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Sample records for nine-cell tesla cavity

  1. NUCLEAR PHYSICS: The First Nine-Cell TESLA Cavity Made in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiang-Yang; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; Hao, Jian-Kui; Zhu, Feng; Lin, Lin; Xu, Wen-Can; Wang, Er-Dong; Wang, Fang; Jin, Song; Xin, Tian-Mu; Yao, Zhong-Yuan; Chen, Jia-Er; Zhao, Kui

    2008-11-01

    A totally home-made 9-cell TESLA type superconducting cavity is made at Peking University. The cavity fabrication is according to DESY specification. The cavity is made of high purity niobium from OTIC, Ningxia. The electron beam welding is carried out at Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin. By the cooperation, the cavity is tested at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, USA. The preliminary result shows the acceleration gradient Eacc is 23MV/m without quench and has potential for improvement.

  2. HOM study and parameter calculation of the TESLA cavity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ri-Hua; Schuh, Marcel; Gerigk, Frank; Wegner, Rolf; Pan, Wei-Min; Wang, Guang-Wei; Liu, Rong

    2010-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is the project for a superconducting, high current H-accelerator at CERN. To find dangerous higher order modes (HOMs) in the SPL superconducting cavities, simulation and analysis for the cavity model using simulation tools are necessary. The existing TESLA 9-cell cavity geometry data have been used for the initial construction of the models in HFSS. Monopole, dipole and quadrupole modes have been obtained by applying different symmetry boundaries on various cavity models. In calculation, scripting language in HFSS was used to create scripts to automatically calculate the parameters of modes in these cavity models (these scripts are also available in other cavities with different cell numbers and geometric structures). The results calculated automatically are then compared with the values given in the TESLA paper. The optimized cavity model with the minimum error will be taken as the base for further simulation of the SPL cavities.

  3. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

    2008-07-07

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

  4. Tuning for the first 9-cell TESLA cavity of PKU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; He, Fei-Si; Xu, Wen-Can; Zhu, Feng; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Zhao, Kui

    2010-04-01

    A method based on circuit model is used to tune the first home-made 9-cell TESLA type superconducting niobium cavity at Peking University. After tuning, a flat field profile with a final π-mode frequency within 3 kHz of target frequency is achieved. The field flatness is measured by a bead-pull method, and the relative electric field is calculated from the frequency shift perturbed by the bead stepping along the axis of the cavity.

  5. Hydroforming of Tesla Cavities at Desy

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; H. Kaiser; X. Singer; I. Gonin; I. Zhelezov; T. Khabibullin; P. Kneisel; K. Saito

    2000-07-01

    Since several years the development of seamless niobium cavity fabrication by hydro forming is being pursued at DESY. This technique offers the possibility of lower cost of fabrication and perhaps better rf performance of the cavities because of the elimination of electron-beam welds, which in the standard fabrication technique have sometimes lead to inferior cavity performance due to defects. Several single cell 1300 MHz cavities have been formed from high purity seamless niobium tubes, which are under computer control expanded with internal pressure while simultaneously being swaged axially. The seamless tubes have been made by either back extrusion and flow forming or by spinning or deep drawing. Standard surface treatment techniques such as high temperature post purification, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), electropolishing (EP) and high pressure ultra pure water rinsing (HPR) have been applied to these cavities. The cavities exhibited high Q - values of 2 x 10{sup 10} at 2K and residual resistances as low as 3 n{Omega} after the removal of a surface layer of app. 100 {micro}m by BCP. Surprisingly, even at high gradients up to the maximum measured values of E{sub acc} {approx} 33 MV/m the Q-value did not decrease in the absence of field emission as often observed. After electropolishing of additional 100 {micro}m one of the cavities reached an accelerating gradient of E{sub acc} {ge} 42 MV/m.

  6. Note on the SC Linear Collider TESLA Cavity Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekutowicz, J.; Proch, D.; Tang, C.

    1997-05-01

    The experience we have gained over the last few years from experiments with superconducting cavities for the TESLA test facility justifies a revision of the design decided almost five years ago. The proposed new design takes advantage of the high quality factor Q0 > 10^10 and the low electron emission as demonstrated by some tested cavities. The main aim of the new design is to simplify the production and preparation of sc cavities and thus to reduce the cost of the linear collider. The new cavity shape has an enlarged iris diameter with the following advantages: significant lower loss factors, simplified and less expensive scheme for the HOM damping, suitability of hydroforming and higher stability of the field profile.

  7. A Single Crystal Niobium RF Cavity of the TESLA Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Kneisel, P.

    2007-08-09

    A fabrication method for single crystal niobium cavities of the TESLA shape was proposed on the basis of metallographic investigations and electron beam welding tests on niobium single crystals. These tests showed that a cavity can be produced without grain boundaries even in the welding area. An appropriate annealing allows the outgassing of hydrogen and stress relaxation of the material without destruction of the single crystal. A prototype single crystal single cell cavity was build. An accelerating gradient of 37.5 MV/m was reached after approximately 110 {mu}m of Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) and in situ baking at 120 deg. C for 6 hrs with a quality factor exceeding 2x1010 at 1.8 K. The developed fabrication method can be extended to fabrication of multi cell cavities.

  8. A Single Crystal Niobium RF Cavity of the TESLA Shape

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; X. Singer; P. Kneisel

    2007-09-01

    A fabrication method for single crystal niobium cavities of the TESLA shape was proposed on the basis of metallographic investigations and electron beam welding tests on niobium single crystals. These tests showed that a cavity can be produced without grain boundaries even in the welding area. An appropriate annealing allows the outgassing of hydrogen and stress relaxation of the material without destruction of the single crystal. A prototype single crystal single cell cavity was built. An accelerating gradient of 37.5 MV/m was reached after approximately 110 mu-m of Buffered Chanical Polishing (BCP) and in situ baking at 120°C for 6 hrs with a quality factor exceeding 2x1010 at 1.8 K. The developed fabrication method can be extended to fabrication of multi cell cavities.

  9. Coaxial Coupling Scheme for TESLA/ILC-type Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports about our efforts to develop a flangeable coaxial coupler for both HOM and fundamental coupling for 9-cell TESLA/ILC-type cavities. The cavities were designed in early 90‘s for pulsed operation with a low duty factor, less than 1 %. The proposed design of the coupler has been done in a way, that the magnetic flux B at the flange connection is minimized and only a field of <5 mT would be present at the accelerating field Eacc of ~ 36 MV/m (B =150 mT in the cavity). Even though we achieved reasonably high Q-values at low field, the cavity/coupler combination was limited in the cw mode to only ~ 7 MV/m, where a thermally initiated degradation occurred. We have improved the cooling conditions by initially drilling radial channels every 30 degrees, then every 15 degrees into the shorting plate. The modified prototype performed well up to 9 MV/m in cw mode. This paper reports about our experiences with the further modified coaxial coupler and about test results in cw and low duty cycle pulsed mode, similar to the TESLA/ILC operation conditions.

  10. MEASUREMENT OF THE TRANSVERSE BEAM DYNAMICS IN A TESLA-TYPE SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Eddy, N.; Edstrom, D.; Lunin, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.; Solyak, N.

    2016-09-26

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, ultra-stable, high-quality electron beams that have widespread applications in Science and Industry. Many project are based on the 1.3-GHz TESLA-type superconducting cavity. In this paper we provide an update on a recent experiment aimed at measuring the transfer matrix of a TESLA cavity at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The results are discussed and compared with analytical and numerical simulations.

  11. Short bunch wake potentials for a chain of TESLA cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; Mosnier, Alban

    2014-11-01

    The modification of wake fields from a single cavity to a quasi-periodic structure of cavities is of great concern, especially for applications using very short bunches. We extend our former study (Novokhatski, 1997 [1]). A strong modification of wake fields along a train of cavities was clearly found for bunch lengths lower than 1 mm. In particular, the wakes induced by the bunch, as it proceeds down the successive cavities, decrease in amplitude and become more linear around the bunch center, with a profile very close to the integral of the charge density. The loss factor, decreasing also with the number of cells, becomes independent of bunch length for very short bunches and tends asymptotically to a finite value. This nice behavior of wake fields for short bunches presents good opportunity for application of very short bunches in Linear Colliders and X-ray Free Electron Lasers.

  12. Preliminary Measurement of the Transfer Matrix of a TESLA-type Cavity at FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, Aliaksei; Eddy, Nathan; Edstrom, Dean; Lunin, Andrei; Piot, Philippe; Ruan, Jinhao; Santucci, James; Solyak, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting linacs are capable of producing intense, ultra-stable, high-quality electron beams that have widespread application in Science and Industry. Many current and planned projects employ 1.3-GHz 9-cell superconducting cavities of the TESLA design*. In the present paper we discuss the transverse-focusing properties of such a cavity and non-ideal transverse-map effects introduced by field asymmetries in the vicinity of the input and high-order-mode radiofrequency (RF) couplers**. We especially consider the case of a cavity located downstream of an RF-gun in a setup similar to the photoinjector of the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. Preliminary experimental measurements of the CC2 cavity transverse matrix were carried out at the FAST facility. The results are discussed and compared with analytical and numerical simulations.

  13. Steering and focusing effects in TESLA cavity due to high order mode and input couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Dohlus, M.; Flottmann, K.; Marx, M.; Wipf, S.G.; /DESY

    2005-05-01

    Many state-of-art electron accelerator proposals incorporate TESLA-type superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities [1]. These standing wave rf cavities include rf input couplers and a pair of high order mode (HOM) couplers to absorb the energy associated to HOM field excited as the bunch passes through the cavity. In the present paper we investigate, using numerical simulations, the impact of the input and HOM couplers on the beam dynamics to zeroth and first order in initial position, and present parametric studies of the strength of these effects for various incoming beam energies. We finally study the impact of this asymmetric field on the beam dynamics, taking as an example the low energy section of the X-ray FEL injector.

  14. Monopole passband excitation by field emitters in 9-cell TESLA-type cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Knobloch, J.; Matveenko, A.

    2010-08-01

    We present an extension of the calculation of dipole-mode driven beam break-up instabilities, as calculated in [V. Volkov, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 011301 (2009); PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.011301V. Volkov, J. Knobloch, and A. Matveenko, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams (to be published)PRABFM1098-4402], to the monopole fundamental mode passband. The excitation of these modes has been observed in 9-cell TESLA cavities on test stands without beam [G. Kreps , Proceedings of SRF2009 (HZB, Berlin, Germany, 2009), pp. 289-291] and the same effect has been observed in klystrons with high DC currents.

  15. Performance in the vertical test of the 832 nine-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschke, D.; Gubarev, V.; Schaffran, J.; Steder, L.; Walker, N.; Wenskat, M.; Monaco, L.

    2017-04-01

    The successful production and associated vertical testing of over 800 superconducting 1.3 GHz accelerating cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) represents the culmination of over 20 years of superconducting radio-frequency R&D. The cavity production took place at two industrial vendors under the shared responsibility of INFN Milano-LASA and DESY. Average vertical testing rates at DESY exceeded 10 cavities per week, peaking at up to 15 cavities per week. The cavities sent for cryomodule assembly at Commissariat à l'énergie atomique (CEA) Saclay achieved an average maximum gradient of approximately 33 MV /m , reducing to ˜30 MV /m when the operational specifications on quality factor (Q) and field emission were included (the so-called usable gradient). Only 16% of the cavities required an additional surface retreatment to recover their low performance (usable gradient less than 20 MV /m ). These cavities were predominantly limited by excessive field emission for which a simple high pressure water rinse (HPR) was sufficient. Approximately 16% of the cavities also received an additional HPR, e.g. due to vacuum problems before or during the tests or other reasons, but these were not directly related to gradient performance. The in-depth statistical analyses presented in this report have revealed several features of the series produced cavities.

  16. ACCELERATORS: Stop band characteristics of a TESLA cavity coaxial-type HOM coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Er-Dong; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; Noguchi, S.; Watanabe, K.; Zhao, Kui

    2009-05-01

    A TTF-type coaxial higher order modes (HOM) coupler has been used in a TESLA 9 cell cavity. It is impossible to measure the stop band characteristics of the HOM coupler with the cavity. A measurement device for the coaxial transmission line type for the HOM coupler has been designed at Peking University. Experimentally it was shown that the average voltage standing wave ratio of the coaxial transmission line is smaller than 1.08. The experimental results of the stop band characteristics of the TTF-type HOM coupler have been fitted for the simulation. This paper describes the design of the measurement device and discusses the experimental and simulation results of stop band characteristics of the HOM coupler.

  17. ACCELERATORS: Measuring the performance of the coaxial HOM coupler on a 2-cell TESLA-shape copper cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Er-Dong; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; Zhao, Kui

    2009-06-01

    Coaxial High Order Mode (HOM) couplers have been fabricated at Peking University and their RF performance has been measured on a test device consisting of a coaxial transmission line and a 2-cell TESLA-shape copper cavity. The test results on the 2-cell TESLA-shape copper cavity with HOM couplers indicate that the coupler can cut off the fundamental mode TM010 and absorb HOMs effectively after a careful adjustment. The optimal angle of the HOM coupler with the beam tube is found. The initial test results of HOM couplers are presented in this paper.

  18. Design, performance and production of the Fermilab TESLA RF input couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, M.

    1996-10-01

    The TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) requires as one of its technical components a radiofrequency (rf) input coupler that transfers 1.3 GHz rf energy from the rf distribution system to a nine-cell superconducting accelerating cavity operating at a temperature of 1.8 K. The input coupler design is driven by numerous design criteria, which result in a rather complicated implementation. The production of twelve input couplers for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is underway at Fermilab, with the first two couplers having been delivered late in 1995. This paper discusses the Fermilab TESLA rf input coupler design, recent test results, and production issues.

  19. Cold RF test and associated mechanical features correlation of a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity built in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jing; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; Lin, Lin; Hao, Jian-Kui; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Wen-Can; He, Fei-Si; Jin, Song; Wang, Fang; Liu, Ke-Xin; L. Geng, R.; Zhao, Kui

    2012-02-01

    The RF performance of a 1.3 GHz 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity was evaluated at cryogenic temperatures following surface processing by using the standard ILC-style recipe. The cavity is a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity, with complete end group components including a higher order mode coupler, built in China for practical applications. An accelerating gradient of 28.6 MV/m was achieved at an unloaded quality factor of 4×109. The morphological property of mechanical features on the RF surface of this cavity was characterized through optical inspection. Correlation between the observed mechanical features and the RF performance of the cavity is attempted.

  20. Multi-cavity complex controller with vector simulator for TESLA technology linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Szewinski, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A digital control, as the main part of the Low Level RF system, for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented. The FPGA based controller, supported by MATLAB system, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The complex control algorithm based on the non-linear system identification is the proposal verified by the preliminary experimental results. The general idea is implemented as the Multi-Cavity Complex Controller (MCC) and is still under development. The FPGA based controller executes procedure according to the prearranged control tables: Feed-Forward, Set-Point and Corrector unit, to fulfill the required cavity performance: driving in the resonance during filling and field stabilization for the flattop range. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for the feed-forward and feedback modes. The vector Simulator table has been introduced for an efficient verification of the FPGA controller structure. Experimental results of the internal simulation, are presented for a cavity representative condition.

  1. Cold RF test and associated mechanical features correlation of a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity built in China

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jing; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; Lin, Lin; Hao, Jian-Kui; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Wen-Can; He, Fei-Si; Jin, Song; Wang, Fang; Liu, Ke-Xin; Geng, R L; Zhao, Kui

    2012-02-01

    The RF performance of a 1.3 GHz 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity was evaluated at cryogenic temperatures following surface processing by using the standard ILC-style recipe. The cavity is a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity, with complete end group components including a higher order mode coupler, built in China for practical applications. An accelerating gradient of 28.6 MV/m was achieved at an unloaded quality factor of 4 x 10{sup 9}. The morphological property of mechanical features on the RF surface of this cavity was characterized through optical inspection. Correlation between the observed mechanical features and the RF performance of the cavity is attempted.

  2. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; ...

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with resultsmore » of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have

  3. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double

  4. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  5. FPGA technology application in a fast measurement and control system for the TESLA superconducting cavity of a FLASH free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2007-08-01

    Contemporary basic research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other branches uses methods based on sample penetration (and the effect measurement) with pulsed ultra-short EM waves of very high beam intensity. This paper is an overview of a free electron laser (FEL) used in such methods. A method for the stabilization of the EM field in a superconducting 'TESLA' cavity accelerator for electrons is presented. This requires precise measurements of the field. The SC accelerator is a basic part of the FEL. The given example concerns the FLASH machine in DESY. The presented, high power EM field stabilization system is based on FPGA circuits with embedded fast hardware multiplication blocks. Examples of a few families of such new generation practically designed and constructed system realizations are given. The system is referred to as the SIMCON (from the microwave superconducting cavity SIMulator and CONtroller). SIMCONs consist of either single-module, multi-module configurable or multichannel distributed units. The SIMCON system stabilizes the EM field by a very fast feedback loop with an adaptation process, supplemented with a feed-forward. The following are presented: a parametric hardware description (firmware) in the form of behavioural VHDL algorithms; implementation results in VirtexIIPro circuits; examples of measurements of high power EM field stability performed under the nominal conditions of accelerator work.

  6. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  7. Cavity Alighment Using Beam Induced Higher Order Modes Signals in the TTF Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.; Frisch, J.; Hacker, K.E.; Jones, R.M.; McCormick, D.; O'Connell, C.; Smith, T.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.; Baboi, N.; Wendt, M.; /DESY

    2005-07-06

    Each nine cell superconducting (SC) accelerator cavity in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY [1] has two higher order mode (HOM) couplers that efficiently remove the HOM power [2]. They can also provide useful diagnostic signals. The most interesting modes are in the first 2 cavity dipole passbands. They are easy to identify and their amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the cavity axis making them excellent beam position monitors (BPM). By steering the beam through an eight-cavity cryomodule, we can use the HOM signals to estimate internal residual alignment errors and minimize wakefield related beam emittance growth. We built and tested a time-domain based waveform recorder system that captures information from each mode in these two bands on each beam pulse. In this paper we present a preliminary experimental study of the single-bunch generated HOM signals at the TTF linac including estimates of cavity alignment precision and HOM BPM resolution.

  8. TESLA & ILC Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T. J.; Weisend, II, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration developed a unique variant of SRF cryomodule designs, the chief feature being use of the large, low pressure helium vapor return pipe as the structural support backbone of the cryomodule. Additional innovative features include all cryogenic piping within the cryomodule (no parallel external cryogenic transfer line), long strings of RF cavities within a single cryomodule, and cryomodules connected in series. Several projects, including FLASH and XFEL at DESY, LCLS-II at SLAC, and the ILC technical design have adopted this general design concept. Advantages include saving space by eliminating the external transfer line, relatively tight packing of RF cavities along the beamline due to fewer warm-cold transitions, and potentially lower costs. However, a primary disadvantage is the relative lack of independence for warm-up, replacement, and cool-down of individual cryomodules.

  9. Report on first TESLA window assembly test

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, D.; Koepke, K.

    1993-10-01

    RF input couplers for the superconducting cavities of the TESLA are under development at DESY and Fermilab. The coaxial part of the Fermilab input coupler has been tested up to 1.7 MW at Fermilab using 805 MHz rf power source. The test results, procedure and test setup are described.

  10. TESLA Coil Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Sloan’s work was actually predated by the earlier work of Nikola Tesla . Sloan mistakenly identified " Tesla Coils" as lumped tuned resonators. The...Lefvw WsnJ L REPORT o]i 3. REPRT TYPE AND OATES COVEIRD May 1992 Special/Aug 1992 - May 1992 Z TITLE AND 5U§nUT S. FUNDING NUMIHRS Tesla Coil Research...STATEMENT 1211. ’ISTRIUUTION COOD Approved for public release; dis~ribution is unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Masrmum 200 worw) High repetition rate Tesla

  11. Edison vs. Tesla

    ScienceCinema

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2016-07-12

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  12. Edison vs. Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2013-11-20

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  13. Physics at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, G. A.

    The physics at a 500-800 GeV electron positron linear collider, TESLA, is reviewed. The machine parameters that impact directly on the physics are discussed and a few key performance goals for a detector at TESLA are given. Emphasis is placed on precision measurements in the Higgs and top sectors and on extrapolation to high energy scales in the supersymmetric scenario.

  14. Mirror-smooth surfaces and repair of defects in superconducting RF cavities by mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. A.; Cooley, L. D.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical techniques for polishing the inside surface of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities have been systematically explored. By extending known techniques to fine polishing, mirror-like finishes were produced, with <15 nm RMS (root mean square) roughness over 1 mm2 scan area. This is an order of magnitude less than the typical roughness produced by the electropolishing of niobium cavities. The extended mechanical polishing (XMP) process was applied to several SRF cavities which exhibited equator defects that caused quench at <20 MV m-1 and were not improved by further electropolishing. Cavity optical inspection equipment verified the complete removal of these defects, and minor acid processing, which dulled the mirror finish, restored performance of the defective cells to the high gradients and quality factors measured for adjacent cells when tested with other harmonics. This innate repair feature of XMP could be used to increase manufacturing yield. Excellent superconducting properties resulted after initial process optimization, with quality factor Q of 3 × 1010 and accelerating gradient of 43 MV m-1 being attained for a single-cell TESLA cavity, which are both close to practical limits. Several repaired nine-cell cavities also attained Q > 8 × 109 at 35 MV m-1, which is the specification for the International Linear Collider. Future optimization of the process and pathways for eliminating requirements for acid processing are also discussed.

  15. A laser system for the TESLA photon collider based on an external ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, I.; Quast, T.; Redlin, H.; Sandner, W.

    2001-10-01

    We present a concept of a laser system for a photon collider at the TESLA linac. It is based on an external optical ring cavity which is pumped by a short-pulse laser. A detailed discussion of the geometry of the external cavity is given.

  16. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  17. [70 years of Nikola Tesla studies].

    PubMed

    Juznic, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Nikola Tesla's studies of chemistry are described including his not very scholarly affair in Maribor. After almost a century and half of hypothesis at least usable scenario of Tesla's life and "work" in Maribor is provided. The chemistry achievements of Tesla's most influential professors Martin Sekulić and Tesla's Graz professors are put into the limelight. The fact that Tesla in Graz studied on the technological chemistry Faculty of Polytechnic is focused.

  18. Report on the TESLA Engineering Study/Review

    SciTech Connect

    Cornuelle, John C.

    2002-08-30

    In March, 2001, the TESLA Collaboration published its Technical Design Report (TDR, see references and links in Appendix), the first sentence of which stated ''...TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) (will be) a superconducting electron-positron collider of initially 500 GeV total energy, extendable to 800 GeV, and an integrated X-ray laser laboratory.'' The TDR included cost and manpower estimates for a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (250 on 250 GeV) based on superconducting RF cavity technology. This was submitted as a proposal to the German government. The government asked the German Science Council to evaluate this proposal. The recommendation from this body is anticipated to be available by November 2002. The government has indicated that it will react on this recommendation by mid-2003. In June 2001, Steve Holmes, Fermilab's Associate Director for Accelerators, commissioned Helen Edwards and Peter Garbincius to organize a study of the TESLA Technical Design Report and the associated cost and manpower estimates. Since the elements and methodology used in producing the TESLA cost estimate were somewhat different from those used in preparing similar estimates for projects within the U.S., it is important to understand the similarities, differences, and equivalences between the TESLA estimate and U.S. cost estimates. In particular, the project cost estimate includes only purchased equipment, materials, and services, but not manpower from DESY or other TESLA collaborating institutions, which is listed separately. It does not include the R&D on the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) nor the costs of preparing the TDR nor the costs of performing the conceptual studies so far. The manpower for the pre-operations commissioning program (up to beam) is included in the estimate, but not the electrical power or liquid Nitrogen (for initial cooldown of the cryogenics plant). There is no inclusion of any contingency or management reserve. If the U.S. were to become

  19. Nikola Tesla: the Moon's rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, A.; Jovanović, B. S.

    1993-09-01

    The review of three articles by N. Tesla, published in the year 1919 in the journal "Electrical experimenter" is given, with special reference to the astronomical contents and to circumstances in which they appeared.

  20. [Nikola Tesla in medicine, too].

    PubMed

    Hanzek, Branko; Jakobović, Zvonimir

    2007-12-01

    Using primary and secondary sources we have shown in this paper the influence of Nikola Tesla's work on the field of medicine. The description of his experiments conduced within secondary-school education programs aimed to present the popularization of his work in Croatia. Although Tesla was dedicated primarily to physics and was not directly involved in biomedical research, his work significantly contributed to paving the way of medical physics particularly radiology and high-frequency electrotherapy.

  1. Adapting TESLA technology for future cw light sources using HoBiCaT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugeler, O.; Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-07-01

    The HoBiCaT facility has been set up and operated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin and BESSY since 2005. Its purpose is testing superconducting cavities in cw mode of operation and it was successfully demonstrated that TESLA pulsed technology can be used for cw mode of operation with only minor changes. Issues that were addressed comprise of elevated dynamic thermal losses in the cavity walls, necessary modifications in the cryogenics and the cavity processing, the optimum choice of operational parameters such as cavity temperature or bandwidth, the characterization of higher order modes in the cavity, and the usability of existing tuners and couplers for cw.

  2. TESLA vertical test dewar cryogenic and mechanical design

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.; Arnold, D.E.; Champion, M.S.

    1993-05-01

    Collaborators on the design of a Tevatron Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) are working toward construction of a test cell consisting of four full length cryostats, 12 meters long, each containing eight, 9-cell superconducting rf cavities. In order to ensure that each cavity meets its performance requirements, [open quote]as received[close quote] structures will be tested in a vertical dewar prior to installation in the cryostat vessels. In addition, the dewar system will accommodate cavities installed in their helium containment vessels for testing if performance problems occur during later stages of fabrication. The vertical dewar system permits testing of the rf performance and high power processing of the cavity structures at their operating temperature of 1.8 K. The design of the cryogenic system, vacuum system, rf input, test instrumentation, and tuning system is described in detail.

  3. Construction of 0.15 Tesla Overhauser Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Yuumi; Nakao, Motonao; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Overhauser enhanced MRI (OMRI) is one of the free radical imaging technologies and has been used in biomedical research such as for partial oxygen measurements in tumor, and redox status in acute oxidative diseases. The external magnetic field of OMRI is frequently in the range of 5-10 mTesla to ensure microwave penetration into small animals, and the S/N ratio is limited. In this study, a 0.15 Tesla OMRI was constructed and tested to improve the S/N ratio for a small sample, or skin measurement. Specification of the main magnet was as follows: 0.15 Tesla permanent magnet; gap size 160 mm; homogenous spherical volume of 80 mm in diameter. The OMRI resonator was designed based on TE101 cavity mode and machined from a phosphorus deoxidized copper block for electron spin resonance (ESR) excitation and a solenoid transmission/receive resonator for NMR detection. The resonant frequencies and Q values were 6.38 MHz/150 and 4.31-4.41 GHz/120 for NMR and ESR, respectively. The Q values were comparable to those of conventional low field OMRI resonators at 15 mTesla. As expected, the MRI S/N ratio was improved by a factor of 30. Triplet dynamic nuclear polarization spectra were observed for (14)N carboxy-PROXYL, along the excitation microwave sweep. In the current setup, the enhancement factor was ca. 0.5. In conclusion, the results of this preliminary evaluation indicate that the 0.15 Tesla OMRI could be useful for free radical measurement for small samples.

  4. A Wire Position Monitor System for the 1.3 FHZ Tesla-Style Cryomodule at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Prieto, P.; Semenov, A.; Voy, D.C.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-17

    The first cryomodule for the beam test facility at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab building is currently under RF commissioning. Among other diagnostics systems, the transverse position of the helium gas return pipe with the connected 1.3 GHz SRF accelerating cavities is measured along the {approx}15 m long module using a stretched-wire position monitoring system. An overview of the wire position monitor system technology is given, along with preliminary results taken at the initial module cooldown, and during further testing. As the measurement system offers a high resolution, we also discuss options for use as a vibration detector. An electron beam test facility, based on superconducting RF (SRF) TESLA-style cryomodules is currently under construction at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab (NML) building. The first, so-called type III+, cryomodule (CM-1), equipped with eight 1.3 GHz nine-cell accelerating cavities was recently cooled down to 2 K, and is currently under RF conditioning. The transverse alignment of the cavity string within the cryomodule is crucial for minimizing transverse kick and beam break-up effects, generated by the high-order dipole modes of misaligned accelerating structures. An optimum alignment can only be guaranteed during the assembly of the cavity string, i.e. at room temperatures. The final position of the cavities after cooldown is uncontrollable, and therefore unknown. A wire position monitoring system (WPM) can help to understand the transverse motion of the cavities during cooldown, their final location and the long term position stability after cryo-temperatures are settled, as well as the position reproducibility for several cold-warm cycles. It also may serve as vibration sensor, as the wire acts as a high-Q resonant detector for mechanical vibrations in the low-audio frequency range. The WPM system consists out of a stretched-wire position detection system, provided with help of INFN-Milano and DESY Hamburg, and RF generation and read

  5. Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes the architectural design, costs, general description, and square footage data for the Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School in Colorado Springs, Colorado. A floor plan and photos are included along with a list of manufacturers and suppliers used for the project. (GR)

  6. Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes the architectural design, costs, general description, and square footage data for the Nikola Tesla Educational Opportunity School in Colorado Springs, Colorado. A floor plan and photos are included along with a list of manufacturers and suppliers used for the project. (GR)

  7. HOMs simulation and measurement results of IHEP02 cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hong-Juan; Zhai, Ji-Yuan; Zhao, Tong-Xian; Gao, Jie

    2015-11-01

    In accelerator RF cavities, there exists not only the fundamental mode which is used to accelerate the beam, but also higher order modes (HOMs). The higher order modes excited by the beam can seriously affect beam quality, especially for the higher R/Q modes. 1.3 GHz low-loss 9-cell superconducting cavity as a candidate for ILC high gradient cavity, the properties of higher order mode has not been studied carefully. IHEP based on existing low loss cavity, designed and developed a large grain size 1.3 GHz low-loss 9-cell superconducting cavity (IHEP02 cavity). The higher order mode coupler of IHEP02 used TESLA coupler's design. As a result of the limitation of the mechanical design, the distance between higher order mode coupler and end cell is larger than TESLA cavity. This paper reports on measured results of higher order modes in the IHEP02 1.3 GHz low-loss 9-cell superconducting cavity. Using different methods, Qe of the dangerous modes passbands have been obtained. The results are compared with TESLA cavity results. R/Q of the first three passbands have also been obtained by simulation and compared with the results of the TESLA cavity. Supported by Knowledge Innovation Project of The Chinese Academy of Sciences

  8. TESLA-N: Polarized electron-nucleon scattering at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinghaus, Frank; Aschenauer, E. C.; Tesla-N Study-Group

    2001-06-01

    Measurements of polarized e-N scattering can be realized at the TESLA linear collider facility with projected luminosities that are about two orders of magnitude higher than those expected of other experiments at comparable energies. Longitudinally polarized electrons, accelerated as a small fraction of the total current in the e+ arm of TESLA, can be directed onto a solid state target that may be longitudinally or transversely polarized. A large variety of polarized parton distribution and fragmentation functions can be determined with unprecedented accuracy, many of them for the first time. A main goal of the experiment is the precise measurement of the x- and Q2-dependence of the unknown transversity distributions that will provide us with the full information on the nucleon's quark spin structure as relevant for high energy processes. The additional possibilities of using unpolarized targets and of experiments with a real photon beam turn TESLA-N into a versatile next-generation facility at the intersection of particle and nuclear physics. .

  9. Tesla - A Flash of a Genius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.

    2005-10-01

    This book, which is entirely dedicated to the inventions of scientist Nikola Tesla, is divided into three parts: a) all the most important innovative technological creations from the alternate current to the death ray, Tesla research in fundamental physics with a particular attention to the concept of "ether", ball lightning physics; b) the life and the bright mind of Nikola Tesla and the reasons why some of his most recent findings were not accepted by the establishment; c) a critical discussion of the most important work by Tesla followers.

  10. Development and testing of RF double window input couplers for TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, W. D.; Shu, Q. S.; Susta, J. T.; Cheng, G.; Treado, T. A.; Einarson, S.; Proch, D.; Kostin, D.; Garvey, T.

    2006-07-01

    More and more accelerators are built with superconducting cavities operating at cryogenic temperatures. A possible window failure might result in contamination of the cavity surface and degrade the accelerating performance. A cost effective design and fabrication method for a new coupler has been developed by AMAC. This new design is an alternative to the present TESLA cylindrical ceramic windows layout. The new design includes two planar disc windows separated by a vacuum space. An alternative design option proposes filling dry nitrogen gas in between the two ceramic windows. Furthermore the new design is optimized for RF input power, taking into consideration the possible requirements of the TESLA superstructure layout. Two prototype couplers with this design have been fabricated. The couplers are being tested on the high power test stand at DESY, Germany. This paper describes the new coupler design and discusses the first measured results.

  11. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions.

  12. A modified post damping ring bunch compressor beamline for the TESLA linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe R.-G. Piot; Winfried Decking

    2004-03-23

    We propose a modified bunch compressor beamline, downstream of the damping ring, for the TESLA linear collider. This modified beamline uses a third harmonic radio-frequency section based on the 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity under development at Fermilab. In our design the beam deceleration is about {approx}50 MeV instead of {approx}450 MeV in the original design proposed.

  13. First results of testing 3.9 GHz TM(010) superconducting cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; Bellantoni, L.; Berenc, T.G.; Edwards, H.T.; Gonin, I.V.; Khabiboulline, T.N.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    Fermilab is developing third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity to improve performances of A0 and TTF photoinjectors. In frame of this project we have built and tested two nine-cell copper models and one 3-cell niobium cavity. Properties of the high order modes were carefully studied in a chain of two copper cavities at room temperature. In paper we discuss results of cold tests of the 3-cell cavity before and after BCP.

  14. Performance of Single Crystal Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kneisel, Peter; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Singer, Waldemar; Singer, Xenia; Reschke, Detlef; Brinkmann, A.

    2008-07-01

    We have fabricated and tested a total of six single cell niobium cavities, made from single crystal, high purity niobium. Two of the three cavities of the TESLA shape (1300 MHz) were made from Heraeus niobium by extending a smaller single crystal by rolling and annealing steps; the third cavity was made by spinning from CBMM material. The three other cavities of the scaled "Low Loss" (LL) shape (two) and "High Gradient" (HG) shape (one) resonated at 2.3 GHz and were fabricated from "as received" single crystals, both from Heraeus and CBMM niobium. After appropriate surface treatments by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing most cavities performed quite nicely and peak surface magnetic fields of ~ 160 mT or above corresponding to accelerating gradients between 38 MV/m and 45 MV/m were reached. This paper reports about the performance of these cavities.

  15. 3 Tesla turbo-FLASH magnetic resonance imaging of deglutition.

    PubMed

    Amin, Milan R; Lazarus, Cathy L; Pai, Vinay M; Mulholland, Thomas P; Shepard, Timothy; Branski, Ryan C; Wang, Edwin Y

    2012-04-01

    In this article we describe a methodology for obtaining high-quality dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences of the swallow sequence in healthy volunteers. The study includes comparison to previous work done in our lab using a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnet. Case series. Three healthy volunteers underwent turbo-fast low angle shot MRI at 3T while swallowing liquid boluses delivered via intravenous tubing to the oral cavity. Imaging was performed in the sagittal and axial planes. Imaging provided by this sequence provided high temporal resolution, with the ability to depict deglutition in the axial and sagittal planes. Comparison with imaging at 1.5 T demonstrated benefits in temporal resolution and signal-to-noise. Anatomic information provided differed from comparative videofluoroscopy. MRI of swallowing using the described technique is reliable and provides a unique evaluation of the swallowing sequence. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Conduction-coupled Tesla transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. L.

    2015-03-01

    A proof-of-principle Tesla transformer circuit is introduced. The new transformer exhibits the high voltage-high power output signal of shock-excited transformers. The circuit, with specification of proper circuit element values, is capable of obtaining extreme oscillatory voltages. The primary and secondary portions of the circuit communicate solely by conduction. The destructive arcing between the primary and secondary inductors in electromagnetically coupled transformers is ubiquitous. Flashover is eliminated in the new transformer as the high-voltage inductors do not interpenetrate and so do not possess an annular volume of electric field. The inductors are remote from one another. The high voltage secondary inductor is isolated in space, except for a base feed conductor, and obtains earth by its self-capacitance to the surroundings. Governing equations, for the ideal case of no damping, are developed from first principles. Experimental, theoretical, and circuit simulator data are presented for the new transformer. Commercial high-temperature superconductors are discussed as a means to eliminate the counter-intuitive damping due to small primary inductances in both the electromagnetic-coupled and new conduction-coupled transformers.

  17. Conduction-coupled Tesla transformer.

    PubMed

    Reed, J L

    2015-03-01

    A proof-of-principle Tesla transformer circuit is introduced. The new transformer exhibits the high voltage-high power output signal of shock-excited transformers. The circuit, with specification of proper circuit element values, is capable of obtaining extreme oscillatory voltages. The primary and secondary portions of the circuit communicate solely by conduction. The destructive arcing between the primary and secondary inductors in electromagnetically coupled transformers is ubiquitous. Flashover is eliminated in the new transformer as the high-voltage inductors do not interpenetrate and so do not possess an annular volume of electric field. The inductors are remote from one another. The high voltage secondary inductor is isolated in space, except for a base feed conductor, and obtains earth by its self-capacitance to the surroundings. Governing equations, for the ideal case of no damping, are developed from first principles. Experimental, theoretical, and circuit simulator data are presented for the new transformer. Commercial high-temperature superconductors are discussed as a means to eliminate the counter-intuitive damping due to small primary inductances in both the electromagnetic-coupled and new conduction-coupled transformers.

  18. Non-Enhanced MR Imaging of Cerebral Aneurysms: 7 Tesla versus 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Wrede, Karsten H.; Dammann, Philipp; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Johst, Sören; Maderwald, Stefan; Sandalcioglu, I. Erol; Müller, Oliver; Özkan, Neriman; Ladd, Mark E.; Forsting, Michael; Schlamann, Marc U.; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively evaluate 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Material and Methods Sixteen neurosurgical patients (male n = 5, female n = 11) with single or multiple UIA were enrolled in this trial. All patients were accordingly examined at 7 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI utilizing dedicated head coils. The following sequences were obtained: 7 Tesla TOF MRA, 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced MPRAGE. Image analysis was performed by two radiologists with regard to delineation of aneurysm features (dome, neck, parent vessel), presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue-contrast and overall image quality. Interobserver accordance and intermethod comparisons were calculated by kappa coefficient and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. Results A total of 20 intracranial aneurysms were detected in 16 patients, with two patients showing multiple aneurysms (n = 2, n = 4). Out of 20 intracranial aneurysms, 14 aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 6 aneurysms in the posterior circulation. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging was superior over 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered aneurysm and image quality features (e.g. image quality: mean MPRAGE7T: 5.0; mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T: 4.3). Ratings for 7 Tesla TOF MRA were equal or higher over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA for all assessed features except for artifact delineation (mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T 4.4). Interobserver accordance was good to excellent for most ratings. Conclusion 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging demonstrated its superiority in the detection and assessment of UIA as well as overall imaging features, offering excellent interobserver accordance and highest scores for all ratings. Hence, it may bear the potential to serve as a high

  19. Non-enhanced MR imaging of cerebral aneurysms: 7 Tesla versus 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Wrede, Karsten H; Dammann, Philipp; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Johst, Sören; Maderwald, Stefan; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Müller, Oliver; Özkan, Neriman; Ladd, Mark E; Forsting, Michael; Schlamann, Marc U; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Sixteen neurosurgical patients (male n = 5, female n = 11) with single or multiple UIA were enrolled in this trial. All patients were accordingly examined at 7 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI utilizing dedicated head coils. The following sequences were obtained: 7 Tesla TOF MRA, 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced MPRAGE. Image analysis was performed by two radiologists with regard to delineation of aneurysm features (dome, neck, parent vessel), presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue-contrast and overall image quality. Interobserver accordance and intermethod comparisons were calculated by kappa coefficient and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. A total of 20 intracranial aneurysms were detected in 16 patients, with two patients showing multiple aneurysms (n = 2, n = 4). Out of 20 intracranial aneurysms, 14 aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 6 aneurysms in the posterior circulation. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging was superior over 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered aneurysm and image quality features (e.g. image quality: mean MPRAGE7T: 5.0; mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T: 4.3). Ratings for 7 Tesla TOF MRA were equal or higher over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA for all assessed features except for artifact delineation (mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T 4.4). Interobserver accordance was good to excellent for most ratings. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging demonstrated its superiority in the detection and assessment of UIA as well as overall imaging features, offering excellent interobserver accordance and highest scores for all ratings. Hence, it may bear the potential to serve as a high-quality diagnostic tool for pretherapeutic assessment and

  20. New HOM coupler design for ILC superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Noguchi, S.; Kako, E.; Shishido, T.; Hayano, H.

    2008-10-01

    Four superconducting cavities have been developed at the superconducting RF test facility (STF) at KEK as candidates for the International Linear Collider (ILC) accelerating cavity. These cavities, which are termed TESLA-type STF baseline cavities, are equipped with newly designed higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers that have a short outer cylinder and a single welding point on the antenna that acts as the inner conductor. Each STF baseline cavity is equipped with two types of these new HOM couplers: STF I-type and STF L-type. The HOM couplers were designed and developed, and their RF performance was evaluated by using a Cooper model. Then, niobium models were fabricated and cool down tests were conducted with these cavities. In all, 14 cool down tests were performed for the four cavities using a vertical setup that involved the newly designed HOM couplers. Electrochemical polishing of the inner surface of the cavity and frequency tuning of the accelerating mode were performed before each cool down test in order to maintain the RF performance and obtain a higher gradient. These new HOM couplers were operated up to a gradient of 32 MV/m in the accelerating field of the end cell without any serious problem. Their damping performance is comparable to that of the TESLA cavity except for the TM 011 mode, whose performance can be easily corrected by changing the installation angle of the next fabricated cavity. In this paper, the development of the new HOM couplers for STF baseline cavities is described.

  1. Performance of 3-cell Seamless Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kneisel, Peter K.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Jelezov, I.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.

    2009-11-01

    In the last several months we have surface treated and cryogenically tested three TESLA-type 3-cell cavities, which had been manufactured at DESY as seamless assemblies by hydroforming. The cavities were completed at JLab with beam tube/flange assemblies. All three cavities performed very well after they had been post-purified with titanium at 1250C for 3 hrs. The cavities, two of which consisted of an end cell and 2 center cells and one was a center cell assembly, achieved gradients of Eacc = 32 MV/m, 34 MV/m and 35 MV/m without quenches. The performance was limited by the appearance of the “Q-drop” in the absence of field emission. This contribution reports about the various measurements undertaken with these cavities.

  2. Accelerator aspects of photon colliders at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Nicholas J.

    2001-10-01

    The TESLA linear collider is being primarily designed as a 500- 800 GeV centre of mass e +e - linear collider. However, a second interaction region is being incorporated into the design with a crossing angle of 32 mrad, which is suitable for use as a γγ collider. In this paper we will review those aspects of the current machine design which are critical to the operation of TESLA as a photon collider, paying particular attention to the preservation of small horizontal emittances, and—in the absence of beamstrahlung—limits on reduced horizontal beam cross-section at the interaction point.

  3. Design of half-reentrant SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidlinger, M.; Grimm, T. L.; Hartung, W.

    2006-07-01

    The shape of a TeSLA inner cell can be improved to lower the peak surface magnetic field at the expense of a higher peak surface electric field by making the cell reentrant. Such a single-cell cavity was designed and tested at Cornell, setting a world record accelerating gradient [V. Shemelin et al., An optimized shape cavity for TESLA: concept and fabrication, 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, Travemünde, Germany, September 8-12, 2003; R. Geng, H. Padamsee, Reentrant cavity and first test result, Pushing the Limits of RF Superconductivity Workshop, Argonne National Laboratory, September 22-24, 2004]. However, the disadvantage to a cavity is that liquids become trapped in the reentrant portion when it is vertically hung during high pressure rinsing. While this was overcome for Cornell’s single-cell cavity by flipping it several times between high pressure rinse cycles, this may not be feasible for a multi-cell cavity. One solution to this problem is to make the cavity reentrant on only one side, leaving the opposite wall angle at six degrees for fluid drainage. This idea was first presented in 2004 [T.L. Grimm et al., IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 15(6) (2005) 2393]. Preliminary designs of two new half-reentrant (HR) inner cells have since been completed, one at a high cell-to-cell coupling of 2.1% (high- kcc HR) and the other at 1.5% (low- kcc HR). The parameters of a HR cavity are comparable to a fully reentrant cavity, with the added benefit that a HR cavity can be easily cleaned with current technology.

  4. Feasibility Study of a HOM IOT for TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, Petra; Weiland, Thomas; Gamp, Alexander; Lu, Fuhai

    1997-05-01

    For the TESLA linear collider 1.3 GHz RF sources with 10 MW peak power and about 70% efficiency are needed. As an alternative to the development of a Multibeam-Klystron, we investigate the feasibility of an IOT (Inductive Output Tube). This is a very compact RF source: The time structure of the beam is produced by a gated emission cathode and the output cavity is directly adjacent to the anode. Unlike IOTs, conventional klystrons lose some of their design efficiency when they are operated below saturation, because only the RF component of the beam is reduced and not the DC beam current. In contrast to this the cathode current of an IOT is controlled by the drive power. In order to keep the gun voltage low, we investigate a device with a hollow beam where the output cavity is excited in a higher order mode (HOM), as was recently suggested by CPI(E.Lien, H.Bohlen, US Patent Application Serial No. 08/413,034). Computer simulations are carried out with the CAD-system MAFIA. First, an existing Klystrode TM IOT built by CPI is analysed. Simulation results will be shown and compared to experimental data. Based upon this experience, a design strategy is discussed for the HOM IOT.

  5. Control System Design for Automatic Cavity Tuning Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Khabiboulline, T.; Kotelnikov, S.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Nogiec, J.; Ross, M.; Schappert, W.; Goessel, A.; Iversen, J.; Klinke, D.; /DESY

    2009-05-01

    A series of four automatic tuning machines for 9-cell TESLA-type cavities are being developed and fabricated in a collaborative effort among DESY, FNAL, and KEK. These machines are intended to support high-throughput cavity fabrication for construction of large SRF-based accelerator projects. Two of these machines will be delivered to cavity vendors for the tuning of XFEL cavities. The control system for these machines must support a high level of automation adequate for industrial use by non-experts operators. This paper describes the control system hardware and software design for these machines.

  6. Nikola Tesla, the Ether and his Telautomaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milar, Kendall

    2014-03-01

    In the nineteenth century physicists' understanding of the ether changed dramatically. New developments in thermodynamics, energy physics, and electricity and magnetism dictated new properties of the ether. These have traditionally been examined from the perspective of the scientists re-conceptualizing the ether. However Nikola Tesla, a prolific inventor and writer, presents a different picture of nineteenth century physics. Alongside the displays that showcased his inventions he presented alternative interpretations of physical, physiological and even psychical research. This is particularly evident in his telautomaton, a radio remote controlled boat. This invention and Tesla's descriptions of it showcase some of his novel interpretations of physical theories. He offered a perspective on nineteenth century physics that focused on practical application instead of experiment. Sometimes the understanding of physical theories that Tesla reached was counterproductive to his own inventive work; other times he offered new insights. Tesla's utilitarian interpretation of physical theories suggests a more scientifically curious and invested inventor than previously described and a connection between the scientific and inventive communities.

  7. Beam dynamic issues in TESLA damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper we study general requirements on impedances of the linear collider TESLA damping ring design. Quantitative consideration is performed for 17-km long ``dog-bone`` ring. Beam dynamics in alternative options of 6.3 and 2.3-km long damping rings is briefly discussed. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Recent Progress of RF Cavity Study at Mucool Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2011-12-02

    Summar of presentation is: (1) MTA is a multi task working space to investigate RF cavities for R&D of muon beam cooling channel - (a) Intense 400 MeV H{sup -} beam, (b) Handle hydrogen (flammable) gas, (c) 5 Tesla SC solenoid magnet, (d) He cryogenic/recycling system; (2) Pillbox cavity has been refurbished to search better RF material - Beryllium button test will be happened soon; (3) E x B effect has been tested in a box cavity - Under study (result seems not to be desirable); (4) 201 MHz RF cavity with SRF cavity treatment has been tested at low magnetic field - (a) Observed some B field effect on maximum field gradient and (b) Further study is needed (large bore SC magnet will be delivered end of 2011); and (5) HPRF cavity beam test has started - (a) No RF breakdown observed and (b) Design a new HPRF cavity to investigate more plasma loading effect.

  9. Design and scaling of microscale Tesla turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vedavalli G.; Romanin, Vince; Carey, Van P.; Maharbiz, Michel M.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the scaling properties and loss mechanisms of Tesla turbines and provide design recommendations for scaling such turbines to the millimeter scale. Specifically, we provide design, fabrication and experimental data for a low-pressure head hydro Tesla micro-turbine. We derive the analytical turbine performance for incompressible flow and then develop a more detailed model that predicts experimental performance by including a variety of loss mechanisms. We report the correlation between them and the experimental results. Turbines with 1 cm rotors, 36% peak efficiency (at 2 cm3 s-1 flow) and 45 mW unloaded peak power (at 12 cm3 s-1 flow) are demonstrated. We analyze the causes for head loss and shaft power loss and derive constraints on turbine design. We then analyze the effect of scaling down on turbine efficiency, power density and rotor revolutions/min. Based on the analysis, we make recommendations for the design of ˜1 mm microscale Tesla turbines.

  10. Optimization of the Low Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.S.; Kneisel, P.; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Saito, K.; Ge, L.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC main linacs. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and TJNAF (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping factors for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reducing the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced multipacting barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, multipacting activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss designs for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting.

  11. First Operating Experiences of Beam Position Monitors in the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R.; Sachwitz, M.; Schreiber, H. J.; Tonisch, F.; Castellano, M.; Patteri, P.; Tazzioli, F.; Catani, L.

    1997-05-01

    Different types of monitors where installed in the TESLA Test Facility Linac to measure the beam position. At each superconducting quadrupole, the transverse beam position will be measured with a resolution of better than 10 μm, using a cylindrical cavity excited in the TM_110-mode by an off-center beam. In addition, two 'warm' cavities working at room temperature were built for the Injector I and the Bunch Compressor. The amplitude of the TM_110-mode and its phase are measured in a homodyne receiver. For the experimental area, stripline monitors having a resolution of better than 100 μm were built, tested and installed. The averaged position of the whole bunch train of Injector I is measured in a narrowband receiver using the amplitude-to-phase conversion. This paper summarizes the designs, cold tests and first operating experiences of both monitor types.

  12. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko-Tesla ``Predecessor''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuilov, Vladimir; Kiselev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Prof. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko (1947-1905) is a bright figure in the history of science of the XIXth century. His major discoveries are: Electrography - the method of the visualization of electric discharge from the bodies due to the application of high strength and high frequency electric fields, and one of the first observations of the propagation of the electromagnetic waives and information transfer over the distances. We review Prof. Jakob Narkiewicz-Jodko's research results and explain our point why we consider him as the predecessor of Nikola Tesla.

  13. Nikola Tesla: the man behind the magnetic field unit.

    PubMed

    Roguin, Ariel

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic field strength of both the magnet and gradient coils used in MR imaging equipment is measured in Tesla units, which are named for Nikola Tesla. This article presents the life and achievements of this Serbian-American inventor and researcher who discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery. Nikola Tesla had 700 patents in the United States and Europe that covered every aspect of science and technology. Tesla's discoveries include the Tesla coil, AC electrical conduction, improved lighting, newer forms of turbine engines, robotics, fluorescent light, wireless transmission of electrical energy, radio, remote control, discovery of cosmic radio waves, and the use of the ionosphere for scientific purposes. He was a genius whose discoveries had a pivotal role in advancing us into the modern era.

  14. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Bangerter, Neal K; Taylor, Meredith D; Tarbox, Grayson J; Palmer, Antony J; Park, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems.

  15. Neuromagnetic effects of pico-Tesla stimulation.

    PubMed

    Troebinger, Luzia; Anninos, Photios; Barnes, Gareth

    2015-09-01

    We used a double-blind experimental design to look for an effect of pico-Tesla magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects. Pico-Tesla stimulation is thought to increase the dominant frequency of 2-7 Hz oscillations in the human brain. We used magnetoencephalography to measure resting state brain activity. Each subject had two separate recording sessions consisting of three runs in between which they were given real or sham pT stimulation. We then tried to predict the real and sham stimulation sessions based on changes in the mean peak frequency in the 2-7 Hz band. Our predictions for these individual runs were 8 out of 14 at chance level (p = 0.39). After unblinding, we found no significant effect (p = 0.11) of an increase in the frequency range (2-7 Hz) across the subject group. Finally, we performed a Bayesian model comparison between the effect size predicted from previous clinical studies and a null model. Even though this study had a sensitivity advantage of at least one order of magnitude over previous work, we found the null model to be significantly (2000 times) more likely.

  16. Meralgia paresthetica: 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Del Grande, Filippo; Soldatos, Theodoros; Chalian, Majid; Belzberg, Allan J; Williams, Eric H; Jalali, Farahani S; Thawait, Gaurav K; Eng, John; Carrino, John A

    2013-06-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and observer performance of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in the evaluation of meralgia paresthetica (MP). Two independent readers were blinded to the clinical diagnosis and evaluated the MRN studies of the pelvis of 11 patients with MP and 28 control participants. In each study, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerves were assessed for signal alteration and/or neuroma formation, indicating lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy, at various levels along their course. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated. Both readers exhibited substantial intraobserver agreement in detecting signal alterations and neuroma formation of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN). The readers demonstrated moderate interobserver agreement in detecting signal alteration of the LFCN and poor interobserver agreement in diagnosing neuroma formation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of LFCN neuropathy diagnosis were ≥ 71 % and ≥ 94 % for both readers respectively. The diagnostic test accuracy was ≥ 90 % for both readers. 3-Tesla MRN provides reliable and accurate diagnostic evaluation of meralgia paresthetica.

  17. Superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1992-02-01

    RF Superconductivity has become an important technology for particle accelerators for high energy physics, nuclear physics, and free electron lasers. More than 100 MVolts of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities have been installed in accelerators for heavy ions and operated at gradients of 2-3 MV/m in excess of 105 hours. More than 500 MVolts are installed in electron accelerators and operated at gradients of 4-6 MV/m in excess of 104 hours. Encouraged by this success, another 500 meters of SRF cavities are in the production line. New applications for High Energy Physics are forthcoming for high current e+e- colliders in the B-quark energy range (B-factory). For the next linear collider in the TeV energy range, there are many compelling attractions to use SRF, if the gradients can be improved substantially and the costs lowered. Substantial progress has been made in understanding performance limitations and in inventing cures through better cavity geometries, materials, and processes. Techniques are now in hand to reach 15-20 MV/m accelerating. In light of this progress, the potential of high gradient SRF for a TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) will be explored.

  18. DOOCS and MatLab control environment for SIMCON 2.1 FPGA based control system for TESLA FEL part III: readouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprek, Waldemar; Pucyk, Piotr; Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2006-02-01

    The note describes integrated system of hardware controller and simulator of the resonant superconducting, narrowband niobium cavity, originally considered for the TTF and TESLA in DESY, Hamburg (now predicted for the W V and X-Ray FEL). The controller bases on a programmable circuit Xilinx VirtexII V3000 embedded on a PCB XtremeDSP Development Kit by Nallatech. The FPGA circuit configuration was done in the VHDL language. The internal hardware multiplication components, present in Virtex II chips, were used, to improve the floating point calculation efficiency. The implementation was achieved of a device working in the real time, according to the demands of the LLRF control system for the TESLA Test Facility. The device under consideration will be referred to as superconducting cavity (SCCav) SIMCON throughout this work. This document is intended to be used by end users and operators. It describes step by step how to install SIMCON in specific configuration, how and what software to copy to computer. There is described set of basic Matlab functions for developers of control algorithms. This paper also contains brief description how to use Matlab function of one algorithm with its graphic user panels. This TESLA Report is in close relations with the following TESLA Reports published previously: 2005-05, 2005-02, 2004-10. Together, these Reports make a full SIMCON manual.

  19. Cavity magnomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-01-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  20. Novel High Cooperativity Photon-Magnon Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobar, Michael; Bourhill, Jeremy; Kostylev, Nikita; G, Maxim; Creedon, Daniel

    Novel microwave cavities are presented, which couple photons and magnons in YIG spheres in a super- and ultra-strong way at around 20 mK in temperature. Few/Single photon couplings (or normal mode splitting, 2g) of more than 6 GHz at microwave frequencies are obtained. Types of cavities include multiple post reentrant cavities, which co-couple photons at different frequencies with a coupling greater that the free spectral range, as well as spherical loaded dielectric cavity resonators. In such cavities we show that the bare dielectric properties can be obtained by polarizing all magnon modes to high energy using a 7 Tesla magnet. We also show that at zero-field, collective effects of the spins significantly perturb the photon modes. Other effects like time-reversal symmetry breaking are observed.

  1. A Study of Thermocurrent Induced Magnetic Fields in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Anthony C.; Cooley, Victoria

    2014-03-31

    The case of axisymmetric ILC-type cavities with titanium helium vessels is investigated. A first-order estimate for magnetic field within the SRF current layer is presented. The induced magnetic field is found to be not more than 1.4x10-8 Tesla = 0.14 milligauss for the case of axial symmetry. Magnetic fields due to symmetry breaking effects are discussed.

  2. Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanin, Vincent Domenic

    This document summarizes the development of an integral perturbation solution of the equations governing momentum transport in microchannels between disks of multiple-disk drag turbines such as the Tesla turbine. This analysis allows a parametric study of turbine performance based on several nondimensional parameters. The results of this analysis are then compared to two sets of test data published in previous work and by other projects. The results are further compared to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Finally, expected performance and potential applications of these devices are discussed in light of the results developed. Analysis of this type of flow problem is a key element in the optimal design of Tesla drag-type turbines for geothermal, waste heat, energy harvesting, or solar alternative energy applications. In multiple-disk turbines, high speed flow enters tangentially at the outer radius of cylindrical microchannels formed by closely spaced parallel disks, spiraling through the channel to an exhaust at a small radius or at the center of the disk. Previous investigations have generally developed models based on simplifying idealizations of the flow in these circumstances. Here, beginning with the momentum and continuity equations for incompressible and steady flow in cylindrical coordinates, an integral solution scheme is developed that leads to a dimensionless perturbation series solution that retains the full complement of momentum and viscous effects to consistent levels of approximation in the series solution. This more rigorous approach indicates all dimensionless parameters that affect flow and transport, and allows a direct assessment of the relative importance of viscous, pressure, and momentum effects in different directions in the flow. The resulting lowest-order equations are solved explicitly and higher order terms in the series solutions are determined numerically. Enhancement of rotor drag in this type of turbine enhances

  3. Conceptual design considerations of a 5-cell dual-axis SRF cavity for ERLs.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-X.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2007-01-01

    Recently a dual-axis energy recovery linac has been proposed for ERL applications, in which accelerating and decelerating beams can go through separate axes but still recover energy in novel dual-axis cavities. Here we discuss a conceptual design of a 5-cell dual-axis cavity evolved from side-by-side jointed TESLA-type cavities. Instead of an engineering design, we aim to explore the feasibility of such a new cavity, giving particular attention to its nonstandard features that might cause concern to the beam. This is a preliminary work-in-progress report.

  4. Overview of high gradient SRF R&D for ILC cavities at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli

    2009-11-01

    We report the progress on high gradient R&D of ILC cavities at Jefferson Lab (JLab) since the Beijing workshop. Routine 9-cell cavity electropolishing (EP) processing and RF testing has been enhanced with added surface mapping and T-mapping instrumentations. 12 new 9-cell cavities (10 of them are baseline fine-grain TESLA-shape cavities: 5 built by ACCEL/Research Instruments, 4 by AES and 1 by JLab; 2 of them are alternative cavities: 1 fine-grain ICHIRO-shape cavity built by KEK/Japan industry and 1 large-grain TESLA-shape cavity built by JLab) are EP processed and tested. 76 EP cycles are accumulated, corresponding to more than 200 hours of active EP time. Field emission (FE) and quench behaviors of electropolished 9-cell cavities are studied. EP process continues to be optimized, resulting in advanced procedures and hence improved cavity performance. Several 9-cell cavities reached 35 MV/m after the first light EP processing. FE-free performance has been demonstrated in 9-cell cavities in 35-40 MV/m range. 1-cell cavity studies explore new techniques for defect removal as well as advanced integrated cavity processing. Surface studies of niobium samples electropolished together with real cavities provide new insight into the nature of field emitters. Close cooperation with the US cavity fabrication industry has been undertaking with the successful achievement of 41 MV/m for the first time in a 9-cell ILC cavity built by AES. As the size of the data set grows, it is now possible to construct gradient yield curves, from which one can see that significant progress has been made in raising the high gradient yield.

  5. Investigation of Thermal Acoustic Effects on SRF Cavities within CM1 at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, Mike; Harms, Elvin; Klebaner, Arkadiy; Leibfritz, Jerry; Martinez, Alex; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; Schappert, Warren

    2016-06-01

    Two TESLA-style 8-cavity cryomodules have been operated at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST), formerly the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. Operational instabilities were revealed during Radio Frequency (RF) power studies. These observations were complemented by the characterization of thermal acoustic effects on cavity microphonics manifested by apparent noisy boiling of helium involving vapor bubble and liquid vibration. The thermal acoustic measurements also consider pressure and temperature spikes which drive the phenomenon at low and high frequencies.

  6. Nikola Tesla and the wireless transmission of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marincic, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    Nikola Tesla, the inventor of the polyphase-current system, is best known for his contribution regarding induction and other types of alternating-current machines. His patents and his published and unpublished notes about wireless transmission of energy are less known and, if known to some extent, they are usually wrongly interpreted. For many years the author studied Tesla's works on wireless transmission of energy and that what is given here is a review of relevant documents, unpublished notes and letters from the archives of the Nikola Tesla Museum in Belgrade. An attempt is made to explain Tesla's physical model on the basis of which he concluded that the wireless transmission of energy on a global scale is possible. His model is critically examined in view of the present day knowledge of extremely low frequency propagation phenomena.

  7. Recent progress of RF cavity study at Mucool Test Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonehara, Katsuya; MTA working Group

    2013-02-01

    In order to develop an RF cavity that is applicable for a muon beam cooling channel, a new facility, called Mucool Test Area (MTA) has been built at Fermilab. MTA is a unique facility whose purpose is to test RF cavities in various conditions. There are 201 and 805 MHz high power sources, a 4-Tesla solenoid magnet, a cryogenic system including a Helium liquifier, an explosion proof apparatus to operate gaseous/liquid Hydrogen, and a beam transport line to send an intense H- beam from the Fermilab Linac accelerator to the MTA hall. Recent activities at MTA will be discussed in this document.

  8. [Quantification of liver iron concentration using 1-Tesla MRI].

    PubMed

    Alústiza Echeverría, J M; Castiella Eguzkiza, A; Zapata Morcillo, E; Jáuregui Garmendia, L; Gabilondo Aguirregabiria, A; Paloc, C

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the quantification of liver iron concentration using 1-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its ability to diagnose or rule out hemochromatosis. To evaluate the role of 1.5-Tesla MRI in inconclusive cases. Between 2002 and 2006, we used 1-Tesla MRI (Gandon method) and liver biopsy to quantify the liver iron concentration in 31 patients. Moreover, we used 1.5-Tesla MRI (according to Alústiza's model) and liver biopsy to determine the liver iron concentration in 10 additional patients and to check the results of 10 patients in whom 1-Tesla MRI detected iron overload. In the first group of 31 patients, liver biopsy classified the liver iron concentration as normal (<36 micromol.Fe/g) in 11 patients, as hemosiderosis (36-80 micromol.Fe/g) in 15, and as hemochromatosis (>80 micromol.Fe/g) in 5. The correlation with the values calculated at MRI was 100% in the 5 cases with hemochromatosis; in the 15 patients with hemosiderosis, 5 were correctly classified and the liver iron concentration was overestimated in 10; of the 11 patients with normal liver iron concentration, 6 were correctly classified and 5 were overestimated. Quantification >80 at MRI has a sensitivity and negative predictive value of 100% and specificity of 50% for the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Quantification <36 at MRI has a positive predictive value and specificity of 100% to identify the absence of iron overload. In the 10 patients with liver biopsy that underwent 1.5-Tesla MRI, there was a high correlation between the two techniques. The reliability of the evaluation of liver iron concentration using 1-Tesla MRI is useful for ruling out hemochromatosis and identifying patients without iron overload. We observed a tendency to overestimate liver iron concentration in both patients with overload and in those without, and this limits the reliability of the technique. 1.5-Tesla MRI is a good alternative for quantifying liver iron concentration more precisely.

  9. Wake fields in 9-cell TESLA accelerating structures : Spectral Element Discontinuous Galerkin (SEDG) simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Min, M.; Fischer, P. F.; Chae, Y.-C.

    2007-01-01

    Using our recently developed high-order accurate Maxwell solver, NEKCEM, we carried out longitudinal wakefield calculations for a 9-cell TESLA cavity structure in 3D. Indirect method is used for wake potential calculations. Computational results with NEKCEM are compared with those of GdfidL. NEKCEM uses a spectral element discontinuous Galerkin (SEDG) method based on a domain decomposition approach using spectral-element discretizations on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids with body-conforming hexahedral meshes. The numerical scheme is designed to ensure high-order spectral accuracy, using the discontinuous Galerkin form with boundary conditions weakly enforced through a flux term between elements. Concerns related to implementation on wake potential calculations are discussed, and wake potential calculations with indirect method by NEKCEM compared with the results of the finite difference time-domain code GdfidL.

  10. Superconducting cavity material for the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Brinkmann, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Navitski, A.; Tamashevich, Y.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of the strategy for superconducting cavity material procurement and quality management is done on the basis of the experience with the cavity production for the European x-ray free electron laser (EXFEL) facility. An adjustment of the material specification to EXFEL requirements, procurement of material, quality control (QC), documentation, and shipment to cavity producers have been worked out and carried out by DESY. A multistep process of qualification of the material suppliers included detailed material testing, single- and nine-cell cavity fabrication, and cryogenic radiofrequency tests. Production of about 25 000 semi-finished parts of high purity niobium and niobium-titanium alloy in a period of three years has been divided finally between companies Heraeus, Tokyo Denkai, Ningxia OTIC, and PLANSEE. Consideration of large-grain (LG) material as a possible option for the EXFEL has resulted in the production of one cryogenic module consisting of seven (out of eight) LG cavities. LG materials fulfilled the EXFEL requirements and showed even 25% to 30% higher unloaded quality factor. A possible shortage of the required quantity of LG material on the market led, however, to the choice of conventional fine-grain (FG) material. Eddy-current scanning (ECS) has been applied as an additional QC tool for the niobium sheets and contributed significantly to the material qualification and sorting. Two percent of the sheets have been rejected, which potentially could affect up to one-third of the cavities. The main imperfections and defects in the rejected sheets have been analyzed. Samples containing foreign material inclusions have been extracted from the sheets and electrochemically polished. Some inclusions remained even after 150 μm surface layer removal. Indications of foreign material inclusions have been found in the industrially fabricated and treated cavities and a deeper analysis of the defects has been performed.

  11. Individual RF Test Results of the Cavities Used in the First US-built ILC-type Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Hocker, A; Harms, E R; Lunin, A; Sergatskov, D A; Sukhanov, A I; Eremeev, G V; Geng, R L; Ozelis, J P

    2012-07-01

    Eight 1.3-GHz, nine-cell SRF cavities have been installed in a cryomodule intended to demonstrate the ILC design goal of 31.5 MV/m. These cavities all underwent two types of individual RF testing: a low-power continuous-wave test of the 'bare' cavity and a high-power pulsed test of the 'dressed' cavity. Presented here is a discussion of the results from these tests and a comparison of their performance in the two configurations.

  12. Multipactor in crossed rf fields on the cavity equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelin, Valery

    2013-01-01

    Multipactor discharge in an accelerating superconducting elliptic cavity occurs usually near its equator. As simulations show, the dimensions of the trajectories of multipacting electrons are very small compared to the dimensions of a cavity. This feature gives a way for solving explicit equations of motion instead of cumbersome simulations. Electric and magnetic fields near the cavity equator are presented in a form of expansions up to the third power of coordinates. Comparisons with numerical calculations of fields made with the SLANS code for the TESLA cavity cells, as well as with the analytical solution for a spherical cavity, are done. These fields are used for solving the equations of motion of electrons in crossed rf fields near the equator. Based on the analysis of these equations, general features of multipacting in this area are obtained. Results are compared with simulations and experimental data. The experimental formulas for multipacting zones are explained and their dependence on the cavity geometries is shown. Because of small sizes of electron trajectories, the influence of the weld seams is taken into account. This suggests a possible explanation of multipacting in a cavity which was not found by simulations. The developed approach allows evaluation of multipacting in a cavity without its simulations but after an analysis of fields in the equatorial region. These fields can be computed by any code used for cavity calculation.

  13. Development of the third harmonic SC cavity at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolay Solyak et al.

    2004-08-05

    The third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity was recently proposed by DESY for a new generation of high brightness photo-injector (TTF photoinjector-2) to compensate nonlinear distortion of the longitudinal phase space due to RF curvature of the 1.3 GHz TESLA cavities [1,2]. Installation of the 3rd harmonic cavity will allow us to generate ultra-short (<50 {micro}m rms) highly charged electron bunches with an extremely small transverse normalized emittance (<1 {micro}m). This is required to support a new generation of linear colliders, free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation sources. In this paper we present the current status of the 3rd harmonic cavity being developed at Fermilab. We discuss the design procedure, the building and testing of the copper and niobium half-cells and components, the design of input and HOM couplers.

  14. Progress toward 10 tesla accelerator dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Gilbert, G.; Taylor, C.; Meuser, R.

    1983-08-01

    A 9.1 T central field has been achieved in a Nb-Ti dipole operating in pressurized helium II at 1.8 K. Three different Nb-Ti dipoles, without iron yokes, have achieved central fields of 8.0, 8.6, and 9.1 T - all short sample performance for the conductors at 1.8 K. In helium I, at 4.3 K, the maximum central fields are from 1.5 to 2.0 T lower. Ten-tesla magnets have been designed for both Nb-Ti operating at 1.8 K and Nb/sub 3/Sn operating at 4.2 K. They are based on a very small beam aperture, (40 to 45 mm), very high current density in the superconductors (over 1000 A/mm/sup 2/), and a very low ratio of stabilizing copper to superconductor (about 1). Both layer and block designs have been developed that utilize Rutherford Cable. Magnet cycling from 0 to 6 T has been carried out for field change rate up to 1 T/s; the cyclic heating at 1 T/s is 36 W per meter. At a more representative rate of 0.2 T/s the heating rate is only 2 W/m. Progress in the program to use Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi superconductor, in 10 T accelerator magnets is also discussed.

  15. Solid targetry at the TESLA Accelerator Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čomor, J. J.; Daković, M.; Rajčević, M.; Košutić, Đ.; Spasić, M.; Vidović, A.; Đuričić, J.; Nedeljković, N.

    2002-03-01

    According to the concept of the TESLA Accelerator Installation, the channel for production of radioisotopes has to routinely produce 201Tl, 111In, 67Ga, 123I and 18F, and a number of other radionuclides for experimental purposes. The production of 123I and 18F will be performed in dedicated, commercial target stations, while a versatile solid target irradiation system is designed for the routine and experimental production of all other radioisotopes. The solid target station is designed to accept targets for both the 7° and 90° irradiation geometry. The targets used for the routine production will be prepared by electroplating on a silver substrate. They can be irradiated with a 1.5 kW beam using the 7° geometry. The cooling of these targets is enhanced by fins on the back of the silver substrate designed so that the highest temperature on the surface of the target does not exceed 110°C. The irradiation procedures will conform to the GMP requirements for the production of radiopharmaceuticals. The irradiated targets will be transported directly into the appropriate hot cell for radiochemical processing. All cells will be equipped with a target dissolution unit for etching the irradiated, electroplated film. After decontamination and sufficient cooling down, these targets will be reused several times.

  16. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  17. Optimization of the Low-Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Li; L. Ge; K. Ko; L. Lee; C.-K. Ng; G. L. Schussman; L. Xiao; T. Higo; Y. Morozumi; K. Saito; P. Kneisel; J. S. Sekutowicz

    2007-08-01

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and JLab (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting (MP) still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reduces the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced MP barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, MP activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss shape for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting. Comparisons of simulation results with measurements will also be presented.

  18. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Meredith D.; Tarbox, Grayson J.; Palmer, Antony J.; Park, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems. PMID:28090448

  19. Three-dimensional flow measurements in a tesla turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thomas; Schosser, Constantin; Hain, Rainer; Kaehler, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Tesla turbines are fluid mechanical devices converting flow energy into rotation energy by two physical effects: friction and adhesion. The advantages of the tesla turbine are its simple and robust design, as well as its scalability, which makes it suitable for custom power supply solutions, and renewable energy applications. To this day, there is a lack of experimental data to validate theoretical studies, and CFD simulations of these turbines. This work presents a comprehensive analysis of the flow through a tesla turbine rotor gap, with a gap height of only 0.5 mm, by means of three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (3D-PTV). For laminar flows, the experimental results match the theory very well, since the measured flow profiles show the predicted second order parabolic shape in radial direction and a fourth order behavior in circumferential direction. In addition to these laminar measurements, turbulent flows at higher mass flow rates were investigated.

  20. Optic Nerve Assessment Using 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arun D.; Platt, Sean M.; Lystad, Lisa; Lowe, Mark; Oh, Sehong; Jones, Stephen E.; Alzahrani, Yahya; Plesec, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to correlate high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histologic findings in a case of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma with clinical evidence of optic nerve invasion. Methods With institutional review board approval, an enucleated globe with choroidal melanoma and optic nerve invasion was imaged using a 7-tesla MRI followed by histopathologic evaluation. Results Optical coherence tomography, B-scan ultrasonography, and 1.5-tesla MRI of the orbit (1-mm sections) could not detect optic disc invasion. Ex vivo, 7-tesla MRI detected optic nerve invasion, which correlated with histopathologic features. Conclusions Our case demonstrates the potential to document the existence of optic nerve invasion in the presence of an intraocular tumor, a feature that has a major bearing on decision making, particularly for consideration of enucleation. PMID:27239461

  1. Challenges for picoTesla Magnetic-Tunnel-Junction Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egelhoff, William; Pong, Philip; McMichael, Robert; Nowak, Edmund; Edelstein, Alan; Burnett, James; Fisher, Greg

    2008-03-01

    The extension of small, inexpensive, low-power, low frequency, ultra-sensitive magnetic sensors to fields between 1 nanoTesla and 1 picoTesla, an area currently dominated by fluxgates, optically-pumped magnetometers, and SQUIDS, would be a paradigm shift for the field of magnetic sensors. The necessary elements for picoTesla MTJ sensors have been identified by modeling the noise characteristics. The results help identify the experimental challenges that exist in the integration of the necessary components of the sensor and illustrate the trade-offs that must be considered. For example, values of the TMR above 100% contribute very little, while lowering the saturation field of the free layer below 10 Oe is essential. These and other insights identify the critical issues than need attention and can guide research into productive directions.

  2. Optic Nerve Assessment Using 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arun D; Platt, Sean M; Lystad, Lisa; Lowe, Mark; Oh, Sehong; Jones, Stephen E; Alzahrani, Yahya; Plesec, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histologic findings in a case of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma with clinical evidence of optic nerve invasion. With institutional review board approval, an enucleated globe with choroidal melanoma and optic nerve invasion was imaged using a 7-tesla MRI followed by histopathologic evaluation. Optical coherence tomography, B-scan ultrasonography, and 1.5-tesla MRI of the orbit (1-mm sections) could not detect optic disc invasion. Ex vivo, 7-tesla MRI detected optic nerve invasion, which correlated with histopathologic features. Our case demonstrates the potential to document the existence of optic nerve invasion in the presence of an intraocular tumor, a feature that has a major bearing on decision making, particularly for consideration of enucleation.

  3. Utilizing Gas Filled Cavities for the Generation of an Intense Muon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys; Neuffer, David V.

    2015-05-01

    A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

  4. Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys; Neuffer, David V.

    2015-05-03

    A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

  5. RF optimization and analysis of the 805-MHz cavity for the MuCool program using ACE3P

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zenghai; Ge Lixin; Adolphsen, Chris; Li Derun; Bowring, Daniel

    2012-12-21

    An 805 MHz pillbox cavity tested at Fermilab's MTA facility showed significant degradation in gradient when operated in a several Tesla solenoidal magnetic field. We have used the advanced ACE3P simulation codes developed at SLAC to study the cavity dark current and multipacting characteristics to gain more insight into the gradient limitations. We also checked whether there is an optimal cavity length that minimizes the dark current impact energy. Finally, we have improved on the cavity design, significantly lowering the fields outside the beam area. These and other results are presented in this paper.

  6. RF optimization and analysis of the 805-MHz cavity for the MuCool program using ACE3P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zenghai; Ge, Lixin; Adolphsen, Chris; Li, Derun; Bowring, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    An 805 MHz pillbox cavity tested at Fermilab's MTA facility showed significant degradation in gradient when operated in a several Tesla solenoidal magnetic field. We have used the advanced ACE3P simulation codes developed at SLAC to study the cavity dark current and multipacting characteristics to gain more insight into the gradient limitations. We also checked whether there is an optimal cavity length that minimizes the dark current impact energy. Finally, we have improved on the cavity design, significantly lowering the fields outside the beam area. These and other results are presented in this paper.

  7. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    PubMed Central

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  8. Time Synchronization in Hierarchical TESLA Wireless Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jason L. Wright; Milos Manic

    2009-08-01

    Time synchronization and event time correlation are important in wireless sensor networks. In particular, time is used to create a sequence events or time line to answer questions of cause and effect. Time is also used as a basis for determining the freshness of received packets and the validity of cryptographic certificates. This paper presents secure method of time synchronization and event time correlation for TESLA-based hierarchical wireless sensor networks. The method demonstrates that events in a TESLA network can be accurately timestamped by adding only a few pieces of data to the existing protocol.

  9. Multi-purpose 805 MHz Pillbox RF Cavity for Muon Acceleration Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic; Jason, Andrew; Miyadera, Haruo; Turchi, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    An 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity has been designed and constructed to investigate potential muon beam acceleration and cooling techniques. The cavity can operate at vacuum or under pressure to 100 atmospheres, at room temperature or in a liquid nitrogen bath at 77 K. The cavity is designed for easy assembly and disassembly with bolted construction using aluminum seals. The surfaces of the end walls of the cavity can be replaced with different materials such as copper, aluminum, beryllium, or molybdenum, and with different geometries such as shaped windows or grid structures. Different surface treatments such as electro polished, high-pressure water cleaned, and atomic layer deposition are being considered for testing. The cavity has been designed to fit inside the 5-Tesla solenoid in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. Current status of the cavity prepared for initial conditioning and operation in the external magnetic field is discussed.

  10. Exploration of material removal rate of srf elliptical cavities as a function of media type and cavity shape on niobium and copper using centrifugal barrel polishing (cbp)

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Li, Yongming; Geng, Rongli

    2013-09-01

    Centrifugal barrel polishing (cbp) for SRF application is becoming more wide spread as the technique for cavity surface preparation. CBP is now being used in some form at SRF laboratories around the world including in the US, Europe and Asia. Before the process can become as mature as wet chemistry like eletro-polishing (EP) and buffered chemical polishing (BCP) there are many questions which remain unanswered. One of these topics includes the uniformity of removal as a function of cavity shape and material type. In this presentation we show CBP removal rates for various media types on 1.3 GHz TESLA and 1.5 GHz CEBAF large/fine grain niobium cavities, and 1.3GHz low surface field copper cavity. The data will also include calculated RF frequency shift modeling non-uniform removal as a function of cavity position and comparing them with CBP results.

  11. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM And SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Bellantoni, L.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  12. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM and SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Bellantoni, L.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-06-23

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  13. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-01

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  14. Development of an advanced electropolishing setup for multicell high gradient niobium cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Éozénou, F.; Chel, S.; Gasser, Y.; Servouin, C.; Visentin, B.; Charrier, J.-P.; Wang, Z.

    2012-08-01

    Reproducible operation at high performances of superconducting cavities is required for linear accelerators. High beta elliptical cavities are thus of concern and, to achieve required performances for such resonators, surface preparation including electropolishing is recommended. We have designed and operate a setup for electropolishing in the vertical position of multicell cavities in order to: (i) obtain high yield with large elliptical cavities for Superconducting Linac (SPL) or European Spallation Source projects; (ii) develop a reference installation demonstrating that this process is appropriate for the large scale treatment of cavities in industry. The setup described here is the first one able to electropolish vertically multicell cavities with circulating acid and high safety standards. This equipment makes it possible to use a wide range of parameters such as voltage, acid flow rate, temperature, and nitrogen injection with an R&D purpose in mind. Optimization is studied using modeling with COMSOL software for different cavities. As examples, we present some results for the 704 MHz high-beta SPL cavity and the 1300 MHz International Linear Collider cavity and show the influence of cathode shape on both acid flow and electric field distribution during the process. Importance of the size of the cavity and first results achieved on single-cell and nine-cell cavities will be discussed.

  15. 3.0 Tesla contrast-enhanced MR angiography of carotid artery stents: in vitro measurements as compared with 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Hähnel, S; Nguyen-Trong, T H; Rohde, S; Hartmann, M; Braun, C; Sartor, K; Heiland, S

    2006-04-01

    To assess the appearance of carotid artery stents at 3.0 Tesla contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) as compared with 1.5 Tesla. 19 stents (GUIDANT Acculink, GUIDANT Dynalink, BOSTON SCIENTIFIC SMART Neuroform, GUIDANT Omnilink, EV3 Protege, BOSTON SCIENTIFIC Carotid Wallstent, ABBOTT Xact) of different materials (nitinol, stainless steal, cobalt alloy) and different sizes (4.0 mm-10.0 mm) were investigated regarding their appearance on CE-MRA at 3.0 Tesla and at 1.5 Tesla. For each stent artificial lumen narrowing (ALN) was calculated based on a pixel-by-pixel profile of the contrast-to-noise-ratio giving an objective indicator for the size of the evaluable stent diameter. Only in two stents (Omnilink 7.0 mm, Omnilink 10.0 mm) was ALN higher at 3.0 Tesla relative to 1.5 Tesla. In all other stents ALN at 3.0 Tesla was the same or even lower as compared with 1.5 Tesla. In contrast to the ferromagnetic stents where ALN was typically higher than 85%, in most of the nitinol stents (Acculink, Dynalink, Neuroform, Protege) ALN was below 35%. In the Xact stents ALN was generally 100% at 1.5 Tesla and ranged between 31.8% and 100% at 3.0 Tesla. CE-MRA after carotid artery stenting is considerably impaired by ALN both at 1.5 Tesla and at 3.0 Tesla. Nevertheless, CE-MRA is well suited for the examination of carotid artery stents made of nitinol at both field strengths. Stent manufacturers should be aware of potential artifacts caused by their stents during noninvasive diagnostic methods such as CE-MRA.

  16. Test of the DEP hybrid photodiode in 5 Tesla Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D; Freeman, J.; Ronzhin, A.; Cushman, R.; Heering, A.

    1997-10-01

    The CMS detector is designed so that the tile/fiber hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) is immersed in a 4 Tesla magnetic field. The Hybrid Photodiode (HPD) will be used as the photodetector. Below we present the experiment data which we obtained on the HPD behavior in a magnetic field.

  17. Identifying Needed Technical Standards: The LITA TESLA Committee at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ruth C.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts of the Technical Standards for Library Automation Committee (TESLA), a division-wide committee of the Library Information and Technology Association (LITA) of the American Library Association, are described. The current status of suggested technical standards and recommended action are detailed. Five sources are given. (Author/EJS)

  18. TESLA FEL Gun simulations with PARMELA and MAFIA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Min; Schuett, Petra

    1997-02-01

    The most recent simulation results of the DESY TESLA FEL gun are presented. Two codes are used: PARMELA and MAFIA. Since the two use different schemes in particle simulations, we will address their differences and try to give an explanation for them.

  19. TESLA FEL Gun simulations with PARMELA and MAFIA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.; Schuett, P.

    1997-02-01

    The most recent simulation results of the DESY TESLA FEL gun are presented. Two codes are used: PARMELA and MAFIA. Since the two use different schemes in particle simulations, we will address their differences and try to give an explanation for them. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Identifying Needed Technical Standards: The LITA TESLA Committee at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ruth C.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts of the Technical Standards for Library Automation Committee (TESLA), a division-wide committee of the Library Information and Technology Association (LITA) of the American Library Association, are described. The current status of suggested technical standards and recommended action are detailed. Five sources are given. (Author/EJS)

  1. What's a Cavity?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cavity (say: KA-vuh-tee) develops when a tooth decays (say: dih-KAZE), or breaks down. A cavity ... and deeper over time. Cavities are also called dental caries (say: KARE-eez), and if you have a ...

  2. Artefacts induced by coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla versus 1.5-Tesla MR angiography--An in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Joanna D; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Vincken, Koen L; de Kort, Gerard A P; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2014-05-01

    To compare metal-induced artefacts from coiled intracranial aneurysms on 3.0-Tesla and 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), since concerns persist on artefact enlargement at 3.0Tesla. We scanned 19 patients (mean age 53; 16 women) with 20 saccular aneurysms treated with coils only, at 1.5 and 3.0Tesla according to standard clinical 3D TOF-MRA protocols containing a shorter echo-time but weaker read-out gradient at 3.0Tesla in addition to intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA). Per modality two neuro-radiologists assessed the occlusion status, measured residual flow, and indicated whether coil artefacts disturbed this assessment on MRA. We assessed relative risks for disturbance by coil artefacts, weighted kappa's for agreement on occlusion levels, and we compared remnant sizes. For artefact measurements, a coil model was created and scanned with the same protocols followed by 2D MR scans with variation of echo-time and read-out gradient strength. Coil artefacts disturbed assessments less frequently at 3.0Tesla than at 1.5Tesla (RR: 0.3; 95%CI: 0.1-0.8). On 3.0-Tesla MRA, remnants were larger than on 1.5-Tesla MRA (difference: 0.7mm; 95%CI: 0.3-1.1) and larger than on IA-DSA (difference: 1.0mm; 95%CI: 0.6-1.5) with similar agreement on occlusion levels with IA-DSA for both field strengths (κ 0.53; 95%CI: 0.23-0.84 for 1.5-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA; κ 0.47; 95%CI: 0.19-0.76 for 3.0-Tesla MRA and IA-DSA). Coil model artefacts were smaller at 3.0Tesla than at 1.5Tesla. The echo-time influenced artefact size more than the read-out gradient. Artefacts were not larger, but smaller at 3.0Tesla because a shorter echo-time at 3.0Tesla negated artefact enlargement. Despite smaller artefacts and larger remnants at 3.0Tesla, occlusion levels were similar for both field strengths. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  4. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  5. Muscle-fat MRI: 1.5 Tesla and 3.0 Tesla versus histology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Parrish, Todd B; Abbott, Rebecca; Hoggarth, Mark A; Mendoza, Karl; Chen, Yu Fen; Elliott, James M

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated muscle/fat fraction (MFF) accuracy and reliability measured with an MR imaging technique at 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T scanner strengths, using biopsy as reference. MRI was performed on muscle samples from pig and rabbit species (n = 8) at 1.5T and 3.0T. A chemical shift based 2-point Dixon method was used, collecting in-phase and out-of-phase data for fat/water of muscle samples. Values were compared with MFFs calculated from histology. No significant difference was found between 1.5T and 3.0T (P values = 0.41-0.96), or between histology and imaging (P = 0.83) for any muscle tested. RESULTS suggest that a 2-point Dixon fat/water separation MRI technique may provide reliable quantification of MFFs at varying field strengths across different animal species, and consistency was established with biopsy. The results set a foundation for larger scale investigation of quantifying muscle fat in neuromuscular disorders. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dark Current and X Ray Measurements of an 805 MHz Pillbox Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    J. Norem; P. Gruber; A. Bross; S. Geer; A. Moretti; Z Qian; D. M. Kaplan; Y. Torun; R. Rimmer; Derun Li; M. Zisman

    2003-05-01

    The muon cooling systems proposed for neutrino factories require low frequency (201 MHz) RF cavities with Be windows, at high gradient (Eacc {approx} 16 MV/m), in strong solenoidal magnetic field ({approx} 5 T). For the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) [1], an experimental demonstration of cooling, we have an additional constraint that we must operate sensitive particle detectors very close to the RF cavities, which produce backgrounds from dark currents and x rays. To understand the processes involved in cavity conditioning and operation near particle detectors, we have constructed a test facility at Lab G of Fermilab, where a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid, a 14 MW peak power klystron and a pillbox test cavity at 805 MHz are available. We present measurements of dark currents, x rays and surface structure from the pillbox cavity, with both copper and beryllium endplates, and discuss the interaction between surface structure and radiation backgrounds produced.

  7. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  8. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  9. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  10. Tuned cavity magnetometer sensitivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (Tesla/{radical}Hz), non-cryogenic magnetometer that utilizes a novel optical (interferometric) detection technique. Further miniaturization and low-power operation are key advantages of this magnetometer, when compared to systems using SQUIDs which require liquid Helium temperatures and associated overhead to achieve similar sensitivity levels.

  11. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  12. A 10 tesla table-top controlled waveform magnet.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Aditya N; Venkataraman, V

    2012-04-01

    Controlled waveform magnets (CWMs) are a class of pulsed magnets whose pulse shape with time can be programmed by the user. With a CWM, the user gains control not only over the magnitude of the field but also over its rate of change. In this work we present a table-top CWM, driven by a capacitor bank, capable of producing virtually any user-shaped magnetic field waveform up to 10 tesla. Insulated gate bipolar transistor chips have been paralleled to form the high current switch and paralleled chips of SiC Schottky diodes form the crowbar diode module. Sample controlled waveforms including flat-tops up to 10 tesla and some triangular magnetic field pulses have been successfully generated for 10-20 ms with a ripple <1%.

  13. Hydrogen Degassing Study During the Heat Treatment of 1.3-GHZ SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, Mijoung; Kim, H. J.; Rowe, A.; Wong, M.

    2013-10-02

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities undergo a number of processes as part of its manufacturing procedure in order to optimize their performance. Among these processes is a high temperature hydrogen degas heat treatment used to prevent 'Q' decrease. The heat treatment occurs in the processing sequence after either chemically or mechanically polishing the cavity. This paper summarizes the hydrogen measurements during the heat treatment of a sample of chemically and mechanically polished single-cell and nine-cell 1.3-GHz cavities. The hydrogen measurements are analyzed according the polishing method, the polishing history, the amount of time that the cavity was baked at 800°C, and the temperature ramp rate.

  14. RHQT Nb3Al 15-Tesla magnet design study

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Feasibility study of 15-Tesla dipole magnets wound with a new copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable is presented. A new practical long copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is presented, which is being developed and manufactured at the National Institute of Material Science (NIMS) in Japan. It has achieved a non-copper J{sub c} of 1000A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, with a copper over non-copper ratio of 1.04, and a filament size less than 50 microns. For this design study a short Rutherford cable with 28 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1 mm diameter will be fabricated late this year. The cosine theta magnet cross section is designed using ROXIE, and the stress and strain in the coil is estimated and studied with the characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. The advantages and disadvantages of the Nb{sub 3}Al cable are compared with the prevailing Nb{sub 3}Sn cable from the point of view of stress-strain, J{sub c}, and possible degradation of stabilizer due to cabling. The Nb{sub 3}Al coil of the magnet, which will be made by wind and react method, has to be heat treated at 800 degree C for 10 hours. As preparation for the 15 Tesla magnet, a series of tests on strand and Rutherford cables are considered.

  15. Cryogenic system for the 45 Tesla hybrid magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sciver, S.W.; Miller, J.R.; Welton, S.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.; McIntosh, G.E.

    1994-12-31

    The 45 Tesla hybrid magnet system will consist of a 14 Tesla superconducting outsert magnet and a 31 Tesla water cooled insert. The magnet is planned for operation in early 1995 at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Its purpose is to provide the highest DC magnetic fields for the materials research community. The present paper discusses the overall design of the cryogenic system for the superconducting magnet. Unique features of this system include static 1.8 K pressurized He II as a coolant for the magnet and a refrigerated structural support system for load transfer during fault conditions. The system will consist of two connected cryostats. The magnet is contained within one cryostat which has a clear warm bore of 616 mm and is designed to be free of system interfaces and therefore minimize interference with the magnet user. A second supply cryostat provides the connections to the refrigeration system and magnet power supply. The magnet and supply cryostats are connected to each other through a horizontal services duct section. Issues to be discussed in the present paper include design and thermal analysis of the magnet system during cooldown and in steady state operation and overall cryogenic system design.

  16. Measurement of Microwave Parameters of a Superconducting Niobium Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaryan, N. S.; Baturitskii, M. A.; Budagov, Yu. A.; Demin, D. L.; Dem‧yanov, S. E.; Karpovich, V. A.; Kniga, V. V.; Krivosheev, R. M.; Lyubetskii, N. V.; Maksimov, S. I.; Pobol‧, I. L.; Rodionova, V. N.; Shirkov, G. D.; Shumeiko, N. M.; Yurevich, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a method for direct measurement of the amplitude-frequency characteristics and the Q factor of empty superconducting niobium radio frequency Tesla-type cavities. An automated measuring complex that permits recording the superconductivity effect and measuring high Q values has been developed. Measurements have been made of the Q factors of the investigated objects (the first domestic 1.3-GHz niobium cavities) at a level no lower than 0.1·109 (with a maximum value of 1.2·1010) and a level of relative losses lower than 130 dB (with a minimum factor of 139.7 dB) at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  17. Development of high purity niobium used in SRF accelerating cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Xie, Wei-Ping; Li, Ming-Yang; He, Ji-Lin; Fan, Hui-Ru; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; He, Fei-Si; Zhao, Kui; Chen, Jia-Er; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2008-12-01

    Niobium is widely used in SRF (Superconducting Radio Frequency) cavities due to its excellent superconductivity and workability. With the continuous development of technology, higher demands of material are raised. One of the key issues is that RRR (Residual Resistance Ratio) of the Nb material should be more than 300, which requires that the Nb ingot have even higher RRR. This article introduces the development and the experimental results of high purity niobium in OTIC in Ningxia (Ningxia Orient Tantalum Industry Co. Ltd.), and the test results of the single cell TESLA (Tera Electron volt energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) shaped cavity manufactured by Peking University using Nb material from OTIC. Supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2002CB713600)

  18. Hydroforming SRF Three-cell Cavity from Seamless Niobium Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Masashi; Dohmae, Takeshi; Hocker, Andy; Inoue, Hitoshi; Park, Gunn-Tae; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Umemori, Kensei

    2016-06-01

    We are developing the manufacturing method for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities by using a hydroforming instead of using conventional electron beam welding. We expect higher reliability and reduced cost with hydroforming. For successful hydroforming, high-purity seamless niobium tubes with good formability as well as advancing the hydroforming technique are necessary. Using a seamless niobium tube from ATI Wah Chang, we were able to successfully hydroform a 1.3 GHz three-cell TESLA-like cavity and obtained an Eacc of 32 MV/m. A barrel polishing process was omitted after the hydroforming. The vertical test was carried out with very rough inside surface. We got amazing and interesting result.

  19. Hip imaging of avascular necrosis at 7 Tesla compared with 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Theysohn, J M; Kraff, O; Theysohn, N; Orzada, S; Landgraeber, S; Ladd, M E; Lauenstein, T C

    2014-05-01

    To compare ultra-high field, high-resolution bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hips at 7 Tesla (T) with 3 T MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head by subjective image evaluations, contrast measurements, and evaluation of the appearance of imaging abnormalities. Thirteen subjects with avascular necrosis treated using advanced core decompression underwent MRI at both 7 T and 3 T. Sequence parameters as well as resolution were kept identical for both field strengths. All MR images (MEDIC, DESS, PD/T2w TSE, T1w TSE, and STIR) were evaluated by two radiologists with regard to subjective image quality, soft tissue contrasts, B1 homogeneity (four-point scale, higher values indicating better image quality) and depiction of imaging abnormalities of the femoral heads (three-point scale, higher values indicating the superiority of 7 T). Contrast ratios of soft tissues were calculated and compared with subjective data. 7-T imaging of the femoral joints, as well as 3-T imaging, achieved "good" to "very good" quality in all sequences. 7 T showed significantly higher soft tissue contrasts for T2w and MEDIC compared with 3 T (cartilage/fluid: 2.9 vs 2.2 and 3.6 vs 2.6), better detailed resolution for cartilage defects (PDw, T2w, T1w, MEDIC, DESS > 2.5) and better visibility of joint effusions (MEDIC 2.6; PDw/T2w 2.4; DESS 2.2). Image homogeneity compared with 3 T (3.9-4.0 for all sequences) was degraded, especially in TSE sequences at 7 T through signal variations (7 T: 2.1-2.9); to a lesser extent also GRE sequences (7 T: 2.9-3.5). Imaging findings related to untreated or treated AVN were better delineated at 3 T (≤1.8), while joint effusions (2.2-2.6) and cartilage defects (2.5-3.0) were better visualized at 7 T. STIR performed much more poorly at 7 T, generating large contrast variations (1.5). 7-T hip MRI showed comparable results in hip joint imaging compared with 3 T with slight advantages in contrast detail

  20. State of the art of multicell SC cavities and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel

    2002-08-01

    Superconducting cavity technology has made major progresses in the last decade with the introduction of high purity niobium on an industrial scale and, at the same time, by an improved understanding of the limiting processes in cavity performance, such as multipacting, field emission loading and thermal break-down. Multicell niobium cavities for beta = 1 particle acceleration, e.g. for the TESLA project, are routinely exceeding gradients of Eacc = 20 MV/m after the application of surface preparation techniques such as buffered chemical polishing or electropolishing, high pressure ultrapure water rinsing, UHV heat treatment and clean room assembly. The successes of the technology for beta = 1 accelerators has triggered a whole set of possible future applications for beta < 1 particle acceleration such as spallation neutron sources (SNS, ESS), transmutation of nuclear waste (TRASCO, ASH) or rare isotopes (RIA). The most advanced of these projects is SNS now under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper will review the technical solutions adopted to advance SRF technology and their impact on cavity performance, based on the SNS prototyping efforts. 2K at these high gradients are no longer out of reach. For the accelerator builder the challenge remains to come up with a good and reasonable design, which takes into account the status of the technology and does not over-estimate the achievable cavity performances in a large assembly such as, e.g., a multi-cavity cryo-module. In the following the criteria for multi-cell sc cavity design are reviewed and it is attempted to give a snapshot of the present status of multi-cell cavity performances.

  1. Non-Enhanced MR Imaging of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Wrede, Karsten H; Dammann, Philipp; Johst, Sören; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Schlamann, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Ladd, Mark E; Forsting, Michael; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate prospectively 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and 7 Tesla non-contrast-enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) for delineation of intracerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Twenty patients with single or multifocal AVMs were enrolled in this trial. The study protocol comprised 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast-enhanced MPRAGE sequences. All patients underwent an additional four-vessel 3D DSA. Image analysis of the following five AVM features was performed individually by two radiologists on a five-point scale: nidus, feeder(s), draining vein(s), relationship to adjacent vessels, and overall image quality and presence of artefacts. A total of 21 intracerebral AVMs were detected. Both sequences at 7 Tesla were rated superior over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered AVM features. Image quality at 7 Tesla was comparable with DSA considering both sequences. Inter-observer accordance was good to excellent for the majority of ratings. This study demonstrates excellent image quality for depiction of intracerebral AVMs using non-contrast-enhanced 7 Tesla MRA, comparable with DSA. Assessment of untreated AVMs is a promising clinical application of ultra-high-field MRA. • Non-contrast-enhanced 7 Tesla MRA demonstrates excellent image quality for intracerebral AVM depiction. • Image quality at 7 Tesla was comparable with DSA considering both sequences. • Assessment of intracerebral AVMs is a promising clinical application of ultra-high-field MRA.

  2. Hydroforming of Multi-Cell Niobium and NbCu-Clad Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    X. Singer, I. Jelezov, A. Matheisen, W. Singer, P. Kneisel

    2009-05-01

    Technological aspects of seamless tube fabrication and multi-cell cavity production by hydroforming will be discussed. Problems related to the fabrication of seamless cavities from bulk niobium are mainly solved. Several two cell- and three cell- niobium cavities have been produced by hydroforming at DESY. A 9-cell cavity of the TESLA shape has been completed from three sub-sections at company ZANON. The cavity was treated by electropolishing (EP) and successfully RF-tested. Two 3-cell units equipped with niobium beam pipes are being RF-tested after BCP surface treatment. The temperature mapping method with Jlab’s two-cell thermometry system is applied for performance analysis. It is of particular interest to compare the seamless cavity quench locations to those from standard cavities. The cryogenic test results and the T-mapping findings will be discussed. Of special interest is the combination of the seamless technique with NbCu cladding, i.e. the fabrication of cavity from bimetallic clad NbCu tube by hydroforming. Fabrication of single-cell and multi-cell NbCu clad cavities by hydroforming from bimetallic tubes is proven. Some test results will be presented.

  3. Design, fabrication, and testing of superconducting RF cavities for high average beam currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidlinger, David Joseph

    For high current applications, it is desirable for the cavity shape to have a low longitudinal loss factor and to have a high beam-breakup threshold current. This dissertation describes three different cavities designed for this purpose: a six-cell elliptical cavity for particles traveling at the speed of light, a two-cell elliptical cavity for subluminal particle speeds, and a single cell cavity which uses the TM012 mode for acceleration. SUPERFISH simulations predict the peak fields in both of the elliptical cavities will not exceed the TeSLA values by more than 10% but both will have 28.7% larger apertures. The elliptical designs assume the bunch frequency equals the accelerating mode frequency. The beam pipe radius is chosen so that the cutoff frequency is less than twice that of the accelerating mode. Hence all of the monopole and dipole higher-order modes (HOMs) that can be driven by a Fourier component of the beam have low loaded Q values. This simplifies the problem of HOM damping. The TM012 cavity is predicted to have much higher peak fields than a pi-mode elliptical cavity, but offers potential advantages from its simplified shape; it is essentially a circular waveguide with curved end plates. This basic shape results in easier fabrication and simplified tuning. Two prototype two-cell cavities were fabricated and tested at cryogenic temperatures without beam.

  4. High-Gradient Tests of the Single-Cell SC Cavity with a Feedback Waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, V.; Solyak, N.; Wu, G.; Ge, M.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ozelis, J.; Rowe, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Rathke, J.

    2010-11-04

    Use of a superconducting (SC) traveling-wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell, rather than a standing-wave structure, may provide a significant increase in the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac [1]. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields, the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing-wave cavities. In addition, the STWA allows longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed and manufactured to demonstrate the possibility of proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. The first results of high-gradient tests of a prototype 1.3 GHz single-cell cavity with feedback waveguide will be presented.

  5. OPTIMIZING CENTRIFUGAL BARREL POLISHING FOR MIRROR FINISH SRF CAVITY AND RF TESTS AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Hui Tian

    2012-07-01

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on a 1.3 GHz fine grain TESLA single cell cavity and 1.5 GHz fine grain CEBAF high gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) single cell cavity following a modified recipe originally developed at Fermi National Accelerator Lab (FNAL). We were able to obtain a mirror like surface similar to that obtained at FNAL, while reducing the number of CBP steps and total processing time. This paper will discuss the change in surface and subsequent cavity performance post CBP, after a 800 C bake (no pre-bake chemistry) and minimal controlled electro-polishing (10 micron). In addition to Q vs. E{sub ACC} thermometry mapping with preheating characteristics and optical inspection of the cavity after CBP will also be shown.

  6. High-Gradient Tests of the Single-Cell SC Cavity with a Feedback Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, V.; Solyak, N.; Wu, G.; Ge, M.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ozelis, J.; Rowe, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Rathke, J.

    2010-11-01

    Use of a superconducting (SC) traveling-wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell, rather than a standing-wave structure, may provide a significant increase in the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac [1]. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields, the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing-wave cavities. In addition, the STWA allows longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed and manufactured to demonstrate the possibility of proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. The first results of high-gradient tests of a prototype 1.3 GHz single-cell cavity with feedback waveguide will be presented.

  7. Cryogenic Test of a Coaxial Coupling Scheme for Fundamental and Higher Order Modes in Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2009-05-01

    A coaxial coupling device located in the beam pipe of the TESLA type superconducting cavities provides for better propagation of Higher Order Modes (HOMs) and their strong damping in appropriate HOM couplers. Additionally, it also provides efficient coupling for fundamental mode RF power into the superconducting cavity. The whole coupling device can be designed as a detachable system. If appropriately dimensioned, the magnetic field can be minimized to a negligible level at the flange position. This scheme, presented previously*, provides for several advantages: strong HOM damping, flangeable solution, exchangeability of the HOM damping device on a cavity, less complexity of the superconducting cavity, possible cost advantages. This contribution will describe the results of the first cryogenic test.

  8. Integral Cavity Hydrogen Maser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    development on a new microwave cavity for the NASA Research (NR) hydrogen maser for the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program. Also included with the results will be...bulb and all the cavity components bonded together, was developed. The "integral cavity" was installed in the NR maser. This NASA Research Experimental

  9. Automated hippocampal subfield segmentation at 7 tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wisse, Laura E.M.; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Honingh, Anita M.; Wang, Hongzhi; Pluta, John B.; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Wolk, David A.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate an automated technique to segment hippocampal subfields and the entorhinal cortex (ERC) at 7 tesla MRI. Materials and Methods Cornu Ammonis (CA)1, CA2, CA3, dentate gyrus (DG), subiculum (SUB) and ERC were manually segmented, covering most of the long axis of the hippocampus, on 0.70 mm3 T2-weighted 7 tesla images of twenty-six participants (59±9 years, 46% men). The Automated Segmentation of Hippocampal Subfields (ASHS) approach was applied and evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results Comparison of automated segmentations with corresponding manual segmentation yielded a Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of >0.75 for CA1, DG, SUB and ERC; and >0.54 for CA2 and CA3. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were >0.74 for CA1, DG and SUB; and >0.43 for CA2, CA3 and the ERC. Restricting the comparison of the ERC segmentation to a smaller range along the anterior-posterior axis improved both ICCs (left: 0.71; right: 0.82) and DSCs (left: 0.78; right: 0.77). The accuracy of ASHS vs a manual rater was lower, though only slightly for most subfields, than the intra-rater reliability of an expert manual rater, but was similar or slightly higher than the accuracy of an expert vs. a manual rater with ~170h of training for almost all subfields. Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a computational technique to automatically label hippocampal subfields and the ERC at 7 tesla MRI, with a high accuracy for most subfields that is competitive with the labor intensive manual segmentation. The software and atlas are publicly available: http://www.nitrc.org/projects/ashs/. PMID:26846925

  10. Status of the NHMFL 60 tesla quasi-continuous magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Boenig, H.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Schilig, J.B.; Sims, J.R.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.

    1995-07-01

    All components of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory`s (NHMFL) 60 T quasi-continuous magnet are now under construction, with complete delivery and installation expected in early 1996. This research magnet has a cold bore of 32 mm and will produce a constant 60 tesla for 100 ms plus a wide variety of other pulse shapes such as linear ramps, steps, crowbar decays, and longer flat-tops at lower fields. Fabrication and testing of prototype coils are described along with the layout, construction status, and protection philosophy of the 400 MW power supply. Examples of simulated pulse shapes are shown.

  11. Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

  12. Cavity quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, P.R.

    1994-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: perturbative cavity quantum electrodynamics; the micromoser; manipulation of neoclassical field states in a cavity by atom interferometry; quantum optics of driven atoms in colored vacua; structure and dynamics in cavity quantum electrodynamics; on electron in a cavity; spontaneous emission by moving atoms; single atom emission in an optical resonator; nonperturbation atom-photon interactions in an optical cavity; and new aspects of the Casimir effect: fluctuations and radiative reaction. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  13. 76 FR 60124 - Tesla Motors, Inc.; Grant of Petition for Temporary Exemption From the Electronic Stability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ...This notice grants the petition of Tesla Motors, Inc. (Tesla) for the temporary exemption of its Roadster model from the electronic stability control requirements of FMVSS No. 126. The basis for the exemption is that the exemption would facilitate the development or field evaluation of a low-emission motor vehicle and would not unreasonably reduce the safety level of that vehicle.

  14. Long Arc Simulated Lightning Attachment Testing Using a 150 kW Tesla Coil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Coil System L4=Secondary of Tesla Coil System LS=Extra Coil of Tesla Coil System Cl=Primary Circuit Charging Capactor C2=Distributed...The fields outside the coil near the center (half way up) loop outward, with the frequency of the output and the magnetic flux changing, the arc is

  15. 77 FR 60672 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tesla Motors, Inc., (Electric Passenger Vehicles), Palo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tesla Motors, Inc., (Electric Passenger... electric passenger vehicles and related powertrain components at the Tesla Motors, Inc., facilities located... establish a special-purpose subzone at the electric passenger vehicle manufacturing facilities of...

  16. In vivo high-resolution 7 Tesla MRI shows early and diffuse cortical alterations in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    De Guio, François; Reyes, Sonia; Vignaud, Alexandre; Duering, Marco; Ropele, Stefan; Duchesnay, Edouard; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Recent data suggest that early symptoms may be related to cortex alterations in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), a monogenic model of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). The aim of this study was to investigate cortical alterations using both high-resolution T2* acquisitions obtained with 7 Tesla MRI and structural T1 images with 3 Tesla MRI in CADASIL patients with no or only mild symptomatology (modified Rankin's scale ≤1 and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) ≥24). Complete reconstructions of the cortex using 7 Tesla T2* acquisitions with 0.7 mm isotropic resolution were obtained in 11 patients (52.1±13.2 years, 36% male) and 24 controls (54.8±11.0 years, 42% male). Seven Tesla T2* within the cortex and cortical thickness and morphology obtained from 3 Tesla images were compared between CADASIL and control subjects using general linear models. MMSE, brain volume, cortical thickness and global sulcal morphology did not differ between groups. By contrast, T2* measured by 7 Tesla MRI was significantly increased in frontal, parietal, occipital and cingulate cortices in patients after correction for multiple testing. These changes were not related to white matter lesions, lacunes or microhemorrhages in patients having no brain atrophy compared to controls. Seven Tesla MRI, by contrast to state of the art post-processing of 3 Tesla acquisitions, shows diffuse T2* alterations within the cortical mantle in CADASIL whose origin remains to be determined.

  17. 77 FR 22383 - Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; TESLA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor... full the petition of Tesla Motors Inc's. (Tesla) for an exemption of the Model S vehicle line in... is likely to be as effective in reducing and deterring motor vehicle theft as compliance with...

  18. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  19. k-t SENSE-accelerated Myocardial Perfusion MR Imaging at 3.0 Tesla - comparison with 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Plein, Sven; Schwitter, Juerg; Suerder, Daniel; Greenwood, John P.; Boesiger, Peter; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of high spatial resolution myocardial perfusion MR at 3.0 Tesla using k-space and time domain undersampling with sensitivity encoding (k-t SENSE). Materials and Methods The study was reviewed and approved by the local ethic review board. k-t SENSE perfusion MR was performed at 1.5 Tesla and 3.0 Tesla (saturation recovery gradient echo pulse sequence, repetition time/echo time 3.0ms/1.0ms, flip angle 15°, 5x k-t SENSE acceleration, spatial resolution 1.3×1.3×10mm3). Fourteen volunteers were studied at rest and 37 patients during adenosine stress. In volunteers, comparison was also made with standard-resolution (2.5×2.5×10mm3) 2x SENSE perfusion MR at 3.0 Tesla. Image quality, artifact scores, signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-enhancement ratios (CER) were derived. In patients, diagnostic accuracy of visual analysis to detect >50% diameter stenosis on quantitative coronary angiography was determined by receiver-operator-characteristics (ROC). Results In volunteers, image quality and artifact scores were similar for 3.0 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla, while SNR was higher (11.6 vs. 5.6) and CER lower (1.1 vs. 1.5, p=0.012) at 3.0 Tesla. Compared with standard-resolution perfusion MR, image quality was higher for k-t SENSE (3.6 vs. 3.1, p=0.04), endocardial dark rim artifacts were reduced (artifact thickness 1.6mm vs. 2.4mm, p<0.001) and CER similar. In patients, area under the ROC curve for detection of coronary stenosis was 0.89 and 0.80, p=0.21 for 3.0 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla, respectively. Conclusions k-t SENSE accelerated high-resolution perfusion MR at 3.0 Tesla is feasible with similar artifacts and diagnostic accuracy as at 1.5 Tesla. Compared with standard-resolution perfusion MR, image quality is improved and artifacts are reduced. PMID:18936311

  20. Diagnosis of rotator cuff tears using 3-Tesla MRI versus 3-Tesla MRA: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, Ciaran; Harb, Ziad; Smith, Christian; Houghton, Russell; Corbett, Steven; Ajuied, Adil

    2016-02-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 2-dimensional magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) and 3-dimensional isotropic MRA in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears when performed exclusively at 3-T. A systematic review was undertaken of the Cochrane, MEDLINE and PubMed databases in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Studies comparing 3-T MRI or 3-T MRA (index tests) to arthroscopic surgical findings (reference test) were included. Methodological appraisal was performed using QUADAS 2. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated and summary receiver-operating curves generated. Kappa coefficients quantified inter-observer reliability. Fourteen studies comprising 1332 patients were identified for inclusion. Twelve studies were retrospective and there were concerns regarding index test bias and applicability in nine and six studies respectively. Reference test bias was a concern in all studies. Both 3-T MRI and 3-T MRA showed similar excellent diagnostic accuracy for full-thickness supraspinatus tears. Concerning partial-thickness supraspinatus tears, 3-T 2D MRA was significantly more sensitive (86.6 vs. 80.5 %, p = 0.014) but significantly less specific (95.2 vs. 100 %, p < 0.001). There was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA showed similar accuracy to 3-T conventional 2D MRA. Three-Tesla MRI appeared equivalent to 3-T MRA in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness tears, although there was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA appears equivalent to 3-T 2D MRA for all types of tears.

  1. Design of a horizontal test cryostat for superconducting RF cavities for the FREIA facility at Uppsala University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Thermeau, J.-P.; Bujard, P.; Junquera, T.; Hermansson, L.; Kern, R. Santiago; Ruber, R.

    2014-01-01

    Uppsala University is constructing a large scale facility, called FREIA (Facility for Research Instrumentation and Accelerator Development). FREIA includes a helium liquefier and an accelerator test facility and has the capacity to test superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the same RF system and RF power level as in an accelerator. A central element of FREIA is a horizontal test cryostat connected in closed loop to a helium liquefier. This cryostat can house two fully equipped (tuners, piezo, power coupler, helium tank) superconducting cavities to perform full RF high power tests and operate at temperatures between 1.8 K and 4.2 K. The cryostat is designed to accommodate a large array of superconducting cavities and magnets, among which the European Spallation Source (ESS) type spoke and high-β elliptical cavities as well as TESLA/ILC type elliptical cavities. The present status of the project and the design of the cryostat are reported.

  2. Defect detection inside superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities by means of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, M.; Michelato, P.; Moretti, M.; Navitski, A.; Pagani, C.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence probe for detection of foreign material inclusions on the inner surface of superconducting cavities has been developed and tested. The setup detects trace element content such as a few micrograms of impurities responsible for thermal breakdown phenomena limiting the cavity performance. The setup has been customized for the geometry of 1.3 GHz TESLA-type niobium cavities and focuses on the surface of equator area at around 103 mm from the centre axis of the cavities with around 20 mm detection spot. More precise localization of inclusions can be reconstructed by means of angular or lateral displacement of the cavity. Preliminary tests confirmed a very low detection limit for elements laying in the high efficiency spectrum zone (from 5 to 10 keV), and a high angular resolution allowing an accurate localization of defects within the equator surface.

  3. Design of a horizontal test cryostat for superconducting RF cavities for the FREIA facility at Uppsala University

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, N. R.; Thermeau, J.-P.; Bujard, P.; Junquera, T.; Hermansson, L.; Kern, R. Santiago; Ruber, R.

    2014-01-29

    Uppsala University is constructing a large scale facility, called FREIA (Facility for Research Instrumentation and Accelerator Development). FREIA includes a helium liquefier and an accelerator test facility and has the capacity to test superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the same RF system and RF power level as in an accelerator. A central element of FREIA is a horizontal test cryostat connected in closed loop to a helium liquefier. This cryostat can house two fully equipped (tuners, piezo, power coupler, helium tank) superconducting cavities to perform full RF high power tests and operate at temperatures between 1.8 K and 4.2 K. The cryostat is designed to accommodate a large array of superconducting cavities and magnets, among which the European Spallation Source (ESS) type spoke and high-β elliptical cavities as well as TESLA/ILC type elliptical cavities. The present status of the project and the design of the cryostat are reported.

  4. Defect detection inside superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities by means of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertucci, M.; Michelato, P.; Moretti, M.; Navitski, A.; Pagani, C.

    2016-01-15

    X-ray fluorescence probe for detection of foreign material inclusions on the inner surface of superconducting cavities has been developed and tested. The setup detects trace element content such as a few micrograms of impurities responsible for thermal breakdown phenomena limiting the cavity performance. The setup has been customized for the geometry of 1.3 GHz TESLA-type niobium cavities and focuses on the surface of equator area at around 103 mm from the centre axis of the cavities with around 20 mm detection spot. More precise localization of inclusions can be reconstructed by means of angular or lateral displacement of the cavity. Preliminary tests confirmed a very low detection limit for elements laying in the high efficiency spectrum zone (from 5 to 10 keV), and a high angular resolution allowing an accurate localization of defects within the equator surface.

  5. Searchers for a new energy source; Tesla, Moray, and Bearden

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Tesla, Moray, Bearden, and others have claimed the existence of another source of energy besides those presently in use. Like sun and wind, this source is available without regard to political boundaries. If true, the development of this energy source would be one of the most important events of the century. It seems that every time mankind reaches a limit of growth due to exhaustion of inexpensive energy supplies, another energy sources is discovered and developed. England had essentially depleted its resources of timber when the technology to mine and burn coal was developed, for example. After coal, technologies for oil, gas, hydro, nuclear fission, wind, photovoltaic, etc. were developed. With each new development, the world was able to support a greater population at a higher standard of living than before. Today, however, many developing countries have reached a limit in improving the quality of life, due in part to the lack of an adequate and economical energy supply. The developed nations are worried about global warming, acid rain, and nuclear waste. The recent excitement about cold fusion illustrated the keen desire for a new energy source, one operating on scientific principles that perhaps are unknown or poorly developed at the present time. a number of researchers have claimed that such a new energy sources exists. This source would be in addition to cold fusion if cold fusion is shown to be valid. Three of the most famous researchers with this belief have been Tesla, Moray, and Bearden. This article discusses each of their concepts.

  6. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  7. Optically measuring interior cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  8. Development of the superconducting rf 2-cell cavity for cERL injector at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Noguchi, S.; Kako, E.; Umemori, K.; Shishido, T.

    2013-06-01

    An injector cryomodule for the compact energy recovery linac (cERL) is under development at KEK. This injector cryomodule has 3 L-band 2-cell superconducting rf cavities. The cERL is required to accelerate a 10-mA CW electron beam to 5 MeV. The required accelerating gradient per cavity is 7.5-12.5 MV/m at ˜30 kW input power to the cavity and the beam. The operational frequency is 1300 MHz at 2 K and the mode of operation is CW. In this application, the critical hardware components are not the cavities, but the rf input couplers and higher-order-mode (HOM) dampers. Initially, a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler was chosen for HOM damping of the injector cavities. However, this HOM coupler had a heating problem at low gradients (a few MV/m) in CW operation. The components heated in the accelerating mode were the HOM body and the feedthrough that extracts HOM power from the cavity. To control the heating problem, a new HOM coupler was designed based on a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler, and the feedthrough was also modified based on a Kyocera N-R type connector to have better thermal conductivity. A prototype 2-cell cavity and 3 other 2-cell cavities with 5 new HOM couplers for actual operation were fabricated through May 2011. Vertical tests of these cavities were carried out after standard surface preparation at the KEK Superconducting Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-STF) through March 2012. The accelerating gradient achieved exceeded 50 MV/m without quenching during the vertical test using the prototype 2-cell cavity and feedthroughs. The magnetic field at the cell equator was 2127 Oe. Three 2-cell cavities passing the criteria of the High Pressure Gas Safety Institute of Japan exceeded 25 MV/m without field emissions. The cavities with the best performance were prepared in March 2012 for the cERL injector. The designs of the HOM couplers and feedthroughs and the results of the vertical tests to evaluate their performance are reported here.

  9. MRI at 7 Tesla and above: demonstrated and potential capabilities.

    PubMed

    Kraff, Oliver; Fischer, Anja; Nagel, Armin M; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Ladd, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    With more than 40 installed MR systems worldwide operating at 7 Tesla or higher, ultra-high-field (UHF) imaging has been established as a platform for clinically oriented research in recent years. Along with technical developments that, in part, have also been successfully transferred to lower field strengths, MR imaging and spectroscopy at UHF have demonstrated capabilities and potentials for clinical diagnostics in a variety of studies. In terms of applications, this overview article focuses on already achieved advantages for in vivo imaging, i.e., in imaging the brain and joints of the musculoskeletal system, but also considers developments in body imaging, which is particularly challenging. Furthermore, new applications for clinical diagnostics such as X-nuclei imaging and spectroscopy, which only really become feasible at ultra-high magnetic fields, will be presented.

  10. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC beam collimation performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I Drozhdin et al.

    2003-03-27

    This note describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible. The post-TRC plans of the Collimation Task Force are briefly outlined in closing.

  11. Operating nanoliter scale NMR microcoils in a 1 tesla field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Andrew F.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

    2007-09-01

    Microcoil probes enclosing sample volumes of 1.2, 3.3, 7.0, and 81 nanoliters are constructed as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detectors for operation in a 1 tesla permanent magnet. The probes for the three smallest volumes utilize a novel auxiliary tuning inductor for which the design criteria are given. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and line width of water samples are measured. Based on the measured DC resistance of the microcoils, together with the calculated radio frequency (RF) resistance of the tuning inductor, the SNR is calculated and shown to agree with the measured values. The details of the calculations indicate that the auxiliary inductor does not degrade the NMR probe performance. The diameter of the wire used to construct the microcoils is shown to affect the signal line widths.

  12. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Sui Seng; DiGialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength. PMID:27597137

  13. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Sui Seng; Digialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength.

  14. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid neon cooled magnet was designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors, tensile shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives, and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will consist of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  15. The NHMFL 60 tesla, 100 millisecond pulsed magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Rogers, J.D.; Schillig, J.B.; Sims, J.R. ); Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J. . National High Magnetic Field Lab.)

    1992-11-09

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving. This report will discuss specifications and parameters of this magnet.

  16. The NHMFL 60 tesla, 100 millisecond pulsed magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Rogers, J.D.; Schillig, J.B.; Sims, J.R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.

    1992-11-09

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving. This report will discuss specifications and parameters of this magnet.

  17. Report on the TESLA engineering study/review

    SciTech Connect

    C. Boffo et al.

    2002-07-18

    A team from Argonne National Lab, Cornell, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and SLAC has studied the TESLA TDR and its associated cost and manpower estimates, concentrating on the five largest cost sub-systems (Main Linac Modules, Main Linac RF Systems, Civil Engineering, Machine Infrastructure, and XFEL Incremental). These elements were concerned mainly with providing energy reach. We did not study the lower cost, but still technically challenging elements providing luminosity and physics capability, namely damping rings, beam delivery system, beam injection system, positron production, polarized beams, etc. The study did not attempt to validate the TDR cost estimates, but rather its purpose was to understand the technology and status of the large cost items, and the methodology by which their estimated cost was determined. In addition, topics of project oversight were studied.

  18. Demountable damped cavity for HOM-damping in ILC superconducting accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konomi, T.; Yasuda, F.; Furuta, F.; Saito, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a new higher-order-mode (HOM) damper called a demountable damped cavity (DDC) as part of the R&D efforts for the superconducting cavity of the International Linear Collider (ILC). The DDC has two design concepts. The first is an axially symmetrical layout to obtain high damping efficiency. The DDC has a coaxial structure along the beam axis to realize strong coupling with HOMs. HOMs are damped by an RF absorber at the end of the coaxial waveguide and the accelerating mode is reflected by a choke filter mounted at the entrance of the coaxial waveguide. The second design concept is a demountable structure to facilitate cleaning, in order to suppress the Q-slope problem in a high field. A single-cell cavity with the DDC was fabricated to test four performance parameters. The first was frequency matching between the accelerating cavity and the choke filter. Since the bandwidth of the resonance frequency in a superconducting cavity is very narrow, there is a possibility that the accelerating field will leak to the RF absorber because of thermal shrinkage. The design bandwidth of the choke filter is 25 kHz. It was demonstrated that frequency matching adjusted at room temperature could be successfully maintained at 2 K. The second parameter was the performance of the demountable structure. At the joint, the magnetic field is 1/6 of the maximum field in the accelerating cavity. Ultimately, the accelerating field reached 19 MV/m and Q0 was 1.5×1010 with a knife-edge shape. The third parameter was field emission and multipacting. Although the choke structure has numerous parallel surfaces that are susceptible to the multipacting problem, it was found that neither field emission nor multipacting presented problems in both an experiment and simulation. The final parameter was the Q values of the HOM. The RF absorber adopted in the system is a Ni-Zn ferrite type. The RF absorber shape was designed based on the measurement data of permittivity and permeability

  19. 3-Tesla MRI: Beneficial visualization of the meniscofemoral ligaments?

    PubMed

    Ebrecht, Johanna; Krasny, Andrej; Hartmann, Dinah Maria; Rückbeil, Marcia Viviane; Ritz, Thomas; Prescher, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Recent investigations have confirmed an important stabilizing and protective function of the meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) to the knee joint and suggest a clinical relevance. Concerning their incidences, however, there have been discrepancies between data acquired from cadaveric studies and MRI data using 0.3- to 1.5-Tesla field strengths probably due to lower resolution. This study aims to investigate whether imaging with 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) is beneficial in gaining information regarding the ligaments' incidence, length, width and anatomic variation. 3-T MRI images of 448 patients (224 males, 224 females, with, respectively, 32 patients of each sex in the age groups: 0-20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, 51-60, 61-70, >70years) were retrospectively reviewed. The influence of the parameters 'sex' and 'age' was determined. Whereas 71% of the patients had at least one MFL, 22% had an anterior MFL (aMFL), 53% had a posterior MFL (pMFL) and five percent had coexisting ligaments. The pMFLs were more likely to be present in female patients (P<0.05) but if so, they were longer in the males (P<0.05). The pMFL was categorized according to its insertion on the medial femoral condyle. 3-T MRI enables an excellent illustration of the anatomic variations of pMFLs. By modifying an anatomic classification for radiological use we measured lengths and widths of the MFLs without any difficulties. Despite its increased resolution, 3-T MRI lends no diagnostic benefit in visualizing the course of the aMFL or filigree coexisting ligaments as compared to MRI at lower field strengths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. What's a Cavity?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and deeper over time. Cavities are also called dental caries (say: KARE-eez), and if you have a cavity, it's important to get it repaired. But why would your ... and when plaque clings to your teeth, the acids can eat away at the outermost ...

  1. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  2. A new approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eidelman, Yu.; Mokhov, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A realistic approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities is developed. It is based on joint solution of equations of longitudinal and transverse motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field of the linac. This field is a given by distribution (measured or calculated) of the component of the longitudinal electric field on the axis of the linac. New approach is compared with other matrix methods to solve the same problem. The comparison with code ASTRA has been carried out. Complete agreement for tracking results for a TESLA-type cavity is achieved. A corresponding algorithm will be implemented into the MARS15 code. A realistic approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities is developed. Complete agreement for tracking results with existed code ASTRA is achieved. New algorithm will be implemented into MARS15 code.

  3. A coaxial HOM coupler for a superconducting RF cavity and its low-power measurement results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, An; Tang, Ya-Zhe; Zhang, Li-Ping; Li, Ying-Min; Han-Sung, Kim

    2011-03-01

    A resonant buildup of beam-induced fields in a superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavity may make a beam unstable or a superconducting RF cavity quench. Higher-order mode (HOM) couplers are used for damping higher-order modes to avoid such a resonant buildup. A coaxial HOM coupler based on the TTF (TESLA Test Facility) HOM coupler has been designed for the superconducting RF cavities at the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) in order to overcome notch frequency shift and feed-through tip melting issues. In order to confirm the HOM coupler design and finalize its structural dimensions, two prototype HOM couplers have been fabricated and tested. Low-power testing and measurement of the HOM couplers has shown that the HOM coupler has good filter properties and can fully meet the damping requirements of the PEFP low-beta superconducting RF linac.

  4. CAVITY EXCITATION CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Franck, J.V.

    1959-10-20

    An electronic oscillator is described for energizing a resonant cavity and to a system for stabilizing the operatin g frequency of the oscillator at the particular frequency necessary to establish a particular preferred field configuration or mode in the cavity, in this instance a linear accelerator. A freely rnnning oscillator has an output coupled to a resonant cavity wherein a field may be built up at any one of several adjacent frequencies. A pickup loop in the cavity is suitably shielded and positioned in the cavity so that only energy at the panticular desired frequency is fed back to stabilize the oscillator. A phase and gain control is in cluded in the feedback line.

  5. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin [Lagga Arby, SE; Ciovati, Gianluigi [Newport News, VA

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  6. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D. L.; DeMello, A. J.; Lambert, A. R.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R. B.

    2012-05-20

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  7. Development of Large Grain/Single Crystal Niobium Cavity Technology at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneisel, P.; Myneni, G. R.; Ciovati, G.; Sekutowicz, J.; Carneiro, T.

    2007-08-01

    Approximately two years ago we started to develop high performance niobium accelerating cavities based on large grain or single crystal high purity niobium. We have fabricated and tested 15 single cell cavities of various shapes and frequencies between 1300 MHz and 2300 MHz using material from a total of 9 different very large grain niobium ingots from four niobium suppliers. The materials differed not only in grain sizes, but also in RRR — value and in the amount of Ta contained in the material. In one ingot supplied by CBMM the central grain exceeded 7 inches in diameter and this was used to fabricate two 2.2 GHz cavities. A single crystal 1300 MHz mono-cell cavity was also produced at DESY by rolling out a single crystal to the size required for this cavity. It was sent to Jlab for surface treatment and testing. In addition, we have fabricated three 7-cell cavities: two of the Jlab high gradient (HG) shape and one of the ILC Low Loss shape. Two 9-cell TESLA shape cavities are presently in fabrication at Jlab and are close to completion.

  8. Development of Large Grain/Single Crystal Niobium Cavity Technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kneisel, P.; Myneni, G. R.; Ciovati, G.; Sekutowicz, J.; Carneiro, T.

    2007-08-09

    Approximately two years ago we started to develop high performance niobium accelerating cavities based on large grain or single crystal high purity niobium. We have fabricated and tested 15 single cell cavities of various shapes and frequencies between 1300 MHz and 2300 MHz using material from a total of 9 different very large grain niobium ingots from four niobium suppliers. The materials differed not only in grain sizes, but also in RRR - value and in the amount of Ta contained in the material. In one ingot supplied by CBMM the central grain exceeded 7 inches in diameter and this was used to fabricate two 2.2 GHz cavities. A single crystal 1300 MHz mono-cell cavity was also produced at DESY by rolling out a single crystal to the size required for this cavity. It was sent to Jlab for surface treatment and testing. In addition, we have fabricated three 7-cell cavities: two of the Jlab high gradient (HG) shape and one of the ILC Low Loss shape. Two 9-cell TESLA shape cavities are presently in fabrication at Jlab and are close to completion.

  9. Development of large Grain/Single Crystal Niobium Cavity Technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel; J. Sekutowicz; T. Carneiro; G. Ciovati

    2006-10-31

    Approximately two years ago we started to develop high performance niobium accelerating cavities based on large grain or single crystal high purity niobium. We have fabricated and tested 15 single cell cavities of various shapes and frequencies between 1300 MHz and 2300 MHz using material from a total of 9 different very large grain niobium ingots from four niobium suppliers. The materials differed not only in grain sizes, but also in RRR ? value and in the amount of Ta contained in the material. In one ingot supplied by CBMM the central grain exceeded 7 inches in diameter and this was used to fabricate two 2.2 GHz cavities. A single crystal 1300 MHz mono-cell cavity was also produced at DESY by rolling out a single crystal to the size required for this cavity. It was sent to Jlab for surface treatment and testing. In addition, we have fabricated three 7-cell cavities: two of the Jlab high gradient (HG) shape and one of the ILC Low Loss shape. Two 9-cell TESLA shape cavities are presently in fabrication at Jlab and are close to completion.

  10. Gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents at 7 Tesla: in vitro T1 relaxivities in human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris M; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Juras, Vladimír; Kraff, Oliver; Ladd, Mark E; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-09-01

    PURPOSE/INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the T1 relaxivities (r1) of 8 gadolinium (Gd)-based MR contrast agents in human blood plasma at 7 Tesla, compared with 3 Tesla. Eight commercially available Gd-based MR contrast agents were diluted in human blood plasma to concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/L. In vitro measurements were performed at 37 degrees C, on a 7 Tesla and on a 3 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scanner. For the determination of T1 relaxation times, Inversion Recovery Sequences with inversion times from 0 to 3500 ms were used. The relaxivities were calculated. The r1 relaxivities of all agents, diluted in human blood plasma at body temperature, were lower at 7 Tesla than at 3 Tesla. The values at 3 Tesla were comparable to those published earlier. Notably, in some agents, a minor negative correlation of r1 with a concentration of up to 2 mmol/L could be observed. This was most pronounced in the agents with the highest protein-binding capacity. At 7 Tesla, the in vitro r1 relaxivities of Gd-based contrast agents in human blood plasma are lower than those at 3 Tesla. This work may serve as a basis for the application of Gd-based MR contrast agents at 7 Tesla. Further studies are required to optimize the contrast agent dose in vivo.

  11. Calculation of asymptotic and RMS kicks due to higher order modes in the 3.9-GHz cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Bellantoni, L.; Edwards, H.; Wanzenberg, R.; /DESY

    2008-03-01

    FLASH plans to use a 'third harmonic' (3.9 GHz) superconducting cavity to compensate nonlinear distortions of the longitudinal phase space due to the sinusoidal curvature of the cavity voltage of the TESLA 1.3 GHz cavities. Higher order modes (HOMs) in the 3.9 GHz have a significant impact on the dynamics of the electron bunches in a long bunch train. Kicks due to dipole modes can be enhanced along the bunch train depending on the frequency and Q-value of the modes. The enhancement factor for a constant beam offset with respect to the cavity has been calculated. A simple Monte Carlo model of these effects, allowing for scatter in HOM frequencies due to manufacturing variances, has also been implemented and results for both FLASH and for an XFEL-like configuration are presented.

  12. Beamstrahlung Photon Load on the TESLA Extraction Septum Blade(LCC-0104)

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A

    2003-10-02

    This note describes work performed in the framework of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee [1] to estimate the power load on the TESLA extraction septum blade due to beamstrahlung photons. It is shown, that under realistic conditions the photon load can be several orders of magnitude higher than what was estimated in the TESLA TDR [2] for the ideal Gaussian beams, potentially representing a serious limitation of the current design.

  13. Analyzing 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging units for implementation in radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mack, Andreas; Wolff, Robert; Scheib, Stefan; Rieker, Marcus; Weltz, Dirk; Mack, G; Kreiner, Hans-Jürg; Pilatus, Ulrich; Zanella, Friedhelm E; Böttcher, Heinz D; Seifert, Volker

    2005-01-01

    The limiting factor affecting accuracy during gamma knife surgery is image quality. The new generation of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging units with field strength up to 3 teslas promise superior image quality for anatomical resolution and contrast. There are, however, questions about chemical shifts or susceptibility effects, which are the subject of this paper. The 3-tesla MR imaging unit (Siemens Trio) was analyzed and compared with a 1-tesla unit (Siemens Magnetom Expert) and to a 1.5-tesla unit (Philips Gyroscan). Evaluation of the magnitude of error was performed within transverse slices in two orientations (axial/coronal) by using a cylindrical phantom with an embedded grid. Deviations were determined for 21 targets in a slab phantom with known geometrical positions within the stereotactic frame. Distortions caused by chemical shift and/or susceptibility effects were analyzed in a head phantom. Inhouse software was used for data analyses. The mean deviation was less than 0.3 mm in axial and less than 0.4 mm in coronal orientations. For the known targets the maximum deviation was 1.16 mm. By optimizing these parameters in the protocol these inaccuracies could be reduced to less than 1.1 mm. Due to inhomogeneities a shift in the z direction of up to 1.5 mm was observed for a dataset, which was shown to be compressed by 1.2 mm. The 3-tesla imaging unit showed superior anatomical contrast and resolution in comparison with the established 1-tesla and 1.5-tesla units; however, due to the high field strength the field within the head coil is very sensitive to inhomogeneities and therefore 3-tesla imaging data will have be handled with care.

  14. Cervical external immobilization devices: evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging issues at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Francis L; Tweardy, Lisa; Shellock, Frank G

    2010-02-15

    Laboratory investigation, ex vivo. Currently, no studies have addressed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues for cervical external immobilization devices at 3-Tesla. Under certain conditions significant heating may occur, resulting in patient burns. Furthermore, artifacts can be substantial and prevent the diagnostic use of MRI. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to evaluate MRI issues for 4 different cervical external immobilization devices at 3-Tesla. Excessive heating and substantial artifacts are 2 potential complications associated with performing MRI at 3-Tesla in patients with cervical external immobilization devices. Using ex vivo testing techniques, MRI-related heating and artifacts were evaluated for 4 different cervical devices during MRI at 3-Tesla. Four cervical external immobilization devices (Generation 80, Resolve Ring and Superstructure, Resolve Ring and Jerome Vest/Jerome Superstructure, and the V1 Halo System; Ossur Americas, Aliso Viejo, CA) underwent MRI testing at 3-Tesla. All devices were made from nonmetallic or nonmagnetic materials. Heating was determined using a gelled-saline-filled skull phantom with fluoroptic thermometry probes attached to the skull pins. MRI was performed at 3-Tesla, using a high level of RF energy. Artifacts were assessed at 3-Tesla, using standard cervical imaging techniques. The Generation 80 and V1 Halo devices exhibited substantial temperature rises (11.6 degrees C and 8.5 degrees C, respectively), with "sparking" evident for the Generation 80 during the MRI procedure. Artifacts were problematic for these devices, as well. By comparison, the 2 Resolve Ring-based cervical external immobilization devices showed little or no heating (< or = 0.6 degrees C) and the artifacts were acceptable for diagnostic MRI examinations. The low degree of heating and minor artifacts associated with the Resolve-based cervical external immobilization devices indicated that these products are safe for patients

  15. In Vivo High-Resolution 7 Tesla MRI Shows Early and Diffuse Cortical Alterations in CADASIL

    PubMed Central

    De Guio, François; Reyes, Sonia; Vignaud, Alexandre; Duering, Marco; Ropele, Stefan; Duchesnay, Edouard; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent data suggest that early symptoms may be related to cortex alterations in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), a monogenic model of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). The aim of this study was to investigate cortical alterations using both high-resolution T2* acquisitions obtained with 7 Tesla MRI and structural T1 images with 3 Tesla MRI in CADASIL patients with no or only mild symptomatology (modified Rankin’s scale ≤1 and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) ≥24). Methods Complete reconstructions of the cortex using 7 Tesla T2* acquisitions with 0.7 mm isotropic resolution were obtained in 11 patients (52.1±13.2 years, 36% male) and 24 controls (54.8±11.0 years, 42% male). Seven Tesla T2* within the cortex and cortical thickness and morphology obtained from 3 Tesla images were compared between CADASIL and control subjects using general linear models. Results MMSE, brain volume, cortical thickness and global sulcal morphology did not differ between groups. By contrast, T2* measured by 7 Tesla MRI was significantly increased in frontal, parietal, occipital and cingulate cortices in patients after correction for multiple testing. These changes were not related to white matter lesions, lacunes or microhemorrhages in patients having no brain atrophy compared to controls. Conclusions Seven Tesla MRI, by contrast to state of the art post-processing of 3 Tesla acquisitions, shows diffuse T2* alterations within the cortical mantle in CADASIL whose origin remains to be determined. PMID:25165824

  16. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  17. Using 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative evaluation of tongue carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moreno, K F; Cornelius, R S; Lucas, F V; Meinzen-Derr, J; Patil, Y J

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the role of 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in predicting tongue tumour thickness via direct and reconstructed measures, and their correlations with corresponding histological measures, nodal metastasis and extracapsular spread. A prospective study was conducted of 25 patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and pre-operative 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging from 2009 to 2012. Correlations between 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and histological measures of tongue tumour thickness were assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient: r values were 0.84 (p < 0.0001) and 0.81 (p < 0.0001) for direct and reconstructed measurements, respectively. For magnetic resonance imaging, direct measures of tumour thickness (mean ± standard deviation, 18.2 ± 7.3 mm) did not significantly differ from the reconstructed measures (mean ± standard deviation, 17.9 ± 7.2 mm; r = 0.879). Moreover, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging had 83 per cent sensitivity, 82 per cent specificity, 82 per cent accuracy and a 90 per cent negative predictive value for detecting cervical lymph node metastasis. In this cohort, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging measures of tumour thickness correlated highly with the corresponding histological measures. Further, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was an effective method of detecting malignant adenopathy with extracapsular spread.

  18. Dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Kelle, S; Hamdan, A; Schnackenburg, B; Köhler, U; Klein, C; Nagel, E; Fleck, E

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The assessment of inducible wall motion abnormalities during high-dose dobutamine-stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (DCMR) is well established for the identification of myocardial ischemia at 1.5 Tesla. Its feasibility at higher field strengths has not been reported. The present study was performed to prospectively determine the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of DCMR at 3 Tesla for depicting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis (≥ 50% diameter stenosis) in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods Thirty consecutive patients (6 women) (66 ± 9.3 years) were scheduled for DCMR between January and May 2007 for detection of coronary artery disease. Patients were examined with a Philips Achieva 3 Tesla system (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands), using a spoiled gradient echo cine sequence. Technical parameters were: spatial resolution 2 × 2 × 8 mm3, 30 heart phases, spoiled gradient echo TR/TE: 4.5/2.6 msec, flip angle 15°. Images were acquired at rest and stress in accordance with a standardized high-dose dobutamine-atropine protocol during short breath-holds in three short and three long-axis views. Dobutamine was administered using a standard protocol (10 μg increments every 3 minutes up to 40 μg dobutamine/kg body weight/minute plus atropine if required to reach target heart rate). The study protocol included administration of 0.1 mmol/kg/body weight Gd-DTPA before the cine images at rest were acquired to improve the image quality. The examination was terminated if new or worsening wall-motion abnormalities or chest pain occurred or when > 85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate was reached. Myocardial ischemia was defined as new onset of wall-motion abnormality in at least one segment. In addition, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was performed. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers. Diagnostic accuracy was determined with coronary angiography as the reference

  19. Optimal choice of cell geometry for a multicell superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelin, Valery

    2009-11-01

    An algorithm for optimization of the multicell cavity cells is proposed. Inner cells are optimized for minimal losses or minimal magnetic field, when the aperture diameter, Epk/Eacc—the ratio of peak electric field to the accelerating field, and the wall slope angle are given. Optimization of the end cells is done for minimal losses or maximal acceleration in them. Two shapes of the end cells—with and without the end irises—are analyzed. This approach facilitates further optimization for higher order modes extraction because it permits keeping the achieved optimal values nearly the same while changing some dimensions of the cells. Comparison of the proposed cavity geometry with the TESLA cavity geometry illustrates the traits of the presented approach. It is also shown that lower values of the wall slope angle, which lead to the reentrant shape for the inner cells, are also beneficial for the end cells. For the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac most dangerous are dipole modes causing the beam breakup (BBU). Minimization of power of higher order modes (HOMs) in a multicell cavity was done using derivatives of the BBU parameter with respect to geometric parameters of the cavity cells. As a starting point of optimization, the shape with minimal losses at the fundamental mode was taken. Further changing the shape for better propagation of HOMs was done with degradation of the fundamental mode loss parameter G·Rsh/Q within 1% while decrease of the BBU parameter was nearly 3 orders of magnitude. The BBU threshold current tends to be inversely proportional to this parameter.

  20. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... minerals in your tooth's hard, outer enamel. This erosion causes tiny openings or holes in the enamel — ... Anorexia and bulimia can lead to significant tooth erosion and cavities. Stomach acid from repeated vomiting (purging) ...

  1. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... centers, and dental providers in the community to foster more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at highest risk of cavities, including those covered ...

  2. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF BREAKDOWN INDUCED SURFACE DAMAGE ON 805 MHZ PILLBOX CAVITY INTERIOR SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Torun, Y.; Bowring, D.; Flanagan, G.

    2013-09-25

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, we have tested two 805 MHz vacuum RF cavities in a multi-Tesla magnetic field to study the effects of the static magnetic field on the cavity operation. This study gives useful information on field emitters in the cavity, dark current, surface conditioning, breakdown mechanisms and material properties of the cavity. All these factors determine the maximum accelerating gradient in the cavity. This paper discusses the image processing technique for quantitative estimation of spark damage spot distribution on cavity interior surfaces. The distribution is compared with the electric field distribution predicted by a computer code calculation. The local spark density is proportional to probability of surface breakdown and shows a power law dependence on the maximum electric field (E). This E dependence is consistent with the dark current calculated from the Fowler-Nordheim equation.

  4. Analysis and active compensation of microphonics in continuous wave narrow-bandwidth superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-08-01

    Many proposals for next generation light sources based on single pass free electron lasers or energy recovery linac facilities require a continuous wave (cw) driven superconducting linac. The effective beam loading in such machines is very small and in principle the cavities can be operated at a bandwidth of a few Hz and with less than a few kW of rf power. However, a power reserve is required to ensure field stability. A major error source is the mechanical microphonics detuning of the niobium cavities. To understand the influence of cavity detuning on longitudinal beam stability, a measurement program has been started at the horizontal cavity test facility HoBiCaT at HZB to study TESLA-type cavities. The microphonics detuning spectral content, peak detuning values, and the driving terms for these mechanical oscillations have been analyzed. In combination with the characterization of cw-adapted fast tuning systems based on the piezoelectric effect this information has been used to design a detuning compensation algorithm. It has been shown that a compensation factor between 2-7 is achievable, reducing the typical detuning of 2-3 Hz rms to below 0.5 Hz rms. These results were included in rf-control simulations of the cavities, and it was demonstrated that a phase stability below 0.02° can be achieved.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Fries, Peter; Runge, Val M; Kirchin, Miles A; Watkins, David M; Buecker, Arno; Schneider, Guenther

    2008-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed dramatically in the 25 years since its clinical introduction. Advances in hardware design have included the development of high field magnets and more sophisticated and sensitive coils. Improvements in sequences, data sampling, and postprocessing software have benefited the attainable spatial and temporal resolution to the point at which the fine depiction of anatomical structure and pathological processes is now routine. As in other radiological areas, the most recent advances in MRI have proven highly valuable in the field of musculoskeletal radiology where the lack of radiation, high soft tissue contrast, and capacity for multiplanar or three-dimensional imaging have made MRI the imaging modality of choice. Particular benefits are seen in diagnostic imaging of the spine where MRI is clearly superior to both conventional radiography and computed tomography. In this article, we discuss the impact of the most recent technological advance in MRI, namely the advent of 3 Tesla (3-T) imaging, on diagnostic imaging of the spine. Comparisons are drawn with imaging at 1.5 T, and emphasis is placed on MR physics and on the benefits and principal difficulties associated with spine imaging at high field strength.

  6. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-neon-cooled magnet has been designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. Its feasibility was established by a previously reported parametric study. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors; tensile-shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives; and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will be made of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll-bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock-up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  7. A passively suspended Tesla pump left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Izraelev, Valentin; Weiss, William J; Fritz, Bryan; Newswanger, Raymond K; Paterson, Eric G; Snyder, Alan; Medvitz, Richard B; Cysyk, Joshua; Pae, Walter E; Hicks, Dennis; Lukic, Branka; Rosenberg, Gerson

    2009-01-01

    The design and initial test results of a new passively suspended Tesla type left ventricular assist device blood pump are described. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was used in the design of the pump. Overall size of the prototype device is 50 mm in diameter and 75 mm in length. The pump rotor has a density lower than that of blood and when spinning inside the stator in blood it creates a buoyant centering force that suspends the rotor in the radial direction. The axial magnetic force between the rotor and stator restrain the rotor in the axial direction. The pump is capable of pumping up to 10 L/min at a 70 mm Hg head rise at 8,000 revolutions per minute (RPM). The pump has demonstrated a normalized index of hemolysis level below 0.02 mg/dL for flows between 2 and 9.7 L/min. An inlet pressure sensor has also been incorporated into the inlet cannula wall and will be used for control purposes. One initial in vivo study showed an encouraging result. Further CFD modeling refinements are planned and endurance testing of the device.

  8. A Passively-Suspended Tesla Pump Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Izraelev, Valentin; Weiss, William J.; Fritz, Bryan; Newswanger, Raymond K.; Paterson, Eric G.; Snyder, Alan; Medvitz, Richard B.; Cysyk, Joshua; Pae, Walter E.; Hicks, Dennis; Lukic, Branka; Rosenberg, Gerson

    2009-01-01

    The design and initial test results of a new passively suspended Tesla type LAVD blood pump are described. CFD analysis was used in the design of the pump. Overall size of the prototype device is 50 mm in diameter and 75 mm in length. The pump rotor has a density lower than that of blood and when spinning inside the stator in blood it creates a buoyant centering force that suspends the rotor in the radial direction. The axial magnetic force between the rotor and stator restrain the rotor in the axial direction. The pump is capable of pumping up to 10 liters/min at a 70 mmHg head rise at 8000 RPM. The pump has demonstrated a normalized index of hemolysis level below .02 mg/dL for flows between 2 and 9.7 L/min. An inlet pressure sensor has also been incorporated into the inlet cannula wall and will be used for control purposes. One initial in vivo study showed an encouraging result. Further CFD modeling refinements are planned as well as endurance testing of the device. PMID:19770799

  9. Cascading Tesla Oscillating Flow Diode for Stirling Engine Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger

    2012-01-01

    Replacing the mechanical check-valve in a Stirling engine with a micromachined, non-moving-part flow diode eliminates moving parts and reduces the risk of microparticle clogging. At very small scales, helium gas has sufficient mass momentum that it can act as a flow controller in a similar way as a transistor can redirect electrical signals with a smaller bias signal. The innovation here forces helium gas to flow in predominantly one direction by offering a clear, straight-path microchannel in one direction of flow, but then through a sophisticated geometry, the reversed flow is forced through a tortuous path. This redirection is achieved by using microfluid channel flow to force the much larger main flow into this tortuous path. While microdiodes have been developed in the past, this innovation cascades Tesla diodes to create a much higher pressure in the gas bearing supply plenum. In addition, the special shape of the leaves captures loose particles that would otherwise clog the microchannel of the gas bearing pads.

  10. Local specific absorption rate in brain tumors at 7 tesla.

    PubMed

    Restivo, Matthew C; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; van Lier, Astrid L H M W; Polders, Daniël L; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Hoogduin, Hans

    2016-01-01

    MR safety at 7 Tesla relies on accurate numerical simulations of transmit electromagnetic fields to fully assess local specific absorption rate (SAR) safety. Numerical simulations for SAR safety are currently performed using models of healthy patients. These simulations might not be useful for estimating SAR in patients who have large lesions with potentially abnormal dielectric properties, e.g., brain tumors. In this study, brain tumor patient models are constructed based on scans of four patients with high grade brain tumors. Dielectric properties for the modeled tumors are assigned based on electrical properties tomography data for the same patients. Simulations were performed to determine SAR. Local SAR increases in the tumors by as much as 30%. However, the location of the maximum 10-gram averaged SAR typically occurs outside of the tumor, and thus does not increase. In the worst case, if the tumor model is moved to the location of maximum electric field intensity, then we do observe an increase in the estimated peak 10-gram SAR directly related to the tumor. Peak local SAR estimation made on the results of a healthy patient model simulation may underestimate the true peak local SAR in a brain tumor patient. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Distinction between pyogenic brain abscess and necrotic brain tumour using 3-tesla MR spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-C; Hsieh, T-J; Chiu, M-L; Liu, G-C; Kuo, Y-T; Lin, W-C

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of relative cerebral blood volume, apparent diffusion coefficient and spectroscopic imaging in differentiating between cerebral abscesses and necrotic tumours. In the prospective study, a 3-tesla MR unit was used to perform proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion imaging in 20 patients with cerebral abscesses and 26 patients who had solitary brain tumours (14 high-grade gliomas and 12 metastases). We found the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value at the central cavities of the cerebral abscesses to be significantly lower than in necrotic tumours. The mean relative cerebral blood volume values of the necrotic tumour wall were statistically significantly higher than the mean relative cerebral blood volume values of the cerebral abscess wall by the Student's t-test. The proton spectra obtained revealed amino acids only in the cerebral abscesses. Although the conventional MRI characteristics of cerebral abscesses and necrotic tumours may sometimes be similar, diffusion, perfusion-weighted and spectroscopic MRI enables distinction between the two.

  12. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    PubMed

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  13. Synchronous optical transmission data link integrated with FPGA for TESLA FEL SIMCON system: long data vector optical transceiver module tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2006-10-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser X-FEL that is being planned at the DESY research center in cooperation with European partners will produce high-intensity ultra-short X-ray flashes with the properties of laser light. This new light source, which can only be described in terms of superlatives, will open up a whole range of new possibilities for the natural sciences. It could also offer very promising opportunities for industrial users. SIMCON (SIMulator and CONtroller) is the project of the fast, low latency digital controller dedicated to the LLRF system in VUV FEL experiment. The main purpose of the project is to create a controller to stabilize the vector sum of fields in cavities of one cryo-module in the experiment. The device can be also used as the simulator of the cavity and test bench for other devices. The synchronic, optical link project was made for the accelerator X-FEL laser TESLA, the LLRF control system experiment at DESY, Hamburg. The control and diagnostic data is transmitted up to 2.5Gbit/s through a plastic fiber in a distance up to a few hundred meters. The link is synchronized once after power up, and never resynchronized when data is transmitted with maximum speed. The one way link bit error rate is less then 10 -15. The transceiver component written in VHDL that works in the dedicated Altera® Stratix® GX FPGA circuit. During the work in the PERG laboratory a 2.5Gbit/s serial link with the long vector parallel interface transceiver was created. Long-Data-Vector transceiver transmits 16bit vector each 8ns with 120ns latency.

  14. Imaging of patients with hippocampal sclerosis at 7 Tesla: initial results.

    PubMed

    Breyer, Tobias; Wanke, Isabel; Maderwald, Stefan; Woermann, Friedrich G; Kraff, Oliver; Theysohn, Jens M; Ebner, Alois; Forsting, Michael; Ladd, Mark E; Schlamann, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Focal epilepsies potentially can be cured by neurosurgery; other treatment options usually remain symptomatic. High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the central imaging strategy in the evaluation of focal epilepsy. The most common substrate of temporal epilepsies is hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which cannot always be sufficiently characterized with current MR field strengths. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging at 7 Tesla in patients with focal epilepsy resulting from a HS and to improve image resolution at 7 Tesla in patients with HS. Six patients with known HS were investigated with T1-, T2-, T2(*)-, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery-weighted sequences at 7 Tesla with an eight-channel transmit-receive head coil. Total imaging time did not exceed 90 minutes per patient. High-resolution imaging at 7 Tesla is feasible and reveals high resolution of intrahippocampal structures in vivo. HS was confirmed in all patients. The maximum non-interpolated in-plane resolution reached 0.2 x 0.2 mm(2) in T2(*)-weighted images. The increased susceptibility effects at 7 Tesla revealed identification of intrahippocampal structures in more detail than at 1.5 Tesla, but otherwise led to stronger artifacts. Imaging revealed regional differences in hippocampal atrophy between patients. The scan volume was limited because of specific absorption rate restrictions, scanning time was reasonable. High-resolution imaging at 7 Tesla is promising in presurgical epilepsy imaging. "New" contrasts may further improve detection of even very small intrahippocampal structural changes. Therefore, further investigations will be necessary to demonstrate the potential benefit for presurgical selection of patients with various lesion patterns in mesial temporal epilepsies resulting from a unilateral HS. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  16. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  17. Coupled resonator vertical cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    The monolithic integration of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. The authors report the first electrically injected coupled resonator vertical-cavity laser diode and demonstrate novel characteristics arising from the cavity coupling, including methods for external modulation of the laser. A coupled mode theory is used model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser.

  18. Focal cortical lesion detection in multiple sclerosis: 3 Tesla DIR versus 7 Tesla FLASH-T2.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A Scott; Kinkel, R Philip; Tinelli, Emanuele; Benner, Thomas; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Mainero, Caterina

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the inter-rater agreement of cortical lesion detection using 7 Tesla (T) FLASH-T2 and 3T DIR sequences. Twenty-six patients with multiple sclerosis were scanned on a human 7T (Siemens) and 3T MRI (TIM Trio, Siemens) to acquire 3T DIR/MEMPR and 7T FLASH-T2 sequences. Four independent reviewers scored and categorized cortical lesions in the bilateral precentral gyri (motor strips) as leukocortical, intracortical, or subpial. Inter-rater agreement was assessed according to lesion category using the kappa statistic. The sensitivity of recent MAGNIMS consensus guidelines for cortical lesion detection using 3T DIR was assessed with 7T FLASH-T2 as the reference gold standard. Inter-rater agreement at 7T was excellent compared with 3T (k = 0.97 versus 0.12). FLASH-T2 at 7T detected subpial lesions while 3T DIR did not. The predicted sensitivity of 3T DIR sequence for cortical lesions in vivo is modest (range of 13.6 to 18.3%). The 7T FLASH-T2 detects more cortical-particularly subpial-lesions compared with 3T DIR. In the absence of DIR/postmortem data, 7T FLASH-T2 is a suitable gold-standard instrument and should be incorporated into future consensus guidelines. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  20. Metasurface external cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Luyao Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Chen, Qi-Sheng

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  1. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-11-23

    Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications.

  2. Diagnostic usefulness of 3 tesla MRI of the brain for cushing disease in a child.

    PubMed

    Ono, Erina; Ozawa, Ayako; Matoba, Kaori; Motoki, Takanori; Tajima, Asako; Miyata, Ichiro; Ito, Junko; Inoshita, Naoko; Yamada, Syozo; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    It is sometimes difficult to confirm the location of a microadenoma in Cushing disease. Recently, we experienced an 11-yr-old female case of Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. She was referred to our hospital because of decrease of height velocity with body weight gain. On admission, she had typical symptoms of Cushing syndrome. Although no pituitary microadenomas were detected on 1.5 Tesla MRI of the brain, endocrinological examinations including IPS and CS sampling were consistent with Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. Oral administration of methyrapone instead of neurosurgery was started after discharge, but subsequent 3 Tesla MRI of the brain clearly demonstrated a 3-mm less-enhanced lesion in the left side of the pituitary gland. Finally, transsphenoidal surgery was performed, and a 3.5-mm left-sided microadenoma was resected. Compared with 1.5 Tesla MRI, 3 Tesla MRI offers the advantage of a higher signal to noise ratio (SNR), which provides higher resolution and proper image quality. Therefore, 3 Tesla MRI is a very useful tool to localize microadenomas in Cushing disease in children as well as in adults. It will be the first choice of radiological examinations in suspected cases of Cushing disease.

  3. MRI safety of a programmable shunt assistant at 3 and 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Mirzayan, M Javad; Klinge, Petra M; Samii, Madjid; Goetz, Friedrich; Krauss, Joachim K

    2012-06-01

    Several new shunt technologies have been developed to optimize hydrocephalus treatment within the past few years. Overdrainage, however, still remains an unresolved problem. One new technology which may reduce the frequency of this complication is the use of a programmable shunt assistant (proSA). Inactive in a horizontal position, it impedes CSF flow in a vertical position according to a prescribed pressure level ranging from 0 to 40 cm H(2)O. We exposed the proSA valve in an ex vivo protocol to MR systems operating at 3 and 7 Tesla to investigate its MRI safety. Following 3 Tesla exposure, no changes in valve settings were noted. Adjustment to any pressure level was possible thereafter. The mean deflection angle was 23 ± 3°. After exposure to 7 Tesla, however, there were unintended pressure changes, and the mechanism for further adjustment of the valves even disintegrated. According to the results of this study, proSA is safe with heteropolar vertical magnet alignment at 3 Tesla. Following 7 Tesla exposure, the valves lost their functional capability.

  4. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing

    PubMed Central

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-01-01

    Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:27886051

  5. Ultrasmall Microfabricated Laser Cavities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-23

    Design of a surface-emitting, subwavelength metal- clad disk laser in the visible spectrum, Optics Express, (08 2010): 0. doi: 10.1364/OE.18.019581 12/08...3.1 Metal- clad disk laser Metal-optic and plasmonic cavities have in recent years been of particular interest. It is well known that metals...metal- clad disk laser cavities that have a room temperature Q-factor of 200 to 300 at the visible red wavelength of λ ~ 670 nm. Non-degenerate

  6. The pioneers of interplanetary communication: From Gauss to Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin-Cerceau, Florence

    2010-12-01

    The present overview covers the period from 1820 to the beginning of the 20th century. Emphasis is laid on the latter half of the 19th century because many efforts have been done at that time to elaborate schemes for contacting our neighboring planets by interplanetary telegraphy. This period knew many advances not only in planetary studies but also in the nascent field of telecommunications. Such a context led astronomers who were also interested in the problem of planetary habitability, to envisage that other planets could be contacted, especially the planet Mars. Interplanetary communication using a celestial telegraphy was planned during this period of great speculations about life on Mars. This paper focuses on four authors: the Frenchmen C. Flammarion, Ch. Cros, A. Mercier and the Serbian N. Tesla, who formulated early proposals to communicate with Mars or Venus. The first proposals (which remained only theoretical) showed that an initial reflection had started as early as the second part of the 19th century on the type of language that could be both universal and distinguishable from a natural signal. Literary history of interplanetary communication preceded by far the scientific one. Authors of the 1900s were very prolific on this topic. French fictions are mentioned in this paper as examples of such a literature. This incursion into selected texts stresses the fact that the problem of techniques and messages employed to communicate with other planets goes beyond the strict scientific framework. Finally, this paper aims to highlight the similarities as well as the differences between the different proposals and to underline what that could possibly help present SETI research to define messages supposed to be sent to other planetary systems.

  7. Toward imaging the body at 10.5 tesla.

    PubMed

    Ertürk, M Arcan; Wu, Xiaoping; Eryaman, Yiğitcan; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edward J; Lagore, Russell L; DelaBarre, Lance; Vaughan, J Thomas; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Adriany, Gregor; Metzger, Gregory J

    2017-01-01

    To explore the potential of performing body imaging at 10.5 Tesla (T) compared with 7.0T through evaluating the transmit/receive performance of similarly configured dipole antenna arrays. Fractionated dipole antenna elements for 10.5T body imaging were designed and evaluated using numerical simulations. Transmit performance of antenna arrays inside the prostate, kidneys and heart were investigated and compared with those at 7.0T using both phase-only radiofrequency (RF) shimming and multi-spoke pulses. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) comparisons were also performed. A 10-channel antenna array was constructed to image the abdomen of a swine at 10.5T. Numerical methods were validated with phantom studies at both field strengths. Similar power efficiencies were observed inside target organs with phase-only shimming, but RF nonuniformity was significantly higher at 10.5T. Spokes RF pulses allowed similar transmit performance with accompanying local specific absorption rate increases of 25-90% compared with 7.0T. Relative SNR gains inside the target anatomies were calculated to be >two-fold higher at 10.5T, and 2.2-fold SNR gain was measured in a phantom. Gradient echo and fast spin echo imaging demonstrated the feasibility of body imaging at 10.5T with the designed array. While comparable power efficiencies can be achieved using dipole antenna arrays with static shimming at 10.5T; increasing RF nonuniformities underscore the need for efficient, robust, and safe parallel transmission methods. Magn Reson Med 77:434-443, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Nikola Tesla: Why was he so much resisted and forgotten? [Retrospectroscope].

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Ortiz, Martin Hill; Cervantes, Daniel; Leder, Ron S

    2016-01-01

    Recently, during the Christmas season, a friend of mine visited me and, sneaking a look at my bookshelves, found two rather old Nikola Tesla biographies, which I had used to prepare a "Retrospectroscope" column for the then-named IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine when our dear friend Alvin Wald was its editor-inchief [2]. Eighteen years have elapsed since then; soon, the idea came up of revamping the article. Cynthia Weber, the magazine's current associate editor, considered it acceptable, and here is the new note divided in two parts: that is, a slightly revised version of the original article followed by new material, including some quite interesting information regarding Tesla's homes and laboratories. On top of this, Tesla is not devoid of a science fiction touch, as mentioned at the end.

  9. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Since superconducting magnets cooled by liquid helium are limited to magnetic fields of about 18 teslas, the design of a 30 tesla cryomagnet necessitates forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. As these channels are too small to handle the vapor flow if the coolant were to boil, the design philosophy calls for suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures. Forced convection heat transfer data are obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid vertically through a resistance-heated instrumented tube. The data are obtained at inlet temperatures between 28 and 34 K and system pressures between 28 to 29 bars. Data correlation is limited to a very narrow range of test conditions, since the tests were designed to simulate the heat transfer characteristics in the coolant channels of the 30 tesla cryomagnet concerned. The results can therefore be applied directly to the design of the magnet system.-

  10. Note: A high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator with novel insulating oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng; Su, Jiancang; Fan, Xuliang

    2017-09-01

    A 10-GW high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator is developed with an improved insulating liquid based on a modified Tesla pulser—TPG700, of which the pulse forming line (PFL) is filled with novel insulating oil instead of transformer oil. Properties of insulating oil determining the stored energy density of the PFL are analyzed, and a criterion for appropriate oil is proposed. Midel 7131 is chosen as an application example. The results of insulating property experiment under tens-of-microsecond pulse charging demonstrate that the insulation capability of Midel 7131 is better than that of KI45X transformer oil. The application test in Tesla pulser TPG700 shows that the output power is increased to 10.5 GW with Midel 7131. The output energy density of TPG700 increases for about 60% with Midel 7131.

  11. Note: Tesla based pulse generator for electrical breakdown study of liquid dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veda Prakash, G.; Kumar, R.; Patel, J.; Saurabh, K.; Shyam, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the process of studying charge holding capability and delay time for breakdown in liquids under nanosecond (ns) time scales, a Tesla based pulse generator has been developed. Pulse generator is a combination of Tesla transformer, pulse forming line, a fast closing switch, and test chamber. Use of Tesla transformer over conventional Marx generators makes the pulse generator very compact, cost effective, and requires less maintenance. The system has been designed and developed to deliver maximum output voltage of 300 kV and rise time of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The paper deals with the system design parameters, breakdown test procedure, and various experimental results. To validate the pulse generator performance, experimental results have been compared with PSPICE simulation software and are in good agreement with simulation results.

  12. Simple RF design for human functional and morphological cardiac imaging at 7tesla.

    PubMed

    Versluis, M J; Tsekos, N; Smith, N B; Webb, A G

    2009-09-01

    Morphological and functional cardiac MRI can potentially benefit greatly from the recent advent of commercial high-field (7tesla and above) MRI systems. However, conventional hardware configurations at lower field using a body-coil for homogeneous transmission are not available at these field strengths. Sophisticated multiple-transmit-channel systems have been shown to be able to image the human heart at 7tesla but such systems are currently not widely available. In this paper, we empirically optimize the design of a simple quadrature coil for cardiac imaging at 7tesla. The size, geometry, and position have been chosen to produce a B(1) field with no tissue-induced signal voids within the heart. Standard navigator echoes for gating were adapted for operation at the heart/lung interface, directly along the head-foot direction. Using this setup, conventional and high-resolution cine functional imaging have been successfully performed, as has morphological imaging of the right coronary artery.

  13. Note: A high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator with novel insulating oil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Su, Jiancang; Fan, Xuliang

    2017-09-01

    A 10-GW high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator is developed with an improved insulating liquid based on a modified Tesla pulser-TPG700, of which the pulse forming line (PFL) is filled with novel insulating oil instead of transformer oil. Properties of insulating oil determining the stored energy density of the PFL are analyzed, and a criterion for appropriate oil is proposed. Midel 7131 is chosen as an application example. The results of insulating property experiment under tens-of-microsecond pulse charging demonstrate that the insulation capability of Midel 7131 is better than that of KI45X transformer oil. The application test in Tesla pulser TPG700 shows that the output power is increased to 10.5 GW with Midel 7131. The output energy density of TPG700 increases for about 60% with Midel 7131.

  14. Cavity Nesting Birds

    Treesearch

    Virgil E. Scott; Keith E. Evans; David R. Patton; Charles P. Stone

    1977-01-01

    Many species of cavity-nesting birds have declined because of habitat reduction. In the eastern United States, where primeval forests are gone, purple martins depend almost entirely on man-made nesting structures (Allen and Nice 1952). The hole-nesting population of peregrine falcons disappeared with the felling of the giant trees upon which they depended (Hickey and...

  15. Filling a Conical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  16. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  17. 76 FR 60118 - Tesla Motors, Inc. Grant of Petition for Renewal of a Temporary Exemption From the Advanced Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ...This notice grants the petition of Tesla Motors, Inc. (Tesla) for the renewal of a temporary exemption of its Roadster model from the advanced air bag requirements of FMVSS No. 208. The basis for the exemption is that compliance with the standard would cause substantial economic hardship to a manufacturer that has tried to comply with the standard in good faith.

  18. 3.0 Tesla vs 1.5 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Butler, Reni S; Chen, Christine; Vashi, Reena; Hooley, Regina J; Philpotts, Liane E

    2013-08-28

    To compare 3.0 Tesla (T) vs 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Upon Institutional Review Board approval, a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of 147 consecutive 3.0T MR examinations and 98 consecutive 1.5T MR examinations in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 7/2009 and 5/2010 was performed. Eleven patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the 3.0T group were excluded. Mammographically occult suspicious lesions (BIRADS Code 4 and 5) additional to the index cancer in the ipsilateral and contralateral breast were identified. Lesion characteristics and pathologic diagnoses were recorded, and results achieved with both systems compared. Statistical significance was analyzed using Fisher's exact test. In the 3.0T group, 206 suspicious lesions were identified in 55% (75/136) of patients and 96% (198/206) of these lesions were biopsied. In the 1.5T group, 98 suspicious lesions were identified in 53% (52/98) of patients and 90% (88/98) of these lesions were biopsied. Biopsy results yielded additional malignancies in 24% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 14% of patients in the 1.5T group (33/136 vs 14/98, P = 0.07). Average size and histology of the additional cancers was comparable. Of patients who had a suspicious MR imaging study, additional cancers were found in 44% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 27% in the 1.5T group (33/75 vs 14/52, P = 0.06), yielding a higher positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. 3.0T MR imaging detected more additional malignancies in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and yielded a higher PPV for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system.

  19. [3-Tesla MRI vs. arthroscopy for diagnostics of degenerative knee cartilage diseases: preliminary clinical results].

    PubMed

    von Engelhardt, L V; Schmitz, A; Burian, B; Pennekamp, P H; Schild, H H; Kraft, C N; von Falkenhausen, M

    2008-09-01

    The literature contains only a few studies investigating the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnostics of degenerative cartilage diseases. Studies on MRI diagnostics of the cartilage using field strengths of 3-Tesla demonstrate promising results. To assess the value of 3-Tesla MRI for decision making regarding conservative or operative treatment possibilities, this study focused on patients with degenerative cartilage diseases. Thirty-two patients with chronic knee pain, a minimum age of 40 years, a negative history of trauma, and at least grade II degenerative cartilage disease were included. Cartilage abnormalities detected at preoperative 3-Tesla MRI (axial/koronar/sagittal PD-TSE-SPAIR, axial/sagittal 3D-T1-FFE, axial T2-FFE; Intera 3.0T, Philips Medical Systems) were classified (grades I-IV) and compared with arthroscopic findings. Thirty-six percent (70/192) of the examined cartilage surfaces demonstrated no agreement between MRI and arthroscopic grading. In most of these cases, grades II and III cartilage lesions were confounded with each other. Regarding the positive predictive values, the probability that a positive finding in MRI would be exactly confirmed by arthroscopy was 39-72%. In contrast, specificities and negative predictive values of different grades of cartilage diseases were 85-95%. Regarding the high specificities and negative predictive values, 3-Tesla MRI is a reliable method for excluding even slight cartilage degeneration. In summary, in degenerative cartilage diseases, 3-Tesla MRI is a supportive, noninvasive method for clinical decision making regarding conservative or operative treatment possibilities. However, the value of diagnostic arthroscopy for a definitive assessment of the articular surfaces and for therapeutic planning currently cannot be replaced by 3-Tesla MRI. This applies especially to treatment options in which a differentiation between grade II and III cartilage lesions is of interest.

  20. Effect of non-uniform surface resistance on the quality factor of superconducting niobium cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weiwei; Lu, Xiangyang; Yang, Ziqin; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yujia

    2016-08-01

    The formula Rs = G /Q0 is commonly used in the calculation of the surface resistance of radio frequency niobium superconducting cavities. The applying of such equation is under the assumption that surface resistance is consistent over the cavity. However, the distribution of the magnetic field varies over the cavity. The magnetic field in the equator is much higher than that in the iris. According to Thermal Feedback Theory, it leads non-uniform distribution of the density of heat flux, which results in a different temperature distribution along the cavity inter surface. The BCS surface resistance, which depends largely on the temperature, is different in each local inner surface. In this paper, the effect of surface non-uniform resistance on the quality factor has been studied, through the calculation of Q0 in the original definition of it. The results show that it is necessary to consider the non-uniform distribution of magnetic field when the accelerating field is above 20 MV/m for TESLA cavities. Also, the effect of inhomogeneity of residual resistance on the quality factor is discussed. Its distribution barely affects the quality factor.

  1. Application of extremum seeking for time-varying systems to resonance control of RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander

    2016-09-13

    A recently developed form of extremum seeking for time-varying systems is implemented in hardware for the resonance control of radio-frequency cavities without phase measurements. Normal conducting RF cavity resonance control is performed via a slug tuner, while superconducting TESLA-type cavity resonance control is performed via piezo actuators. The controller maintains resonance by minimizing reflected power by utilizing model-independent adaptive feedback. Unlike standard phase-measurement-based resonance control, the presented approach is not sensitive to arbitrary phase shifts of the RF signals due to temperature-dependent cable length or phasemeasurement hardware changes. The phase independence of this method removes common slowly varying drifts and required periodic recalibration of phase-based methods. A general overview of the adaptive controller is presented along with the proof of principle experimental results at room temperature. Lastly, this method allows us to both maintain a cavity at a desired resonance frequency and also to dynamically modify its resonance frequency to track the unknown time-varying frequency of an RF source, thereby maintaining maximal cavity field strength, based only on power-level measurements.

  2. Application of extremum seeking for time-varying systems to resonance control of RF cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander

    2016-09-13

    A recently developed form of extremum seeking for time-varying systems is implemented in hardware for the resonance control of radio-frequency cavities without phase measurements. Normal conducting RF cavity resonance control is performed via a slug tuner, while superconducting TESLA-type cavity resonance control is performed via piezo actuators. The controller maintains resonance by minimizing reflected power by utilizing model-independent adaptive feedback. Unlike standard phase-measurement-based resonance control, the presented approach is not sensitive to arbitrary phase shifts of the RF signals due to temperature-dependent cable length or phasemeasurement hardware changes. The phase independence of this method removes common slowly varying drifts andmore » required periodic recalibration of phase-based methods. A general overview of the adaptive controller is presented along with the proof of principle experimental results at room temperature. Lastly, this method allows us to both maintain a cavity at a desired resonance frequency and also to dynamically modify its resonance frequency to track the unknown time-varying frequency of an RF source, thereby maintaining maximal cavity field strength, based only on power-level measurements.« less

  3. A technique for monitoring fast tuner piezoactuator preload forces for superconducting rf cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Branlard, J.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Edwards, H.; Orris, D.; Makulski, A.; McGee, M.; Nehring, R.; Poloubotko, V.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technology for mechanically compensating Lorentz Force detuning in superconducting RF cavities has already been developed at DESY. One technique is based on commercial piezoelectric actuators and was successfully demonstrated on TESLA cavities [1]. Piezo actuators for fast tuners can operate in a frequency range up to several kHz; however, it is very important to maintain a constant static force (preload) on the piezo actuator in the range of 10 to 50% of its specified blocking force. Determining the preload force during cool-down, warm-up, or re-tuning of the cavity is difficult without instrumentation, and exceeding the specified range can permanently damage the piezo stack. A technique based on strain gauge technology for superconducting magnets has been applied to fast tuners for monitoring the preload on the piezoelectric assembly. The design and testing of piezo actuator preload sensor technology is discussed. Results from measurements of preload sensors installed on the tuner of the Capture Cavity II (CCII)[2] tested at FNAL are presented. These results include measurements during cool-down, warmup, and cavity tuning along with dynamic Lorentz force compensation.

  4. Application of extremum seeking for time-varying systems to resonance control of RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander

    2016-09-13

    A recently developed form of extremum seeking for time-varying systems is implemented in hardware for the resonance control of radio-frequency cavities without phase measurements. Normal conducting RF cavity resonance control is performed via a slug tuner, while superconducting TESLA-type cavity resonance control is performed via piezo actuators. The controller maintains resonance by minimizing reflected power by utilizing model-independent adaptive feedback. Unlike standard phase-measurement-based resonance control, the presented approach is not sensitive to arbitrary phase shifts of the RF signals due to temperature-dependent cable length or phasemeasurement hardware changes. The phase independence of this method removes common slowly varying drifts and required periodic recalibration of phase-based methods. A general overview of the adaptive controller is presented along with the proof of principle experimental results at room temperature. Lastly, this method allows us to both maintain a cavity at a desired resonance frequency and also to dynamically modify its resonance frequency to track the unknown time-varying frequency of an RF source, thereby maintaining maximal cavity field strength, based only on power-level measurements.

  5. Magnetic Semiconductor Quantum Wells in High Fields to 60 Tesla: Photoluminescence Linewidth Annealing at Magnetization Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, D.D.; Crooker, S.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Rickel, D.G.; Samarth, N.

    1999-05-24

    Magnetic semiconductors offer a unique possibility for strongly tuning the intrinsic alloy disorder potential with applied magnetic field. We report the direct observation of a series of step-like reductions in the magnetic alloy disorder potential in single ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se quantum wells between O and 60 Tesla. This disorder, measured through the linewidth of low temperature photoluminescence spectra drops abruptly at -19, 36, and 53 Tesla, in concert with observed magnetization steps. Conventional models of alloy disorder (developed for nonmagnetic semiconductors) reproduce the general shape of the data, but markedly underestimate the size of the linewidth reduction.

  6. Cold- and Beam Test of the First Prototypes of the Superstructure for the TESLA Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, Nicoleta

    2003-08-08

    After three years of preparation, two superstructures, each made of two superconducting 7-cell weakly coupled subunits, have been installed in the TESLA Test Facility linac (TTF) for the cold- and beam-test. The energy stability, the HOMs damping, the frequency and the field adjustment methods were tested. The measured results confirmed expectation on the superstructure performance and proved that alternative layout for the 800 GeV upgrade of the TESLA collider, as it was proposed in TDR, is feasible. We report on the test and give here an overview of its results which are commented in more detail elsewhere in these Proceedings.

  7. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  8. [Myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Janů, F

    A number of benign and malignant tumors may develop in the abdominal cavity. Sarcomas are rather rare tumors of the abdominal cavity. They are often diagnosed at advanced growth stages as their local growth can cause clinical problems to the patients. The author presents a case report of myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity.Key words: myxofibrosarcoma.

  9. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  10. Single-cavity SLED device

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, B.A.

    1984-09-01

    The conventional SLED device used at SLAC requires two cavities. However, the same effect can be obtained with a single cavity; the theory and operation of the device is the same, only the hardware is changed. The single-cavity device is described here.

  11. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-09-20

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth.

  12. SRF cavity alignment detection method using beam-induced HOM with curved beam orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Ayaka; Hayano, Hitoshi

    2017-09-01

    We have developed a method to obtain mechanical centers of nine cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities from localized dipole modes, that is one of the higher order modes (HOM) induced by low-energy beams. It is to be noted that low-energy beams, which are used as alignment probes, are easy to bend in fringe fields of accelerator cavities. The estimation of the beam passing orbit is important because only information about the beam positions measured by beam position monitors outside the cavities is available. In this case, the alignment information about the cavities can be obtained by optimizing the parameters of the acceleration components over the beam orbit simulation to consistently represent the position of the beam position monitors measured at every beam sweep. We discuss details of the orbit estimation method, and estimate the mechanical center of the localized modes through experiments performed at the STF accelerator. The mechanical center is determined as (x , y) =(0 . 44 ± 0 . 56 mm , - 1 . 95 ± 0 . 40 mm) . We also discuss the error and the applicable range of this method.

  13. CAVITY CONTROL ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2010-09-01

    A digital low level radio frequency (RF) system typically incorporates either a heterodyne or direct sampling technique, followed by fast ADCs, then an FPGA, and finally a transmitting DAC. This universal platform opens up the possibilities for a variety of control algorithm implementations. The foremost concern for an RF control system is cavity field stability, and to meet the required quality of regulation, the chosen control system needs to have sufficient feedback gain. In this paper we will investigate the effectiveness of the regulation for three basic control system algorithms: I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature), Amplitude & Phase and digital SEL (Self Exciting Loop) along with the example of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV cavity field control system.

  14. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  15. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  16. Reliability of Stereotactic Coordinates of 1.5-Tesla and 3-Tesla MRI in Radiosurgery and Functional Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-il; Jin, Seong Jin; Jin, Sung-Chul; Kim, Jung Soo; Jeon, Kyoung Dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study are to identify interpersonal differences in defining coordinates and to figure out the degree of distortion of the MRI and compare the accuracy between CT, 1.5-tesla (T) and 3.0T MRI. Methods We compared coordinates in the CT images defined by 2 neurosurgeons. We also calculated the errors of 1.5T MRI and those of 3.0T. We compared the errors of the 1.5T with those of the 3.0T. In addition, we compared the errors in each sequence and in each axis. Results The mean difference in the CT images between the two neurosurgeons was 0.48±0.22 mm. The mean errors of the 1.5T were 1.55±0.48 mm (T1), 0.75±0.38 (T2), and 1.07±0.57 (FLAIR) and those of the 3.0T were 2.35±0.53 (T1), 2.18±0.76 (T2), and 2.16±0.77 (FLAIR). The smallest mean errors out of all the axes were in the x axis : 0.28-0.34 (1.5T) and 0.31-0.52 (3.0T). The smallest errors out of all the MRI sequences were in the T2 : 0.29-0.58 (1.5T) and 0.31-1.85 (3.0T). Conclusion There was no interpersonal difference in running the Gamma Plan® to define coordinates. The errors of the 3.0T were greater than those of the 1.5T, and these errors were not of an acceptable level. The x coordinate error was the smallest and the z coordinate error was the greatest regardless of the MRI sequence. The T2 sequence was the most accurate sequence. PMID:24851148

  17. 3.0 Tesla vs 1.5 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Reni S; Chen, Christine; Vashi, Reena; Hooley, Regina J; Philpotts, Liane E

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare 3.0 Tesla (T) vs 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. METHODS: Upon Institutional Review Board approval, a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of 147 consecutive 3.0T MR examinations and 98 consecutive 1.5T MR examinations in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 7/2009 and 5/2010 was performed. Eleven patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the 3.0T group were excluded. Mammographically occult suspicious lesions (BIRADS Code 4 and 5) additional to the index cancer in the ipsilateral and contralateral breast were identified. Lesion characteristics and pathologic diagnoses were recorded, and results achieved with both systems compared. Statistical significance was analyzed using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: In the 3.0T group, 206 suspicious lesions were identified in 55% (75/136) of patients and 96% (198/206) of these lesions were biopsied. In the 1.5T group, 98 suspicious lesions were identified in 53% (52/98) of patients and 90% (88/98) of these lesions were biopsied. Biopsy results yielded additional malignancies in 24% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 14% of patients in the 1.5T group (33/136 vs 14/98, P = 0.07). Average size and histology of the additional cancers was comparable. Of patients who had a suspicious MR imaging study, additional cancers were found in 44% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 27% in the 1.5T group (33/75 vs 14/52, P = 0.06), yielding a higher positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. CONCLUSION: 3.0T MR imaging detected more additional malignancies in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and yielded a higher PPV for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. PMID:24003354

  18. Water clusters in nonpolar cavities

    PubMed Central

    Vaitheeswaran, Subramanian; Yin, Hao; Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    We explore the structure and thermodynamics of water clusters confined in nonpolar cavities. By calculating the grand-canonical partition function term by term, we show that small nonpolar cavities can be filled at equilibrium with highly structured water clusters. The structural and thermodynamic properties of these encapsulated water clusters are similar to those observed experimentally in the gas phase. Water filling is highly sensitive to the size of the cavity and the strength of the interactions with the cavity wall. Water penetration into pores can thus be modulated by small changes in the polarity and structure of the cavity. Implications on water penetration into proteins are discussed. PMID:15572444

  19. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  20. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  1. Shot noise startup of the 6 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W. M.

    1996-02-01

    We present here the results of an extensive simulation activity for the TESLA SASE FEL. We have used the program GINGER to determine the FEL saturation length and the power fluctuations from shot to shot. The spectral properties of the output power and the correlation functions are investigated and compared with available theoretical models.

  2. Design study of 15-Tesla RHQT Nb3Al block type dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    The design study of the block type 15-Tesla RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al dipole magnet, and its merits over Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets are presented. The copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is now becoming commercially available for the application to the accelerator magnets. A 1 mm diameter RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand with filament size about 50 {mu}, non-copper Jc about 1000 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, copper ratio of 50%, can now be produced over several hundred meters. The stress and strain characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand are superior to the Nb{sub 3}Sn strand. Another advantage is that it can tolerate a longitudinal strain up to 0.55%. The RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable will have less chance of contamination of the stabilizer, compared to Nb{sub 3}Sn cable. These characteristics of the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al will be beneficial for designing and producing 15-Tesla dipole magnets. An example 15-Tesla magnet cross section, utilizing the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Sn strand is presented. A systematic investigation on RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strands, its Rutherford cables, and building a small racetrack magnet for cable testing are proposed.

  3. The development of a TESLA recirculator with superconducting accelerating structures in Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guk, I. S.; Dovbnya, A. N.

    2008-12-01

    The recirculator project, which is to be built at the National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (NSC KIPT), is presented. The basic solutions incorporated in the design are given. The TESLA superconducting section is chosen as the accelerating structure of an accelerating complex.

  4. Prospects for 6 to 10 tesla magnets for a TEVATRON upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, Paul M.

    1988-07-08

    The first SSC physics is at least 10 years away. An upgrade of the Fermilab Tevatron will ensure the continuity of a vigorous high-energy physics program until the SSC turns on. Three basic proposals are under consideration: /bar p/p at 3 /times/ 10/sup 31/ --Increase luminosity by improvements to the p source. pp at 1 TeV and 2 /times/ 10/sup 32/--Move the main ring to a new tunnel, build a second Tevatron ring, and /bar p/p > 1.5 TeV and 7 /times/ 10/sup 30/--Replace the tevatron with a higher energy ring. The last two options requires about a hundred 6.6-tesla dipoles in addition to a ring of Tevatron strength (4.4 T) magnets. These higher-field magnets are necessary in both rings to lengthen the straight sections in order to realize the collision optics. The third option requires a ring of magnets of 6.6 T or slightly higher to replace the present Tevatron plus a number of special 8--9 tesla magnets. The viability of the high-energy option then depends on the practicality of sizable numbers of reliable 8--9 tesla dipoles as well as 800 6.6-tesla dipoles. The following develops a specification for an 8.8 T dipole, examines the design considerations and reviews the current state of high-field magnet development. 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of…

  6. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 Tesla MRI: clinical and radiological correlates.

    PubMed

    van Dalen, Jan Willem; Scuric, Eva E M; van Veluw, Susanne J; Caan, Matthan W A; Nederveen, Aart J; Biessels, Geert Jan; van Gool, Willem A; Richard, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a population-based cohort of 194 nondemented older people (72-80 years) with systolic hypertension. Using a case-control design, participants with and without CMIs were compared on age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and white matter hyperintensity volume. We identified 23 CMIs in 12 participants (6%). CMIs were associated with older age, higher diastolic blood pressure, and a history of recent stroke. There was a trend for a higher white matter hyperintensity volume in participants with CMIs. We found an association of CMIs with clinical parameters, including age and cardiovascular risk factors. Although the prevalence of CMIs is relatively low, our results suggest that the study of CMIs in larger clinical studies is possible using 3 Tesla MRI. This opens the possibility of large-scale prospective investigation of the clinical relevance of CMIs in older people. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of…

  8. Lobar intracerebral haematomas: Neuropathological and 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    De Reuck, Jacques; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Deramecourt, Vincent; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Leys, Didier; Pasquier, Florence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Bordet, Regis

    2016-10-15

    The Boston criteria for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) need validation by neuropathological examination in patients with lobar cerebral haematomas (LCHs). In "vivo" 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is unreliable to detect the age-related signal changes in LCHs. This post-mortem study investigates the validity of the Boston criteria in brains with LCHs and the signal changes during their time course with 7.0-tesla MRI. Seventeen CAA brains including 26 LCHs were compared to 13 non-CAA brains with 14 LCHs. The evolution of the signal changes with time was examined in 25 LCHs with T2 and T2* 7.0-tesla MRI. In the CAA group LCHs were predominantly located in the parieto-occipital lobes. Also white matter changes were more severe with more cortical microinfarcts and cortical microbleeds. On MRI there was a progressive shift of the intensity of the hyposignal from the haematoma core in the acute stage to the boundaries later on. During the residual stage the hyposignal mildly decreased in the boundaries with an increase of the superficial siderosis and haematoma core collapse. Our post-mortem study of LCHs confirms the validity of the Boston criteria for CAA. Also 7.0-tesla MRI allows staging the age of the LCHs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. MAXIMUM EFFICIENCY RF SHIMMING: THEORY AND INITIAL APPLICATION FOR HIP IMAGING AT 7 TESLA

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Cem Murat; Brown, Ryan; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Zhu, Yudong

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency shimming with multiple channel excitation has been proposed to increase the transverse magnetic field uniformity and reduce specific absorption rate at high magnetic field strengths (≥ 7 Tesla) where high-frequency effects can make traditional single channel volume coils unsuitable for transmission. In the case of deep anatomic regions and power-demanding pulse sequences, optimization of transmit efficiency may be a more critical requirement than homogeneity per se. This work introduces a novel method to maximize transmit efficiency using multiple channel excitation and radiofrequency shimming. Shimming weights are calculated in order to obtain the lowest possible net radiofrequency power deposition into the subject for a given transverse magnetic field strength. The method was demonstrated in imaging studies of articular cartilage of the hip joint at 7 Tesla. We show that the new radiofrequency shimming method can enable reduction in power deposition while maintaining an average flip angle or adiabatic condition in the hip cartilage. Building upon the improved shimming, we further show the signal-to-noise ratio in hip cartilage at 7 Tesla can be substantially greater than that at 3 Tesla, illustrating the potential benefits of high field hip imaging. PMID:22714835

  10. [3 Tesla MRI: successful results with higher field strengths].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, F; Grosu, D; Mohr, C; Purdy, D; Salem, K; Scott, K T; Stoeckel, B

    2004-01-01

    The recent development of 3 Tesla MRI (3T MRI) has been fueled by promise of increased signal-to-noise ratio(SNR). Many are excited about the opportunity to not only use the increased SNR for clearer images, but also the chance to exchange it for better resolution or faster scans. These possibilities have caused a rapid increase in the market for 3T MRI, where the faster scanning tips an already advantageous economic outlook in favor of the user. As a result, the global market for 3T has grown from a research only market just a few years ago to an ever-increasing clinically oriented customer base. There are, however, significant obstacles to 3T MRI presented by the physics at higher field strengths. For example, the T1 relaxation times are prolonged with increasing magnet field strength. Further, the increased RF-energy deposition (SAR), the larger the chemical shift and the stronger susceptibility effect have to be considered as challenges. It is critical that one looks at both the advantages and disadvantages of using 3T. While there are many issues to address aand a number of different methods for doing so, to properly tackle each of these concerns will take time and effort on the part od researchers and clinicians. The optimization of 3T MRI scanning will have to be a combined effort, though much of the work to date has been in neuroimaging. Multiple applications have been explored in addition to clinical anatomical imaging, where resolution is improved showing structure in the brain never seen before in human MRI. Body and cardiac imaging provide a great challenge but are also achievable at 3T. As an example, the full range of clinical applications currently achieved on today's state-of-the-art 1.5T cardiac MR scanners has also been demonstrated at 3T. In the body, the full range of contrast is available over large fields of view allowing whole liver studies in the clinic or, as needed, one may choose a smaller field of view for high-resolution imaging of the

  11. Prostate cancer detection by prebiopsy 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Sachiyo; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Mishima, Takao; Kurokawa, Hiroaki; Sakaida, Noriko; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2011-09-01

    The diagnostic value of 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to assess the features of prostate cancer detectable by prebiopsy 3.0-Tesla MRI. From January 2007 through to December 2008, 116 patients who were examined by prebiopsy 3.0-Tesla MRI underwent radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Prostate specimens were examined to see whether the largest cancer area was the same as the area indicated on the MRI. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify variables predictive of agreement between MRI and histopathological findings. Sixty-six (56.9%) patients were suspected of having prostate cancer on the basis of MRI findings. In 49 of these patients (74.2%), it was considered that there was agreement between the abnormal area on the MRI and the index tumor. Univariate analysis revealed that there were significant differences in abnormal digital rectal examination, capsular penetration, the diameter of the index tumor of the radical prostatectomy specimen, and the Gleason scores of the biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens. Multivariate analysis revealed that the Gleason score of the radical prostatectomy specimen was associated with the accurate detection of the prostate cancer by MRI (P = 0.0177). In conclusion, 3.0-Tesla MRI tends to accurately diagnose prostate cancer with high tumor burden and aggressiveness. Multimodal examination (T2-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging) is recommended for the diagnosis of prostate cancer using 3.0-Tesla MRI. © 2011 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Whole-brain three-dimensional T2-weighted BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Jones, Craig K

    2014-12-01

    A new acquisition scheme for T2-weighted spin-echo BOLD fMRI is introduced. It uses a T2-preparation module to induce blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, followed by a single-shot three-dimensional (3D) fast gradient-echo readout with short echo time (TE). It differs from most spin-echo BOLD sequences in that BOLD contrast is generated before the readout, which eliminates the "dead time" due to long TE required for T2 contrast, and substantially improves acquisition efficiency. This approach, termed "3D T2prep-GRE," was implemented at 7 Tesla (T) with a typical spatial (2.5 × 2.5 × 2.5 mm(3) ) and temporal (TR = 2.3 s) resolution for functional MRI (fMRI) and whole-brain coverage (55 slices), and compared with the widely used 2D spin-echo EPI sequence. In fMRI experiments of simultaneous visual/motor activities, 3D T2prep-GRE showed minimal distortion and little signal dropout across the whole brain. Its lower power deposition allowed greater spatial coverage (55 versus 17 slices with identical TR, resolution and power level), temporal SNR (60% higher) and CNR (35% higher) efficiency than 2D spin-echo EPI. It also showed smaller T2* contamination. This approach is expected to be useful for ultra-high field fMRI, especially for regions near air cavities. The concept of using T2-preparation to generate BOLD contrast can be combined with many other sequences at any field strength. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cavity optomechanical magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Forstner, S; Prams, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2012-03-23

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated. The magnetic-field-induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is resonantly transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator and read out optically with ultrahigh sensitivity. A peak magnetic field sensitivity of 400  nT  Hz(-1/2) is achieved, with theoretical modeling predicting the possibility of sensitivities below 1  pT  Hz(-1/2). This chip-based magnetometer combines high sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  14. Cavity soliton billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Prati, F.; Lugiato, L. A.; Tissoni, G.; Brambilla, M.

    2011-11-15

    The motion of a self-propelled cavity soliton in a laser where the pump profile acts as a square billiard is investigated. In the long-term dynamics, only closed trajectories are possible, exhibiting nonspecular reflections with striking similarities to walking droplets in a vibrated liquid bath. Open orbits can be achieved either by introducing scattering defects in the pump profile or in the presence of more than two solitons, due to their interaction. Such dynamical properties can be exploited for applications such as a compact soliton-force microscope.

  15. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current In Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  16. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current in Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Unlisted

    2010-09-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  17. Hypersonic flow past open cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenstern, Alagacyr, Jr.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1993-01-01

    The hypersonic flow over a cavity is investigated. The time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations, in terms of mass averaged variables, are numerically solved. An implicit algorithm, with a subiteration procedure to recover time-accuracy, is used to perform the time-accurate computations. The objective of the study is to investigate the effects of Reynolds number and cavity dimensions. The comparison of the computations with available experimental data, in terms of time mean static pressure, heat transfer, and Mach number show good agreement. In the computations large vortex structures, which adversely affect the cavity flow characteristics, are observed at the rear of the cavity. A self-sustained oscillatory motion occurs within the cavity over a range of Reynolds number and cavity dimensions. The frequency spectra of the oscillations show good agreement with a modified semi-empirical relation.

  18. Hypersonic flow past open cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenstern, Algacyr, Jr.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1994-01-01

    The hypersonic flow over a cavity is investigated. The time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically solved. An implicit algorithm, with a subiteration procedure to recover time accuracy, is used to perform the time-accurate computations. The objective of the study is to investigate the effects of Reynolds number and cavity dimensions. The comparsion of the computations with available experimental data, in terms of time mean static pressure, heat transfer, and Mach number, show good agreement. In the computations large vortex structures, which adversely affect the cavity flow characteristics, are observed at the rear of the cavity. A self-sustained oscillatory motion occurs within the cavity over a range of Reynolds number and cavity dimensions. The frequency spectra of the oscillations show good agreement with a modified semiempirical relation.

  19. Oral cavity eumycetoma.

    PubMed

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Stuani, Maria Luiza de Toledo; Stuani, Luís Antonio Sasso

    2011-01-01

    Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal) or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  20. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-01

    "Cavity-optomechanics" aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  1. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  2. Reflectance measurements on cavity radiators.

    PubMed

    Jones, O C; Forno, C

    1971-12-01

    A knowledge of the emissivity of a cavity radiator may be deduced from reflectance measurements, but these may be difficult to make if the cavity has a small aperture and low reflectance. The use of a He-Ne laser as a source facilitates such measurements. Results are presented for one ceramic and three metallic cavities that have been used in photometric and spectroradoimetric standards work. An integrating sphere method appears more satisfactory than a goniophotometric approach.

  3. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-04

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  4. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, T.; Cormick, C.; Landa, H.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Demler, E.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  5. Nuclear reactor cavity decontamination machine

    SciTech Connect

    Vassalotti, M.; Obligado, A.

    1984-03-13

    Apparatus is disclosed for decontaminating the wall of a boiling water reactor cavity. A chassis on wheels is rollable on the refueling floor along the cavity curb. A pair of horizontal wheels roll against the curb. A support member extends upwardly and laterally from the chassis to clear the personnel handrail. A mast depends from the support member into the cavity and includes a horizontal reaction wheel bearing against the cavity wall. A vertically positionable carriage is mounted on the mast and carries water spray nozzles directed against the wall.

  6. JLEIC SRF cavity RF Design

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    The initial design of a low higher order modes (HOM) impedance superconducting RF (SRF) cavity is presented in this paper. The design of this SRF cavity is for the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC). The electron ring of JLEIC will operate with electrons of 3 to 10 GeV energy. The ion ring of JLEIC will operate with protons of up to 100 GeV energy. The bunch lengths in both rings are ~12 mm (RMS). In order to maintain the short bunch length in the ion ring, SRF cavities are adopted to provide large enough gradient. In the first phase of JLEIC, the PEP II RF cavities will be reused in the electron ring to lower the initial cost. The frequency of the SRF cavities is chosen to be the second harmonic of PEP II cavities, 952.6 MHz. In the second phase of JLEIC, the same frequency SRF cavities may replace the normal conducting PEP II cavities to achieve higher luminosity at high energy. At low energies, the synchro-tron radiation damping effect is quite weak, to avoid the coupled bunch instability caused by the intense closely-spaced electron bunches, low HOM impedance of the SRF cavities combined with longitudinal feedback sys-tem will be necessary.

  7. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  8. 77 FR 2269 - Foreign-Trade Zone 18-San Jose, CA, Application for Subzone, Tesla Motors, Inc. (Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... purpose subzone status for the electric passenger- vehicle manufacturing facilities of Tesla Motors, Inc..., compressors, body moldings and trim, latches, HVAC components, blower motors, valves, fasteners, electric motors, lithium- ion batteries, electrical assemblies, lamps and lighting equipment,...

  9. Shock induced cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  10. A scanning cavity microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm2; we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  11. Update on coaxial coupling scheme for International Linear Collider-type cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel, Jacek Sekutowicz

    2010-02-17

    This paper reports on our efforts to develop a flangeable coaxial coupler for both higher order mode and fundamental coupling for nine-cell ILC-type cavities, which were designed in the early 1990’s for pulsed operation with a duty factor less than 1%. The design of the coupler has been done in such a way that the rf magnetic flux B at the flange connection was minimized and only a field of <5 mT would be present for an operation at an accelerating field Eacc~36 MV/m (B~150 mT) in the cavity. Even though we achieved reasonably high Q values at low field, the cavity/coupler combination was limited in the cw mode to only ~7 MV/m, where a thermally initiated degradation occurred. We believed that this limitation was caused by poor cooling of the shorting plate and inner tube in the coaxial coupler; therefore, we have improved the cooling conditions by initially drilling radial cooling channels every 30 degrees, then every 15 degrees into the shorting plate and eventually removing the “bridges” between the channels. This paper reports on our experiences with the modified coaxial coupler under cw and pulsed conditions.

  12. Design study of steady-state 30-tesla liquid-neon-cooled magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    A design for a 30-tesla, liquid-neon-cooled magnet was reported which is capable of continuous operation. Cooled by nonboiling, forced-convection heat transfer to liquid neon flowing at 2.8 cu m/min in a closed, pressurized heat-transfer loop and structurally supported by a tapered structural ribbon, the tape-wound coils with a high-purity-aluminum conductor will produce over 30 teslas for 1 minute at 850 kilowatts. The magnet will have an inside diameter of 7.5 centimeters and an outside diameter of 54 centimeters. The minimum current density at design field will be 15.7 kA/sq cm.

  13. Assessing the MR compatibility of dental retainer wires at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Joep; Kooij, Bert Jan; Webb, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    To determine the MR compatibility of common dental retainer wires at 7 Tesla in terms of potential RF heating and magnetic susceptibility effects. Electromagnetic simulations and experimental results were compared for dental retainer wires placed in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Simulations were then performed for a human model with wire in place. Finally, image quality was assessed for different scanning protocols and wires. Simulations and experimental data in phantoms agreed well, with the length of the wire correlating to maximum heating in phantoms being approximately 47 mm. Even in this case, no substantial heating occurs when scanning within the specific absorption rate (SAR) guidelines for the head. Image distortions from the most ferromagnetic dental wire were not significant for any brain region. Dental retainer wires appear to be MR compatible at 7 Tesla. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  15. Programmable infusion pump and catheter: evaluation using 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shellock, Frank G; Crivelli, Rocco; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2008-07-01

    Objective.  This study assessed 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues for a programmable infusion pump and associated catheters. Methods.  A programmable infusion pump and associated catheters (MedStream Programmable Infusion Pump, 40 mL; SureStream TI Coil-Reinforced Intraspinal Catheter; SureStream TI Connector; and SureStream Silicone Catheter; Codman and Shurtleff Inc., a Johnson & Johnson Company, Raynham, MA, USA) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (deflection angle and torque), heating (transmit/receive body radiofrequency coil; whole-body averaged specific absorption rate, 3 W/kg for 15 min), functional changes (before and after MRI using eight different MRI conditions), and artifacts (T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo pulse sequences) at 3-Tesla. Results.  The programmable infusion pump and associated catheters exhibited minor magnetic field interactions. Heating was not excessive (≤ 1.9°), especially considering the experimental conditions used for this evaluation (ie, relatively high radiofrequency power/specific absorption rate level and use of a nonperfused phantom). The function of three out of six pumps was temporarily altered by exposures to 3-Tesla MRI conditions. Reset was achieved in each case. Artifacts were relatively large for the pump and minor for the catheter. Conclusions.  The programmable infusion pump and catheters will not pose increased risk to a patient examined using 3-Tesla MRI as long as specific safety guidelines are followed, which includes interrogation of the pump post-MRI to ensure proper settings. Artifacts for the programmable infusion pump may impact the diagnostic use of MRI if the area of interest is in the same area or near the device.

  16. A compact multi-wire-layered secondary winding for Tesla transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Su, Jian-cang; Li, Rui; Wu, Xiao-long; Xu, Xiu-dong; Qiu, Xu-dong; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Peng-cheng

    2017-05-01

    A compact multi-wire-layered (MWL) secondary winding for a Tesla transformer is put forward. The basic principle of this winding is to wind the metal wire on a polymeric base tube in a multi-layer manner. The tube is tapered and has high electrical strength and high mechanical strength. Concentric-circle grooves perpendicular to the axis of the tube are carved on the surface of the tube to wind the wire. The width of the groove is basically equal to the diameter of the wire so that the metal wire can be fixed in the groove without glue. The depth of the groove is n times of the diameter of the wire to realize the n-layer winding manner. All the concentric-circle grooves are connected via a spiral groove on the surface of the tube to let the wire go through. Compared with the traditional one-wire-layered (OWL) secondary winding for the Tesla transformer, the most conspicuous advantage of the MWL secondary winding is that the latter is compact with only a length of 2/n of the OWL. In addition, the MWL winding has the following advantages: high electrical strength since voids are precluded from the surface of the winding, high mechanical strength because polymer is used as the material of the base tube, and reliable fixation in the Tesla transformer as special mechanical connections are designed. A 2000-turn MWL secondary winding is fabricated with a winding layer of 3 and a total length of 1.0 m. Experiments to test the performance of this winding on a Tesla-type pulse generator are conducted. The results show that this winding can boost the voltage to 1 MV at a repetition rate of 50 Hz reliably for a lifetime longer than 104 pulses, which proves the feasibility of the MWL secondary winding.

  17. A compact multi-wire-layered secondary winding for Tesla transformer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Su, Jian-Cang; Li, Rui; Wu, Xiao-Long; Xu, Xiu-Dong; Qiu, Xu-Dong; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Peng-Cheng

    2017-05-01

    A compact multi-wire-layered (MWL) secondary winding for a Tesla transformer is put forward. The basic principle of this winding is to wind the metal wire on a polymeric base tube in a multi-layer manner. The tube is tapered and has high electrical strength and high mechanical strength. Concentric-circle grooves perpendicular to the axis of the tube are carved on the surface of the tube to wind the wire. The width of the groove is basically equal to the diameter of the wire so that the metal wire can be fixed in the groove without glue. The depth of the groove is n times of the diameter of the wire to realize the n-layer winding manner. All the concentric-circle grooves are connected via a spiral groove on the surface of the tube to let the wire go through. Compared with the traditional one-wire-layered (OWL) secondary winding for the Tesla transformer, the most conspicuous advantage of the MWL secondary winding is that the latter is compact with only a length of 2/n of the OWL. In addition, the MWL winding has the following advantages: high electrical strength since voids are precluded from the surface of the winding, high mechanical strength because polymer is used as the material of the base tube, and reliable fixation in the Tesla transformer as special mechanical connections are designed. A 2000-turn MWL secondary winding is fabricated with a winding layer of 3 and a total length of 1.0 m. Experiments to test the performance of this winding on a Tesla-type pulse generator are conducted. The results show that this winding can boost the voltage to 1 MV at a repetition rate of 50 Hz reliably for a lifetime longer than 10(4) pulses, which proves the feasibility of the MWL secondary winding.

  18. Implications of long-range wakefields on multi-bunch beam dynamics in the ILC with a new low surface field superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesmiyan, I.; Jones, R. M.; Juntong, N.

    2014-01-01

    This article focusses on a beam dynamics study for the linacs of the ILC. In particular, the impact of long-range transverse wakefields on the beam quality is studied for the case in which the ILC would be built using the new low surface field (NLSF) superconducting cavities. This presents an alternative design to the baseline TESLA-style cavities. The progress of the beam down ~10 km of each linac is simulated using the tracking computer code PLACET. In addition, the results of an analytical matrix method, in which the beam is subjected to identical wakefields from each cavity, are also presented. Both systematic and random errors, arising as a natural process during fabrication, are implemented in the beam tracking study. The latter source of error is found to be beneficial, as emittance dilution is reduced due to the beam receiving non-coherent kicks.

  19. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  20. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  1. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  3. Rapid Parametric Mapping of the Longitudinal Relaxation Time T1 Using Two-Dimensional Variable Flip Angle Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Dieringer, Matthias A.; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. Methods T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Results Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of

  4. Rapid parametric mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 using two-dimensional variable flip angle magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Dieringer, Matthias A; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of parametric MR based lesion detection and

  5. Non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel at 7 Tesla in comparison to 1.5 Tesla: First steps towards clinical application.

    PubMed

    Hahnemann, Maria L; Kraff, Oliver; Maderwald, Stefan; Johst, Soeren; Orzada, Stephan; Umutlu, Lale; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2016-06-01

    To perform non-enhanced (NE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the small bowel at 7 Tesla (7T) and to compare it with 1.5 Tesla (1.5T). Twelve healthy subjects were prospectively examined using a 1.5T and 7T MRI system. Coronal and axial true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP) imaging and a coronal T2-weighted (T2w) half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence were acquired. Image analysis was performed by 1) visual evaluation of tissue contrast and detail detectability, 2) measurement and calculation of contrast ratios and 3) assessment of artifacts. NE MRI of the small bowel at 7T was technically feasible. In the vast majority of the cases, tissue contrast and image details were equivalent at both field strengths. At 7T, two cases revealed better detail detectability in the TrueFISP, and better contrast in the HASTE. Susceptibility artifacts and B1 inhomogeneities were significantly increased at 7T. This study provides first insights into NE ultra-high field MRI of the small bowel and may be considered an important step towards high quality T2w abdominal imaging at 7T MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-15

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  7. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, Paulus S.; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders. PMID:26106306

  8. Assessment of MRI Issues at 3 Tesla for a New Metallic Tissue Marker.

    PubMed

    Cronenweth, Charlotte M; Shellock, Frank G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MRI issues at 3 Tesla for a metallic tissue marker used to localize removal areas of tissue abnormalities. Materials and Methods. A newly designed, metallic tissue marker (Achieve Marker, CareFusion, Vernon Hills, IL) used to mark biopsy sites, particularly in breasts, was assessed for MRI issues which included standardized tests to determine magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts at 3 Tesla. Temperature changes were determined for the marker using a gelled-saline-filled phantom. MRI was performed at a relatively high specific absorption rate (whole body averaged SAR, 2.9-W/kg). MRI artifacts were evaluated using T1-weighted, spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. Results. The marker displayed minimal magnetic field interactions (2-degree deflection angle and no torque). MRI-related heating was only 0.1°C above background heating (i.e., the heating without the tissue marker present). Artifacts seen as localized signal loss were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the marker. Conclusions. Based on the findings, the new metallic tissue marker is acceptable or "MR Conditional" (using current labeling terminology) for a patient undergoing an MRI procedure at 3 Tesla or less.

  9. Focused tight dressing does not prevent cochlear implant magnet migration under 1.5 Tesla MRI.

    PubMed

    Cuda, D; Murri, A; Succo, G

    2013-04-01

    We report a retrospective case of inner magnet migration, which occurred after 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning in an adult recipient of a bilateral cochlear implant (CI) despite a focused head dressing. The patient, bilaterally implanted with Nucleus 5 CIs (Cochlear LTD, Sydney, Australia), underwent a 1.5 Tesla cholangio-MRI scan for biliary duct pathology. In subsequent days, a focal skin alteration appeared over the left inner coil. Plain skull radiographs showed partial magnet migration on the left side. Surgical exploration confirmed magnet twisting; the magnet was effectively repositioned. Left CI performance was restored to pre-migration level. The wound healed without complications. Thus, focused dressing does not prevent magnet migration in CI recipients undergoing 1.5 Tesla MRI. All patients should be counselled on this potential complication. A minor surgical procedure is required to reposition the magnet. Nevertheless, timely diagnosis is necessary to prevent skin breakdown and subsequent device contamination. Plain skull radiograph is very effective in identifying magnet twisting; it should be performed systematically after MRI or minimally on all suspected cases.

  10. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia.

    PubMed

    Rommer, Paulus S; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders.

  11. A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator for solid dielectric breakdown research.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Pan, Ya Feng; Su, Jian Cang; Zhang, Xi Bo; Wang, Li Min; Fang, Jin Peng; Sun, Xu; Lui, Rui

    2013-10-01

    A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator including a pair of electrode and a matched absorption resistor is established for the application of solid dielectric breakdown research. As major components, a built-in Tesla transformer and a gas-gap switch are designed to boost and shape the output pulse, respectively; the electrode is to form the anticipated electric field; the resistor is parallel to the electrode to absorb the reflected energy from the test sample. The parameters of the generator are a pulse width of 10 ns, a rise and fall time of 3 ns, and a maximum amplitude of 300 kV. By modifying the primary circuit of the Tesla transformer, the generator can produce both positive and negative pulses at a repetition rate of 1-50 Hz. In addition, a real-time measurement and control system is established based on the solid dielectric breakdown requirements for this generator. With this system, experiments on test samples made of common insulation materials in pulsed power systems are conducted. The preliminary experimental results show that the constructed generator is capable to research the solid dielectric breakdown phenomenon on a nanosecond time scale.

  12. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-01

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  13. Hippocampal disconnection in early Alzheimer's disease: a 7 tesla MRI study.

    PubMed

    Wisse, Laura E M; Reijmer, Yael D; ter Telgte, Annemieke; Kuijf, Hugo J; Leemans, Alexander; Luijten, Peter R; Koek, Huiberdina L; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2015-01-01

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), atrophy of the entorhinal cortex (ERC) and hippocampal formation may induce degeneration of connecting white matter tracts. We examined the association of hippocampal subfield and ERC atrophy at 7 tesla MRI with fornix and parahippocampal cingulum (PHC) microstructure in patients with early AD. Twenty-five patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) (n = 15) or early AD (n = 10) and 17 controls underwent 3 tesla diffusion MRI to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) of the fornix and PHC and 7 tesla MRI to obtain ERC and hippocampal subfield volumes. Linear regression analyses were performed, adjusted for age, gender, and intracranial volume. Fornix FA was significantly lower and subiculum, cornu ammonis (CA) 1, and dentate gyrus &CA4 volume were significantly smaller in patients with MCI or AD as compared to controls. In patients with MCI or AD, fornix FA was positively associated with subiculum volume (β = 0.53, 95% CI 0.10; 0.96), but not with ERC/other subfield volumes. PHC FA was not associated with ERC/subfield volumes. These findings indicate that in early AD subiculum atrophy is associated with lower FA of the fornix, which primarily consists of axons originating in the subiculum. This suggests that degeneration of subicular cell bodies and their axons are related processes in early AD.

  14. Assessment of MRI Issues at 3 Tesla for a New Metallic Tissue Marker

    PubMed Central

    Cronenweth, Charlotte M.; Shellock, Frank G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MRI issues at 3 Tesla for a metallic tissue marker used to localize removal areas of tissue abnormalities. Materials and Methods. A newly designed, metallic tissue marker (Achieve Marker, CareFusion, Vernon Hills, IL) used to mark biopsy sites, particularly in breasts, was assessed for MRI issues which included standardized tests to determine magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts at 3 Tesla. Temperature changes were determined for the marker using a gelled-saline-filled phantom. MRI was performed at a relatively high specific absorption rate (whole body averaged SAR, 2.9-W/kg). MRI artifacts were evaluated using T1-weighted, spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. Results. The marker displayed minimal magnetic field interactions (2-degree deflection angle and no torque). MRI-related heating was only 0.1°C above background heating (i.e., the heating without the tissue marker present). Artifacts seen as localized signal loss were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the marker. Conclusions. Based on the findings, the new metallic tissue marker is acceptable or “MR Conditional” (using current labeling terminology) for a patient undergoing an MRI procedure at 3 Tesla or less. PMID:26266051

  15. Evaluation of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Mahrad; Thomas, Asish; Shellock, Frank G

    2015-05-01

    Replacement of the aortic heart valve typically requires open-heart surgery. A new transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) bioprosthesis made from metallic material was recently developed that is an advantageous alternative insofar as it is implanted using a minimally invasive procedure. Because of the presence of metal, there are safety issues related to MRI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use standardized testing techniques to evaluate MRI issues for this TAVR bioprosthesis in association with a 3-Tesla MR system. The TAVR bioprosthesis (Hydra Aortic Valve, Percutaneous Heart Valve Prosthesis, Vascular Innovations Company, Ltd, Thailand) was evaluated for magnetic field interactions (translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating at a relative high specific absorption rate level (whole body average SAR, 2.9-W/kg), and artifacts (T1-weighted, spin echo, and gradient echo pulse sequences) at 3-Tesla. The TAVR bioprosthesis demonstrated negligible magnetic field interactions (deflection angle, 3-degrees; torque, 0) and minimal heating (maximum temperature rise, 2.5°C; background temperature rise, 1.7°C). Artifacts were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the implant. The TAVR bioprosthesis that was evaluated in this investigation is acceptable, or using current MRI terminology "MR Conditional", for a patient undergoing MRI at 3-Tesla or less. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intraindividual comparison of image quality in MR urography at 1.5 and 3 tesla in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Regier, M; Nolte-Ernsting, C; Adam, G; Kemper, J

    2008-10-01

    Experimental evaluation of image quality of the upper urinary tract in MR urography (MRU) at 1.5 and 3 Tesla in a porcine model. In this study four healthy domestic pigs, weighing between 71 and 80 kg (mean 73.6 kg), were examined with a standard T1w 3D-GRE and a high-resolution (HR) T1w 3D-GRE sequence at 1.5 and 3 Tesla. Additionally, at 3 Tesla both sequences were performed with parallel imaging (SENSE factor 2). The MR urographic scans were performed after intravenous injection of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg body weight (bw)) and low-dose furosemide (0.1 mg/kg bw). Image evaluation was performed by two independent radiologists blinded to sequence parameters and field strength. Image analysis included grading of image quality of the segmented collecting system based on a five-point grading scale regarding anatomical depiction and artifacts observed (1: the majority of the segment (>50%) was not depicted or was obscured by major artifacts; 5: the segment was visualized without artifacts and had sharply defined borders). Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were determined. Statistical analysis included kappa-statistics, Wilcoxon and paired student t-test. The mean scores for MR urographies at 1.5 Tesla were 2.83 for the 3D-GRE and 3.48 for the HR3D-GRE sequence. Significantly higher values were determined using the corresponding sequences at 3 Tesla, averaging 3.19 for the 3D-GRE (p = 0.047) and 3.92 for the HR3D-GRE (p = 0,023) sequence. Delineation of the pelvicaliceal system was rated significantly higher at 3 Tesla compared to 1.5 Tesla (3D-GRE: p = 0.015; HR3D-GRE: p = 0.006). At 3 Tesla the mean SNR and CNR were significantly higher (p < 0.05). A kappa of 0.67 indicated good interobserver agreement. In an experimental setup, MR urography at 3 Tesla allowed for significantly higher image quality and SNR compared to 1.5 Tesla, particularly for the visualization of the pelvicaliceal system.

  17. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  18. Laser Scanner for Tile-Cavity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, Stanley Y.; Wykes, Donald H.; Hagen, George R.; Lotgering, Gene E.; Gaynor, Michael B.; Westerlund, Paul G.; Baal, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    Irregular surfaces mapped and digitized for numerical-control machinery. Fast, accurate laser scanning system measures size and shape of cavity without making any physical contact with cavity and walls. Measurements processed into control signals for numerically controlled machining of tile or block to fit cavity. System generates map of grid points representing cavity and portion of outer surface surrounding cavity. Map data used to control milling machine, which cuts tile or block to fit in cavity.

  19. Laser Scanner for Tile-Cavity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, Stanley Y.; Wykes, Donald H.; Hagen, George R.; Lotgering, Gene E.; Gaynor, Michael B.; Westerlund, Paul G.; Baal, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    Irregular surfaces mapped and digitized for numerical-control machinery. Fast, accurate laser scanning system measures size and shape of cavity without making any physical contact with cavity and walls. Measurements processed into control signals for numerically controlled machining of tile or block to fit cavity. System generates map of grid points representing cavity and portion of outer surface surrounding cavity. Map data used to control milling machine, which cuts tile or block to fit in cavity.

  20. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-06-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  1. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  2. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-01

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schrödinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  3. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  4. Novel Crab Cavity RF Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Sah, R.; Rimmer, B.; Wang, H.

    2011-03-01

    A 20-50 MV integrated transverse voltage is required for the Electron-Ion Collider. The most promising of the crab cavity designs that have been proposed in the last five years are the TEM type crab cavities because of the higher transverse impedance. The TEM design approach is extended here to a hybrid crab cavity that includes the input power coupler as an integral part of the design. A prototype was built with Phase I monies and tested at JLAB. The results reported on, and a system for achieving 20-50 MV is proposed.

  5. Call for Papers: Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, W.; Gerard, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    Cavity QED interactions of light and matter have been investigated in a wide range of systems covering the spectrum from microwaves to optical frequencies, using media as diverse as single atoms and semiconductors. Impressive progress has been achieved technologically as well as conceptually. This topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics is intended to provide a comprehensive account of the current state of the art of cavity QED by uniting contributions from researchers active across this field. As Guest Editors of this topical issue, we invite manuscripts on current theoretical and experimental work on any aspects of cavity QED. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletCavity QED in optical microcavities bulletSemiconductor cavity QED bulletQuantum dot cavity QED bulletRydberg atoms in microwave cavities bulletPhotonic crystal cavity QED bulletMicrosphere resonators bulletMicrolasers and micromasers bulletMicrodroplets bulletDielectric cavity QED bulletCavity QED-based quantum information processing bulletQuantum state engineering in cavities The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 July 2003 to allow the topical issue to appear in about February 2004. All papers will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Submissions should ideally be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. There are no page charges for publication. In addition to the usual 50 free reprints, the corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should if possible be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/jopb. or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the

  6. Acoustic confinement in superlattice cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Daniel; Déleglise, Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Atkinson, Paola; Lagoin, Camille; Perrin, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    The large coupling rate between the acoustic and optical fields confined in GaAs/AlAs superlattice cavities makes them appealing systems for cavity optomechanics. We have developed a mathematical model based on the scattering matrix that allows the acoustic guided modes to be predicted in nano and micropillar superlattice cavities. We demonstrate here that the reflection at the surface boundary considerably modifies the acoustic quality factor and leads to significant confinement at the micropillar center. Our mathematical model also predicts unprecedented acoustic Fano resonances on nanopillars featuring small mode volumes and very high mechanical quality factors, making them attractive systems for optomechanical applications.

  7. Light storage and cavity supermodes in two coupled optomechanical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically investigate a hybrid optomechanical system including two coupled optomechanical cavities in the presence of two strong pump fields and a weak probe field. The photon-hopping coupling of the cavities gives rise to two cavity supermodes whose resonant frequencies can be obtained in the probe transmission spectrum. In a strong photon-hopping coupling regime, there is a large coupling rate between the probe field and one of the two cavity supermodes that is called a bright mode. The optomechanical couplings between the bright mode and two mechanical resonators can cause double optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT), which can be employed to both separately and simultaneously store two weak probe pulses with different central frequencies. We obtain the group delay (light storage time) of the probe field in the hybrid optomechanical system. The results suggest that compared with that of a single cavity optomechanical system, the maximum value of the storage time roughly quadrupled in a particular case. The physical origin of the results is discussed. The hybrid optomechanical system opens an avenue of light storage in cavity optomechanics.

  8. Role of MRI in Evaluation of Malignant Lesions of Tongue and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amandeep; Thukral, Chuni Lal; Gupta, Kamlesh; Sood, Arvinder Singh; Singla, Hanish; Singh, Kunwarpal

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of MRI in staging of malignant lesions of the oral cavity and to correlate MRI findings with clinical/surgical and anatomical-pathological findings, wherever possible. Material/Methods The study included 50 patients who presented with malignant lesions of the oral cavity and were referred to radiology departments for MRI. All patients included were subjected to a detailed physical examination following which MRI was carried out on Philips Gyroscan Achieva 1.5 Tesla unit. Results In the study, the highest number of patients were found to have tongue malignancy (82%) followed by buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus malignancy (18%). The highest number of patients was in the age group of 51–60 years (32%). The incidence was higher in males (96%). There was moderate agreement (k=0.537) for T stage between the clinical and MRI staging assessments. The agreement for N stage between clinical and MRI staging assessments was fair (k=0.328). The final diagnosis was made by histopathology in 22 patients. The agreement for T stage was good/substantial (k=0.790) and for N stage was moderate (k=0.458) between MRI and histopathology staging assessments. Conclusions MRI provides satisfactory accuracy for preoperative estimation of tumor thickness and predicting occult cervical nodal metastasis. MRI is the preferred modality in evaluation and staging of oral cavity malignancy which helps a clinician for planning of treatment. PMID:28289481

  9. CRAB Cavity in CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Beam collisions with a crossing angle at the interaction point are often necessary in colliders to reduce the effects of parasitic collisions which induce emittance growth and decrease beam lifetime. The crossing angle reduces the geometrical overlap of the beams and hence the luminosity. Crab cavity offer a promising way to compensate the crossing angle and to realize effective head-on collisions. Moreover, the crab crossing mitigates the synchro-betatron resonances due to the crossing angle. A crab cavity experiment in SPS is proposed as a proof of principle before deciding on a full crab-cavity implementation in the LHC. In this paper, we investigate the effects of a single crab cavity on beam dynamics in the SPS and life time.

  10. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  11. [Radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Racadot, S; Moreira, J F; Berger, L; Peiffert, D

    2016-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy are standard techniques for the irradiation of oral cavity cancers. These techniques are detailed in terms of indication, preparation, delineation and selection of the volumes, dosimetry and patient positioning control.

  12. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM{sub 210} mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities.

  13. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  14. Imaging of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Meesa, Indu Rekha; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is a challenging area in head and neck imaging because of its complex anatomy and the numerous pathophysiologies that involve its contents. This challenge is further compounded by the ubiquitous artifacts that arise from the dental amalgam, which compromise image quality. In this article, the anatomy of the oral cavity is discussed in brief, followed by a description of the imaging technique and some common pathologic abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Active Control of Open Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    UKeiley, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Open loop edge blowing was demonstrated as an effective method for reducing the broad band and tonal components of the fluctuating surface pressure in open cavities. Closed loop has been successfully applied to low Mach number open cavities. Need to push actuators that are viable for closed loop control in bandwidth and output. Need a better understanding of the effects of control on the flow through detailed measurements so better actuation strategies can be developed.

  16. Cavity alignment using fringe scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkunaite, Laura Paulina; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael

    2017-01-01

    LIGO employs two 4-km long Fabry-Pérot arm cavities, which need to be aligned in order for an interferometer to be locked on a TEM00 mode. Once the cavity is locked, alignment signals can be derived from wave-front sensors which measure the TEM01 mode content. However, the alignment state is not always good enough for locking on TEM00. Even when this is the case, the alignment can be evaluated using a free swinging cavity, that shows flashes when higher-order modes become resonant. By moving test masses, small changes are made to the mirror orientation, and hence the TEM00 mode can be optimized iteratively. Currently, this is a manual procedure, and thus it is very time-consuming. Therefore, this project is aimed to study another possible way to lock the cavity on the TEM00 mode. Misalignment information can also be extracted from the power of the higher-order modes transmitted through the cavity. This talk will present an algorithm for this alternative and faster way to derive the alignment state of the arm cavities. Supported by APS FIP, NSF, and Caltech SFP.

  17. In Vivo 1H NMR Spectroscopy of the Human Brain at 9.4 Tesla: Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Adriany, Gregor; Iltis, Isabelle; Andersen, Peter; Strupp, John P.; Vaughan, J. Thomas; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-01-01

    In vivo proton NMR spectroscopy allows non-invasive detection and quantification of a wide range of biochemical compounds in the brain. Higher field strength is generally considered advantageous for spectroscopy due to increased signal-to-noise and increased spectral dispersion. So far 1H NMR spectra have been reported in the human brain up to 7 Tesla. In this study we show that excellent quality short echo time STEAM and LASER 1H NMR spectra can be measured in the human brain at 9.4 Tesla. The information content of the human brain spectra appears very similar to that measured in the past decade in rodent brains at the same field strength, in spite of broader linewidth in human brain. Compared to lower fields, the T1 relaxation times of metabolites were slightly longer while T2 relaxation values of metabolites were shorter (< 100 ms) at 9.4 Tesla. The linewidth of the total creatine (tCr) resonance at 3.03 ppm increased linearly with magnetic field (1.35 Hz/Tesla from 1.5 T to 9.4 T), with a minimum achievable tCr linewidth of around 12.5 Hz at 9.4 Tesla. At very high-field, B0 microsusceptibility effects are the main contributor to the minimum achievable linewidth. PMID:20598925

  18. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the normal pancreas: reproducibility and variations of apparent diffusion coefficient measurement at 1.5- and 3.0-Tesla.

    PubMed

    Barral, M; Soyer, P; Ben Hassen, W; Gayat, E; Aout, M; Chiaradia, M; Rahmouni, A; Luciani, A

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate reproducibility and variations in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement in normal pancreatic parenchyma at 1.5- and 3.0-Tesla and determine if differences may exist between the four pancreatic segments. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the pancreas was performed at 1.5-Tesla in 20 patients and at 3.0-Tesla in other 20 patients strictly matched for gender and age using the same b values (0, 400 and 800s/mm(2)). Two independent observers placed regions of interest within the four pancreatic segments to measure ADC at both fields. Intra- and inter-observer agreement in ADC measurement was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis and comparison between ADC values obtained at both fields using non-parametrical tests. There were no significant differences in ADC between repeated measurements and between ADC obtained at 1.5-Tesla and those at 3.0-Tesla. The 95% limits of intra-observer agreement between ADC were 2.3%-22.7% at 1.5-Tesla and 1%-24.2% at 3.0-Tesla and those for inter-observer agreement between 1.9%-14% at 1.5-Tesla and 8%-25% at 3.0-Tesla. ADC values were similar in all pancreatic segments at 3.0-T whereas the tail had lower ADC at 1.5-Tesla. ADC measurement conveys high degrees of intra- and inter-observer reproducibility. ADC have homogeneous distribution among the four pancreatic segments at 3.0-Tesla. Copyright © 2012 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Noninvasive Assessment of Oxygen Extraction Fraction in Chronic Ischemia Using Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Uwano, Ikuko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Sato, Ryota; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kameda, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Jun-Ichi; Mori, Futoshi; Yamashita, Fumio; Ito, Kenji; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Sasaki, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    The oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) is an effective metric to evaluate metabolic reserve in chronic ischemia. However, OEF is considered to be accurately measured only when using positron emission tomography (PET). Thus, we investigated whether OEF maps generated by magnetic resonance quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) at 7 Tesla enabled detection of OEF changes when compared with those obtained with PET. Forty-one patients with chronic stenosis/occlusion of the unilateral internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery were examined using 7 Tesla-MRI and PET scanners. QSM images were obtained from 3-dimensional T2*-weighted images, using a multiple dipole-inversion algorithm. OEF maps were generated based on susceptibility differences between venous structures and brain tissues on QSM images. OEF ratios of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery territory against the contralateral side were calculated on the QSM-OEF and PET-OEF images, using an anatomic template. The OEF ratio in the middle cerebral artery territory showed significant correlations between QSM-OEF and PET-OEF maps (r=0.69; P<0.001), especially in patients with a substantial increase in the PET-OEF ratio of 1.09 (r=0.79; P=0.004), although showing significant systematic biases for the agreements. An increased QSM-OEF ratio of >1.09, as determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis, showed a sensitivity and specificity of 0.82 and 0.86, respectively, for the substantial increase in the PET-OEF ratio. Absolute QSM-OEF values were significantly correlated with PET-OEF values in the patients with increased PET-OEF. OEF ratios on QSM-OEF images at 7 Tesla showed a good correlation with those on PET-OEF images in patients with unilateral steno-occlusive internal carotid artery/middle cerebral artery lesions, suggesting that noninvasive OEF measurement by MRI can be a substitute for PET. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Value of 3 Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for assessing liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Papalavrentios, Lavrentios; Sinakos, Emmanouil; Chourmouzi, Danai; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Drevelegas, Konstantinos; Constantinides, Manos; Drevelegas, Antonios; Talwalkar, Jayant; Akriviadis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly the new generation 3 Tesla technology, and especially diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in predicting liver fibrosis. The aim of our pilot study was to assess the clinical performance of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of liver parenchyma for the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). 18 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD underwent DWI with 3 Tesla MRI. DWI was performed with single-shot echo-planar technique at b values of 0-500 and 0-1000 s/mm(2). ADC was measured in four locations in the liver and the mean ADC value was used for analysis. Staging of fibrosis was performed according to the METAVIR system. The median age of patients was 52 years (range 23-73). The distribution of patients in different fibrosis stages was: 0 (n=1), 1 (n=7), 2 (n=1), 3 (n=5), 4 (n=4). Fibrosis stage was poorly associated with ADC at b value of 0-500 s/mm(2) (r= -0.30, P=0.27). However it was significantly associated with ADC at b value of 0-1000 s/mm(2) (r= -0.57, P=0.01). For this b value (0-1000 s/mm(2)) the area under receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.93 for fibrosis stage ≥3 and the optimal ADC cut-off value was 1.16 ×10(-3) mm(2)/s. 3 Tesla DWI can possibly predict the presence of advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD.

  1. Can magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0-Tesla reliably detect patients with endometriosis? Initial results.

    PubMed

    Thomeer, Maarten G; Steensma, Anneke B; van Santbrink, Evert J; Willemssen, Francois E; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Hunink, Myriam G; Spronk, Sandra; Laven, Joop S; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an optimized 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol is sensitive and specific enough to detect patients with endometriosis. This was a prospective cohort study with consecutive patients. Forty consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of endometriosis underwent 3.0-Tesla MRI, including a T2-weighted high-resolution fast spin echo sequence (spatial resolution=0.75 ×1.2 ×1.5 mm³) and a 3D T1-weighted high-resolution gradient echo sequence (spatial resolution=0.75 ×1.2 × 2.0 mm³). Two radiologists reviewed the dataset with consensus reading. During laparoscopy, which was used as reference standard, all lesions were characterized according to the revised criteria of the American Fertility Society. Patient-level and region-level sensitivities and specificities and lesion-level sensitivities were calculated. Patient-level sensitivity was 42% for stage I (5/12) and 100% for stages II, III and IV (25/25). Patient-level specificity for all stages was 100% (3/3). The region-level sensitivity and specificity was 63% and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity per lesion was 61% (90% for deep lesions, 48% for superficial lesions and 100% for endometriomata). The detection rate of obliteration of the cul-the-sac was 100% (10/10) with no false positive findings. The interreader agreement was substantial to perfect (kappa=1 per patient, 0.65 per lesion and 0.71 for obliteration of the cul-the-sac). An optimized 3.0-Tesla MRI protocol is accurate in detecting stage II to stage IV endometriosis. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  3. Assessment of the immune responsiveness of mice exposed to a 1. 5-Tesla stationary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Shifrine, M.

    1984-01-01

    Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were assayed following a 6-day exposure of LAF1/J mice to a 1.50 Tesla (1 T . 10(4) Gauss) stationary magnetic field. In tests of the immune response to sheep erythrocytes, the number of Jerne plaques formed by spleen lymphocytes and the level of serum IgM were not significantly different for the exposed mice in comparison with control animals. Tests for mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation also demonstrated no significant differences in the response of spleen lymphocytes from exposed and control groups of mice.

  4. COMPARISON OF THE TESLA, NLC AND CLIC BEAM-COLLIMATION SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-05-28

    This report describes studies performed in the frame-work of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the second International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible.

  5. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC beam-collimation system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I Drozhdin; Grahame Blair; Lewis P Keller

    2003-05-28

    This report describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible.

  6. 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: A new standard in liver imaging?

    PubMed

    Girometti, Rossano

    2015-07-28

    An ever-increasing number of 3.0 Tesla (T) magnets are installed worldwide. Moving from the standard of 1.5 T to higher field strength implies a number of potential advantage and drawbacks, requiring careful optimization of imaging protocols or implementation of novel hardware components. Clinical practice and literature review suggest that state-of-the-art 3.0 T is equivalent to 1.5 T in the assessment of focal liver lesions and diffuse liver disease. Therefore, further technical improvements are needed in order to fully exploit the potential of higher field strength.

  7. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 30-tesla magnet design is studied which calls for forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. The design also requires suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures through use of magnet coils enclosed in a pressure vessel which is maintained at the critical pressure of liquid neon. This high pressure reduces the possibility of the system flow instabilities which may occur at low pressures. The forced convection heat transfer data presented were obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid to flow vertically through a resistance heated, instrumented tube.

  8. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D.; Sikes, W. C.

    1992-08-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. Finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  9. Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Junyi; Xing Zengping; Dong Shuxiang; Li Jiefang; Viehland, D.

    2006-02-06

    The measurement of low-frequency (10{sup -2}-10{sup 3} Hz) minute magnetic field variations (10{sup -12} Tesla) at room temperature in a passive mode of operation would be critically enabling for deployable neurological signal interfacing and magnetic anomaly detection applications. However, there is presently no magnetic field sensor capable of meeting all of these requirements. Here, we present new bimorph and push-pull magneto-electric laminate composites, which incorporate a charge compensation mechanism (or bridge) that dramatically enhances noise rejection, enabling achievement of such requirements.

  10. Science and Technology of the TESLA Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Albrecht

    2002-07-01

    Recent analyses of the long term future of particles physics in Asia, Europe, and the U.S.A. have led to the consensus that the next major facility to be built to unravel the secrets of the micro-cosmos is an electron-positron linear collider in the energy range of 500 to 1000 GeV. This collider should be constructed in an as timely fashion as possible to overlap with the Large Hadron Collider, under construction at CERN. Here, the scientific potential and the technological aspects of the TESLA projects, a superconducting collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory, are summarised.

  11. Poly-coil design for a 60 tesla quasi-stationary magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boenig, H. J.; Campbell, L. J.; Hodgdon, M. L.; Lopez, E. A.; Rickel, D. G.; Rogers, J. D.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    1993-02-01

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving.

  12. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  13. Experimental determination of magnetohydrodynamic seawater thruster performance in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.; Doss, E.; Black, D. ); Sikes, W.C. )

    1992-01-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate MHD thruster performance computer models. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rational are discussed. finally, representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  14. Tesla: An application for real-time data analysis in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Amato, S.; Anderlini, L.; Benson, S.; Cattaneo, M.; Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.; Frank, M.; Gligorov, V. V.; Head, T.; Jones, C.; Komarov, I.; Lupton, O.; Matev, R.; Raven, G.; Sciascia, B.; Skwarnicki, T.; Spradlin, P.; Stahl, S.; Storaci, B.; Vesterinen, M.

    2016-11-01

    Upgrades to the LHCb computing infrastructure in the first long shutdown of the LHC have allowed for high quality decay information to be calculated by the software trigger making a separate offline event reconstruction unnecessary. Furthermore, the storage space of the triggered candidate is an order of magnitude smaller than the entire raw event that would otherwise need to be persisted. Tesla is an application designed to process the information calculated by the trigger, with the resulting output used to directly perform physics measurements.

  15. 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: A new standard in liver imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Rossano

    2015-01-01

    An ever-increasing number of 3.0 Tesla (T) magnets are installed worldwide. Moving from the standard of 1.5 T to higher field strength implies a number of potential advantage and drawbacks, requiring careful optimization of imaging protocols or implementation of novel hardware components. Clinical practice and literature review suggest that state-of-the-art 3.0 T is equivalent to 1.5 T in the assessment of focal liver lesions and diffuse liver disease. Therefore, further technical improvements are needed in order to fully exploit the potential of higher field strength. PMID:26244063

  16. Tissue expander stimulated lengthening of arteries (TESLA) induces early endothelial cell proliferation in a novel rodent model.

    PubMed

    Potanos, Kristina; Fullington, Nora; Cauley, Ryan; Purcell, Patricia; Zurakowski, David; Fishman, Steven; Vakili, Khashayar; Kim, Heung Bae

    2016-04-01

    We examine the mechanism of aortic lengthening in a novel rodent model of tissue expander stimulated lengthening of arteries (TESLA). A rat model of TESLA was examined with a single stretch stimulus applied at the time of tissue expander insertion with evaluation of the aorta at 2, 4 and 7day time points. Measurements as well as histology and proliferation assays were performed and compared to sham controls. The aortic length was increased at all time points without histologic signs of tissue injury. Nuclear density remained unchanged despite the increase in length suggesting cellular hyperplasia. Cellular proliferation was confirmed in endothelial cell layer by Ki-67 stain. Aortic lengthening may be achieved using TESLA. The increase in aortic length can be achieved without tissue injury and results at least partially from cellular hyperplasia. Further studies are required to define the mechanisms involved in the growth of arteries under increased longitudinal stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  18. Red-cockaded woodpecker nest-cavity selection: relationships with cavity age and resin production

    Treesearch

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph; William G. Ross; David L. Kulhavy

    1998-01-01

    The authors evaluated selection of nest sites by male red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) in Texas relative to the age of the cavity when only cavities excavated by the woodpeckers were available and when both naturally excavated cavities and artificial cavities were available. They also evaluated nest-cavity selection relative to the ability of naturally...

  19. Comparison of Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Targeting Accuracy and Procedure Duration between 1.5- and 3-Tesla Interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems: An Initial 12-Month Experience.

    PubMed

    Southwell, Derek G; Narvid, Jared A; Martin, Alastair J; Qasim, Salman E; Starr, Philip A; Larson, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) allows deep brain stimulator lead placement under general anesthesia. While the accuracy of lead targeting has been described for iMRI systems utilizing 1.5-tesla magnets, a similar assessment of 3-tesla iMRI procedures has not been performed. To compare targeting accuracy, the number of lead targeting attempts, and surgical duration between procedures performed on 1.5- and 3-tesla iMRI systems. Radial targeting error, the number of targeting attempts, and procedure duration were compared between surgeries performed on 1.5- and 3-tesla iMRI systems (SmartFrame and ClearPoint systems). During the first year of operation of each system, 26 consecutive leads were implanted using the 1.5-tesla system, and 23 consecutive leads were implanted using the 3-tesla system. There was no significant difference in radial error (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.26), number of lead placements that required multiple targeting attempts (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.59), or bilateral procedure durations between surgeries performed with the two systems (p = 0.15). Accurate DBS lead targeting can be achieved with iMRI systems utilizing either 1.5- or 3-tesla magnets. The use of a 3-tesla magnet, however, offers improved visualization of the target structures and allows comparable accuracy and efficiency of placement at the selected targets. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Olivier, Gilles; Renard, Bertrand; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  1. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousson, Sebastien; Darve, Christine; Duthil, Patxi; Elias, Nuno; Molloy, Steve; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  2. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Renard, Bertrand; Olivier, Gilles; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  3. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Bousson, Sebastien; Duthil, Patxi; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  4. Computations predicting RF cavity characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Y.; Nicholls, G.

    1988-09-01

    The APS storage ring cavity is a single cell semi-spherical structure patterned along the lines of the KEK Photon Factory and the Daresbury cavities. The cavity was initially scaled to the APS frequency of 352.9 MHz using the computer code URMEL. Before construction of the prototype, it was considered essential to simulate the cavity as it would be measured in the machine shop as it was being built. The cavity has four large ports on the equator which would lower the frequency, but by how much? The code URMEL is only able to represent structures with rotational symmetry; MAFIA is three dimensional, and thus is able to simulate the actual structure. The first task was to determine what mesh size would be required using MAFIA to represent the structure in detail equivalent to that using URMEL. The computations not only give the effects of the ports on the frequency, but also a simulated tuner has been inserted into a port at various depths; thus, they have a prediction of a tuning curve. For each of the conditions, the first ten modes have been calculated, so they can see the effect of the tuner on the fundamental mode and also on the Higher Order Modes (HOM).

  5. Coupling of an overdriven cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Garbin, H D

    1993-11-01

    It is well known that when a nuclear test is conducted in a sufficiently large cavity, the resulting seismic signal is sharply reduced when compared to a normal tamped event. Cavity explosions are of interest in the seismic verification community because of this possibility of reducing the seismic energy generated which can lower signal amplitudes and make detection difficult. Reduced amplitudes would also lower seismic yield estimates which has implications in a Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT). In the past several years, there have been a number of nuclear tests at NTS (Nevada Test Site) inside hemispherical cavities. Two such tests were MILL YARD and MISTY ECHO which had instrumentation at the surface and in the free-field. These two tests differ in one important aspect. MILL YARD was completely decoupled i.e., the cavity wall behaved in an elastic manner. It was estimated that MILL YARD`s ground motion was reduced by a factor of at least 70. In contrast, MISTY ECHO was detonated in a hemispherical cavity with the same dimensions as MILL YARD, but with a much larger device yield. This caused an inelastic behavior on the wall and the explosion was not fully decoupled.

  6. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-08-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R{sub sun} and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R{sub sun} than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  7. RRR Characteristics for SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-10-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes such as a quarter-wave resonator (QWR), a half-wave resonator (HWR) and a single-spoke resonator (SSR) were fabricated. One of the critical factors determining the performances of superconducting cavities is the residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how pure niobium is and how fast niobium can transmit heat. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to impurity incorporation. Thus, it is important to maintain the RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, the welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level, will be discussed.

  8. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of the story are the humanization of meaning, an association with heroes and heroic qualities, the limits of reality and extremes of experience, a sense of wonder, and a contesting of conventions and conventional ideas. The study demonstrates the learning benefits of encouraging a romantic understanding through a story that is structured explicitly around the identified features, in this instance in the context of the production and transmission of alternating current electricity. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of journal entries showed that the group of students who were encouraged to understand the concept of alternating current romantically (the experimental group) became more involved with both the content and the context of the story than a comparison group of students who were taught the concept explicitly, without a context (the control group). The students in the experimental group also performed statistically better on a science-content test taken 1 week and again 8 weeks after the indicated teaching intervention. This finding, along with the content analyses of students' journals, provided evidence of romantic understanding of the science content for those students who listened to the Tesla story.

  9. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1(-)) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI.

  10. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1-) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI.

  11. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson’s disease at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Peng, Shuai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Haibo; Su, Wen; Zhao, Xuna; Zhou, Jinyuan; Chen, Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson’s disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Methods Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54–77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55–73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (−6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Results Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P=0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P<0.001, P=0.003, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusions CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. PMID:25038850

  12. Evaluation of MRI artifacts at 3 Tesla for 38 commonly used cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Escher, Kirin; Shellock, Frank G

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate MRI artifacts at 3-Tesla for 38 commonly used cosmetics. Thirty-eight cosmetics (16, nail polishes; 5, eyeliners; 3, mascaras; 10, eye shadows; 1, lip gloss; 1, body lotion; 1, body glitter, and 1, hair loss concealer) underwent evaluation for MRI artifacts at 3-Tesla. The cosmetics were applied a copper-sulfate-filled, phantom and initially assessed using a "screening" gradient echo (GRE) pulse sequence. Of the 38 different cosmetics, 14 (37%) exhibited artifacts. For these 14 cosmetics, additional characterization of artifacts was performed using a GRE pulse sequence. A qualitative scale was applied to characterize the artifact size. Artifacts were observed, as follows: 2, nail polishes; 5, eyeliners; 3, mascaras; 3, eye shadows; 1, hair loss concealer. Artifact size ranged from small (eye shadow) to very large (hair loss concealer) and tended to be associated with the presence of iron oxide or other metal-based ingredient. Commonly used cosmetics caused artifacts that may create issues if the area of interest is the same as where the cosmetic was applied or if its presence was unknown, thus, potentially causing it to be construed as pathology. Therefore, these findings have important implications for patients referred for MRI examinations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 3D calculations of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 3 Tesla magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A 20 TeV Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) proton accelerator is being proposed by the High Energy Physics Community. One proposal would consist of a ring of magnets 164 km in circumference with a field strength of 3 Tesla and would cost 2.7 billion dollars. The magnet consists of stacked steel laminations with superconducting coils. The desired field uniformity is obtained for all fields from 0.2 to 3 Tesla by using three (or more) different pole shapes. These three different laminations are stacked in the order 1-2-3-1-2-3-... creating a truly three dimensional geometry. A three laminated stack 1-2-3 with periodic boundary conditions at 1 and 3 was assigned about 5000 finite elements per lamination and solved using the computer program TOSCA. To check the TOSCA results, the field of each of the three different shaped laminations was calculated separately using periodic boundary conditions and compared to the two dimensional field calculations using TRIM. This was done for a constant permeability of 2000 and using the B-H table for fully annealed 1010 steel. The difference of the field calculations in the region of interest was always less than +-.2%

  14. A time-efficient acquisition protocol for multipurpose diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Sepehrband, Farshid; O'Brien, Kieran; Barth, Markus

    2017-02-12

    Several diffusion-weighted MRI techniques have been developed and validated during the past 2 decades. While offering various neuroanatomical inferences, these techniques differ in their proposed optimal acquisition design, preventing clinicians and researchers benefiting from all potential inference methods, particularly when limited time is available. This study reports an optimal design that enables for a time-efficient diffusion-weighted MRI acquisition scheme at 7 Tesla. The primary audience of this article is the typical end user, interested in diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla. We tested b-values in the range of 700 to 3000 s/mm(2) with different number of angular diffusion-encoding samples, against a data-driven "gold standard." The suggested design is a protocol with b-values of 1000 and 2500 s/mm(2) , with 25 and 50 samples, uniformly distributed over two shells. We also report a range of protocols in which the results of fitting microstructural models to the diffusion-weighted data had high correlation with the gold standard. We estimated minimum acquisition requirements that enable diffusion tensor imaging, higher angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging, neurite orientation dispersion, and density imaging and white matter tract integrity across whole brain with isotropic resolution of 1.8 mm in less than 11 min. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Detection of glucose in the human brain with (1) H MRS at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Lana G; Hirokazu, Kawaguchi; Fukunaga, Masaki; B Matson, Gerald

    2016-12-01

    A new method is proposed for noninvasive detection of glucose in vivo using proton MR spectroscopy at 7 Tesla. The proposed method utilizes J-difference editing to uncover the resonance of beta-glucose (β-glc) at 3.23 ppm, which is strongly overlapped with choline. Calculations using the density matrix formalism are used to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the β-glc resonance at 3.23 ppm. The calculations are verified using phantom and in vivo data collected at 7 Tesla. The proposed method allows observation of the glucose signal at 3.23 ppm in the human brain spectrum. Additional co-edited resonances of N-acetylaspartylglutamatate and glutathione are also detected in the same experiment. The proposed method does not require carbon ((13) C)- labeled glucose injections and (13) C hardware; as such, it has a potential to provide valuable information on intrinsic glucose concentration in the human brain in vivo. Magn Reson Med 76:1653-1660, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Magnetic field interactions of orthodontic wires during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Arndt; Kemper, Jörn; Schulze, Dirk; Adam, Gerhard; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel

    2005-07-01

    Orthodontic appliances pose a potential risk during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to forces on metallic objects within the static magnetic field of MRI systems. The aim of the present investigation was to measure forces on orthodontic wires caused by the static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI system, and to assess the safety hazards associated with these forces. Thirty-two different orthodontic wires (21 arch wires, eight ligature wires and three retainer wires) were investigated in a 1.5-Tesla MRI system (Magnetom Symphony, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). The translational forces were measured using the deflection angle test (ASTM F2052-02); rotational forces were assessed on a 5-point qualitative scale. All retainer wires and the steel arch wires (the Noninium arch wire being the exception) were subjected to considerable rotational and translational forces within the MRI system's magnetic field. Translational forces were from 9.1- to 27.6-times as high as gravitational forces on these objects. Steel ligature wires and arch wires made of cobalt chromium, titanium molybdenum, nickel-titanium, and brass alloys showed no or negligible forces within the magnetic field. The translational and rotational forces within the MRI magnetic field should pose no risk to carefully-ligated arch wires. Steel retainer wire bonds should be checked to ensure secure attachment prior to an MRI investigation.

  17. Synchronization in an optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomi, Keren; Yuvaraj, D.; Baskin, Ilya; Suchoi, Oren; Winik, Roni; Buks, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEO) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. Synchronization is observed when the optical power that is injected into the cavity is periodically modulated. A theoretical analysis based on the Fokker-Planck equation evaluates the expected phase space distribution (PSD) of the self-oscillating mechanical resonator. A tomography technique is employed for extracting PSD from the measured reflected optical power. Time-resolved state tomography measurements are performed to study phase diffusion and phase locking of the SEO. The detuning region inside which synchronization occurs is experimentally determined and the results are compared with the theoretical prediction.

  18. Temperature optimization for superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, Claus

    1999-06-01

    Since our previous analysis of optimized operating temperature of superconducting cavities in an accelerator a decade ago, significant additional information has been discovered about SRF cavities. The most significant is the Q0 (quality factor) shift across the Lambda line at higher gradients as a result of a slope in Q0 vs. Eacc above Lambda. This is a result of the changing heat conduction conditions. We discuss temperature optimizations as a function of gradient and frequency. The refrigeration hardware impacts and changes in cycle efficiency are presented.

  19. Cavity-controlled spectral singularity.

    PubMed

    Nireekshan Reddy, K; Dutta Gupta, S

    2014-08-01

    We study theoretically a parity-time (PT)-symmetric, saturable, balanced gain-loss system in a ring-cavity configuration. The saturable gain and loss are modeled by a two-level medium with or without population inversion. We show that the specifics of the spectral singularity can be fully controlled by the cavity and the atomic detuning parameters. The theory is based on the mean-field approximation, as in the standard theory of optical bistability. Further, in the linear regime we demonstrate the regularization of the singularity in detuned systems, while larger input power levels are shown to be adequate to limit the infinite growth in absence of detunings.

  20. Experimental cavity pressure distributions at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, Robert L., Jr.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to define pressure distributions for rectangular cavities over a range of free-stream Mach numbers and cavity dimensions. These pressure distributions together with schlieren photographs are used to define the critical values of cavity length-to-depth ratio that separate open type cavity flows from closed type cavity flows. For closed type cavity flow, the shear layer expands over the cavity leading edge and impinges on the cavity floor, whereas for open type cavity flow, the shear layer bridges the cavity. The tests were conducted by using a flat-plate model permitting the cavity length to be remotely varied from 0.5 to 12 in. Cavity depths and widths were varied from 0.5 to 2.5 in. The flat-plate boundary layer approaching the cavity was turbulent and had a thickness of approximately 0.2 in. at the cavity front face for the range of test Mach numbers from 1.5 to 2.86. Presented are a discussion of the results and a complete tabulation of the experimental data.

  1. Non-contrast-enhanced MR portography and hepatic venography with time-spatial labeling inversion pulses: comparison at 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Tsuyoshi; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Furuta, Akihiro; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-05-01

    A 3 Tesla (3 T) magnetic resonance (MR) scanner is a promising tool for upper abdominal MR angiography. However, there is no report focused on the image quality of non-contrast-enhanced MR portography and hepatic venography at 3 T. To compare and evaluate images of non-contrast-enhanced MR portography and hepatic venography with time-spatial labeling inversion pulses (Time-SLIP) at 1.5 Tesla (1.5 T) and 3 T. Twenty-five healthy volunteers were examined using respiratory-triggered three-dimensional balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) with Time-SLIP. For portography, we used one tagging pulse (selective inversion recovery) and one non-selective inversion recovery pulse; for venography, two tagging pulses were used. The relative signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were quantified, and the quality of visualization was evaluated. The CNRs of the main portal vein, right portal vein, and left portal vein at 3 T were better than at 1.5 T. The image quality scores for the portal branches of segment 4, 5, and 8 were significantly higher at 3 T than at 1.5 T. The CNR of the right hepatic vein (RHV) at 3 T was significantly lower than at 1.5 T. The image quality scores of RHV and the middle hepatic vein were higher at 1.5 T than at 3 T. For RHV visualization, the difference was statistically significant. Non-contrast-enhanced MR portography with Time-SLIP at 3 T significantly improved visualization of the peripheral branch in healthy volunteers compared with1.5 T. Non-contrast-enhanced MR hepatic venography at 1.5 T was better than at 3 T.

  2. Conduction cooling systems for linear accelerator cavities

    DOEpatents

    Kephart, Robert

    2017-05-02

    A conduction cooling system for linear accelerator cavities. The system conducts heat from the cavities to a refrigeration unit using at least one cavity cooler interconnected with a cooling connector. The cavity cooler and cooling connector are both made from solid material having a very high thermal conductivity of approximately 1.times.10.sup.4 W m.sup.-1 K.sup.-1 at temperatures of approximately 4 degrees K. This allows for very simple and effective conduction of waste heat from the linear accelerator cavities to the cavity cooler, along the cooling connector, and thence to the refrigeration unit.

  3. Progress on a Be Cavity Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M. S.; Palmer, R.; Stratakis, D.

    2011-10-06

    Previous RF experiments with normal-conducting cavities have demonstrated that there is a significant degradation in maximum gradient when the cavity is subjected to a strong axial magnetic field. We have developed a model suggesting that a cavity with beryllium walls may perform better than copper cavities. In this paper we outline the issues that led us to propose fabricating a Be-wall cavity. We also discuss a concept for fabricating such a cavity and mention some of the manufacturing issues we expect to face.

  4. Progress on a Be Cavity Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Palmer, R.; Stratakis, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-12-24

    Previous RF experiments with normal-conducting cavities have demonstrated that there is a significant degradation in maximum gradient when the cavity is subjected to a strong axial magnetic field. We have developed a model suggesting that a cavity with beryllium walls may perform better than copper cavities. In this paper we outline the issues that led us to propose fabricating a Be-wall cavity. We also discuss a concept for fabricating such a cavity and mention some of the manufacturing issues we expect to face.

  5. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  6. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  7. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  8. Facing rim cavities fluctuation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Damiano; Ribeiro, André F. P.; Fares, Ehab

    2014-06-01

    Cavity modes taking place in the rims of two opposite wheels are investigated through Lattice-Boltzmann CFD simulations. Based on previous observations carried out by the authors during the BANC-II/LAGOON landing gear aeroacoustic study, a resonance mode can take place in the volume between the wheels of a two-wheel landing gear, involving a coupling between shear-layer vortical fluctuations and acoustic modes resulting from the combination of round cavity modes and wheel-to-wheel transversal acoustic modes. As a result, side force fluctuations and tonal noise side radiation take place. A parametric study of the cavity mode properties is carried out in the present work by varying the distance between the wheels. Moreover, the effects due to the presence of the axle are investigated by removing the axle from the two-wheel assembly. The azimuthal properties of the modes are scrutinized by filtering the unsteady flow in narrow bands around the tonal frequencies and investigating the azimuthal structure of the filtered fluctuation modes. Estimation of the tone frequencies with an ad hoc proposed analytical formula confirms the observed modal properties of the filtered unsteady flow solutions. The present study constitutes a primary step in the description of facing rim cavity modes as a possible source of landing gear tonal noise.

  9. Cavity Enhanced Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siller, Brian; Mills, Andrew; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2010-06-01

    Velocity modulation spectroscopy has traditionally been used with a unidirectional multipass White cell to obtain several passes through a plasma in order to obtain strong signals from the absorption of ions, but the total number of passes allowed by this type of setup is limited to ˜8. By placing an optical cavity around an N_2^+ plasma and locking the cavity to a Ti:Sapphire laser, the effective number of passes has been increased to several hundred. Demodulating the signal from the transmitted light at twice the plasma frequency (due to the symmetric nature of the cavity) gives a 2nd derivative lineshape for ions and a Gaussian lineshape for excited neutrals. N_2^+ and N_2^* have been observed to be 78° out of phase with one another. The different lineshapes and phases allow for discrimination and separation of the ion and neutral signals. The high intensity laser light within the cavity causes the transitions to saturate, which allows for the observation of lamb dips; this opens the door to sub-Doppler spectroscopy, as well as to studies of ion-neutral collisional rate coefficients.

  10. Piezoelectric tunable microwave superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, N. C.; Fan, Y.; Tobar, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of engineered quantum systems, there is a demand for superconducting tunable devices, able to operate with high-quality factors at power levels equivalent to only a few photons. In this work, we developed a 3D microwave re-entrant cavity with such characteristics ready to provide a very fine-tuning of a high-Q resonant mode over a large dynamic range. This system has an electronic tuning mechanism based on a mechanically amplified piezoelectric actuator, which controls the resonator dominant mode frequency by changing the cavity narrow gap by very small displacements. Experiments were conducted at room and dilution refrigerator temperatures showing a large dynamic range up to 4 GHz and 1 GHz, respectively, and were compared to a finite element method model simulated data. At elevated microwave power input, nonlinear thermal effects were observed to destroy the superconductivity of the cavity due to the large electric fields generated in the small gap of the re-entrant cavity.

  11. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  12. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  13. Seismic resonances of acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F. M.; Esterhazy, S.; Perugia, I.; Bokelmann, G.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to clarify at a possible testsite whether a member state of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)has violated its rules by conducting a underground nuclear test. Compared toatmospheric and underwater tests underground nuclear explosions are the mostdifficult to detect.One primary structural target for the field team during an OSI is the detectionof an underground cavity, created by underground nuclear explosions. Theapplication of seismic-resonances of the cavity for its detection has beenproposed in the CTBT by mentioning "resonance seismometry" as possibletechnique during OSIs. We modeled the interaction of a seismic wave-field withan underground cavity by a sphere filled with an acoustic medium surrounded byan elastic full space. For this setting the solution of the seismic wave-fieldcan be computed analytically. Using this approach the appearance of acousticresonances can be predicted in the theoretical calculations. Resonance peaksappear in the spectrum derived for the elastic domain surrounding the acousticcavity, which scale in width with the density of the acoustic medium. For lowdensities in the acoustic medium as for an gas-filled cavity, the spectralpeaks become very narrow and therefore hard to resolve. The resonancefrequencies, however can be correlated to the discrete set of eigenmodes of theacoustic cavity and can thus be predicted if the dimension of the cavity isknown. Origin of the resonance peaks are internal reverberations of wavescoupling in the acoustic domain and causing an echoing signal that couples outto the elastic domain again. In the gas-filled case the amplitudes in timedomain are very low.Beside theoretical considerations we seek to find real data examples fromsimilar settings. As example we analyze a 3D active seismic data set fromFelsőpetény, Hungary that has been conducted between 2012 and 2014 on behalf ofthe CTBTO. In the subsurface of this area a former clay mine is

  14. Comparison of different undulator schemes with superimposed alternating gradients for the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pflueger, J.; Nikitina, Y.M.

    1995-12-31

    For the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility an undulator with a total length of 30 m is needed. In this study three different approaches to realize an undulator with a sinusoidal plus a superimposed quadrupolar field were studied with the 3D code MAFIA.

  15. Implementation of fast macromolecular proton fraction mapping on 1.5 and 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanners: preliminary experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnykh, V.; Korostyshevskaya, A.

    2017-08-01

    Macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) is a biophysical parameter describing the amount of macromolecular protons involved into magnetization exchange with water protons in tissues. MPF represents a significant interest as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarker of myelin for clinical applications. A recent fast MPF mapping method enabled clinical translation of MPF measurements due to time-efficient acquisition based on the single-point constrained fit algorithm. However, previous MPF mapping applications utilized only 3 Tesla MRI scanners and modified pulse sequences, which are not commonly available. This study aimed to test the feasibility of MPF mapping implementation on a 1.5 Tesla clinical scanner using standard manufacturer’s sequences and compare the performance of this method between 1.5 and 3 Tesla scanners. MPF mapping was implemented on 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI units of one manufacturer with either optimized custom-written or standard product pulse sequences. Whole-brain three-dimensional MPF maps obtained from a single volunteer were compared between field strengths and implementation options. MPF maps demonstrated similar quality at both field strengths. MPF values in segmented brain tissues and specific anatomic regions appeared in close agreement. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of fast MPF mapping using standard sequences on 1.5 T and 3 T clinical scanners.

  16. PLACD-7T Study: Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque Components Correlated with Cerebral Damage at 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, A G; Bovens, S M; Koning, W; Hendrikse, J; Pasterkamp, G; Moll, F L; de Borst, G J

    2011-02-01

    In patients with carotid artery stenosis histological plaque composition is associated with plaque stability and with presenting symptomatology. Preferentially, plaque vulnerability should be taken into account in pre-operative work-up of patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. However, currently no appropriate and conclusive (non-) invasive technique to differentiate between the high and low risk carotid artery plaque in vivo is available. We propose that 7 Tesla human high resolution MRI scanning will visualize carotid plaque characteristics more precisely and will enable correlation of these specific components with cerebral damage. The aim of the PlaCD-7T study is 1: to correlate 7T imaging with carotid plaque histology (gold standard); and 2: to correlate plaque characteristics with cerebral damage ((clinically silent) cerebral (micro) infarcts or bleeds) on 7 Tesla high resolution (HR) MRI. We propose a single center prospective study for either symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with haemodynamic significant (70%) stenosis of at least one of the carotid arteries. The Athero-Express (AE) biobank histological analysis will be derived according to standard protocol. Patients included in the AE and our prospective study will undergo a pre-operative 7 Tesla HR-MRI scan of both the head and neck area. We hypothesize that the 7 Tesla MRI scanner will allow early identification of high risk carotid plaques being associated with micro infarcted cerebral areas, and will thus be able to identify patients with a high risk of periprocedural stroke, by identification of surrogate measures of increased cardiovascular risk.

  17. Spatial Distortion in MRI-Guided Stereotactic Procedures: Evaluation in 1.5-, 3- and 7-Tesla MRI Scanners.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Giese, Henrik; Biller, Armin; Nagel, Armin M; Kiening, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is replacing computed tomography (CT) as the main imaging modality for stereotactic transformations. MRI is prone to spatial distortion artifacts, which can lead to inaccuracy in stereotactic procedures. Modern MRI systems provide distortion correction algorithms that may ameliorate this problem. This study investigates the different options of distortion correction using standard 1.5-, 3- and 7-tesla MRI scanners. A phantom was mounted on a stereotactic frame. One CT scan and three MRI scans were performed. At all three field strengths, two 3-dimensional sequences, volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo, were acquired, and automatic distortion correction was performed. Global stereotactic transformation of all 13 datasets was performed and two stereotactic planning workflows (MRI only vs. CT/MR image fusion) were subsequently analysed. Distortion correction on the 1.5- and 3-tesla scanners caused a considerable reduction in positional error. The effect was more pronounced when using the VIBE sequences. By using co-registration (CT/MR image fusion), even a lower positional error could be obtained. In ultra-high-field (7 T) MR imaging, distortion correction introduced even higher errors. However, the accuracy of non-corrected 7-tesla sequences was comparable to CT/MR image fusion 3-tesla imaging. MRI distortion correction algorithms can reduce positional errors by up to 60%. For stereotactic applications of utmost precision, we recommend a co-registration to an additional CT dataset. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Simultaneous EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging at 4 Tesla: correlates of brain activity to spontaneous alpha rhythm during relaxation.

    PubMed

    Difrancesco, Mark W; Holland, Scott K; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2008-10-01

    : Simultaneous EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging have been applied to the study of brain states associated with alpha waves using a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla and has been shown in recent years to be feasible up to 3 Tesla for other applications. This study demonstrates this technique's continued viability at a field strength of 4 Tesla, affording a proportionally greater sensitivity to changes in Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signal. In addition, for the study of alpha correlations, the authors used a larger number of subjects and scanning sessions than in the previous work. Random effects group regression analysis of 35 EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions against occipital alpha magnitude in a relaxed state detected bilateral widespread activation of dorsal thalamus and portions of the anterior cingulate and cerebellum. In the same group analysis, deactivations arose predominantly in the fusiform and adjacent visual association areas with a small activation cluster also detected in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. This pattern is consistent with a correspondence between alpha magnitude variations and resting state network dynamics ascertained by recent studies of low frequency spontaneous BOLD fluctuations. The central role of the thalamus in resting state networks correlated with alpha activity is highlighted. Demonstrating the applicability of simultaneous EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging up to 4 Tesla is particularly important for clinically relevant research involving challenging spontaneous EEG abnormalities, such as those of epilepsy.

  19. Recurrent ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow: Correlation of surgical findings and 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thakkar, Rashmi S; Carrino, John A; Dellon, A Lee

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the correlation between 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) and surgical findings in two patients who underwent multiple previous failed ulnar nerve surgeries. MRN correctly localized the site of the abnormality. Prospectively observed MRN findings of perineural fibrosis, ulnar nerve re-entrapment abnormalities, medial antebrachial cutaneous neuroma and additional median nerve entrapment were confirmed surgically.

  20. Extinction measurement with open-path cavity ring-down technique of variable cavity length.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hao; Li, Bincheng; Han, Yanling; Wang, Jing; Gao, Chunming; Wang, Yafei

    2016-06-13

    Open-path cavity ring down (OPCRD) technique with variable cavity length was developed to measure optical extinction including scattering and absorption of air in laboratory environment at 635 nm wavelength. By moving the rear cavity mirror of the ring-down cavity to change cavity length, ring-down time with different cavity lengths was experimentally obtained and the dependence of total cavity loss on cavity length was determined. The extinction coefficient of air was determined by the slope of linear dependence of total cavity loss on cavity length. The extinction coefficients of air with different particle concentrations at 635 nm wavelength were measured to be from 10.46 to 84.19 Mm-1 (ppm/m) in a normal laboratory environment. This variable-cavity-length OPCRD technique can be used for absolute extinction measurement and real-time environmental monitoring without closed-path sample cells and background measurements.

  1. Pressurized H2 rf Cavities in Ionizing Beams and Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Collura, M. G.; Flanagan, G.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P. M.; Jana, M. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Kaplan, D. M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Torun, Y.; Yonehara, K.

    2013-10-01

    A major technological challenge in building a muon cooling channel is operating RF cavities in multi-tesla external magnetic fields. We report the first experimental characterization of a high pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity for use with intense ionizing beams and strong external magnetic fields. RF power consumption by beam-induced plasma was investigated with hydrogen and deuterium gases with pressures between 20 and 100 atm and peak RF gradients between 5 and 50 MV/m. The energy absorption per ion pair-RF cycle ranges from 10-18 to 10-16 J. The low pressure case agrees well with an analytical model based on electron and ion mobilities. Varying concentrations of oxygen gas were investigated to remove free electrons from the cavity and reduce the RF power consumption. Measurements of the electron attachment time to oxygen and rate of ion-ion recombination were also made. Additionally, we demonstrate the operation of the gas-filled RF cavity in a solenoidal field of up to 3 T, finding no major magnetic field dependence. These results indicate that a high pressure gas-filled cavity is potentially a viable technology for muon ionization cooling.

  2. Optimization of Beam Injection Into the First Accelerating Module at TTF With Cavity Dipole Mode Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, N.; Kreps, G.; Schlarb, H.; Wendt, M.; Frisch, J.; McCormick, D.; Ross, M.; Smith, T.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.G.; /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-04-10

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is a user facility for intense VUV-FEL light. The facility is densely equipped with diagnostics, essential in obtaining the necessary beam parameters, in particular the low emittance. However there is no dedicated component for alignment of the beam in the accelerating modules, each containing eight superconducting cavities. Large beam offsets can lead to an increase of the beam emittance. The centering of the beam in these modules is therefore important, mostly at the low energy end. A misalignment of the first TTF module with respect to the gun axis has already been observed using cavity dipole modes. This paper presents the experimental results of the optimization of the beam injection into the first module, based on the monitoring of dipole modes through the couplers installed for wakefield damping. For this we use a spectrum analyzer together with a multiplexer. By scanning the beam position and tilt with two pairs of steerers, we can find the trajectory which minimizes the dipole modes amplitude. The impact of the beam steering in the module on the beam is discussed. A time domain setup is also being presented.

  3. Human in vivo cardiac phosphorus NMR spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Angela Properzio

    One of the newest methods with great potential for use in clinical diagnosis of heart disease is human, cardiac, phosphorus NMR spectroscopy (cardiac p 31 MRS). Cardiac p31 MRS is able to provide quantitative, non-invasive, functional information about the myocardial energy metabolites such as pH, phosphocreatine (PCr), and adenosinetriphosphate (ATP). In addition to the use of cardiac p3l MRS for other types of cardiac problems, studies have shown that the ratio of PCr/ATP and pH are sensitive and specific markers of ischemia at the myocardial level. In human studies, typically performed at 1.5 Tesla, PCr/ATP has been relatively easy to measure but often requires long scan times to provide adequate signal-to-noise (SNR). In addition, pH which relies on identification of inorganic phosphate (Pi), has rarely been obtained. Significant improvement in the quality of cardiac p31 MRS was achieved through the use of the General Electric SIGNATM 3.0 Tesla whole body magnet, improved coil designs and optimized pulse sequences. Phantom and human studies performed on many types of imaging and spectroscopy sequences, identified breathhold gradient-echo imaging and oblique DRESS p31 spectroscopy as the best compromises between SNR, flexibility and quality localization. Both single-turn and quadrature 10-cm diameter, p31 radiofrequency coils, were tested with the quadrature coil providing greater SNR, but at a greater depth to avoid skeletal muscle contamination. Cardiac p31 MRS obtained in just 6 to 8 minutes, gated, showed both improved SNR and discernment of Pi allowing for pH measurement. A handgrip, in-magnet exerciser was designed, created and tested at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla on volunteers and patients. In ischemic patients, this exercise was adequate to cause a repeated drop in PCr/ATP and pH with approximately eight minutes of isometric exercise at 30% maximum effort. As expected from literature, this exercise did not cause a drop in PCr/ATP for reference volunteers.

  4. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  5. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes the lips, the inside ... oropharynx. The oropharynx is the part of the throat just behind the mouth. It begins where the ...

  6. Passive optical cavity with backward scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Skryabin, D.V.; Radin, A.M.

    1994-07-01

    A passive optical cavity with an aperture is considered. An account of scattering and mode polarization results in splitting of the cavity spectrum. Analytic equations are derived for scattering losses and natural frequencies. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Machining and brazing of accelerating RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodke, S.R.; Barnwal, Rajesh; Mondal, Jayant; and others

    2014-07-01

    BARC has developed 2856 MHz accelerating cavities for 6 MeV, 9 MeV and 10 MeV RF Linac. New vendors are developed for mass production of accelerating cavity for future projects. New vendors are developing for diamond turning machining, cleaning and brazing processes. Fabrication involved material testing, CNC diamond turning of cavity, cavity cleaning and brazing. Before and after brazing resonance frequency (RF) of cavity was checked with vector network analyser (VNA). A power feed test setup is also fabricated to test power feed cavity before brazing. This test setup will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. This paper discusses about nano machining, cleaning and brazing processes of RF cavities. (author)

  8. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as amalgam...

  9. Impairment of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity by exposure to 3-tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging is temporary.

    PubMed

    Sunk, Ilse-Gerlinde; Trattnig, Siegfried; Graninger, Winfried B; Amoyo, Love; Tuerk, Birgit; Steiner, Carl-Walter; Smolen, Josef S; Bobacz, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices at high field strengths on living tissues is unknown. We investigated the effects of a 3-tesla electromagnetic field (EMF) on the biosynthetic activity of bovine articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was obtained from juvenile and adult animals. Whole joints or cartilage explants were subjected to a pulsed 3-tesla EMF; controls were left unexposed. Synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) was measured by using [35S]sulfate incorporation; mRNA encoding the cartilage markers aggrecan and type II collagen, as well as IL-1beta, were analyzed by RT-PCR. Furthermore, effects of the 3-tesla EMF were determined over the course of time directly after exposure (day 0) and at days 3 and 6. In addition, the influence of a 1.5-tesla EMF on cartilage sGAG synthesis was evaluated. Chondrocyte cell death was assessed by staining with Annexin V and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Exposure to the EMF resulted in a significant decrease in cartilage macromolecule synthesis. Gene expression of both aggrecan and IL-1beta, but not of collagen type II, was reduced in comparison with controls. Staining with Annexin V and TUNEL revealed no evidence of cell death. Interestingly, chondrocytes regained their biosynthetic activity within 3 days after exposure, as shown by proteoglycan synthesis rate and mRNA expression levels. Cartilage samples exposed to a 1.5-tesla EMF remained unaffected. Although MRI devices with a field strength of more than 1.5 T provide a better signal-to-noise ratio and thereby higher spatial resolution, their high field strength impairs the biosynthetic activity of articular chondrocytes in vitro. Although this decrease in biosynthetic activity seems to be transient, articular cartilage exposed to high-energy EMF may become vulnerable to damage.

  10. Impairment of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity by exposure to 3-tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging is temporary

    PubMed Central

    Sunk, Ilse-Gerlinde; Trattnig, Siegfried; Graninger, Winfried B; Amoyo, Love; Tuerk, Birgit; Steiner, Carl-Walter; Smolen, Josef S; Bobacz, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices at high field strengths on living tissues is unknown. We investigated the effects of a 3-tesla electromagnetic field (EMF) on the biosynthetic activity of bovine articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was obtained from juvenile and adult animals. Whole joints or cartilage explants were subjected to a pulsed 3-tesla EMF; controls were left unexposed. Synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) was measured by using [35S]sulfate incorporation; mRNA encoding the cartilage markers aggrecan and type II collagen, as well as IL-1β, were analyzed by RT–PCR. Furthermore, effects of the 3-tesla EMF were determined over the course of time directly after exposure (day 0) and at days 3 and 6. In addition, the influence of a 1.5-tesla EMF on cartilage sGAG synthesis was evaluated. Chondrocyte cell death was assessed by staining with Annexin V and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Exposure to the EMF resulted in a significant decrease in cartilage macromolecule synthesis. Gene expression of both aggrecan and IL-1β, but not of collagen type II, was reduced in comparison with controls. Staining with Annexin V and TUNEL revealed no evidence of cell death. Interestingly, chondrocytes regained their biosynthetic activity within 3 days after exposure, as shown by proteoglycan synthesis rate and mRNA expression levels. Cartilage samples exposed to a 1.5-tesla EMF remained unaffected. Although MRI devices with a field strength of more than 1.5 T provide a better signal-to-noise ratio and thereby higher spatial resolution, their high field strength impairs the biosynthetic activity of articular chondrocytes in vitro. Although this decrease in biosynthetic activity seems to be transient, articular cartilage exposed to high-energy EMF may become vulnerable to damage. PMID:16831232

  11. An economical wireless cavity-nest viewer

    Treesearch

    Daniel P. Huebner; Sarah R. Hurteau

    2007-01-01

    Inspection of cavity nests and nest boxes is often required during studies of cavity-nesting birds, and fiberscopes and pole-mounted video cameras are sometimes used for such inspection. However, the cost of these systems may be prohibitive for some potential users. We describe a user-built, wireless cavity viewer that can be used to access cavities as high as 15 m and...

  12. Multipacting analysis for JLAB ampere class cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Genfa Wu; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; Robert Rimmer; Evan Donoghue

    2005-07-10

    JLAB's ampere class 5-cell cavities require a moderate accelerating gradient (16.7 {approx} 20MV/m). Electron multipacting activity in the machine operating range can degrade the expected performance. A survey was conducted in the area of multipacting analysis for beta=1 electron cavity shapes, including options for the new high current cavity shape. The results obtained provided useful guidance to the final cavity shape adopted and to its expected performance.

  13. Quench Studies of Six High Temperature Nitrogen Doped 9 Cell Cavities for Use in the LCLS-II Baseline Prototype Cryomodule at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli; Eremeev, Grigory; Reece, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) processed six nine-cell cavities as part of a small-scale production for LCLS-II cavity processing development utilizing the promising nitrogen-doping process. Various nitrogen-doping recipes have been scrutinized to optimize process parameters with the aim to guarantee an unloaded quality factor (Q_0) of 2.7∙1010 at an accelerating field (Eacc) of 16 MV/m at 2.0 K in the cryomodule. During the R&D phase the characteristic Q0 vs. Eacc performance curve of the cavities has been measured in JLab’s vertical test area at 2 K. The findings showed the characteristic rise of the Q0 with Eacc as expected from nitrogen-doping. Initially, five cavities achieved an average Q0 of 3.3·1010 at the limiting Eacc averaging to 16.8 MV/m, while one cavity experienced an early quench accompanied by an unusual Q_0 vs. Eacc curve. The project accounts for a cavity performance loss from the vertical dewar test (with or without the helium vessel) to the horizontal performance in a cryomodule, such that these results leave no save margin to the cryomodule specification. Consequently, a refinement of the nitrogen-doping has been initiated to guarantee an average quench field above 20 MV/m without impeding the Q_0. This paper covers the refinement work performed for each cavity, which depends on the initial results, as well as a quench analysis carried out before and after the rework during the vertical RF tests as far as applicable.

  14. Modeling and cavity optimization of an external cavity semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feies, Valentin I.; Montrosset, Ivo

    2004-09-01

    Semiconductor external cavity lasers (ECL) have a wide range of applications in the field of DWDM and measurement systems. One of their most important features is the continuous tuning without mode hopping in a wide wavelength range. In this paper we present a modelling approach for an ECL in Littman-Metcalf configuration carried out for optimising: 1) the laser diode position inside the cavity in order to maximize the range of continuous wavelength tuning without mode hopping and without cavity-length adjustment and 2) the choice of the detuning of the operating wavelength respect to the Bragg condition in order to minimize the four-wave mixing (FWM) effects and the effect of a non-perfect antireflection coating (ARC). A realistic example has been analyzed and therefore we considered: the wavelength dependence of the modal gain, linewidth enhancement factor and grating selectivity, as well as the modal refractive index change with carrier injection, operating wavelength and temperature. The implemented numerical tools allow also to obtain some specifications on the grating selectivity and the ARC design.

  15. Cavity Enhanced Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siller, Brian; Mills, Andrew; Porambo, Michael; McCall, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    Over the past several decades, velocity modulation spectroscopy has been used to study dozens of molecular ions of astronomical importance. This technique has been so productive because it provides the advantage of ion-neutral discrimination, which is critically important when interfering neutral molecules are many orders of magnitude more abundant, and when combined with heterodyne techniques, its sensitivity can approach the shot noise limit. Traditionally, velocity modulation experiments have utilized unidirectional multipass White cells to achieve up to about 8 passes through a positive column discharge cell. But by positioning the cell within an optical cavity, it is possible to obtain an effective path length orders of magnitude longer than was previously possible. We have demonstrated this novel technique using a Ti:Sapp laser in the near-IR to observe rovibronic transitions of N2+. By demodulating at twice the modulation frequency, 2nd derivative-like lineshapes are observed for ions that are velocity-modulated, while Gaussian lineshapes are observed for excited neutral that are concentration-modulated. The signals for N2+ and N2+* have been observed to be 78° out of phase with one another, so ion-neutral discrimination is retained. And due to the laser power enhancement and geometry of the optical cavity, Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy is now possible. Observed Lamb dips have widths of 50 MHz, and when combined with calibration by an optical frequency comb, this allows for determination of line centers to within 1 MHz. In our original demonstration of this technique, our sensitivity was limited by noise in the laser-cavity lock. Since then, we have integrated Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) by adding sidebands to the laser at an exact multiple of the cavity free spectral range, and demodulating at the sideband frequency before sending the signal to a lock-in amplifier for demodulating at twice the

  16. Discrete wavelength-locked external cavity laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An external cavity laser (and method of generating laser light) comprising: a laser light source; means for collimating light output by the laser light source; a diffraction grating receiving collimated light; a cavity feedback mirror reflecting light received from the diffraction grating back to the diffraction grating; and means for reliably tuning the external cavity laser to discrete wavelengths.

  17. Photonic crystal cavities and integrated optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lin; Li, ZhiYuan

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to our recent works on photonic crystal (PhC) cavities and related integrated optical structures and devices. Theoretical background and numerical methods for simulation of PhC cavities are first presented. Based on the theoretical basis, two relevant quantities, the cavity mode volume and the quality factor are discussed. Then the methods of fabrication and characterization of silicon PhC slab cavities are introduced. Several types of PhC cavities are presented, such as the usual L3 missing-hole cavity, the new concept waveguide-like parallel-hetero cavity, and the low-index nanobeam cavity. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of cavity are discussed. This will help the readers to decide which type of PhC cavities to use in particular applications. Furthermore, several integrated optical devices based on PhC cavities, such as optical filters, channel-drop filters, optical switches, and optical logic gates are described in both the working principle and operation characteristics. These devices designed and realized in our group demonstrate the wide range of applications of PhC cavities and offer possible solutions to some integrated optical problems.

  18. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  19. Does the availability of artificial cavities affect cavity excavation rates in red-cockaded woodpeckers?

    Treesearch

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph; Richard R. Schaefer

    2002-01-01

    Rates of cavity excavation by Red-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) were examined from 1983 to 1999 on the Angelina National Forest in east Texas. We compared the rare of natural cavity excavation between 1983 and 1990 (before artificial cavities were available) with the rate of cavity excavation between 1992 and 1993, a period when...

  20. Many-atom-cavity QED system with homogeneous atom-cavity coupling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongmin; Vrijsen, Geert; Teper, Igor; Hosten, Onur; Kasevich, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a many-atom-cavity system with a high-finesse dual-wavelength standing wave cavity in which all participating rubidium atoms are nearly identically coupled to a 780-nm cavity mode. This homogeneous coupling is enforced by a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by the field of a 1560-nm cavity mode.

  1. Parameter study of the VUV-FEL at the Tesla Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brefeld, W.; Faatz, B.

    1995-12-31

    In this contribution we present a detailed study of the influence of the electron beam and machine parameters on the performance of the TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY. The TTF FEL will be a 6 nm SASE device operating with the beam provided by the Tesla Test Facility superconducting linac, driven by an rf photcathode gun. The FEL output power and saturation length have been assessed with the use of different 2D3-D steady state simulation codes. The parameter range over which the FEL would reach saturation within the specified undulator length of 25 to 30 m have been determined and checked against semi-analytical expressions.

  2. Shot noise startup of the 6 NM SASE FEL at the Tesla Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W.M.

    1995-12-31

    We present here an analysis of the shot noise startup of the 6 nm SASE FEI proposal at the TESLA Test Facility in DESY The statistical of the saturation length and output power due to the intrinsic randomness of the noise startup are investigated with the use of the 2D time dependent code GINGER, that takes into account propagation effects and models shot noise. We then provide estimates for the spectral contents and linewidth of the emitted radiation and describe its spiking characteristics. The output radiation will develop superradiant spikes seeded by the shot noise in the electron beam, which can entrance the average emitted power at the expense of some spectral broadening.

  3. 76 FR 47639 - Tesla Motors, Inc.; Receipt of Petition for Temporary Exemption From the Electronic Stability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ...In accordance with the procedures in 49 CFR part 555, Tesla Motors, Inc., has petitioned the agency for a temporary exemption from the electronic stability control requirements of FMVSS No. 126. The bases for the application are that the petitioner avers that the exemption would make the development or field evaluation of a low- emission vehicle easier and would not unreasonably lower the safety level of that vehicle and that compliance would cause it substantial economic hardship and that it has tried in good faith to comply with the standard.\\1\\ This notice of receipt of an application for a temporary exemption is published in accordance with statutory and administrative provisions. NHTSA has made no judgment on the merits of the application. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

  4. LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE DIFFERENCES IN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY: 4-TESLA HARDI TRACTOGRAPHY IN 569 TWINS.

    PubMed

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Dennis, Emily L; Toga, Arthur W; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Hickie, Ian B; Thompson, Paul M

    2012-05-01

    Diffusion imaging can map anatomical connectivity in the living brain, offering new insights into fundamental questions such as how the left and right brain hemispheres differ. Anatomical brain asymmetries are related to speech and language abilities, but less is known about left/right hemisphere differences in brain wiring. To assess this, we scanned 457 young adults (age 23.4±2.0 SD years) and 112 adolescents (age 12-16) with 4-Tesla 105-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging. We extracted fiber tracts throughout the brain with a Hough transform method. A 70×70 connectivity matrix was created, for each subject, based on the proportion of fibers intersecting 70 cortical regions. We identified significant differences in the proportions of fibers intersecting left and right hemisphere cortical regions. The degree of asymmetry in the connectivity matrices varied with age, as did the asymmetry in network topology measures such as the small-world effect.

  5. 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction with relevance to clinical staging.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Soldatos, Theodoros; Chalian, Majid; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Fritz, Jan; Fayad, Laura M; Carrino, John A; Schon, Lew

    2011-01-01

    The posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the most important dynamic stabilizer of the medial ankle and longitudinal arch of the foot. PTT dysfunction is a degenerative disorder of the tendon, which secondarily involves multiple ligaments, joint capsules, fascia, articulations, and bony structures of the ankle, hindfoot, midfoot, and forefoot. When the tendon progressively attenuates, the patient develops a painful, progressive collapsed flatfoot or pes planovalgus deformity. This comprehensive review illustrates the 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) features of PTT dysfunction. In addition, the reader will gain knowledge of the expected pathologic findings on MRI, as they are related to clinical staging of PTT dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC Beam Collimation Systems Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Lewis P

    2003-03-27

    This note describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects and does not always meet the original design goals. However, these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible. The post-TRC plans of the Collimation Task Force are outlined briefly in closing.

  7. Reproducibility of subregional trabecular bone micro-architectural measures derived from 7-Tesla magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Liang, Guoyuan; Babb, James S; Saha, Punam K; Regatte, Ravinder R

    2011-06-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of trabecular bone combined with quantitative image analysis represents a powerful technique to gain insight into trabecular bone micro-architectural derangements in osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. The increased signal-to-noise ratio of ultra high-field MR (≥7 Tesla) permits images to be obtained with higher resolution and/or decreased scan time compared to scanning at 1.5/3T. In this small feasibility study, we show high measurement precision for subregional trabecular bone micro-architectural analysis performed on 7T knee MR images. The results provide further support for the use of trabecular bone measures as biomarkers in clinical studies of bone disorders.

  8. Mapping quantal touch using 7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging and single-unit intraneural microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Panchuelo, Rosa Maria; Ackerley, Rochelle; Glover, Paul M; Bowtell, Richard W; Wessberg, Johan; Francis, Susan T; McGlone, Francis

    2016-05-07

    Using ultra-high field 7 Tesla (7T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we map the cortical and perceptual responses elicited by intraneural microstimulation (INMS) of single mechanoreceptive afferent units in the median nerve, in humans. Activations are compared to those produced by applying vibrotactile stimulation to the unit's receptive field, and unit-type perceptual reports are analyzed. We show that INMS and vibrotactile stimulation engage overlapping areas within the topographically appropriate digit representation in the primary somatosensory cortex. Additional brain regions in bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex, premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, insula and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in contralateral prefrontal cortex are also shown to be activated in response to INMS. The combination of INMS and 7T fMRI opens up an unprecedented opportunity to bridge the gap between first-order mechanoreceptive afferent input codes and their spatial, dynamic and perceptual representations in human cortex.

  9. Clinical functional MRI of sensorimotor cortex using passive motor and sensory stimulation at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Blatow, Maria; Reinhardt, Julia; Riffel, Katharina; Nennig, Ernst; Wengenroth, Martina; Stippich, Christoph

    2011-08-01

    To establish a passive motor paradigm for clinical functional MRI (fMRI) that could be beneficial for patients with motor or attention deficits who are not able to perform active motor tasks. A novel standardized sensorimotor fMRI protocol was applied in 16 healthy volunteers at 3 Tesla (T) using active and passive motor tasks as well as sensory stimulation of hands and feet. Data analysis was carried out individually using a dynamic thresholding routine. Active motor tasks yielded time efficient and robust blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in primary motor cortex. Noteworthy, it was possible to achieve equal activation levels within identical anatomical localization for passive and active motor tasks with these paradigms. Patients unable to perform active movements can benefit from paradigms with passive motor and sensory stimulation. Therefore, we recommend these paradigms for functional somatotopic mapping of the central region at 3T in clinical routine. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of a MEMS nano-Tesla ferromagnetic-piezoelectric magnetic sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Peng; Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu; Bidthanapally, Rao; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Petrov, Vladimir; Qu, Hongwei

    2016-06-01

    A self-biased MEMS magnetic sensor array with ferromagnetic-piezoelectric composites has been fabricated and characterized. The array with two Quartz-Nickel-Metglas cantilevers with nano-tesla sensitivity was fabricated by MEMS processes including silicon-quartz low temperature bonding, quartz wafer thinning, and electroplating of thick nickel thin films. Under self-biasing due to magnetization grading of ferromagnetic layer, magnetoelectric coefficients of 6.6 and 5.6 V/cm Oe and resolutions of ˜0.58 and ˜0.75 nT are obtained at the mechanical resonant frequencies of 191.5 and 184.8 Hz for the two sensors in the array, respectively. Such arrays have the potential for applications in biomagnetic imaging technologies including magneto-cardiography.

  11. D-zero rototrack: first stage of D-zero 2 Tesla solenoid field mapping device

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Korienek, J.; Krider, J.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Miksa, D.; Miksa, R.

    1997-09-01

    A simple and portable field mapping device was developed at Fermilab and successfully used to test the D0 2 Tesla solenoid at Toshiba Works in Japan. A description of the mechanical structure, electric driving and control system, and software of the field mapping device is given. Four Hall probe elements of Group3 Digital Gaussmeters are mounted on the radial extension arm of a carriage, which is mounted on a central rotating beam. The system gives two dimensional motions (axial and rotational) to the Hall probes. To make the system compact and portable, we used a laptop computer with PCMCIA cards. For the control system we used commercially available software LabVIEW and Motion Toolbox, and for the data analysis we used Microsoft Excel.

  12. Prototype tests and description of a 60 tesla quasi-continuous magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.R.; Dominguez, T.; Northington, T.E.; Pacheco, M.D.; Rickel, D.G.; Robinson, E.L.; Rogers, J.D.; Schillig, J.B.

    1993-10-01

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has designed and will build a large ore, 60 tesla, 100ms (quasi continuous) flat-top magnet for installation and use at Los Alamos. The magnet consists of eight concentric, resistive, solenoid coils fabricated from high strength, high conductivity copper supported by external stainless steel shells. Before each pulse the magnet is cooled to 77 K with liquid nitrogen. The energy for the magnet is provided through converter power supplies from a 1430 MVA, 24kV alternating current energy storage generator. Plans for prototype tests of full scale portions of the magnet are discussed. A detailed description of the magnet is presented along with available information on fabrication methods to be employed in its manufacture.

  13. Design of the superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wang, Q.; Dai, Y.; Ni, Z.; Zhu, X.; Li, L.; Zhao, B.; Chen, S.

    2017-02-01

    A superconducting magnet for 9.4 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is designed and fabricated in Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this paper, the electromagnetic design methods of the main coils and compensating coils are presented. Sensitivity analysis is performed for all superconducting coils. The design of the superconducting shimming coils is also presented and the design of electromagnetic decoupling of the Z2 coils from the main coils is introduced. Stress and strain analysis with both averaged and detailed models is performed with finite element method. A quench simulation code with anisotropic continuum model and control volume method is developed by us and is verified by experimental study. By means of the quench simulation code, the quench protection system for the 9.4 T magnet is designed for the main coils, the compensating coils and the shimming coils. The magnet cryostat design with zero helium boiling-off technology is also introduced.

  14. Technical aspects on magnetic resonance imaging of the spine at 1.5 tesla.

    PubMed

    Holtås, S L; Plewes, D B; Simon, J H; Ekholm, S; Kido, D K; Utz, R

    1987-01-01

    Technical aspects on surface coil magnetic resonance imaging of the spine using a superconducting system with a field strength of 1.5 tesla are described. By using a flat surface coil instead of the body coil the image quality was markedly improved and the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) was increased approximately 2.6 times. Small voxels resulted in low S/N. The best image quality was achieved with a slice thickness of 5 mm, a field of view of 20 to 24 cm and a matrix of 256 X 256. Interleaved slices provided superior image quality compared with contiguous slices at the expense of acquisition time. For sagittal images the phase encoding gradient should be in the cranio-caudal direction to minimize motion artifacts. To obtain T1 and T2 images of high quality, spin echo pulse sequences with TR 600/TE 20 ms and TR 2000/TE 40 to 80 ms are useful.

  15. Current Progress in Fabrication of a 14 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie, III; Benson, Christopher; Damborsky, Kyle; Diaczenko, Nick; Elliott, Tim; Garrison, Ray; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, Alfred; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Dior

    2012-03-01

    The Accelerator Technology Laboratory at Texas A&M is fabricating a model dipole magnet, TAMU3, designed to operate at a 14 Tesla bore field. The dipole employs an advanced internal-tin Nb3Sn/Cu composite strand with enhanced current density. The coils must be processed through a heat treatment after winding, during which the Sn within the heterogeneous strands diffuse into the Cu/Nb matrix to form high-performance superconducting layers. Heat treatment of the first coil assembly revealed tin leakage from the Sn cores that was caused by omission of a pre-anneal step in the heat treatment. We are evaluating the electrical properties of the coil, the microstructure and short-sample superconducting performance of cut-off samples of current leads to determine the extent of damage to the performance of the windings. Results of those tests and plans for construction of TAMU3 will be presented.

  16. GRASE imaging at 3 Tesla with template interactive phase-encoding.

    PubMed

    Jovicich, J; Norris, D G

    1998-06-01

    A new method for ordering the phase-encoding gradient is proposed, and an application for short effective TE gradient- and spin-echo (GRASE) imaging is demonstrated. The proposed method calculates the phase-encoding order from the signal decay of a template scan (hence "template interactive phase-encoding" or TIPE). Computer simulations are used to compare the point spread functions of different phase-encoding orders giving short effective echo times (kb centric GRASE, centric GRASE, centric TIPE). The conventional centric phase-encoding order is also considered for GRASE. The conventional centric method is sensitive to both amplitude and phase modulation of the signal in k-space. The centric TIPE method gives the least amplitude modulation artifacts but is vulnerable to phase artifacts. The TIPE experiment was implemented on a 3 Tesla system. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first in vivo GRASE images at this field strength.

  17. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  18. Preattentive mechanisms of change detection in early auditory cortex: a 7 Tesla fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Szycik, G R; Stadler, J; Brechmann, A; Münte, T F

    2013-12-03

    The auditory system continuously monitors the environment for irregularities in an automatic, preattentive fashion. This is presumably accomplished by two mechanisms: a sensory mechanism detects a deviant sound on the basis of differential refractoriness of neural populations sensitive to the standard and deviant sounds, whereas the cognitive mechanism reveals deviance by comparing incoming auditory information with a template derived from previous input. Using fast event-related high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla we show that both mechanisms can be mapped to different parts of the auditory cortex both at the group level and the single-subject level. The sensory mechanism is supported by primary auditory areas in Heschl's gyrus whereas the cognitive mechanism is implemented in more anterior secondary auditory areas. Both mechanisms are equally engaged by simple sine-wave tones and speech-related phonemes indicating that streams of speech and non-speech stimuli are processed in a similar fashion.

  19. A test of a 2 Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Carcagno, Ruben; Claypool, Brad; Foster, George W.; Hays, Steven L.; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Malamud, Ernest; Mazur, Peter O.; Nehring, Roger; Oleck, Andrew; Rabehl, Roger; Schlabach, Phil; Sylvester, Cosmore; Velev, Gueorgui; Volk, James; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Superconducting transmission line magnet test system for an injector accelerator of a staged VLHC proton-proton colliding beam accelerator has been built and operated at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, twin-aperture, combined function dipole magnet of 2 Tesla field is excited by a single turn 100 kA transmission line superconductor. The 100 kA dc current is generated using dc-dc switching converters powered by a bulk 240 kW supply. A pair of horizontally placed conventional leads facilitates transfer of this current to the magnet transmission line superconductor operating at liquid helium temperature. Fabrication of magnet components and magnet assembly work are described. The magnet test system and its operation are presented, and the performance is summarized.

  20. A mechanically tunable and efficient ceramic probe for MR-microscopy at 17 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurdjumov, Sergei; Glybovski, Stanislav; Hurshkainen, Anna; Webb, Andrew; Abdeddaim, Redha; Ciobanu, Luisa; Melchakova, Irina; Belov, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    In this contribution we propose and study numerically a new probe (radiofrequency coil) for magnetic resonance mi-croscopy in the field of 17T. The probe is based on two coupled donut resonators made of a high-permittivity and low-loss ceramics excited by a non-resonant inductively coupled loop attached to a coaxial cable. By full-wave numerical simulation it was shown that the probe can be precisely tuned to the Larmor frequency of protons (723 MHz) by adjusting a gap between the two resonators. Moreover, the impedance of the probe can be matched by varying the distance from one of the resonators to the loop. As a result, a compact and mechanically tunable resonant probe was demonstrated for 17 Tesla applications using no lumped capacitors for tuning and matching. The new probe was numerically compared to a conventional solenoidal probe showing better efficiency.

  1. Anatomy and metabolism of the normal human brain studied by magnetic resonance at 1. 5 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Bottomley, P.A.; Hart, H.R. Jr.; Edelstein, W.A.; Schenck, J.F.; Smith, L.S.; Leue, W.M.; Mueller, O.M.; Redington, R.W.

    1984-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained of the human head in magnetic fields as high as 1.5 Tesla (T) using slotted resonator high radio-frequency (RF) detection coils. The images showed no RF field penetration problems and exhibited an 11 (+/-1)-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over a .12-T imaging system. The first localized phosphorus 31, carbon 13, and proton MR chemical shift spectra recorded with surface coils from the head and body in the same instrument showed relative concentrations of phosphorus metabolites, triglycerides, and, when correlated with proton images, negligible lipid (-CH/sub 2/-) signal from brain tissue on the time scale of the imaging experiment. Sugar phosphate and phosphodiester concentrations were significantly elevated in the head compared with muscle. This method should allow the combined assessment of anatomy, metabolism, and biochemistry in both the normal and diseased brain.

  2. Magnet Design and Analysis of a 40 Tesla Long Pulse System Energized by a Battery Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y. L.; Peng, T.; Wang, G. B.; Ding, T. H.; Han, X. T.; Pan, Y.; Li, L.

    2013-03-01

    A 40 tesla long pulse magnet and a battery bank as the power supply have been designed. This is now under construction at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The 22 mm bore magnet will generate smooth pulses with duration 1 s and rise time 0.5 s. The battery bank consists of 945 12V/200 Ah lead-acid battery cells. The magnet and battery bank were optimized by codes developed in-house and by ANSYS. The coil was made from soft copper with internal reinforcement by fiber-epoxy composite; it is divided into two sections connected in series. The inner section consists of helix coils with each layer reinforced by Zylon composite. The outer section will be wound from copper sheet and externally reinforced by carbon fiber composite.

  3. Particle-in-cell based parameter study of 12-cavity, 12-cathode rising-sun relativistic magnetrons for improved performance

    SciTech Connect

    Majzoobi, A.; Joshi, R. P. Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.

    2015-10-15

    Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to analyze the efficiency, output power and leakage currents in a 12-Cavity, 12-Cathode rising-sun magnetron with diffraction output (MDO). The central goal is to conduct a parameter study of a rising-sun magnetron that comprehensively incorporates performance enhancing features such as transparent cathodes, axial extraction, the use of endcaps, and cathode extensions. Our optimum results demonstrate peak output power of about 2.1 GW, with efficiencies of ∼70% and low leakage currents at a magnetic field of 0.45 Tesla, a 400 kV bias with a single endcap, for a range of cathode extensions between 3 and 6 centimeters.

  4. Magnetic Texture & Frustration in Quantum Magnets via Strain Measurements to 100 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, Marcelo

    2014-03-01

    Strong geometrical frustration in magnets leads to exotic states, such as spin liquids, spin supersolids, magnetic solitons, and complex magnetic textures. SrCu2(BO3)2 , a spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet in the archetypical Shastry-Sutherland lattice, exhibits a rich spectrum of magnetization plateaus and stripe-like magnetic textures in applied fields. We observed new magnetic textures via optical FBG magnetostriction and magnetocaloric measurements in fields up to 100.75 Tesla at 73.6 T and at 82 T which we attribute, using a controlled density matrix renormalization group approach, to a 2/5 plateau and to the long-predicted 1/2-saturation plateau. The plateau predicted at 2/5 saturation is particularly interesting since strain appears to be the only experimental probe with enough sensitivity to reveal it as magnetization probes see a much more gradual change in the same field range. BiCu2PO6 is a frustrated two-leg spin ladder compound with a spin gap that can be closed with a magnetic field of approximately 20T to induce a soliton lattice. Time permitting, I will also discuss magnetization, magnetostriction and specific heat vs magnetic fields to 65 T used to obtain the anisotropic (H,T) phase diagram in BiCu2PO6 single crystal samples. Work at the NHMFL was supported by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Science through the project ``Science at 100 Tesla,'' and the State of Florida.

  5. A 10 Kelvin 3 Tesla Magnet for Space Flight ADR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Riall, Sara; Pourrahimi, Shahin

    2003-01-01

    Many future space flight missions are expected to use adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs) to reach detector operating temperatures well below one Kelvin. The goal is to operate each ADR with a mechanical cooler as its heat sink, thus avoiding the use of liquid cryogens. Although mechanical coolers are being developed to operate at temperatures of 6 Kelvin and below, there is a large efficiency cost associated with operating them at the bottom of their temperature range. For the multi-stage ADR system being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center, the goal is to operate with a 10 Kelvin mechanical cooler heat sink. With currently available paramagnetic materials, the highest temperature ADR stage in such a system will require a magnetic field of approximately three Tesla. Thus the goal is to develop a small, lightweight three Tesla superconducting magnet for operation at 10 Kelvin. It is important that this magnet have a low current/field ratio. Because traditional NbTi magnets do not operate safely above about six Kelvin, a magnet with a higher Tc is required. The primary focus has been on Nb3Sn magnets. Since standard Nb3Sn wire must be coated with thick insulation, wound on a magnet mandrel and then reacted, standard Nb,Sn magnets are quite heavy and require high currents Superconducting Systems developed a Nb3Sn wire which can be drawn down to small diameter, reacted, coated with thin insulation and then wound on a small diameter coil form. By using this smaller wire and operating closer to the wire s critical current, it should be possible to reduce the mass and operating current of 10 Kelvin magnets. Using this "react-then-wind" technology, Superconducting Systems has produced prototype 10 Kelvin magnets. This paper describes the development and testing of these magnets and discusses the outlook for including 10 Kelvin magnets on space-flight missions.

  6. Arterial spin labeling at 3.0 Tesla in subacute ischemia: comparison to dynamic susceptibility perfusion.

    PubMed

    Huck, S; Kerl, H U; Al-Zghloul, M; Groden, C; Nölte, I

    2012-03-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a promising but clinically not established non-invasive method to assess cerebral perfusion. The purpose of this study was to compare perfusion imaging with pulsed ASL (pASL) to conventional dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWL) using commercially available equipment and postprocessing (3.0 Tesla, 32-channel head coil) in patients with subacute ischemia. The pASL and DSC-PWI techniques were compared in 15 patients with subacute ischemia (age 49-88 years, 6 females and 9 males, time from onset to scan 4-161 h). Image inhomogeneity was assessed with the non-uniformity index. Image quality, delineation of hypoperfusion and degree of hypoperfusion were rated by two readers using a 5-scale grading system. The volume of hypoperfusion was quantified planimetrically. Image quality and image inhomogeneity were superior in DSC time-to-peak (TTP) compared to pASL cerebral brain flow (CBF; both p < 0.05). The delineation of hypoperfusion was better in DSC-TTP (p < 0.05) and the hypoperfusion was graded as more severe in DSC-TTP (p < 0.05). The volume of hypoperfusion did not differ between pASL-CBF and DSC-TTP, however, in pASL-CBF five cases with small infarctions (lacunar and pontine) were false negative compared to DSC-relative CBF. The mismatch frequency was lower in pASL (13%) than in DSC-rCBF (20%) and DSC-TTP (47%). Using a commercially available sequence and a 32-channel head coil at 3.0 Tesla pASL-CBF is feasible but limited compared to DSC-PWI in the assessment of ischemic stroke. In its present form pASL has a reserve role in clinical practice for situations when gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) is contraindicated.

  7. Low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference device operating in Tesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tobias; Nagel, Joachim; Wölbing, Roman; Kemmler, Matthias; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter

    2013-01-22

    Superconductivity in the cuprate YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) persists up to huge magnetic fields (B) up to several tens of Teslas, and sensitive direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be realized in epitaxially grown YBCO films by using grain boundary Josephson junctions (GBJs). Here we present the realization of high-quality YBCO nanoSQUIDs, patterned by focused ion beam milling. We demonstrate low-noise performance of such a SQUID up to B = 1 T applied parallel to the plane of the SQUID loop at the temperature T = 4.2 K. The GBJs are shunted by a thin Au layer to provide nonhysteretic current voltage characteristics, and the SQUID incorporates a 90 nm wide constriction which is used for on-chip modulation of the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop. The white flux noise of the device increases only slightly from 1.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz)(1/2) at B = 0 to 2.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. Assuming that a point-like magnetic particle with magnetization in the plane of the SQUID loop is placed directly on top of the constriction and taking into account the geometry of the SQUID, we calculate a spin sensitivity S(μ)(1/2) = 62 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at B = 0 and 110 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. The demonstration of low noise of such a SQUID in Tesla fields is a decisive step toward utilizing the full potential of ultrasensitive nanoSQUIDs for direct measurements of magnetic hysteresis curves of magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets.

  8. Seven-Tesla Magnetization Transfer Imaging to Detect Multiple Sclerosis White Matter Lesions.

    PubMed

    Chou, I-Jun; Lim, Su-Yin; Tanasescu, Radu; Al-Radaideh, Ali; Mougin, Olivier E; Tench, Christopher R; Whitehouse, William P; Gowland, Penny A; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2017-09-25

    Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at 3 Tesla (T) field strength is the most sensitive modality for detecting white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis. While 7T FLAIR is effective in detecting cortical lesions, it has not been fully optimized for visualization of white matter lesions and thus has not been used for delineating lesions in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the normal appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of 7T magnetization-transfer-weighted (MTw ) images in the detection of white matter lesions compared with 3T-FLAIR. Fifteen patients with clinically isolated syndrome, 6 with multiple sclerosis, and 10 healthy participants were scanned with 7T 3-dimensional (D) MTw and 3T-2D-FLAIR sequences on the same day. White matter lesions visible on either sequence were delineated. Of 662 lesions identified on 3T-2D-FLAIR images, 652 were detected on 7T-3D-MTw images (sensitivity, 98%; 95% confidence interval, 97% to 99%). The Spearman correlation coefficient between lesion loads estimated by the two sequences was .910. The intrarater and interrater reliability for 7T-3D-MTw images was good with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 98.4% and 81.8%, which is similar to that for 3T-2D-FLAIR images (ICC 96.1% and 96.7%). Seven-Tesla MTw sequences detected most of the white matter lesions identified by FLAIR at 3T. This suggests that 7T-MTw imaging is a robust alternative for detecting demyelinating lesions in addition to 3T-FLAIR. Future studies need to compare the roles of optimized 7T-FLAIR and of 7T-MTw imaging. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  9. A 10 Kelvin 3 Tesla Magnet for Space Flight ADR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Riall, Sara; Pourrahimi, Shahin

    2003-01-01

    Many future space flight missions are expected to use adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs) to reach detector operating temperatures well below one Kelvin. The goal is to operate each ADR with a mechanical cooler as its heat sink, thus avoiding the use of liquid cryogens. Although mechanical coolers are being developed to operate at temperatures of 6 Kelvin and below, there is a large efficiency cost associated with operating them at the bottom of their temperature range. For the multi-stage ADR system being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center, the goal is to operate with a 10 Kelvin mechanical cooler heat sink. With currently available paramagnetic materials, the highest temperature ADR stage in such a system will require a magnetic field of approximately three Tesla. Thus the goal is to develop a small, lightweight three Tesla superconducting magnet for operation at 10 Kelvin. It is important that this magnet have a low current/field ratio. Because traditional NbTi magnets do not operate safely above about six Kelvin, a magnet with a higher Tc is required. The primary focus has been on Nb3Sn magnets. Since standard Nb3Sn wire must be coated with thick insulation, wound on a magnet mandrel and then reacted, standard Nb,Sn magnets are quite heavy and require high currents Superconducting Systems developed a Nb3Sn wire which can be drawn down to small diameter, reacted, coated with thin insulation and then wound on a small diameter coil form. By using this smaller wire and operating closer to the wire s critical current, it should be possible to reduce the mass and operating current of 10 Kelvin magnets. Using this "react-then-wind" technology, Superconducting Systems has produced prototype 10 Kelvin magnets. This paper describes the development and testing of these magnets and discusses the outlook for including 10 Kelvin magnets on space-flight missions.

  10. 7 Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in adult X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ratai, Eva; Kok, Trina; Wiggins, Christopher; Wiggins, Graham; Grant, Ellen; Gagoski, Borjan; O'Neill, Gilmore; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Eichler, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Background Adult patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) remain at risk for progressive neurological deterioration. Phenotypes vary in their pathology, ranging from axonal degeneration to inflammatory demyelination. The severity of symptoms is poorly explained by conventional imaging. Objective To test the hypothesis that neurochemistry in normal appearing brain differs among adult phenotypes of X-ALD, and that neurochemical changes correlate with the severity of symptoms. Patients and Methods Using a 7 Tesla scanner we performed structural and proton MRSI in 13 adult patients with X-ALD, including 4 patients with adult cerebral ALD (ACALD), 5 with adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and 4 female heterozygotes. Studies were also performed in nine healthy controls. Results Among adult X-ALD phenotypes, MI/Cr was 46% higher and Cho/Cr 21% higher in normal appearing white matter of ACALD compared to AMN (p < 0.05). Both NAA/Cr and Glu/Cr ratios were lower in AMN patients (p = 0.028 and p = 0.036, respectively) than in controls. There were no significant differences between AMN and female heterozygotes. In cortex, ACALD patients had lower values of NAA/Cr compared to female heterozygotes and controls (p = 0.022). The global MI/Cr ratio demonstrated a significant association with the EDSS (Spearman ρ = 0.66, p = 0.039). Conclusion 7 Tesla proton MRSI reveals differences in the neurochemistry of ACALD but is unable to distinguish AMN from female heterozygotes. MI/Cr correlates with the severity of the symptoms and may be a meaningful biomarker in adult X-ALD. PMID:19001168

  11. Knee implant imaging at 3 Tesla using high-bandwidth radiofrequency pulses.

    PubMed

    Bachschmidt, Theresa J; Sutter, Reto; Jakob, Peter M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Nittka, Mathias

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the impact of high-bandwidth radiofrequency (RF) pulses used in turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences or combined with slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) on artifact reduction at 3 Tesla in the knee in the presence of metal. Local transmit/receive coils feature increased maximum B1 amplitude, reduced SAR exposition and thus enable the application of high-bandwidth RF pulses. Susceptibility-induced through-plane distortion scales inversely with the RF bandwidth and the view angle, hence blurring, increases for higher RF bandwidths, when SEMAC is used. These effects were assessed for a phantom containing a total knee arthroplasty. TSE and SEMAC sequences with conventional and high RF bandwidths and different contrasts were tested on eight patients with different types of implants. To realize scan times of 7 to 9 min, SEMAC was always applied with eight slice-encoding steps and distortion was rated by two radiologists. A local transmit/receive knee coil enables the use of an RF bandwidth of 4 kHz compared with 850 Hz in conventional sequences. Phantom scans confirm the relation of RF bandwidth and through-plane distortion, which can be reduced up to 79%, and demonstrate the increased blurring for high-bandwidth RF pulses. In average, artifacts in this RF mode are rated hardly visible for patients with joint arthroplasties, when eight SEMAC slice-encoding steps are applied, and for patients with titanium fixtures, when TSE is used. The application of high-bandwidth RF pulses by local transmit coils substantially reduces through-plane distortion artifacts at 3 Tesla. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  13. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  14. Atomic entanglement in cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. F.; You, L.; Chapman, M. S.; Kennedy, T. A. B.

    1998-05-01

    Quantum gates can be implemented by the entanglement of atoms or ions, which interact with a common quantized field(T. Pellizzari, S. A. Gardiner, J. I. Cirac, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 3788 (1995).. Two atom entanglements can be created by a sequence of adiabatic pulses which address the atoms independently. The system then evolves to an entangled final state through degenerate adiabatic dark states of the coupled two-atom plus quantized cavity field system. However, successful state transfer and thus gate action, as measured by the target state probability generally deteriorates as a result of dissipation, and non-adiabatic pulse effects. We report investigations of quantum state transfer and entanglement between two trapped atoms in optical cavity QED, including the influence of dissipation, atomic hyperfine structure, and differential level shifts due to trapping fields.

  15. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  16. Grinding Inside A Toroidal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Walter; Adams, James F.; Burley, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Weld lines ground smooth within about 0.001 in. Grinding tool for smoothing longitudinal weld lines inside toroidal cavity includes curved tunnel jig to guide grinding "mouse" along weld line. Curvature of tunnel jig matched to shape of toroid so grinding ball in mouse follows circular arc of correct radius as mouse is pushed along tunnel. Tool enables precise control of grindout shape, yet easy to use.

  17. Magnetic spheres in microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Rameshti, Babak; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2015-06-01

    We apply Mie scattering theory to study the interaction of magnetic spheres with microwaves in cavities beyond the magnetostatic and rotating wave approximations. We demonstrate that both strong and ultrastrong coupling can be realized for stand alone magnetic spheres made from yttrium iron garnet (YIG), acting as an efficient microwave antenna. The eigenmodes of YIG spheres with radii of the order mm display distinct higher angular momentum character that has been observed in experiments.

  18. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan; El-Jallal, Said

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  19. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  20. Botryomycosis in a lung cavity

    PubMed Central

    Vinay, D; Ramasubramanian, V; Gopalakrishnan, Ram; Jessani, Laxman G

    2016-01-01

    Botryomycosis is a rare pyogranulomatous disease characterized by suppurative and often granulomatous bacterial infection of the skin, soft tissues and viscera. Only about 90 cases have been reported in world literature till date: 75% of them are cases of cutaneous botryomycosis. Of the 18 reported cases of primary pulmonary botryomycosis, only one had histologically proven botryomycosis in a lung cavity. We report here a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis occurring in a lung cavity, which is to the best of our knowledge first such case from India. The index case was a 62 year old female who presented to us with recurrent episodes of non-massive streaky hemoptysis with CT chest revealing ‘Air Crescent’ sign with a probable fungal ball in a left upper lobe cavity. Left upper pulmonary lobectomy was done and histopathology of the cavitary tissue revealed Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon and features suggestive of Botryomycosis. Tissue culture from the cavitary specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Botryomycosis can mimic Aspergilloma radiologically as was seen in our case, but therapy is often a combination of both medical and surgical measures unlike Aspergilloma. PMID:27625451

  1. Packing loops into annular cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, T. A.; Gomes, M. A. F.

    2017-02-01

    The continuous packing of a flexible rod in two-dimensional cavities yields a countable set of interacting domains that resembles nonequilibrium cellular systems and belongs to a new class of lightweight material. However, the link between the length of the rod and the number of domains requires investigation, especially in the case of non-simply connected cavities, where the number of avoided regions emulates an effective topological temperature. In the present article we report the results of an experiment of injection of a single flexible rod into annular cavities in order to find the total length needed to insert a given number of loops (domains of one vertex). Using an exponential model to describe the experimental data we quite minutely analyze the initial conditions, the intermediary behavior, and the tight packing limit. This method allows the observation of a new fluctuation phenomenon associated with instabilities in the dynamic evolution of the packing process. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the global pattern enters the discussion under a novel point of view. A comparison with the classical problems of the random close packing of disks and jammed disk packings is made.

  2. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  3. Controlled directional scattering cavity for tubular absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1982-01-01

    A specular cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity is provided with a series of V groove-like indentations (or pyramidal-type indentations) which redirect energy entering between the receiver and cavity structure onto the receiver. The aperture opening of each V groove is less than half the cavity opening and in most preferred embodiments, much less than half. This enables the optical receiver to be emplaced a distance g from the cavity wherein 0.414r

  4. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.; Jackaway, Adam D.

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  5. Acoustic cavity technology for high performance injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of damping more than one mode of rocket engine combustion instability by means of differently tuned acoustic cavities sharing a common entrance was shown. Analytical procedures and acoustic modeling techniques for predicting the stability behavior of acoustic cavity designs in hot firings were developed. Full scale testing of various common entrance, dual cavity configurations, and subscale testing for the purpose of obtaining motion pictures of the cavity entrance region, to aid in determining the mechanism of cavity damping were the two major aspects of the program.

  6. Clinical Benefit of 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Rescanning in Patients With Focal Epilepsy and Negative 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady D; Balaguera, Pedro; Rascovsky, Simon; Delgado, Jorge; Llano, Juan; Hernández-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Gómez-Arias, Bety; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an essential tool in the pre-surgical evaluation of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Our aim was to assess the value of re-imaging patients with focal drug-resistant epilepsy. Thirty patients with negative or non-conclusive 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging were rescanned with 1.5T and 3T. All of them had previous 1.5 scans with no seizure protocol in a non-specialized center. Two neuroradiologists who were blinded to prior imaging results randomly reviewed the magnetic resonance images. Kappa score was used to assess the reliability. Mean age of patients was 30 (SD ± 11) years. The intra-observer agreement for the first radiologist was 0.74 for 1.5T and 0.71 for 3T. In the second radiologist it was 0.82 and 0.66, respectively. Three lesions (10%) were identified by general radiologists in non-specialized centers using a 1.5T standard protocol. In our center a consensus between two neuroradiologists using epilepsy protocol identified seven lesions (23%) using 1.5T and 10 (33%) using 3T (p < 0.01). In 28% of patients this additional information resulted in a change in clinical management. 3T magnetic resonance imaging rescanning improves the diagnostic yield in patients with focal epilepsy and previous negative 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging. Use of 3T magnetic resonance imaging, epilepsy protocols, and interpretation by experienced neuroradiologists is highly recommended.

  7. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Smith, J. D.A.; Rimmer, R.; Wang, H.; Delayen, J.; Calaga, R.

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  8. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  9. Plasmonic Coupled Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupled cavity modes on Moire surfaces. An experimental study has been made of the propagation of SPPs on a thin silver surface that is textured with Moire surface pattern using interference lithography. The Moire surface contains periodic array of one dimensional cavities. The distance between the cavities can be controlled by changing the periodicities of Moire surface. When the SPP cavity separation is sufficiently small, we show splitting of strongly coupled plasmonic cavity modes through numerical simulations. Conversely, when the SPP cavity separation is sufficiently large, SPP cavity modes are found to be localized and do not show splitting of SPP cavity modes . This splitting of SPP cavity modes are well explained with a tight binding model that has been succesfully applied in photonic coupled cavities. Reflection measurements and numerical simulation of a large number of adjacent SPP cavities have shown a coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) type plasmonic waveguide band formation within the band gap region of unperturbed uniform grating.

  10. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  11. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Lingwood, C.; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  12. Shape Determination for Deformed Electromagnetic Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Ko, Kwok; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zhenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The measured physical parameters of a superconducting cavity differ from those of the designed ideal cavity. This is due to shape deviations caused by both loose machine tolerances during fabrication and by the tuning process for the accelerating mode. We present a shape determination algorithm to solve for the unknown deviations from the ideal cavity using experimentally measured cavity data. The objective is to match the results of the deformed cavity model to experimental data through least-squares minimization. The inversion variables are unknown shape deformation parameters that describe perturbations of the ideal cavity. The constraint is the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We solve the nonlinear optimization problem using a line-search based reduced space Gauss-Newton method where we compute shape sensitivities with a discrete adjoint approach. We present two shape determination examples, one from synthetic and the other from experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is very effective in determining the deformed cavity shape.

  13. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  14. Quantized mode of a leaky cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, S. M.; Nienhuis, G.

    2000-12-01

    We use Thomson's classical concept of mode of a leaky cavity to develop a quantum theory of cavity damping. This theory generalizes the conventional system-reservoir theory of high-Q cavity damping to arbitrary Q. The small system now consists of damped oscillators corresponding to the natural modes of the leaky cavity rather than undamped oscillators associated with the normal modes of a fictitious perfect cavity. The formalism unifies semiclassical Fox-Li modes and the normal modes traditionally used for quantization. It also lays the foundations for a full quantum description of excess noise. The connection with Siegman's semiclassical work is straightforward. In a wider context, this theory constitutes a radical departure from present models of dissipation in quantum mechanics: unlike conventional models, system and reservoir operators no longer commute with each other. This noncommutability is an unavoidable consequence of having to use natural cavity modes rather than normal modes of a fictitious perfect cavity.

  15. Noble gas clusters in model zeolite cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng Yin; Berry, R. Stephen

    1993-03-01

    Noble gas atoms trapped in the intracrystalline cavities of zeolites may form clusters. A classical-mechanical isoenergetic molecular dynamics simulation is performed to simulate the dynamical behavior of noble gas clusters in zeolite cavities. To implement the simulation, a model is adopted of a homogeneous spherical cavity with Morse interaction between the noble gas atoms and cavity walls. The results for Ar6 clusters indicate that the noble gas clusters in the cavity undergo the same solid/liquid phase changes as in free space, and, at high enough energies, a rapid exchange between atoms adsorbed on the inner surface and thosein the interior of the cavity. Mathematical quenching is used to investigated the multidimensional potential surface of Ar clusters in the cavity.

  16. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  17. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... drill out the decay and fill the resulting space. Along with the common cold and gum disease, ... than flossing but only if there is enough space between the teeth to accommodate them. They come ...

  18. [Dirofilaria in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Révész, Erzsébet; Markovics, Gabriella; Darabos, Zoltán; Tóth, Ildikó; Fok, Eva

    2008-10-01

    Number of cases of filariasis have been recently reported in the Hungarian medical literature, most of them caused by Dirofilaria repens . Dirofilaria repens is a mosquito-transmitted filarioid worm in the subcutaneous tissue of dogs and cats. Human infection manifests as either subcutaneous nodules or lung parenchymal disease, which may even be asymptomatic. The authors report a human Dirofilaria repens infection of the abdominal cavity in a 61-year-old man,who underwent laparotomy for acute abdomen. Intraoperatively, local peritonitis was detected caused by a white nemathhelminth, measured 8 cm in size. Histocytology confirmed that the infection was caused by Dirofilaria repens.

  19. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  20. Cancer of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Montero, Pablo H; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Although early diagnosis is relatively easy, presentation with advanced disease is not uncommon. The standard of care is primary surgical resection with or without postoperative adjuvant therapy. Improvements in surgical techniques combined with the routine use of postoperative radiation or chemoradiation therapy have resulted in improved survival. Successful treatment is predicated on multidisciplinary treatment strategies to maximize oncologic control and minimize impact of therapy on form and function. Prevention of oral cancer requires better education about lifestyle-related risk factors, and improved awareness and tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumours of the nasal cavity*

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Hauser, B.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the nasal cavity are rare in domestic animals, most cases occurring in the dog. Epithelial tumours are the most common type in carnivores (dogs and cats). In general, the same types of tumour occur in domestic animals as occur in man. There was no significant predisposition for breed in dogs, but in both dogs and cats far more males than females were affected. Metastases occurred only rarely. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:1086156

  2. Mass renormalization in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Matloob, Reza

    2011-01-15

    We show that the presence of a background medium and a boundary surface or surfaces in cavity QED produces no change in the energy shift of a free charged particle due to its coupling to the fluctuating electromagnetic field of the vacuum. This clarifies that the electromagnetic and the observed mass of the charged particle are not affected by the modification of the field of the vacuum. The calculations are nonrelativistic and restricted to the dipole approximation but are otherwise based on the general requirements of causality.

  3. Design, Construction, and Initial Test of High Spatial Resolution Thermometry Arrays for Detection of Surface Temperature Profiles on SRF Cavities in Super Fluid Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Grigory Eremeev

    2011-07-01

    We designed and built two high resolution (0.6-0.55mm special resolution [1.1-1.2mm separation]) thermometry arrays prototypes out of the Allen Bradley 90-120 ohm 1/8 watt resistor to measure surface temperature profiles on SRF cavities. One array was designed to be physically flexible and conform to any location on a SRF cavity; the other was modeled after the common G-10/stycast 2850 thermometer and designed to fit on the equator of an ILC (Tesla 1.3GHz) SRF cavity. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each array and their construction. In addition we will present a case study of the arrays performance on a real SRF cavity TB9NR001. TB9NR001 presented a unique opportunity to test the performance of each array as it contained a dual (4mm separation) cat eye defect which conventional methods such as OST (Oscillating Superleak second-sound Transducers) and full coverage thermometry mapping were unable to distinguish between. We will discuss the new arrays ability to distinguish between the two defects and their preheating performance.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  5. In vitro assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for a breast tissue expander with a remote port.

    PubMed

    Linnemeyer, Hannah; Shellock, Frank G; Ahn, Christina Y

    2014-04-01

    A patient with a breast tissue expander may require a diagnostic assessment using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To ensure patient safety, this type of implant must undergo in vitro MRI testing using proper techniques. Therefore, this investigation evaluated MRI issues (i.e., magnetic field interactions, heating, and artifacts) at 3-Tesla for a breast tissue expander with a remote port. A breast tissue expander with a remote port (Integra Breast Tissue Expander, Model 3612-06 with Standard Remote Port, PMT Corporation, Chanhassen, MN) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. Heating was evaluated by placing the implant in a gelled-saline-filled phantom and MRI was performed using a transmit/receive RF body coil at an MR system reported, whole body averaged specific absorption rate of 2.9-W/kg. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted and GRE pulse sequences. Magnetic field interactions were not substantial and, thus, will not pose a hazard to a patient in a 3-Tesla or less MRI environment. The highest temperature rise was 1.7°C, which is physiologically inconsequential. Artifacts were large in relation to the remote port and metal connector of the implant but will only present problems if the MR imaging area of interest is where these components are located. A patient with this breast tissue expander with a remote port may safely undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less under the conditions used for this investigation. These findings are the first reported at 3-Tesla for a tissue expander. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. PLACD-7T Study: Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque Components Correlated with Cerebral Damage at 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    den Hartog, A.G; Bovens, S.M; Koning, W; Hendrikse, J; Pasterkamp, G; Moll, F.L; de Borst, G.J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with carotid artery stenosis histological plaque composition is associated with plaque stability and with presenting symptomatology. Preferentially, plaque vulnerability should be taken into account in pre-operative work-up of patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. However, currently no appropriate and conclusive (non-) invasive technique to differentiate between the high and low risk carotid artery plaque in vivo is available. We propose that 7 Tesla human high resolution MRI scanning will visualize carotid plaque characteristics more precisely and will enable correlation of these specific components with cerebral damage. Study objective: The aim of the PlaCD-7T study is 1: to correlate 7T imaging with carotid plaque histology (gold standard); and 2: to correlate plaque characteristics with cerebral damage ((clinically silent) cerebral (micro) infarcts or bleeds) on 7 Tesla high resolution (HR) MRI. Design: We propose a single center prospective study for either symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with haemodynamic significant (70%) stenosis of at least one of the carotid arteries. The Athero-Express (AE) biobank histological analysis will be derived according to standard protocol. Patients included in the AE and our prospective study will undergo a pre-operative 7 Tesla HR-MRI scan of both the head and neck area. Discussion: We hypothesize that the 7 Tesla MRI scanner will allow early identification of high risk carotid plaques being associated with micro infarcted cerebral areas, and will thus be able to identify patients with a high risk of periprocedural stroke, by identification of surrogate measures of increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:22294972

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant - a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant.

  8. Rebuild of Capture Cavity 1 at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Arkan, T.; Borissov, E.; Dhanaraj, N.; Hocker, A.; Orlov, Y.; Peterson, T.; Premo, K.

    2014-01-01

    The front end of the proposed Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab employs two single cavity cryomodules, known as 'Capture Cavity 1' and 'Capture Cavity 2', for the first stage of acceleration. Capture Cavity 1 was previously used as the accelerating structure for the A0 Photoinjector to a peak energy of ~14 MeV. In its new location a gradient of ~25 MV/m is required. This has necessitated a major rebuild of the cryomodule including replacement of the cavity with a higher gradient one. Retrofitting the cavity and making upgrades to the module required significant redesign. The design choices and their rationale, summary of the rebuild, and early test results are presented.

  9. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the .pi.-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is .beta..lambda., where .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a .pi./2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range.

  10. Cavity-Dumped Communication Laser Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Cavity-dumped lasers have significant advantages over more conventional Q-switched lasers for high-rate operation with pulse position modulation communications, including the ability to emit laser pulses at 1- to 10-megahertz rates, with pulse widths of 0.5 to 5 nanoseconds. A major advantage of cavity dumping is the potential to vary the cavity output percentage from pulse to pulse, maintaining the remainder of the energy in reserve for the next pulse. This article presents the results of a simplified cavity-dumped laser model, establishing the requirements for cavity efficiency and projecting the ultimate laser efficiency attainable in normal operation. In addition, a method of reducing or eliminating laser dead time is suggested that could significantly enhance communication capacity. The design of a laboratory demonstration laser is presented with estimates of required cavity efficiency and demonstration potential.

  11. Turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Daniels, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer for the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large-scale model, simulating the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. These experiments of the aerodynamic driving mechanisms explored the following: (1) flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities; (2) coolant flow injected into the disk cavities; (3) coolant density; (4) leakage flows through the seal between blades; and (5) the role that each of these various flows has in determining the adiabatic recovery temperature at all of the critical locations within the cavities. The model and the test apparatus provide close geometrical and aerodynamic simulation of all the two-stage cavity flow regions for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump and the ability to simulate the sources and sinks for each cavity flow.

  12. Experimental study of double-cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuerke, F.; Pastur, L. R.; Sciamarella, D.; Lusseyran, F.; Artana, G.

    2017-07-01

    The flow through two facing, identical cavities (double-cavity) is characterized experimentally, as the inflow velocity and the distance between the cavities is varied. Standard 2D2C particle image velocimetry measurements in the spanwise mid-plane provide information on the instantaneous and mean velocity flow fields. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements at several points in the double-cavity domain reveal the global character of the streamwise fluctuating velocity spectra. The flow is characterized based on time series, recorded in the shear layer of one of the cavities, for a wide range of inflow velocities and intercavity distances. In a detailed spectral study, we show how the shear layer spectra get affected when the two cavities are brought closer together. Based on the experimental data, a temporal local linear stability analysis was carried out, which was able to explain why the frequency peaks for close intercavity distances broaden and move to higher Strouhal numbers.

  13. Subwavelength Nanopatch Cavities for Semiconductor Plasmon Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolatou, Christina; Rana, Farhan

    2008-05-01

    We propose and analyze a family of nanoscale cavities for electrically-pumped surface-emitting semiconductor lasers that use surface plasmons to provide optical mode confinement in cavities which have dimensions in the 100-300 nm range. The proposed laser cavities are in many ways nanoscale optical versions of micropatch antennas that are commonly used at microwave/RF frequencies. Surface plasmons are not only used for mode confinement but also for output beam shaping to realize single-lobe far-field radiation patterns with narrow beam waists from subwavelength size cavities. We identify the cavity modes with the largest quality factors and modal gain, and show that in the near-IR wavelength range (1.0-1.6 microns) cavity losses (including surface plasmon losses) can be compensated by the strong mode confinement in the gain region provided by the surface plasmons themselves and the required material threshold gain values can be smaller than 700 1/cm.

  14. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manish; Jiao, Hong; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2002-11-01

    Cavity-enhanced methods have been extended to fiber optics by use of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as reflectors. High-finesse fiber cavities were fabricated from FBGs made in both germanium/boron-co-doped photosensitive fiber and hydrogen-loaded Corning SMF-28 fiber. Optical losses in these cavities were determined from the measured Fabry-Perot transmission spectra and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. For a 10-m-long single-mode fiber cavity, ring-down times in excess of 2 ms were observed at 1563.6 nm, and individual laser pulses were resolved. An evanescent-wave access block was produced within a fiber cavity, and an enhanced sensitivity to optical loss was observed as the external medium's refractive index was altered.

  15. Transport Properties of the CEBAF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Bisognano, Joseph; Yunn, Byunn C

    1993-05-17

    The transport properties of the CEBAF 5-cell cavity are studied. The 3-D cavity fields are calculated by use of the 3-D program MAFIA and are incorporated in a modified PARMELA. Numerical simulation results show that the cavity has finite dipole, quadrupole and skew quadrupole field components, which are due to the asymmetric field in the fundamental and the higher-order-mode couplers. The azimuthal focusing of the cavity disappears for high energy particles as 1/gamma^2. The dependence on the initial energy and cavity phase is given. The cavity-steering effects were measured on the CEBAF 45 MeV injector and are in good agreement with the numerical simulation.

  16. Tunable-cavity QED with phase qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Jed D.; da Silva, Fabio; Allman, Michael Shane; Lecocq, Florent; Cicak, Katarina; Sirois, Adam; Teufel, John; Aumentado, Jose; Simmonds, Raymond W.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a tunable-cavity QED architecture with an rf SQUID phase qubit inductively coupled to a single-mode, resonant cavity with a tunable frequency that allows for both tunneling and dispersive measurements. Dispersive measurement is well characterized by a three-level model, strongly dependent on qubit anharmonicity, qubit-cavity coupling and detuning. The tunable cavity frequency provides dynamic control over the coupling strength and qubit-cavity detuning helping to minimize Purcell losses and cavity-induced dephasing during qubit operation. The maximum decay time T1 = 1 . 5 μs is limited by dielectric losses from a design geometry similar to planar transmon qubits. This work supported by NIST and NSA grant EAO140639.

  17. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  18. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  19. Cavity nucleation in Al 5083 alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, N.; Chen, Z.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper the authors address the controversial issue of nucleation of cavities in Al 5083 alloys. They focus on the origin of cavities during the manufacture of these alloys into SPF (superplastic forming) sheet form. Experimental observations on the pre-existing cavities in this alloy are made using optical and electron microscopy. The effects of rolling direction and state of stress during superplastic deformations on the formation of cavities are also discussed. Numerical simulations of the sheet manufacturing process are carried out to understand the effect of hard phase/matrix, mechanical properties and interfacial strength on the origin of cavities. Based on the numerical results, a simplified model relating the process, material parameters and the cavity nucleation is presented.

  20. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla: Is administration of hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide mandatory?

    PubMed Central

    Roethke, Matthias C; Kuru, Timur H; Radbruch, Alexander; Hadaschik, Boris; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the value of administration of hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide (HBB) for image quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate. METHODS: Seventy patients were retrospectively included in the study. Thirty-five patients were examined with administration of 40 milligrams of HBB (Buscopan®; Boehringer, Ingelheim, Germany); 35 patients were examined without HBB. A multiparametric MRI protocol was performed on a 3.0 Tesla scanner without using an endorectal coil. The following criteria were evaluated independently by two experienced radiologists on a five-point Likert scale: anatomical details (delineation between peripheral and transitional zone of the prostate, visualisation of the capsule, depiction of the neurovascular bundles); visualisation of lymph nodes; motion related artefacts; and overall image quality. RESULTS: Comparison of anatomical details between the two cohorts showed no statistically significant difference (3.9 ± 0.7 vs 4.0 ± 0.9, P = 0.54, and 3.8 ± 0.7 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, P = 0.07) for both readers. There was no significant advantage regarding depiction of local and iliac lymph nodes (3.9 ± 0.6 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, P = 0.07, and 3.8 ± 0.9 vs 4.1 ± 0.8, P = 0.19). Motion artefacts were rated as “none” to “few” in both groups and showed no statistical difference (2.3 ± 1.0 vs 1.9 ± 0.9, P = 0.19, and 2.3 ± 1.1 vs 1.9 ± 0.7, P = 0.22). Overall image quality was rated “good” in average for both cohorts without significant difference (4.0 ± 0.6 vs 4.0 ± 0.9, P = 0.78, and 3.8 ± 0.8 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated no significant effect of HBB administration on image quality. The study suggests that use of HBB is not mandatory for MRI of the prostate at 3.0 Tesla. PMID:23908696