11. Calculated electric dipole moment of NiH X2Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    A calculated dipole moment of 2.39 D at R sub e = 2.79 a sub 0 is reported, obtained from complete active space SCF/configuration interaction calculations plus one natural orbital iteration. The calculation is in good agreement with the experimental value of 2.4 + or - 0.1 D measured for the lowest vibrational level. In agreement with Gray et al. (1985), it is found that the dipole moment is strongly correlated with the 3d electron population; the good agreement with experiment thus provides verification of the mixed state model of NiH. It is concluded that the electric dipole moment of NiH is a sensitive test of the quality of the NiH wave function.

  12. The INTELSAT Experience with Reconditioning of NiH2 Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalici, Frank; Dunnet, Andrew; Xu, Daphne

    1997-01-01

    INTELSAT has been reconditioning NiH2 batteries since 1983 when the INTELSAT V F-6 geosynchronous communications satellite was launched. This was the first commercial use of NiH2 batteries. INTELSAT has continued this practice on all 46 NiH2 batteries it has operated in-orbit. The batteries are of several types including the classic INTELSAT cell, the HAC re-circulating design, and the Gates Mantech design. Reconditioning is performed twice each year, prior to the Eclipse Season. At this time Water Migration problems, if present, are dealt with. Temperature limits are imposed for the discharge and charge cycles as a safety precaution. In support of in-orbit operations, it is INTELSAT's practice to perform ground based life tests. In-orbit data and ground tests results are presented and the benefits of reconditioning noted.

  13. The NIH-3 immunodeficient mouse is a model for Lyme borreliosis myositis and carditis.

    PubMed Central

    Defosse, D. L.; Duray, P. H.; Johnson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental infection of immunodeficient NIH-3 (N:NIH-bg-nu-xid) mice with Borrelia burgdorferi was found to result in multisystem histopathologic lesions. In addition to T-cell deficiency due to the nude mutation, these mice have an x-linked defect affecting the B-cell maturation and the beige mutation resulting in the absence of NK cells. NIH-3 mice were susceptible to progressive infection with B. burgdorferi resulting in pancarditis, synovitis, and skeletal interstitial myositis whereas controls remained normal. Cardiomyopathy was characterized by inflammatory mononuclear infiltration and fibrillar necrosis. Synovial hyperplasia and inflammation were seen in the tibiotarsal and ulna-carpal joints. Advanced myositis was observed in peripheral skeletal muscle. Gastrointestinal submucosa, heart, and skeletal muscle were heavily colonized with B. burgdorferi. This mouse is proposed as a model for Lyme borreliosis carditis, synovitis, and myositis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1632468

  14. Distributed Cognition and Process Management Enabling Individualized Translational Research: The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program Experience.

    PubMed

    Links, Amanda E; Draper, David; Lee, Elizabeth; Guzman, Jessica; Valivullah, Zaheer; Maduro, Valerie; Lebedev, Vlad; Didenko, Maxim; Tomlin, Garrick; Brudno, Michael; Girdea, Marta; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Haendel, Melissa A; Mungall, Christopher J; Smedley, Damian; Hochheiser, Harry; Arnold, Andrew M; Coessens, Bert; Verhoeven, Steven; Bone, William; Adams, David; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Gahl, William A; Sincan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH UDP) applies translational research systematically to diagnose patients with undiagnosed diseases. The challenge is to implement an information system enabling scalable translational research. The authors hypothesized that similar complex problems are resolvable through process management and the distributed cognition of communities. The team, therefore, built the NIH UDP integrated collaboration system (UDPICS) to form virtual collaborative multidisciplinary research networks or communities. UDPICS supports these communities through integrated process management, ontology-based phenotyping, biospecimen management, cloud-based genomic analysis, and an electronic laboratory notebook. UDPICS provided a mechanism for efficient, transparent, and scalable translational research and thereby addressed many of the complex and diverse research and logistical problems of the NIH UDP. Full definition of the strengths and deficiencies of UDPICS will require formal qualitative and quantitative usability and process improvement measurement.

  15. Distributed Cognition and Process Management Enabling Individualized Translational Research: The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program Experience

    PubMed Central

    Links, Amanda E.; Draper, David; Lee, Elizabeth; Guzman, Jessica; Valivullah, Zaheer; Maduro, Valerie; Lebedev, Vlad; Didenko, Maxim; Tomlin, Garrick; Brudno, Michael; Girdea, Marta; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Haendel, Melissa A.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Smedley, Damian; Hochheiser, Harry; Arnold, Andrew M.; Coessens, Bert; Verhoeven, Steven; Bone, William; Adams, David; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Gahl, William A.; Sincan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (NIH UDP) applies translational research systematically to diagnose patients with undiagnosed diseases. The challenge is to implement an information system enabling scalable translational research. The authors hypothesized that similar complex problems are resolvable through process management and the distributed cognition of communities. The team, therefore, built the NIH UDP integrated collaboration system (UDPICS) to form virtual collaborative multidisciplinary research networks or communities. UDPICS supports these communities through integrated process management, ontology-based phenotyping, biospecimen management, cloud-based genomic analysis, and an electronic laboratory notebook. UDPICS provided a mechanism for efficient, transparent, and scalable translational research and thereby addressed many of the complex and diverse research and logistical problems of the NIH UDP. Full definition of the strengths and deficiencies of UDPICS will require formal qualitative and quantitative usability and process improvement measurement. PMID:27785453

  16. NIH and NCI grant-related changes during fiscal years 2014 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 fiscal year (FY) continued to be a challenging one for all federal agencies despite the many Congressional strategies proposed to address the U.S. budget deficit. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 passed by the House and Senate in December 2013 approved a two-year spending bill which cancelled the FY2014 and FY2015 required sequestration cuts (i.e., 4-5% National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget reduction initiated on March 1, 2013), but extended the sequestration period through FY2023. This bill passage helped minimize any further budget reductions and resulted in a final FY2014 NIH budget of 29.9 billion and a NCI budget of 4.9 billion. Both NIH and NCI worked hard to maintain awarding the same number of NIH/NCI investigator-initiated R01 and exploratory R21 grants funded in FY2014 and similar to the level seen in FY2013 and previous years (see Tables 1 and 2). Since Congress only recently passed the 2015 spending bill in December 16, 2014, the final NIH and NCI budget appropriations for FY2015 remains unknown at this time and most likely will be similar to the FY2014 budget level. The NCI overall success and funding rates for unsolicited investigator-initiated R01 applications remained at 15%, while the success rate for exploratory R21 applications was 12% in FY2014 with similar rates seen in FY2013 (see Tables 1 and 2). The success rate for biomedical research applications in the Photodynamic Therapy and laser research field will be provided for the past few years. NIH provides numerous resources to help inform the extramural biomedical research community of new and current grant applicants about new grant policy changes and the grant submission and review processes.

  17. An analysis of the NIH-supported sickle cell disease research portfolio.

    PubMed

    Gavini, Nara; Hoots, W Keith; Mensah, George A; Hanspal, Manjit

    2015-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), an inherited blood disorder is due to a single amino acid substitution on the beta chain of hemoglobin, and is characterized by anemia, severe infections, acute and chronic pain, and multi-organ damage. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is dedicated to support basic, translational and clinical science research to improve care and ultimately, to find a cure for SCD that causes such suffering. This report provides a detailed analysis of grants funded by the NIH for SCD research in Fiscal Years 2007 through 2013. During this period, the NIH supported 247 de novo grants totaling $272,210,367 that address various aspects of SCD. 83% of these funds supported research project grants investigating the following 5 scientific themes: Pathology of Sickle Red Blood Cells; Globin Gene Expression; Adhesion and Vascular Dysfunction; Neurological Complications and Organ-specific Dysfunction; and Pain Management and Intervention. The remaining 17% of total funds supported career development and training grants; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants; large Center grants; and Conference grants. Further analysis showed that the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is the largest funder of SCD research within NIH with 67% of total grants, contributing 77% of total funds; followed by the National Institute for Digestive Diseases and Kidney (NIDDK) that is funding 19% of grants, contributing 13% of total funds. The remaining 14% of grants totaling 10% of the funds were supported by all other NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs) combined. In summary, the NIH is using multiple funding mechanisms to support a sickle cell disease research agenda that is intended to advance the detection, treatment, and cure of this debilitating genetic disease.

  18. Characteristics of storage related capacity loss in Ni/H2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari

    1993-01-01

    The changes in the capacity, voltage and pressure profile of flight configuration Ni/H2 cells when they are stored for extended periods is examined. The Ni/H2 cells exhibit capacity fade phenomenon regardless of their design when they are stored at room temperature. Capacity loss also occurs if old cells (5 years old) are stored in a very low rate trickle charge (C/200 rate) condition. A periodic recharge technique leads to pressure rise in the cells. Conventional trickle charge (C/100 rate) helps in minimizing or eliminating the second plateau which is one of the characteristics of the capacity fade phenomenon.

  19. Morrison Receives NIH Award for Major Ras/Raf Breakthroughs | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Deborah Morrison, Ph.D., laboratory chief, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research (CCR), received an NIH Director’s Award in June “for major breakthroughs in elucidating the mechanisms of Ras/Raf signaling that will be critical for diagnosis and treatment of disease,” according to the NIH Director’s Awards Ceremony brochure. She was nominated by Ira Daar, Ph.D., senior investigator, Developmental Signal Transduction Section, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, CCR.

  20. National Institutes of Health, Rodent 4 (NIH.R4); Calcium Metabolism and Vascular Function After Spaceflight: A Collaborative Series with NASA and NIH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Steele, Marianne; Aquillina, Rudy; Savage, Paul D. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NIH.R4 payload was a collaborative experiment conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This middeck payload was the fourth in a series of experiments focusing on developmental biology and the effects of microgravity on mammalian systems. The NIH.R4 payload was flown onboard STS-80, which launched November 19, 1996, and landed at Kennedy Space Center on December 7, 1996, and was the longest shuttle mission to date. Fourteen male Spontaneously Hypertensive rats (SHR) were flown; seven in each of two Animal Enclosure Modules (AEM) in the shuttle middeck. The flight animals were exposed to 18 days of microgravity. Two synchronous control groups were utilized for this study in addition to an asynchronous post-flight AEM control study conducted at the PI lab. The animals were fed two different calcium diets in the NASA food bar (2.0% and 0.2%) three weeks prior to launch and insight. Blood pressures were taken at pre-determined intervals and were the basis for flight selection. Upon recovery Dwight animals blood pressure was measured and a variety of tissues were collected. Project testing and data will be presented.

  1. 78 FR 39741 - Announcement of Agency Decision: Recommendations on the Use of Chimpanzees in NIH-Supported Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...This notice announces the responses to public comments and decisions of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) regarding the use of chimpanzees in research. In February 2012, the NIH charged a working group of the Council of Councils, a federal advisory committee, to provide advice on implementing recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Use of Chimpanzees in......

  2. Findings and Implications of the Survey of Graduate Science Student Support from an NIH Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jean Anne M.

    To the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the federal agency primarily responsible for the conduct of biomedical research, the Survey of Graduate Science Student Support and Postdoctorals is important because it provides information concerning bioscience research manpower projections. To policymakers in NIH, the two main components of the survey…

  3. 78 FR 12074 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... practices should be developed for transport of infectious materials to designated alternate location(s... sent to the CDC for testing (RT-PCR and confirmatory sequencing). The revised Appendix G-II-C-5-(2) now... (RT-PCR and confirmatory sequencing). When the NIH Guidelines were revised in 2009, Appendix...

  4. Guidance from an NIH workshop on designing,implementing, and reporting clinical studies of soy interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NIH sponsored a scientific workshop, “Soy Protein/Isoflavone Research: Challenges in Designing and Evaluating Intervention Studies,” July 28–29, 2009. The workshop goal was to provide guidance for the next generation of soy protein/isoflavone human research. Session topics included population ex...

  5. 78 FR 50424 - NIH Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Program: Invitation To Solicit Nonclinical and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... investigators' proposals responsive to a solicitation will be reviewed by their IC's Scientific Director to... time and resources. Once the research proposal is approved by the IC Scientific Director, the NIH IRP... resources to be contributed by the collaborator (e.g., scientific expertise, R&D support,...

  6. 75 FR 61763 - Submission of OMB Review; Comment Request; Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... accountability record will be used to keep track of the dispensing of investigational anticancer agents to... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Direct Comments to OMB: Written... public burden and associated response times, should be directed to the Attention: NIH Desk...

  7. Trusted Health Information for the Public | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... debuted on October 22, 1998, with 22 “health topic” pages—collections of links to reliable information on subjects ... twitter.com/medlineplus4you ). MedlinePlus contains: Nearly 900 health topics pages that link to health information from NIH and ...

  8. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Contents Dr. Asad Umar, Chief of the Gastrointestinal and Other Cancers Research Group, National Cancer Institute Photo Courtesy of: ... NIH Asad Umar, DVM, PhD, Chief of the Gastrointestinal and Other Cancers Research Group at the National Cancer Institute, shared ...

  9. Playing Fair?: Minority Research Institutions Call for NIH to Address Funding Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    When Ph.D. science and health researchers are seeking financial support for their health science studies, more often than not they apply to the federal government's National Institutes of Health (NIH) for an RO1 research grant, which boosts a project's standing in the research community as well as the career of the applicant. Even before the NIH…

  10. Effect of Handling, Storage and Cycling on Ni-H2 Cells: Second Plateau Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the effects of handling, storing, and cycling of NiH2 cells, particularly the second plateau phenomenon. Details are given on the criteria for cell selection, cell history, the second plateau capacity at C/2 discharge, and cell reversal test conditions. Tables display a gas analysis and nickel precharge.

  11. The NIH R03 Award: An Initial Funding Step for Social Work Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langhorst, Diane M.; Svikis, Dace S.

    2007-01-01

    Social workers in academic and agency settings have the opportunity to do funded research using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) R03 small grant mechanism designed for discrete, clearly defined projects that can be completed within a 1- to 2-year time period with limited funding. This article describes the R03 mechanism and provides a guide…

  12. Life after the NIH: After a Flawed Policy, What's next for Librarians and Open Access?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2005-01-01

    On January 15, 2005, a standing-room-only crowd of librarians listened as a panel of experts, moderated by Columbia University's Jim Neal, voiced support for the National Institute of Health's (NIH) proposal to mandate free online access to the research it funds. This article briefly discusses some personal accounts where open access would have…

  13. "Keep the Beat" Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... magazine, click on "MedlinePlus Magazine" on the left side of the screen. NHLBI ’s Your Guide to Lowering High Blood Pressure The DASH Diet Eating Guide: www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/ dash/new_dash.pdf Winter 2010 Issue: Volume 5 Number 1 Page ...

  14. From the NIH: A Systems Approach to Increasing the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Lund, P. Kay; Gammie, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to attracting, developing, and supporting the best scientists from all groups as an integral part of excellence in training. Biomedical research workforce diversity, capitalizing on the full spectrum of skills, talents, and viewpoints, is essential for solving complex human health challenges.…

  15. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Pena, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this…

  16. NIH Courts Younger Researchers, Even as It Debates How Far to Go

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, a gathering held for young research faculty last week at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory was a clear expression of determination by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to help them compete for grants. The agency fears that continued Congressional budget cuts, combined with the growing number of scientists who work later into…

  17. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS researchers that helps extend our overall medical knowledge. Jeremy M. Berg, Ph.D. NIGMS Director Photo courtesy of NIH/ NIGMS True or False One of the valuable aspects of basic research is the discovery of new, previously unimagined scientific connections. For example: ...

  18. 75 FR 28811 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... introduction of drug resistance into a microorganism if the introduction of that drug resistance trait can... resistance trait into an attenuated strain (CO92 lcr-) of Yersinia pestis has been submitted to the NIH... chloramphenicol resistance into these strains, thereby creating lcr- Y. pestis strains that are resistant...

  19. 75 FR 21008 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... containment for work with partial viral genomes in tissue culture. In response to public comments received on... III-E-1 of the NIH Guidelines allows investigators to proceed with certain tissue culture experiments... tissue culture at BL1 containment if no more than two-thirds of the full viral genome is present and...

  20. DCP Leading NIH Glycoscience Common Fund Program; Funding Opportunities Open | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Division of Cancer Prevention is a leading participant for a key initiative in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Glycoscience Common Fund program. This program supports development of accessible and affordable new tools and technologies for studying the role complex carbohydrates in health and disease. |

  1. A Conversation with Sanjay Gupta, M.D.| NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... What You Can Do to Protect Children from Environmental Risks yosemite.epa.gov/ochp/ochpweb.nsf/content/tips.htm Health and Human Development www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/Pages/index.aspx Summer 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number 2 Page 6-8

  2. Increased association of dynamin II with myosin II in ras transformed NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yoo, Jiyun; Han, Mi-Young; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Heung-Joong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Choi, Baik-Dong; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2006-08-01

    Dynamin has been implicated in the formation of nascent vesicles through both endocytic and secretory pathways. However, dynamin has recently been implicated in altering the cell membrane shape during cell migration associated with cytoskeleton-related proteins. Myosin II has been implicated in maintaining cell morphology and in cellular movement. Therefore, reciprocal immunoprecipitation was carried out to identify the potential relationship between dynamin II and myosin II. The dynamin II expression level was higher when co-expressed with myosin II in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells than in normal NIH3T3 cells. Confocal microscopy also confirmed the interaction between these two proteins. Interestingly, exposing the NIH3T3 cells to platelet-derived growth factor altered the interaction and localization of these two proteins. The platelet-derived growth factor treatment induced lamellipodia and cell migration, and dynamin II interacted with myosin II. Grb2, a 24 kDa adaptor protein and an essential element of the Ras signaling pathway, was found to be associated with dynamin II and myosin II gene expression in the Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest that dynamin II acts as an intermediate messenger in the Ras signal transduction pathway leading to membrane ruffling and cell migration.

  3. 77 FR 41191 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Effectiveness of the NIH Curriculum Supplements Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... in presenting science in a more engaging and interactive way. The supplements help K-12 educators... collection projects, the Office of Science Education, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will publish... collection of information, contact Lisa Strauss, Office of Science Education, National Institutes of...

  4. The Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with criticism of the NIH Roadmap.

    PubMed

    Crowley, William; Courtney, John; Jameson, Larry; Pardes, Herbert; Moskowitz, Jay; Orringer, Eugene; Rubenstein, Arthur; Wood, Alastair; Rettig, Richard; Ausiello, Dennis; Brenner, David; Collins, Francis; Elias, Jack; Greene, Warner; Horowitz, Ralph; Jameson, Larry; Kieff, Elliott; Thompson, Craig; Swain, Judith L

    2006-08-01

    As representatives of 50 leading academic medical centers focusing on clinical research and many of academic medicine's scientific leaders, the Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with the JCI's recent editorials on the NIH Roadmap, Elias Zerhouni's leadership, and the future directions of biomedical research.

  5. NIH Fiscal Policy for Grant Awards in FY 2013 Released | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This Notice provides guidance about the NIH Fiscal Operations for the remainder of FY 2013 in light of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 (P.L. 113-6), signed by President Obama on March 26, 2013, and the sequestration provisions of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act, as amended, 2 U.S.C. |

  6. Coping with Vasculitis and Contributing to Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... because, as he told her, one of the benefits of being in a research study is gaining information about the newest ideas in treatment options. “In the beginning, I went to the NIH in Bethesda, Maryland, four times a year for routine lab work, including blood samples, totaling 18 vials each time, ...

  7. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS FROM DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUNDS (CR-LRP) § 68a.1 What is the scope and purpose of the NIH...

  8. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS FROM DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUNDS (CR-LRP) § 68a.1 What is the scope and purpose of the NIH...

  9. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS FROM DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUNDS (CR-LRP) § 68a.1 What is the scope and purpose of the NIH...

  10. Human c-fgr induces a monocyte-specific enzyme in NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kazushi; Akiyama, Tetsu; Toyoshima, Kumao ); Wongsasant, Budsaba )

    1991-12-01

    The mutant c-fgr protein (p58{sup c-fgr/F523}) containing Phe-523 instead of Tyr-523 exhibited transforming activity in NIH 3T3 cells like other protein-tyrosine kinases of the src family, but normal p58{sup c-fgr} (p58{sup c-fgr/wt}) did not. The mutant protein showed tyrosine kinase activity threefold higher than that of the normal protein in vitro. Surprisingly, transfection of the normal c-fgr gene into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in induction of sodium fluoride (NaF)-sensitive {alpha}-naphthyl butyrate esterase ({alpha}-NBE), marker enzyme of cells of monocytic origin, which was not induced in v-src-, v-fgr-, or lyn-transfected NIH 3T3 cells. The NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE induced in c-fgr transfectants was shown by isoelectric focusing to have a pI of 5.2 to 5.4, a range which was the same as those for thioglycolate-induced murine peritoneal macrophages and 1{alpha}, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-treated WEHI-3B cells. Immunoblotting studies with antophosphotyrosine antibodies revealed that 58-, 62-, 75-, 120-, 200-, and 230-kDa proteins were commonly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in cells transfected with the mutated c-fgr. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of specific cellular substrate proteins is important in induction of NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE and cell transformation by p58{sup c-fgr}.

  11. Isolation and characterization of NIH 3T3 cells expressing polyomavirus small T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, T.; Satake, M.; Robins, T.; Ito, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The polyomavirus small T-antigen gene, together with the polyomavirus promoter, was inserted into retrovirus vector pGV16 which contains the Moloney sarcoma virus long terminal repeat and neomycin resistance gene driven by the simian virus 40 promoter. This expression vector, pGVST, was packaged into retrovirus particles by transfection of PSI2 cells which harbor packaging-defective murine retrovirus genome. NIH 3T3 cells were infected by this replication-defective retrovirus containing pGVST. Of the 15 G418-resistant cell clones, 8 express small T antigen at various levels as revealed by immunoprecipitation. A cellular protein with an apparent molecular weight of about 32,000 coprecipitates with small T antigen. Immunofluorescent staining shows that small T antigen is mainly present in the nuclei. Morphologically, cells expressing small T antigen are indistinguishable from parental NIH 3T3 cells and have a microfilament pattern similar to that in parental NIH 3T3 cells. Cells expressing small T antigen form a flat monolayer but continue to grow beyond the saturation density observed for parental NIH 3T3 cells and eventually come off the culture plate as a result of overconfluency. There is some correlation between the level of expression of small T antigen and the growth rate of the cells. Small T-antigen-expressing cells form small colonies in soft agar. However, the proportion of cells which form these small colonies is rather small. A clone of these cells tested did not form tumors in nude mice within 3 months after inoculation of 10/sup 6/ cells per animal. Thus, present studies establish that the small T antigen of polyomavirus is a second nucleus-localized transforming gene product of the virus (the first one being large T antigen) and by itself has a function which is to stimulate the growth of NIH 3T3 cells beyond their saturation density in monolayer culture.

  12. Pharmacogenomic incidental findings in 308 families: The NIH Undiagnosed Disease Program experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elizabeth M.J.; Xu, Karen; Mosbrook, Emma; Links, Amanda; Guzman, Jessica; Adams, David R.; Flynn, Elise; Valkanas, Elise; Toro, Camillo; Tifft, Cynthia J.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Gahl, William A.; Sincan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Using SNP chip and exome sequence data from individuals participating in the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP), we evaluated the number and therapeutic informativeness of incidental pharmacogenetic variants. METHODS Pharmacogenomics Knowledgebase (PharmGKB) annotated sequence variants were identified in 1,101 individuals. Medication records of participants were used to identify individuals prescribed medications for which a genetic variant might alter efficacy. RESULTS 395 sequence variants, including 19 PharmGKB 1A and 1B variants, were identified in SNP chip sequence data and 388 variants, including 21 PharmGKB 1A and 1B variants, were identified in the exome sequence data. Nine participants had incidental pharmacogenetic variants associated with altered efficacy of a prescribed medication. CONCLUSIONS Despite the small size of the NIH UDP patient cohort, we identified pharmacogenetic incidental findings potentially useful for guiding therapy. Consequently, groups conducting clinical genomic studies might consider reporting of pharmacogenetic incidental findings. PMID:27253732

  13. Expression of Nanog gene promotes NIH3T3 cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jingyu; Wang Xia; Chen Bing; Suo Guangli; Zhao Yanhong; Duan Ziyuan; Dai Jianwu . E-mail: jwdai@genetics.ac.cn

    2005-12-16

    Cells are the functional elements in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A large number of cells are usually needed for these purposes. However, there are numbers of limitations for in vitro cell proliferation. Nanog is an important self-renewal determinant in embryonic stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether Nanog will influence the cell cycle and cell proliferation of mature cells. In this study, we expressed Nanog in NIH3T3 cells and showed that expression of Nanog in NIH3T3 promoted cells to enter into S phase and enhanced cell proliferation. This suggests that Nanog gene might function in a similar fashion in mature cells as in ES cells. In addition, it may provide an approach for in vitro cell expansion.

  14. The Science of Eliminating Health Disparities: Summary and Analysis of the NIH Summit Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyu B.; Williams, Kester; Sanchez, Idalia; Sy, Francisco S.; Stinson, Nathaniel; Ruffin, John

    2010-01-01

    In December 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored the first NIH Summit showcasing its investment and contribution to health disparities research and unveiling a framework for moving this important field forward. The Summit, titled “The Science of Eliminating Health Disparities,” drew on extensive experience of experts leading health disparities research transformation in diverse fields. The Summit also provided a historic educational opportunity to contribute to health care reform. The theme, addressing disparities through integration of science, practice, and policy, introduced a paradigm for advancing research through transformational, translational, and transdisciplinary research. Engaging active participation throughout the Summit generated recommendations bridging science, practice, and policy, including action on social determinants of health, community engagement, broad partnerships, capacity-building, and media outreach. PMID:20147660

  15. From the NIH: A Systems Approach to Increasing the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Lund, P. Kay; Gammie, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is committed to attracting, developing, and supporting the best scientists from all groups as an integral part of excellence in training. Biomedical research workforce diversity, capitalizing on the full spectrum of skills, talents, and viewpoints, is essential for solving complex human health challenges. Over the past few decades, the biomedical research workforce has benefited from NIH programs aimed at enhancing diversity. However, there is considerable room for improvement, particularly at the level of independent scientists and within scientific leadership. We provide a rationale and specific opportunities to develop and sustain a diverse biomedical research workforce through interventions that promote the successful transitions to different stages on the path toward completion of training and entry into the biomedical workforce. PMID:27587850

  16. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA-induced malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumoto, S.; Burkhardt, A.L.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    A biological function for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) DNA was demonstrated by transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. HPV 16 DNA has been found frequently in genital cancer and has been classified as a papillomavirus on the basis of DNA homology. A recombinant HPV 16 DNA (pSHPV16d), which contains a head-to-tail dimer of the full-length HPV 16 genome, induced morphologic transformation; the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. Expression of transforming activity was unique because of the long latency period (more than 4 weeks) required for induction of morphologic transformation and because the transfected DNA existed primarily in a multimeric form with some rearrangement. Furthermore, virus-specific RNAs were expressed in the transformants. The transformation of NIH 3T3 cells provides a model for analyzing the functions of HPV 16, which is associated with cervical carcinomas.

  17. Understanding the NIH review process: a brief guide to writing grant proposals in neurotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Burbacher, T; Guilarte, T R; Laughlin, N K; Lopachin, R; Suszkiw, J; Tilson, H

    1999-02-01

    During the past two years, the National Institutes of Health have made significant changes in the review process for investigator-initiated research grant applications in neurotoxicology. First, study sections that formerly dealt with toxicology and alcohol, respectively, have been merged. Neurotoxicology grant applications are now reviewed by ALTX-3, a study section in which the majority of members have expertise in the neuronal, biochemical or behavioral effects of alcohol, but usually not other neurotoxicants. Second, the NIH has instituted new review criteria, in which significance, approach, innovation, investigator expertise, and research environment must all be explicitly addressed by the reviews. In this article, past and present members of the ALTX-3 study section describe the NIH review process, with emphasis on how neurotoxicology applications are handled, and provide guidelines for preparing competitive applications.

  18. Then & Now: Research Pays Off for All Americans Back to the Future: Slimming Down the Old-Fashioned Way | NIH ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pays Off for All Americans Back to the Future: Slimming Down the Old-Fashioned Way Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of Contents Fast Facts According to the NIH: Globally, more than 1 billion adults are ...

  19. NIH-IEEE 2015 Strategic Conference on Healthcare Innovations and Point-of-Care Technologies for Prec

    Cancer.gov

    NIH and the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (IEEE/EMBS) hosted the third iteration of the Healthcare Innovations and Point-of-Care Technologies Conference last week.

  20. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 Film | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 ... of Medicine To view Medical Movies on the Web, go to: www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/collections/ ...

  1. Welcome from Library Director Donald A.B. Lindberg, M.D. | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Welcome to the NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Donald ... about their efforts to cure disease. Lastly, the magazine's lively graphics, fun quizzes and practical tips have ...

  2. Dr. George Koob: "Alcohol use disorders are a major problem …" | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Dr. George Koob: "Alcohol use disorders are a major problem …" Past Issues / ... is Director of the NIH's National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. A renowned expert on how ...

  3. 76 FR 47216 - Expediting Research Tools to NIH Licensees Through the Use of Pay.gov for Rapid Processing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... critical drug development program or other business venture. By eliminating the need for bank checks, the... to https://www.pay.gov and clicking on NIH in the agency list. Pay.gov is maintained by the...

  4. Better Accountability Procedures Needed in NSF and NIH Research Grant Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-30

    research at colleges and universities. Peer review (expert advice of selected researchers) is the primary component of the research grant scientific...and found that the peer review and internal review systems are working reasonably well. Although the systems are basically the same at the two...agencies, the procedures differ. GAO found that some of the NIH peer review procedures have advantages over those at NSF, but believes that changes are

  5. Partnering with the NIH: Now part of the “Value Proposition” for start-ups

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    With its “value proposition” statement a start-up company needs to convince potential investors or pharma partners how it will add more value or solve a problem better than others. High value, low cost assets such as those from the NIH ranging from technology to funding to assistance provide such biomedical firms an excellent jump-start in reaching their goals. PMID:23476116

  6. Building integrated approaches for the proteomics of complex, dynamic systems: NIH programs in technology and infrastructure development.

    PubMed

    Sheeley, Douglas M; Breen, Joseph J; Old, Susan E

    2005-01-01

    Proteomics technology and methods remain inadequate. Technological constraints contribute to an artificially static view of complex biological systems and a barrier between quantitative and interaction studies. Several NIH programs combine proteomics technology development with research on challenging biological problems to drive progress. A new initiative of the NIH Roadmap focuses on characterization of dynamic systems. The success of these programs will be judged by their impact on relevant biological problems.

  7. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  8. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Peña, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this article describes the authors' perspectives regarding the considerations to accept postdocs, key elements in their training programs, lessons learned, and outcomes from training. To provide an overview of the funding mechanism and distribution of funds to institutes and centers relevant to social work, data were obtained from databases that list NIH training grants awarded each year. Study results showed a limited amount of variation in fellows' training plans. The majority of training time was spent building skill in manuscript preparation, grant development, and socialization to the NIH culture. Above all other themes, the desire for advanced research training was a critically important factor in accepting a postdoctoral training position. Finally, the outcomes of training may have a profound effect on professional development, yet the long-term trajectory of postdoctoral fellows in academic positions as compared with people without postdoctoral training in social work programs requires further study.

  9. Global climate change and health: developing a research agenda for the NIH.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Joshua P; Jessup, Christine M

    2009-01-01

    Global climate change is receiving worldwide attention because of its anticipated impacts on the Earth's physical and biological systems. Through its effects on natural and human environments, climate change will likely impact economic viability and human health and well-being. The impact of climate change on human health is likely to be complex and significant, including effects on cancers, cardiovascular and respiratory disease, food-, water-, and vector-borne diseases, heat-related illness, mental and social well-being, nutrition, trauma, and vulnerable demographic sectors. Most assessments predict that these effects will disproportionately affect the poor, the elderly and the young, especially those living in Africa and Southeast Asia, where environmental conditions are poor, health infrastructure is weak and the burden of disease is great. Enormous efforts are underway to plan and finance climate change adaptation programs within national governments (including multiple U.S. agencies), United Nations organizations and private philanthropies. However, these endeavors are proceeding with a relatively poor understanding of the nature and magnitude of probable effects of climate change on health. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) already funds a portfolio of projects that are indirectly related to the concerns posed by global climate change. At the NIH, we have recently established an agency-wide planning group to assess the research questions in health and medicine that climate change presents, to link this agenda to parallel activities across other agencies of the U.S. Government (USG), and to advance a NIH research agenda in this area.

  10. Are we studying what matters? Health priorities and NIH-funded biomedical engineering research.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Jessica B; Paltiel, A David; Saltzman, W Mark

    2010-07-01

    With the founding of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in 1999, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) made explicit its dedication to expanding research in biomedical engineering. Ten years later, we sought to examine how closely federal funding for biomedical engineering aligns with U.S. health priorities. Using a publicly accessible database of research projects funded by the NIH in 2008, we identified 641 grants focused on biomedical engineering, 48% of which targeted specific diseases. Overall, we found that these disease-specific NIH-funded biomedical engineering research projects align with national health priorities, as quantified by three commonly utilized measures of disease burden: cause of death, disability-adjusted survival losses, and expenditures. However, we also found some illnesses (e.g., cancer and heart disease) for which the number of research projects funded deviated from our expectations, given their disease burden. Our findings suggest several possibilities for future studies that would serve to further inform the allocation of limited research dollars within the field of biomedical engineering.

  11. Engineering behaviour change in an epidemic: the epistemology of NIH-funded HIV prevention science.

    PubMed

    Green, Adam; Kolar, Kat

    2015-05-01

    Social scientific and public health literature on National Institutes of Health-funded HIV behavioural prevention science often assumes that this body of work has a strong biomedical epistemological orientation. We explore this assumption by conducting a systematic content analysis of all NIH-funded HIV behavioural prevention grants for men who have sex with men between 1989 and 2012. We find that while intervention research strongly favours a biomedical orientation, research into the antecedents of HIV risk practices favours a sociological, interpretive and structural orientation. Thus, with respect to NIH-funded HIV prevention science, there exists a major disjunct in the guiding epistemological orientations of how scientists understand HIV risk, on the one hand, and how they engineer behaviour change in behavioural interventions, on the other. Building on the extant literature, we suggest that the cause of this disjunct is probably attributable not to an NIH-wide positivist orientation, but to the specific standards of evidence used to adjudicate HIV intervention grant awards, including randomised controlled trials and other quantitative measures of intervention efficacy.

  12. WE-G-BRB-00: NIH-Funded Research: Instrumental in the Pursuit of Clinical Trials and Technological Innovations

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Over the past 20 years the NIH has funded individual grants, program projects grants, and clinical trials which have been instrumental in advancing patient care. The ways that each grant mechanism lends itself to the different phases of translating research into clinical practice will be described. Major technological innovations, such as IMRT and proton therapy, have been advanced with R01-type and P01-type funding and will be discussed. Similarly, the role of program project grants in identifying and addressing key hypotheses on the potential of 3D conformal therapy, normal tissue-guided dose escalation and motion management will be described. An overview will be provided regarding how these technological innovations have been applied to multi-institutional NIH-sponsored trials. Finally, the panel will discuss regarding which research questions should be funded by the NIH to inspire the next advances in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the different funding mechanisms of the NIH Learn about research advances that have led to innovation in delivery Review achievements due to NIH-funded program project grants in radiotherapy over the past 20 years Understand example advances achieved with multi-institutional clinical trials NIH.

  13. Resistance to oncogenic transformation in revertant R1 of human ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzumaki, N.; Ogiso, Y.; Oda, A.; Fujita, H.; Suzuki, H.; Sato, C.; Mullauer, L.

    1989-05-01

    A flat revertant, R1, was isolated from human activated c-Ha-ras-1 (hu-ac-Ha-ras) gene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells (EJ-NIH 3T3) treated with mutagens. R1 contained unchanged transfected hu-ac-Ha-ras DNA and expressed high levels of hu-ac-Ha-ras-specific mRNA and p21 protein. Transfection experiments revealed that NIH 3T3 cells could be transformed by DNA from R1 cells but R1 cells could not be retransformed by Kirsten sarcoma virus, DNA from EJ-NIH 3T3 cells, hu-ac-Ha-ras, v-src, v-mos, simian virus 40 large T antigen, or polyomavirus middle T antigen. Somatic cell hybridization studies showed that R1 was not retransformed by fusion with NIH 3T3 cells and suppressed anchorage independence of EJ-NIH 3T3 and hu-ac-Ha-ras gene-transformed rat W31 cells in soft agar. These results suggest that the reversion and resistance to several oncogenes in R1 is due n not to cellular defects in the production of the transformed phenotype but rather to enhancement of cellular mechanisms that suppress oncogenic transformation.

  14. Regulation of Na+-H+ exchange in normal NIH-3T3 cells and in NIH-3T3 cells expressing the ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, N.E.; Knapik, J.; Strebel, F.; Tarpley, W.G.; Gorman, R.R.

    1989-04-01

    Our laboratory and others have demonstrated that Na+-H+ exchange can be regulated by two different pathways; one that is mediated by an inositol trisphosphate-stimulated increase in intracellular calcium activity, and one that is mediated by an increase in protein kinase C activity. To determine whether one of these pathways is more important than the other, or whether one pathway is physiologically relevant, we employed normal NIH-3T3 cells (3T3 cells) and NIH-3T3 cells expressing the EJ human bladder ras oncogene (EJ cells). The EJ cells were chosen because they provide a genetic model that does not exhibit serum- or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated inositol trisphosphate release or Ca2+ mobilization. It was found that serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange was more pronounced in EJ cells than in control 3T3 cells. As expected, serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in 3T3 cells was inhibited by chelating intracellular Ca2+ with the intracellular Ca2+ chelator quin2, by the intracellular Ca2+ antagonist 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8), and by the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine. In contrast, these agents did not inhibit serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells. Activators of protein kinase C (e.g., 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol or biologically active phorbol esters) were found to stimulate Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells to the same extent as serum. However, these agents were considerably less effective than serum in control 3T3 cells. Despite these findings, PDGF did not stimulate diacylglycerol levels in EJ cells.

  15. Report of the NIH Task Force on Research Standards for Chronic Low Back Pain†

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Dworkin, Samuel F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Andersson, Gunnar; Borenstein, David; Carragee, Eugene; Carrino, John; Chou, Roger; Cook, Karon; DeLitto, Anthony; Goertz, Christine; Khalsa, Partap; Loeser, John; Mackey, Sean; Panagis, James; Rainville, James; Tosteson, Tor; Turk, Dennis; Von Korff, Michael; Weiner, Debra K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite rapidly increasing intervention, functional disability due to chronic low back pain (cLBP) has increased in recent decades. We often cannot identify mechanisms to explain the major negative impact cLBP has on patients’ lives. Such cLBP is often termed non-specific, and may be due to multiple biologic and behavioral etiologies. Researchers use varied inclusion criteria, definitions, baseline assessments, and outcome measures, which impede comparisons and consensus. The NIH Pain Consortium therefore charged a Research Task Force (RTF) to draft standards for research on cLBP. The resulting multidisciplinary panel recommended using 2 questions to define cLBP; classifying cLBP by its impact (defined by pain intensity, pain interference, and physical function); use of a minimal data set to describe research participants (drawing heavily on the PROMIS methodology); reporting “responder analyses” in addition to mean outcome scores; and suggestions for future research and dissemination. The Pain Consortium has approved the recommendations, which investigators should incorporate into NIH grant proposals. The RTF believes these recommendations will advance the field, help to resolve controversies, and facilitate future research addressing the genomic, neurologic, and other mechanistic substrates of chronic low back pain. We expect the RTF recommendations will become a dynamic document, and undergo continual improvement. Perspective A Task Force was convened by the NIH Pain Consortium, with the goal of developing research standards for chronic low back pain. The results included recommendations for definitions, a minimal dataset, reporting outcomes, and future research. Greater consistency in reporting should facilitate comparisons among studies and the development of phenotypes. PMID:26388962

  16. REPORT OF THE NIH TASK FORCE ON RESEARCH STANDARDS FOR CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Dworkin, Samuel F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Andersson, Gunnar; Borenstein, David; Carragee, Eugene; Carrino, John; Chou, Roger; Cook, Karon; DeLitto, Anthony; Goertz, Christine; Khalsa, Partap; Loeser, John; Mackey, Sean; Panagis, James; Rainville, James; Tosteson, Tor; Turk, Dennis; Von Korff, Michael; Weiner, Debra K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite rapidly increasing intervention, functional disability due to chronic low back pain (cLBP) has increased in recent decades. We often cannot identify mechanisms to explain the major negative impact cLBP has on patients’ lives. Such cLBP is often termed non-specific, and may be due to multiple biologic and behavioral etiologies. Researchers use varied inclusion criteria, definitions, baseline assessments, and outcome measures, which impede comparisons and consensus. The NIH Pain Consortium therefore charged a Research Task Force (RTF) to draft standards for research on cLBP. The resulting multidisciplinary panel recommended using 2 questions to define cLBP; classifying cLBP by its impact (defined by pain intensity, pain interference, and physical function); use of a minimal data set to describe research participants (drawing heavily on the PROMIS methodology); reporting “responder analyses” in addition to mean outcome scores; and suggestions for future research and dissemination. The Pain Consortium has approved the recommendations, which investigators should incorporate into NIH grant proposals. The RTF believes these recommendations will advance the field, help to resolve controversies, and facilitate future research addressing the genomic, neurologic, and other mechanistic substrates of chronic low back pain. We expect the RTF recommendations will become a dynamic document, and undergo continual improvement. Perspective A Task Force was convened by the NIH Pain Consortium, with the goal of developing research standards for chronic low back pain. The results included recommendations for definitions, a minimal dataset, reporting outcomes, and future research. Greater consistency in reporting should facilitate comparisons among studies and the development of phenotypes. PMID:24787228

  17. NiH2 Reliability Impact Upon Hubble Space Telescope Battery Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Hollandsworth, Roger; Armantrout, Jon; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was designed to be deployed and later serviced for maintenance and upgrades, as required, by the space shuttle fleet, with a Goodyear mission life for the batteries. HST was deployed 380 miles above the Earth, from Space Shuttle Discovery, on April 25, 1990. Four servicing missions, (SM1, SM2, SM3A, AND SM3B) have been performed. Astronauts have replaced or modified optics, solar arrays, a power control unit, and various science packages. A fifth Servicing Mission, SM4 scheduled for early 2004, is planned to replace the batteries for the first time. The HST is powered by solar array wings and nickel hydrogen (NiH2) Duracell batteries, which are grouped into two parallel battery modules of three parallel batteries each. With a design life of 7 years at launch, these batteries have surpassed 12 years in orbit, which gives HST the highest number of charge/discharge cycles of any NiH2 battery currently in low earth orbit (LEO) application. Being in a LEO orbit, HST has a 45-minute umbra period, during which spacecraft power requirements normally force the batteries into discharge, and a 60-minute sun period, which is available for battery recharge. The intent of this paper is to address the issue of NiH2 battery reliability and how battery capacity degradation can impact scheduling of a Servicing Mission to bring replacement batteries to HST, and extend mission life till deployment of Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), planned for 2008 at the earliest.

  18. Development of the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Gastrointestinal Symptom Scales

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Brennan M.R.; Hays, Ron D.; Bolus, Roger; Melmed, Gil Y.; Chang, Lin; Whitman, Cynthia; Khanna, Puja P.; Paz, Sylvia H.; Hays, Tonya; Reise, Steve; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) is a standardized set of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) that cover physical, mental, and social health. The aim of this study was to develop the NIH PROMIS gastrointestinal (GI) symptom measures. METHODS We first conducted a systematic literature review to develop a broad conceptual model of GI symptoms. We complemented the review with 12 focus groups including 102 GI patients. We developed PROMIS items based on the literature and input from the focus groups followed by cognitive debriefing in 28 patients. We administered the items to diverse GI patients (irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and other common GI disorders) and a census-based US general population (GP) control sample. We created scales based on confirmatory factor analyses and item response theory modeling, and evaluated the scales for reliability and validity. RESULTS A total of 102 items were developed and administered to 865 patients with GI conditions and 1,177 GP participants. Factor analyses provided support for eight scales: gastroesophageal reflux (13 items), disrupted swallowing (7 items), diarrhea (5 items), bowel incontinence/soilage (4 items), nausea and vomiting (4 items), constipation (9 items), belly pain (6 items), and gas/bloat/flatulence (12 items). The scales correlated significantly with both generic and disease-targeted legacy instruments, and demonstrate evidence of reliability. CONCLUSIONS Using the NIH PROMIS framework, we developed eight GI symptom scales that can now be used for clinical care and research across the full range of GI disorders. PMID:25199473

  19. Potentiostatic and ac impedance studies of the hydrogen electrodes used in Ni/H2 batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Helloco, Jean-Guy; Bojkov, Hristo; Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    In a study of electrode activity for hydrogen evolution and hydrogen ionization, knowledge of the detailed kinetics and of the surface coverage by adsorbed hydrogen is essential. In the Ni/H2 battery, the hydrogen electrode is subjected to high hydrogen pressure; elucidation of the variation of kinetic parameters with hydrogen pressure is therefore of interest. Potentiostatic and ac impedance spectroscopic techniques were used in the present study. The equivalent circuit of the reaction, the kinetic parameters, and their pressure dependence have been determined.

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Ni/H2 and Li-Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John W.; White, Ralph E.; Dougal, Roger A.

    2001-01-01

    The modelling effort outlined in this viewgraph presentation encompasses the following topics: 1) Electrochemical Deposition of Nickel Hydroxide; 2) Deposition rates of thin films; 3) Impregnation of porous electrodes; 4) Experimental Characterization of Nickel Hydroxide; 5) Diffusion coefficients of protons; 6) Self-discharge rates (i.e., oxygen-evolution kinetics); 7) Hysteresis between charge and discharge; 8) Capacity loss on cycling; 9) Experimental Verification of the Ni/H2 Battery Model; 10) Mathematical Modeling Li-Ion Batteries; 11) Experimental Verification of the Li-Ion Battery Model; 11) Integrated Power System Models for Satellites; and 12) Experimental Verification of Integrated-Systems Model.

  1. Linking the NIH strategic plan to the research agenda for social workers in health and aging.

    PubMed

    Raveis, Victoria H; Gardner, Daniel S; Berkman, Barbara; Harootyan, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Although social work has a long and distinctive tradition of practice-relevant research aimed at enhancing the health and well-being of older adults, the profession has been underrepresented among the ranks of academic researchers and the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) scientific endeavors. In this article, the inherent capacities of social workers to generate and disseminate empirical health-related knowledge are discussed and recent developments in social work's geriatric research infrastructure are described. Emerging domains for advancing the profession's contribution to practice-relevant geriatric research on the federal level are identified and the next steps toward advancing the field's research agenda are posed.

  2. Community resources and technologies developed through the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program.

    PubMed

    Satterlee, John S; Beckel-Mitchener, Andrea; McAllister, Kim; Procaccini, Dena C; Rutter, Joni L; Tyson, Frederick L; Chadwick, Lisa Helbling

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes resources and technologies generated by the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program that may be useful to epigenomics researchers investigating a variety of diseases including cancer. Highlights include reference epigenome maps for a wide variety of human cells and tissues, the development of new technologies for epigenetic assays and imaging, the identification of novel epigenetic modifications, and an improved understanding of the role of epigenetic processes in a diversity of human diseases. We also discuss future needs in this area including exploration of epigenomic variation between individuals, single-cell epigenomics, environmental epigenomics, exploration of the use of surrogate tissues, and improved technologies for epigenome manipulation.

  3. Impedances of Ni electrodes and Ni/H2 cells from different manufacturers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The consistency of impedance measurements within each group of flightweigth Ni/H2 cells being tested for Space Station Freedom confirms that impedance measurements are reproducible provided that the same conditions of cycling and storage are maintained. However, electrodes and cells from different manufacturers vary widely, even with the same cycling and storage conditions. Measurements on cells from two manufacturers that have been cycled for 500-800 cycles show that there are not only major changes upon cycling, but there are substantial differences in the behavior of cells from different manufacturers with cycling.

  4. A relevant in vitro ELISA test in alternative to the in vivo NIH test for human rabies vaccine batch release.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Richard; Alberti, Monique; Poirier, Bertrand; Jallet, Corinne; Tordo, Noël; Morgeaux, Sylvie

    2013-12-05

    To assess the quality of vaccine batches before release, international regulation requires the control of potency of each lot of human rabies vaccines by the in vivo NIH challenge test. Meanwhile, the 3Rs strategy for animal testing encourages the replacement of the in vivo potency test by an in vitro assay. Consequently, since more than 10 years, an ELISA method has been implemented by ANSM in parallel to the NIH test for rabies vaccines lots. It consists in the evaluation of the glycoprotein content using a monoclonal antibody recognizing the trimeric native form of the glycoprotein. This ELISA method is able 1) to monitor the consistency of production with a similar profile than the NIH; 2) to detect a low quantity of glycoprotein in vaccines and 3) to agree with the manufacturer's NIH results by declaring a non compliant batch. This ELISA which characterizes the immunogenic form of the glycoprotein formulated in vaccines seems to be relevant to replace the NIH test and is a promising candidate to be standardized by a collaborative study.

  5. Spatial learning in the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock and RLA-I/RHA-I rats: revisiting the relationship with unconditioned and conditioned anxiety.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Membrives, Esther; López-Aumatell, Regina; Blázquez, Gloria; Cañete, Toni; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-05-15

    To characterize learning/memory profiles for the first time in the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock, and to examine whether these are associated with anxiety, we evaluated NIH-HS rats for spatial learning/memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) and in the following anxiety/fear tests: the elevated zero-maze (ZM; unconditioned anxiety), a context-conditioned fear test and the acquisition of two-way active avoidance (conditioned anxiety). NIH-HS rats were compared with the Roman High- (RHA-I) and Low-Avoidance (RLA-I) rat strains, given the well-known differences between the Roman strains/lines in anxiety-related behavior and in spatial learning/memory. The results show that: (i) As expected, RLA-I rats were more anxious in the ZM test, displayed more frequent context-conditioned freezing episodes and fewer avoidances than RHA-I rats. (ii) Scores of NIH-HS rats in these tests/tasks mostly fell in between those of the Roman rat strains, and were usually closer to the values of the RLA-I strain. (iii) Pigmented NIH-HS (only a small part of NIH-HS rats were albino) rats were the best spatial learners and displayed better spatial memory than the other three (RHA-I, RLA-I and NIH-HS albino) groups. (iv) Albino NIH-HS and RLA-I rats also showed better learning/memory than the RHA-I strain. (v) Within the NIH-HS stock, the most anxious rats in the ZM test presented the best learning and/or memory efficiency (regardless of pigmentation). In summary, NIH-HS rats display a high performance in spatial learning/memory tasks and a passive coping strategy when facing conditioned conflict situations. In addition, unconditioned anxiety in NIH-HS rats predicts better spatial learning/memory.

  6. Research Participant-Centered Outcomes at NIH-Supported Clinical Research Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Rhonda G.; Lee, Laura N.; Yessis, Jennifer M.; Wesley, Robert; Alfano, Sandra; Alexander, Steven R.; Kassis, Sylvia Baedorf; Cola, Phil; Dozier, Ann; Ford, Dan E.; Harris, Paul; Kim, Emmelyn; Lee, Simon Craddock; O’Riordan, Gerri; Roth, Mary-Tara; Schuff, Kathryn; Wasser, June; Henderson, David K.; Coller, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although research participation is essential for clinical investigation, few quantitative outcome measures exist to assess participants’ experiences. To address this, we developed and deployed a survey at 15 NIH-supported clinical research centers to assess participant-centered outcomes; we report responses from 4,961 participants. Methods Survey questions addressed core aspects of the research participants’ experience, including their overall rating, motivation, trust, and informed consent. We describe participant characteristics, responses to individual questions, and correlations among responses. Results Respondents broadly represented the research population in sex, race, and ethnicity. Seventy-three percent awarded top ratings to their overall research experience and 94% reported no pressure to enroll. Top ratings correlated with feeling treated with respect, listened to, and having access to the research team (R2=0.80 - 0.96). White participants trusted researchers (88%) than did non-white participants collectively (80%) (p<0.0001). Many participants felt fully prepared by the informed consent process (67%) and wanted to receive research results (72%). Conclusions Our survey demonstrates that a majority of participants at NIH-supported clinical research centers rate their research experience very positively and that participant-centered outcome measures identify actionable items for improvement of participant’s experiences, research protections, and the conduct of clinical investigation. PMID:24842076

  7. The NIH Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats Program: overview and special challenges.

    PubMed

    Jett, David A

    2016-06-01

    Intentional exposures to toxic chemicals can stem from terrorist attacks, such as the release of sarin in the Tokyo subway system in 1995, as well as from toxic industrial accidents that are much more common. Developing effective medical interventions is a critical component of the overall strategy to overcome the challenges of chemical emergencies. These challenges include the rapid and lethal mode of action of many toxic chemicals that require equally fast-acting therapies, the large number of chemicals that are considered threats, and the diverse demographics and vulnerabilities of those who may be affected. In addition, there may be long-term deleterious effects in survivors of a chemical exposure. Several U.S. federal agencies are invested in efforts to improve preparedness and response capabilities during and after chemical emergencies. For example, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) Program supports investigators who are developing therapeutics to reduce mortality and morbidity from chemical exposures. The program awards grants to individual laboratories and includes contract resource facilities and interagency agreements with Department of Defense laboratories. The range of high-quality research within the NIH CounterACT Program network is discussed.

  8. A screen of the NIH Clinical Collection small molecule library identifies potential anti-coronavirus drugs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianzhong; Forrest, J Craig; Zhang, Xuming

    2015-02-01

    With the recent emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus in humans and the outbreak of devastating porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus in swine, therapeutic intervention is urgently needed. However, anti-coronavirus drugs currently are not available. In an effort to assist rapid development of anti-coronavirus drugs, here we screened the NIH Clinical Collection in cell culture using a luciferase reporter-expressing recombinant murine coronavirus. Of the 727 compounds screened, 84 were found to have a significant anti-coronavirus effect. Further experiments revealed that 51 compounds blocked virus entry while 19 others inhibited viral replication. Additional validation studies with the top 3 inhibitors (hexachlorophene, nitazoxanide and homoharringtonine) demonstrated robust anti-coronavirus activities (a reduction of 6 to 8log10 in virus titer) with an IC50 ranging from 11nM to 1.2μM. Furthermore, homoharringtonine and hexachlorophene exhibited broad antiviral activity against diverse species of human and animal coronaviruses. Since the NIH Clinical Collection consists of compounds that have already been through clinical trials, these small molecule inhibitors have a great potential for rapid development as anti-coronavirus drugs.

  9. Evaluation and the NIH clinical and translational science awards: a "top ten" list.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Harold Alan; Abedin, Zainab; Blank, Arthur E; Mazmanian, Paul E

    2013-12-01

    Since 2006, a total of 61 Clinical and Translational Science Institutes (CTSAs) have been funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), with the aim of reducing translation time from a bench discovery to when it impacts patients. This special issue of Evaluation & the Health Professions focuses on evaluation within and across the large, complex system of the CTSA Program of NIH. Through insights gained by reading the articles in this special edition and the experience of the authors, a "top ten" list of lessons learned and insights gained is presented. The list outlines issues that face those who evaluate the influence of the CTSA Program, as they work to anticipate what will be needed for continuing success. Themes include (1) considering the needs of stakeholders, (2) the perspective of the evaluators, (3) the importance of service improvement, (4) the importance of teams and people, (5) costs and return on investments, (6) methodology considerations to evaluate the CTSA enterprise, (7) innovation in evaluation, (8) defining the transformation of research, (9) evaluating the long-term impact of the CTSAs on public health, and (10) contributing to science policy formulation and implementation. The establishment of the CTSA Program, with its mandated evaluation component, has not only influenced the infrastructure and nature of translational research but will continue to impact policy and management in science.

  10. Ethics in Psychiatric Research: A Review of 25 Years of NIH-funded Empirical Research Projects

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, James; Bante, Holly; Hadley, Whitney B.

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper reviews the past 25 years of empirical research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on matters of ethics in psychiatric research. Methods Using the NIH RePORTER and Medline databases, we identified 43 grants and 77 publications that involved the empirical study of a matter of ethics in research involving mental health service users. Results These articles provide original and useful information on important topics, most especially the capacity to consent and the voluntariness of consent. For example, participants who share a diagnosis vary widely in levels of cognitive impairment that correlate with decisional capacity, and capacity to consent can be enhanced easily using iterative consent processes. Few articles address matters of justice or benefits in research, particularly from the perspectives of participants. No articles address matters of privacy, confidentiality, or researcher professionalism. Conclusions Despite the usefulness of data from the studies conducted to date, current research on research ethics in psychiatry does not adequately address the concerns of service users as expressed in recent publications. PMID:23259152

  11. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): Validation of Executive Function Measures in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zelazo, Philip David; Anderson, Jacob E.; Richler, Jennifer; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Conway, Kevin P.; Gershon, Richard; Weintraub, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This study describes psychometric properties of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) executive function measures in an adult sample. The NIHTB-CB was designed for use in epidemiologic studies and clinical trials for ages 3 to 85. A total of 268 self-described healthy adults were recruited at four university-based sites, using stratified sampling guidelines to target demographic variability for age (20–85 years), gender, education and ethnicity. The NIHTB-CB contains two computer-based instruments assessing executive function: the Dimensional Change Card Sort (a measure of cognitive flexibility) and a flanker task (a measure of inhibitory control and selective attention). Participants completed the NIHTB-CB, corresponding gold standard convergent and discriminant measures, and sociodemographic questionnaires. A subset of participants (N = 89) was retested 7 to 21 days later. Results reveal excellent sensitivity to age-related changes during adulthood, excellent test–retest reliability, and adequate to good convergent and discriminant validity. The NIH Toolbox EF measures can be used effectively in epidemiologic and clinical studies. PMID:24960301

  12. Oxidative changes and apoptosis induced by 1800-MHz electromagnetic radiation in NIH/3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qingxia; Wang, Minglian; Wu, Shuicai; Ma, Xuemei; An, Guangzhou; Liu, Huan; Xie, Fei

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the potential adverse effects of mobile phone radiation, we studied reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) after intermittent exposure (5 min on/10 min off, for various durations from 0.5 to 8 h) to an 1800-MHz GSM-talk mode electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at an average specific absorption rate of 2 W/kg. A 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate fluorescence probe was used to detect intracellular ROS levels, immunofluorescence was used to detect γH2AX foci as a marker for DNA damage, and flow cytometry was used to measure apoptosis. Our results showed a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels after EMR exposure and it reached the highest level at an exposure time of 1 h (p < 0.05) followed by a slight decrease when the exposure continued for as long as 8 h. No significant effect on the number of γH2AX was detected after EMR exposure. The percentage of late-apoptotic cells in the EMR-exposed group was significantly higher than that in the sham-exposed groups (p < 0.05). These results indicate that an 1800-MHz EMR enhances ROS formation and promotes apoptosis in NIH/3T3 cells.

  13. Steering a new course for stem cell research: NIH's intramural Center for Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mahendra S; Collins, Francis S

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenal progress made in stem cell biology in the past few years has infused the field of regenerative medicine with a great deal of scientific enthusiasm. However, along with the excitement of discovery comes a new sense of translational urgency. The prospect of using embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell tools and technologies to produce cell-based therapies and other treatments is no longer a distant dream; it is a very real opportunity that demands our attention today. As with most new fields, regenerative medicine has experienced some significant growing pains, and we have identified a number of key obstacles to progress. Given our role as the lead U.S. biomedical research agency and the world's largest supporter of medical research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has a responsibility to find ways to reduce or remove many of these obstacles and, consequently, has-and continues-to respond to these challenges in a variety of ways. In this brief essay, we will review our progress and highlight a new development: the founding of a Center for Regenerative Medicine on the NIH campus.

  14. Alteration of glycolipids in ras-transfected NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, G.R.; Aaronson, S.A.; Brady, R.O.; Fishman, P.H.

    1987-09-01

    Glycosphingolipid alterations upon viral transformation are well documented. Transformation of mouse 3T3 cells with murine sarcoma viruses results in marked decreases in the levels of gangliosides GM1 and GD1a and an increase in gangliotriaosylceramide. The transforming oncogenes of these viruses have been identified as members of the ras gene family. The authors analyzed NIH 3T3 cells transfected with human H-, K- and N-ras oncogenes for their glycolipid composition and expression of cell surface gangliosides. Using conventional thin-layer chromatographic analysis, they found that the level of GM3 was increased and that of GD1a was slightly decreased or unchanged, and GM1 was present but not in quantifiable levels. Cell surface levels of GM1 were determined by /sup 125/I-labeled cholera toxin binding to intact cells. GD1a was determined by cholera toxin binding to cells treated with sialidase prior to toxin binding. All ras-transfected cells had decreased levels of surface GM1 and GD1 as compared to logarithmically growing normal NIH 3T3 cells. Levels of GM1 and, to a lesser extent, GD1a increased as the latter cells became confluent. Using a monoclonal antibody assay, they found that gangliotriaosylceramide was present in all ras-transfected cells studied but not in logarithmically growing untransfected cells. These results indicated that ras oncogenes derived form human tumors are capable of inducing alterations in glycolipid composition.

  15. VII. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): factor structure for 3 to 15 year olds.

    PubMed

    Mungas, Dan; Widaman, Keith; Zelazo, Philip David; Tulsky, David; Heaton, Robert K; Slotkin, Jerry; Blitz, David L; Gershon, Richard C

    2013-08-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used the evaluate the dimensional structure underlying the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB) and the measures chosen to serve as concurrent validity criteria for the NIH Toolbox CB. These results were used to evaluate the convergent and discriminant validity of the CB in children ranging from 3 to 15 years of age. Results were evaluated separately for a 3- to 6-year-old group and a 8- to 15-year-old group because different validation measures were used in these age groups. Three distinct dimensions were found for the 3- to 6-year-old group: Vocabulary, Reading, and Fluid Abilities. Five dimensions were found for 8-15 year olds: Vocabulary, Reading, Episodic Memory, Working Memory, and Executive Function/Processing Speed. CB measures and their validation analogues consistently defined common factors in a pattern that broadly supported the convergent and discriminant validity of the CB, but results showed higher intercorrelation and less differentiation of cognitive dimensions in younger than in older children and in older children compared with adults. Age was strongly related to the cognitive dimensions underlying test performance in both groups of children and results are consistent with broader literature showing increasing differentiation of cognitive abilities associated with the rapid brain development that occurs from early childhood into adulthood.

  16. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Howard H; Deschamps, Anne M

    2014-03-01

    Physician scientists (researchers with either M.D. or M.D.-Ph.D. degrees) have the unique potential to combine clinical perspectives with scientific insight, and their participation in biomedical research has long been an important topic for policymakers and educators. Given the recent changes in the research environment, an update and extension of earlier studies of this population was needed. Our findings show that physician scientists are less likely to take a major role in biomedical research than they were in the past. The number of physician scientists receiving postdoctoral research training and career development awards is at an all-time low. Physician scientists today, on average, receive their first major research award (R01 equivalent) at a later age than in the 1980s. The number of first-time R01-equivalent awards to physicians is at the same level as it was 30 yr ago, but physicians now represent a smaller percentage of the grant recipients. The long-term decline in the number of physicians entering research careers was temporarily halted during the period of substantial U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget growth (1998-2003). These gains are lost, however, in the subsequent years when NIH budgets failed to keep pace with rising costs.

  17. Room-temperature metal-hydride discharge source, with observations on NiH and FeH.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Raphaël; Ashworth, Stephen H; Crozet, Patrick; Field, Robert W; Forthomme, Damien; Harker, Heather; Richard, Cyril; Ross, Amanda J

    2009-11-26

    A metal sputtering source suitable for laboratory production of metal hydrides is described. Sputtering from pure nickel or iron in an Ar/H(2) discharge is analyzed at low resolution. High resolution laser excitation and dispersed fluorescence spectra of NiH have also been recorded. The source has been designed to operate with a ferromagnetic circuit for Zeeman spectroscopy. Signals from the source are strong enough to record dispersed fluorescence from NiH by Fourier transform interferometry in magnetic fields up to 1 T. We establish that FeH can also be formed in this source.

  18. Immunolocalization of the cellular src protein in interphase and mitotic NIH c-src overexpresser cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The mouse mAb, mAb 327, that recognizes specifically both pp60v-src and pp60c-src in a wide variety of cells, has been used to determine precisely the various locations of pp60c-src in NIH c-src overexpresser cells, using the technique of immunofluorescence microscopy. In interphase cells, the protein exhibits two main distributions: one that appears uniform and in association with the cell surface and the other that is patchy and juxtanuclear and coincides with the centrosomes. The juxtanuclear aggregation of pp60c-src-containing patches depends on microtubules and does not seem to occur within the Golgi apparatus and the rough ER. At the G2-to-M-phase transition, a drastic change in the localization patterns of pp60c-src takes place. We also report experiments in which the NIH c-src overexpresser cells were exposed to Con A for various times to induce a redistribution of the cell surface Con A receptors. We show that, at each stage of the Con A-mediated endocytotic process, the Con A-receptor complexes redistribute into structures to which pp60c-src appears also to be associated: at first, into patches that form at the cell surface level and then, into a cap that stands at the cell center in a juxtanuclear position and that coincides with the Golgi apparatus. During this capping process, pp60c- src-containing vesicles continue to accumulate in a centriolar spot, as in interphase, Con A-untreated cells, from which Con A is excluded. The significance of the intracellular locations of pp60c-src to the possible functions of the protein is discussed. Also, the distribution patterns of the cellular protein in the NIH c-src overexpresser cells are compared with those of pp60v-src in RSV-transformed cells. The differences observed are discussed in relation with the differences in transforming capacities of the two proteins. Finally, the possible physiological significance of the association between pp60c-src and the structures generated after the binding of Con A to its

  19. MUC4, a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein, induces oncogenic transformation of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Sangeeta; Singh, Ajay P; Moniaux, Nicolas; Eudy, James D; Meza, Jane L; Batra, Surinder K.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have established the association of MUC4 with the progression of cancer and metastasis. An aberrant expression of MUC4 is reported in precancerous lesions indicating its early involvement in the disease process; however, its precise role in cellular transformation has not been explored. MUC4 contains many unique domains and is proposed to impact on cell signaling pathways and behavior of the tumor cells. In the present study, to decipher its oncogenic potential of MUC4, we stably expressed the MUC4 mucin in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Stable ectopic expression of MUC4 resulted in increased growth, colony formation and motility of NIH3T3 cells in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice, when cells were injected subcutaneously. Microarray analysis demonstrated increased expression of several growth- and mitochondrial energy production-associated genes in MUC4-expressing NIH3T3 cells. In addition, expression of MUC4 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in enhanced levels of oncoprotein ErbB2 and its phosphorylated form (pY1248-ErbB2). In conclusion, our studies provide the first evidence that MUC4 alone induces cellular transformation and indicates a novel role of MUC4 in cancer biology. PMID:19010895

  20. Challenges of Implementing the NIH Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a Minority-Serving University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The impacts and challenges of implementing an NIH/NICHD Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a private Minority-Serving-Institution (MSI) are examined. This article outlines efforts to gain institutional buy-in and challenges encountered in creating a functioning Office of Sponsored Research and implementing research policies…

  1. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  2. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  3. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  4. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  5. 42 CFR 52b.8 - How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How will NIH monitor the use of facilities constructed with federal funds? 52b.8 Section 52b.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.8 How will...

  6. 75 FR 11889 - Request for Comments on Proposed NIH, AHRQ and CDC Process Change for Electronic Submission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Request for Comments on Proposed NIH, AHRQ and CDC Process Change for Electronic...), and the Center of Disease Control (CDC) seek comments from the public on the impact of eliminating...

  7. 76 FR 61719 - Notice of a meeting of a working group of the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ..., Senior Health Policy Analyst, Office of Biotechnology Activities, Office of Science Policy, Office of the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of a meeting of a working group of the NIH...

  8. 75 FR 80828 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The NIH-American Association for Retired Persons...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Collection: The Nutritional Epidemiology Branch of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics of the... the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to establish... Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS,...

  9. Physical and chemical analysis of a Ni/H2 cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, H.; Earl, M. W.; Kirkendall, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    A cycled aerospace nickel hydrogen (Ni/H2) cell was subjected to destructive physical analysis to determine the reason for a capacity loss after 5,967 cycles at 60 percent depth of discharge. The positive plates in the cell were analyzed in terms of chemical composition, active material utilization, charge efficiency, and thickness increase. The microstructure of a cross section of the positive plate was determined by backscattered electron image analysis. The results suggest that the capacity loss in the cell is caused by low charge acceptance and low active material utilization at the positive plate. The oxidized nickel species content of the positive plate increased due to corrosion of the nickel sintered skeleton. This appears to circumvent the orderly reaction of the active material. Microstructural analysis has indicated that a new phase of active material is formed with cycling.

  10. Destructive physical analysis results of Ni/H2 cells cycled in LEO regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hong S.; Zelter, Gabriela R.; Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    Six 48-Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) Ni/H2 cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH electrolyte were life cycle tested in low Earth orbit. All three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed (3729, 4165, and 11,355 cycles), while those with 26 percent KOH were cycled over 14,000 times in the continuing test. Destructive physical analysis (DPA) of the failed cells included visual inspections, measurements of electrode thickness, scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte flooded cell. The cycling failure was due to a decrease of nickel electrode capacity. As possible causes of the capacity decrease, researchers observed electrode expansion, rupture, and corrosion of the nickel electrode substrate, active material redistribution, and accumulation of electrochemically undischargeable active material with cycling.

  11. Destructive physical analysis results of Ni/H2 cells cycled in LEO regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hong S.; Zelter, Gabriela R.; Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    Six 48-Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) Ni/H2 cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH electrolyte were life cycle tested in low earth orbit. All three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed (3729, 4165, and 11,355 cycles), while those with 26 percent KOH were cycled over 14,000 times in the continuing test. Destructive physical analysis (DPA) of the failed cells included visual inspections, measurements of electrode thickness, scanning electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte flooded cell. The cycling failure was due to a decrease of nickel electrode capacity. As possible causes of the capacity decrease, researchers observed electrode expansion, rupture, and corrosion of the nickel electrode substrate, active material redistribution, and accumulation of electrochemically undischargeable active material with cycling.

  12. Single Synonymous Mutations in KRAS Cause Transformed Phenotypes in NIH3T3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Andrew M.; Bagni, Rachel; Portugal, Franklin; Hartley, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Synonymous mutations in the KRAS gene are clustered at G12, G13, and G60 in human cancers. We constructed 9 stable NIH3T3 cell lines expressing KRAS, each with one of these synonymous mutations. Compared to the negative control cell line expressing the wild type human KRAS gene, all the synonymous mutant lines expressed more KRAS protein, grew more rapidly and to higher densities, and were more invasive in multiple assays. Three of the cell lines showed dramatic loss of contact inhibition, were more refractile under phase contrast, and their refractility was greatly reduced by treatment with trametinib. Codon usage at these glycines is highly conserved in KRAS compared to HRAS, indicating selective pressure. These transformed phenotypes suggest that synonymous mutations found in driver genes such as KRAS may play a role in human cancers. PMID:27684555

  13. NIH peer review percentile scores are poorly predictive of grant productivity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Peer review is widely used to assess grant applications so that the highest ranked applications can be funded. A number of studies have questioned the ability of peer review panels to predict the productivity of applications, but a recent analysis of grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US found that the percentile scores awarded by peer review panels correlated with productivity as measured by citations of grant-supported publications. Here, based on a re-analysis of these data for the 102,740 funded grants with percentile scores of 20 or better, we report that these percentile scores are a poor discriminator of productivity. This underscores the limitations of peer review as a means of assessing grant applications in an era when typical success rates are often as low as about 10%. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13323.001 PMID:26880623

  14. Demographically Corrected Normative Standards for the Spanish Language Version of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery

    PubMed Central

    Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Umlauf, Anya; Marquine, Maria; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Mungas, Daniel; Gershon, Richard; Slotkin, Jerry; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Heaton, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnicity in the United States, yet there are limited well-validated neuropsychological tools in Spanish, and an even greater paucity of normative standards representing this population. The Spanish NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) is a novel neurocognitive screener; however, the original norms were developed combining Spanish- and English-versions of the battery. We developed normative standards for the Spanish NIHTB-CB, fully adjusting for demographic variables and based entirely on a Spanish-speaking sample. Methods A total of 408 Spanish-speaking neurologically healthy adults (ages 18–85 years) and 496 children (ages 3–7 years) completed the NIH Toolbox norming project. We developed three types of scores: uncorrected based on the entire Spanish-speaking cohort, age-corrected, and fully demographically corrected (age, education, sex) scores for each of the seven NIHTB-CB tests and three composites (Fluid, Crystallized, Total Composites). Corrected scores were developed using polynomial regression models. Demographic factors demonstrated medium-to-large effects on uncorrected NIHTB-CB scores in a pattern that differed from that observed on the English NIHTB-CB. For example, in Spanish-speaking adults, education was more strongly associated with Fluid scores, but showed the strongest association with Crystallized scores among English-speaking adults. Results Demographic factors were no longer associated with fully corrected scores. The original norms were not successful in eliminating demographic effects, overestimating children’s performances, and underestimating adults’ performances on the Spanish NIHTB-CB. Conclusions The disparate pattern of demographic associations on the Spanish versus English NIHTB-CB supports the need for distinct normative standards developed separately for each population. Fully adjusted scores presented here will aid in more accurately characterizing acquired brain dysfunction

  15. Radiation Risk Assessment of the Individual Astronaut: A Complement to Radiation Interests at the NIH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Predicting human risks following exposure to space radiation is uncertain in part because of unpredictable distribution of high-LET and low-dose-derived damage amongst cells in tissues, unknown synergistic effects of microgravity upon gene- and protein-expression, and inadequately modeled processing of radiation-induced damage within cells to produce rare and late-appearing malignant cancers. Furthermore, estimation of risks of radiogenic outcome within small numbers of astronauts is not possible using classic epidemiologic study. It therefore seems useful to develop strategies of risk-assessment based upon large datasets acquired from correlated biological models useful for resolving radiogenic risk-assessment for irradiated individuals. In this regard, it is suggested that sensitive cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the biomolecular risk of malignant transformation be developed in order to resolve these NASA-specific challenges. Multiparametric cellular biodosimeters could be developed using analyses of gene-expression and protein-expression whereby large datasets of cellular response to radiation-induced damage are analyzed for markers predictive for acute response as well as cancer-risk. A new paradigm is accordingly addressed wherein genomic and proteomic datasets are registered and interrogated in order to provide statistically significant dose-dependent risk estimation in individual astronauts. This evaluation of the individual for assessment of radiogenic outcomes connects to NIH program in that such a paradigm also supports assignment of a given patient to a specific therapy, the diagnosis of response of that patient to therapy, and the prediction of risks accumulated by that patient during therapy - such as risks incurred by scatter and neutrons produced during high-energy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

  16. Estimates of intakes and internal doses from ingestion of {sup 32}P at MIT and NIH

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    A researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) became internally contaminated with {sup 32}P, probably due to an intentional act. The incident occurred on or about 14 August 1995. Subsequent measurement of activity in urine and a single whole body count were used to estimate the individual`s intake, with the assumption of ingestion as the route of intake. Two separate Sets of urine data were analyzed-one supplied by MIT and one from independent analyses of urine samples conducted at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); the former data set contained 35 samples, the latter 49. In addition, the results of 35 whole body counts, provided by MIT from a chair-type counter calibrated for 32p, were used to obtain a separate estimate of intake. The kinetic model for 32P proposed in ICRP Publication 30 and implemented in NUREG/CR-4884 was used to interpret the data. The data were analyzed using both the weighted and unweighted least squares techniques. All of the intake estimates were in very good agreement with each other, ranging from 18-22 MBq. Based on the dose model in ICRP 30, this would indicate a committed effective dose equivalent of 38-46 mSv. The incident was helpful in assessing the value of the least squares techniques in determining estimates of intake and dose. The ICRP model tended to slightly overestimate the whole body retention data and underestimate the urinary excretion at later times. Further results obtained by visual best fit and development of an individual-specific kinetic and dose model will also be discussed. This incident was quite similar to another case of ingestion of 32p that occurred at the National Institute of Health (NIH) on 28 June 1995. Dose assessment for the NIH case will also be presented if the data are available for public release.

  17. Data mining a small molecule drug screening representative subset from NIH PubChem.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiang-Qun; Chen, Jian-Zhong

    2008-03-01

    PubChem is a scientific showcase of the NIH Roadmap Initiatives. It is a compound repository created to facilitate information exchange and data sharing among the NIH Roadmap-funded Molecular Library Screening Center Network (MLSCN) and the scientific community. However, PubChem has more than 10 million records of compound information. It will be challenging to conduct a drug screening of the whole database of millions of compounds. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to develop a data mining cheminformatics approach in order to construct a representative and structure-diverse sublibrary from the large PubChem database. In this study, a new chemical diverse representative subset, rePubChem, was selected by whole-molecule chemistry-space matrix calculation using the cell-based partition algorithm. The representative subset was generated and was then subjected to evaluations by compound property analyses based on 1D and 2D molecular descriptors. The new subset was also examined and assessed for self-similarity analysis based on 2D molecular fingerprints in comparing with the source compound library. The new subset has a much smaller library size (540K compounds) with minimum similarity and redundancy without loss of the structural diversity and basic molecular properties of its parent library (5.3 million compounds). The new representative subset library generated could be a valuable structure-diverse compound resource for in silico virtual screening and in vitro HTS drug screening. In addition, the established subset generation method of using the combined cell-based chemistry-space partition metrics with pairwised 2D fingerprint-based similarity search approaches will also be important to a broad scientific community interested in acquiring structurally diverse compounds for efficient drug screening, building representative virtual combinatorial chemistry libraries for syntheses, and data mining large compound databases like the PubChem library in general.

  18. Regulation of p53 in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts following hyperosmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Ian Henry; Enghoff, Maria Stine; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this project was to analyze the regulation of p53 expression in NIH3T3 fibroblasts under the influence of increasing hyperosmotic stress. Expression of p53 showed a biphasic response pattern in NIH3T3 cells under increasing osmotic stress (337 mOsm to 737 mOsm) with a maximum at 587 mOsm. Under isotonic conditions p53 expression increased after addition of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 indicating that cellular p53 levels in unperturbed cells is kept low by proteasomal degradation. However, under hypertonic conditions p53 synthesis as well as p53 degradation were significantly reduced and it is demonstrated that the increase in p53 expression observed when tonicity is increased from 337 to 587 mOsm reflects that degradation is more inhibited than synthesis, whereas the decrease in p53 expression at higher tonicities reflects that synthesis is more inhibited than degradation. The activity of the p53 regulating proteins p38 MAP kinase and the ubiquitin ligase MDM2 were studied as a function of increasing osmolarity. MDM2 protein expression was unchanged at all osmolarities, whereas MDM2 phosphorylation (Ser166) increased at osmolarities up to 537 mOsm and remained constant at higher osmolarities. Phosphorylation of p38 increased at osmolarities up to 687 mOsm which correlated with an increased phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and the decreased p53 degradation. Caspase-3 activity increased gradually with hypertonicity and at 737 mOsm both Caspase-3 activity and annexin V binding are high even though p53 expression and activity are low, indicating that initiation of apoptosis under severe hypertonic conditions is not strictly controlled by p53. PMID:26056062

  19. Why the NIH Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) Should Be Abandoned

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Kimball C.; Woeckner, Elizabeth; Baratz, Robert S.; Sampson, Wallace I.

    2008-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) was begun in 2003 and is expected to be completed in 2009. It is a trial of office-based, intravenous disodium ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (Na2EDTA) as a treatment for coronary artery disease (CAD). A few case series in the 1950s and early 1960s had found Na2EDTA to be ineffective for CAD or peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Nevertheless, a few hundred physicians, almost all of whom advocate other dubious treatments, continued to peddle chelation as an office treatment. They claim that chelation dramatically improves symptoms and prolongs life in 80% to 90% of patients. In response, academics performed 4 controlled trials during the 1990s. None favored chelation, but chelationists repudiated those findings. We have investigated the method and the trial. We present our findings in 4 parts: history, origin and nature of the TACT, state of the evidence, and risks. We present evidence that chelationists and their organization, the American College for Advancement in Medicine, used political connections to pressure the NIH to fund the TACT. The TACT protocols justified the trial by misrepresenting case series and by ignoring evidence of risks. The trial employs nearly 100 unfit co-investigators. It conflates disodium EDTA and another, somewhat safer drug. It lacks precautions necessary to minimize risks. The consent form reflects those shortcomings and fails to disclose apparent proprietary interests. The trial's outcome will be unreliable and almost certainly equivocal, thus defeating its stated purpose. We conclude that the TACT is unethical, dangerous, pointless, and wasteful. It should be abandoned. PMID:18596934

  20. An NIH intramural percubator as a model of academic-industry partnerships: from the beginning of life through the valley of death.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2011-05-08

    In 2009 the NIH publicly announced five strategic goals for the institutes that included the critical need to translate research discoveries into public benefit at an accelerated pace, with a commitment to find novel ways to engage academic investigators in the process. The emphasis on moving scientific advancements from the laboratory to the clinic is an opportune time to discuss how the NIH intramural program in Bethesda, the largest biomedical research center in the world, can participate in this endeavor. Proposed here for consideration is a percolator-incubator program, a 'percubator' designed to enable NIH intramural investigators to develop new medical interventions as quickly and efficiently as possible.

  1. MO-C-BRB-06: Translating NIH / NIBIB funding to clinical reality in quantitative diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, E.

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  2. Electrochemical behavior of heavily cycled nickel electrodes in Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    A study has been made of charge and discharge voltage changes with cycling of Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations. A study has also been made of electrochemical behavior of the nickel electrodes from the cycled Ni/H2 cells as a function of overcharge amounts. Discharge voltages depressed gradually with cycling for cells having high KOH concentrations (31 to 36 percent), but the voltages increased for those having low KOH concentrations (21 to 26 percent). To determine if there was a crystallographic change of the active material due to cycling, electrochemical behavior of nickel electrodes was studied in an electrolyte flooded cell containing either 31 or 26 percent KOH electrolyte as a function of the amount of overcharge. The changes in discharge voltage appear to indicate crystal structure changes of active material from gamma-phase to beta-phase in low KOH concentrations, and vice versa in high KOH concentration.

  3. WE-H-BRB-01: Overview of the ASTRO-NIH-AAPM 2015 Workshop On Exploring Opportunities for Radiation Oncology in the Era of Big Data.

    PubMed

    Benedict, S

    2016-06-01

    Big Data in Radiation Oncology: (1) Overview of the NIH 2015 Big Data Workshop, (2) Where do we stand in the applications of big data in radiation oncology?, and (3) Learning Health Systems for Radiation Oncology: Needs and Challenges for Future Success The overriding goal of this trio panel of presentations is to improve awareness of the wide ranging opportunities for big data impact on patient quality care and enhancing potential for research and collaboration opportunities with NIH and a host of new big data initiatives. This presentation will also summarize the Big Data workshop that was held at the NIH Campus on August 13-14, 2015 and sponsored by AAPM, ASTRO, and NIH. The workshop included discussion of current Big Data cancer registry initiatives, safety and incident reporting systems, and other strategies that will have the greatest impact on radiation oncology research, quality assurance, safety, and outcomes analysis.

  4. Colleagues Pay Tribute to Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, Retiring After Three Decades of NLM Leadership | NIH MedlinePlus ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Colleagues Pay Tribute to Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, Retiring After Three Decades of NLM Leadership ... of Contents Outgoing NLM Director Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg. Photo courtesy of Ernie Branson, NIH On ...

  5. Author Disambiguation in PubMed: Evidence on the Precision and Recall of Author-ity among NIH-Funded Scientists.

    PubMed

    Lerchenmueller, Marc J; Sorenson, Olav

    2016-01-01

    We examined the usefulness (precision) and completeness (recall) of the Author-ity author disambiguation for PubMed articles by associating articles with scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In doing so, we exploited established unique identifiers-Principal Investigator (PI) IDs-that the NIH assigns to funded scientists. Analyzing a set of 36,987 NIH scientists who received their first R01 grant between 1985 and 2009, we identified 355,921 articles appearing in PubMed that would allow us to evaluate the precision and recall of the Author-ity disambiguation. We found that Author-ity identified the NIH scientists with 99.51% precision across the articles. It had a corresponding recall of 99.64%. Precision and recall, moreover, appeared stable across common and uncommon last names, across ethnic backgrounds, and across levels of scientist productivity.

  6. Compensation for research-related injury in NIH-sponsored HIV/AIDS clinical trials in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mamotte, Nicole; Wassenaar, Douglas; Singh, Nivedhna

    2013-02-01

    Concern has been voiced in the research ethics literature that under U.S. federal regulations U.S. sponsors, particularly the NIH, are not required to provide compensation for the treatment of research-related injury for trial participants or to allow grant funds to be used by investigators for appropriate insurance. This is problematic in developing country contexts because most participants are unlikely to have health insurance, resulting in overburdened and under-resourced health systems in many developing countries being responsible for providing care and treatment for research-related injury. This study provides preliminary insight into how respondent principal investigators of NIH-sponsored HIV/AIDS clinical trials in Africa and African research ethics committees deal with compensation for research-related injury. The majority of PIs surveyed provided free treatment for research-related injury, but few provided other forms of financial reparation to participants. The study also found that half of the PIs surveyed indicated that NIH funds were used for compensation, highlighting a contradiction between literature and practice. The majority of REC chairs surveyed indicated that their RECs routinely reviewed compensation plans for research-related injury and that their ethics application forms specifically requested information on compensation. Findings from one southern African country revealed that NIH funds were not used to provide treatment and/or financial reparation for research-related injury. Instead, PIs from this country relied on the government or the individual research participant (and/or their medical aid/health insurer) to cover the costs of research-related injury. The findings are discussed in the light of the recent (December 2011) U.S. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethics report which recommends that research participants are morally entitled to compensation for research-related injury.

  7. Quantitative fractography by digital image processing: NIH Image macro tools for stereo pair analysis and 3-D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hein, L R

    2001-10-01

    A set of NIH Image macro programs was developed to make qualitative and quantitative analyses from digital stereo pictures produced by scanning electron microscopes. These tools were designed for image alignment, anaglyph representation, animation, reconstruction of true elevation surfaces, reconstruction of elevation profiles, true-scale elevation mapping and, for the quantitative approach, surface area and roughness calculations. Limitations on time processing, scanning techniques and programming concepts are also discussed.

  8. Genomewide Association Studies in Pharmacogenomics: Meeting Report of the NIH Pharmacogenomics Research Network-RIKEN (PGRN-RIKEN) Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Sook Wah; Momozawa, Yukihide; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Ratain, Mark J.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Kubo, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Genomewide association studies (GWAS) have resulted in the identification of many heritable genetic factors that underlie risk for human disease or variation in physiologic traits. In contrast, there are fewer GWAS of drug response phenotypes, despite extensive unexplained interindividual variability. To address this urgent need, the NIH Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN) and the Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) at RIKEN support a collaboration, PGRN-RIKEN, with the goal of accelerating GWAS of drug response phenotypes. PMID:27256705

  9. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) component of the NIH MRI study of normal brain development (PedsDTI).

    PubMed

    Walker, Lindsay; Chang, Lin-Ching; Nayak, Amritha; Irfanoglu, M Okan; Botteron, Kelly N; McCracken, James; McKinstry, Robert C; Rivkin, Michael J; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Rumsey, Judith; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The NIH MRI Study of normal brain development sought to characterize typical brain development in a population of infants, toddlers, children and adolescents/young adults, covering the socio-economic and ethnic diversity of the population of the United States. The study began in 1999 with data collection commencing in 2001 and concluding in 2007. The study was designed with the final goal of providing a controlled-access database; open to qualified researchers and clinicians, which could serve as a powerful tool for elucidating typical brain development and identifying deviations associated with brain-based disorders and diseases, and as a resource for developing computational methods and image processing tools. This paper focuses on the DTI component of the NIH MRI study of normal brain development. In this work, we describe the DTI data acquisition protocols, data processing steps, quality assessment procedures, and data included in the database, along with database access requirements. For more details, visit http://www.pediatricmri.nih.gov. This longitudinal DTI dataset includes raw and processed diffusion data from 498 low resolution (3 mm) DTI datasets from 274 unique subjects, and 193 high resolution (2.5 mm) DTI datasets from 152 unique subjects. Subjects range in age from 10 days (from date of birth) through 22 years. Additionally, a set of age-specific DTI templates are included. This forms one component of the larger NIH MRI study of normal brain development which also includes T1-, T2-, proton density-weighted, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging data, and demographic, clinical and behavioral data.

  10. Cloning and Expression of CD19, a Human B-Cell Marker in NIH-3T3 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Background CD19 is a pan B cell marker that is recognized as an attractive target for antibody-based therapy of B-cell disorders including autoimmune disease and hematological malignancies. The object of this study was to stably express the human CD19 antigen in the murine NIH-3T3 cell line aimed to be used as an immunogen in our future study. Methods Total RNA was extracted from Raji cells in which high expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry. Synthesized cDNA was used for CD19 gene amplification by conventional PCR method using Pfu DNA polymerase. PCR product was ligated to pGEM-T Easy vector and ligation mixture was transformed to DH5α competent bacteria. After blue/white selection, one positive white colony was subjected to plasmid extraction and direct sequencing. Then, CD19 cDNA was sub-cloned into pCMV6-Neo expression vector by double digestion using KpnI and HindIII enzymes. NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line was subsequently transfected by the construct using Jet-PEI transfection reagent. After 48 hours, surface expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry and stably transfected cells were selected by G418 antibiotic. Results Amplification of CD19 cDNA gave rise to 1701 bp amplicon confirmed by alignment to reference sequence in NCBI database. Flow cytometric analysis showed successful transient and stable expression of CD19 on NIH-3T3 cells (29 and 93%, respectively). Conclusion Stable cell surface expression of human CD19 antigen in a murine NIH-3T3 cell line may develop a proper immunogene which raises specific anti-CD19 antibody production in the mice immunized sera. PMID:25926951

  11. Failure Mechanisms of Ni-H2 and Li-Ion Batteries Under Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.; Lyons, F.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) batteries have yielded significant performance advantages for many industries, including the aerospace industry, and have been selected to replace nickel hydrogen (Ni-H2) batteries for the International Space Station (ISS) program to meet the energy storage demands. As the ISS uses its vast solar arrays to generate its power, the solar ar-rays meet their sunlit power demands and supply excess power to battery packs for power de-livery on the sun obscured phase of the approximate 90 minute low Earth orbit. These large battery packs are located on the exterior of the ISS, and as such, the battery packs are ex-posed to external environment threats like naturally occurring meteoroids and artificial orbital debris (MMOD). While the risks from these solid particle environments has been known and addressed to an acceptable risk of failure through shield design, it is not possible to completely eliminate the risk of loss of these assets on orbit due to MMOD, and as such, failure consequences to the ISS have been considered.

  12. Challenges and opportunities in RSV vaccine development: Meeting report from FDA/NIH workshop.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jeffrey N; Graham, Barney S; Karron, Ruth A; Munoz, Flor M; Falsey, Ann R; Anderson, Larry J; Marshall, V; Kim, Sonnie; Beeler, Judy A

    2016-09-22

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of serious acute lower respiratory illness in infants and young children and a significant cause of disease burden in the elderly and immunocompromised. There are no licensed RSV vaccines to address this significant public health need. While advances in vaccine technologies have led to a recent resurgence in RSV vaccine development, the immune correlates of protection against RSV and the immunology of vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) remain poorly understood. FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) and NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) organized and co-sponsored an RSV Vaccines Workshop in Bethesda, Maryland on June 1 and 2, 2015. The goal of the conference was to convene scientists, regulators, and industry stakeholders to discuss approaches to RSV vaccine development within the context of three target populations - infants and children, pregnant women, and individuals >60years of age. The agenda included topics related to RSV vaccine development in general, as well as considerations specific to each target population, such as clinical and serological endpoints. The meeting focused on vaccine development for high income countries (HIC), because issues relevant to vaccine development for low and middle income countries (LMIC) have been discussed in other forums. This manuscript summarizes the discussion of clinical, scientific, and regulatory perspectives, research gaps, and lessons learned.

  13. IV. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): measuring language (vocabulary comprehension and reading decoding).

    PubMed

    Gershon, Richard C; Slotkin, Jerry; Manly, Jennifer J; Blitz, David L; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Schnipke, Deborah; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Gleason, Jean Berko; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Adams, Marilyn Jager; Weintraub, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    Mastery of language skills is an important predictor of daily functioning and health. Vocabulary comprehension and reading decoding are relatively quick and easy to measure and correlate highly with overall cognitive functioning, as well as with success in school and work. New measures of vocabulary comprehension and reading decoding (in both English and Spanish) were developed for the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB). In the Toolbox Picture Vocabulary Test (TPVT), participants hear a spoken word while viewing four pictures, and then must choose the picture that best represents the word. This approach tests receptive vocabulary knowledge without the need to read or write, removing the literacy load for children who are developing literacy and for adults who struggle with reading and writing. In the Toolbox Oral Reading Recognition Test (TORRT), participants see a letter or word onscreen and must pronounce or identify it. The examiner determines whether it was pronounced correctly by comparing the response to the pronunciation guide on a separate computer screen. In this chapter, we discuss the importance of language during childhood and the relation of language and brain function. We also review the development of the TPVT and TORRT, including information about the item calibration process and results from a validation study. Finally, the strengths and weaknesses of the measures are discussed.

  14. Effects of Weightlessness on Vestibular Development: Summary of Research on NIH.R1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Bruce, L. L.

    1998-01-01

    In our original application we proposed to investigate the effects of gravity on the formation of connections between the gravity receptors of the ear and the brain in rat pups raised in space beginning at an age before these connections are made until near the time of birth, when they are to some extent functional. We used the neuronal tracer, Dil, which could be applied to tissue obtained immediately after landing of the space shuttle, thus minimizing changes due to the earth's gravity. We hoped to determine whether the vestibular system develops in two phases, as do other sensory systems (such as the visual system). In these other systems the first phase of development is controlled genetically and the second phase is controlled by environmental stimulation. Our data collected strongly supports the idea that the vestibular system has these same two phases of development. The tissue obtained from the NIH.R1 experiment was of exceptionally high quality for our analysis. Therefore, we expanded our investigation into the ultrastructural effects of microgravity on vestibular development. For the sake of clarity we will subdivide our summary into two categories: (1) analysis of the branching pattern of axons between the vestibular nerve and the gravistatic receptors of the ear in flight and control animals, and (2) analysis of the branching pattern of axons between the vestibular nerve and the brain in flight and control animals.

  15. Long life 80Ah standard IPV NiH2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, Jon D.; Waller, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    A standard Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) battery cell is needed to meet future low cost, high performance mission requirements for NASA, military, and civil space programs. A common or standard cell design has evolved from the heritage of HST, Milstar, and other Air Force Mantech cell designs with substantial flight experience, while incorporating some of the historical COMSAT cell design features described in a previous NASA publication. Key features include slurry process nickel electrodes having high strength, long life and high yield (lower cost), and dual layer zircar separators for improved KOH retention, uniformality, and longer life. The cell design will have a zirconium oxide wall wick inside the pressure vessel to redistribute electrolyte and extend life. The slurry electrode will be 35 mils thick to take advantage of qualified cell mechanical configurations and proven assembly and activation techniques developed by Eagle Picher Industries (EPI) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) RNH-90-3 and 'Generic HST' RNH-90-5 cell designs with back-to-back nickel electrodes produced by the dry sinter process. The 80Ah common cell design can be scaled to meet capacity requirements from 60Ah to 100Ah. Producibility, commonality, and long life performance will be enhanced with the robust cell design described herein.

  16. Transformation of NIH 3T3 cells with cloned fragments of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J A; Fleckenstein, B; Galloway, D A; McDougall, J K

    1982-01-01

    NIH 3T3 cells were transfected with restriction endonuclease and cloned human cytomegalovirus DNA fragments to identify the transforming region(s). Cleavage of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 DNA with XbaI and HindIII left a transforming region intact whereas EcoRI inactivated this function. Transfection of cells with cosmids containing human cytomegalovirus DNA spanning the entire genome resulted in transformation by one cosmid, pCM1058, with the AD169 HindIII DNA fragments E, R, T, and a'. Cells were selected for their growth in 1.2% methylcellulose. The clones isolated had a significant replating efficiency and were oncogenic in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Transfection of cosmids and plasmids containing subsets of the viral sequences in pCM1058 identified a common region possessed by all of the transforming recombinant molecules. This region was in the HindIII E fragment with the left boundary defined by the EcoRI d-R junction and the right boundary defined by the HindIII E-T junction. Further mapping and transfection experiments determined that the transforming region was contained without a 2.9-kilobase fragment between map units 0.123 and 0.14 on the prototype molecule of the AD169 strain. Images PMID:6287019

  17. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  18. NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery (NIHTB-CB): the NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test.

    PubMed

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Tulsky, David S; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Weintraub, Sandra; Conway, Kevin; Gershon, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    The NIH Toolbox (NIHTB) Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed within the NIHTB for the Assessment of Neurological Behavior and Function Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB). This study highlights validation data collected in adults ages 18-85 on this measure and reports descriptive data, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and preliminary work creating a composite index of processing speed. Results indicated good test-retest reliability. There was also evidence for both convergent and discriminant validity; the Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test demonstrated moderate significant correlations with other processing speed tests (i.e., WAIS-IV Coding, Symbol Search and Processing Speed Index), small significant correlations with measures of working memory (i.e., WAIS-IV Letter-Number Sequencing and PASAT), and non-significant correlations with a test of vocabulary comprehension (i.e., PPVT-IV). Finally, analyses comparing and combining scores on the NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test with other measures of simple reaction time from the NIHTB-CB indicated that a Processing Speed Composite score performed better than any test examined in isolation. The NIHTB Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test exhibits several strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages, 3-85 years), it is short and easy to administer, and it has high construct validity.

  19. Performance Comparison Between NiH2 Dry Sinter and Slurry Electrode Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, J. D.; Hafen, D. P.; Rao, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical and thermal performance of dry sinter and slurry process electrode cells manufactured for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) batteries have been characterized for a matrix of operating conditions over the temperature range from 14 to 86 F at various charge control levels. The dry sinter process electrode cells tested are similar to the onboard HST NiH2 cells. The slurry process electrode cells were developed to be less susceptible to electrode expansion and impedance changes with life. Both cell types were impregnated by the aqueous electrochemical process. Test conditions included standard capacity tests and electrical cycling using 96-minute cycling regimens incorporating gr depth-of-discharge (DOD) cycles. The dry sinter process electrodes have higher operating capacities to 1.20V/cell, but both electrode types have similar heat dissipation for the conditions tested. The results of the testing included cyclic heat generation during a typical 96-minute cycle, operating capacity data vs. cutoff voltage to generate a temperature-compensated voltage curve, and voltage characteristics suitable to develop a voltage prediction model. Analysis of data shows differences in the discharge voltage plateaus operating conditions evaluated. This is the basis for recommended changes in the battery charge control.

  20. A specific protein, p92, detected in flat revertants derived from NIH/3T3 transformed by human activated c-Ha-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Suzuki, H; Kuzumaki, N; Müllauer, L; Ogiso, Y; Oda, A; Ebisawa, K; Sakurai, T; Nonomura, Y; Kijimoto-Ochiai, S

    1990-01-01

    Total proteins from a mouse embryo fibroblast cell line NIH/3T3, NIH/3T3 cells transformed by human activated c-Ha-ras (EJ-ras) oncogene (EJ-NIH/3T3), and the two flat revertant cell lines, R1 and R2, were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (IEF and NEPHGE). Several hundred polypeptides were resolved as seen by silver staining. Common alterations in four polypeptide spots were observed in the revertants when compared with NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. In these alterations, a new polypeptide spot p92-5.7 (designated by molecular weight x 10(-3) and pI) was detected only in the revertants and not in NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of p92-5.7 seemed to be associated with the flat morphology and the reduced tumorigenicity of the revertants. Polypeptide p92-5.7 was also not detected in the total proteins extracted from BALB/3T3 cells, NIH Swiss mouse primary embryo fibroblasts, NRK (normal rat kidney) cells, and L6 (rat myoblast). Subcellular fractionation of total protein from R1 cells revealed that the p92-5.7 was present in the cytosol. Western blot analysis using an anti-gelsolin antibody demonstrated that the p92-5.7 might be a variant form of gelsolin which is thought to be an actin regulatory protein or a gelsolin-like polypeptide. These results may suggest that the expression of p92-5.7 detected only in the revertants is associated, at least in part, with the reversion. This may be the first demonstration of specific protein expression in the flat revertants.

  1. Inhibition of NIH 3T3 cell proliferation by a mutant ras protein with preferential affinity for GDP.

    PubMed Central

    Feig, L A; Cooper, G M

    1988-01-01

    Substitution of asparagine for serine at position 17 decreased the affinity of rasH p21 for GTP 20- to 40-fold without significantly affecting its affinity for GDP. Transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with a mammalian expression vector containing the Asn-17 rasH gene and a Neor gene under the control of the same promoter yielded only a small fraction of the expected number of G418-resistant colonies, indicating that expression of Asn-17 p21 inhibited cell proliferation. The inhibitory effect of Asn-17 p21 required its localization to the plasma membrane and was reversed by coexpression of an activated ras gene, indicating that the mutant p21 blocked the endogenous ras function required for NIH 3T3 cell proliferation. NIH 3T3 cells transformed by v-mos and v-raf, but not v-src, were resistant to inhibition by Asn-17 p21, indicating that the requirement for normal ras function can be bypassed by these cytoplasmic oncogenes. The Asn-17 mutant represents a novel reagent for the study of ras function by virtue of its ability to inhibit cellular ras activity in vivo. Since this phenotype is likely associated with the preferential affinity of the mutant protein for GDP, analogous mutations might also yield inhibitors of other proteins whose activities are regulated by guanine nucleotide binding. Images PMID:3145408

  2. S-phase induction and transformation of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells by microinjection of phospholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.R.; Ryu, Sungho; Suh, Panghill; Rhee, Suegoo; Kung, Hsiangfu )

    1989-05-01

    Two inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes (PLC-I and -II) have been purified from bovine brain. When PLC-I or PLC-II was microinjected into quiescent NIH 3T3 cells, a time- and dose-dependent induction of DNA synthesis occurred, as demonstrated by ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into nuclear DNA. In addition, {approx} 8 hr after PLC injection, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts appeared spindle-shaped, refractile, and highly vacuolated, displaying a morphology similar to transformed cells. The morphologic transformation was apparent for 26-30 hr after which the injected cells reverted back to a normal phenotype. Microinjected PLC at a high concentration was cytotoxic, dissolving the cytoplasmic membrane and leaving behind cellular ghosts. PLC is a key regulatory enzyme involved in cellular membrane signal transduction. Introduction of exogenous PLC into NIH 3T3 cells by microinjection induced a growth and oncogenic potential, as demonstrated by the ability of microinjected PLC to override the cellular G{sub 0} block, inducing DNA synthesis and morphologic transformation of growth-arrested fibroblast cells.

  3. S-phase induction and transformation of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells by microinjection of phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Smith, M R; Ryu, S H; Suh, P G; Rhee, S G; Kung, H F

    1989-05-01

    Two inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes (PLC-I and -II) have been purified from bovine brain. When PLC-I or PLC-II was microinjected (100-700 micrograms/ml) into quiescent NIH 3T3 cells, a time- and dose-dependent induction of DNA synthesis occurred, as demonstrated by [3H]thymidine incorporation into nuclear DNA. In addition, approximately to 8 hr after PLC injection, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts appeared spindle-shaped, refractile, and highly vacuolated, displaying a morphology similar to transformed cells. The morphologic transformation was apparent for 26-30 hr after which the injected cells reverted back to a normal phenotype. Microinjected PLC at a high concentration (1 mg/ml) was cytotoxic, dissolving the cytoplasmic membrane and leaving behind cellular ghosts. PLC is a key regulatory enzyme involved in cellular membrane signal transduction. Introduction of exogenous PLC into NIH 3T3 cells by microinjection induced a growth and oncogenic potential, as demonstrated by the ability of microinjected PLC (approximately 10,000 molecules per cell) to override the cellular G0 block, inducing DNA synthesis and morphologic transformation of growth-arrested fibroblast cells.

  4. Nickel-Refining Fumes Induced DNA Damage and Apoptosis of NIH/3T3 Cells via Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wang, Sheng-Yuan; Jia, Li; Zhang, Lin; Ba, Jing-Chong; Han, Dan; Yu, Cui-Ping; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Although there have been numerous studies examining the toxicity and carcinogenicity of nickel compounds in humans and animals, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In our research, NIH/3T3 cells were exposed to nickel-refining fumes at the concentrations of 0, 6.25, 12.50, 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL for 24 h. Cell viability, cell apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, the level of glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) level were detected. The exposure of NIH/3T3 cells to nickel-refining fumes significantly reduced cell viability and induced cell apoptotic death in a dose-dependent manner. Nickel-refining fumes significantly increased ROS levels and induced DNA damage. Nickel-refining fumes may induce the changes in the state of ROS, which may eventually initiate oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis of NIH/3T3 cells. PMID:27347984

  5. The NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery: Results from a Large Normative Developmental Sample (PING)

    PubMed Central

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Newman, Erik; Thompson, Wesley K.; McCabe, Connor; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Chang, Linda; Amaral, David G.; Casey, B. J.; Ernst, Thomas M.; Frazier, Jean A.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Kenet, Tal; Kennedy, David N.; Libiger, Ondrej; Mostofsky, Stewart; Murray, Sarah S.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.; Schork, Nicholas; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NTCB) was designed to provide a brief, efficient computerized test of key neuropsychological functions appropriate for use in children as young as 3 years of age. This report describes the performance of a large group of typically developing children and adolescents and examines the impact of age and sociocultural variables on test performance. Method The NTCB was administered to a sample of 1020 typically developing males and females ranging in age from 3 to 20 years, diverse in terms of socioeconomic status (SES) and race/ethnicity, as part of the new publicly accessible Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics (PING) data resource, at 9 sites across the United States. Results General additive models of nonlinear age-functions were estimated from age-differences in test performance on the 8 NTCB subtests while controlling for family SES and genetic ancestry factors (GAFs). Age accounted for the majority of the variance across all NTCB scores, with additional significant contributions of gender on some measures, and of SES and race/ethnicity (GAFs) on all. After adjusting for age and gender, SES and GAFs explained a substantial proportion of the remaining unexplained variance in Picture Vocabulary scores. Conclusions The results highlight the sensitivity to developmental effects and efficiency of this new computerized assessment battery for neurodevelopmental research. Limitations are observed in the form of some ceiling effects in older children, some floor effects, particularly on executive function tests in the youngest participants, and evidence for variable measurement sensitivity to cultural/socioeconomic factors. PMID:24219608

  6. Abbreviated report of the NIH/NINDS workshop on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Donner, E.J.; So, E.L.; Jacobs, M.; Nashef, L.; Noebels, J.L.; Buchhalter, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is a devastating complication of epilepsy and is not rare. The NIH and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke sponsored a 3-day multidisciplinary workshop to advance research into SUDEP and its prevention. Parallel sessions were held: one with a focus on the science of SUDEP, and the other with a focus on issues related to the education of health care practitioners and people with epilepsy. This report summarizes the discussions and recommendations of the workshop, including lessons learned from investigations of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), sudden cardiac death, autonomic and respiratory physiology, medical devices, genetics, and animal models. Recommendations include educating all people with epilepsy about SUDEP as part of their general education on the potential harm of seizures, except in extenuating circumstances. Increasing awareness of SUDEP may facilitate improved seizure control, possibly decreasing SUDEP incidence. There have been significant advances in our understanding of the clinical and physiologic features of SIDS, sudden cardiac death, and SUDEP in both people and animals. Research should continue to focus on the cardiac, autonomic, respiratory, and genetic factors that likely contribute to the risk of SUDEP. Multicenter collaborative research should be encouraged, especially investigations with direct implications for the prevention of SUDEP. An ongoing SUDEP Coalition has been established to facilitate this effort. With the expansion of clinical, genetic, and basic science research, there is reasonable hope of advancing our understanding of SUDEP and ultimately our ability to prevent it. Neurology® 2011;76:1932–1938 PMID:21543734

  7. Hubble Space Telescope On-orbit NiH2 Battery Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Krol, Stanley J., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery performance from launch to the present time. Over the life of HST vehicle configuration, charge system degradation and failures together with thermal design limitations have had a significant effect on the capacity of the HST batteries. Changes made to the charge system configuration in order to protect against power system failures and to maintain battery thermal stability resulted in undercharging of the batteries. This undercharging resulted in decreased usable battery capacity as well as battery cell voltage/capacity divergence. This cell divergence was made evident during on-orbit battery capacity measurements by a relatively shallow slope of the discharge curve following the discharge knee. Early efforts to improve the battery performance have been successful. On-orbit capacity measurement data indicates increases in the usable battery capacity of all six batteries as well as improvements in the battery cell voltage/capacity divergence. Additional measures have been implemented to improve battery performance, however, failures within the HST Power Control Unit (PCU) have prevented verification of battery status. As this PCU fault prevents the execution of on-orbit capacity testing, the HST Project has based the battery capacity on trends, which utilizes previous on-orbit battery capacity test data, for science mission and servicing mission planning. The Servicing Mission 38 (SM-3B) in March 2002 replaced the faulty PCU. Following the servicing mission, on-orbit capacity test resumed. A summary of battery performance is reviewed since launch in this paper.

  8. 1,2-Dichloroethane impairs glucose and lipid homeostasis in the livers of NIH Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Xu, Dandan; Fan, Qiming; Rong, Weifeng; Zheng, Jiewei; Gao, Chen; Li, Guoliang; Zeng, Ni; Guo, Tao; Zeng, Lihai; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Chen; Cai, Li; Tang, Shangqing; Deng, Xinlei; Yin, Xiao; Huang, Manqi; Lu, Fengrong; Hu, Qiansheng; Chen, Wen; Huang, Zhenlie; Wang, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Excessive exposure to 1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCE), a chlorinated organic toxicant, can lead to liver dysfunction. To fully explore the mechanism of 1,2-DCE-induced hepatic abnormalities, 30 male National Institutes of Health (NIH) Swiss mice were exposed to 0, 350, or 700mg/m(3) of 1,2-DCE, via inhalation, 6h/day for 28days. Increased liver/body weight ratios, as well as serum AST and serum ALT activity were observed in the 350 and 700mg/m(3) 1,2-DCE exposure group mice, compared with the control group mice. In addition, decreased body weights were observed in mice exposed to 700mg/m(3) 1,2-DCE, compared with control mice. Exposure to 350 and 700mg/m(3) 1,2-DCE also led to significant accumulation of hepatic glycogen, free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides, elevation of blood triglyceride and FFA levels, and decreases in blood glucose levels. Results from microarray analysis indicated that the decreases in glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6PC) and liver glycogen phosphorylase (PYGL) expression, mediated by the activation of AKT serine/threonine kinase 1 (Akt1), might be responsible for the hepatic glycogen accumulation and steatosis. Further in vitro study demonstrated that 2-chloroacetic acid (1,2-DCE metabolite), rather than 1,2-DCE, up-regulated Akt1 phosphorylation and suppressed G6PC and PYGL expression, resulting in hepatocellular glycogen accumulation. These results suggest that hepatic glucose and lipid homeostasis are impaired by 1,2-DCE exposure via down-regulation of PYGL and G6PC expression, which may be primarily mediated by the 2-chloroacetic acid-activated Akt1 pathway.

  9. Bacterial vaginosis: identifying research gaps proceedings of a workshop sponsored by DHHS/NIH/NIAID.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Martin, David H; Watts, D Heather; Schulte, Joann; Sobel, Jack D; Hillier, Sharon L; Deal, Carolyn; Fredricks, David N

    2010-12-01

    The microbiota of the human vagina can affect the health of women, their fetuses, and newborns. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent form of vaginal infection in women of reproductive age, affecting 8% to 23%, and is the most common etiology of vaginal symptoms prompting women to seek medical care. While traditional cultivation has identified numerous BV-associated bacteria involved in these processes, recent advances in molecular biology have facilitated the detection and identification of bacteria without cultivation, some of which have not previously been described or well characterized. A more complete understanding of vaginal microbial populations resulting from the adoption of molecular tools may lead to better strategies to maintain healthy vaginal microbial communities-thus enhancing women's health-and will create opportunities to explore the role of novel bacteria in reproductive tract diseases. On November 19-20, 2008, the NIH convened a workshop of experts in the field of research and clinical practice related to BV in order to discuss how these new advances should be interpreted and applied to research in progress and collaborations between relevant disciplines. This paper summarizes the presentations of this workshop and outlines general recommendations arising from the related discussions. Future studies of BV and its associated adverse outcomes should determine if specific combinations of organisms are more pathogenic than others, and causally associated with different adverse events. Moreover, determination of causality will depend not only on more precise categorization of the vaginal microbiota, but also on variations in the host environment that may be associated with changes in bacterial communities over time. In this report, we offer suggestions and recommendations that we hope will facilitate conduct of consistent approaches to collaborative efforts towards advancing our understanding of the vaginal microbiota and its impact on human

  10. The NIH-NIAID Schistosomiasis Resource Center at the Biomedical Research Institute: Molecular Redux

    PubMed Central

    Cody, James J.; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Miller, André N.; Henein, Lucie; Mentink-Kane, Margaret M.; Hsieh, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a health burden in many parts of the world. The complex life cycle of Schistosoma parasites and the economic and societal conditions present in endemic areas make the prospect of eradication unlikely in the foreseeable future. Continued and vigorous research efforts must therefore be directed at this disease, particularly since only a single World Health Organization (WHO)-approved drug is available for treatment. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)–National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Schistosomiasis Resource Center (SRC) at the Biomedical Research Institute provides investigators with the critical raw materials needed to carry out this important research. The SRC makes available, free of charge (including international shipping costs), not only infected host organisms but also a wide array of molecular reagents derived from all life stages of each of the three main human schistosome parasites. As the field of schistosomiasis research rapidly advances, it is likely to become increasingly reliant on omics, transgenics, epigenetics, and microbiome-related research approaches. The SRC has and will continue to monitor and contribute to advances in the field in order to support these research efforts with an expanding array of molecular reagents. In addition to providing investigators with source materials, the SRC has expanded its educational mission by offering a molecular techniques training course and has recently organized an international schistosomiasis-focused meeting. This review provides an overview of the materials and services that are available at the SRC for schistosomiasis researchers, with a focus on updates that have occurred since the original overview in 2008. PMID:27764112

  11. Sedentary behavior and prostate cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Brigid M.; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Kopciuk, Karen A.; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Moore, Steven C.; Matthews, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary behavior (sitting time) has been proposed as an independent risk factor for some cancers; however, its role in the development of prostate cancer has not been determined. We examined the prospective associations of self-reported daily sitting time and daily television/video viewing time with risk of developing or dying from prostate cancer among 170,481 men in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals using Cox Proportional Hazards regression. Between 1996 and 2006 there were 13,751 incident (including 1,365 advanced) prostate cancer cases identified; prostate cancer mortality (through 2008) was 669. No strong or significant association with prostate cancer risk was seen in fully adjusted models for either daily sitting or television/video time. There was some suggestion of effect modification by body mass index (interaction for television/video time and body mass index, p = 0.02). For total prostate cancer risk, television/video time was associated with a slightly elevated, but non-significant increased amongst obese men (HR=1.28, 95%CI: 0.98, 1.69); a null association was observed amongst overweight men (HR=1.04, 0.89, 1.22); and, for men with a normal body mass index, television/video time was associated with a non-significant risk decrease (HR=0.82, 95%CI: 0.66, 1.01). Similar patterns were observed for total daily sitting and television/video time in advanced prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality. Sedentary behavior appears to play a limited role in the development of prostate cancer, however we cannot rule out potential effect modification by body mass index or the impact of measurement error on results. PMID:24526287

  12. Treatment with LPS plus INF-γ induces the expression and function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, modulating NIH3T3 cell proliferation: participation of NOS and COX

    PubMed Central

    Español, A J; Maddaleno, M O; Lombardi, M G; Cella, M; Martínez Pulido, P; Sales, M E

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose LPS and IFN-γ are potent stimuli of inflammation, a process in which fibroblasts are frequently involved. We analysed the effect of treatment with LPS plus IFN-γ on the expression and function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in NIH3T3 fibroblasts with regards to proliferation of these cells. We also investigated the participation of NOS and COX, and the role of NF-κB in this process. Experimental Approach NIH3T3 cells were treated with LPS (10 ng·mL−1) plus IFN-γ (0.5 ng·mL−1) for 72 h (iNIH3T3 cells). Cell proliferation was evaluated with MTT and protein expression by Western blot analysis. NOS and COX activities were measured by the Griess method and radioimmunoassay respectively. Key Results The cholinoceptor agonist carbachol was more effective at stimulating proliferation in iNIH3T3 than in NIH3T3 cells, probably due to the de novo induction of M3 and M5 muscarinic receptors independently of NF-κB activation. iNIH3T3 cells produced higher amounts of NO and PGE2 than NIH3T3 cells, concomitantly with an up-regulation of NOS1 and COX-2, and with the de novo induction of NOS2/3 in inflamed cells. We also found a positive feedback between NOS and COX that could potentiate inflammation. Conclusions and Implications Inflammation induced the expression of muscarinic receptors and, therefore,stimulated carbachol-induced proliferation of fibroblasts. Inflammation also up-regulated the expression of NOS and COX-2, thus potentiating the effect of carbachol on NO and PGE2 production. A positive crosstalk between NOS and COX triggered by carbachol in inflamed cells points to muscarinic receptors as potential therapeutic targets in inflammation. PMID:24990429

  13. Interdisciplinarity and systems science to improve population health: a view from the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research.

    PubMed

    Mabry, Patricia L; Olster, Deborah H; Morgan, Glen D; Abrams, David B

    2008-08-01

    Fueled by the rapid pace of discovery, humankind's ability to understand the ultimate causes of preventable common disease burdens and to identify solutions is now reaching a revolutionary tipping point. Achieving optimal health and well-being for all members of society lies as much in the understanding of the factors identified by the behavioral, social, and public health sciences as by the biological ones. Accumulating advances in mathematical modeling, informatics, imaging, sensor technology, and communication tools have stimulated several converging trends in science: an emerging understanding of epigenomic regulation; dramatic successes in achieving population health-behavior changes; and improved scientific rigor in behavioral, social, and economic sciences. Fostering stronger interdisciplinary partnerships to bring together the behavioral-social-ecologic models of multilevel "causes of the causes" and the molecular, cellular, and, ultimately, physiological bases of health and disease will facilitate breakthroughs to improve the public's health. The strategic vision of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is rooted in a collaborative approach to addressing the complex and multidimensional issues that challenge the public's health. This paper describes OBSSR's four key programmatic directions (next-generation basic science, interdisciplinary research, systems science, and a problem-based focus for population impact) to illustrate how interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary perspectives can foster the vertical integration of research among biological, behavioral, social, and population levels of analysis over the lifespan and across generations. Interdisciplinary and multilevel approaches are critical both to the OBSSR's mission of integrating behavioral and social sciences more fully into the NIH scientific enterprise and to the overall NIH mission of utilizing science in the pursuit of

  14. Gene expression in amygdala as a function of differential trait anxiety levels in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Morán, Sira; Palència, Marta; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; López-Aumatell, Regina; Sabariego, Marta; Donaire, Rocío; Morón, Ignacio; Torres, Carmen; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Tobeña, Adolf; Esteban, Francisco José; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    To identify genes involved in anxiety/fear traits, we analyzed the gene expression profile in the amygdala of genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats. The NIH-HS rat stock has revealed to be a unique genetic resource for the fine mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) to very small genomic regions, due to the high amount of genetic recombinants accumulated along more than 50 breeding generations, and for the same reason it can be expected that those genetically heterogeneous rats should be especially useful for studying differential gene expression as a function of anxiety-(or other)-related traits. We selected high- and low-anxious NIH-HS rats differing in their number of avoidances in a single 50-trial session of the two-way active avoidance task. Rats were also tested in unconditioned anxiety tests (e.g., elevated zero-maze). Three weeks after behavioural testing, the amygdala was dissected and prepared for the microarray study. There appeared 6 significantly down-regulated and 28 up-regulated genes (fold-change >|2|, FDR<0.05) between the low- and high-anxious groups, with central nervous system-related functions. Regression analyses (stepwise) revealed that differential expression of some genes could be predictive of anxiety/fear responses. Among those genes for which the present results suggest a link with individual differences in trait anxiety, six relevant genes were examined with qRT-PCR, four of which (Ucn3, Tacr3, H2-M9 and Arr3) were validated. Remarkably, some of them are characterized by sharing known functions related with hormonal HPA-axis responses to (and/or modulation of) stress, anxiety or fear, and putative involvement in related neurobehavioural functions. The results confirm the usefulness of NIH-HS rats as a good animal model for research on the neurogenetic basis of anxiety and fear, while suggesting the involvement of some neuropeptide/neuroendocrine pathways on the development of differential anxiety profiles.

  15. Nickel-smelting fumes increased the expression of HIF-1α through PI3K/ERK pathway in NIH/3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dan; Yang, Yue; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yue; Tan, Wen-Qiao; Hu, Xue-Ying; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Nickel (Ni) -smelting fumes on oncogenic proteins in vivo and in vitro. Methods: Ni fallout beside a Ni smelting furnace in a factory was sampled to study its toxic effect. The effects of Ni-smelting fumes on the regulation of PI3K and ERK signaling pathways and the important downstream hypoxia inducible factor, HIF-1α, were studied both in NIH/3T3 cells and in the lung tissue of rats. NIH/3T3 cell transformation induced by Ni-smelting fumes was also observed. Results: Ni-smelting fumes activated PI3K, p-AKT, p70S6K1, and ERK proteins and increased HIF-1α expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. However, activation was suppressed when NIH/3T3 cells were pretreated with PI3K/AKT or ERK inhibitors. Ni-smelting fumes caused malignant transformation of NIH/3T3 cells. Conclusions: Ni-smelting fumes increased the expression of HIF-1α through the PI3K/ERK pathway in NIH/3T3 cells and induced malignant transformation in these cells indicating that Ni-smelting fumes may be a potential carcinogen in mammalian cells. PMID:27488040

  16. Sleep Duration and Cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Fangyi; Xiao, Qian; Chu, Lisa W.; Yu, Kai; Matthews, Charles E.; Hsing, Ann W.; Caporaso, Neil E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Very few studies have examined sleep duration in relation to cancer incidence with the exception of breast cancer. Methods We assessed the associations between sleep duration and incidences of total and 18 site-specific cancers in the NIH-AARP Health and Diet Study cohort, with 173,327 men and 123,858 women aged 51–72 years at baseline. Self-reported sleep duration categories were assessed via questionnaire. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), using 7–8 hours/night as the reference. Results We observed a significantly increased risk of stomach cancer among male short sleepers (multivariable HR5-6 vs. 7–8 hours = 1.29; 95%CI: 1.05, 1.59; Ptrend = 0.03). We also observed suggestive associations in either short or long sleepers, which did not reach overall significance (Ptrend >0.05), including increased risks in male short sleepers for cancers of head and neck (HR<5vs.7-8 hours = 1.39; 95%CI:1.00–1.95), bladder (HR5-6vs.7-8 hours = 1.10; 95%CI:1.00–1.20), thyroid (HR<5 vs. 7–8 hours = 2.30; 95%CI:1.06, 5.02), Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) (HR5-6vs.7-8 hours = 1.17; 95%CI:1.02–1.33), and myeloma (HR<5vs.7-8 hours = 2.06; 95%CI:1.20–3.51). In women, the suggestive associations include a decreased total cancer risk (HR<5vs.7-8 hours = 0.9; 95%CI:0.83–0.99) and breast cancer risk (HR<5vs.7-8 hours = 0.84; 95%CI:0.71–0.98) among short sleepers. A decreased ovarian cancer risk (HR≥ 9 vs. 7–8 hours = 0.50; 95%CI:0.26–0.97) and an increased NHL risk (HR≥ 9 vs. 7–8 hours = 1.45; 95%CI:1.00–2.11) were observed among long sleepers. Conclusion In an older population, we observed an increased stomach cancer risk in male short sleepers and suggestive associations with short or long sleep duration for many cancer risks in both genders. PMID:27611440

  17. Nanofiber Alignment Regulates NIH3T3 Cell Orientation and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression on Electrospun PCL+Gelatin Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Fee, Timothy; Surianarayanan, Swetha; Downs, Crawford; Zhou, Yong; Berry, Joel

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of substrate topology on the behavior of fibroblasts, tissue engineering scaffolds were electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL) and a blend of PCL and gelatin (PCL+Gel) to produce matrices with both random and aligned nanofibrous orientations. The addition of gelatin to the scaffold was shown to increase the hydrophilicity of the PCL matrix and to increase the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells compared to scaffolds of PCL alone. The orientation of nanofibers within the matrix did not have an effect on the proliferation of adherent cells, but cells on aligned substrates were shown to elongate and align parallel to the direction of substrate fiber alignment. A microarray of cyotoskeleton regulators was probed to examine differences in gene expression between cells grown on an aligned and randomly oriented substrates. It was found that transcriptional expression of eight genes was statistically different between the two conditions, with all of them being upregulated in the aligned condition. The proteins encoded by these genes are linked to production and polymerization of actin microfilaments, as well as focal adhesion assembly. Taken together, the data indicates NIH3T3 fibroblasts on aligned substrates align themselves parallel with their substrate and increase production of actin and focal adhesion related genes. PMID:27196306

  18. Research jobs for recent college graduates: A comparison between traditional lab technician positions and NIH's postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship.

    PubMed

    Herbert, J Taylor

    2003-01-01

    The features that distinguish the Postbaccalaureate IRTA experience from a normal lab tech job are the enhanced educational opportunities, greater independence, more organized social outlets and networking opportunities, life in the DC Metro area, and the NIH itself. Also, research experience looks great on a CV when applying for research jobs or graduate schools, and the NIH name and Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship are impressive to potential employers and admissions committees. On the other hand, lab tech jobs often require fewer commitments outside of a normal 9-to-5 work day and usually have better pay and benefits than the Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship. In addition, working at a specific university often carries the benefit of being closer to one's family, friends, and/or significant others. Someone who does not like cities can choose to work at a university that has ready access to the beach, mountains, or regions of the country that are more personally appealing than the Washington, DC, area. Lab tech jobs also usually require at least a two year commitment, whereas the Postbac IRTA fellowship is generally a one year commitment (possibly two). Regardless of which option you choose, you should be active in searching for a job that lets you fulfill the goals you set for yourself in the years between graduating and starting graduate or medical school. Whether those goals are to publish, get experience, save money, or just enjoy yourself, with careful questioning and circumspection, you should be able to maximize the possibility that you will meet your goals.

  19. In-situ investigation of the hydrogen release mechanism in bulk Mg2NiH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Xuan Quy; McDonald, Stuart D.; Gu, Qinfen; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Shigematsu, Koji; Aso, Kohei; Tanaka, Eishi; Matsumura, Syo; Nogita, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen storage is an important aspect to enable the so-called hydrogen economy. Mg-Ni alloys are among the most promising candidates for solid-state hydrogen storage systems yet many questions remain unanswered regarding the hydriding/dehydriding mechanism of the alloys. Mg2NiH4 particularly has received much attention both for its potential as a hydrogen storage medium and also exhibits interesting properties relating to its different polymorphs. Here, the dehydriding mechanism in bulk Mg2NiH4 is investigated using in-situ ultra-high voltage transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). We find that the hydrogen release is based on a mechanism of nucleation and growth of Mg2NiHx (x∼0-0.3) solid solution grains and is greatly enhanced in the presence of crystal defects occurring as a result of the polymorphic phase transformation. Also importantly, with atomic resolution TEM imaging a high density of stacking faults is identified in the dehydrided Mg2NiHx (x∼0-0.3) lattices.

  20. Spindlin1, a novel nuclear protein with a role in the transformation of NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanhong; Yue, Wen; Zhang, Peng; Li, Li; Xie, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Hongfeng; Chen, Lin; Liu, Daqing; Yan, Fang; Pei, Xuetao

    2005-09-23

    spindlin1, a novel human gene recently isolated by our laboratory, is highly homologous to mouse spindlin gene. In this study, we cloned cDNA full-length of this novel gene and send it to GenBank database as spindlin1 (Homo sapiens spindlin1) with Accession No. AF317228. In order to investigate the function of spindlin1, we studied further the subcellular localization of Spindlin1 protein and the effects of spindlin1 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells. The results showed that the fusion protein pEGFP-N1-spindlin1 was located in the nucleus and the C-terminal is correlated with nuclear localization of Spindlin1 protein. NIH3T3 cells which could stably express spindlin1 as a result of RT-PCR analysis compared with the control cells displayed a complete morphological change; made cell growth faster; and increased the percentage of cells in G2/M and S phase. Furthermore, overexpressed spindlin1 cells formed colonies in soft agar in vitro and formed tumors in nude mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that spindlin1 gene may contribute to tumorigenesis.

  1. Electronic health records based phenotyping in next-generation clinical trials: a perspective from the NIH Health Care Systems Collaboratory.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel L; Hammond, W Ed; Nahm, Meredith; Wixted, Douglas; Simon, Gregory E; Robinson, Jennifer G; Bauck, Alan E; Cifelli, Denise; Smerek, Michelle M; Dickerson, John; Laws, Reesa L; Madigan, Rosemary A; Rusincovitch, Shelley A; Kluchar, Cynthia; Califf, Robert M

    2013-12-01

    Widespread sharing of data from electronic health records and patient-reported outcomes can strengthen the national capacity for conducting cost-effective clinical trials and allow research to be embedded within routine care delivery. While pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) have been performed for decades, they now can draw on rich sources of clinical and operational data that are continuously fed back to inform research and practice. The Health Care Systems Collaboratory program, initiated by the NIH Common Fund in 2012, engages healthcare systems as partners in discussing and promoting activities, tools, and strategies for supporting active participation in PCTs. The NIH Collaboratory consists of seven demonstration projects, and seven problem-specific working group 'Cores', aimed at leveraging the data captured in heterogeneous 'real-world' environments for research, thereby improving the efficiency, relevance, and generalizability of trials. Here, we introduce the Collaboratory, focusing on its Phenotype, Data Standards, and Data Quality Core, and present early observations from researchers implementing PCTs within large healthcare systems. We also identify gaps in knowledge and present an informatics research agenda that includes identifying methods for the definition and appropriate application of phenotypes in diverse healthcare settings, and methods for validating both the definition and execution of electronic health records based phenotypes.

  2. Small capacity, low cost (Ni-H2) design concept for commercial, military, and higher-volume aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.; Cook, William D.; Smith, Ron

    1991-01-01

    Nickel Hydrogen (Ni/H2) batteries have become the technology of choice for both commercial and defense related satellites in geosynchronous orbits. Their use for low earth orbit (LEO) applications is not as advanced, but seems just as inevitable because of their inherent advantages over nickel cadmium batteries. These include superior energy density, longer cycle life, and better tolerance to over-charge and reversal. Ni/H2 cells have the added advantage in both construction and operation of not presenting the environmental possibility of cadmium pollution. Unfortunately, but necessarily, the design of these cells has been driven to high cost by the sophistication of the satellites and their uses. Now, using most of the same concepts but less costly materials and techniques, a low cost, small cell design was developed. Combined with the concept of the common pressure vessel, this new design promises to be ideal for the small-sat and commercial markets which, increasingly, are calling for large numbers of less expensive satellites.

  3. Revised diagnostic criteria and classification for the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): report from the 2009 NIH International Workshop.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joao B; Bleesing, Jack J; Dianzani, Umberto; Fleisher, Thomas A; Jaffe, Elaine S; Lenardo, Michael J; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic; Siegel, Richard M; Su, Helen C; Teachey, David T; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-10-07

    Lymphadenopathy in children for which no infectious or malignant cause can be ascertained constitutes a challenging diagnostic dilemma. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human genetic disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis resulting in an accumulation of lymphocytes and childhood onset chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, multilineage cytopenias, and an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. In 1999, investigators at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggested criteria to establish the diagnosis of ALPS. Since then, with approximately 500 patients with ALPS studied worldwide, significant advances in our understanding of the disease have prompted the need for revisions to the existing diagnostic criteria and classification scheme. The rationale and recommendations outlined here stem from an international workshop held at NIH on September 21 and 22, 2009, attended by investigators from the United States, Europe, and Australia engaged in clinical and basic science research on ALPS and related disorders. It is hoped that harmonizing the diagnosis and classification of ALPS will foster collaborative research and better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune cytopenias and B-cell lymphomas.

  4. Clinical laboratory markers of inflammation as determinants of chronic graft-versus-host disease activity and NIH global severity

    PubMed Central

    Grkovic, Lana; Baird, Kristin; Steinberg, Seth M.; Williams, Kirsten M.; Pulanic, Drazen; Cowen, Edward W.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Hakim, Fran T.; Martires, Kathryn J.; Avila, Daniele N.; Taylor, Tiffani N.; Salit, Rachel B.; Rowley, Scott D.; Zhang, Dan; Fowler, Daniel H.; Bishop, Michael R.; Gress, Ronald E.; Pavletic, Steven Z.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) remains a major cause of non-relapse morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Currently there are no accepted measures of cGVHD activity to aid in clinical management and disease staging. We analyzed clinical markers of inflammation in the sera of patients with established cGVHD and correlated those with definitions of disease activity. 189 adults with cGVHD (33% moderate and 66% severe according to NIH global scoring) were consecutively enrolled onto a cross-sectional prospective cGVHD natural history study. At the time of evaluation, 80% were receiving systemic immunosuppression and failed a median of 4 prior systemic therapies (PST) for their cGVHD. Lower albumin (p<0.0001), higher CRP (C-reactive protein; p=0.043), higher platelets (p=0.030) and higher number of PST (p<0.0001) were associated with active disease defined as clinician's intention to intensify or alter systemic therapy due to the lack of response. Higher platelet count (p=0.021) and higher number of PST (p<0.0001) were associated with more severe diseased defined by NIH global score. This study identified common laboratory indicators of inflammation that can serve as markers of cGVHD activity and severity. PMID:22005783

  5. Constitutive phosphorylation of a Rac GAP MgcRacGAP is implicated in v-Src-induced transformation of NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Doki, Noriko; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Akiho; Oneyama, Chitose; Akagi, Tsuyoshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Kitamura, Toshio

    2009-09-01

    MgcRacGAP plays critical roles in cell division through regulating Rho family small GTPases. As we previously reported, phosphorylation of MgcRacGAP on serine 387 (S387) is induced by Aurora B kinase at the midbody during cytokinesis, which is a critical step of cytokinesis. Phosphorylation of S387-MgcRacGAP converts it from RacGAP to RhoGAP, leading to completion of cytokinesis. Here we show that MgcRacGAP is prominently phosphorylated on S387 even in the interphase of v-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells in the cytoplasm, but not in the interphase of parental NIH3T3 or H-RasV12-transformed NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, levels of phosphorylation on S387 (pS387) correlated with soft agar colony-forming abilities of v-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells. Expression of a phosphorylation-mimic mutant MgcRacGAP-S387D enhanced colony formation of v-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells. Surprisingly, a Rac1 inhibitor but not kinase inhibitors including Aurora B kinase inhibitor specifically inhibited phosphorylation of S387-MgcRacGAP in v-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells, suggesting the v-Src-induced pathological positive feedback mechanisms towards Rac1 activation using pS387-MgcRacGAP. These results indicated the difference in the mechanisms between v-Src- and H-RasV12-induced transformation, and should shed some light on pathological roles of disordered phosphorylation of MgcRacGAP at S387 in v-Src-induced cell transformation.

  6. T24 HRAS transformed NIH/3T3 mouse cells (GhrasT-NIH/3T3) in serial tumorigenic in vitro/in vivo passages give rise to increasingly aggressive tumorigenic cell lines T1-A and T2-A and metastatic cell lines T3-HA and T4-PA.

    PubMed

    Ray, Durwood B; Merrill, Gerald A; Brenner, Frederic J; Lytle, Laurie S; Lam, Tan; McElhinney, Aaron; Anders, Joel; Rock, Tara Tauber; Lyker, Jennifer Kier; Barcus, Scott; Leslie, Kara Hust; Kramer, Jill M; Rubenstein, Eric M; Pryor Schanz, Karen; Parkhurst, Amy J; Peck, Michelle; Good, Kimberly; Granath, Kristi Lemke; Cifra, Nicole; Detweiler, Jessalee Wantz; Stevens, Laura; Albertson, Richard; Deir, Rachael; Stewart, Elisabeth; Wingard, Katherine; Richardson, Micah Rose; Blizard, Sarah B; Gillespie, Lauren E; Kriley, Charles E; Rzewnicki, Daniel I; Jones, David H

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells often arise progressively from "normal" to "pre-cancer" to "transformed" to "local metastasis" to "metastatic disease" to "aggressive metastatic disease". Recent whole genome sequencing (WGS) and spectral karyotyping (SKY) of cancer cells and tumorigenic models have shown this progression involves three major types of genome rearrangements: ordered small step-wise changes, more dramatic "punctuated evolution" (chromoplexy), and large catastrophic steps (chromothripsis) which all occur in random combinations to generate near infinite numbers of stochastically rearranged metastatic cancer cell genomes. This paper describes a series of mouse cell lines developed sequentially to mimic this type of progression. This starts with the new GhrasT-NIH/Swiss cell line that was produced from the NIH/3T3 cell line that had been transformed by transfection with HRAS oncogene DNA from the T24 human bladder carcinoma. These GhrasT-NIH/Swiss cells were injected s.c. into NIH/Swiss mice to produce primary tumors from which one was used to establish the T1-A cell line. T1-A cells injected i.v. into the tail vein of a NIH/Swiss mouse produced a local metastatic tumor near the base of the tail from which the T2-A cell line was established. T2-A cells injected i.v. into the tail vein of a nude NIH/Swiss mouse produced metastases in the liver and one lung from which the T3-HA (H=hepatic) and T3-PA (P=pulmonary) cell lines were developed, respectively. T3-HA cells injected i.v. into a nude mouse produced a metastasis in the lung from which the T4-PA cell line was established. PCR analysis indicated the human T24 HRAS oncogene was carried along with each in vitro/in vivo transfer step and found in the T2-A and T4-PA cell lines. Light photomicrographs indicate that all transformed cells are morphologically similar. GhrasT-NIH/Swiss cells injected s.c. produced tumors in 4% of NIH/Swiss mice in 6-10 weeks; T1-A cells injected s.c. produced tumors in 100% of NIH/Swiss mice in 7

  7. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) State-of-the-Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors in Adolescents--A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Although youth in the United States remain substantially more violent than adolescents and young adults in most industrial countries, the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) State-of-the-Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors in Adolescents identified many reasons for optimism about our capacity to…

  8. Combined effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic field exposure with various stress factors on cellular transformation in NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-June; Jin, Yeung Bae; Lee, Jae Seon; Choi, Jong-Il; Lee, Ju-Woon; Myung, Sung Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2012-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) are associated with an increased incidence of cancer. Studies using in vitro systems have reported mixed results for the effects of ELF-MF alone, and the World Health Organization (WHO) Research Agenda published in 2007 suggested that high priority research should include an evaluation of the co-carcinogenic effects of ELF-MF exposure using in vitro models. Here, the carcinogenic potential of ELF-MF exposure alone and in combination with various stress factors was investigated in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts using an in vitro cellular transformation assay. NIH3T3 cells were exposed to a 60 Hz ELF-MF (1 mT) alone or in combination with ionizing radiation (IR), hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), or c-Myc overexpression, and the resulting number of anchorage-independent colonies was counted. A 4 h exposure of NIH3T3 cells to ELF-MF alone produced no cell transformation. Moreover, ELF exposure did not influence the transformation activity of IR, H₂O₂, or activated c-Myc in our in vitro assay system, suggesting that 1 mT ELF-MF did not affect any additive or synergistic transformation activities in combination with stress factors such as IR, H₂O₂, or activated c-Myc in NIH3T3 cells.

  9. 42 CFR 68.11 - What does an individual have to do in return for loan repayments received under the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What does an individual have to do in return for loan repayments received under the NIH LRPs? 68.11 Section 68.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH...

  10. 42 CFR 68.11 - What does an individual have to do in return for loan repayments received under the NIH LRPs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What does an individual have to do in return for loan repayments received under the NIH LRPs? 68.11 Section 68.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH...

  11. The art and science of integrating Undoing Racism with CBPR: challenges of pursuing NIH funding to investigate cancer care and racial equity.

    PubMed

    Yonas, Michael A; Jones, Nora; Eng, Eugenia; Vines, Anissa I; Aronson, Robert; Griffith, Derek M; White, Brandolyn; DuBose, Melvin

    2006-11-01

    In this nation, the unequal burden of disease among People of Color has been well documented. One starting point to eliminating health disparities is recognizing the existence of inequities in health care delivery and identifying the complexities of how institutional racism may operate within the health care system. In this paper, we explore the integration of community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles with an Undoing Racism process to conceptualize, design, apply for, and secure National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to investigate the complexities of racial equity in the system of breast cancer care. Additionally, we describe the sequence of activities and "necessary conflicts" managed by our Health Disparities Collaborative to design and submit an application for NIH funding. This process of integrating CBPR principles with anti-racist community organizing presented unique challenges that were negotiated only by creating a strong foundation of trusting relationships that viewed conflict as being necessary. The process of developing a successful NIH grant proposal illustrated a variety of important lessons associated with the concepts of cultural humility and cultural safety. For successfully conducting CBPR, major challenges have included: assembling and mobilizing a partnership; the difficulty of establishing a shared vision and purpose for the group; the problem of maintaining trust; and the willingness to address differences in institutional cultures. Expectation, acceptance and negotiation of conflict were essential in the process of developing, preparing and submitting our NIH application. Central to negotiating these and other challenges has been the utilization of a CBPR approach.

  12. Chemopreventive effect of punicalagin, a novel tannin component isolated from Terminalia catappa, on H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin-Shern; Li, Jih-Heng

    2006-05-05

    Terminalia catappa and its major tannin component, punicalagin, have been characterized to possess antioxidative and anti-genotoxic activities. However, their effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated carcinogenesis are still unclear. In the present study, H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells were used to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of T. catappa water extract (TCE) and punicalagin. In the cell proliferation assay, TCE and punicalagin suppressed the proliferation of H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells with a dose-dependent manner but only partially affected non-transformed NIH3T3 cells proliferation. The differential cytotoxicity of TCE/punicalagin on the H-ras-transformed and non-transformed NIH3T3 cells indicated the selectivity of TCE/punicalagin against H-ras induced transformation. TCE or punicalagin treatment reduced anchorage-independent growth that could be due to a cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. The intracellular superoxide level, known to modulate downstream signaling of Ras protein, was decreased by punicalagin treatments. The levels of phosphorylated JNK-1 and p38 were also decreased with punicalagin treatments. Thus, the chemopreventive effect of punicalagin against H-ras induced transformation could result from inhibition of the intracellular redox status and JNK-1/p38 activation.

  13. Zeeman spectroscopy of NiH: Landé factors of three Ω = 3/2 excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, H.; Richard, C.; Tourasse, G.; Crozet, P.; Ross, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    We report molecular Landé factors for three Ω‧ = 3/2 vibronic levels of NiH: E[17.8], D[17.6], and I[17.2], lying 17 000-18 000 cm-1 above the ground electronic state. The molecular Landé factors of these three states exhibit unusual variations with J and with parity. Also, molecular Landé factors of the D[17.6] excited electronic state are unexpectedly sensitive to Ni isotope substitution at low J. These observations provide evidence for extensive mixing among electronic states, deviation from Hund's case (a) coupling, and the existence of a local perturbing state. We also report polarization-dependent discrepancies between experimental and theoretical spectral intensities [1] for transitions involving the I[17.2] excited electronic state.

  14. ABSL-4 Aerobiology Biosafety and Technology at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick

    PubMed Central

    Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Wada, Jiro; Bollinger, Laura; Kindrachuk, Jason; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Kuhn, Jens H.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    The overall threat of a viral pathogen to human populations is largely determined by the modus operandi and velocity of the pathogen that is transmitted among humans. Microorganisms that can spread by aerosol are considered a more challenging enemy than those that require direct body-to-body contact for transmission, due to the potential for infection of numerous people rather than a single individual. Additionally, disease containment is much more difficult to achieve for aerosolized viral pathogens than for pathogens that spread solely via direct person-to-person contact. Thus, aerobiology has become an increasingly necessary component for studying viral pathogens that are naturally or intentionally transmitted by aerosol. The goal of studying aerosol viral pathogens is to improve public health preparedness and medical countermeasure development. Here, we provide a brief overview of the animal biosafety level 4 Aerobiology Core at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick, Maryland, USA. PMID:24402304

  15. NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Program: Wet Life of Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Batteries. Volume 1, Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, David S.; Lee, Leonine S.; Manzo, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group was chartered within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). The Battery Working Group was tasked to complete tasks and to propose proactive work to address battery related, agency-wide issues on an annual basis. In its first year of operation, this proactive program addressed various aspects of the validation and verification of aerospace battery systems for NASA missions. Studies were performed, issues were discussed and in many cases, test programs were executed to generate recommendations and guidelines to reduce risk associated with various aspects of implementing battery technology in the aerospace industry. This document contains Part 3 - Volume I: Wet Life of Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Batteries of the program's operations.

  16. Effects of AEA Cell-Bypass-Switch Closure on Charged EOS-Aqua NiH2 Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Denney; Sullivan, David J.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Wannemacher, Harry; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the effects of AEA cell bypass-switch closure on a charged EOS-Aqua NiH2 cell. The objectives of the presentation are to: (1) Verify the Performance of AEA Cell Bypass Protection Device (CBPD) under simulated EOS-Aqua/Aura flight hardware configuration; (2) Assess the safety of the hardware under an inadvertent firing of CBPD switch, as well as the closing of CBPD switch under simulated high cell impedance; and (3) Confirm that the mode of operation of CBPD switch is the formation of a continuous low impedance path-homogeneous low melting point eutectic (Indium alloy). Details are given on the EOS-Aqua flight hardware, AEA hardware tested, AEA bypass switch schematic, and the tests performed, which include images of equipment and results.

  17. Modelling multi-protein complexes using PELDOR distance measurements for rigid body minimisation experiments using XPLOR-NIH

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Colin M.; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Norman, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallographic and NMR approaches have provided a wealth of structural information about protein domains. However, often these domains are found as components of larger multi domain polypeptides or complexes. Orienting domains within such contexts can provide powerful new insight into their function. The combination of site specific spin labelling and Pulsed Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR) provide a means of obtaining structural measurements that can be used to generate models describing how such domains are oriented. Here we describe a pipeline for modelling the location of thio-reactive nitroxyl spin locations to engineered sties on the histone chaperone Vps75. We then use a combination of experimentally determined measurements and symmetry constraints to model the orientation in which homodimers of Vps75 associate to form homotetramers using the XPLOR-NIH platform. This provides a working example of how PELDOR measurements can be used to generate a structural model. PMID:25448300

  18. The band structure of Ni(H 5C 3B 2). An example for energetic stabilization due to dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Michael C.; Ramírez, Rafael

    1986-07-01

    The band structure of Ni(H 5C 3B 2) the first experimentally verified one-dimensional (1D) polydecker system, has been investigated by means of a semi-empirical crystal orbital (CO) formalism based on an improved INDO (intermediate neglect of differential overlap) hamiltonian. In order to allow for an analysis of the electronic structure of a 1D arrangement composed by unit cells with an ungerade number of electrons a grand canonical (GC) averaging scheme has been used for the definition of the crystal hamiltonian. The synthesized 1D material with 13 valence electrons per simplest stoichiometric unit is a semiconductor and shows nuclear distortions into the direction of the stacking axis (i.e. formation of non-equivalent metal-ligand contacts). The tight-binding calculations lead to a transparent theoretical explanation of this formal dimerization. The 1D arrangement built up by one Ni(H 5C 3B 2) half-sandwich per unit cell reproducing the full translational symmetry is unstable towards a dimerization that leads to a unit which is formed by two half-sandwiches. The energy of the 1D column with the doubled cell is stabilized due to a symmetry-violation of the spatial wavefunction (i.e. symmetry-breaking for a symmetry atomic arrangement). A nuclear distortion (formation of non-equivalent metal-ligand distances) causes an additional energy lowering of the 1D system. The band structure properties in the outer valence region are analyzed. The calculated band gap is in line with he experimentally observed semiconducting properties of the 1D chain. The microstates of the valence band contain both admixtures from the cyclic organic π ligand (leading contribution) and from the transition metal centers (3d xz or 3d yz orbitals).

  19. Changes in gap junction organization and decreased coupling during induced apoptosis in lens epithelial and NIH-3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Carsten; Mazur, Antonina; Meller, Karl; Mannherz, Hans Georg

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that global induction of apoptosis in primary bovine lens epithelial (LEC) or fibroblastic mouse NIH-3T3 cells by staurosporine, puromycin, cycloheximide, or etoposide is accompanied by a decrease in coupling by gap junctions. Cell coupling as tested by neurobiotin spreading was maintained when the LEC or NIH-3T3 cells were pre-incubated with the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD or the caspase-3 inhibiting tetrapeptide DEVD. Immunohistochemistry using anti-connexin-43 antibodies showed a reduction of plasma membrane integrated connexin-43 in both cell lines when undergoing apoptosis. Western blotting indicated degradation of connexin-43 that was inhibited by zVAD or DEVD. Cell coupling at single cell level was tested by direct microinjecting into LEC apoptosis-inducing agents of low molecular mass like staurosporine, etoposide and puromycin or the high molecular mass proteins caspase-3 and -8 in activated state. Microinjection of puromycin or etoposide induced apoptotic morphological changes of only the injected cell within 90 or 180 min, but did not affect adjacent cells. In contrast, microinjection of staurosporine led to a rapid induction of apoptosis of the injected and a number of adjacent cells suggesting spreading of staurosporine most probably through gap junction pores held open by dephosphorylation of connexin-43 as verified by immunoblotting and staining using a phospho-serine368-specific anti-connexin-43 antibody. Microinjection of active caspase-8 led after 3 h to morphological apoptotic alterations of only the injected cell, but did not inhibit spreading of co-injected neurobiotin to neighboring cells during the first hour. In contrast, microinjection of active caspase-3-induced apoptosis only of the injected cell after 60 min and rapidly and completely suppressed coupling to neighboring cells.

  20. Data sharing through an NIH central database repository: a cross-sectional survey of BioLINCC users

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S; Ritchie, Jessica D; Finn, Emily; Desai, Nihar R; Lehman, Richard L; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gross, Cary P

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterise experiences using clinical research data shared through the National Institutes of Health (NIH)'s Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center (BioLINCC) clinical research data repository, along with data recipients’ perceptions of the value, importance and challenges with using BioLINCC data. Design and setting Cross-sectional web-based survey. Participants All investigators who requested and received access to clinical research data from BioLINCC between 2007 and 2014. Main outcome measures Reasons for BioLINCC data request, research project plans, interactions with original study investigators, BioLINCC experience and other project details. Results There were 536 investigators who requested and received access to clinical research data from BioLINCC between 2007 and 2014. Of 441 potential respondents, 195 completed the survey (response rate=44%); 89% (n=174) requested data for an independent study, 17% (n=33) for pilot/preliminary analysis. Commonly cited reasons for requesting data through BioLINCC were feasibility of collecting data of similar size and scope (n=122) and insufficient financial resources for primary data collection (n=76). For 95% of respondents (n=186), a primary research objective was to complete new research, as opposed to replicate prior analyses. Prior to requesting data from BioLINCC, 18% (n=36) of respondents had contacted the original study investigators to obtain data, whereas 24% (n=47) had done so to request collaboration. Nearly all (n=176; 90%) respondents found the data to be suitable for their proposed project; among those who found the data unsuitable (n=19; 10%), cited reasons were data too complicated to use (n=5) and data poorly organised (n=5). Half (n=98) of respondents had completed their proposed projects, of which 67% (n=66) have been published. Conclusions Investigators were primarily using clinical research data from BioLINCC for independent research, making use of

  1. The Intersection of Massage Practice and Research: Community Massage Therapists as Research Personnel on an NIH-funded Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Munk, Niki; Stewart, Katie; Love, Margaret M.; Carter, Eddie; Elder, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Few NIH funded studies give community massage therapists the opportunity to become study personnel. A recent NIH/NCCAM-funded study investigating chronic low back pain (CLBP) recruited, trained, and utilized community massage practitioners (CMPs) as study personnel. This study’s aim was to determine whether health-related outcomes for CLBP improve when patients are referred from primary care to select CAM modalities including massage therapy (MT). The purpose of this paper is to report the results of the study’s three massage practice-driven study objectives which were to: 1) identify challenges and solutions to recruiting and retaining ample CMPs, 2) develop a practice-informed protocol reflecting real-world MT, and 3) determine the extent to which CMPs comply with rigorous research methodology in their clinical practices as study personnel. Methods Eligible CMPs in urban and rural Kentucky counties were identified through licensure board records, professional organizations, and personal contact opportunities. Interested CMPs completed 6 CE hours of research and Human Subjects Protection training and agreed to comply with a study protocol reflecting MT as practiced. Once trained, study CMPs were matched with study participants to provide and document up to 10 MT sessions per participant. Results Utilizing prominent MT community members proved invaluable to CMP recruitment and protocol development. CMP recruitment challenges included mixed interest, low number of available rural CMPs, busy clinic schedules, and compensation. Ethics CE credits were offered to encourage CMP interest. A total of 28 Kentucky licensed massage therapists with 5–32 years of experience completed study training. A total of 127 CLBP patients consented to participate (n = 104 for MT). Twenty-five CMPs were assigned CLBP patients and provided 1–10 treatments for 94 study participants. Treatment documentation was provided by CMPs for 97% of treatments provided. Conclusions

  2. Effects of salvianolic acid-A on NIH/3T3 fibroblast proliferation, collagen synthesis and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng-Hai; Hu, Yi-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Xu, Lie-Ming; Liu, Ping

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms of salvianolic acid A (SA-A) against liver fibrosis in vitro. METHODS: NIH/3T3 fibroblasts were cultured routinely, and incubated with 10-4 mol/L-10-7 mol/L SA-A for 22 h. The cell viability was assayed by [3H]proline incorporation, cell proliferation by [3H]TdR incorporation, cell collagen synthetic rate was measured with [3H]proline impulse and collagenase digestion method. The total RNA was prepared from the control cells and the drug treated cells respectively, and α (1) I pro-collagen mRNA expression was semi-quantitatively analyzed with RT-PCR. RESULTS: 10-4 mol/L SA-A decreased cell viability and exerted some cytotoxiciy, while 10-5 mol/L-10-7 mol/L SA-A did not affect cell viability, but inhibited cell proliferation significantly, and 10-6 mol/L SA-A had the best effect on cell viability among these concentrations of drugs. 10-5 mol/L-10-6 mol/L SA-A inhibited intracellular collagen synthetic rate, but no significant influence on extracellular collagen secretion. Both 10-5 mol/L and 10-6 mol/L SA-A could decrease α (1) I pro-collagen mRNA expression remarkably. CONCLUSION: SA-A had potent action against liver fibrosis. It inhibited NIH/3T3 fibroblast proliferation, intracellular collagen synthetic rate and type I pro-collagen gene expression, which may be one of the main mechanisms of the drug. PMID:11819598

  3. Profiling the NIH Small Molecule Repository for Compounds That Generate H2O2 by Redox Cycling in Reducing Environments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We have screened the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Small Molecule Repository (SMR) libraries in a horseradish peroxidase–phenol red (HRP-PR) H2O2 detection assay to identify redox cycling compounds (RCCs) capable of generating H2O2 in buffers containing dithiothreitol (DTT). Two RCCs were identified in the LOPAC set, the ortho-naphthoquinone β-lapachone and the para-naphthoquinone NSC 95397. Thirty-seven (0.02%) concentration-dependent RCCs were identified from 195,826 compounds in the NIH SMR library; 3 singleton structures, 9 ortho-quinones, 2 para-quinones, 4 pyrimidotriazinediones, 15 arylsulfonamides, 2 nitrothiophene-2-carboxylates, and 2 tolyl hydrazides. Sixty percent of the ortho-quinones and 80% of the pyrimidotriazinediones in the library were confirmed as RCCs. In contrast, only 3.9% of the para-quinones were confirmed as RCCs. Fifteen of the 251 arylsulfonamides in the library were confirmed as RCCs, and since we screened 17,868 compounds with a sulfonamide functional group we conclude that the redox cycling activity of the arylsulfonamide RCCs is due to peripheral reactive enone, aromatic, or heterocyclic functions. Cross-target queries of the University of Pittsburgh Drug Discovery Institute (UPDDI) and PubChem databases revealed that the RCCs exhibited promiscuous bioactivity profiles and have populated both screening databases with significantly higher numbers of active flags than non-RCCs. RCCs were promiscuously active against protein targets known to be susceptible to oxidation, but were also active in cell growth inhibition assays, and against other targets thought to be insensitive to oxidation. Profiling compound libraries or the hits from screening campaigns in the HRP-PR H2O2 detection assay significantly reduce the timelines and resources required to identify and eliminate promiscuous nuisance RCCs from the candidates for lead optimization. PMID:20070233

  4. Aminoglycoside antibiotics for NIH category II chronic bacterial prostatitis: A single-cohort study with one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Vittorio; Montanari, Emanuele; Marras, Emanuela; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Although fluoroquinolones are first-line agents for the treatment of National Institutes of Health (NIH) category II chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), therapy with these agents is not always feasible due to the increasing worldwide resistance of causative uropathogens. New therapeutic options are urgently required, as drugs such as β-lactam antibiotics distribute poorly to prostatic sites of infection and trimethoprim therapy is often unfeasible due to high resistance rates. The present study aimed to analyze the efficacy of aminoglycosides, administered to a cohort of 78 patients affected by fluoroquinolone-resistant CBP, or excluded from fluoroquinolone therapy due to various contraindications. Patients received netilmicin (4.5 mg/kg, once-daily, intramuscular), combined or not with a β-lactam antibiotic, for 4 weeks. Follow-up visits were scheduled 6 and 12 months after the end of treatment. Fifty-five out of 70 patients (78.6%) showed eradication of the causative pathogen, and a significant reduction of the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) total score from a baseline median value of 21 to 14 at the end of therapy, and to 9 and 8 at 6-month and 12-month follow-up assessments, respectively. The pain, voiding and quality of life subdomains of the NIH-CPSI decreased accordingly. In 15 patients showing persistence of infection, NIH-CPSI total and subdomain scores did not decrease at the end of therapy. Additional clinical parameters, such as the urinary peak flow rate, percentage voided bladder, serum prostate-specific antigen concentration, International Prostate Symptom Score and prostate volume improved significantly only in the group of patients in which the infection was eradicated. Therapy was well tolerated, and genetic testing for deafness-predisposing mitochondrial mutations allowed safer administration of aminoglycosides. These results suggest that aminoglycosides may become a therapeutic alternative for the treatment of CBP. These

  5. The human transforming growth factor type alpha coding sequence is not a direct-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Finzi, E; Fleming, T; Segatto, O; Pennington, C Y; Bringman, T S; Derynck, R; Aaronson, S A

    1987-01-01

    A peptide secreted by some tumor cells in vitro imparts anchorage-independent growth to normal rat kidney (NRK) cells and has been termed transforming growth factor type alpha (TGF-alpha). To directly investigate the transforming properties of this factor, the human sequence coding for TGF-alpha was placed under the control of either a metallothionein promoter or a retroviral long terminal repeat. These constructs failed to induce morphological transformation upon transfection of NIH 3T3 cells, whereas viral oncogenes encoding a truncated form of its cognate receptor, the EGF receptor, or another growth factor, sis/platelet-derived growth factor 2, efficiently induced transformed foci. When NIH 3T3 clonal sublines were selected by transfection of TGF-alpha expression vectors in the presence of a dominant selectable marker, they were shown to secrete large amounts of TGF-alpha into the medium, to have downregulated EGF receptors, and to be inhibited in growth by TGF-alpha monoclonal antibody. These results indicated that secreted TGF-alpha interacts with its receptor at a cell surface location. Single cell-derived TGF-alpha-expressing sublines grew to high saturation density in culture. However, when plated as single cells on contact-inhibited monolayers of NIH 3T3 cells, they failed to form colonies, whereas v-sis- and v-erbB-transfected cells formed transformed colonies under the same conditions. Moreover, TGF-alpha-expressing sublines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. These and other results imply that TGF-alpha exerts a growth-promoting effect on the entire NIH 3T3 cell population after secretion into the medium but little, if any, effect on the individual cell synthesizing this factor. It is concluded that the normal coding sequence for TGF-alpha is not a direct-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells. Images PMID:3035551

  6. Aminoglycoside antibiotics for NIH category II chronic bacterial prostatitis: A single-cohort study with one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Magri, Vittorio; Montanari, Emanuele; Marras, Emanuela; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2016-10-01

    Although fluoroquinolones are first-line agents for the treatment of National Institutes of Health (NIH) category II chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), therapy with these agents is not always feasible due to the increasing worldwide resistance of causative uropathogens. New therapeutic options are urgently required, as drugs such as β-lactam antibiotics distribute poorly to prostatic sites of infection and trimethoprim therapy is often unfeasible due to high resistance rates. The present study aimed to analyze the efficacy of aminoglycosides, administered to a cohort of 78 patients affected by fluoroquinolone-resistant CBP, or excluded from fluoroquinolone therapy due to various contraindications. Patients received netilmicin (4.5 mg/kg, once-daily, intramuscular), combined or not with a β-lactam antibiotic, for 4 weeks. Follow-up visits were scheduled 6 and 12 months after the end of treatment. Fifty-five out of 70 patients (78.6%) showed eradication of the causative pathogen, and a significant reduction of the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) total score from a baseline median value of 21 to 14 at the end of therapy, and to 9 and 8 at 6-month and 12-month follow-up assessments, respectively. The pain, voiding and quality of life subdomains of the NIH-CPSI decreased accordingly. In 15 patients showing persistence of infection, NIH-CPSI total and subdomain scores did not decrease at the end of therapy. Additional clinical parameters, such as the urinary peak flow rate, percentage voided bladder, serum prostate-specific antigen concentration, International Prostate Symptom Score and prostate volume improved significantly only in the group of patients in which the infection was eradicated. Therapy was well tolerated, and genetic testing for deafness-predisposing mitochondrial mutations allowed safer administration of aminoglycosides. These results suggest that aminoglycosides may become a therapeutic alternative for the treatment of CBP. These

  7. Association between prepulse inhibition of the startle response and latent inhibition of two-way avoidance acquisition: A study with heterogeneous NIH-HS rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Ana; Esnal, Aitor; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Oliveras, Ignasi; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the first evaluation of the associations between responses in two paradigms related to schizophrenia in the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. NIH-HS rats are a stock of genetically heterogeneous animals that have been derived from eight different inbred strains. A rotational breeding schedule has been followed for more than eighty generations, leading to a high level of genetic recombination that makes the NIH-HS rats a unique tool for studying the genetic basis of (biological, behavioral, disease-related) complex traits. Previous work has dealt with the characterization of coping styles, cognitive and anxiety/fear-related profiles of NIH-HS rats. In the present study we have completed their characterization in two behavioral models, prepulse inhibition (PPI) and latent inhibition (LI) of the two-way active avoidance response, that appear to be related to schizophrenia or to schizophrenia-relevant symptoms. We have found that these rats display PPI for each of the four prepulse intensities tested, allowing their stratification in high, medium and low PPI subgroups. When testing these three subgroups for LI of two-way active avoidance acquisition it has been observed that the LowPPI and MediumPPI subgroups present impaired LI, which, along with the fact that the HighPPI group presents significant LI, allows us to hypothesize that responses in these two paradigms are somehow related and that selection of NIH-HS rats for Low vs HighPPI could make a promising animal model for the study of clusters of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms and their underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  8. TGF beta induces a sustained c-fos expression associated with stimulation or inhibition of cell growth in EL2 or NIH 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Liboi, E; Di Francesco, P; Gallinari, P; Testa, U; Rossi, G B; Peschle, C

    1988-02-29

    We have previously indicated that epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a fundamental role in the proliferation control of EL2 rat fibroblast line. It is shown here that transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) stimulates both DNA synthesis and proliferation of EL2 cells, while exerting an inhibitory effect on the growth of murine NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. We also report the effect of TGF beta and EGF on c-fos expression in EL2 cells, as compared to that of TGF beta in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. In EL2 cells EGF induces a transient c-fos expression at both mRNA and protein level, as previously observed in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts treated with platelet-derived or fibroblast growth factor (PDGF, FGF). Conversely, TGF beta induces in EL2 cells a sustained expression of fos mRNA and protein, which are still detectable at least 24 and 7 hr after treatment respectively. In NIH-3T3 fibroblasts TGF beta causes a sustained fos RNA expression, which is not associated, however, with detectable fos protein. We conclude that in fibroblasts stimulated by mitogens c-fos expression may be differentially modulated, depending of the growth factor and the cell line. This is seemingly due to differential regulation of fos gene expression, not only at the transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional level (transient or sustained fos RNA induction by EGF or TGF beta in EL2 cells), but also at the translational level (fos protein(s) induction by TGF beta in EL2 but not NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, possibly related to the stimulatory vs inhibitory effect of this factor on the growth of the former vs the latter line).

  9. Characterization and cloning of a receptor for BMP-2 and BMP-4 from NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, B B; Cook, J S; Wolsing, D H; Ting, J; Tiesman, J P; Correa, P E; Olson, C A; Pecquet, A L; Ventura, F; Grant, R A

    1994-01-01

    The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a group of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-related factors whose only receptor identified to date is the product of the daf-4 gene from Caenorhabditis elegans. Mouse embryonic NIH 3T3 fibroblasts display high-affinity 125I-BMP-4 binding sites. Binding assays are not possible with the isoform 125I-BMP-2 unless the positively charged N-terminal sequence is removed to create a modified BMP-2, 125I-DR-BMP-2. Cross-competition experiments reveal that BMP-2 and BMP-4 interact with the same binding sites. Affinity cross-linking assays show that both BMPs interact with cell surface proteins corresponding in size to the type I (57- to 62-kDa) and type II (75- to 82-kDa) receptor components for TGF-beta and activin. Using a PCR approach, we have cloned a cDNA from NIH 3T3 cells which encodes a novel member of the transmembrane serine/threonine kinase family most closely resembling the cloned type I receptors for TGF-beta and activin. Transient expression of this receptor in COS-7 cells leads to an increase in specific 125I-BMP-4 binding and the appearance of a major affinity-labeled product of approximately 64 kDa that can be labeled by either tracer. This receptor has been named BRK-1 in recognition of its ability to bind BMP-2 and BMP-4 and its receptor kinase structure. Although BRK-1 does not require cotransfection of a type II receptor in order to bind ligand in COS cells, complex formation between BRK-1 and the BMP type II receptor DAF-4 can be demonstrated when the two receptors are coexpressed, affinity labeled, and immunoprecipitated with antibodies to either receptor subunit. We conclude that BRK-1 is a putative BMP type I receptor capable of interacting with a known type II receptor for BMPs. Images PMID:8065329

  10. Expression of a connexin 43/beta-galactosidase fusion protein inhibits gap junctional communication in NIH3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Gap junctions contain membrane channels that mediate the cell-to-cell movement of ions, metabolites and cell signaling molecules. As gap junctions are comprised of a hexameric array of connexin polypeptides, the expression of a mutant connexin polypeptide may exert a dominant negative effect on gap junctional communication. To examine this possibility, we constructed a connexin 43 (Cx43)/beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) expression vector in which the bacterial beta-gal protein is fused in frame to the carboxy terminus of Cx43. This vector was transfected into NIH3T3 cells, a cell line which is well coupled via gap junctions and expresses high levels of Cx43. Transfectant clones were shown to express the fusion protein by northern and western analysis. X-Gal staining further revealed that all of the fusion protein containing cells also expressed beta-gal enzymatic activity. Double immunostaining with a beta-gal and Cx43 antibody demonstrated that the fusion protein is immunolocalized to the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm and also as punctate spots at regions of cell-cell contact. This pattern is similar to that of Cx43 in the parental 3T3 cells, except that in the fusion protein expressing cells, Cx43 expression was reduced at regions of cell-cell contact. Examination of gap junctional communication (GJC) with dye injection studies further showed that dye coupling was inhibited in the fusion protein expressing cells, with the largest reduction in coupling found in a clone exhibiting little Cx43 localization at regions of cell-cell contact. When the fusion protein expression vector was transfected into the communication poor C6 cell line, abundant fusion protein expression was observed, but unlike the transfected NIH3T3 cells, no fusion protein was detected at the cell surface. Nevertheless, dye coupling was inhibited in these C6 cells. Based on these observations, we propose that the fusion protein may inhibit GJC by sequestering the Cx43 protein intracellularly

  11. MO-C-BRB-05: Translating NIH funding to a [potential] clinical device in breast cancer radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  12. MO-C-BRB-04: The role of the NIH in funding innovations in science and medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Pettigrew, R.

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  13. NIH support of Centers for AIDS Research and Department of Health Collaborative Public Health Research: advancing CDC's Enhanced Comprehensive HIV Prevention Planning project.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Alan E; Purcell, David W; Gordon, Christopher M; Flores, Stephen; Grossman, Cynthia; Fisher, Holly H; Barasky, Rebecca J

    2013-11-01

    The contributions reported in this supplemental issue highlight the relevance of NIH-funded CEWG research to health department–supported HIV prevention and care activities in the 9 US cities with the highest numbers of AIDS cases. The project findings have the potential to enhance ongoing HIV treatment and care services and to advance the wider scientific agenda. The HIV testing to care continuum, while providing a framework to help track progress on national goals, also can reflect the heterogeneities of local epidemics. The collaborative research that is highlighted in this issue not only reflects a locally driven research agenda but also demonstrates research methods, data collection tools, and collaborative processes that could be encouraged across jurisdictions. Projects such as these, capitalizing on the integrated efforts of NIH, CDC, DOH, and academic institutions, have the potential to contribute to improvements in the HIV care continuum in these communities, bringing us closer to realizing the HIV prevention and treatment goals of the NHAS.

  14. Divergent in vitro/in vivo responses to drug treatments of highly aggressive NIH-Ras cancer cells: a PET imaging and metabolomics-mass-spectrometry study

    PubMed Central

    Gaglio, Daniela; Valtorta, Silvia; Ripamonti, Marilena; Bonanomi, Marcella; Damiani, Chiara; Todde, Sergio; Negri, Alfredo Simone; Sanvito, Francesca; Mastroianni, Fabrizia; Campli, Antonella Di; Turacchio, Gabriele; Di Grigoli, Giuseppe; Belloli, Sara; Luini, Alberto; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Colangelo, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic K-ras is capable to control tumor growth and progression by rewiring cancer metabolism. In vitro NIH-Ras cells convert glucose to lactate and use glutamine to sustain anabolic processes, but their in vivo environmental adaptation and multiple metabolic pathways activation ability is poorly understood. Here, we show that NIH-Ras cancer cells and tumors are able to coordinate nutrient utilization to support aggressive cell proliferation and survival. Using PET imaging and metabolomics-mass spectrometry, we identified the activation of multiple metabolic pathways such as: glycolysis, autophagy recycling mechanism, glutamine and serine/glycine metabolism, both under physiological and under stress conditions. Finally, differential responses between in vitro and in vivo systems emphasize the advantageous and uncontrolled nature of the in vivo environment, which has a pivotal role in controlling the responses to therapy. PMID:27409831

  15. Human transforming growth factor type. cap alpha. coding sequence is not a directed-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Finzi, E.; Fleming, T.; Segatto, O.; Pennington, C.Y.; Bringman, T.S.; Derynck, R.; Aaronson, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    A peptide secreted by some tumor cells in vitro imparts anchorage-independent growth to normal rat kidney (NRK) cells and has been termed transforming growth factor type ..cap alpha.. (TGF-..cap alpha..). To directly investigate the transforming properties of this factor, the human sequence coding for TGF-..cap alpha.. was placed under the control of either a metallothionein promoter or a retroviral long terminal repeat. These constructs failed to induce morphological transformation upon transfection of NIH 3T3 cells, whereas viral oncogenes encoding a truncated form of its cognate receptor, the EGF receptor, or another growth factor, sis/platelet-derived growth factor 2, efficiently induced transformed foci. Binding assays were done using (/sup 125/I)-EGF. When NIH 3T3 clonal sublines were selected by transfection of TGF-..cap alpha.. expression vectors in the presence of a dominant selectable market, they were shown to secrete large amounts of TGF-..cap alpha.. into the medium, to have downregulated EGF receptors, and to be inhibited in growth by TGF-..cap alpha.. monoclonal antibody. These results indicated that secreted TGF-..cap alpha.. interacts with its receptor at a cell surface location. Single cell-derived TGF-..cap alpha..-expressing sublines grew to high saturation density in culture. These and other results imply that TGF-..cap alpha.. exerts a growth-promoting effect on the entire NIH 3T3 cell population after secretion into the medium but little, if any, effect on the individual cell synthesizing this factor. It is concluded that the normal coding sequence for TGF-..cap alpha.. is not a direct-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells.

  16. Stable release of BDNF from the fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 grown on silicone elastomers enhances survival of spiral ganglion cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Warnecke, Athanasia; Sasse, Susanne; Wenzel, Gentiana I; Hoffmann, Andrea; Gross, Gerhard; Paasche, Gerrit; Scheper, Verena; Reich, Uta; Esser, Karl-Heinz; Lenarz, Thomas; Stöver, Timo; Wissel, Kirsten

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of choice for profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is direct electrical stimulation of spiral ganglion cells (SGC) via a cochlear implant (CI). The number and excitability of SGC seem to be critical for the success that can be achieved via CI treatment. However, SNHL is associated with degeneration of SGC. Long-term drug delivery to the inner ear for improving SGC survival may be achieved by functionalisation of CI electrodes with cells providing growth factors. Therefore, the capacity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-secreting NIH3T3 cells grown on cylindrically shaped silicone elastomers (SE) to exert local and sustained neuroprotective effects was assessed in vitro and in vivo. An in vitro model to investigate adhesion and cell growth of lentivirally modified NIH3T3 cells synthesising BDNF on SE was established. The bioactivity of BDNF was characterised by co-cultivation of SGC with cell-coated SE. In addition, cell-coated SE were implanted into deafened guinea pigs. The recombinant NIH3T3 cells proliferated on silicone surfaces during 14 days of cultivation and expressed significantly increasing BDNF levels. Enhanced survival rates and neurite outgrowth of SGC demonstrated the bioactivity of BDNF in vitro. Implantation of SE with adhering BDNF-secreting NIH3T3 cells into the cochleae of systemically deafened guinea pigs induced a significant increase in SGC survival in comparison to SE without cell coating. Our data demonstrate a novel approach of cell-based long-term drug delivery to support SGC survival in vitro and in vivo. This therapeutic strategy--once transferred to cells suitable for clinical application--may improve CI performance.

  17. Expression of progesterone receptor B is associated with G0/G1 arrest of the cell cycle and growth inhibition in NIH3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Kato, Kiyoko . E-mail: kkatoh@tsurumi.beppu.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Suga, Shin; Takahashi, Akira; Ueoka, Yousuke; Arima, Takahiro; Nishida, Jun-ichi; Hachisuga, Toru; Kawarabayashi, Tatsuhiko; Wake, Norio

    2005-05-01

    Previously, we found a significant reduction of progesterone receptor B (PR-B) expression levels in the Ras-mediated NIH3T3 cell transformation, and re-expression of exogenous PR-B eliminated the tumorigenic potential. We hypothesized that this reduction is of biological significance in cell transformation. In the present study, we determined the correlation between PR-B expression and cell cycle progression. In synchronized NIH3T3 cells, we found an increase in PR-B protein and p27 CDK inhibitor levels in the G0/G1 phase and a reduction due to redistribution in the S and G2/M phases. The MEK inhibitor or cAMP stimulation arrested NIH3T3 cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. The expression of PR-B and p27 CDK inhibitors was up-regulated by treatment with both the MEK inhibitor and cAMP. Treatment of synchronized cells with a PKA inhibitor in the presence of 1% calf serum resulted in a significant reduction in both PR-B and p27 levels. The decrease in the PR-B levels caused by anti-sense oligomers or siRNA corresponded to the reduction in p27 levels. PR-B overexpression by adenovirus infection induced p27 and suppressed cell growth. Finally, we showed that PR-B modulation involved in the regulation of NIH3T3 cell proliferation was independent of nuclear estrogen receptor (ER) activity but dependent on non-genomic ER activity.

  18. Destructive physical analysis results of Ni/H2 cells cycled in low earth orbit regime (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hong S.; Zelter, Gabriela R.; Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephan W.

    1994-10-01

    Six 48-Ah individual pressure vessel Ni/H2 cells containing 26 and 31% KOH electrolytes have been on a low earth orbit cycle-life test. Three cells containing 31% KOH have failed after an average of 6400 cycles while the other three with 26% KOH have cycled for an average of 19,500 cycles. We have carried out post-cycle characterization tests and destructive physical analyses (DPA) of all cells. The DPA included visual inspections, measurements of electrode thickness, scanning electron microscopy, chemical analyses, and measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte flooded cell. A gradual decrease of the usable cell capacity at high rate (1.4C) was the failure mode of all cells tested. Decrease of the usable capacity was due to decrease in the utilization of the active material with cycling mainly due to build-up of low rate capacity (residual capacity) and undischargeable active material. Cycle life of one of the cells might have been shortened prematurely due to the breakage of the cell core. Many gradual changes occurred with cycling at a rate which is independent of the KOH concentration. Each of these individual changes are difficult to be attributed to be the direct cause of the utilization decrease. However, an involved interaction of the changes might be responsible for the decrease.

  19. Effect of KOH Concentration and Anions on the Performance of a Ni-H2 Battery Positive Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Robbins, Kathleen; Gopalakrishna, M. Rao

    1996-01-01

    The capacity and voltage behavior of electrochemically impregnated sintered nickel positive plates was examined by galvanostatic charging and discharging in a flooded electrolyte cell. Three different concentrations of potassium hydroxide (KOH) (40, 31, and 26 percent) and 31 percent KOH containing dissolved nitrate, sulfate, or silicate were investigated. The end-of-charge voltage at C/10 charge and at 10 degrees C showed the following order: 40 percent KOH greater than 31 percent KOH alone and in the presence of the anions greater than 26 percent KOH. The mid discharge voltage at C/2 discharge was higher in 26 percent KOH, almost the same for 31 percent KOH with and without added contaminants, and much lower for 40 percent KOH. The plate capacity was marginally affected by cycling in all cases except for 40 percent KOH, where the capacity declined after 1,000 cycles at 80 percent depth of discharge (DOD). At the end of cycling, all the plates tested experienced a weight loss, except in the case of 31 percent KOH, as a result of active material extrusion. Cyclic voltammetry of miniature electrodes in 31 percent KOH showed that the cathodic peak potentials are less polarized in the presence and absence of silicate at -5 degrees C compared to 25 degrees C indicating a slightly higher voltage during discharge in a Ni-H2 battery. Futhermore, the features of the current-potential profile were practically unchanged in the presence of silicate.

  20. Met promotes the formation of double minute chromosomes induced by Sei-1 in NIH-3T3 murine fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    You, Jia; Wu, Di; Yu, Yang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Fei; Xu, Lu; Wang, Liqun; Wang, Nan; Tian, Xing; Wang, Falin; Liang, Hongbin; Gao, Yating; Cui, Xiaobo; Ji, Guohua; Bai, Jing; Yu, Jingcui; Meng, Xiangning; Jin, Yan; Sun, Wenjing; Guan, Xin-yuan; Zhang, Chunyu; Fu, Songbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Sei-1 is an oncogene capable of inducing double minute chromosomes (DMs) formation. DMs are hallmarks of amplification and contribute to oncogenesis. However, the mechanism of Sei-1 inducing DMs formation remains unelucidated. Results DMs formation significantly increased during serial passage in vivo and gradually decreased following culture in vitro. micro nuclei (MN) was found to be responsible for the reduction. Of the DMs-carrying genes, Met was found to be markedly amplified, overexpressed and highly correlated with DMs formation. Inhibition of Met signaling decreased the number of DMs and reduced the amplification of the DMs-carrying genes. We identified a 3.57Mb DMs representing the majority population, which consists of the 1.21 Mb AMP1 from locus 6qA2 and the 2.36 Mb AMP2 from locus 6qA2-3. Materials and Methods We employed NIH-3T3 cell line with Sei-1 overexpression to monitor and characterize DMs in vivo and in vitro. Array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to reveal amplification regions and DMs-carrying genes. Metaphase spread was prepared to count the DMs. Western blot and Met inhibition rescue experiments were performed to examine for involvement of altered Met signaling in Sei-1 induced DMs. Genomic walking and PCR were adopted to reveal DMs structure. Conclusions Met is an important promotor of DMs formation. PMID:27494853

  1. Tunable swelling of polyelectrolyte multilayers in cell culture media for modulating NIH-3T3 cells adhesion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; Cai, Peng; Yuan, Wenjing; Wang, Hua

    2014-11-01

    For polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) assembled by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique, their nanostructure and properties can be governed by many parameters during the building process. Here, it was demonstrated that the swelling of the PEMs containing poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) in cell culture media could be tuned with changing supporting salt solutions during the assembly process. Importantly, the influence of the PEMs assembled in different salt solutions on NIH-3T3 cell adhesion was observable. Specifically, the cells could possess a higher affinity for the films assembled in low salt concentration (i.e. 0.15M NaCl) or no salt, the poorly swelling films in cell culture media, which was manifested by the large cell spreading area and focal adhesions. In contrast, those were assembled in higher salt concentration, highly swelling films in cell culture media, were less attractive for the fibroblasts. As a result, the cell adhesion behaviors may be manipulated by tailoring the physicochemical properties of the films, which could be performed by changing the assembly conditions such as supporting salt concentration. Such a finding might promise a great potential in designing desired biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  2. Electrical Stimulation of NIH-3T3 Cells with Platinum-PEDOT-Electrodes Integrated in a Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Grit; Müller-Wichards, Wiebke; Goepfert, Christiane; Pörtner, Ralf; Müller, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work involves the development and integration of electrodes for the electrical stimulation of cells within a bioreactor. Electrodes need to fit properties such as biocompatibility, large reversible charge transfer and high flexibility in view of their future application as implants on the tympanic membrane. Flexible thin-film platinum-poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene)-electrodes on a poly(ethylene terephthalate)-foil manufactured using microsystems technology were integrated into a bioreactor based on the design of a 24 well plate. The murine fibroblast cell line NIH-3T3 was cultured on the foil electrodes and the cells were stimulated with direct voltage and unipolar pulsed voltage. The amplitude, the pulse length and the ratio of pulse to pause were varied. The stimulated cells were stained in order to determine the angle between the cell cleavage plane of the dividing cells and the vector of the electric field. These angles were subsequently used to calculate the polarization index, which is a measure of the orientation of the metaphase plane of dividing cells that occurs for example during wound healing or embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:24358059

  3. NIH working group report—using genomic information to guide weight management: From universal to precision treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Molly S; Loos, Ruth JF; McCaffery, Jeanne M; Ling, Charlotte; Franks, Paul W; Weinstock, George M; Snyder, Michael P; Vassy, Jason L; Agurs-Collins, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    Objective Precision medicine utilizes genomic and other data to optimize and personalize treatment. Although more than 2,500 genetic tests are currently available, largely for extreme and/or rare phenotypes, the question remains whether this approach can be used for the treatment of common, complex conditions like obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance, which underlie a host of metabolic diseases. Methods This review, developed from a Trans-NIH Conference titled “Genes, Behaviors, and Response to Weight Loss Interventions,” provides an overview of the state of genetic and genomic research in the area of weight change and identifies key areas for future research. Results Although many loci have been identified that are associated with cross-sectional measures of obesity/body size, relatively little is known regarding the genes/loci that influence dynamic measures of weight change over time. Although successful short-term weight loss has been achieved using many different strategies, sustainable weight loss has proven elusive for many, and there are important gaps in our understanding of energy balance regulation. Conclusions Elucidating the molecular basis of variability in weight change has the potential to improve treatment outcomes and inform innovative approaches that can simultaneously take into account information from genomic and other sources in devising individualized treatment plans. PMID:26692578

  4. Potential functional applications of extracellular vesicles: a report by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium.

    PubMed

    Quesenberry, Peter J; Aliotta, Jason; Camussi, Giovanni; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B; Wen, Sicheng; Goldberg, Laura; Zhang, Huang-Ge; Tetta, Ciro; Franklin, Jeffrey; Coffey, Robert J; Danielson, Kirsty; Subramanya, Vinita; Ghiran, Ionita; Das, Saumya; Chen, Clark C; Pusic, Kae M; Pusic, Aya D; Chatterjee, Devasis; Kraig, Richard P; Balaj, Leonora; Dooner, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Program's initiative on clinical utility of extracellular RNAs and therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies is reviewed here. Background information and details of the projects are presented. The work has focused on modulation of target cell fate by extracellular vesicles (EVs) and RNA. Work on plant-derived vesicles is of intense interest, and non-mammalian sources of vesicles may represent a very promising source for different therapeutic approaches. Retro-viral-like particles are intriguing. Clearly, EVs share pathways with the assembly machinery of several other viruses, including human endogenous retrovirals (HERVs), and this convergence may explain the observation of viral-like particles containing viral proteins and nucleic acid in EVs. Dramatic effect on regeneration of damaged bone marrow, renal, pulmonary and cardiovascular tissue is demonstrated and discussed. These studies show restoration of injured cell function and the importance of heterogeneity of different vesicle populations. The potential for neural regeneration is explored, and the capacity to promote and reverse neoplasia by EV exposure is described. The tremendous clinical potential of EVs underlies many of these projects, and the importance of regulatory issues and the necessity of general manufacturing production (GMP) studies for eventual clinical trials are emphasized. Clinical trials are already being pursued and should expand dramatically in the near future.

  5. Confounding Factors Affecting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease Organ-Specific Score and Global Severity

    PubMed Central

    Aki, Sahika Zeynep; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Carpenter, Paul A.; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Martin, Paul J.; Flowers, Mary E.D.

    2016-01-01

    The 2005 NIH chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) organ severity is based on the assessment of current status regardless of whether abnormalities are due to GVHD. The score assignment does not require knowledge of past manifestations, attribution, or whether cGVHD is still active. The aim of this study is to describe confounding factors affecting organ scores in patients with cGVHD. The study included 189 consecutive cGVHD patients evaluated at our center in 2013. Providers completed the NIH 0–3 organ-specific scoring evaluation with two questions added for each organ to identify abnormalities that were 1) not attributed to cGVHD, or 2) attributed to cGVHD plus other causes. Abnormalities attributed to causes other than GVHD were recorded. Eighty (14%) abnormalities were not attributed to cGVHD in at least one organ, and 41 (7%) abnormalities were attributed to cGVHD plus other causes in at least one organ. A total of 436 (78%) abnormalities were attributed only to cGVHD. Abnormalities not attributed to cGVHD were observed most frequently in the lung, gastrointestinal tract and skin. Most common abnormalities included pre-transplant condition, sequelae from GVHD, deconditioning, infections and medications. Our results support the the 2014 NIH consensus recommendation to consider attribution when scoring organ abnormalities. PMID:27214071

  6. Antiproliferative activity of flower hexane extract obtained from Mentha spicata associated with Mentha rotundifolia against the MCF7, KB, and NIH/3T3 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nedel, Fernanda; Begnini, Karine; Carvalho, Pedro Henrique de Azambuja; Lund, Rafael Guerra; Beira, Fátima T A; Del Pino, Francisco Augusto B

    2012-11-01

    This study assessed the antiproliferative effect in vitro of the flower hexane extract obtained from Mentha spicata associated with Mentha rotundifolia against the human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), human mouth epidermal carcinoma (KB), and mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines, using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. A cell density of 2×10(4)/well was seeded in 96-well plates, and samples at different concentrations ranging from 10 to 500 mg/mL were tested. The optical density was determined in an ELISA multiplate reader (Thermo Plate TP-Reader). Results demonstrated that the hexane extract presented antiproliferative activity against both the tumor cell lines KB and MCF-7, presenting a GI(50) (MCF-7=13.09 mg/mL), TGI (KB=37.76 mg/mL), and IL(50) (KB=291.07 mg/mL). Also, the hexane extract presented antiproliferative activity toward NIH 3T3 cells GI(50) (183.65 mg/mL), TGI (280.54 mg/mL), and IL(50) (384.59 mg/mL). The results indicate that the flower hexane extract obtained from M. spicata associated with M. rotundifolia presents an antineoplastic activity against KB and MCF-7, although an antiproliferative effect at a high concentration of the extract was observed toward NIH 3T3.

  7. NIH conference on the future of telehealth: essential tools and technologies for clinical research and care--a summary. June 25-26, 2009 Bethesda, Maryland.

    PubMed

    Doarn, Charles R; Portilla, Lili M; Sayre, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Major government efforts to widen the use of health information technology and speed the translation of biomedical research discoveries into clinical practice are converging with the rapid growth of the Internet to create unprecedented opportunities to use telehealth networks to broaden access to high-quality healthcare and expand the scope and reach of clinical and translational research. Recognizing the dual potential of telehealth networks to improve health outcomes and reduce barriers to participation in research, particularly in medically underserved communities, the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), convened a national conference at the NIH on June 25-26, 2009, titled "Future of Telehealth: Essential Tools and Technologies for Clinical Research and Care," in collaboration with experts from the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Indian Health Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs, Internet2, and the NIH National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, and National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities. The conference brought together over 400 subject matter experts from government, academia, and industry to discuss a wide range of issues in telehealth research and development. Its primary outcome is a set of short papers reporting on recommendations from thematic breakout sessions and some overarching recommendations that can, taken together, stimulate and help guide further research through new multi-agency, interdisciplinary collaborations.

  8. Beyond the NIH Multicenter HIV Transplant Trial Experience: Outcomes of HIV+ Liver Transplant Recipients Compared to HCV+ or HIV+/HCV+ Coinfected Recipients in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sawinski, Deirdre; Goldberg, David S.; Blumberg, Emily; Abt, Peter L.; Bloom, Roy D.; Forde, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The effectiveness of liver transplant (LT) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected recipients in the United States is unknown. We investigated (i) the effect of HIV on US patient and allograft LT outcomes, compared to HCV+ and HIV/HCV uninfected recipients and (ii) whether LT at centers that participated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Solid Organ Transplantation in HIV Trial, reflecting experience and a standardized approach to patient selection, impacted outcomes. Methods. A retrospective cohort study of primary LT recipients transplanted 27 February 2002 through 31 December 2013, categorized by serostatus: HCV+ (n = 20 829), HIV+ (n = 72), HIV+/HCV+ (n = 160), and HIV−/HCV− uninfected (n = 22 926) as reference. Survival was determined using Cox regression, stratified according to center NIH trial participation. Results. HCV (hazard ratio [HR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41–1.52) and HIV/HCV coinfection (HR 2.62, 95% CI, 2.06–3.33) were associated with mortality; HIV monoinfection was not (HR 1.37, 95% CI, .86–2.18). This was unchanged after stratification on NIH trial participation, although mortality was higher in NIH-enrolling (HIV+: HR 1.65, 95% CI, .93–2.92; HIV+/HCV+: HR 3.15, 95% CI, 2.32–4.28) than in non-enrolling centers (HIV+: HR 1.03, 95% CI, .43–2.47, HIV+/HCV+: HR 2.55, 95% CI, 1.64–3.96). Although allograft loss was higher in HIV/HCV coinfected recipients transplanted at enrolling (HR 2.64, 9%% CI, 1.91–3.64) vs nonenrolling centers (HR 2.22, 95% CI, 1.41–3.49), there was no difference in HIV and HCV monoinfected patients. Conclusions. HIV+ LT recipient outcomes were superior to HCV+ or HIV/HCV coinfected recipients. Despite a standardized approach and plausibly more experience with HIV patients, transplantation at NIH study center did not improve outcomes. PMID:26082506

  9. High quality NMR structures: a new force field with implicit water and membrane solvation for Xplor-NIH.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Schwieters, Charles D; Opella, Stanley J; Marassi, Francesca M

    2017-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by NMR is unique in its ability to measure restraints, very accurately, in environments and under conditions that closely mimic those encountered in vivo. For example, advances in solid-state NMR methods enable structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent-free lipid bilayers, and of large soluble proteins prepared by sedimentation, while parallel advances in solution NMR methods and optimization of detergent-free lipid nanodiscs are rapidly pushing the envelope of the size limit for both soluble and membrane proteins. These experimental advantages, however, are partially squandered during structure calculation, because the commonly used force fields are purely repulsive and neglect solvation, Van der Waals forces and electrostatic energy. Here we describe a new force field, and updated energy functions, for protein structure calculations with EEFx implicit solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals Lennard-Jones forces, in the widely used program Xplor-NIH. The new force field is based primarily on CHARMM22, facilitating calculations with a wider range of biomolecules. The new EEFx energy function has been rewritten to enable OpenMP parallelism, and optimized to enhance computation efficiency. It implements solvation, electrostatics, and Van der Waals energy terms together, thus ensuring more consistent and efficient computation of the complete nonbonded energy lists. Updates in the related python module allow detailed analysis of the interaction energies and associated parameters. The new force field and energy function work with both soluble proteins and membrane proteins, including those with cofactors or engineered tags, and are very effective in situations where there are sparse experimental restraints. Results obtained for NMR-restrained calculations with a set of five soluble proteins and five membrane proteins show that structures calculated with EEFx have significant improvements in accuracy, precision

  10. Patterns of Feedback on the Bridge to Independence: A Qualitative Thematic Analysis of NIH Mentored Career Development Award Application Critiques

    PubMed Central

    Dattalo, Melissa; Regner, Caitlin; Filut, Amarette; Carnes, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: NIH Mentored Career Development (K) Awards bridge investigators from mentored to independent research. A smaller proportion of women than men succeed in this transition. The aim of this qualitative study was to analyze reviewers' narrative critiques of K award applications and explore thematic content of feedback provided to male and female applicants. Method: We collected 88 critiques, 34 from 9 unfunded and 54 from 18 funded applications, from 70% (n = 26) of investigators at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with K awards funded between 2005 and 2009 on the first submission or after revision. We qualitatively analyzed text in the 5 critique sections: candidate, career development plan, research plan, mentors, and environment and institutional commitment. We explored thematic content within these sections for male and female applicants and for applicants who had received a subsequent independent research award by 2014. Results: Themes revealed consistent areas of criticism for unfunded applications and praise for funded applications. Subtle variations in thematic content appeared for male and female applicants: For male applicants criticism was often followed by advice but for female applicants it was followed by questions about ability; praise recurrently characterized male but not female applicants' research as highly significant with optimism for future independence. Female K awardees that obtained subsequent independent awards stood out as having track records described as “outstanding.” Conclusion: This exploratory study suggests that K award reviewer feedback, particularly for female applicants, should be investigated as a potential contributor to research persistence and success in crossing the bridge to independence. PMID:26418619

  11. Dietary nitrate and nitrite and the risk of thyroid cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Kilfoy, Briseis A; Zhang, Yawei; Park, Yikyung; Holford, Theodore R; Schatzkin, Arthur; Hollenbeck, Albert; Ward, Mary H

    2011-07-01

    During the past several decades, an increasing incidence of thyroid cancer has been observed worldwide. Nitrate inhibits iodide uptake by the thyroid, potentially disrupting thyroid function. An increased risk of thyroid cancer associated with nitrate intake was recently reported in a cohort study of older women in Iowa. We evaluated dietary nitrate and nitrite intake and thyroid cancer risk overall and for subtypes in the National Institutes of Health-American Association of Retired Persons (NIH-AARP) Diet and Health Study, a large prospective cohort of 490,194 men and women, ages 50-71 years in 1995-1996. Dietary intakes were assessed using a 124-item food frequency questionnaire. During an average of 7 years of follow-up we identified 370 incident thyroid cancer cases (170 men, 200 women) with complete dietary information. Among men, increasing nitrate intake was positively associated with thyroid cancer risk (relative risk [RR] for the highest quintile versus lowest quintile RR = 2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.29-4.041; p-trend <0.001); however, we observed no trend with intake among women (p-trend = 0.61). Nitrite intake was not associated with risk of thyroid cancer for either men or women. We evaluated risk for the two main types of thyroid cancer. We found positive associations for nitrate intake and both papillary (RR = 2.10; 95% CI: 1.09-4.05; p-trend = 0.05) and follicular thyroid cancer (RR = 3.42; 95% CI: 1.03-11.4; p-trend = 0.01) among men. Nitrite intake was associated with increased risk of follicular thyroid cancer (RR = 2.74; 95%CI: 0.86-8.77; p-trend = 0.04) among men. Our results support a role of nitrate in thyroid cancer risk and suggest that further studies to investigate these exposures are warranted.

  12. Reproductive factors and menopausal hormone therapy and bladder cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Sarah E; Lacey, James V; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Park, Yikyung; Hoover, Robert N; Silverman, Debra T

    2013-07-15

    The incidence of bladder cancer among women is at least one-third to one-fourth that observed among men in many countries. Even after accounting for known risk factors, the reason for this gender disparity remains unexplained. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of reproductive factors and exogenous hormone use with a primary focus on menopausal hormone therapy use and risk of bladder cancer in women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Reproductive and hormonal factors were ascertained on the baseline questionnaire in 1995-1996 among 201,492 females who were followed until December 31, 2006. During follow-up, 651 cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed. A subset of women provided detailed information on use of MHT in a second questionnaire in 1996-1997. In this analysis, 127,361 females were followed through June 30, 2002 and 198 incident bladder cancer cases were identified. Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for smoking status, cigarettes per day and body mass index using age as the time metric, were used to obtain hazard ratios (HRs). A reduced risk was observed among parous women (HR=0.76; 95% CI 0.62-0.93) and women who reported late age at menarche (≥15 years) (HR=0.57; 95% CI 0.39-0.84). Women who reported ever using estrogen and progestin therapy had a decreased risk (HR=0.53; 95% CI: 0.34-0.83) compared with women who did not report MHT use. No association was observed for estrogen only users (HR=0.82; 95% CI: 0.58-1.15). Our results suggest a putative role for sex hormones in the etiology of bladder cancer among women.

  13. Calcium, dairy foods, and risk of incident and fatal prostate cancer: the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Yikyung; Mitrou, Panagiota N; Kipnis, Victor; Hollenbeck, Albert; Schatzkin, Arthur; Leitzmann, Michael F

    2007-12-01

    Calcium and dairy foods in relation to prostate cancer were examined in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP (formerly known as the American Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study (1995/1996-2001). Diet was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Multivariate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox regression. During up to 6 years of follow-up (n = 293,888), the authors identified 10,180 total prostate cancer cases (8,754 nonadvanced, 1,426 advanced, and 178 fatal cases). Total and supplemental calcium were unrelated to total and nonadvanced prostate cancer. However, a statistically nonsignificant positive association with total calcium was observed for advanced (> or = 2,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: relative risk (RR) = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.91, 1.71; p(trend) = 0.06) and fatal (> or = 1,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 0.92, 2.09; p(trend) = 0.10) prostate cancer. Skim milk, but not other dairy foods, was associated with increased risk of advanced prostate cancer (> or = 2 vs. zero servings/day: RR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.54; p(trend) = 0.01). In contrast, calcium from nondairy foods was associated with lower risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer (> or = 600 vs. < 250 mg/day: RR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.99; p(trend) = 0.04). Although the authors cannot definitively rule out a weak association for aggressive prostate cancer, their findings do not provide strong support for the hypothesis that calcium and dairy foods increase prostate cancer risk.

  14. Meat and components of meat and the risk of bladder cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrucci, Leah M.; Sinha, Rashmi; Ward, Mary H.; Graubard, Barry I.; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Kilfoy, Briseis A.; Schatzkin, Arthur; Michaud, Dominique S.; Cross, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Meat could be involved in bladder carcinogenesis via multiple potentially carcinogenic meat-related compounds related to cooking and processing, including nitrate, nitrite, heterocyclic amines (HCAs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We comprehensively investigated the association between meat and meat components and bladder cancer. Methods During 7 years of follow-up, 854 transitional cell bladder cancer cases were identified among 300,933 men and women who completed a validated food frequency questionnaire in the large prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. We estimated intake of nitrate and nitrite from processed meat and HCAs and PAHs from cooked meat using quantitative databases of measured values. We calculated total dietary nitrate and nitrite based on literature values. Results The hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for red meat (HR for fifth compared to first quintile=1.22, 95% CI=0.96–1.54, p-trend=0.07) and the HCA 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) (HR=1.19, 95% CI=0.95–1.48, p-trend=0.06) conferred a borderline statistically significant increased risk of bladder cancer. We observed positive associations in the top quintile for total dietary nitrite (HR=1.28, 95% CI=1.02–1.61, p-trend= 0.06) and nitrate plus nitrite intake from processed meat (HR=1.29 95% CI=1.00–1.67, p-trend= 0.11). Conclusions These findings provide modest support for a role for total dietary nitrite and nitrate plus nitrite from processed meat in bladder cancer. Our results also suggest a positive association between red meat and PhIP and bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:20681011

  15. The d{sup 8}, d{sup 9} and d{sup 10} supermultiplets of NiH, PdH, and PtH

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.W.; McCarthy, M.C.; Kanamori, H.; Steimle, T.

    1993-12-31

    The concept of integer oxidation states organizes an enormous body of structural and reactivity information. Yet, for gas phase diatomic molecules, oxidation states seem never to be taken seriously by either spectroscopists or quantum chemists. For MH, MO, MF, and MM{prime} diatomics, where M is a rare earth or transition metal, oxidation states can be defined by the near-integer occupancy of the (n{minus}1)d or (n{minus}2)f valence subshell. For example, the d{sup 8}, d{sup 9}, and d{sup 10} occupancies in the (NiH, PdH, PtH) family of molecules correspond respectively to M{sup 0}, M{sup +1}, and M{sup +2} oxidation states. Spin-orbit coupling plays a central role in controlling the pattern of low-lying states, the relative intensities of nominally forbidden electronic transitions, and the predissociative interaction strength between bound and repulsive electronic states. Also, since the atomic spin-orbit coupling constant {zeta}(nd) decreases by {approximately} 10% when an electron is added to the n{minus}1d subshell, the molecular spin-orbit parameters in a supermultiplet fit model can serve as diagnostic of the fractional characters of the various n{minus}1d{sup N} occupancies (i.e. oxidation states) for each of the MH, MF, and MCu electronic states. The NiH, PdH, PtH family of molecules provides an excellent opportunity to apply supermultiplet diagnostics because (i) the energy order of the d{sup 10}, d{sup 9}s, and d{sup 8}s{sup 2} configurations in the free M atom is different for (NiH, PtH) vs PdH; (ii) the n{minus}1d orbitals are maximally contracted.

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of novel mouse cell line (NIH/3T3)-adapted human enterovirus 71 strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv).

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chow, Vincent T K; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2014-01-01

    Since its identification in 1969, Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has been causing periodic outbreaks of infection in children worldwide and most prominently in the Asia-Pacific Region. Understanding the pathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is hampered by the virus's inability to infect small animals and replicate in their derived in vitro cultured cells. This manuscript describes the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of two selected EV71 strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv), which have been adapted to replicate in mouse-derived NIH/3T3 cells, in contrast to the original parental virus which is only able to replicate in primate cell lines. The EV71:TLLm strain exhibited productive infection in all primate and rodent cell lines tested, while EV71:TLLmv exhibited greater preference for mouse cell lines. EV71:TLLmv displayed higher degree of adaptation and temperature adaptability in NIH/3T3 cells than in Vero cells, suggesting much higher fitness in NIH/3T3 cells. In comparison with the parental EV71:BS strain, the adapted strains accumulated multiple adaptive mutations in the genome resulting in amino acid substitutions, most notably in the capsid-encoding region (P1) and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3D). Two mutations, E167D and L169F, were mapped to the VP1 canyon that binds the SCARB2 receptor on host cells. Another two mutations, S135T and K140I, were located in the VP2 neutralization epitope spanning amino acids 136-150. This is the first report of human EV71 with the ability to productively infect rodent cell lines in vitro.

  17. Ambient Particulate Matter Air Pollution Exposure and Mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, George D.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Cromar, Kevin R.; Shao, Yongzhao; Reynolds, Harmony R.; Jerrett, Michael; Lim, Chris C.; Shanley, Ryan; Park, Yikyung; Hayes, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    . Citation: Thurston GD, Ahn J, Cromar KR, Shao Y, Reynolds HR, Jerrett M, Lim CC, Shanley R, Park Y, Hayes RB. 2016. Ambient particulate matter air pollution exposure and mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health cohort. Environ Health Perspect 124:484–490; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509676 PMID:26370657

  18. Are meat and heme iron intake associated with pancreatic cancer? Results from the NIH-AARP diet and health cohort.

    PubMed

    Taunk, Pulkit; Hecht, Eric; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael

    2016-05-01

    Several studies on pancreatic cancer have reported significant positive associations for intake of red meat but null associations for heme iron. We assessed total, red, white and processed meat intake, meat cooking methods and doneness and heme iron and mutagen intake in relation to pancreatic cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort. A total of 322,846 participants (187,265 men and 135,581 women) successfully completed and returned the food frequency questionnaire between 1995 and 1996. After a mean follow-up of 9.2 years (up to 10.17 years), 1,417 individuals (895 men and 522 women) developed exocrine pancreatic cancer. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and trends were calculated using the median value of each quantile. Models incorporated age as the time metric and were adjusted for smoking history, body mass index, self-reported diabetes and energy-adjusted saturated fat. Pancreatic cancer risk significantly increased with intake of total meat (Q5 vs. Q1: HR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.02-1.42, p-trend = 0.03), red meat (HR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.48, p-trend = 0.02), high-temperature cooked meat (HR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.00-1.45, p-trend = 0.02), grilled/barbequed meat (HR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.03-1.50, p-trend = 0.007), well/very well done meat (HR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.10-1.58, p-trend = 0.005) and heme iron from red meat (Q4 vs. Q1: HR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.01-1.45, p-trend = 0.04). When stratified by sex, these associations remained significant in men but not women except for white meat intake in women (HR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.02-1.74, p-trend = 0.04). Additional studies should confirm our findings that consuming heme iron from red meat increases pancreatic cancer risk.

  19. NIH Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic

    MedlinePlus

    ... and treat children with arthritis, periodic fever syndromes, lupus, and other rheumatic diseases who are enrolled in clinical trials. Clinical trials may be studies of the natural history, signs, and symptoms of disease when usual treatment ...

  20. NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... the next 48 weeks when compared with postponing ART until signs of illness or a weakened immune system appear—the standard of care when the study began. Based on ongoing assessments of vaccine safety information, FDA ...

  1. NIH Loses a Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... West King, M.D., Chairman Friends of the National Library of Medicine Let Us Hear From You! We want your feedback on ... Stay Connected! Keep up with MedlinePlus and the National Library of ... information. Join us online, and please spread the word! MedlinePlus and ...

  2. NIH Minority Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This publication contains brief descriptions of National Institutes of Health programs for underrepresented minorities, including fellowships, programs for high school students, graduate research assistantships, postdoctoral training, and programs for college students. The publication provides a description of each program, eligibility…

  3. The Mos/MAP kinase pathway stabilizes c-Fos by phosphorylation and augments its transforming activity in NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, K; Sagata, N

    1995-01-01

    The c-mos proto-oncogene product, Mos, is a serine/threonine kinase that can activate ERK1 and 2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases by direct phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK). ERK activation is essential for oncogenic transformation of NIH 3T3 cells by Mos. In this study, we examined how mitogenic and oncogenic signalling from the Mos/MEK/ERK pathway reaches the nucleus to activate downstream target genes. We show that c-Fos (the c-fos protooncogene product), which is an intrinsically unstable nuclear protein, is metabolically highly stabilized, and greatly enhances the transforming efficiency of NIH 3T3 cells, by Mos. This stabilization of c-Fos required Mos-induced phosphorylation of its C-terminal region on Ser362 and Ser374, and double replacements of these serines with acidic (Asp) residues markedly increased the stability and transforming efficiency of c-Fos even in the absence of Mos. Moreover, activation of the ERK pathway was necessary and sufficient for the c-Fos phosphorylation and stabilization by Mos. These results indicate that c-Fos undergoes stabilization, and mediates at least partly the oncogenic signalling, by the Mos/MEK/ERK pathway. The present findings also suggest that, in general, the ERK pathway may regulate the cell fate and function by affecting the metabolic stability of c-Fos. Images PMID:7588633

  4. Effect of CeH2.29 on the microstructures and hydrogen properties of LiBH4-Mg2NiH4 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Han, Shu-min; Li, Yuan; Chen, Xiao-cui; Ke, Dan-dan

    2015-04-01

    A composite of LiBH4-Mg2NiH4 doped with 10wt% CeH2.29 was prepared by ball milling followed by dynamic interspace vacuum treatment at 573 K. The introduction of CeH2.29 caused a transformation in the morphology of Mg from complex spongy and lamellar to uniformly spongy, resulting in refined particle size and abundant H diffusion pathways. This LiBH4-Mg2NiH4 + 10wt% CeH2.29 composite exhibited excellent hydrogen storage properties. The starting temperature of rapid H absorption decreased to 375 K in the doped composite from 452 K for the unmodified material, and the onset decomposition temperature of its hydride was reduced from 536 K to 517 K. In addition, the time required for a hydrogen release of 1.5wt% (at 598 K) was 87 s less than that of the un-doped composite.

  5. Improvements and Limitations of Humanized Mouse Models for HIV Research: NIH/NIAID “Meet the Experts” 2015 Workshop Summary

    PubMed Central

    Akkina, Ramesh; Allam, Atef; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Blankson, Joel N.; Burnett, John C.; Casares, Sofia; Garcia, J. Victor; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Kitchen, Scott G.; Klein, Florian; Kumar, Priti; Luster, Andrew D.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Rao, Mangala; Shultz, Leonard D.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The number of humanized mouse models for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other infectious diseases has expanded rapidly over the past 8 years. Highly immunodeficient mouse strains, such as NOD/SCID/gamma chainnull (NSG, NOG), support better human hematopoietic cell engraftment. Another improvement is the derivation of highly immunodeficient mice, transgenic with human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and cytokines that supported development of HLA-restricted human T cells and heightened human myeloid cell engraftment. Humanized mice are also used to study the HIV reservoir using new imaging techniques. Despite these advances, there are still limitations in HIV immune responses and deficits in lymphoid structures in these models in addition to xenogeneic graft-versus-host responses. To understand and disseminate the improvements and limitations of humanized mouse models to the scientific community, the NIH sponsored and convened a meeting on April 15, 2015 to discuss the state of knowledge concerning these questions and best practices for selecting a humanized mouse model for a particular scientific investigation. This report summarizes the findings of the NIH meeting. PMID:26670361

  6. Fibroblast growth factor-1 stimulation of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells increases G/T mismatch-binding protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, P J; Feng, S L; Alberts, G F; Guo, Y; Peifley, K A; Hsu, D K; Winkles, J A

    1996-01-01

    Polypeptide growth factors promote cell-cycle progression in part by the transcriptional activation of a diverse group of specific genes. We have used an mRNA differential-display approach to identify several fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 (acidic FGF)-inducible genes in NIH 3T3 cells. Here we report that one of these genes, called FGF-regulated (FR)-3, is predicted to encode G/T mismatch-binding protein (GTBP), a component of the mammalian DNA mismatch correction system. The murine GTBP gene is transiently expressed after FGF-1 or calf serum treatment, with maximal mRNA levels detected at 12 and 18 h post-stimulation. FGF-1-stimulated NIH 3T3 cells also express an increased amount of GTBP as determined by immunoblot analysis. These results indicate that elevated levels of GTBP may be required during the DNA synthesis phase of the cell cycle for efficient G/T mismatch recognition and repair. PMID:8870641

  7. Research highlights from the UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietary Supplements Research for Women’s Health: Black cohosh from the field to the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Norman R; Mahady, Gail B.

    2009-01-01

    In 1999, the Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy at the College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois (UIC) at Chicago was funded to establish a Botanical Dietary Supplements Research Center from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The emphasis of the UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietary Supplements Research (CBDSR) is botanical dietary supplements (BDS) for women's health. Center’s research has focused on BDS that may improve women's health and quality of life, specifically in the areas of menopause, premenstrual syndrome, and persistent urinary tract infections. Center investigators have overcome many challenges associated with botanical dietary supplements research, including acquiring and identifying plant species for investigation, isolating and identifying active constituents, elucidating the mechanisms of action of these botanicals, and conducting phase I and phase II clinical studies. Black cohosh [Actaea racemosa L. (Ranunculaceae)] has been used as a model to illustrate the steps involved in taking a botanical dietary supplement from the field, all the way to clinical trials. Bioassays are described that were necessary to elucidate the pertinent biological studies of plant extracts and their mechanisms of action. The Center has used an innovative multidisciplinary approach to this type of research, and thus has been very successful in fulfilling its specific aims. PMID:20161501

  8. Thyrostimulin-TSHR signaling promotes the proliferation of NIH:OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells via trans-regulation of the EGFR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Lin, Ting-Yu; Wang, Sheng-Wen; Wu, Fang-Ju; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin signaling plays an indispensable role in ovarian cancer progression. We previously have demonstrated that thyrostimulin and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), the most ancient glycoprotein hormone and receptor pair that evolved much earlier than the gonadotropin systems, co-exist in the ovary. However, whether thyrostimulin-driven TSHR activation contributes to ovarian cancer progression in a similar way to gonadotropin receptors has never been explored. In this study, we first found that TSHR is expressed in both rat normal ovarian surface epithelium and human epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs). Using human NIH:OVCAR-3 as a cell model, we demonstrated that thyrostimulin promotes EOC cell proliferation as strongly as gonadotropins. Thyrostimulin treatment not only activated adenylyl cyclase and the subsequent PKA, MEK-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT signal cascades, but also trans-activated EGFR signaling. Signaling dissection using diverse inhibitors indicated that EOC cell proliferation driven by thyrostimulin-TSHR signaling is PKA independent, but does require the involvement of the MEK-ERK and PI3K-AKT signal cascades, which are activated mainly via the trans-activation of EGFR. Thus, not only have we proved that this ancient glycoprotein hormone system is involved in NIH:OVCAR-3 cell proliferation for the first time, but also that it may possibly become a novel oncotarget when studying ovarian cancer. PMID:27273257

  9. Study of smart antibacterial PCL-xFe3 O4 thin films using mouse NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pai B, Ganesh; Kulkarni, Ajay V; Jain, Shilpee

    2016-01-13

    Surface energy plays a major role in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell interactions with biomedical devices. In the present study, poly(ε-caprolactone)-xFe3 O4 nanoparticles (PCL-xFO NPs; x = 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 wt% FO concentration in PCL) composite thin films were developed for skin tissue regeneration. The surface properties in terms of roughness, surface energy, wettability of the thin films were altered with the incorporation of Fe3 O4 NPs. These thin films show antimicrobial properties and cyto-compatibility with NIH 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The porosity and thickness of the films were controlled by varying RPM of the spin coater. Interestingly, at 1000 RPM the roughness of the film decreased with increasing concentrations of FO NPs in PCL, whereas the surface energy increased with increasing FO NPs concentrations. Furthermore, the spreading of NIH-3T3 cells grown on PCL-xFO thin films was less as compared to control (TCPS), however cells overcame this effect after 48 h of seeding and cells spread similarly to those grown on TCPS after 48 h. Also, the incorporation of FO NPs in thin films induced inner membrane permeabilization in E. coli bacteria leading to bacterial cell death. The viability of E. coli bacteria decreased with increasing concentration of FO NPs in PCL. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  10. Amaranth lunasin-like peptide internalizes into the cell nucleus and inhibits chemical carcinogen-induced transformation of NIH-3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Cervantes, Enrique; Jeong, Hyung Jin; León-Galván, Fabiola; Barrera-Pacheco, Alberto; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; González de Mejia, Elvira; de Lumen, Ben O; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P

    2010-09-01

    Because an unbalanced diet is an important risk factor for several illnesses, interest has increased in finding novel health-promoting foods. Amaranth produces seeds that not only have substantial nutritional properties but that also contain phytochemical compounds as rutin and nicotiflorin and peptides with antihypertensive and anticarcinogenic activities. We report that a cancer-preventive peptide in amaranth has activities similar to those of soybean lunasin. The amaranth lunasin-like peptide, however, requires less time than the soybean lunasin to internalize into the nucleus of NIH-3T3 cells, and inhibits histone acetylation (H(3) and H(4) in a 70 and 77%, respectively). The amaranth lunasin-like peptide inhibited the transformation of NIH-3T3 cells to cancerous foci. The open reading frame (ORF) of amaranth lunasin corresponds to a bifunctional inhibitor/lipid-transfer protein (LTP). LTPs are a family of proteins that in plants are implicated in different functions, albeit all linked to developmental processes and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. Our results open new intriguing questions about the function of lunasin in plants and support that amaranth is a food alternative containing natural peptides with health-promoting benefits.

  11. Up-regulation of glutathione biosynthesis in NIH3T3 cells transformed with the ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Hong-Gyum; Lim, Hye-Won; Park, Eun-Hee; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2005-02-28

    The ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion, first identified in the chromosomal translocation in congenital fibrosarcoma, encodes a chimeric protein tyrosine kinase with potent transforming activity. ETV6-NTRK3-dependent transformation involves the joint action of NTRK3 signaling pathways, and aberrant cell cycle progression resulting from activation of Mek1 and Akt. The level of glutathione (GSH) was found to be markedly increased in ETV6-NTRK3-transformed NIH3T3 cells. The activities of the two GSH biosynthetic enzymes as well as of glutathione peroxidase, together with their mRNAs, were also higher in the transformed cells. The transformed cells were able to grow in the presence of GSH-depleting agents, whereas the control cells were not. L-Buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) inhibited activation of Mek1 and Akt in the transformed NIH3T3 cells. These observations imply that up-regulation of GSH biosynthesis plays a central role in ETV6-NTRK3-induced transformation.

  12. Loss of responsiveness of an AP1-related factor, PEBP1, to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate after transformation of NIH 3T3 cells by the Ha-ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Sataka, Masanobu; Ibaraki, Tamotsu; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Ito, Yoshiaki )

    1989-09-01

    The function of the A element (nucleotides 5107 to 5130) of the polyomavirus enhancer is augmented in NIH 3T3 cells by a tumor-promoting phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). One of its targets is an AP1 consensus sequence motif recognized by a nuclear factor, PEBP1. In Ha-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells, however, A element function was not enhanced by TPA treatment, and at the same time PEBP1 was not detected in the nuclear extract by a mobility shift assay. PEBP1 was not detected in either the extract from NIH 3T3 cells treated in vivo with a protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, or the extract from NIH 3T3 cells after treatment in vitro with phosphatase. These results suggest that PEBP1 is required to be properly phosphorylated for DNA binding and that it is underphosphorylated, possibly due to the downregulation of protein kinase C in Ha-ras-transformed cells. In addition, it was observed that PEBP2, which bound to the A element adjacent to PEBP1, was converted to apparently related PEBP3 when conditions favored underphosphorylation.

  13. Awareness of federal regulatory mechanisms relevant to community-engaged research: survey of health disparities-oriented NIH-funded investigators

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Anderson, Emily E.; Cowan, Ketch; Malen, Rachel C.; Brugge, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Few studies or investigators involved in community engaged research or community-based participatory research have examined awareness and adoption of federal regulatory mechanisms. We conducted a survey of investigators affiliated with the ten National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities. A questionnaire designed to capture experience with the conduct and oversight of community engaged research, and awareness of pertinent regulatory mechanisms, including Federalwide Assurances (FWAs), Individual Investigator Agreements (IIAs), and Institutional Review Board Authorization Agreements (IAAs), was completed by 101 respondents (68% response rate). Although most were aware of FWAs, only a minority of those surveyed reported knowledge of IAAs and IIAs and even fewer had used them in their research with community partners. Implications for future training and oversight are discussed. PMID:25742662

  14. Characterization of the pharmacology, signal transduction and internalization of the fluorescent PACAP ligand, fluor-PACAP, on NIH/3T3 cells expressing PAC1.

    PubMed

    Germano, P M; Stalter, J; Le, S V; Wu, M; Yamaguchi, D J; Scott, D; Pisegna, J R

    2001-06-01

    Fluor-PACAP, a fluorescent derivative of PACAP-27, has been confirmed to share a high affinity for PAC1 receptors transfected into NIH/3T3 cells and to have comparable pharmacological characteristics to the unconjugated, native form. Through competitive binding with 125I-PACAP-27, the two ligands exhibited similar dose- dependent inhibition. Additional examination of the efficacy of activating adenylyl cyclase revealed that both ligands analogously stimulated the production of cyclic AMP. Furthermore, PAC1 internalization visualized by our Fluor-PACAP, is compareable to that performed with the radioligand, 125I-PACAP-27, with maximal internalization achieved within thirty minutes. Thus, Fluor-PACAP exhibits intracellular signaling abilities homologous to the native ligand.

  15. The NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research Patient Registry Standard: A Report from the University of New Mexico’s Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvari, Shamsi; Youssof, Sarah; Kroth, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Patient registries remove barriers to performing research by assembling patient cohorts and data in a systematic, efficient, and proactive manner. Consequently, registries are a valuable strategy for facilitating research and scientific discovery. Registries for rare diseases are arguably even more valuable since there is difficulty in assembling cohorts of adequate size for study. Recently, the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research created a rare disease registry Standard to facilitate research across multiple registries. We implemented the Standard for the Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy patient registry created at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. We performed a data element analysis for each Common Data Element defined in the Standard. Problems included the use of previous HL7 versions, non-structured data types, and a recent update to the Standard. Overall, the Standard is an excellent first step toward standardizing patient registries to facilitate work on broader questions and promote novel interdisciplinary collaborations. PMID:24551336

  16. Effects of environmental and physiological covariates on sex differences in unconditioned and conditioned anxiety and fear in a large sample of genetically heterogeneous (N/Nih-HS) rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Physiological and environmental variables, or covariates, can account for an important portion of the variability observed in behavioural/physiological results from different laboratories even when using the same type of animals and phenotyping procedures. We present the results of a behavioural study with a sample of 1456 genetically heterogeneous N/Nih-HS rats, including males and females, which are part of a larger genome-wide fine-mapping QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci) study. N/Nih-HS rats have been derived from 8 inbred strains and provide very small distance between genetic recombinations, which makes them a unique tool for fine-mapping QTL studies. The behavioural test battery comprised the elevated zero-maze test for anxiety, novel-cage (open-field like) activity, two-way active avoidance acquisition (related to conditioned anxiety) and context-conditioned freezing (i.e. classically conditioned fear). Using factorial analyses of variance (ANOVAs) we aimed to analyse sex differences in anxiety and fear in this N/Nih-HS rat sample, as well as to assess the effects of (and interactions with) other independent factors, such as batch, season, coat colour and experimenter. Body weight was taken as a quantitative covariate and analysed by covariance analysis (ANCOVA). Obliquely-rotated factor analyses were also performed separately for each sex, in order to evaluate associations among the most relevant variables from each behavioural test and the common dimensions (i.e. factors) underlying the different behavioural responses. ANOVA analyses showed a consistent pattern of sex effects, with females showing less signs of anxiety and fear than males across all tests. There were also significant main effects of batch, season, colour and experimenter on almost all behavioural variables, as well as "sex × batch", "sex × season" and "sex × experimenter" interactions. Body weight showed significant effects in the ANCOVAs of most behavioural measures, but sex effects were

  17. Cytotoxicity of Agaricus sylvaticus in non-tumor cells (NIH/3T3) and tumor (OSCC-3) using tetrazolium (MTT) assay.

    PubMed

    Orsine, Joice Vinhal Costa; Marques Brito, Luíssa; Silva, Renata Carvalho; Santos Almeida, Maria de Fátima Menezes; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cytotoxic effect of the non-fractionated aqueous extract of A. sylvaticus mushroom in cultures of non-tumor cells (NIH3T3) and tumor cells (OSCC-3). The cells were maintained in DMEN cell culture medium added of 10% of fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotic. For the cytotoxicity test we prepared the aqueous mushroom extract at concentrations of 0.01 mg.ml⁻¹, 0.02 mg.ml⁻¹, 0.04 mg.ml⁻¹, 0.08 mg.ml⁻¹, 0.16 mg.ml⁻¹, and 0.32 mg.ml⁻¹. For the culture, 2 x 10⁵ cells/ml was deposited in 96-well microplates during 24 hour incubation with subsequent exchange of medium by another containing the mushroom concentrations. After 24 hour incubation the medium was discarded and 100 ml of tetrazolium blue (MTT) was added at a concentration of 5 mg.ml⁻¹. The microplates were incubated for 2 h at 37° C. Spectrophotometric analysis was performed using 570 nm wavelength. From the values of the optical densities we determined the drug concentration capable of reducing cell viability by 50%. Therefore, the mushroom A. sylvaticus, at all concentrations tested, did not show cytotoxic effects, once the inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) obtained for tumor cells OSCC-3 was 0.06194 mg.ml⁻¹, and the IC₅₀ checked for non-tumor cells NIH3T3 was 0,06468 mg.ml⁻¹. This test made it possible to determine that A. sylvaticus mushroom has no cytotoxic effects, suggesting its use safe for human consumption.

  18. Loss of platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated phospholipase activity in NIH-3T3 cells expressing the EJ-ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, C.W.; Tarpley, W.G.; Gorman, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Data indicating that the 21-kDa protein (p21) Harvey-ras gene product shares sequence homology with guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) has stimulated research on the influence(s) of p21 on G-protein-regulated systems in vertebrate cells. Previous work demonstrated that NIH-3T3 mouse cells expressing high levels of the cellular ras oncogene isolated from the EJ human bladder carcinoma (EJ-ras) exhibited reduced hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. The authors now report that in these cells another enzyme system thought to be regulated by G proteins is inhibited, namely phospholipases A/sub 2/ and C. NIH-3T3 cells incubated in plasma-derived serum release significant levels of prostaglandin E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 2/) as determined by radioimmunoassay when exposed to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 2 units/ml. The lack of PDGF-stimulated PGE/sub 2/ release from EJ-ras-transfected cells is not due to a defect in the prostaglandin cyclooxygenase enzyme, since incubation of control cells and EJ-ras-transfected cells in 0.33, 3.3, or 33 ..mu..M arachidonate resulted in identical levels of PGE/sub 2/ release. The lack of PDGF-stimulated PGE/sub 2/ release from EJ-ras-transfected cells also does not result from the loss of functional PDGF receptors. EJ-ras-transformed cells bind 70% as much /sup 125/I-labeled PDGF as control cells and are stimulated to incorporate (/sup 3/H)thymidine and to proliferate after exposure to PDGF. Determination of total water-soluble inositolphospholipids and changes in the specific activities of phosphatidylcholine in control and EJ-ras-transfected cells demonstrated that PDGF-stimulated phospholipase C and A/sub 2/ activities are inhibited in the EJ-ras-transfected cells.

  19. Antigen(s)-specific tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from tumour induced by human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) DNA transfected NIH 3T3 transformants.

    PubMed Central

    Puri, R K; Leland, P; Razzaque, A

    1991-01-01

    Tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) have recently been shown to mediate potent therapeutic effects in certain malignancies in mice and in humans. To understand the mechanism of TIL immunotherapy it would be advantageous to generate tumour-specific TIL and to study a defined system of TIL and target cells in which the tumour epitope(s) recognized by TIL might be identified. We have established tumourigenic cell lines by transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with the entire genome of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and its small fragment (about 5% of the viral DNA sequence). Injection of these cells into nude mice produced tumours termed G-2T and 14-2T, respectively. Cell lines derived from these tumours when injected in NIH Swiss mice produced tumours, G-2TS and 14-2TS, respectively. We have generated TIL from G-2TS tumour that can kill G-2TS tumour cells in vitro but not other related tumours (14-2TS or MCA-106). These TIL can be expanded between 2-6.5 every 3-5 days. The TIL proliferated in tissue culture in response to recombinant interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 and maintained their tumor specificity for up to 6 months in vitro. Their phenotype was Thy 1.2+, Lyt-2+ and L3T4-. The availability of such tumour-specific stable TIL lines and specific viral-transformed targets will provide an opportunity to characterize the tumour-associated antigen critical for the specific cytotoxicity in this system and thereby to clarify the mechanism of this promising immunological approach to cancer therapy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1703057

  20. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G.; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, “Low-PPI” NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to “Medium-PPI” and “High-PPI” NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps “at risk”) phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to

  1. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, "Low-PPI" NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to "Medium-PPI" and "High-PPI" NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps "at risk") phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia.

  2. A homeopathic remedy from arnica, marigold, St. John’s wort and comfrey accelerates in vitro wound scratch closure of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drugs of plant origin such as Arnica montana, Calendula officinalis or Hypericum perforatum have been frequently used to promote wound healing. While their effect on wound healing using preparations at pharmacological concentrations was supported by several in vitro and clinical studies, investigations of herbal homeopathic remedies on wound healing process are rare. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a commercial low potency homeopathic remedy Similasan® Arnica plus Spray on wound closure in a controlled, blind trial in vitro. Methods We investigated the effect of an ethanolic preparation composed of equal parts of Arnica montana 4x, Calendula officinalis 4x, Hypericum perforatum 4x and Symphytum officinale 6x (0712–2), its succussed hydroalcoholic solvent (0712–1) and unsuccussed solvent (0712–3) on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Cell viability was determined by WST-1 assay, cell growth using BrdU uptake, cell migration by chemotaxis assay and wound closure by CytoSelect ™Wound Healing Assay Kit which generated a defined “wound field”. All assays were performed in three independent controlled experiments. Results None of the three substances affected cell viability and none showed a stimulating effect on cell proliferation. Preparation (0712–2) exerted a stimulating effect on fibroblast migration (31.9%) vs 14.7% with succussed solvent (0712–1) at 1:100 dilutions (p < 0.001). Unsuccussed solvent (0712–3) had no influence on cell migration (6.3%; p > 0.05). Preparation (0712–2) at a dilution of 1:100 promoted in vitro wound closure by 59.5% and differed significantly (p < 0.001) from succussed solvent (0712–1), which caused 22.1% wound closure. Conclusion Results of this study showed that the low potency homeopathic remedy (0712–2) exerted in vitro wound closure potential in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. This effect resulted from stimulation of fibroblasts motility rather than of their mitosis. PMID:22809174

  3. Bioethics training programmes for Africa: evaluating professional and bioethics-related achievements of African trainees after a decade of Fogarty NIH investment

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Nancy E; Ali, Joseph; Hallez, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our primary aim was to evaluate the impact of US National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded bioethics training programmes (Fogarty bioethics training programmes, FBTPs) that trained individuals from Africa over the programme's first 10 years to examine changes between pretraining and post-training in individual achievement and to document any associations between individual, training programme and post-training accomplishments. Design We surveyed trainees from the 10 bioethics programmes funded by NIH Fogarty International Center from 2000 to 2011 that included African trainees. McNemar's and Wilcoxon signed rank-sum tests were used to analyse pre–post levels of general and bioethics-related professional achievement. Likelihood of specific post-training achievement outcomes was measured using logistic regression including demographic, pretraining and intratraining variables. Setting 10 different FBTPs that trained individuals from Africa from 2000 to 2011. Participants Of 253 eligible respondents, 171 completed the survey (response rate 67.6%). Primary outcome measures Pre–post comparisons of professional achievement indicators (eg, serving in leadership roles, teaching, publishing manuscripts); likelihood of specific post-training achievement outcomes. Results Post-training, respondents were significantly more likely to report serving in a leadership role, being an investigator on a research grant, serving on international committees, serving as a mentor, and publishing manuscripts than at pretraining. Post-training, significantly greater numbers of respondents reported bioethics-related achievements including being a bioethics instructor, serving on an Institutional Review Board (IRB), being an investigator on a bioethics grant and publishing bioethics-related manuscripts than pretraining. Controlling for other factors, there were no significant differences by gender in the post-training success of these participants in terms of leadership roles

  4. [Prostate histopathology of NIH category IV prostatitis detected by sextant prostate needle biopsy from the patients with high prostatic specific antigen].

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Tatsuya; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Madarame, Jun; Kimura, Takahiro; Onodera, Shouichi

    2003-08-01

    Asymptomatic prostatitis is classified as category IV in NIH classification of prostatitis syndrome (1999). No report concerning this category has been present. We investigated this category histopathologically and clinically, in order to clarify the histopathological distribution and its correlation to the clinical features, in this study. Among 785 patients who were suspected prostate cancer because of their high prostatic specific antigen (PSA) values and to have a sextant prostate needle biopsy was performed between January, 1996 and December, 2000, 88 patients (11.2%) were diagnosed as NIH category IV prostatitis (asymptomatic prostatitis). We observed all pathological specimens stained with Hematoxylin-Eosine, and classified them into subtypes according to the classification criteria for prostatitis defined by True et al. (1999). We also investigated the relationship between histopathological distribution and clinical features such as PSA values, PSA density, the incidence of pyuria or bacteriuria. In the histopathological study, grade distributions were 12.5% (11/88) in mild, 71.6% (63/88) in moderate, and 15.9% (14/88) in severe. Location distributions were 2.3% (2/88) in glandular, 68.2% (60/88) in periglandular, and 29.5% (26/88) in stromal. No relationship between these subtypes and clinical features was recognized statistically. However, 7 patients (7.95%) were diagnosed as prostate cancers, later. Pyuria was found in 29.1% (23/79). Bacteriuria was present in 14.3% (11/77). Isolated bacteria were 4 strains of Enterococcus faccalis, 2 strains of each of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, and one strain of each of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Gram positive rod, and Candida sp. No relationship between these subtypes and bacterial species was recognized. These results indicated that the incidence of NIII category IV prostatits

  5. The protective effects of guaraná extract (Paullinia cupana) on fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells exposed to sodium nitroprusside.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, L S; Machado, D C; Machado, M M; Dos Santos, G F F; Algarve, T D; Marinowic, D R; Ribeiro, E E; Soares, F A A; Barbisan, F; Athayde, M L; Cruz, I B M

    2013-03-01

    The antioxidant effects of the hydro-alcoholic guaraná extract (Paullinia cupana var. sorbilis Mart.) on nitric oxide (NO) and other compounds generated from the degradation of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in an embryonic fibroblast culture (NIH-3T3 cells) were evaluated. The guaraná bioactive compounds were initially determined by high-performance liquid chromatography: caffeine=12.240 mg/g, theobromine=6.733 mg/g and total catechins=4.336 mg/g. Cells were exposed to 10 μM SNP during a 6 h period because the cells exhibited >90% mortality at this concentration. Guaraná was added to the cultures in five concentrations (0.5, 1, 5, 10 and 20 mg/mL). The guaraná antioxidant effect was evaluated by viability assays, biochemical oxidation [lipid peroxidation, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity] and genotoxicity (DNA Comet assay) analysis. Additionally, oxidative stress was evaluated by a 2,7-dihydrodichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence assay. Guaraná reverted the SNP toxicity mainly at lower concentrations (<5 mg), which decreased cell mortality, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and cell oxidative stress as well as increased the SOD levels. These results demonstrate that guaraná has an antioxidant effect on NO metabolism in situations with higher cellular NO levels.

  6. Phosphorylation of the growth arrest-specific protein Gas2 is coupled to actin rearrangements during Go-->G1 transition in NIH 3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Growth arrest-specific (Gas2) protein has been shown to be a component of the microfilament system, that is highly expressed in growth arrested mouse and human fibroblasts and is hyperphosphorylated upon serum stimulation of quiescent cells. (Brancolini, C., S. Bottega, and C. Schneider. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 117:1251-1261). In this study we demonstrate that the kinetics of Gas2 phosphorylation, during Go-->G1 transition, as induced by addition of 20% FCS to serum starved NIH 3T3 cells, is temporally coupled to the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton. To better dissect the relationship between Gas2 phosphorylation and the modification of the microfilament architecture we used specific stimuli for both membrane ruffling (PDGF and PMA) and stress fiber formation (L-alpha-lysophosphatidic acid LPA) (Ridley, A. J., and A. Hall. 1992. Cell. 70:389-399). All of them, similarly to 20% FCS, are able to downregulate Gas2 biosynthesis. PDGF and PMA induce Gas2 hyperphosphorylation that is temporally coupled with the appearance of membrane ruffling where Gas2 localizes. On the other hand LPA, a specific stimulus for stress fiber formation, fails to induce a detectable Gas2 hyperphosphorylation. Thus, Gas2 hyperphosphorylation is specifically correlated with the formation of membrane ruffling possibly implying a role of Gas2 in this process. PMID:8120096

  7. Factors influencing the expression of endogenous reverse transcriptases and viral-like 30 elements in mouse NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Tzavaras, Theodore; Eftaxia, Sofia; Tavoulari, Sotiria; Hatzi, Paraskevi; Angelidis, Charalambos

    2003-10-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a definite role in retroviral life cycle and is essential for the process of retrotransposition. We investigated the RNA expression of endogenous reverse transcriptases (enRTs) in the NIH3T3 mouse genome using, as a probe, a mixture of RT-PCR generated reverse transcriptase products potentially detecting a large number of RTs following treatment with different agents. We found that the expression of enRTs is induced approximately 500-fold following 5'-azacytidine-treatment. Amongst steroid hormones used such as estradiol, diethylstilbestrol, progesterone and dexamethasone only the latter was effective in inducing enRTs up to 4-fold at a concentration of 10(-7) M. Expression of a mouse dominant-negative form of p53 protein in cell clones resulted in induction of 20- to 50-fold, whereas C2-ceramide in a 4-fold induction at concentrations of 20-80 micro M. In a parallel analysis, the respective expression of the transposable viral-like 30 elements (VL30s) was also measured. Their expression was induced up to 50-fold by 5'-azacytidine, overexpression of the p53 gene and C2-ceramide at 80 micro M. It was also induced approximately 3- to 5-fold following estradiol, diethylstilbestrol or progesterone treatment and 30-fold by dexamethasone. Collectively, our results suggest that such stimuli inducing enRTs might play a role in the activation of transcription and retrotransposition of VL30.

  8. Sheets of Vertically Aligned BaTiO3 Nanotubes Reduce Cell Proliferation but Not Viability of NIH-3T3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Marianna; Giannaccini, Martina; Sibillano, Teresa; Giannini, Cinzia; Liu, Dun; Wang, Zhigang; Baù, Andrea; Dente, Luciana; Cuschieri, Alfred; Raffa, Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    All biomaterials initiate a tissue response when implanted in living tissues. Ultimately this reaction causes fibrous encapsulation and hence isolation of the material, leading to failure of the intended therapeutic effect of the implant. There has been extensive bioengineering research aimed at overcoming or delaying the onset of encapsulation. Nanotechnology has the potential to address this problem by virtue of the ability of some nanomaterials to modulate interactions with cells, thereby inducing specific biological responses to implanted foreign materials. To this effect in the present study, we have characterised the growth of fibroblasts on nano-structured sheets constituted by BaTiO3, a material extensively used in biomedical applications. We found that sheets of vertically aligned BaTiO3 nanotubes inhibit cell cycle progression - without impairing cell viability - of NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells. We postulate that the 3D organization of the material surface acts by increasing the availability of adhesion sites, promoting cell attachment and inhibition of cell proliferation. This finding could be of relevance for biomedical applications designed to prevent or minimize fibrous encasement by uncontrolled proliferation of fibroblastic cells with loss of material-tissue interface underpinning long-term function of implants. PMID:25506693

  9. Technical Consultation of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Nickel Hydrogen (NiH2) Battery Charge Capacity Prediction. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Pandipati, Radha; Ling, Jerri; Miller, Thomas; Jeevarajan, Judith; Halpert, Gerald; Zimmerman, Albert

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the GSFC position paper is to identify critical HST milestone dates for continued science studies followed by the attachment of a re-entry module or a robotic servicing mission. The paper examines the viability of the HST with respect to the NiH2 continued battery charge capacity. In the course of the assessment, it was recognized that the HST battery thermal control system has an average heat dissipation limitation of 30 W per bay per orbit cycle. This thermal constraint will continue to govern options for battery capacity maintenance. In addition, the HST usage represents the longest exposure ofNiH2 batteries to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) at the current level of Depth of Discharge (DOD). Finally, the current battery life is at the limit predicted by the manufacturer, Eaglepicher. Therefore, given these factors, the potential exists that the HST battery capacities could radically degrade at any point. Given this caveat on any life extrapolations, the conservative model proposed in the GSFC position paper was viewed by the NESC as having several technical assumptions such as limited utilization of flight battery capacity data, the susceptibility of the proposed prediction method to large variations when supplemented with additional information, and the failure to qualitatively or quantitatively assess life prediction sensitivities. The NESC conducted an independent evaluation of the supporting information and assumptions to generate the predictions for battery capacity loss and practicality of on-orbit battery conditioning.

  10. Impact of the National Institutes of Health Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (NIH FSGS) clinical trial on the treatment of steroid-resistant FSGS.

    PubMed

    Canetta, Pietro A; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2013-03-01

    Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is among the most common, morbid and treatment-resistant conditions faced by nephrologists. While glucocorticoids have traditionally been the mainstay of initial treatment, they induce remission in only a minority of patients. A variety of other immunosuppressants have been utilized against steroid-resistant FSGS, but few have been rigorously examined in well-controlled trials. Recently, the results were published from a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored multicenter randomized trial comparing cyclosporine (CSA) with a combination of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and pulse dexamethasone (DEX) for the treatment of steroid-resistant FSGS. No difference in treatment effectiveness was shown between the two groups, and adverse effects were comparable. This was the largest randomized trial ever undertaken in FSGS, but it was unfortunately underpowered to show clinically relevant differences in response rates. This shortcoming, along with particularities of the study population and outcome measures, makes it challenging to draw definitive conclusions from the trial results. Despite these limitations, the trial does provide valuable insights into treatment strategies for FSGS and offers important lessons for planning future research.

  11. The translational science training program at NIH: Introducing early career researchers to the science and operation of translation of basic research to medical interventions.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, C Taylor; Sittampalam, G Sitta; Wang, Philip Y; Ryan, Philip E

    2017-01-02

    Translational science is an emerging field that holds great promise to accelerate the development of novel medical interventions. As the field grows, so does the demand for highly trained biomedical scientists to fill the positions that are being created. Many graduate and postdoctorate training programs do not provide their trainees with sufficient education to take advantage of this growing employment sector. To help better prepare the trainees at the National Institutes of Health for possible careers in translation, we have created the Translational Science Training Program (TSTP). The TSTP is an intensive 2- to 3-day training program that introduces NIH postdoctoral trainees and graduate students to the science and operation of turning basic research discoveries into a medical therapeutic, device or diagnostic, and also exposes them to the variety of career options in translational science. Through a combination of classroom teaching from practicing experts in the various disciplines of translation and small group interactions with pre-clinical development teams, participants in the TSTP gain knowledge that will aid them in obtaining a career in translational science and building a network to make the transition to the field. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):13-24, 2017.

  12. Grading criteria for chronic ocular graft-versus-host disease: Comparing the NIH eye score, Japanese dry eye score, and DEWS 2007 score

    PubMed Central

    Tatematsu, Yukako; Ogawa, Yoko; Abe, Takayuki; Kamoi, Mizuka; Uchino, Miki; Saijo-Ban, Yumiko; Yaguchi, Saori; Mukai, Shin; Mori, Takehiko; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Ocular graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a common complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here we compared the diagnostic rates of ocular GVHD, including its severity, prognosis and the agreement, obtained using three grading scales: the National Institutes of Health (NIH) eye score, Japanese dry eye score, and dry eye workshop score, by retrospectively reviewing the records of 82 patients who underwent HSCT. Tear dynamics and ocular surface assessments made 6–9 months after HSCT were used to determine ocular GVHD severity with the three scales. By the three scales, ocular GVHD was diagnosed in 56 patients (68.3%), 51 patients (62.2%), and 52 patients (63.4%), respectively. The Kappa coefficient was calculated to determine the agreement between scales for diagnosing ocular GVHD. The severity progression within two years after onset was also assessed by tear dynamics and ocular surface examination. The patients were categorized as no change, improved, or progressive. The three grading scales showed good agreement (Kappa = 0.87 to 0.97) in diagnosing patients with ocular GVHD, and the scores by all three were significantly associated with the patients' prognosis (p < 0.01). We recommend that multi-center research is needed for further validation and investigation. PMID:25338290

  13. The apoptotic effect of nanosilver is mediated by a ROS- and JNK-dependent mechanism involving the mitochondrial pathway in NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chun-Feng; Huang, Shing; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2008-07-10

    Nanomaterials and nanoparticles have received considerable attention recently because of their unique properties and diverse biotechnology and life sciences applications. Nanosilver products, which have well-known antimicrobial properties, have been used extensively in a range of medical settings. Despite the widespread use of nanosilver products, relatively few studies have been undertaken to determine the biological effects of nanosilver exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of nanosilver and to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms underlying the biological effects of nanosilver. Here, we show that nanosilver is cytotoxic, inducing apoptosis in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells. Treatment with nanosilver induced the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol and translocation of Bax to mitochondria, indicating that nanosilver-mediated apoptosis is mitochondria-dependent. Nanosilver-induced apoptosis was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and JNK activation, and inhibition of either ROS or JNK attenuated nanosilver-induced apoptosis. In nanosilver-resistant HCT116 cells, up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 appeared to be associated with a diminished apoptotic response. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for a molecular mechanism of nanosilver cytotoxicity, showing that nanosilver acts through ROS and JNK to induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway.

  14. Widening the mutation spectrum of EVC and EVC2: ectopic expression of Weyer variants in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts disrupts Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Maria; Lapunzina, Pablo; Lim, Derek; Zannolli, Raffaella; Bartholdi, Deborah; Wollnik, Bernd; Al-Ajlouni, Othman; Eid, Suhair S; Cox, Helen; Buoni, Sabrina; Hayek, Joseph; Martinez-Frias, Maria L; Antonio, Perez-Aytes; Temtamy, Samia; Aglan, Mona; Goodship, Judith A; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2009-12-01

    Autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and autosomal dominant Weyer acrodental dysostosis are allelic conditions caused by mutations in EVC or EVC2. We performed a mutation screening study in 36 EvC cases and 3 cases of Weyer acrodental dysostosis, and identified pathogenic changes either in EVC or in EVC2 in all cases. We detected 40 independent EVC/EVC2 mutations of which 29 were novel changes in Ellis-van Creveld cases and 2 were novel mutations identified in Weyer pedigrees. Of interest one EvC patient had a T>G nucleotide substitution in intron 7 of EVC (c.940-150T>G), which creates a new donor splice site and results in the inclusion of a new exon. The T>G substitution is at nucleotide +5 of the novel 5' splice site. The three Weyer mutations occurred in the final exon of EVC2 (exon 22), suggesting that specific residues encoded by this exon are a key part of the protein. Using murine versions of EVC2 exon 22 mutations we demonstrate that the expression of a Weyer variant, but not the expression of a truncated protein that mimics an Ellis-van Creveld syndrome mutation, impairs Hedgehog signal transduction in NIH 3T3 cells in keeping with its dominant effect.

  15. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(L-Lysine) cationic hybrid materials for non-viral gene delivery in NIH 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Renjith P; Uthaman, Saji; John, Johnson V; Heo, Min Seon; Park, In Kyu; Suh, Hongsuk; Kim, Il

    2014-09-01

    In order to develop efficient and nontoxic gene delivery vectors, a series of biocompatible block copolymers, poly[(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)40 -block-(L-lysine)n ] (n = 40, 80, 120, 150), are prepared by combining an atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate with a ring-opening polymerization of N(ϵ) -(carbobenzoxy)-L-lysine N-carboxyanhydride. The block copolymers are successfully condensed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) into nanosized (<200 nm) polyplexes. As a representative sample, p(HEMA)40 -b-p(lys)150 is utilized to confirm the effective cellular and nuclear uptake of pDNA. The polymer/pDNA polyplexes exhibit very low cytotoxicity and enhanced transfection activity by being easily taken up into mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line (NIH 3T3). Thus, the chimeric block copolymers provide a means for developing versatile nonviral gene vectors harboring the ideal requirements of low cytotoxicity, good stability, and high transfection efficiency for gene therapy.

  16. Viral-cellular junction fragment from a human papillomavirus type 16-positive tumor is competent in transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Le, J.Y.; Defendi, V.

    1988-11-01

    A 4.4-kilobase DNA fragment (T4.4) from a human tumor was found to be competent to fully transform NIH 3T3 cells. This competency resides in the whole hybrid DNA fragment, since the separate viral or cellular DNA sequences were not active. Abundant E6-E7 transcripts were found in the transformed cells. When the cellular fragments were substituted with polyadenylation sequences from polyomavirus or simian virus 40 DNA, little or no restoration of transforming activity was observed. In experiments in which an exogenous reporting gene, that for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, was used, the possibility was excluded that the cellular flanking sequences act as a traditional enhancer; yet, when the cellular sequences were placed downstream of a cloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression vector (pSV2 CAT), activity of the reference gene was clearly enhanced. These results indicate that DNA containing human papillomavirus type 16 open reading frames E6 and E7 isolated from the genome of a human tumor has transforming potential, but this potential is realized when the viral DNA is joined to cellular sequences, and that the cellular sequences function in a more complex way than by simply providing polyadenylation signals.

  17. Right ventricular failure due to chronic pressure load: What have we learned in animal models since the NIH working group statement?

    PubMed

    Borgdorff, Marinus A J; Dickinson, Michael G; Berger, Rolf M F; Bartelds, Beatrijs

    2015-07-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure determines outcome in patients with pulmonary hypertension, congenital heart diseases and in left ventricular failure. In 2006, the Working Group on Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Right Heart Failure of the NIH advocated the development of preclinical models to study the pathophysiology and pathobiology of RV failure. In this review, we summarize the progress of research into the pathobiology of RV failure and potential therapeutic interventions. The picture emerging from this research is that RV adaptation to increased afterload is characterized by increased contractility, dilatation and hypertrophy. Clinical RV failure is associated with progressive diastolic deterioration and disturbed ventricular-arterial coupling in the presence of increased contractility. The pathobiology of the failing RV shows similarities with that of the LV and is marked by lack of adequate increase in capillary density leading to a hypoxic environment and oxidative stress and a metabolic switch from fatty acids to glucose utilization. However, RV failure also has characteristic features. So far, therapies aiming to specifically improve RV function have had limited success. The use of beta blockers and sildenafil may hold promise, but new therapies have to be developed. The use of recently developed animal models will aid in further understanding of the pathobiology of RV failure and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  18. Pharmaco-Phylogenetic Investigation of Methyl Gallate Isolated from Acacia nilotica (L.) Delile and Its Cytotoxic Effect on NIH3T3 Mouse Fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rohit K; Ramakrishna, M; Mishra, Vani; Pathak, Ashutosh; Rajesh, S; Sharma, Shivesh; Pandey, Avinash C; Nageswara Rao, G; Dikshit, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Present exploration deals with the therapeutic perspective of methyl gallate isolated from the leaf extract of Acacia nilotica (L.) Delile in contrast to food-borne bacterial pathogen's viz., Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus with their evolutionary succession. The extract was subjected to phytochemical analysis and isolated compound was identified as methyl gallate using UV-vis, IR and NMR spectra. It was found most potent against K. pneumoniae with its minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of 0.32 mg/ml and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) at 0.62 mg/ml. The correlation of MIC values with an evolutionary succession assists the relationship between their genetic and toxic properties. The cytotoxic pursuit of methyl gallate was additionally assessed over NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast by Neutral red (NR) uptake, MTT cell proliferation assay and did not disclose any relevant influence on cell viability as well as cell proliferation. As such, the methyl gallate extracted from the leaf of A. nilotica holds massive antibacterial aptitude and hands out towards a new paradigm for food and pharmaceutical industries.

  19. Overexpression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in NIH 3T3 cells lowers membrane potential and intracellular pH and confers a multidrug resistance phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L Y; Stutts, M J; Hoffman, M M; Roepe, P D

    1995-01-01

    Because of the similarities between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, recent observations of decreased plasma membrane electrical potential (delta psi) in cells overexpressing either MDR protein or the CFTR, and the effects of delta psi on passive diffusion of chemotherapeutic drugs, we have analyzed chemotherapeutic drug resistance for NIH 3T3 cells overexpressing different levels of functional CFTR. Three separate clones not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs exhibit resistance to doxorubicin, vincristine, and colchicine that is similar to MDR transfectants not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs. Two other clones expressing lower levels of CFTR are less resistant. As shown previously these clones exhibit decreased plasma membrane delta psi similar to MDR transfectants, but four of five exhibit mildly acidified intracellular pH in contrast to MDR transfectants, which are in general alkaline. Thus the MDR protein and CFTR-mediated MDR phenotypes are distinctly different. Selection of two separate CFTR clones on either doxorubicin or vincristine substantially increases the observed MDR and leads to increased CFTR (but not measurable MDR or MRP) mRNA expression. CFTR overexpressors also exhibit a decreased rate of 3H -vinblastine uptake. These data reveal a new and previously unrecognized consequence of CFTR expression, and are consistent with the hypothesis that membrane depolarization is an important determinant of tumor cell MDR. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 PMID:8519988

  20. Neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis associated with overexpression of imup-1 and imup-2 genes in cultured NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ryoo, Zae Young . E-mail: jaewoong64@hanmail.net; Jung, Boo Kyoung; Lee, Sang Ryeul; Kim, Myoung Ok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Hyo Jin; Ahn, Jung Yong; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Cho, Youl Hee; Park, Jae Hak; Kim, Jin Kyeoung

    2006-10-27

    Immortalization-upregulated protein 1 (IMUP-1) and immortalization-upregulated protein 2 (IMUP-2) genes have been recently cloned and are known to be involved in SV40-mediated immortalization. IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 genes were strongly expressed in various cancer cell lines and tumors, suggesting the possibility that they might be involved in tumorigenicity. To directly elucidate the functional role of IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 on neoplastic transformation and tumorigenicity, we stably transfected IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 into NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Cellular characteristics of the neoplastic transformation were assessed by transformation foci, growth in soft agar, and tumor development in nude mice. We found that IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 overexpressing cells showed altered growth properties, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and inducing tumor in nude mice. Furthermore, IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 transformants proliferated in reduced serum and shortened cell cycle. These results suggest that ectopic overexpression of IMUP-1 and IMUP-2 may play an important role in acquiring a transformed phenotype, tumorigenicity in vivo, and be related to cellular proliferation.

  1. A Blueprint of Pain Curriculum across Prelicensure Health Sciences Programs: One NIH Pain Consortium Center of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPE) Experience

    PubMed Central

    Doorenbos, AZ; Gordon, DB; Tauben, D; Palisoc, J; Drangsholt, M; Lindhorst, T; Danielson, J; Spector, J; Ballweg, R; Vorvick, L; Loeser, JD

    2013-01-01

    To improve U.S. pain education and promote inter-institutional and inter-professional collaborations, the NIH Pain Consortium has funded 12 sites to develop Centers of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPE). Each site was given the tasks of development, evaluation, integration, and promotion of pain management curriculum resources, including case studies that will be shared nationally. Collaborations among schools of medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and others were encouraged. The John D. Loeser CoEPE is unique in that it represents extensive regionalization of health science education, in this case in the region covering the states of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho (WWAMI). This paper describes a blueprint of pain content and teaching methods across the University of Washington’s six health sciences schools and provides recommendations for improvement in pain education at the prelicensure level. The Schools of Dentistry and Physician Assistant provide the highest percentage of total required curriculum hours devoted to pain compared with the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work. The findings confirm paucity of pain content in health sciences curricula, missing International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) curriculum topics, and limited use of innovative teaching methods such as problem-based and team-based learning. PMID:24094694

  2. Gene Expression Patterns of Hemizygous and Heterozygous KIT Mutations Suggest Distinct Oncogenic Pathways: A Study in NIH3T3 Cell Lines and GIST Samples

    PubMed Central

    Dessaux, Sophie; Besse, Anthony; Brahimi-Adouane, Sabrina; Emile, Jean-François; Blay, Jean-Yves; Alberti, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Objective Most gain of function mutations of tyrosine kinase receptors in human tumours are hemizygous. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) with homozygous mutations have a worse prognosis. We aimed to identify genes differentially regulated by hemizygous and heterozygous KIT mutations. Materials and Methods Expression of 94 genes and 384 miRNA was analysed with low density arrays in five NIH3T3 cell lines expressing the full-length human KIT cDNA wild-type (WT), hemizygous KIT mutation with del557-558 (D6) or del564-581 (D54) and heterozygous WT/D6 or WT/D54. Expression of 5 of these genes and 384 miRNA was then analysed in GISTs samples. Results Unsupervised and supervised hierarchical clustering of the mRNA and miRNA profiles showed that heterozygous mutants clustered with KIT WT expressing cells while hemizygous mutants were distinct. Among hemizygous cells, D6 and D54 expressing cells clustered separately. Most deregulated genes have been reported as potentially implicated in cancer and severals, as ANXA8 and FBN1, are highlighted by both, mRNA and miRNA analyses. MiRNA and mRNA analyses in GISTs samples confirmed that their expressions varied according to the mutation of the alleles. Interestingly, RGS16, a membrane protein of the regulator of G protein family, correlate with the subcellular localization of KIT mutants and might be responsible for regulation of the PI3K/AKT signalling pathway. Conclusion Patterns of mRNA and miRNA expression in cells and tumours depend on heterozygous/hemizygous status of KIT mutations, and deletion/presence of TYR568 & TYR570 residues. Thus each mutation of KIT may drive specific oncogenic pathways. PMID:23593401

  3. PKCeta associates with cyclin E/Cdk2 complex in serum-starved MCF-7 and NIH-3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Shtutman, Marat; Hershko, Tzippi; Maissel, Adva; Fima, Eyal; Livneh, Etta

    2003-05-15

    Protein kinase C (PKC) encodes a family of enzymes implicated in cellular differentiation, growth control, and tumor promotion. However, very little is known with respect to the molecular mechanisms that link protein kinase C to cell cycle control. Here we report that PKCeta associates with the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex. This is shown for the ectopically overexpressed PKCeta in NIH-3T3 cells, the inducibly expressed PKCeta in MCF-7 cells (under control of the tetracycline-responsive promoter), and the endogenously expressed PKCeta in mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cells. Subcellular cell fractionation experiments revealed that the complex with cyclin E is formed mostly in the nuclear fractions, although in these cells PKCeta is predominantly expressed in the cytosolic fractions. The complex of PKCeta and cyclin E was studied at various phases of the cell cycle, in serum-starved quiescent cells and in cells stimulated with serum to reenter the cell cycle. Interestingly, the interaction between PKCeta and cyclin E was most prominent in serum-starved cells and was disintegrated when cells entered the cells cycle. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that in serum-starved cells PKCeta is concentrated at the perinuclear zone, which is also the site of its colocalization with cyclin E. Colocalization of PKCeta and cyclin E in the perinuclear region was observed in serum-starved cells, and less in proliferating cells. These experiments suggest that the interaction between PKCeta and cyclin E is carefully regulated, and is correlated with the inactivated form of the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex. Thus, our studies support an important link between PKC and cell cycle control.

  4. Screening for dysglycaemia during pregnancy: Proposals conciliating International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) and US National Institutes of Health (NIH) panels.

    PubMed

    Cosson, E; Valensi, P; Carbillon, L

    2015-06-01

    The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) has proposed that blood glucose levels for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) be the values associated with a 1.75-fold increase in the risk of neonatal complications in the Hyperglycaemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) study. However, this recommendation was not adopted by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) panel as it would have been responsible for a huge increase in the prevalence of GDM with no clear evidence of a reduction of events at such blood glucose values. Considering this aspect, we now propose the use of a blood glucose threshold combination associated with an odds-ratio of 2.0 for neonatal disorders [fasting plasma glucose (FPG)≥ 95 mg/dL, or a 1-h glucose value after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)≥ 191 mg/dL or a 2-h glucose value ≥ 162 mg/dL] for GDM diagnosis. This would lead to a lower prevalence of GDM and concentrate medical resources on those with the highest risk of complications. This would also allow the use of a similar FPG value for both the diagnosis and therapeutic target of GDM. The IADPSG also proposed screening for dysglycaemia during early pregnancy, using FPG measurement with a similar threshold after 24 weeks of gestation. We propose the same strategy considering an FPG value ≥ 95 mg/dL as abnormal, but only after confirmatory measurements. We also believe that an OGTT should not be used before 24 weeks of gestation as normal values during that time are as yet unknown.

  5. Sodium alginate-cross-linked polymyxin B sulphate-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: Antibiotic resistance tests and HaCat and NIH/3T3 cell viability studies.

    PubMed

    Severino, Patrícia; Chaud, Marco V; Shimojo, Andrea; Antonini, Danilo; Lancelloti, Marcelo; Santana, Maria Helena A; Souto, Eliana B

    2015-05-01

    Polymyxins are a group of antibiotics with a common structure of a cyclic peptide with a long hydrophobic tail. Polymyxin B sulphate (PLX) has cationic charge, which is an obstacle for the efficient loading into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN). In the present paper, we describe an innovative method to load PLX into SLN to achieve the sustained release of the drug. PLX was firstly cross-linked with sodium alginate (SA) at different ratios (1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 SA/PLX), and loaded into SLN produced by high pressure homogenization (HPH). Optimized SLN were produced applying 500bar pressure and 5 homogenization cycles. The best results were obtained with SA/PLX (1:1), recording 99.08±1.2% for the association efficiency of the drug with SA, 0.99±10g for the loading capacity and 212.07±5.84% degree of swelling. The rheological profile of aqueous SA solution followed the typical behaviour of concentrated polymeric solutions, whereas aqueous SA/PLX solution exhibited a gel-like dynamic behaviour. Micrographs show that SA/PLX depicted a porous and discontinuous amorphous phase in different ratios. The encapsulation efficiency of SA/PLX (1:1) in SLN, the mean particle diameter, polydispersity index and zeta potential were, respectively, 82.7±5.5%; 439.5±20.42nm, 0.241±0.050 and -34.8±0.55mV. The effect of SLN on cell viability was checked in HaCat and NIH/3T3 cell lines, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. SA/PLX-loaded SLN were shown to be less toxic than free PLX. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) showed the presence of the cross-linker polymer-drug complex, and SLN were shown to enhance MIC in the evaluated strains.

  6. Antigenicity of cell wall mannans of Candida albicans NIH B-792 (serotype B) strain cells cultured at high temperature in yeast extract-containing sabouraud liquid medium.

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Y; Goto, K; Nemoto, S; Akashi, M; Sugawara, C; Hanzawa, M; Kawamata, M; Takahata, T; Shibata, N; Kobayashi, H; Suzuki, S

    1996-01-01

    Cultivation of Candida albicans NIH B-792 (serotype B) at high temperature (37 degrees C) for 48 h in yeast extract-containing Sabouraud liquid medium (YSLM) provided the following findings in comparison with the findings obtained after incubation at 27 degrees C. Growth of the blastoconidia of this strain was decreased, with a dry weight of 9%, and the cells were deficient in cytokinesis. The cells did not undergo agglutination with serum factor 5 from a commercially available serum factor kit (Candida Check). Mannan (B-37-M) obtained from the cells cultured at 37 degrees C had partially lost its reactivity against serum factor 4 and lost most of its reactivity against serum factor 5 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in contrast to that (B-27-M) at 27 degrees C. Both cells and mannan prepared by cultivation first at 37 degrees C and then at 27 degrees C entirely recovered their reactivities with serum factors 4 and 5. 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis also revealed that B-37-M had lost a beta-1,2-linked mannopyranose unit and retained a phosphate group. Similar changes were observed in the three other serotype B strains used in the study. The beta-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides longer than mannotetraose were not included among the products released from B-37-M by mild acid treatment. The results of the inhibition ELISA with a series of beta-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides from biose to octaose (M2 to M8, respectively) showed that the reactivity against serum factor 4 was inhibited most strongly by the oligosaccharides M4 to M8 and that the reactivity against serum factor 5 was inhibited completely by relatively longer oligosaccharides, M5 to M8, indicating their participation as the antigenic factor 5 epitopes. PMID:8705679

  7. Identification of a novel potent, selective and cell permeable inhibitor of protein kinase CK2 from the NIH/NCI Diversity Set Library.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Barbara; Hochscherf, Jennifer; Jensen, Nina Bjelkerup; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2015-08-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein kinase CK2 increasingly becomes an attractive target in cancer research with great therapeutic potential. Here, we have performed an in vitro screening of the Diversity Set III of the DTP program from the NCI/NIH, comprising 1600 compounds. We have identified 1,3-Dichloro-6-[(E)-((4-methoxyphenyl)imino)methyl] dibenzo(b,d) furan-2,7-diol (referred to as D11) to be a potent and selective inhibitor of protein kinase CK2. The D11 compound was tested against 354 eukaryotic protein kinases. By setting the threshold for inhibition to <2% remaining kinase activity, only DYRK1B, IRAK1 and PIM3 were inhibited to an extent as the tetrameric CK2 holoenzyme and its catalytic subunits α and α'. The IC50 values for the CK2α and CK2α' were on average 1-2 nM in comparison to the DYRK1B, IRAK1 and PIM3 kinases, which ranged from 18 to 49 nM. Cell permeability and efficacy of D11 were tested with cells in culture. In MIA PaCa-2 cells (human pancreatic carcinoma cell line), the phosphorylation of the CK2 biomarker CDC37 at S13 was almost completely inhibited in the presence of D11. This was observed both under normoxia and hypoxia. In the case of the human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line, H1299, increasing amounts of D11 led to an inhibition of S380/T382/383 phosphorylation in PTEN, another biomarker for CK2 activity.

  8. NIH Precision Medicine Initiative | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine and research. Well-known for his molecular biology and biochemistry research, Keith leads a major precision ... because of advances in basic research, including molecular biology, genomics, and bioinformatics. Furthermore, the initiative taps into ...

  9. Latest NIH Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... The results showed 20 percent fewer lung cancer deaths among trial participants screened with low-dose CT compared to those who got screened with chest X-rays. Clinical Trials Related to Smoking Clinical trials are scientific studies that try to ...

  10. Risk stratification systems for surgically treated localized primary Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST). Review of literature and comparison of the three prognostic criteria: MSKCC Nomogramm, NIH-Fletcher and AFIP-Miettinen.

    PubMed

    Belfiori, Giulio; Sartelli, Massimo; Cardinali, Luca; Tranà, Cristian; Bracci, Raffaella; Gesuita, Rosaria; Marmorale, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    L’avvento dell’Imatinib mesilato (glivec) ha rivoluzionato la terapia dei GIST, apportando un aumento della sopravvivenza libera da malattia dopo resezione chirurgica completa di un GIST a localizzazione primitiva (RFS: Recurrence Free Survival). La definizione di un sistema prognostico accurato è fondamentale per decidere quali pazienti sottoporre a tale trattamento. In letteratura, esistono attualmente vari sistemi prognostici di riferimento in grado di predire la probabilità di recidiva, tra cui: NIH-FLETCHER, AFIP-MIETTINEN standard e modificato. A questi che sono i più diffusamente utilizzati, di recente si sono aggiunti altri metodi che utilizzano modelli matematici o no, come il Nomogramma del MSKCC, Nomogramma di Rossi ed il Joensuu high hotline Degjun. Nonostante tutti questi tentativi la storia naturale dei GIST rimane ancora non completamente nota e controversa e non è ancora possibile predire le recidive con una accuratezza assoluta. Lo scopo del nostro studio è stato quello di trovare quale sistema è più accurato e pratico per essere utilizzato nella nostra pratica clinica. Particolare attenzione è stata posta al Nomogamma del MSKCC, che è stato pertanto confrontato con i NIH-Fletcher ed AFIPMiettinen. Sono stati analizzati retrospettivamente i dati riguardanti 37 GIST operati presso il nostro istituto dal 2002 al 2012 e da questi sono stati selezionati 27 GIST a localizzazione primitiva, completamente resecati c non trattati con l’imatinib ne prima ne dopo l’intervento, sui quali è stato eseguito il confronto. Le conclusioni sono state che il nomogramma MSKCC è un metodo prognostico pratico, sicuro e valido, probabilmente più del NIH e AFIP e può essere utilizzato nella pratica clinica per predire il rischio di recidiva, specialmente nella pianificazione della strategia terapeutica, anche se non è un metodo ottimale per calcolare il tempo di sopravvivenza libera da recidiva. Il limite del Nomogramma del MSKCC sta nel valutare il

  11. Red and processed meat, nitrite, and heme iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Sinha, Rashmi; Gierach, Gretchen L; Ward, Mary H

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have shown inconsistent associations between red and processed meat intake and breast cancer risk. N-nitroso compounds and heme iron have been hypothesized as contributing factors. We followed 193,742 postmenopausal women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and identified 9,305 incident breast cancers (1995-2006). Dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. We adjusted daily intakes of meat, nitrite and heme iron for energy intake using the nutrient density method. We estimated multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by quintiles of dietary exposures for all breast cancer, by stage (in-situ, localized, regional/distant) and by estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) status using Cox proportional hazards regression. Total red meat intake was positively associated with risk of regional/distant cancer (p-trend = 0.02). The risk was 25% higher in the highest vs. lowest intake quintile (95% CI = 1.03-1.52). Higher processed red meat intake (Q5 vs. Q1) was associated with 27% higher risk of localized breast cancer (95% CI = 1.01-1.27, p-trend = 0.03) and a 19% higher risk of regional/distant cancer (95% CI = 0.98-1.44, p-trend = 0.10). In addition, higher nitrite intake from processed red meat was positively associated with localized cancer (HR for Q5 vs. Q1 = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.09-1.39, p-trend < 0.0001). Heme iron intake was positively associated with breast cancer risk overall and all cancer stages (p-trend = 0.02-0.05). No heterogeneity was observed in risk associations by hormone receptor status. Our findings suggest that high consumption of red meat and processed meat may increase risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Added nitrite and heme iron may partly contribute to these observed associations.

  12. Evaluation of anti-Zika virus activities of broad-spectrum antivirals and NIH clinical collection compounds using a cell-based, high-throughput screen assay.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Robert S; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Golden, Jennifer E; Chung, Dong-Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have clearly underscored the association between Zika virus (ZIKV) and severe neurological diseases such as microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Given the historical complacency surrounding this virus, however, no significant antiviral screenings have been performed to specifically target ZIKV. As a result, there is an urgent need for a validated screening method and strategy that is focused on highlighting potential anti-ZIKV inhibitors that can be further advanced via rigorous validation and optimization. To address this critical gap, we sought to test whether a cell-based assay that measures protection from the ZIKV-induced cytopathic effect could serve as a high-throughput screen assay for discovering novel anti-ZIKV inhibitors. Employing this approach, we tested the anti-ZIKV activity of previously known broad-spectrum antiviral compounds and discovered several compounds (e.g., NITD008, SaliPhe, and CID 91632869) with anti-ZIKV activity. Interestingly, while GTP synthesis inhibitors (e.g., ribavirin or mycophenolic acid) were too toxic or showed no anti-ZIKV activity (EC50 > 50 μM), ZIKV was highly susceptible to pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors (e.g., brequinar) in the assay. We amended the assay into a high-throughput screen (HTS)-compatible 384-well format and then screened the NIH Clinical Compound Collection library, which includes a total of 727 compounds organized, using an 8-point dose response format with two Zika virus strains (MR766 and PRVABC59, a recent human isolate). The screen discovered 6-azauridine and finasteride as potential anti-ZIKV inhibitors with EC50 levels of 3.18 and 9.85 μM for MR766, respectively. We further characterized the anti-ZIKV activity of 6-azauridine and several pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors such as brequinar in various secondary assays including an antiviral spectrum test within flaviviruses and alphaviruses, Western blot (protein), real-time PCR (RNA), and plaque reduction assays (progeny

  13. Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... The NINDS also collaborates with the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) on BioFIND , a ... an Art / Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease / Michael J. Fox: Spurring Research on Parkinson's / Diagnosis and Treatment / Research ...

  14. NIH Standard. Animal Care Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Office of Administrative Management.

    The National Institutes of Health standardized animal care equipment is presented in this catalog. Each piece of equipment is illustrated and described in terms of overall dimensions, construction, and general usage. A price list is included to estimate costs in budgeting, planning, and requisitioning animal care equipment. The standards and…

  15. NIH Quickfinder and NIH Medline Plus Advisory Group | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... ex-officio) Lakshmi Grama, National Cancer Institute Susan Johnson, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Thomas Johnson, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Kathy ...

  16. On the sequence of three related phases of [Ni(H2O)2(15-crown-5)](HSO4)2 in the temperature range 110-295 K.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Maxime A; Stavitski, Eli

    2010-08-01

    Attempts to prepare the compound [Ni(H(2)O)(2)(15-crown-5)](X)(2) were eventually successful with X = NO(3)(-) provided that a synthetic route aimed at restricting water was followed. Application of this method was extended to make the analogous compound with X = HSO(4)(-), for which three symmetry-related phases were isolated between 295 and 110 K: a room-temperature phase with Z' = (1/2) [phase (I)], an intermediate-temperature phase with Z' = 1 [phase (II)] and a low-temperature phase with Z' = 2 [phase (III)]. The phases are related by two reversible solid-solid phase transitions, and both transitions take place without a significant loss of crystallinity. In the phase sequence (I) <--> (II) <--> (III) (Z': (1/2) <--> 1 <--> 2), the crystal packing remains remarkably similar but the degree of order in the crystal changes significantly; the structure is very disordered at room and intermediate temperatures but is ordered at 110 K. The compound [Ni(H(2)O)(2)(15-crown-5)](HSO(4))(2) has a complicated hydrogen-bonding network, which contains O-H...O bonds between the counterions. Structural changes are largest along some face-diagonal directions in the sequence (I) <--> (II) <--> (III).

  17. Development of an NIH consortium for preclinicAl AssESsment of CARdioprotective therapies (CAESAR): a paradigm shift in studies of infarct size limitation.

    PubMed

    Lefer, David J; Bolli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    biomarkers, and relevant animal models (including conscious animals and models of comorbidities). Therapies will be tested in 3 species (anesthetized mouse, conscious rabbit, and conscious pig). A major goal is to ensure reproducibility; to this end, each study in each species will be performed in 2 centers using identical protocols. The structure of CAESAR will ensure that the consortium will be a true public resource available to all interested investigators and that all proposed studies will be evaluated in an equitable fashion. Proposals for studying cardioprotective therapies will be solicited from the entire scientific community. The consortium will be available at no cost to all National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded investigators. This unique infrastructure will enable rigorous preclinical evaluation of promising cardioprotective therapies and will serve the entire scientific community (both in the academia and in the biomedical industry), thereby constituting a public resource. Consortium for preclinicAl assESsment of cARdioprotective therapies will be a major paradigm shift in cardioprotection. By screening promising therapies and identifying those that are truly effective in relevant experimental models and, thus, most likely to be effective in patients, CAESAR will dramatically advance our ability to rationally translate basic findings into clinical use. This article will summarize the rationale, structure, and operation of the NHLBI CAESAR Consortium.

  18. Chemical composition of the essential oil from basil (Ocimum basilicum Linn.) and its in vitro cytotoxicity against HeLa and HEp-2 human cancer cell lines and NIH 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kathirvel, Poonkodi; Ravi, Subban

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the chemical composition and in vitro anticancer activity of the essential oil from Ocimum basilicum Linn. (Lamiaceae), cultivated in the Western Ghats of South India. The chemical compositions of basil fresh leaves were identified by GC-MS: 11 components were identified. The major constituents were found to be methyl cinnamate (70.1%), linalool (17.5%), β-elemene (2.6%) and camphor (1.52%). The results revealed that this plant may belong to the methyl cinnamate and linalool chemotype. A methyl thiazol tetrazolium assay was used for in vitro cytotoxicity screening against the human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa), human laryngeal epithelial carcinoma cell line (HEp-2) and NIH 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The IC(50) values obtained were 90.5 and 96.3 µg mL(-1), respectively, and the results revealed that basil oil has potent cytotoxicity.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization, and Study of In Vitro Cytotoxicity of ZnO-Fe3O4 Magnetic Composite Nanoparticles in Human Breast Cancer Cell Line (MDA-MB-231) and Mouse Fibroblast (NIH 3T3).

    PubMed

    Bisht, Gunjan; Rayamajhi, Sagar; Kc, Biplab; Paudel, Siddhi Nath; Karna, Deepak; Shrestha, Bhupal G

    2016-12-01

    Novel magnetic composite nanoparticles (MCPs) were successfully synthesized by ex situ conjugation of synthesized ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and Fe3O4 NPs using trisodium citrate as linker with an aim to retain key properties of both NPs viz. inherent selectivity towards cancerous cell and superparamagnetic nature, respectively, on a single system. Successful characterization of synthesized nanoparticles was done by XRD, TEM, FTIR, and VSM analyses. VSM analysis showed similar magnetic profile of thus obtained MCPs as that of naked Fe3O4 NPs with reduction in saturation magnetization to 16.63 emu/g. Also, cell viability inferred from MTT assay showed that MCPs have no significant toxicity towards noncancerous NIH 3T3 cells but impart significant toxicity at similar concentration to breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231. The EC50 value of MCPs on MDA-MB-231 is less than that of naked ZnO NPs on MDA-MB-231, but its toxicity on NIH 3T3 was significantly reduced compared to ZnO NPs. Our hypothesis for this prominent difference in cytotoxicity imparted by MCPs is the synergy of selective cytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles via reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exhausting scavenging activity of cancerous cells, which further enhance the cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 NPs on cancer cells. This dramatic difference in cytotoxicity shown by the conjugation of magnetic Fe3O4 NPs with ZnO NPs should be further studied that might hold great promise for the development of selective and site-specific nanoparticles. Schematic representation of the conjugation, characterization and cytotoxicity analysis of Fe3O4-ZnO magnetic composite particles (MCPs).

  20. 2-Methoxy-4-vinylphenol can induce cell cycle arrest by blocking the hyper-phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein in benzo[a]pyrene-treated NIH3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Jeong, Hyung Jin

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} 2M4VP activated the expression of p21 and p15 protein, and down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E. {yields} 2M4VP inhibited hyper-phosphorylation of Rb protein. {yields} 2M4VP induced cell cycle arrest from G1 to S. {yields} 2M4VP inhibited hyper-proliferation of the cells in BaP-treated cells. {yields} 2M4VP induces growth arrest of BaP-treated cells by blocking hyper-phosphorylation of Rb via regulating the expression of cell cycle-related proteins. -- Abstract: Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is an environment carcinogen that can enhance cell proliferation by disturbing the signal transduction pathways in cell cycle regulation. In this study, the effects of 2M4VP on cell proliferation, cell cycle and cell cycle regulatory proteins were studied in BaP-treated NIH 3T3 cells to establish the molecular mechanisms of 2M4VP as anti-proliferative agents. 2M4VP exerted a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell growth correlated with a G1 arrest. Analysis of G1 cell cycle regulators expression revealed 2M4VP increased expression of CDK inhibitor, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p15 INK4b, decreased expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and inhibited kinase activities of CDK4 and CDK2. However, 2M4VP did not affect the expression of CDK4 and CDK2. Also, 2M4VP inhibited the hyper-phosphorylation of Rb induced by BaP. Our results suggest that 2M4VP induce growth arrest of BaP-treated NIH 3T3 cells by blocking the hyper-phosphorylation of Rb via regulating the expression of cell cycle-related proteins.

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, and Study of In Vitro Cytotoxicity of ZnO-Fe3O4 Magnetic Composite Nanoparticles in Human Breast Cancer Cell Line (MDA-MB-231) and Mouse Fibroblast (NIH 3T3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, Gunjan; Rayamajhi, Sagar; KC, Biplab; Paudel, Siddhi Nath; Karna, Deepak; Shrestha, Bhupal G.

    2016-12-01

    Novel magnetic composite nanoparticles (MCPs) were successfully synthesized by ex situ conjugation of synthesized ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and Fe3O4 NPs using trisodium citrate as linker with an aim to retain key properties of both NPs viz. inherent selectivity towards cancerous cell and superparamagnetic nature, respectively, on a single system. Successful characterization of synthesized nanoparticles was done by XRD, TEM, FTIR, and VSM analyses. VSM analysis showed similar magnetic profile of thus obtained MCPs as that of naked Fe3O4 NPs with reduction in saturation magnetization to 16.63 emu/g. Also, cell viability inferred from MTT assay showed that MCPs have no significant toxicity towards noncancerous NIH 3T3 cells but impart significant toxicity at similar concentration to breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231. The EC50 value of MCPs on MDA-MB-231 is less than that of naked ZnO NPs on MDA-MB-231, but its toxicity on NIH 3T3 was significantly reduced compared to ZnO NPs. Our hypothesis for this prominent difference in cytotoxicity imparted by MCPs is the synergy of selective cytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles via reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exhausting scavenging activity of cancerous cells, which further enhance the cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 NPs on cancer cells. This dramatic difference in cytotoxicity shown by the conjugation of magnetic Fe3O4 NPs with ZnO NPs should be further studied that might hold great promise for the development of selective and site-specific nanoparticles.

  2. Expression of Caveolin-1 reduces cellular responses to TGF-{beta}1 through down-regulating the expression of TGF-{beta} type II receptor gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Youn Sook; Han, In-Oc; Park, Seok Hee . E-mail: parks@skku.edu

    2007-07-27

    Transcriptional repression of Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} type II receptor (T{beta}RII) gene has been proposed to be one of the major mechanisms leading to TGF-{beta} resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells down-regulates the expression of T{beta}RII gene in the transcriptional level, eventually resulting in the decreased responses to TGF-{beta}. The reduced expression of T{beta}RII gene by Cav-1 appeared to be due to the changes of the sequence-specific DNA binding proteins to either Positive Regulatory Element 1 (PRE1) or PRE2 of the T{beta}RII promoter. In addition, Cav-1 expression inhibited TGF-{beta}-mediated cellular proliferation and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor (PAI)-1 gene expression as well as TGF-{beta}-induced luciferase activity. Furthermore, the inhibition of endogeneous Cav-1 by small interfering RNA increased the expression of T{beta}RII gene. These findings strongly suggest that expression of Cav-1 leads to the decreased cellular responsiveness to TGF-{beta} through down-regulating T{beta}RII gene expression.

  3. Evaluation of the sensitivity of the 'Wiley registry of tandem mass spectral data, MSforID' with MS/MS data of the 'NIST/NIH/EPA mass spectral library'.

    PubMed

    Oberacher, Herbert; Whitley, Graeme; Berger, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    Tandem mass spectral libraries are versatile tools for small molecular identification finding application in forensic science, doping control, drug monitoring, food and environmental analysis, as well as metabolomics. Two important libraries are the 'Wiley Registry of Tandem Mass Spectral Data, MSforID' (Wiley Registry MSMS) and the collection of MS/MS spectra part of the 2011 edition of the 'NIST/NIH/EPA Mass Spectral Library' (NIST 11 MSMS). Herein, the sensitivity and robustness of the Wiley Registry MSMS were evaluated using spectra extracted from the NIST 11 MSMS library. The sample set was found to be heterogeneous in terms of mass spectral resolution, type of CID, as well as applied collision energies. Nevertheless, sensitive compound identification with a true positive identification rate ≥95% was possible using either the MSforID Search program or the NIST MS Search program 2.0g for matching. To rate the performance of the Wiley Registry MSMS, cross-validation experiments were repeated using subcollections of NIST 11 MSMS as reference library and spectra extracted from the Wiley Registry MSMS as positive controls. Unexpectedly, with both search algorithms tested, correct results were obtained in less than 88% of cases. We examined possible causes for the results of the cross validation study. The large number of precursor ions represented by a single tandem mass spectrum only was identified as the basic cause for the comparably lower sensitivity of the NIST library.

  4. Generation of human innate immune responses towards membrane macrophage colony stimulating factor (mM-CSF) expressing U251 glioma cells within immunodeficient (NIH-nu/beige/xid) mice.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Christina; Hoa, Neil; Callahan, Linda L; Schiltz, Patric M; Jahroudi, Reza Alipanah; Zhang, Jian Gang; Wepsic, H Terry; Jadus, Martin R

    2007-06-01

    The response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to cloned human HLA-A2+ U251 glioma cells (U251-2F11/TK) expressing membrane macrophage colony stimulating factor (mM-CSF) was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Enriched human monocytes derived from cancer patients produced a respiratory burst following 20min of interaction with mM-CSF expressing U251 glioma cells. This respiratory burst response was not observed in the enriched human monocytes following similar exposure to the viral vector control U251 (U251-VV) cells. Reactive oxygen species such as H(2)O(2) and HOCl produced death of the U251 cells. The U251-2F11/TK cells failed to grow in severely compromised combined immunodeficient (NIH-bg-nu-xidBR) mice that were depleted of murine monocyte/macrophages then reconstituted with human HLA-A2+ PBMC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were produced by PBMC, both in vitro and in vivo in response tomM-CSF expressing U251 cells. U251-2F11/TK cells failed to form subcutaneous tumors in macrophage depleted mice reconstituted with human PBMC; whereas, progressive growth of such tumors was observed with the U251-VV cells. U251-2F11/TK tumors formed if the initial inoculums of PBMC were depleted of monocytes. From this work it can be concluded that mM-CSF transduced U251-2F11/TK glioma cells can safely stimulate human innate immune responses in vivo.

  5. Effect of in vitro administered 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on DNA-binding activities of nuclear transcription factors in NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seong Gu; Sasagawa, Hiromi; Matsumura, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    TCDD is a very toxic environmental contaminant which is known to cause a variety of toxic symptoms in many species. Because of a myriad of biochemical changes TCDD is known to induce in many test animals, it has been difficult to pinpoint the causative event common to all those symptoms in different species. One of the research avenues we have been following is identification of the pattern of TCDD-induced changes in DNA binding characteristics of nuclear transcription factors (NTFs), each of which has the property to trigger a set of coordinated changes in many gene expressions. Since in our previous work we studied animals affected by TCDD in vivo using gel mobility shift assay approached with32P labeled oligonucleotide probes, we examined in the current study the possibility whether we could establish an equivalent in vitro system in NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cells so as to be able to learn the similarities and the dissimilarities of TCDD-induced responses of NTFs between in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that, for a large part, this in vitro test system could reasonably reproduce the pattern of changes occurring in vivo at the early stages of TCDD's action in terms of induced changes in binding of thes NTSs to DNA. The key features were TCDD induced upregulation of NTFs binding to the response elements for AP-1, dioxin (DRE) and T3 (thyroid hormone) and down-regulation of those to response elements (REs) for c-Myc, Sp-1 and retinoic acid receptor (RARE). However, the time course required the changes in DNA binding activity was much shorter in vitro. To study the basic cause for such changes in NTF binding, we studied the effects of exogenously added EGF, forskolin, TPA (12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol acetate) and TNFalpha on the expression of TCDD's action on some of these NTFs. The results showed that these agents indeed greatly influence the outcome. The most influential agents were TNFalpha, forskolin and EGF. These results indicate that this in vitro

  6. Molecularly Characterized Solvent Extracts and Saponins from Polygonum hydropiper L. Show High Anti-Angiogenic, Anti-Tumor, Brine Shrimp, and Fibroblast NIH/3T3 Cell Line Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Muhammad; Junaid, Muhammad; Ullah, Farhat; Sadiq, Abdul; Subhan, Fazal; Khan, Mir Azam; Ahmad, Waqar; Ali, Gowhar; Imran, Muhammad; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Polygonum hydropiper is used as anti-cancer and anti-rheumatic agent in folk medicine. This study was designed to investigate the anti-angiogenic, anti-tumor, and cytotoxic potentials of different solvent extracts and isolated saponins. Samples were analyzed using GC, Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) to identify major and bioactive compounds. Quantitation of antiangiogenesis for the plant's samples including methanolic extract (Ph.Cr), its subsequent fractions; n-hexane (Ph.Hex), chloroform (Ph.Chf), ethyl acetate (Ph.EtAc), n-Butanol (Ph.Bt), aqueous (Ph.Aq), saponins (Ph.Sp) were performed using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Potato disc anti-tumor assay was performed on Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing tumor inducing plasmid. Cytotoxicity was performed against Artemia salina and mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 cell line following contact toxicity and MTT cells viability assays, respectively. The GC–MS analysis of Ph.Cr, Ph.Hex, Ph.Chf, Ph.Bt, and Ph.EtAc identified 126, 124, 153, 131, and 164 compounds, respectively. In anti-angiogenic assay, Ph.Chf, Ph.Sp, Ph.EtAc, and Ph.Cr exhibited highest activity with IC50 of 28.65, 19.21, 88.75, and 461.53 μg/ml, respectively. In anti-tumor assay, Ph.Sp, Ph.Chf, Ph.EtAc, and Ph.Cr were most potent with IC50 of 18.39, 73.81, 217.19, and 342.53 μg/ml, respectively. In MTT cells viability assay, Ph.Chf, Ph.EtAc, Ph.Sp were most active causing 79.00, 72.50, and 71.50% cytotoxicity, respectively, at 1000 μg/ml with the LD50 of 140, 160, and 175 μg/ml, respectively. In overall study, Ph.Chf and Ph.Sp have shown overwhelming results which signifies their potentials as sources of therapeutic agents against cancer. PMID:27065865

  7. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bartlett, National Human Genome Research Institute Break a Sweat, Reduce Your Stroke Risk Here's another reason to ... suggests that regular exercise—enough to break a sweat—may reduce the risk of having a stroke. ...

  8. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... a collection of scientific images of blood, bacteria, viruses, and more, enlarged up to 50,000 times. Scientists created the images for medical research. The colors come from chemical dyes and computer programs used to better see biology. Life: Magnified ...

  9. NiH2 Cycle Life Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollandsworth, Roger P.; Armantrout, Jon D.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2002-01-01

    Cycle life studies have been performed at Eagle Picher Technologies (EPT), on HST Mantech design cells with various pedigrees of slurry and dry sinter processed electrodes, to evaluate peak load voltage performance during generic load profile testing. These tests provide information for determining voltage and capacity fade (degradation) mechanisms, and their impact on nickel hydrogen cell cycle life. Comparison of peak load voltage fade, as a function of State of Charge and cycle life, with capacity data from HST indicates that the cycle life limiting mechanism is due to impedance growth, and formation of a second discharge plateau. With a second plateau on discharge, capacity from the cell is still available, but at an unacceptable low voltage of 0.8 V per cell (17.6 V battery). Data shows that cell impedance increases with cycle number and depth of discharge, as expected.

  10. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... for biomarkers on tiny, fluid-filled sacs called exosomes. Exosomes are released by cells and circulate in blood. ... Nature on July 9, 2015. The scientists compared exosomes from a human cancer cell line and several ...

  11. Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director

    MedlinePlus

    ... concluded successfully in April 2003 with the complete map of the human genome, the instruction book for peoples' DNA. Dr. Collins is also known for discovering a number of important genes, including those responsible for cystic fibrosis, neurofibromatosis, Huntington's ...

  12. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Researchers led by Gideon Lack, M.D., of ... Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D., and National Cancer Institute Director Harold Varmus, M.D., wrote a ...

  13. Skin Diseases: NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person's immune cells to attack the skin cancer cells. Other forms of immunotherapy are also being studied. A recent small study showed that treating patients with immune system cells found in tumors could shrink skin cancer tumors and possibly prolong life, too. Another study ...

  14. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthlines Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents Ebola Virus Disease Information The outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa may have you looking for accurate and updated information. The Ebola topic page on Medlineplus.gov rounds up helpful ...

  15. Healthlines | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents The Biology of Addiction: Drugs and Alcohol Can Hijack Your ... scientists are working to learn more about the biology of addiction. They've shown that addiction is ...

  16. From The NIH Director - Envisioning the Future

    MedlinePlus

    ... even more important for basic research and understanding biology. MedlinePlus : There has been lots of news recently ... tomography (CAT) is a way of looking at biology indirectly; at anatomy, structure, and function. And whenever ...

  17. Vision and Mission | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences both generates new knowledge and seeks to ensure that the products of cancer control research are effectively applied in all segments of the population.

  18. Student Interns Tour Two NIH Facilities | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Thirty-five Werner H. Kirsten student interns toured the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda in August to learn about the services and opportunities available.

  19. Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Indians ever undertaken Jackson Heart Study of African Americans www.jacksonheartstudy.org The mission of the Jackson ... for the greater prevalence of cardiovascular disease among African Americans and uncover new approaches for reducing this health ...

  20. NIH News in Health: September 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wein, Harrison, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    News in Health, is a monthly newsletter that provides practical health news and information. As college students arrive on campus this fall, it is a time of new experiences, new friendships and making memories that will last a lifetime. Unfortunately for many, it can also be a time of excessive drinking and dealing with its aftermath--vandalism,…