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Sample records for nitric oxide enhances

  1. Nitric oxide enhancement strategies.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Nathan S

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that many diseases are characterized or associated with perturbations in nitric oxide (NO) production/signaling. Therapeutics or strategies designed to restore normal NO homeostasis will likely have broad application and utility. This highly complex and multistep pathway for NO production and subsequent target activation provides many steps in the endogenous pathway that may be useful targets for drug development for cardiovascular disease, antimicrobial, cancer, wound healing, etc. This article will summarize known strategies that are currently available or in development for enhancing NO production or availability in the human body. Each strategy will be discussed including exogenous sources of NO, use of precursors to promote NO production and downstream pathways affected by NO production with advantages and disadvantages highlighted for each. Development of NO-based therapeutics is and will continue to be a major focus of biotech, academia as well as pharmaceutical companies. Application of safe and effective strategies will certainly transform health and disease.

  2. Nitric oxide enhancement strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Nathan S

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that many diseases are characterized or associated with perturbations in nitric oxide (NO) production/signaling. Therapeutics or strategies designed to restore normal NO homeostasis will likely have broad application and utility. This highly complex and multistep pathway for NO production and subsequent target activation provides many steps in the endogenous pathway that may be useful targets for drug development for cardiovascular disease, antimicrobial, cancer, wound healing, etc. This article will summarize known strategies that are currently available or in development for enhancing NO production or availability in the human body. Each strategy will be discussed including exogenous sources of NO, use of precursors to promote NO production and downstream pathways affected by NO production with advantages and disadvantages highlighted for each. Development of NO-based therapeutics is and will continue to be a major focus of biotech, academia as well as pharmaceutical companies. Application of safe and effective strategies will certainly transform health and disease. PMID:28031863

  3. Enhanced colonic nitric oxide generation and nitric oxide synthase activity in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Stamler, J S; Bachwich, D; Karmeli, F; Ackerman, Z; Podolsky, D K

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that nitric oxide (NO.), the product of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory cells, may play a part in tissue injury and inflammation through its oxidative metabolism. In this study the colonic generation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and nitric oxide synthase activity was determined in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Colonic biopsy specimens were obtained from inflammatory bowel disease patients and from normal controls. Mucosal explants were cultured in vitro for 24 hours and NOx generation was determined. Nitric oxide synthase activity was monitored by the conversion of [3H]-L-arginine to citrulline. Median NOx generation by inflamed colonic mucosa of patients with active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's colitis was 4.2- and 8.1-fold respectively higher than that by normal human colonic mucosa. In ulcerative colitis and Crohn's colitis nitric oxide synthase activity was 10.0- and 3.8-fold respectively higher than in normal subjects. Colonic NOx generation is significantly decreased by methylprednisolone and ketotifen. The decrease in NOx generation by cultured colonic mucosa induced by methylprednisolone suggests that NO synthase activity is induced during the culture and the steroid effect may contribute to its therapeutic effect. Enhanced colonic NOx generation by stimulated nitric oxide synthase activity in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease may contribute to tissue injury. PMID:7541008

  4. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    Treesearch

    Iris C. Anderson; Joel S. Levine; Mark A. Poth; Philip J. Riggan

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least 6 months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of...

  5. Nitric Oxide Enhances Charge-Coupled Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.; Poindexter, Edward H.

    1990-01-01

    Simple treatment increases and stabilizes quantum efficiency of charge-coupled-device photodetector illuminated on back surface at wavelengths less than 4,500 Angstrom. Must be biased in strong accumulation mode. Physical principle of enhancement explained more fully in "Metal Film Increases CCD Output" (NPO-16815). Useful for imaging at wavelengths from ultraviolet to blue; for example, in astronomical observations.

  6. Enhanced gastric nitric oxide synthase activity in duodenal ulcer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Karmeli, F; Eliakim, R; Stalnikowicz, R; Ackerman, Z; Amir, G; Stamler, J S

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide, the product of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory cells, may have a role in tissue injury through its oxidative metabolism. Nitric oxide may have a role in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer and may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the association between gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and peptic disease. In this study, calcium independent nitric oxide synthase activity was detected in human gastric mucosa suggesting expression of the inducible isoform. In 17 duodenal ulcer patients gastric antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity was found to be two and 1.5-fold respectively higher than its activity in the antrum and fundus of 14 normal subjects (p < 0.05). H pylori was detected in the antrum of 15 of 17 duodenal ulcer patients and only in 7 of 14 of the control subjects. Antral nitric oxide synthase activity in H pylori positive duodenal ulcer patients was twofold higher than in H pylori positive normal subjects (p < 0.05). In duodenal ulcer patients antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity resumed normal values after induction of ulcer healing with ranitidine. Eradication of H pylori did not further affect gastric nitric oxide synthase activity. These findings suggest that in duodenal ulcer patients stimulated gastric mucosal nitric oxide synthase activity, though independent of the H pylori state, may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:7525417

  7. [Nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Basal nitric oxide production is enhanced by hydraulic pressure in cultured human trabecular cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, T.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Nitric oxide donors reduce intraocular pressure. Human trabecular cells in culture were examined for their nitric oxide production in response to hydraulic pressure.
METHODS—Human trabecular cells were cultured from trabeculum tissue fragments excised during trabeculectomy and exposed to hydraulic pressure change in a culture flask connected to a glass syringe. The pressure was exerted by automatic infusion of the piston of the syringe and monitored by a pressure gauge. The intracellular nitric oxide level was measured in real time with a nitric oxide binding fluorescent dye, diaminofluorescein-2.
RESULTS—Intracellular nitric oxide levels in cultured trabecular cells showed spontaneous fluctuation during 400 seconds of observation. Peak levels of intracellular nitric oxide were significantly higher at hydraulic pressure of 30, 40, and 50 mm Hg, compared with 0 and 25 mm Hg (p<0.0001, one way ANOVA, and p<0.05, Tukey-Kramer test). The fluctuation was completely abolished by the presence of N-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. The cultured trabecular cells were shown by immunohistochemistry to express brain nitric oxide synthase (bNOS).
CONCLUSION—Higher levels of hydraulic pressure enhanced basal production of nitric oxide in human trabecular cells. Nitric oxide would be a physiological mediator in the regulation of intraocular pressure.

 PMID:10837391

  9. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  10. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Iris C.; Levine, Joel S.; Poth, Mark A.; Riggan, Philip J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least six months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of exchangeable ammonium in the soil following the burn. Biomass burning is known to be an instantaneous source of NO and N2O resulting from high-temperature combustion. Now it is found that biomass burning also results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of these gases, which persist for months following the burn.

  11. Nitric Oxide Mediates Glutamate-Linked Enhancement of cGMP Levels in the Cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredt, David S.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. We show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  12. Nitric oxide mediates glutamate-linked enhancement of cGMP levels in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Bredt, D S; Snyder, S H

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. We show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine--citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  13. Nitric oxide mediates glutamate-linked enhancement of cGMP levels in the cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. The authors show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  14. Estrogen increases the severity of anaphylaxis in female mice through enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Hox, Valerie; Desai, Avanti; Bandara, Geethani; Gilfillan, Alasdair M; Metcalfe, Dean D; Olivera, Ana

    2015-03-01

    Clinical observations suggest that anaphylaxis is more common in adult women compared with adult men, although the mechanistic basis for this sex bias is not well understood. We sought to document sex-dependent differences in a mouse model of anaphylaxis and explore the role of female sex hormones and the mechanisms responsible. Passive systemic anaphylaxis was induced in female and male mice by using histamine, as well as IgE or IgG receptor aggregation. Anaphylaxis was assessed by monitoring body temperature, release of mast cell mediators and/or hematocrit, and lung weight as a measure of vascular permeability. A combination of ovariectomy, estrogen receptor antagonism, and estrogen administration techniques were used to establish estrogen involvement. Anaphylactic responses were more pronounced in female than male mice. The enhanced severity of anaphylaxis in female mice was eliminated after pretreatment with an estrogen receptor antagonist or ovariectomy but restored after administration of estradiol in ovariectomized mice, demonstrating that the sex-specific differences are due to the female steroid estradiol. Estrogen did not affect mast cell responsiveness or anaphylaxis onset. Instead, it increased tissue expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Blockage of NOS activity with the inhibitor L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester or genetic eNOS deficiency abolished the sex-related differences. Our study defines a contribution of estrogen through its regulation of eNOS expression and nitric oxide production to vascular hyperpermeability and intensified anaphylactic responses in female mice, providing additional mechanistic insights into risk factors and possible implications for clinical management in the further exploration of human anaphylaxis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. High-calcium diet enhances vasorelaxation in nitric oxide-deficient hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jolma, P; Kalliovalkama, J; Tolvanen, J P; Kööbi, P; Kähönen, M; Hutri-Kähönen, N; Wu, X; Pörsti, I

    2000-09-01

    Because the effects of calcium supplementation on arterial tone in nitric oxide-deficient hypertension are unknown, we investigated the influence of elevating dietary calcium from 1.1 to 3.0% in Wistar rats treated with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg. kg(-1). day(-1)) for 8 wk. A high-calcium diet attenuated the development of hypertension induced by L-NAME and abrogated the associated impairments of endothelium-independent mesenteric arterial relaxations to nitroprusside, isoproterenol, and cromakalim. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine during nitric oxide synthase inhibition in vitro were decreased in L-NAME rats and improved by calcium supplementation. The inhibition of cyclooxygenase by diclofenac augmented the responses to acetylcholine in L-NAME rats but not in calcium + L-NAME rats. When hyperpolarization of smooth muscle was prevented by KCl precontraction, the responses to acetylcholine during combined nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibition were similar in all groups. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase enhanced the acetylcholine-induced relaxations in L-NAME rats but not in calcium + L-NAME rats. In conclusion, calcium supplementation reduced blood pressure during chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition and abrogated the associated impairments in endothelium-dependent and -independent arterial relaxation. The augmented vasorelaxation after increased calcium intake in L-NAME hypertension may be explained by enhanced hyperpolarization and increased sensitivity to nitric oxide in arterial smooth muscle and decreased vascular production of superoxide and vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  16. Detection of nitric oxide pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Weisbach, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    Studies of absorption spectra enhancement of certain atomic and molecular species inserter in dye-laser cavities have indicated that nitric oxide can be determined at low concentrations. Absorption coefficient of small amounts of nitric oxide in intra-laser-cavity absorption cell containing helium is enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude.

  17. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel-2 Interaction with Nitric Oxide Synthase Enhances Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cell Nitric Oxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Alvira, Cristina M.; Umesh, Anita; Husted, Cristiana; Ying, Lihua; Hou, Yanli; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Nowak, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Increased pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) endothelium-dependent nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity mediates perinatal pulmonary vasodilation. Compromised eNOS activity is central to the pathogenesis of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Voltage-derived anion channel (VDAC)-1 was recently demonstrated to bind eNOS in the systemic circulation. We hypothesized that VDAC isoforms modulate eNOS activity in the pulmonary circulation, and that decreased VDAC expression contributes to PPHN. In PAECs derived from an ovine model of PPHN: (1) there is eNOS activity, but not expression; and (2) VDAC1 and -2 proteins are decreased. Immunocytochemistry, coimmunoprecipitation, and in situ proximity ligation assays in human PAECs (hPAECs) demonstrate binding between eNOS and both VDAC1 and -2, which increased upon stimulation with NO agonists. The ability of agonists to increase the eNOS/VDAC interaction was significantly blunted in hypertensive, compared with normotensive, ovine PAECs. Depletion of VDAC2, but not VDAC1, blocked the agonist-induced increase in eNOS activity in hPAECs. Overexpression of VDAC2 in hypertensive PAECs increased eNOS activity. Binding of VDAC2 enhances eNOS activity in the pulmonary circulation, and diminished VDAC2 constrains eNOS in PAECs derived from fetal lambs with chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension. We speculate that decreases in VDAC2 may contribute to the limited eNOS activity that characterizes pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22842492

  18. Voltage-dependent anion channel-2 interaction with nitric oxide synthase enhances pulmonary artery endothelial cell nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Alvira, Cristina M; Umesh, Anita; Husted, Cristiana; Ying, Lihua; Hou, Yanli; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Nowak, Jeffrey; Cornfield, David N

    2012-11-01

    Increased pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) endothelium-dependent nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity mediates perinatal pulmonary vasodilation. Compromised eNOS activity is central to the pathogenesis of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Voltage-derived anion channel (VDAC)-1 was recently demonstrated to bind eNOS in the systemic circulation. We hypothesized that VDAC isoforms modulate eNOS activity in the pulmonary circulation, and that decreased VDAC expression contributes to PPHN. In PAECs derived from an ovine model of PPHN: (1) there is eNOS activity, but not expression; and (2) VDAC1 and -2 proteins are decreased. Immunocytochemistry, coimmunoprecipitation, and in situ proximity ligation assays in human PAECs (hPAECs) demonstrate binding between eNOS and both VDAC1 and -2, which increased upon stimulation with NO agonists. The ability of agonists to increase the eNOS/VDAC interaction was significantly blunted in hypertensive, compared with normotensive, ovine PAECs. Depletion of VDAC2, but not VDAC1, blocked the agonist-induced increase in eNOS activity in hPAECs. Overexpression of VDAC2 in hypertensive PAECs increased eNOS activity. Binding of VDAC2 enhances eNOS activity in the pulmonary circulation, and diminished VDAC2 constrains eNOS in PAECs derived from fetal lambs with chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension. We speculate that decreases in VDAC2 may contribute to the limited eNOS activity that characterizes pulmonary hypertension.

  19. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea leads to enhanced pulmonary vascular nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Lattimore, Jo-Dee L; Wilcox, Ian; Adams, Mark R; Kilian, Jens G; Celermajer, David S

    2008-05-23

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with pulmonary hypertension, however neither the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular disease nor the effect of successful treatment of OSA on pulmonary vascular physiology has been characterised. Seven subjects aged 52 (range 36-63) years with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea (apnoea-hypopnoea index>15/h) had detailed pulmonary vascular reactivity studies, before and after 3 months of successful treatment with nasal continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP). On both occasions, we measured pulmonary pressure, flow velocity, flow and resistance, at baseline and in response to acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent dilator), sodium nitroprusside (an endothelium-independent dilator), l-NMMA (an antagonist of nitric oxide synthesis) and l-Arginine (the substrate of nitric oxide). At baseline, pulmonary flow increased in response to acetylcholine and nitroprusside and fell in response to l-NMMA. Following CPAP treatment, the decrease in flow to l-NMMA was significantly greater (to 62+/-6% of control value vs 85+/-6% of pre-treatment; p=0.01), consistent with enhanced basal release of nitric oxide. The acetylcholine response tended to be greater after treatment (174+/-26% of control vs 147+/-12% of pre-CPAP, p=0.22), however the nitroprusside response was unchanged. Successful treatment of obstructive sleep apnoeic episodes in sleep results in enhanced nitric oxide release by the pulmonary microvascular circulation.

  20. Endurance training enhances vasodilation induced by nitric oxide in human skin.

    PubMed

    Boegli, Yann; Gremion, Gerald; Golay, Sandrine; Kubli, Sandrine; Liaudet, Lucas; Leyvraz, Pierre-François; Waeber, Bernard; Feihl, François

    2003-11-01

    Endurance training modifies the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow, as manifested by a greater augmentation of skin perfusion for the same increase in core temperature in athletes, in comparison with sedentary subjects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a component of this adaptation might reside in a higher ability of cutaneous blood vessels to respond to vasodilatory stimuli. We recruited healthy nonsmoking males, either endurance trained or sedentary, in two different age ranges (18-35 y and >50 y). Skin blood flow was measured in the forearm skin, using a laser Doppler imager, allowing to record the vasodilatory responses to the following stimuli: iontophoresis of acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent vasodilator), iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside (a nitric oxide donor), and release of a temporary interruption of arterial inflow (reactive hyperemia). There was no effect of training on reactive hyperemia or the response to acetylcholine. In contrast, the increase in perfusion following the iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside, expressed in perfusion units, was larger in trained than in sedentary subjects (younger: 398 +/- 54 vs 350 +/- 87, p < 0.05; older 339 +/- 72 vs 307 +/- 66, p < 0.05). In conclusion, endurance training enhances the vasodilatory effects of nitric oxide in the human dermal microcirculation, at least in forearm skin. These observations have considerable physiologic interest in view of recent data indicating that nitric oxide mediates in part the cutaneous vasodilation induced by heat stress in humans. Therefore, the augmentation of nitric oxide bioactivity in the dermal microcirculation might be one mechanism whereby endurance training modifies the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow.

  1. Nitric oxide delivery by core/shell superparamagnetic nanoparticle vehicles with enhanced biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X F; Mansouri, S; Mbeh, D A; Yahia, L'H; Sacher, E; Veres, T

    2012-09-04

    We report the synthesis of Fe(3)O(4)/silica core/shell nanoparticles and their functionalization with S-nitrosothiols. These nanoparticles are of immense interest because of their nitric oxide (NO) release capabilities in human alveolar epithelial cells. Moreover, they act as large storage reservoirs of NO that can be targeted magnetically to the specific site with a sustainable release of NO for up to 50 h. Such nanoparticles provide an enhancement of the biocompatibility with released NO while allowing intracellular accumulation ascribed to their small size.

  2. Enhancement of fracture healing in the rat, modulated by compounds that stimulate inducible nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Rajfer, R. A.; Kilic, A.; Neviaser, A. S.; Schulte, L. M.; Hlaing, S. M.; Landeros, J.; Ferrini, M. G.; Ebramzadeh, E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the effects on fracture healing of two up-regulators of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a rat model of an open femoral osteotomy: tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and the recently reported nutraceutical, COMB-4 (consisting of L-citrulline, Paullinia cupana, ginger and muira puama), given orally for either 14 or 42 days. Materials and Methods Unilateral femoral osteotomies were created in 58 male rats and fixed with an intramedullary compression nail. Rats were treated daily either with vehicle, tadalafil or COMB-4. Biomechanical testing of the healed fracture was performed on day 42. The volume, mineral content and bone density of the callus were measured by quantitative CT on days 14 and 42. Expression of iNOS was measured by immunohistochemistry. Results When compared with the control group, the COMB-4 group exhibited 46% higher maximum strength (t-test, p = 0.029) and 92% higher stiffness (t-test, p = 0.023), but no significant changes were observed in the tadalafil group. At days 14 and 42, there was no significant difference between the three groups with respect to callus volume, mineral content and bone density. Expression of iNOS at day 14 was significantly higher in the COMB-4 group which, as expected, had returned to baseline levels at day 42. Conclusion This study demonstrates an enhancement in fracture healing by an oral natural product known to augment iNOS expression. Cite this article: R. A. Rajfer, A. Kilic, A. S. Neviaser, L. M. Schulte, S. M. Hlaing, J. Landeros, M. G. Ferrini, E. Ebramzadeh, S-H. Park. Enhancement of fracture healing in the rat, modulated by compounds that stimulate inducible nitric oxide synthase: Acceleration of fracture healing via inducible nitric oxide synthase. Bone Joint Res 2017:6:–97. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.62.BJR-2016-0164.R2. PMID:28188129

  3. Hydrogen sulfide enhances nitric oxide-induced tolerance of hypoxia in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Peng, Renyi; Bian, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Lina; Cheng, Wei; Hai, Na; Yang, Changquan; Yang, Tao; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Chongying

    2016-11-01

    Our data present H 2 S in a new role, serving as a multi-faceted transducer to different response mechanisms during NO-induced acquisition of tolerance to flooding-induced hypoxia in maize seedling roots. Nitric oxide (NO), serving as a secondary messenger, modulates physiological processes in plants. Recently, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been demonstrated to have similar signaling functions. This study focused on the effects of treatment with H2S on NO-induced hypoxia tolerance in maize seedlings. The results showed that treatment with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced survival rate of submerged maize roots through induced accumulation of endogenous H2S. The induced H2S then enhanced endogenous Ca(2+) levels as well as the Ca(2+)-dependent activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), improving the capacity for antioxidant defense and, ultimately, the hypoxia tolerance in maize seedlings. In addition, NO induced the activities of key enzymes in H2S biosynthesis, such as L-cysteine desulfhydrases (L-CDs), O-acetyl-L-serine (thiol)lyase (OAS-TL), and β-Cyanoalanine Synthase (CAS). SNP-induced hypoxia tolerance was enhanced by the application of NaHS, but was eliminated by the H2S-synthesis inhibitor hydroxylamine (HA) and the H2S-scavenger hypotaurine (HT). H2S concurrently enhanced the transcriptional levels of relative hypoxia-induced genes. Together, our findings indicated that H2S serves as a multi-faceted transducer that enhances the nitric oxide-induced hypoxia tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.).

  4. Enhancement of fracture healing in the rat, modulated by compounds that stimulate inducible nitric oxide synthase: Acceleration of fracture healing via inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Rajfer, R A; Kilic, A; Neviaser, A S; Schulte, L M; Hlaing, S M; Landeros, J; Ferrini, M G; Ebramzadeh, E; Park, S-H

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effects on fracture healing of two up-regulators of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a rat model of an open femoral osteotomy: tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and the recently reported nutraceutical, COMB-4 (consisting of L-citrulline, Paullinia cupana, ginger and muira puama), given orally for either 14 or 42 days. Unilateral femoral osteotomies were created in 58 male rats and fixed with an intramedullary compression nail. Rats were treated daily either with vehicle, tadalafil or COMB-4. Biomechanical testing of the healed fracture was performed on day 42. The volume, mineral content and bone density of the callus were measured by quantitative CT on days 14 and 42. Expression of iNOS was measured by immunohistochemistry. When compared with the control group, the COMB-4 group exhibited 46% higher maximum strength (t-test, p = 0.029) and 92% higher stiffness (t-test, p = 0.023), but no significant changes were observed in the tadalafil group. At days 14 and 42, there was no significant difference between the three groups with respect to callus volume, mineral content and bone density. Expression of iNOS at day 14 was significantly higher in the COMB-4 group which, as expected, had returned to baseline levels at day 42. This study demonstrates an enhancement in fracture healing by an oral natural product known to augment iNOS expression.Cite this article: R. A. Rajfer, A. Kilic, A. S. Neviaser, L. M. Schulte, S. M. Hlaing, J. Landeros, M. G. Ferrini, E. Ebramzadeh, S-H. Park. Enhancement of fracture healing in the rat, modulated by compounds that stimulate inducible nitric oxide synthase: Acceleration of fracture healing via inducible nitric oxide synthase. Bone Joint Res 2017:6:-97. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.62.BJR-2016-0164.R2. © 2017 Park et al.

  5. Involvement of nitric oxide in enhanced germination and seedling growth of magnetoprimed maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pinke; Kadur Narayanaswamy, Guruprasad; Kataria, Sunita; Baghel, Lokesh

    2017-02-21

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly reactive gaseous free radical, which in plants was found to stimulate seed germination and ending of dormancy. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of NO inhibitors sodium tungstate (ST) and Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on untreated and magnetoprimed maize (Zea mays var: GSF-2) seeds. Treatment of maize seeds with these inhibitors inhibited germination related parameters like seedling length, fresh weight, dry weight and vigour indices and α-amylase activity of maize seeds under laboratory conditions, whereas NO donor (SNP) promoted all these parameters. Among three different inhibitors used ST was most effective and showed an inhibition in seedling length of 67% and 71% at 1 mM concentration for untreated (UT) and magnetically treated (MT) seeds respectively. Data presented here indicate the involvement of nitric oxide in enhanced germination and seedling growth of magnetoprimed maize seeds. ROS are continuosly produced by the cell of germinating seeds and play a positive role in germination of magnetoprimed maize seeds. ROS inhibitor (DPI) inhibited seedling length by 34% and 40% for control and MT seeds respectively. α-amylase activity was also inhibited by all the three inhibitors used. It is concluded that NO inhibitors and ROS inhibitor inhibited magnetic field induced promotion of seedling parameters and α- amylase activity of maize seeds.

  6. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  7. JS-K, a Nitric Oxide Prodrug, Has Enhanced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cells with Knockdown of Thioredoxin Reductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Edes, Kornelia; Cassidy, Pamela; Shami, Paul J.; Moos, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The selenoenzyme thioredoxin reductase 1 has a complex role relating to cell growth. It is induced as a component of the cellular response to potentially mutagenic oxidants, but also appears to provide growth advantages to transformed cells by inhibiting apoptosis. In addition, selenocysteine-deficient or alkylated forms of thioredoxin reductase 1 have also demonstrated oxidative, pro-apoptotic activity. Therefore, a greater understanding of the role of thioredoxin reductase in redox initiated apoptotic processes is warranted. Methodology The role of thioredoxin reductase 1 in RKO cells was evaluated by attenuating endogenous thioredoxin reductase 1 expression with siRNA and then either inducing a selenium-deficient thioredoxin reductase or treatment with distinct redox challenges including, hydrogen peroxide, an oxidized lipid, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenol, and a nitric oxide donating prodrug. Thioredoxin redox status, cellular viability, and effector caspase activity were measured. Conclusions/Significance In cells with attenuated endogenous thioredoxin reductase 1, a stably integrated selenocysteine-deficient form of the enzyme was induced but did not alter either the thioredoxin redox status or the cellular growth kinetics. The oxidized lipid and the nitric oxide donor demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity when thioredoxin reductase 1 was knocked-down; however, the effect was more pronounced with the nitric oxide prodrug. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that attenuation of the thioredoxin-system can promote apoptosis in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. PMID:20098717

  8. Rocuronium Bromide Inhibits Inflammation and Pain by Suppressing Nitric Oxide Production and Enhancing Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rocuronium bromide is a nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking drug and has been used as an adjunct for relaxation or paralysis of the skeletal muscles, facilitation of endotracheal intubation, and improving surgical conditions during general anesthesia. However, intravenous injection of rocuronium bromide induces injection pain or withdrawal movement. The exact mechanism of rocuronium bromide-induced injection pain or withdrawal movement is not yet understood. We investigated whether rocuronium bromide treatment is involved in the induction of inflammation and pain in vascular endothelial cells. Methods For this study, calf pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells were used, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Western blot, nitric oxide detection, and prostaglandin E2 immunoassay were conducted. Results Rocuronium bromide treatment inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase and suppressed nitric oxide production in CPAE cells. Rocuronium bromide activated cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase and increased prostaglandin E2 synthesis in CPAE cells. Conclusions Rocuronium bromide induced inflammation and pain in CPAE cells. Suppressing nitric oxide production and enhancing prostaglandin E2 synthesis might be associated with rocuronium bromide-induced injection pain or withdrawal movement. PMID:28043117

  9. Inhibition of nitric oxide enhances ovine lentivirus replication in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Keane, Kevin A; Mason, Gary L; DeMartini, James C

    2002-12-01

    Ovine lentivirus (OvLV) also known as maedi-visna virus, infects and replicates primarily in macrophages. This investigation examined the role of nitric oxide in the replication of OvLV in cultured macrophages. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from OvLV-free sheep and cultured in Teflon coated flasks at a high concentration of lamb serum. The cells were subsequently infected with OvLV strain 85/34. OvLV replication was assessed under different experimental treatments by comparison of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in culture supernatant. Cultures that were treated with exogenous nitric oxide via S-nitroso-acetylpenicillamine did not have altered levels of RT activity compared to cultures treated with the inactive control compound, acetylpenicillamine. However, blockage of nitric oxide production by treatment with aminoguanidine, a competitive inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), led to a significant rise in RT activity. This rise in RT activity was partially reversed in aminoguanidine treated cultures by L-arginine, the normal substrate for iNOS. Finally, the number of viral antigen producing cells was also quantified after aminoguanidine treatment and found to be significantly higher than untreated cultures. Collectively, these results indicate that nitric oxide is a negative regulator of OvLV replication in macrophages.

  10. Interactive role of nitric oxide and calcium chloride in enhancing tolerance to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nasir; Siddiqui, Manzer H; Mohammad, Firoz; Naeem, M

    2012-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a small diffusible, ubiquitous bioactive molecule, acts as prooxidant as well as antioxidant, and also regulates remarkable spectrum of plant cellular mechanisms. The present work was undertaken to investigate the role of nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and/or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) in the tolerance of excised mustard leaves to salt stress. After 24h, salt stressed leaves treated with SNP and/or CaCl(2), showed an improvement in the activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and nitrate reductase (NR), and leaf chlorophyll (Chl) content, leaf relative water content (LRWC) and leaf ion concentration as compared with the leaves treated with NaCl only. Salinity stress caused a significant increase in H(2)O(2) content and membrane damage which is witnessed by enhanced levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and electrolyte leakage. By contrast, such increases were blocked by the application of 0.2mM SNP and 10mM CaCl(2) to salt stressed leaves. Application of SNP and/or CaCl(2) alleviated NaCl stress by enhancing the activities of antioxidative enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) and by enhancing proline (Pro) and glycinebetaine (GB) accumulation with a concomitant decrease in H(2)O(2) content, TBARS and electrolyte leakage, which is manifested in the tolerance of plants to salinity stress. Moreover, application of SNP with CaCl(2) was more effective to reduce the detrimental effects of NaCl stress on excised mustard leaves. In addition to this, ameliorating effect of SNP was not effective in presence of NO scavenger cPTIO [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide]. To put all these in a nut shell, the results advocate that SNP in association with CaCl(2) plays a role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to salt stress by improving antioxidative defence system, osmolyte accumulation and ionic

  11. Dobesilate enhances endothelial nitric oxide synthase-activity in macro- and microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Suschek, Christoph; Kolb, Hubert; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria

    1997-01-01

    Dobesilate is used for normalizing vascular dysfunction in a number of diseases. In search for an effect on endothelial NO production, macrovascular endothelial cells from rat aorta, microvascular endothelial cells from rat exocrine pancreatic tissue, and capillary endothelial cells from rat islets, were cultured in the presence or absence of Mg-Dobesilate. The activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) in resident cells as well as of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cytokine-activated cells was measured indirectly by recording the citrulline concentrations in culture supernatants.In each of the different endothelial cells Mg-Dobesilate incubation (0.25–1 mM) for 24 h led to a significant and concentration-dependent increase in ecNOS-activities. With cytokine-activated endothelial cell cultures only moderate effects were seen with little or no concentration-dependency. Addition of the NOS-inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine led to a significant suppression of citrulline formation in all cultures as an evidence for the enzyme specificity of these effects.iNOS- and ecNOS-specific reverse transcription and semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) with RNA from resident or cytokine-activated endothelial cells gave no evidence for an increase in NOS-specific mRNA after Mg-Dobesilate-treatment. Furthermore, Dobesilate-mediated enhancement of NO synthesis in resting endothelial cells was not due to iNOS induction in these cells, as no iNOS-specific signal was found by RT–PCR. PMID:9421302

  12. Overexpression of Rat Neurons Nitric Oxide Synthase in Rice Enhances Drought and Salt Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Liu, Wen; Wang, Wen-Shu; Fu, Zheng-Wei; Han, Tong-Tong; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to play an important role in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis mutants with lower or higher levels of endogenous NO. The exogenous application of NO donors or scavengers has also suggested an important role for NO in plant defense against environmental stress. In this study, rice plants under drought and high salinity conditions showed increased nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and NO levels. Overexpression of rat neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in rice increased both NOS activity and NO accumulation, resulting in improved tolerance of the transgenic plants to both drought and salt stresses. nNOS-overexpressing plants exhibited stronger water-holding capability, higher proline accumulation, less lipid peroxidation and reduced electrolyte leakage under drought and salt conditions than wild rice. Moreover, nNOS-overexpressing plants accumulated less H2O2, due to the observed up-regulation of OsCATA, OsCATB and OsPOX1. In agreement, the activities of CAT and POX were higher in transgenic rice than wild type. Additionally, the expression of six tested stress-responsive genes including OsDREB2A, OsDREB2B, OsSNAC1, OsSNAC2, OsLEA3 and OsRD29A, in nNOS-overexpressing plants was higher than that in the wild type under drought and high salinity conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that nNOS overexpression suppresses the stress-enhanced electrolyte leakage, lipid peroxidation and H2O2 accumulation, and promotes proline accumulation and the expression of stress-responsive genes under stress conditions, thereby promoting increased tolerance to drought and salt stresses.

  13. Overexpression of Rat Neurons Nitric Oxide Synthase in Rice Enhances Drought and Salt Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Liu, Wen; Wang, Wen-Shu; Fu, Zheng-Wei; Han, Tong-Tong; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to play an important role in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis mutants with lower or higher levels of endogenous NO. The exogenous application of NO donors or scavengers has also suggested an important role for NO in plant defense against environmental stress. In this study, rice plants under drought and high salinity conditions showed increased nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and NO levels. Overexpression of rat neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in rice increased both NOS activity and NO accumulation, resulting in improved tolerance of the transgenic plants to both drought and salt stresses. nNOS-overexpressing plants exhibited stronger water-holding capability, higher proline accumulation, less lipid peroxidation and reduced electrolyte leakage under drought and salt conditions than wild rice. Moreover, nNOS-overexpressing plants accumulated less H2O2, due to the observed up-regulation of OsCATA, OsCATB and OsPOX1. In agreement, the activities of CAT and POX were higher in transgenic rice than wild type. Additionally, the expression of six tested stress-responsive genes including OsDREB2A, OsDREB2B, OsSNAC1, OsSNAC2, OsLEA3 and OsRD29A, in nNOS-overexpressing plants was higher than that in the wild type under drought and high salinity conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that nNOS overexpression suppresses the stress-enhanced electrolyte leakage, lipid peroxidation and H2O2 accumulation, and promotes proline accumulation and the expression of stress-responsive genes under stress conditions, thereby promoting increased tolerance to drought and salt stresses. PMID:26121399

  14. Nitric oxide in the airways.

    PubMed

    Scadding, Glenis

    2007-08-01

    This review briefly explains the basic facts about nitric oxide, which is entering clinical practice as a measure of lower airways inflammation and is likely also to be employed in otorhinolaryngological practice. These include the validity of nasal nitric oxide in diagnosing primary ciliary dyskinesia and in monitoring the response to chronic rhinosinusitis therapy. The nasal nitric oxide value combined with a humming manoeuvre, which increases the passage of nitric oxide from the sinuses to the nose if the ostiomeatal complex is patent, could reduce the need for computed tomography scans. The link between nitric oxide production and ciliary beating requires further exploration. Therapeutic adjustments to nitric oxide production are under investigation. Nitric oxide is likely to prove highly relevant to airways defence, as well as being an inflammatory mediator. Nasal nitric oxide probably explains some of the benefit of nasal rather than mouth breathing.

  15. Absorption-Enhancing Effect of Nitric Oxide on the Absorption of Hydrophobic Drugs in Rat Duodenum.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Hisanao; Miyazaki, Kaori; Takizawa, Yusuke; Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Inoue, Katsuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an endogenous gas that plays a versatile role in the physiological system, has the ability to increase the intestinal absorption of water-soluble compounds through the paracellular route. However, it remains unclear whether NO can enhance the absorption of hydrophobic drugs through the transcellular route. In this study, we examined the absorption-enhancing effect of NO on intestinal permeability of hydrophobic drugs in rat intestine. The pretreatment of rat gastrointestinal sacs with NOC7, a NO-releasing reagent, significantly increased the permeation of griseofulvin from mucosa to serosa in the sacs prepared from the duodenum, but not in those prepared from the other regions such as jejunum, ileum, and colon. The absorption-enhancing effect of NOC7 on the duodenal permeation varied depending on the hydrophobicity of the drugs used. Furthermore, NOC7 treatment was found to be apparently ineffective on the griseofulvin permeation in the duodenum pretreated with dithiothreitol (DTT) that was used as a mucus remover, even though the permeation was increased by pretreatment with DTT alone. These results suggest that NO increases the absorption of hydrophobic drugs through the transcellular route in the duodenum by modulating the mucus layer function.

  16. Amperometric nitric oxide sensors with enhanced selectivity over carbon monoxide via platinum oxide formation under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Gary C; Zheng, Zheng; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2013-11-05

    An improved planar amperometric nitric oxide (NO) sensor with enhanced selectivity over carbon monoxide (CO), which represents a volatile interfering species for NO sensors that has been largely overlooked until recently, is described. Formation of an oxide film on the inner platinum working electrode via anodic polarization using an inner alkaline electrolyte solution provides the basis for improved selectivity. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that formation of an oxidized Pt film inhibits adsorption of CO to the electrode surface, which is a necessary initial step in the electrocatalytic oxidation of CO on Pt. Previous NO gas sensors that employ internal electrolyte solutions have been assembled using acidic internal solutions that inhibit the formation of a dense platinum oxide film on the working electrode surface. It is demonstrated herein that increasing the internal electrolyte pH promotes oxidized platinum film formation, resulting in improved selectivity over CO. Selectivity coefficients (log KNO,j) for sensors assembled with internal solutions at various pH values range from -0.08 at pH 2.0 to -2.06 at pH 11.7, with average NO sensitivities of 1.24 nA/μM and a limit of detection (LOD) of <1 nM.

  17. Short Time-Scale Enhancements to the Global Thermosphere Temperature and Nitric Oxide Content Resulting From Ionospheric Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, D. R.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Sutton, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    The total Joule heating in the polar ionosphere can be derived from an empirical model of the electric fields and currents, using input measurements of the solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In the thermosphere, measurements of the neutral density from accelerometers on the CHAMP and GRACE satellites are used to derive exospheric temperatures, showing that enhanced ionospheric energy dissipation produces elevated temperatures with little delay.Using the total ionospheric heating, changes in the global mean exosphere temperature as a function of time can be calculated with a simple differential equation. The results compare very well with the CHAMP and GRACE measurement. A critical part of the calculation is the rate at which the thermosphere cools after the ionospheric heating is reduced. It had been noted previously that events with significant levels of heating subsequently cool at a faster rate, and this cooling was attributed to enhanced nitric oxide emissions. This correlation with nitric oxide has been confirmed with very high correlations with measurements of nitric oxide emissions in the thermosphere, from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. These measurements were used in a recent improvement in the equations that calculate the thermosphere temperature. The global nitric oxide cooling rates are included in this calculation, and the predicted levels of nitric oxide, derived from the ionosphere heating model, match the SABER measurements very well, having correlation coefficients on the order of 0.9.These calculations are used to govern the sorting of measurements CHAMP and GRACE measurements, on the basis of the global temperature enhancements due to Joule heating, as well as various solar indices, and season. Global maps of the exospheric temperature are produced from these sorted data.

  18. Thyroid Hormone Enhances Nitric Oxide-Mediated Bacterial Clearance and Promotes Survival after Meningococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Altenbacher, Georg; Hagner, Matthias; Berglund, Pernilla; Gao, Yumin; Lu, Ting; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sjölinder, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Euthyroid sick syndrome characterized by reduced levels of thyroid hormones (THs) is observed in patients with meningococcal shock. It has been found that the level of THs reflects disease severity and is predictive for mortality. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of THs on host defense during meningococcal infection. We found that supplementation of thyroxine to mice infected with Neisseria meningitidis enhanced bacterial clearance, attenuated the inflammatory responses and promoted survival. In vitro studies with macrophages revealed that THs enhanced bacteria-cell interaction and intracellular killing of meningococci by stimulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos)-mediated NO production. TH treatment did not activate expression of TH receptors in macrophages. Instead, the observed TH-directed actions were mediated through nongenomic pathways involving the protein kinases PI3K and ERK1/2 and initiated at the membrane receptor integrin αvβ3. Inhibition of nongenomic TH signaling prevented iNos induction, NO production and subsequent intracellular bacterial killing by macrophages. These data demonstrate a beneficial role of THs in macrophage-mediated N. meningitidis clearance. TH replacement might be a novel option to control meningococcal septicemia. PMID:22844479

  19. Nitric oxide promotes infectious bone resorption by enhancing cytokine-stimulated interstitial collagenase synthesis in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sze-Kwan; Kok, Sang-Heng; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping; Lee, Ming-Shu; Wang, Chih-Chiang; Lan, Wan-Hong; Hsiao, Michael; Goldring, Steven R; Hong, Chi-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    This experiment was undertaken to determine the role of macrophage-derived nitric oxide (NO) in mediating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone resorption by using an in vitro co-culture system and an in vivo model of infectious bone resorption. Our results demonstrated that LPS stimulated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a mRNAs and nitrite synthesis in the J774 mouse macrophage cell line but not in the UMR-106 (rat) and MC3T3-E1 (mouse) osteoblast cell lines. Conditioned media (CM) from LPS-stimulated J774 triggered only low to moderate levels of iNOS mRNAs in MC3T3-E1 and a trivial effect in UMR-106. On the other hand, CM induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) gene expression in both osteoblast cell lines. The NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) did not alter this effect in MC3T3-E1 and UMR-106, whereas TNF-a antibody diminished the CM-induced MMP-1 gene expression in both cell lines. Interestingly, SNAP, a NO donor, although by itself is not a MMP-1 stimulator for UMR-106, augmented the TNF-alpha-stimulated MMP-1 mRNA production in UMR-106. In a J774/UMR-106 co-culture system, LPS stimulated significant MMP-1 gene expression in UMR-106, and this upregulation was abolished by L-NMMA and TNF-alpha antibodies. Immunohistochemical analysis in a rat model of infectious bone resorption (periapical lesion) showed co-distributions of iNOS+ macrophages and MMP-1+ osteoblasts around the osteolytic areas. Administration of L-NMMA markedly reduced the extent of bone loss and the percentage of MMP-1-synthesizing osteoblasts. These data suggest that NO derived from macrophages after LPS stimulation may enhance bone loss by augmenting the cytokine-induced MMP-1 production in osteoblasts.

  20. Novel enhancement mechanism of tyrosine hydroxylase enzymatic activity by nitric oxide through S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Sung, Chun Chau; Chung, Kenny K. K.

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is a rate-limiting step enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamines. Catecholamines function both as hormone and neurotransmitters in the peripheral and central nervous systems, therefore TH’s expression and enzymatic activity is tightly regulated by various mechanisms. Several post-translational modifications have been shown to regulate TH’s enzymatic activity such as phosphorylation, nitration and S-glutathionylation. While phosphorylation at N-terminal of TH can activate its enzymatic activity, nitration and S-glutathionylation can inactivate TH. In this study, we found that TH can also be S-nitrosylated by nitric oxide (NO). S-nitrosylation is a reversible modification of cysteine (cys) residue in protein and is known to be an emerging signaling mechanism mediated by NO. We found that TH can be S-nitrosylated at cys 279 and TH S-nitrosylation enhances its enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo. These results provide a novel mechanism of how NO can modulate TH’s enzymatic activity through S-nitrosylation. PMID:28287127

  1. Enhancing vascular relaxing effects of nitric oxide-donor ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Michele; Banin, Tamy M; de Andrade, Fernanda A; Bendhack, Lusiane M

    2014-05-01

    Ruthenium-derived complexes have emerged as new nitric oxide (NO) donors that may help circumvent the NO deficiency that impairs vasodilation. NO in vessels can be produced by the endothelial cells and/or released by NO donors. NO interacts with soluble guanylyl-cyclase to produce cGMP to activate the kinase-G pathway. As a result, conductance arteries, veins and resistance arteries dilate, whereas the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in the smooth muscle cells decrease. NO also reacts with oxygen or the superoxide anion, to generate reactive oxygen species that modulate NO-induced vasodilation. In this article, we focus on NO production by NO synthase and discuss the vascular changes taking place during hypertension originating from endothelial dysfunction. We will describe how the NO released from ruthenium-derived complexes enhances the vascular effects arising from failed NO generation or lack of NO bioavailability. In addition, how ruthenium-derived NO donors induce the hypotensive effect by vasodilation is also discussed.

  2. Nitric oxide facilitates active avoidance learning via enhancement of glutamate levels in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi; Pan, De-Xi; Wang, Dan; Wan, Peng; Qiu, De-Lai; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2014-09-01

    The hippocampus is a key structure for learning and memory in mammals, and long-term potentiation (LTP) is an important cellular mechanism responsible for learning and memory. Despite a number of studies indicating that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the formation and maintenance of LTP as a retrograde messenger, few studies have used neurotransmitter release as a visual indicator in awake animals to explore the role of NO in learning-dependent long-term enhancement of synaptic efficiency. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of l-NMMA (a NO synthase inhibitor) and SNP (a NO donor) on extracellular glutamate (Glu) concentrations and amplitudes of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) were measured in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) region during the acquisition and extinction of active-avoidance behavior in freely-moving conscious rats. In the control group, the extracellular concentration of Glu in the DG was significantly increased during the acquisition of active-avoidance behavior and gradually returned to baseline levels following extinction training. In the experimental group, the change in Glu concentration was significantly reduced by local microinjection of l-NMMA, as was the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior. In contrast, the change in Glu concentration was significantly enhanced by SNP, and the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior was significantly accelerated. Furthermore, in all groups, the changes in extracellular Glu were accompanied by corresponding changes in fEPSP amplitude and active-avoidance behavior. Our results suggest that NO in the hippocampal DG facilitates active avoidance learning via enhancements of glutamate levels and synaptic efficiency in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancing the pharmacodynamic profile of a class of selective COX-2 inhibiting nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Biava, Mariangela; Battilocchio, Claudio; Poce, Giovanna; Alfonso, Salvatore; Consalvi, Sara; Di Capua, Angela; Calderone, Vincenzo; Martelli, Alma; Testai, Lara; Sautebin, Lidia; Rossi, Antonietta; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Giordani, Antonio; Persiani, Stefano; Colovic, Milena; Dovizio, Melania; Patrignani, Paola; Anzini, Maurizio

    2014-01-15

    We report herein the development, synthesis, physicochemical and pharmacological characterization of a novel class of pharmacodynamic hybrids that selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) isoform and present suitable nitric oxide releasing properties. The replacement of the ester moiety with the amide group gave access to in vivo more stable and active derivatives that highlighted outstanding pharmacological properties. In particular, the glycine derivative proved to be extremely active in suppressing hyperalgesia and edema. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitric Oxide Donors Enhance the Frequency Dependence of Dopamine Release in Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Henrike; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in normal as well as maladaptive motivated behaviors including drug addiction. Whether the striatal neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) influences DA release in NAc is unknown. We investigated whether exogenous NO modulates DA transmission in NAc core and how this interaction varies depending on the frequency of presynaptic activation. We detected DA with cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse NAc in slices following stimuli spanning a full range of DA neuron firing frequencies (1–100 Hz). NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) or z-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA/NONOate) enhanced DA release with increasing stimulus frequency. This NO-mediated enhancement of frequency sensitivity of DA release was not prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), DA transporters, or large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, and did not require glutamatergic or GABAergic input. However, experiments to identify whether frequency-dependent NO effects were mediated via changes in powerful acetylcholine–DA interactions revealed multiple components to NO modulation of DA release. In the presence of a nicotinic receptor antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), NO donors increased DA release in a frequency-independent manner. These data suggest that NO in the NAc can modulate DA release through multiple GC-independent neuronal mechanisms whose net outcome varies depending on the activity in DA neurons and accumbal cholinergic interneurons. In the presence of accumbal acetylcholine, NO promotes the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activation, but with reduced acetylcholine input, NO will promote DA release in an activity-independent manner through a direct action on dopaminergic terminals. PMID:21508928

  5. Bacterial nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Crane, Brian R; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Patel, Bhumit A

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are multidomain metalloproteins first identified in mammals as being responsible for the synthesis of the wide-spread signaling and protective agent nitric oxide (NO). Over the past 10 years, prokaryotic proteins that are homologous to animal NOSs have been identified and characterized, both in terms of enzymology and biological function. Despite some interesting differences in cofactor utilization and redox partners, the bacterial enzymes are in many ways similar to their mammalian NOS (mNOS) counterparts and, as such, have provided insight into the structural and catalytic properties of the NOS family. In particular, spectroscopic studies of thermostable bacterial NOSs have revealed key oxyheme intermediates involved in the oxidation of substrate L-arginine (Arg) to product NO. The biological functions of some bacterial NOSs have only more recently come to light. These studies disclose new roles for NO in biology, such as taking part in toxin biosynthesis, protection against oxidative stress, and regulation of recovery from radiation damage.

  6. Nitric oxide neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M

    1996-06-01

    Derangements in glutamate neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including, stroke, epilepsy, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtype of glutamate receptors results in the influx of calcium which binds calmodulin and activates neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to convent L-arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). NO has many roles in the central nervous system as a messenger molecule, however, when generated in excess NO can be neurotoxic. Excess NO is in part responsible for glutamate neurotoxicity in primary neuronal cell culture and in animal models of stroke. It is likely that most of the neurotoxic actions of NO are mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOO-), the reaction product from NO and superoxide anion. In pathologic conditions, peroxynitrite and oxygen free radicals can be generated in excess of a cell antioxidant capacity resulting in severe damage to cellular constituents including proteins, DNA and lipids. The inherent biochemical and physiological characteristics of the brain, including high lipid concentrations and energy requirements, make it particularly susceptible to free radical and oxidant mediated insult. Increasing evidence indicates that many neurologic disorders may have components of free radical and oxidative stress induced injury.

  7. Enhancement of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla Neuronal Nitric-Oxide Synthase–Nitric-Oxide Signaling Mediates the Central Cannabinoid Receptor 1-Evoked Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Our recent studies implicated brainstem GABAergic signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R)-mediated pressor response in conscious rats. Given the well established link between neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling and GABAergic transmission in brainstem cardiovascular regulating areas, we elucidated the role of nNOS-generated NO in the central CB1R-elicited pressor response. Compared with vehicle, intracisternal (i.c.) microinjection of the CB1R agonist (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl) methanone mesylate (WIN55212-2) (15 μg/rat) significantly enhanced nNOS phosphorylation as well as the total nitrate and nitrite content in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) at 5, 10, and 30 min, which paralleled the elicited pressor response. These findings were corroborated by: 1) the parallel dose-related increases in blood pressure and RVLM-NO levels, measured in real time by in vivo electrochemistry, elicited by intra-RVLM WIN55212-2 (100, 200, or 300 pmol /80 nl; n = 5) in conscious rats; and 2) the significantly higher phosphorylated nNOS (p-nNOS) levels in the WIN55212-2-injected RVLM compared with the contralateral RVLM. Subsequent neurochemical studies showed that WIN55212-2 (15 μg/rat i.c.) significantly increased the number and percentage of neurons immunostained for nNOS (nitroxidergic neurons) and c-Fos (marker of neuronal activity) within the RVLM. The increases in blood pressure and the neurochemical responses elicited by intracisternal WIN55212-2 were attenuated by prior central CB1R blockade by N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 30 μg/rat i.c.) or selective nNOS inhibition by Nω-propyl-L-arginine (1 μg/rat i.c.). These findings implicate RVLM p-nNOS/NO signaling as a molecular mechanism in the central CB1R-evoked pressor effect in conscious rats. PMID:22366659

  8. Nitric oxide releasing hydrogel enhances the therapeutic efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xinpeng; Liu, Yi; Gao, Jie; Yang, Liang; Mao, Duo; Stefanitsch, Christina; Li, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Ou, Lailiang; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Zongjin

    2015-08-01

    Stem cell therapy has been proved to be an effective approach to ameliorate the heart remodeling post myocardial infarction (MI). However, poor cell engraftment and survival in ischemic myocardium limits the successful use of cellular therapy for treating MI. Here, we sought to transplant adipose derived-mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) with a hydrogel (NapFF-NO), naphthalene covalently conjugated a short peptide, FFGGG, and β-galactose caged nitric oxide (NO) donor, which can release NO molecule in response to β-galactosidase. AD-MSCs, either from transgenic mice that constitutively express GFP and firefly luciferase (Fluc), or express Fluc under the control of VEGFR2 promoter, were co-transplanted with NapFF-NO hydrogel into murine MI models. Improved cell survival and enhanced cardiac function were confirmed by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and echocardiogram respectively. Moreover, increasing VEGFR2-luc expression was also tracked in real-time in vivo, indicating NapFF-NO hydrogel stimulated VEGF secretion of AD-MSCs. To investigate the therapeutic mechanism of NapFF-NO hydrogel, cell migration assay, paracrine action of AD-MSCs, and histology analysis were carried out. Our results revealed that condition medium from AD-MSCs cultured with NapFF-NO hydrogel could promote endothelial cell migration. Additionally, AD-MSCs showed significant improvement secretion of angiogenic factors VEGF and SDF-1α in the presence of NapFF-NO hydrogel. Finally, postmortem analysis confirmed that transplanted AD-MSCs with NapFF-NO hydrogel could ameliorate heart function by promoting angiogenesis and attenuating ventricular remodeling. In conclusion, NapFF-NO hydrogel can obviously improve therapeutic efficacy of AD-MSCs for MI by increasing cell engraftment and angiogenic paracrine action.

  9. Genetic removal of basal nitric oxide enhances contractile activity in isolated murine collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J

    2013-04-15

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating lymphatic contractile function and, consequently, lymph flow has been the subject of intense study. Despite this, the precise effects of NO on lymphatic contractile activity remain unclear. Recent hypotheses posit that basal levels of endogenous NO increase lymphatic contraction strength as a consequence of lowering frequency (i.e. positive lusitropy), whereas higher agonist-evoked concentrations of NO exert purely inhibitory effects on contractile function. We tested both hypotheses directly by isolating and cannulating collecting lymphatic vessels from genetically modified mice for ex vivo study. The effects of basal NO and agonist-evoked NO were evaluated, respectively, by exposing wild-type (WT), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS)(-/-) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS)(-/-) lymphatic vessels to controlled pressure steps followed by ACh doses. To compare with pharmacological inhibition of eNOS, we repeated both tests in the presence of l-NAME. Surprisingly, genetic removal of basal NO enhanced contraction amplitude significantly without increasing contraction frequency. Higher levels of NO production stimulated by ACh evoked dilation, decreased tone, slowed contraction frequency and reduced fractional pump flow. We conclude that basal NO specifically depresses contraction amplitude, and that greater NO production then inhibits all other aspects of contractile function. Further, this work demonstrates definitively that mouse collecting lymphatic vessels exhibit autonomous, large-amplitude contractions that respond to pressure similarly to collecting lymphatics of other mammalian species. At least in the peripheral lymphatic vasculature, NO production depresses contractile function, which influences lymph flow needed for fluid regulation, humoral immunity and cancer metastasis.

  10. Inhibition of inflammation may enhance nitric oxide availability in patients undergoing bariatric surgery for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Blum, A; Ginat-Maimon, L; Yehuda, H; Geron, N; Ben Ami, M; Tamir, S

    2015-10-01

    Weight loss surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial cardiovascular effects are poorly understood, although inhibition of inflammatory markers has been demonstrated. We hypothesized that anti-inflammatory and antioxidative stress reactions are responsible for the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery that have been shown in clinical trials. The inflammatory system was studied by measuring mRNA levels of E-selectin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and in a cell line (HUVEC-CS) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells that were incubated for 4 h with pools of serum, collected before and 3 months after surgery, from 20 women who underwent bariatric surgery for weight loss. The oxidative stress pathway was examined by mRNA expression of NADPH oxidase (P22(phox) ), paraoxonase (PON2), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase following incubation of the cells for 4 h with serum pools. The nitric oxide (NO) pathway was studied by measuring mRNA levels of inducible NOS and endothelial NOS and by determining nitrite and nitrate levels. To study the functional behaviour of endothelial cells under stress, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (PECs) were incubated with the serum pools for 48 h, with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for the last 4 h. The inflammatory system: incubation of HUVEC-CS cells with serum from women who underwent bariatric surgery led to a significant decrease in mRNA expression of E-selectin and IL-6 postsurgery. Stimulation of PECs with LPS in the presence of serum from women who underwent bariatric surgery caused a more significant difference in E-selectin and TNF-α mRNA expression before and after surgery. The antioxidant system: incubation of HUVEC-CS cells with serum from women who underwent bariatric surgery did not lead to any difference in mRNA expression of P22(phox) , PON2, SOD2, GPx or catalase. Stimulation of

  11. Copper enhances EDNO (endothelium-derived nitric oxide) activity by cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, T; Oguri, T; Ueda, D; Tada, M

    1996-06-01

    The effect of copper sulfate (Cu) on viable cell number, endothelium-derived nitric oxide (EDNO), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) was investigated. The viable cell number was not affected by the addition of Cu (1.0-500.0 microM). To assess the effect of EDNO by HUVEC, platelet aggregation experiments were performed, using cuvettes lined with HUVEC. Thrombin (0.05 units/ml)-induced platelet aggregation was markedly inhibited in the presence of HUVEC compared with aggregation in the absence of HUVEC. The HUVEC-dependent anti-platelet aggregatory effect was slightly reduced when HUVEC were pretreated with indomethacin (IND; 1.0 micro M), an inhibitor of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. However, the thrombin-induced platelet aggregation in the presence of HUVEC pretreated with IND was smaller than that in the absence of HUVEC, which is dependent on EDNO. The anti-platelet aggregatory effect of HUVEC pretreated with IND was increased dose-dependently by 48-hour pretreatment of HUVEC with Cu (1.0-100.0 microM). To assess the effect of Cu on NOS, HUVEC were stained with NOS/NADPH diaphorase. However, there were no significant differences in the NOS-positive HUVEC cell count between cells without Cu and those with various concentrations of Cu. These findings suggest that Cu stimulates the activity of EDNO, which action may be dependent on Cu decreasing EDNO-oxidative damage.

  12. Co-administration of glutathione and nitric oxide enhances insulin sensitivity in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, Maria P; Macedo, M Paula

    2006-01-01

    The liver modulates insulin sensitivity through a prandial-dependent mechanism that requires activation of the hepatic parasympathetic nerves, hepatic nitric oxide (NO) and hepatic glutathione (GSH). We tested the hypothesis that co-administration of GSH and NO to the liver enhances insulin sensitivity in a GSH and NO dose-dependent manner. 24 h fasted Wistar rats were used. Hepatic GSH was supplemented by administration of glutathione monoethylester (GSH-E; 0.1/0.25/0.5/1/2 mmol kg−1) and 3-morpholinosidnonimine (SIN-1; 5/10 mg kg−1) was used as a NO donor. The drugs were administered either systemically (i.v.) or intraportally (i.p.v.). Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a transient euglycemic clamp. Neither GSH-E nor SIN-1 increased insulin sensitivity when administered alone, both i.v. and i.p.v. Moreover, changes in insulin sensitivity were not observed when GSH-E was administered i.v. followed by either i.v. or i.p.v. SIN-1 at any of the doses tested. However, i.p.v. administration of GSH-E followed by i.p.v. SIN-1 10 mg kg−1 significantly increased insulin sensitivity in a GSH-E dose-dependent manner: 26.1±9.4% after 0.1 mmol kg−1 GSH-E; 44.6±7.9% after 0.25 mmol kg−1 GSH-E; 59.4±15.1% after 0.5 mmol kg−1 GSH-E; 138.9±12.7% after 1 mmol kg−1 GSH-E and 117.3±29.2% after a dose of 2 mmol kg−1 (n=23, P<0.005). Our results confirm that insulin sensitivity is enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by co-administration of NO and GSH donors to the liver. PMID:16491098

  13. Demystified … Nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Stuart-Smith, K

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) demonstrated that cells could communicate via the manufacture and local diffusion of an unstable lipid soluble molecule. Since the original demonstration of the vascular relaxant properties of endothelium derived NO, this fascinating molecule has been shown to have multiple, complex roles within many biological systems. This review cannot hope to cover all of the recent advances in NO biology, but seeks to place the discovery of NO in its historical context, and show how far our understanding has come in the past 20 years. The role of NO in mitochondrial respiration, and consequently in oxidative stress, is described in detail because these processes probably underline the importance of NO in the development of disease. PMID:12456772

  14. Enhancement of tolerance of Ganoderma lucidum to cadmium by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanshan; Yao, Yuan; Zuo, Lei; Shi, Wenjin; Gao, Ni; Xu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is considered as a signaling molecule involved in regulation of diverse physiological processes and stress responses in animals and plants. However, whether NO regulates fungal, particularly edible fungi, response to heavy metal stresses, is unknown. This study investigated the effect of nitric oxide on biological responses of mycelia of Ganoderma lucidum to cadmium (Cd) toxicity. Exposure of Ganoderma lucidum to Cd (400 µM) triggered production of H2O2 and O2(-) in the mycelia and further induced lipid peroxidation as well as sharply decrease of fresh biomass. However, such an effect can be reversed by exogenous supply of NO. Mycelia treated with 100 µM SNP accumulated less H2O2, O2(-), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and fresh biomass of this treatment was improved. Treatment with SNP significantly increased activities of antioxidant enzyme (peroxidase and catalase) to resist Cd stress. Meanwhile, NO-mediated alleviation of Cd toxicity was closely related to the accumulated proline as well as reduced Cd accumulation. These results suggested that NO plays a crucial role in preventing the mycelia of Ganoderma lucidum from Cd toxicity.

  15. Direct Observation of Enhanced Nitric Oxide in a Murine Model of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Boels, Margien G. S.; van Faassen, Ernst E. H.; Avramut, M. Cristina; van der Vlag, Johan; van den Berg, Bernard M.; Rabelink, Ton J.

    2017-01-01

    Uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) secondary to redox signaling is a central mechanism in endothelial and macrophage activation. To date studies on the production of nitric oxide (NO) during the development of diabetic complications show paradoxical results. We previously showed that recoupling eNOS by increasing the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) could restore endothelial function and prevent kidney injury in experimental kidney transplantation. Here, we employed a diabetic mouse model to investigate the effects of diabetes on renal tissue NO bioavailability. For this, we used in vivo NO trapping, followed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, we investigated whether coupling of NOS by supplying the cofactor BH4 could restore glomerular endothelial barrier function. Our data show that overall NO availability at the tissue level is not reduced sixteen weeks after the induction of diabetes in apoE knockout mice, despite the presence of factors that cause endothelial dysfunction, and the presence of the endogenous NOS inhibitor ADMA. Targeting uncoupled NOS with the BH4 precursor sepiapterin further increases NO availability, but did not modify renal glomerular injury. Notably, glomerular heparanase activity as a driver for loss of glomerular barrier function was not reduced, pointing towards NOS-independent mechanisms. This was confirmed by unaltered increased glomerular presence of cathepsin L, the protease that activates heparanase. PMID:28103268

  16. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase enhances superoxide activity in canine kidney.

    PubMed

    Majid, Dewan S A; Nishiyama, Akira; Jackson, Keith E; Castillo, Alexander

    2004-07-01

    To evaluate the role of a potential interaction between superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) and nitric oxide (NO) in regulating kidney function, we examined the renal responses to intra-arterial infusion of a superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol (0.5 mg.kg(-1).min(-1)), in anesthetized dogs treated with or without NO synthase inhibitor, N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine (NLA; 50 microg.kg(-1).min(-1)). In one group of dogs (n = 10), tempol infusion alone for 30 min before NLA infusion did not cause any significant changes in renal blood flow (RBF; 5.2 +/- 0.4 to 5.0 +/- 0.4 ml.min(-1).g(-1)), glomerular filtration rate (GFR; 0.79 +/- 0.04 to 0.77 +/- 0.04 ml.min(-1).g(-1)), urine flow (V; 13.6 +/- 2.1 to 13.9 +/- 2.5 microl.min(-1).g(-1)), or sodium excretion (U(Na)V; 2.4 +/- 0.3 to 2.2 +/- 0.3 micromol.min(-1).g(-1)). Interestingly, when tempol was infused in another group of dogs (n = 12) pretreated with NLA, it caused increases in V (4.4 +/- 0.4 to 9.7 +/- 1.4 microl.min(-1).g(-1)) and in U(Na)V (0.7 +/- 0.1 to 1.3 +/- 0.2 micromol.min(-1).g(-1)) without affecting RBF or GFR. Although NO inhibition caused usual qualitative responses in both groups of dogs, the antidiuretic (47 +/- 5 vs. 26 +/- 4%) and antinatriuretic (67 +/- 4 vs. 45 +/- 11%) responses to NLA were seen much less in dogs pretreated with tempol. NLA infusion alone increased urinary excretion of 8-isoprostane (13.9 +/- 2.7 to 22.8 +/- 3.6 pg.min(-1).g(-1); n = 7), which returned to the control levels (11.6 +/- 3.4 pg.min(-1).g(-1)) during coadministration of tempol. These data suggest that NO synthase inhibition causes enhancement of endogenous O(2)(-) levels and support the hypothesis that NO plays a protective role against the actions of O(2)(-) in the kidney.

  17. Study of Atmospheric Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of energetic nitrogen atoms to the production of nitric oxide in the thermosphere and their influence on the infrared emission spectrum. The nitric oxide molecules are important contributors to the cooling of the atmosphere. We first pointed out that in determining the energy distribution of the nitrogen atoms, it is important to take into account the thermal motion of the atmospheric gases. It had been ignored in all earlier studies. The source spectra are broadened considerably by the center of mass motion of the reactants. We worked out the consequences for the production of nitric oxide at night, using as sources of energetic N atoms, NO(+) + e yield N + O, N(D-2) + O yield N + O. The high energy tail is enhanced by orders of magnitude. We had earlier suggested (Sharma et al. 1993) that the reaction of energetic nitrogen atoms with O2 was responsible for the rotationally enhanced NO identified in the infrared spectrum. Our calculations provided quantitative confirmation of the suggestion. We proceeded to explore the validity of another approximation used in earlier analyses, the hard sphere approximation for the energy loss in elastic collisions. We carried out precise quantum mechanical calculations of the elastic 2 differential scattering of nitrogen atoms in collisions with oxygen atoms and showed that although the hard sphere approximation was nowhere of high precision, reasonable results could be obtained with an effective cross section of 6 x 10(exp 15)sq cm. We also initiated a program to include inelastic energy loss processes in the determination of the energy distribution function. We began a calculation of the rotation and vibrational excitation cross sections of molecular nitrogen and nitrogen atoms and developed a method for including inelastic energy loss as a function of scattering angle in the Boltzmann equation. A procedure for obtaining the solution of the Boltzman equation was worked out.

  18. Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions by Hydrogen Peroxide-Enhanced Gas-Phase Oxidation Of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Kasper, John M; Iii, Christian A Clausen; Cooper, C David

    1996-02-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOX) and sulfur oxides (SOX) are criteria air pollutants, emitted in large quantities from fossil-fueled electric power plants. Emissions of SOX are currently being reduced significantly in many places by wet scrubbing of the exhaust or flue gases, but most of the NOX in the flue gases is NO, which is so insoluble that it is virtually impossible to scrub. Consequently, NOX control is mostly achieved by using combustion modifications to limit the formation of NOX, or by using chemical reduction techniques to reduce NOX to N2. Low NOX burners are relatively inexpensive but can only achieve about 50% reduction in NOX emissions; selective catalytic reduction (SCR) can achieve high reductions but is very expensive. The removal of NOX in wet scrubbers could be greatly enhanced by gas-phase oxidation of the NO to NO2, HNO2, and HNO3 (the acid gases are much more soluble in water than NO). This oxidation is accomplished by injecting liquid hydrogen peroxide into the flue gas; the H2O2 vaporizes and dissociates into hydroxyl radicals. The active OH radicals then oxidize the NO and NO2. This NOX control technique might prove economically feasible at power plants with existing SO2 scrubbers. The higher chemical costs for H2O2 would be balanced by the investment cost savings, compared with an alternative such as SCR. The oxidation of NOX by using hydrogen peroxide has been demonstrated in a laboratory quartz tube reactor. NO conversions of 97% and 75% were achieved at hydrogen peroxide/NO mole ratios of 2.6 and 1.6, respectively. The reactor conditions (500 °C, a pressure of one atmosphere, and 0.7 seconds residence time) are representative of flue gas conditions for a variety of combustion sources. The oxidized NOX species were removed by caustic water scrubbing.

  19. Nitric oxide signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Allan D

    2005-01-01

    Plants have four nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS1 appears mitochondrial, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) chloroplastic. Distinct peroxisomal and apoplastic NOS enzymes are predicted. Nitrite-dependent NO synthesis is catalyzed by cytoplasmic nitrate reductase or a root plasma membrane enzyme, or occurs nonenzymatically. Nitric oxide undergoes both catalyzed and uncatalyzed oxidation. However, there is no evidence of reaction with superoxide, and S-nitrosylation reactions are unlikely except during hypoxia. The only proven direct targets of NO in plants are metalloenzymes and one metal complex. Nitric oxide inhibits apoplastic catalases/ascorbate peroxidases in some species but may stimulate these enzymes in others. Plants also have the NO response pathway involving cGMP, cADPR, and release of calcium from internal stores. Other known targets include chloroplast and mitochondrial electron transport. Nitric oxide suppresses Fenton chemistry by interacting with ferryl ion, preventing generation of hydroxyl radicals. Functions of NO in plant development, response to biotic and abiotic stressors, iron homeostasis, and regulation of respiration and photosynthesis may all be ascribed to interaction with one of these targets. Nitric oxide function in drought/abscisic acid (ABA)-induction of stomatal closure requires nitrate reductase and NOS1. Nitric oxide synthasel likely functions to produce sufficient NO to inhibit photosynthetic electron transport, allowing nitrite accumulation. Nitric oxide is produced during the hypersensitive response outside cells undergoing programmed cell death immediately prior to loss of plasma membrane integrity. A plasma membrane lipid-derived signal likely activates apoplastic NOS. Nitric oxide diffuses within the apoplast and signals neighboring cells via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent induction of salicylic acid biosynthesis. Response to wounding appears to involve the same NOS and direct targets.

  20. Expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase is enhanced in Leishmania spp naturally resistant to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Rios, M C; Silva, W R T; Azevedo, A F; Santos, P L; Teixeira, S A; Muscará, M N; Thomazzi, S M; Almeida, R P; Fernandes, R P M; Scher, R

    2015-06-29

    Leishmania spp are the causative agents of a spectrum of diseases termed leishmaniasis that affect mammals, including humans and dogs. Although reactive nitrogen species are employed in the control of parasitism by the immune system, it is known that Leishmania can withstand this oxidative stress. As the mechanism by which these species are resistant to nitric oxide (NO) is poorly understood, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania chagasi promastigotes showing natural resistance to NO. GAPDH transcript levels were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification, and GAPDH activity (assessed by levels of NADH oxidation) was measured by spectrophotometry. The level of nitration in total protein was assessed by immunoblotting. The results demonstrated an increase in GAPDH expression in resistant isolates of both species compared to susceptible isolates. The increase in GAPDH expression led to an increase in the activity of GAPDH in L. amazonensis human isolates resistant to NO. The pattern of protein nitration did not differ between sensitive and resistant isolates. Our results suggest that changes in expression of GAPDH may be responsible, at least in part, to natural resistance to NO found in human and canine Leishmania spp.

  1. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife

    2006-12-01

    Endothelium has many important functions including the control of blood-tissue permeability and vascular tonus, regulation of vascular surface properties for homeostasis and inflammation. Nitric oxide is the chief molecule in regulation of endothelial functions. Nitric oxide deficiency, which is also known as endothelial dysfunction, is the first step for the occurrence of many disease states in cardiovascular system including heart failure, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia and smoking. This review deals with the importance of nitric oxide for cardiovascular system. It also includes the latest improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  2. Nitric oxide and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muntané, Jordi; la Mata, Manuel De

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a lipophilic, highly diffusible and short-lived physiological messenger which regulates a variety of important physiological responses including vasodilation, respiration, cell migration, immune response and apoptosis. NO is synthesized by three differentially gene-encoded NO synthase (NOS) in mammals: neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS-1), inducible NOS (iNOS or NOS-2) and endothelial NOS (eNOS or NOS-3). All isoforms of NOS catalyze the reaction of L-arginine, NADPH and oxygen to NO, L-citrulline and NADP. NO may exert its cellular action by cGMP-dependent as well as by cGMP-independent pathways including postranslational modifications in cysteine (S-nitrosylation or S-nitrosation) and tyrosine (nitration) residues, mixed disulfide formation (S-nitrosoglutathione or GSNO) or promoting further oxidation protein stages which have been related to altered protein function and gene transcription, genotoxic lesions, alteration of cell-cycle check points, apoptosis and DNA repair. NO sensitizes tumor cells to chemotherapeutic compounds. The expression of NOS-2 and NOS-3 has been found to be increased in a variety of human cancers. The multiple actions of NO in the tumor environment is related to heterogeneous cell responses with particular attention in the regulation of the stress response mediated by the hypoxia inducible factor-1 and p53 generally leading to growth arrest, apoptosis or adaptation. PMID:21161018

  3. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    PubMed Central

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  4. Enhancement of dendritic branching in cultured hippocampal neurons by 17beta-estradiol is mediated by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2003-06-01

    Both 17beta-estradiol (E2) and nitric oxide (NO) are important in neuronal development, learning and memory, and age-related memory changes. There is growing evidence that a number of estrogen receptor-mediated effects of estradiol utilize nitric oxide as an intermediary. The role of estradiol in hippocampal neuronal differentiation and function has particular implications for learning and memory. Low levels of estradiol (10nM) significantly increase dendritic branching in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons (158% of control). This study investigates the hypothesis that the estrogen-stimulated increase in dendritic branching is mediated by nitric oxide. We found that nitric oxide donors also produce significantly increased dendritic branching S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP: 119%; 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (NOC-18): 128% of control). We then determined that the increases in dendritic branching stimulated by estradiol or by a nitric oxide donor were both blocked by an inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase. Dendritic branching was also stimulated by a cell permeable analog of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (dibutyryl-cGMP: 173% of control). Estradiol-stimulated dendritic branching was reversed by the nitric oxide scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl imidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO). This study provides evidence that estradiol influences the development of embryonic hippocampal neurons in culture by increasing the production of nitric oxide or by increasing the sensitivity of the neurons to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide in turn stimulates dendritic branching via activation of guanylyl cyclase.

  5. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  6. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  7. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  8. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  9. Nitric oxide in shock.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, A

    2007-09-01

    Refractory hypotension with end-organ hypoperfusion and failure is an ominous feature of shock. Distributive shock is caused by severe infections (septic shock) or severe systemic allergic reactions (anaphylactic shock). In 1986, it was concluded that nitric oxide (NO) is the endothelium-derived relaxing factor that had been discovered 6 years earlier. Since then, NO has been shown to be important for the physiological and pathological control of vascular tone. Nevertheless, although inhibition of NO synthesis restores blood pressure, NO synthase (NOS) inhibition cannot improve outcome, on the contrary. This implies that NO acts as a double-edged sword during septic shock. Consequently, the focus has shifted towards selective inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitors. The contribution of NO to anaphylactic shock seems to be more straightforward, as NOS inhibition abrogates shock in conscious mice. Surprisingly, however, this shock-inducing NO is not produced by the inducible iNOS, but by the so-called constitutive enzyme endothelial NOS. This review summarizes the contribution of NO to septic and anaphylactic shock. Although NOS inhibition may be promising for the treatment of anaphylactic shock, the failure of a phase III trial indicates that other approaches are required for the successful treatment of septic shock. Amongst these, high hopes are set for selective iNOS inhibitors. But it might also be necessary to shift gears and focus on downstream cardiovascular targets of NO or on other vasodilating phenomena.

  10. Chemiluminescence of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Rusch, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the intensities of the delta and gamma bands of nitric oxide in the nighttime terrestrial thermosphere are presented and used to infer the rate coefficient for the transition from the C 2 Pi to the A 2 Sigma + states. The nightglow spectrum was observed between 1900 and 2300 A at a resolution of 15 A by a rocket-borne scanning 1/4-m spectrometer pointing north at an apogee of 150 km. Progressions of the delta, gamma and epsilon bands are identified on the spectra by the construction of synthetic spectra, and the contributions of resonance fluorescence to the total band intensities are calculated. Finally, the ratio of the sum of the gamma bands for v-prime = 0 to the sum of the delta bands for v-prime = 0 is used to derive a branching ratio of 0.21 + or - 0.04 to the A 2 Sigma + state, which yields a probability for the C-A transition of 5.6 + or - 1.5 x to the 6th/sec.

  11. Nitric Oxide Induces Stomatal Closure and Enhances the Adaptive Plant Responses against Drought Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Carlos García; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a very active molecule involved in many and diverse biological pathways where it has proved to be protective against damages provoked by oxidative stress conditions. In this work, we studied the effect of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine SNP-treated on the response of wheat (Triticum aestivum) to water stress conditions. After 2 and 3 h of drought, detached wheat leaves pretreated with 150 μm SNP retained up to 15% more water than those pretreated with water or NO2−/NO3−. The effect of SNP treatment on water retention was also found in wheat seedlings after 7 d of drought. These results were consistent with a 20% decrease in the transpiration rate of SNP-treated detached wheat leaves for the same analyzed time. In parallel experiments, NO was also able to induce a 35%, 30%, and 65% of stomatal closure in three different species, Tradescantia sp. (monocotyledonous) and two dicotyledonous, Salpichroa organifolia and fava bean (Vicia faba), respectively. In SNP-treated leaves of Tradescantia sp., the stomatal closure was correlated with a 10% increase on RWC. Ion leakage, a cell injury index, was 25% lower in SNP-treated wheat leaves compared with control ones after the recovery period. Carboxy-PTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a specific NO scavenger, reverted SNP action by restoring the transpiration rate, stomatal aperture, and the ion leakage to the level found in untreated leaves. Northern-blot analysis showed that SNP-treated wheat leaves display a 2-fold accumulation of a group three late embryogenesis abundant transcript with respect to control leaves both after 2 and 4 h of drought periods. All together, these results suggest that the exogenous application of NO donors might confer an increased tolerance to severe drought stress conditions in plants. PMID:11457969

  12. Dietary Supplementation of Honey Bee Larvae with Arginine and Abscisic Acid Enhances Nitric Oxide and Granulocyte Immune Responses after Trauma.

    PubMed

    Negri, Pedro; Ramirez, Leonor; Quintana, Silvina; Szawarski, Nicolás; Maggi, Matías; Le Conte, Yves; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Eguaras, Martin

    2017-08-15

    Many biotic and abiotic stressors impact bees' health, acting as immunosupressors and contribute to colony losses. Thus, the importance of studying the immune response of honey bees is central to develop new strategies aiming to enhance bees' fitness to confront the threats affecting them. If a pathogen breaches the physical and chemical barriers, honey bees can protect themselves from infection with cellular and humoral immune responses which represent a second line of defense. Through a series of correlative studies we have previously reported that abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO) share roles in the same immune defenses of Apis mellifera (A. mellifera). Here we show results supporting that the supplementation of bee larvae's diet reared in vitro with l-Arginine (precursor of NO) or ABA enhanced the immune activation of the granulocytes in response to wounding and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection.

  13. Dietary Supplementation of Honey Bee Larvae with Arginine and Abscisic Acid Enhances Nitric Oxide and Granulocyte Immune Responses after Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Leonor; Quintana, Silvina; Szawarski, Nicolás; Maggi, Matías; Le Conte, Yves; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Eguaras, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Many biotic and abiotic stressors impact bees’ health, acting as immunosupressors and contribute to colony losses. Thus, the importance of studying the immune response of honey bees is central to develop new strategies aiming to enhance bees’ fitness to confront the threats affecting them. If a pathogen breaches the physical and chemical barriers, honey bees can protect themselves from infection with cellular and humoral immune responses which represent a second line of defense. Through a series of correlative studies we have previously reported that abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO) share roles in the same immune defenses of Apis mellifera (A. mellifera). Here we show results supporting that the supplementation of bee larvae’s diet reared in vitro with l-Arginine (precursor of NO) or ABA enhanced the immune activation of the granulocytes in response to wounding and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. PMID:28809782

  14. Measurement of nitric oxide concentrations in flames by using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Chai, Ning; Naik, Sameer V.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Kuehner, Joel P.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2006-11-01

    We have measured nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in flames by using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (ERE-CARS). Visible pump and Stokes beams were tuned to a Q-branch vibrational Raman resonance of NO. A UV probe beam was tuned into resonance with specific rotational transitions in the (v″=1,v‧=0) vibrational band in the A2Σ+-X2Π electronic transition, thus providing a substantial electronic-resonance enhancement of the resulting CARS signal. NO concentrations were measured at levels down to 50 parts in 106 in H2/air flames at atmospheric pressure. NO was also detected in heavily sooting C2H2/air flames at atmospheric pressure with minimal background interference.

  15. Enhancement of nitric oxide decomposition efficiency achieved with lanthanum-based perovskite-type catalyst.

    PubMed

    Pan, Kuan Lun; Chen, Mei Chung; Yu, Sheng Jen; Yan, Shaw Yi; Chang, Moo Been

    2016-06-01

    Direct decompositions of nitric oxide (NO) by La0.7Ce0.3SrNiO4, La0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4, and Pr0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4 are experimentally investigated, and the catalysts are tested with different operating parameters to evaluate their activities. Experimental results indicate that the physical and chemical properties of La0.7Ce0.3SrNiO4 are significantly improved by doping with Ba and partial substitution with Pr. NO decomposition efficiencies achieved with La0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4 and Pr0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4 are 32% and 68%, respectively, at 400 °C with He as carrier gas. As the temperature is increased to 600 °C, NO decomposition efficiencies achieved with La0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4 and Pr0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4, respectively, reach 100% with the inlet NO concentration of 1000 ppm while the space velocity is fixed at 8000 hr(-1). Effects of O2, H2O(g), and CO2 contents and space velocity on NO decomposition are also explored. The results indicate that NO decomposition efficiencies achieved with La0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4 and Pr0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4, respectively, are slightly reduced as space velocity is increased from 8000 to 20,000 hr(-1) at 500 °C. In addition, the activities of both catalysts (La0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4 and Pr0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4) for NO decomposition are slightly reduced in the presence of 5% O2, 5% CO2, or 5% H2O(g). For durability test, with the space velocity of 8000 hr(-1) and operating temperature of 600 °C, high N2 yield is maintained throughout the durability test of 60 hr, revealing the long-term stability of Pr0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4 for NO decomposition. Overall, Pr0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4 shows good catalytic activity for NO decomposition. Nitrous oxide (NO) not only causes adverse environmental effects such as acid rain, photochemical smog, and deterioration of visibility and water quality, but also harms human lungs and respiratory system. Pervoskite-type catalysts, including La0.7Ce0.3SrNiO4, La0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4, and Pr0.4Ba0.4Ce0.2SrNiO4, are applied for direct

  16. Novel nitric oxide generating compound glycidyl nitrate enhances the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Shoucheng; Bednarski, Mark; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Knox, Susan J.

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Glycidyl nitrate (GLYN) is a NO generating small molecule and has ability to release NO on bioactivation in tumor cells. • GLYN-induced intracellular NO generation was attenuated by NO scavengers. • GLYN increases tumor blood flow in tumor-bearing animal model. • GLYN significantly increased the anti-tumor efficacy of cisplatin and radiation therapy in mice. • GLYN is well tolerated with no obvious systemic toxicities at its effective therapeutic doses in preclinical animal studies. - Abstract: Selective release of nitric oxide (NO) in tumors could improve the tumor blood flow and drug delivery for chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy, thereby increasing the therapeutic index. Glycidyl nitrate (GLYN) is a NO generating small molecule, and has ability to release NO on bioactivation in SCC VII tumor cells. GLYN-induced intracellular NO generation was significantly attenuated by NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO (cPTIO) and NAC. GLYN significantly increases tumor blood flow, but has no effect on the blood flow of normal tissues in tumor-bearing mice. When used with cisplatin, GLYN significantly increased the tumor growth inhibition effect of cisplatin. GLYN also had a modest radiosensitizing effect in vitro and in vivo. GLYN was well tolerated and there were no acute toxicities found at its effective therapeutic doses in preclinical studies. These results suggest that GLYN is a promising new drug for use with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and provide a compelling rationale for future studies of GLYN and related compounds.

  17. Nitric oxide: a novel inducer for enhancement of microbial lipase production.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Mesut; Unver, Yagmur; Yildiz, Melike; Ortucu, Serkan; Askin, Hakan

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether exogenous nitric oxide (NO) has a potential beneficial effect on lipase production capacity of some microorganisms. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as an exogenous NO donor in production medium. In comparison with the control (0 nM SNP), SNP concentrations from 10 to 100 nM induced lipase production in mesophilic bacterium Bacillus subtilis and cold-adapted yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Especially, the maximum lipase activities for Y. lipolytica (81.2 U/L) and B. subtilis (74.5 U/L) were attained at 30 and 50 nM SNP concentrations, respectively. When compared to the control, the optimal SNP concentrations resulted in about 5.14 and 2.27-fold increases in lipase activities of B. subtilis and Y. lipolytica, respectively. Besides, it was found that the optimal SNP concentrations provided shorter incubation periods for lipase production. Conversely, no significant positive effect of exogenous NO on lipase production was determined for thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus. This study showed for the first time that exogenous NO could be used as an inducer in the production of microbial lipases.

  18. Therapeutic effect of enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and preventing eNOS uncoupling

    PubMed Central

    Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelium is an important protective molecule in the vasculature. It is generated by the enzyme endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Similar to all NOS isoforms, functional eNOS transfers electrons from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), via the flavins flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide in the carboxy-terminal reductase domain, to the heme in the amino-terminal oxygenase domain. Here, the substrate L-arginine is oxidized to L-citrulline and NO. Cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia or cigarette smoking reduce bioactive NO. These risk factors lead to an enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the vessel wall. NADPH oxidases represent major sources of this ROS and have been found upregulated in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. NADPH-oxidase-derived superoxide avidly reacts with eNOS-derived NO to form peroxynitrite (ONOO-). The essential NOS cofactor (6R-)5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is highly sensitive to oxidation by this ONOO-. In BH4 deficiency, oxygen reduction uncouples from NO synthesis, thereby converting NOS to a superoxide-producing enzyme. Among conventional drugs, compounds interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and statins can reduce vascular oxidative stress and increase bioactive NO. In recent years, we have identified a number of small molecules that have the potential to prevent eNOS uncoupling and, at the same time, enhance eNOS expression. These include the protein kinase C inhibitor midostaurin, the pentacyclic triterpenoids ursolic acid and betulinic acid, the eNOS enhancing compounds AVE9488 and AVE3085, and the polyphenolic phytoalexin trans-resveratrol. Such compounds enhance NO production from eNOS also under pathophysiological conditions and may thus have therapeutic potential. PMID:21198553

  19. Effects of quenching on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Naik, Sameer V.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Gord, James R.

    2006-09-01

    We investigate the effects of gas-mixture composition on the electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) signals of nitric oxide (NO). From previous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) studies, quenching rates are known to change drastically, by factors of 400-800, in mixtures of CO2/O2/N2. The observed ERE-CARS signal remains constant to within 30% whereas LIF signals from NO are predicted to decrease by more than two orders of magnitudes in the same environments. This is very significant for using NO ERE-CARS in high-pressure combustion environments where the electronic quenching rate can vary rapidly as a function of both space and time.

  20. Part per trillion nitric oxide measurement by optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrillard, Irène; Gorrotxategi-Carbajo, Paula; Romanini, Daniele

    2017-06-01

    While nitric oxide (NO) is being monitored in various fields of application, there is still a lack of available instruments at a sub-ppb level of sensitivity. We report on the first application of Optical Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) to NO trace gas analysis, with a room-temperature quantum-cascade laser at 5.26 µm (1900.5 cm^{-1}). A detection limit of 60 ppt is reached in a single measurement performed in 140 ms. The stability of the instrument allows to average for 10 s down to 8.3 ppt, limited by drift of etalon fringes in the spectra. This work opens the path towards new applications notably in breath analysis and environment sciences.

  1. Diclofenac enhances proinflammatory cytokine-induced nitric oxide production through NF-{kappa}B signaling in cultured astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kakita, Hiroki; Aoyama, Mineyoshi Hussein, Mohamed Hamed; Kato, Shin; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ito, Tetsuya; Togari, Hajime; Asai, Kiyofumi

    2009-07-01

    Recently, the number of reports of encephalitis/encephalopathy associated with influenza virus has increased. In addition, the use of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac sodium (DCF), is associated with a significant increase in the mortality rate of influenza-associated encephalopathy. Activated astrocytes are a source of nitric oxide (NO), which is largely produced by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in response to proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, we investigated whether DCF enhances nitric oxide production in astrocytes stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines. We stimulated cultured rat astrocytes with three cytokines, interleukin-1{beta}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interferon-{gamma}, and then treated the astrocytes with DCF or acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol: APAP). iNOS and NO production in astrocyte cultures were induced by proinflammatory cytokines. The addition of DCF augmented NO production, but the addition of APAP did not. NF-{kappa}B inhibitors SN50 and MG132 inhibited iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes with or without DCF. Similarly, NF-{kappa}B p65 Stealth small interfering RNA suppressed iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes with or without DCF. LDH activity and DAPI staining showed that DCF induces cell damage in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes. An iNOS inhibitor, L-NMMA, inhibited the cytokine- and DCF-induced cell damage. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that iNOS and NO are induced in astrocyte cultures by proinflammatory cytokines. Addition of DCF further augments NO production. This effect is mediated via NF-{kappa}B signaling and leads to cell damage. The enhancement of DCF on NO production may explain the significant increase in the mortality rate of influenza-associated encephalopathy in patients treated with DCF.

  2. Enhanced stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte differentiation in suspension culture by delivery of nitric oxide using S-nitrosocysteine.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Alexander J; Zhong, Juming; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2016-04-01

    The development of cell-based treatments for heart disease relies on the creation of functionally mature stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes employing in vitro culture suspension systems, a process which remains a formidable and expensive endeavor. The use of nitric oxide as a signaling molecule during differentiation has demonstrated the potential for creating increased numbers of spontaneously contracting embryoid bodies in culture; however, the effects of nitric oxide signaling on the function and maturation of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes is not well understood. In this study, the effects of nitric oxide on mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte contractile activity, protein, and gene expression, and calcium handling were quantified. Embryoid bodies (EBs) formed using the hanging drop method, were treated with the soluble nitric oxide donor S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO) over a period of 18 days in suspension culture and spontaneous contractile activity was assessed. On day 8, selected EBs were dissociated to form monolayers for electrophysiological characterization using calcium transient mapping. Nitric oxide treatment led to increased numbers of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SC-CMs) relative to non-treated EBs after 8 days in suspension culture. Increased incidence of spontaneous contraction and frequency of contraction were observed from days 8-14 in EBs receiving nitric oxide treatment in comparison to control. Expression of cardiac markers and functional proteins was visualized using immunocytochemistry and gene expression was assessed using qPCR. Cardiac-specific proteins were present in both CysNO-treated and control SC-CMs; however, CysNO treatment during differentiation significantly increased βMHC gene expression in SC-CMs relative to control SC-CMs. Furthermore, increased calcium transient velocity and decreased calcium transient duration was observed for CysNO-treated SC-CMs in comparison to control SC-CMs. Soluble nitric oxide donors

  3. UV-B irradiation alleviates the deterioration of cold-stored mangoes by enhancing endogenous nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jiazhao; Li, Mengya; Jin, Haihong; Sun, Lina; Zhu, Yun; Xu, Maojun; Dong, Jufang

    2015-02-15

    Effects of UV-B radiation on chilling injury, ripening and endogenous nitric oxide (NO) levels in mango fruit were evaluated. Chilling injury index, ion leakage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the fruit pretreated with 5kJm(-2) UV-B for 4h were significantly lower than those of the control during fruit ripening at ambient temperature following cold storage at 6°C for 10days. Fruit firmness of the mangoes irradiated with UV-B was significantly higher than the control during the ripening period. Endogenous NO levels of the UV-B-irradiated fruit were rapidly increased after UV-B treatment. Pre-treatment of mangoes with the NO specific scavenger, not only abolished UV-B-triggered NO accumulation, but also suppressed the UV-B-reduced chilling injury, oxidative damage, and ripening delay of the fruit. Together, the results suggest that UV-B treatment may enhance chilling tolerance and delay fruit ripening of mangoes by triggering endogenous NO generation in the fruit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhaled nitric oxide reduces endothelial activation and parasite accumulation in the brain, and enhances survival in experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Serghides, Lena; Kim, Hani; Lu, Ziyue; Kain, Dylan C; Miller, Chris; Francis, Roland C; Liles, W Conrad; Zapol, Warren M; Kain, Kevin C

    2011-01-01

    The host immune response contributes to the onset and progression of severe malaria syndromes, such as cerebral malaria. Adjunctive immunomodulatory strategies for severe malaria may improve clinical outcome beyond that achievable with artemisinin-based therapy alone. Here, we report that prophylaxis with inhaled nitric oxide significantly reduced systemic inflammation (lower TNF, IFNγ and MCP-1 in peripheral blood) and endothelial activation (decreased sICAM-1 and vWF, and increased angiopoeitin-1 levels in peripheral blood) in an experimental cerebral malaria model. Mice that received inhaled nitric oxide starting prior to infection had reduced parasitized erythrocyte accumulation in the brain, decreased brain expression of ICAM-1, and preserved vascular integrity compared to control mice.Inhaled nitric oxide administered in combination with artesunate, starting as late as 5.5 days post-infection, improved survival over treatment with artesunate alone (70% survival in the artesunate only vs. 100% survival in the artesunate plus iNO group, p = 0.03). These data support the clinical investigation of inhaled nitric oxide as a novel adjunctive therapy in patients with severe malaria.

  5. Two-color vibrational, femtosecond, fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) of gas-phase nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Hans U; Roy, Sukesh; Schmidt, Jacob B; Wrzesinski, Paul J; Gord, James R

    2016-09-28

    A resonantly enhanced, two-color, femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) approach is demonstrated and used to explore the nature of the frequency- and time-dependent signals produced by gas-phase nitric oxide (NO). Through careful selection of the input pulse wavelengths, this fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) scheme allows rovibronic-state-resolved observation of time-dependent rovibrational wavepackets propagating on the vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surface of this diatomic species. Despite the use of broadband, ultrafast time-resolved input pulses, high spectral resolution of gas-phase rovibronic transitions is observed in the FREE-CARS signal, dictated by the electronic dephasing timescales of these states. Analysis and computational simulation of the time-dependent spectra observed as a function of pump-Stokes and Stokes-probe delays provide insight into the rotationally resolved wavepacket motion observed on the excited-state and vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surfaces of NO, respectively.

  6. Enhanced production of nitric oxide in A549 cells through activation of TRPA1 ion channel by cold stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenwu; Wang, Zhonghua; Cao, Jianping; Wang, Xu; Han, Yaling; Ma, Zhuang

    2014-08-31

    The respiratory epithelium is exposed to the external environment, and inhalation of cold air is common during the season of winter. In addition, the lung is a major source of nitric oxide (NO). However, the effect of cold stress on the production of NO is still unclear. In the present work, We measured the change of NO in single cell with DACF-DA and the change in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in A549 cell. We observed that cold stress (from 20 °C to 5 °C) induced an increase of NO in A549 cell, which was completely abolished by applying an extracellular Ca(2+) free medium. Further experiments showed that cold-sensing transient receptor potential subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) channel agonist (allyl isothiocyanate, AITC) increased the production of NO and the level of [Ca(2+)]c in A549 cell. Additionally, TRPA1 inhibitor, Ruthenium red (RR) and camphor, significantly blocked the enhanced production of NO and the rise of [Ca(2+)]c induced by AITC or cold stimulation, respectively. Taken together, these data indicated that cold-induced TRPA1 activation was responsible for the enhanced production of NO in A549 cell.

  7. Nitric oxide enhances increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) and promotes nicotine-triggered MAPK pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Aya; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Takata, Tsuyoshi; Nyunoya, Mayumi; Nozaki, Naohito; Ihara, Hideshi; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs), and protein kinase C (PKC) in nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Treatment with nicotine stimulated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in the PC12 cells expressing nNOS (NPC12 cells) as compared with that in control PC12 cells. An inhibitor of L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel suppressed the nicotine-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. The inhibition of CaMK-kinase, the upstream activator of CaMKI and CaMKIV, did not inhibit the enhanced their phosphorylation. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated by inhibitors of p38 MAPK, PKC, and MAPK-kinase 1/2, indicating the involvement of these protein kinases upstream of ERK1/2. Furthermore, we found that nNOS expression enhances the nicotine-induced increase in the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+), using the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent probe Fura2. These data suggest that NO promotes nicotine-triggered Ca(2+) transient in PC12 cells to activate possibly CaMKII, leading to sequential phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2.

  8. Two-color vibrational, femtosecond, fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) of gas-phase nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Schmidt, Jacob B.; Wrzesinski, Paul J.; Gord, James R.

    2016-09-01

    A resonantly enhanced, two-color, femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) approach is demonstrated and used to explore the nature of the frequency- and time-dependent signals produced by gas-phase nitric oxide (NO). Through careful selection of the input pulse wavelengths, this fully resonant electronically enhanced CARS (FREE-CARS) scheme allows rovibronic-state-resolved observation of time-dependent rovibrational wavepackets propagating on the vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surface of this diatomic species. Despite the use of broadband, ultrafast time-resolved input pulses, high spectral resolution of gas-phase rovibronic transitions is observed in the FREE-CARS signal, dictated by the electronic dephasing timescales of these states. Analysis and computational simulation of the time-dependent spectra observed as a function of pump-Stokes and Stokes-probe delays provide insight into the rotationally resolved wavepacket motion observed on the excited-state and vibrationally excited ground-state potential energy surfaces of NO, respectively.

  9. TEMPOL enhances the antihypertensive effects of sodium nitrite by mechanisms facilitating nitrite-derived gastric nitric oxide formation.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Jefferson H; Montenegro, Marcelo F; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Ferreira, Graziele C; Barroso, Rafael P; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-12-01

    Orally administered nitrite exerts antihypertensive effects associated with increased gastric nitric oxide (NO) formation. While reducing agents facilitate NO formation from nitrite, no previous study has examined whether antioxidants with reducing properties improve the antihypertensive responses to orally administered nitrite. We hypothesized that TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) could enhance the hypotensive effects of nitrite in hypertensive rats by exerting antioxidant effects (and enhancing NO bioavailability) and by promoting gastric nitrite-derived NO generation. The hypotensive effects of intravenous and oral sodium nitrite were assessed in unanesthetized freely moving rats with L-NAME (N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; 100mg/kg; po)-induced hypertension treated with TEMPOL (18mg/kg; po) or vehicle. While TEMPOL exerted antioxidant effects in hypertensive rats, as revealed by lower plasma 8-isoprostane and vascular reactive oxygen species levels, this antioxidant did not affect the hypotensive responses to intravenous nitrite. Conversely, TEMPOL enhanced the dose-dependent hypotensive responses to orally administered nitrite, and this effect was associated with higher increases in plasma nitrite and lower increases in plasma nitrate concentrations. In vitro experiments using electrochemical and chemiluminescence NO detection under variable pH conditions showed that TEMPOL enhanced nitrite-derived NO formation, especially at low pH (2.0 to 4.0). TEMPOL signal evaluated by electron paramagnetic resonance decreased when nitrite was reduced to NO under acidic conditions. Consistent with these findings, increasing gastric pH with omeprazole (30mg/kg; po) attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite and blunted the enhancement in plasma nitrite concentrations and hypotensive effects induced by TEMPOL. Nitrite-derived NO formation in vivo was confirmed by using the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl

  10. [Nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation].

    PubMed

    Cristol, J P; Maggi, M F; Guérin, M C; Torreilles, J; Descomps, B

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical produced enzymatically in biological systems from the guanidino group of L-arginine. Its large spectrum of biological effects is achieved through chemical interactions with different targets including oxygen (O2), superoxide (O2o-) and other oxygen reactive species (ROS), transition metals and thiols. Superoxide anions and other ROS have been reported to react with NO to produce peroxynitrite anions that can decompose to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and hydroxyl radial (OHo). Thus, NO has been reported to have a dual effect on lipid peroxidation (prooxidant via the peroxynitrite or antioxydant via the chelation of ROS). In the present study we have investigated in different models the in vitro and in vivo action of NO on lipid peroxidation. Copper-induced LDL oxidation were used as an in vitro model. Human LDL (100 micrograms ApoB/ml) were incubated in oxygene-saturated PBS buffer in presence or absence of Cu2+ (2.5 microM) with increasing concentrations of NO donnors (sodium nitroprussiate or nitroso-glutathione). LDL oxidation was monitored continuously for conjugated diene formation (234 nm) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation. Exogenous NO prevents in a dose dependent manner the progress of copper-induced oxidation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), characterized by an overproduction of ROS, is used as an in vivo model. Anaesthetized rats were submitted to 1 hour renal ischaemia following by 2 hours of reperfusion. Sham-operated rats (SOP) were used as control. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring the HNE accumulated in rats kidneys in presence or absence of L-arginine or D-arginine infusion. L-arginine, but not D-arginine, enhances HNE accumulation in I/R but not in SOP (< 0.050 pmol/g tissue in SOP versus 0.6 nmol/g tissue in I/R), showing that, in this experimental conditions, NO produced from L-arginine, enhances the toxicity of ROS. This study shows that the pro- or antioxydant effects of NO are different

  11. A small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor increases localization of inducible nitric oxide synthase to the macrophage phagosome and enhances bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Kristin M; Perry, Jeffrey W; Wobus, Christiane E; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Kapuria, Vaibhav; O'Riordan, Mary X D

    2011-12-01

    Macrophages are key mediators of antimicrobial defense and innate immunity. Innate intracellular defense mechanisms can be rapidly regulated at the posttranslational level by the coordinated addition and removal of ubiquitin by ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs). While ubiquitin ligases have been extensively studied, the contribution of DUBs to macrophage innate immune function is incompletely defined. We therefore employed a small molecule DUB inhibitor, WP1130, to probe the role of DUBs in the macrophage response to bacterial infection. Treatment of activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) with WP1130 significantly augmented killing of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. WP1130 also induced killing of phagosome-restricted bacteria, implicating a bactericidal mechanism associated with the phagosome, such as the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). WP1130 had a minimal antimicrobial effect in macrophages lacking iNOS, indicating that iNOS is an effector mechanism for WP1130-mediated bacterial killing. Although overall iNOS levels were not notably different, we found that WP1130 significantly increased colocalization of iNOS with the Listeria-containing phagosome during infection. Taken together, our data indicate that the deubiquitinase inhibitor WP1130 increases bacterial killing in macrophages by enhancing iNOS localization to the phagosome and suggest a potential role for ubiquitin regulation in iNOS trafficking.

  12. Constitutive production of nitric oxide leads to enhanced drought stress resistance and extensive transcriptional reprogramming in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in plant responses to many environmental stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines that constitutively express rat neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) were described recently. In this study, it is reported that the nNOS transgenic Arabidopsis plants displayed high levels of osmolytes and increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Transcriptomic analysis identified 601 or 510 genes that were differentially expressed as a consequence of drought stress or nNOS transformation, respectively. Pathway and gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analyses revealed that genes involved in photosynthesis, redox, stress, and phytohormone and secondary metabolism were greatly affected by the nNOS transgene. Several CBF genes and members of zinc finger gene families, which are known to regulate transcription in the stress response, were changed by the nNOS transgene. Genes regulated by both the nNOS transgene and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments were compared and identified, including those for two ABA receptors (AtPYL4 and AtPYL5). Moreover, overexpression of AtPYL4 and AtPYL5 enhanced drought resistance, antioxidant enzyme activity, and osmolyte levels. These observations increase our understanding of the role of NO in drought stress response in Arabidopsis.

  13. Nitric Oxide Enhances Desiccation Tolerance of Recalcitrant Antiaris toxicaria Seeds via Protein S-Nitrosylation and Carbonylation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xuegui; Yang, Liming; Tian, Meihua; Chen, Jinhui; Shi, Jisen; Yang, Yongping; Hu, Xiangyang

    2011-01-01

    The viability of recalcitrant seeds is lost following stress from either drying or freezing. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting from uncontrolled metabolic activity are likely responsible for seed sensitivity to drying. Nitric oxide (NO) and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle can be used for the detoxification of ROS, but their roles in the seed response to desiccation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that desiccation induces rapid accumulation of H2O2, which blocks recalcitrant Antiaris toxicaria seed germination; however, pretreatment with NO increases the activity of antioxidant ascorbate-glutathione pathway enzymes and metabolites, diminishes H2O2 production and assuages the inhibitory effects of desiccation on seed germination. Desiccation increases the protein carbonylation levels and reduces protein S-nitrosylation of these antioxidant enzymes; these effects can be reversed with NO treatment. Antioxidant protein S-nitrosylation levels can be further increased by the application of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase inhibitors, which further enhances NO-induced seed germination rates after desiccation and reduces desiccation-induced H2O2 accumulation. These findings suggest that NO reinforces recalcitrant seed desiccation tolerance by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities to stabilize H2O2 accumulation at an appropriate concentration. During this process, protein carbonylation and S-nitrosylation patterns are used as a specific molecular switch to control antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:21674063

  14. Effects of pressure variations on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Chai, Ning; Naik, Sameer V.; Roy, Sukesh; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Kuehner, Joel P.; Gord, James R.

    2007-06-01

    The effects of pressure variations on the electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) signal of nitric oxide (NO) were studied at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 8 bar. ERE-CARS signals were recorded in a gas cell filled with a mixture of 300 ppm NO in N 2 buffer gas at room temperature. The ERE-CARS signal was found to increase with rising pressure up to 2 bar and to remain nearly constant thereafter. The spectra recorded at different cell pressures were modeled using a modified version of the Sandia CARSFT code. Laser-saturation effects were accounted for by systematically varying the theoretical ultraviolet probe-laser linewidth. Excellent agreement was obtained between theory and experiment for the pressure-scaling behavior of the ERE-CARS signal of NO. This finding, along with a negligible influence of electronic quenching on the ERE-CARS signal, provides strong incentive for the application of ERE-CARS to measurements of NO concentrations in high-pressure combustion environments.

  15. Constitutive production of nitric oxide leads to enhanced drought stress resistance and extensive transcriptional reprogramming in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in plant responses to many environmental stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines that constitutively express rat neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) were described recently. In this study, it is reported that the nNOS transgenic Arabidopsis plants displayed high levels of osmolytes and increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Transcriptomic analysis identified 601 or 510 genes that were differentially expressed as a consequence of drought stress or nNOS transformation, respectively. Pathway and gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analyses revealed that genes involved in photosynthesis, redox, stress, and phytohormone and secondary metabolism were greatly affected by the nNOS transgene. Several CBF genes and members of zinc finger gene families, which are known to regulate transcription in the stress response, were changed by the nNOS transgene. Genes regulated by both the nNOS transgene and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments were compared and identified, including those for two ABA receptors (AtPYL4 and AtPYL5). Moreover, overexpression of AtPYL4 and AtPYL5 enhanced drought resistance, antioxidant enzyme activity, and osmolyte levels. These observations increase our understanding of the role of NO in drought stress response in Arabidopsis. PMID:24868034

  16. Effects of collisions on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, Anil K.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.; Lucht, Robert P.; Settersten, Thomas B.

    2009-06-01

    A six-level model is developed and used to study the effects of collisional energy transfer and dephasing on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) in nitric oxide. The model includes the three levels that are coherently coupled by the three applied lasers as well as three additional bath levels that enable inclusion of the effects of electronic quenching and rotational energy transfer. The density-matrix equations that describe the evolution of the relevant populations and coherences are presented. The parametric dependencies of the ERE-CARS signal on collisional energy transfer and dephasing processes are described in terms of both a steady-state analytical solution and the numerical solutions to the governing equations. In the weak-field limit, the ERE-CARS signal scales inversely with the square of the dephasing rates for the electronic and Raman coherences. In accord with published experimental observations [Roy et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 104105 (2006)], the ERE-CARS signal is shown to be insensitive to the collisional quenching rate. Parametric dependencies on quenching, rotational energy transfer, and pure electronic dephasing are presented, demonstrating reduced collisional dependence for saturating laser fields.

  17. Perturbative theory and modeling of electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehner, Joel P.; Naik, Sameer V.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Chai, Ning; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Scully, Marlan O.; Roy, Sukesh; Patnaik, Anil K.; Gord, James R.

    2008-05-01

    A theory is developed for three-laser electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy of nitric oxide (NO). A vibrational Q-branch Raman polarization is excited in the NO molecule by the frequency difference between visible Raman pump and Stokes beams. An ultraviolet probe beam is scattered from the induced Raman polarization to produce an ultraviolet ERE-CARS signal. The frequency of the ultraviolet probe beam is selected to be in electronic resonance with rotational transitions in the AΣ+2←XΠ2 (1,0) band of NO. This choice results in a resonance between the frequency of the ERE-CARS signal and transitions in the (0,0) band. The theoretical model for ERE-CARS NO spectra has been developed in the perturbative limit. Comparisons to experimental spectra are presented where either the probe laser was scanned with fixed Stokes frequency or the Stokes laser was scanned with fixed probe frequency. At atmospheric pressure and an NO concentration of 100ppm, good agreement is found between theoretical and experimental spectral peak locations and relative intensities for both types of spectra. Factors relating to saturation in the experiments are discussed, including implications for the theoretical predictions.

  18. Nitric oxide enhances desiccation tolerance of recalcitrant Antiaris toxicaria seeds via protein S-nitrosylation and carbonylation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuegui; Yang, Liming; Tian, Meihua; Chen, Jinhui; Shi, Jisen; Yang, Yongping; Hu, Xiangyang

    2011-01-01

    The viability of recalcitrant seeds is lost following stress from either drying or freezing. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting from uncontrolled metabolic activity are likely responsible for seed sensitivity to drying. Nitric oxide (NO) and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle can be used for the detoxification of ROS, but their roles in the seed response to desiccation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that desiccation induces rapid accumulation of H(2)O(2), which blocks recalcitrant Antiaris toxicaria seed germination; however, pretreatment with NO increases the activity of antioxidant ascorbate-glutathione pathway enzymes and metabolites, diminishes H(2)O(2) production and assuages the inhibitory effects of desiccation on seed germination. Desiccation increases the protein carbonylation levels and reduces protein S-nitrosylation of these antioxidant enzymes; these effects can be reversed with NO treatment. Antioxidant protein S-nitrosylation levels can be further increased by the application of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase inhibitors, which further enhances NO-induced seed germination rates after desiccation and reduces desiccation-induced H(2)O(2) accumulation. These findings suggest that NO reinforces recalcitrant seed desiccation tolerance by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities to stabilize H(2)O(2) accumulation at an appropriate concentration. During this process, protein carbonylation and S-nitrosylation patterns are used as a specific molecular switch to control antioxidant enzyme activities.

  19. [Nitric oxide production in plants].

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Urszula

    2007-01-01

    There are still many controversial observations and opinions on the cellular/subcellular localization and sources of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis in plant cells. NO can be produced in plants by non-enzymatic and enzymatic systems depending on plant species, organ or tissue as well as on physiological state of the plant and changing environmental conditions. The best documented reactions in plant that contribute to NO production are NO production from nitrite as a substrate by cytosolic (cNR) and membrane bound (PM-NR) nitrate reductases (NR), and NO production by several arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase-like activities (NOS). The latest papers indicate that mitochondria are an important source of arginine- and nitrite-dependent NO production in plants. There are other potential enzymatic sources of NO in plants including xanthine oxidoreductase, peroxidase, cytochrome P450.

  20. Nitric oxide reburning with methane

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpaty, S.K.; Subramanian, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with initial findings from the ongoing, three-year DOE program that began on 02/01/1995. The program involves computer simulation studies to aid in planning and conducting a series of experiments that will extend the knowledge of reburning process. The objective of this work is to find nitric oxide reduction effectiveness for various reburning fuels and identify both homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction mechanisms characterizing NO reduction.

  1. Nitric oxide and airway reactivity.

    PubMed

    Strapkova, A; Nosalova, G

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a neurotransmitter of the inhibitory nonadrenergic noncholinergic mediation in the respiratory system. Its participation in the regulation of airways functions is determined by its level in the organism. We examined participation of nitric oxide in the changes of the airway reactivity evoked by toluene exposure as the source of the free radicals. The changes of nitric oxide level in the organism were evoked by administration of its indirect donor isosorbide dinitrate. Thiol groups were provided by administration of antioxidative mucolytic N-acetylcysteine. Used drugs--isosorbide dinitrate (5 mg/kg b.w.) and N-acetylcysteine (300 mg/kg b.w.) were administered intraperitoneally or by inhalation 30 minutes before each exposure to the toluene vapours. The control group was not treated with drugs. After toluene exposure (2 hours in each of 3 consecutive days) tracheal and lung strips smooth muscle reactivity to histamine was observed under in "in vitro" conditions. The administration of isosorbide dinitrate decreased especially the lung strip smooth muscle reactivity to histamine. We revealed more expressive effect of the pretreatment with intraperitoneally administered isosorbide dinitrate in the comparison with inhalation. Simultaneous pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine intensified beneficial effect of isosorbide dinitrate probably by increasing of the intracellullary level of thiols. In our experimental conditions possible participation of nitric oxide in changes of airways smooth muscle reactivity after exposure to the toluene follows from results, as well as the importance of thiol groups for the activity of its indirect donors. (Fig. 6, Tab. 3, Ref. 35.)

  2. Nitric Oxide Production in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Planchet, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    There is now general agreement that nitric oxide (NO) is an important and almost universal signal in plants. Nevertheless, there are still many controversial observations and opinions on the importance and function of NO in plants. Partly, this may be due to the difficulties in detecting and even more in quantifying NO. Here, we summarize major pathways of NO production in plants, and briefly discuss some methodical problems. PMID:19521475

  3. Nitric oxide and the common cold.

    PubMed

    Proud, David

    2005-02-01

    The common cold is a clinical syndrome triggered by a variety of viral pathogens, but rhinoviruses are the most frequent cause. Complications of such infections include sinusitis, otitis media, and exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease. There is growing interest in host innate defence responses that may regulate the severity of viral responses. We will review recent evidence that nitric oxide is an important contributor to the host response during colds. Infection of human airway epithelial cells with human rhinovirus has been shown to lead to the increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase both in vitro and in vivo. This increase in epithelial inducible nitric oxide synthase correlates with increased levels of nitric oxide in exhaled air. Importantly, nitric oxide can inhibit human rhinovirus-induced epithelial expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and can inhibit viral replication in epithelial cells in vitro. Moreover, nitric oxide can modulate several signal transduction pathways that are associated with cytokine generation. Nitric oxide can also nitrosylate viral proteases and can interact with the immune system. Consistent with these observations, pilot studies have indicated that the increased generation of nitric oxide during rhinovirus infections is associated with fewer symptoms and more rapid viral clearance. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in colds and to determine whether the administration of nitric oxide donor compounds could be a viable therapeutic approach for viral exacerbations of airway diseases.

  4. Nitric oxide concentration measurements in atmospheric pressure flames using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, N.; Kulatilaka, W. D.; Naik, S. V.; Laurendeau, N. M.; Lucht, R. P.; Kuehner, J. P.; Roy, S.; Katta, V. R.; Gord, J. R.

    2007-06-01

    We report the application of electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) for measurements of nitric oxide concentration ([NO]) in three different atmospheric pressure flames. Visible pump (532 nm) and Stokes (591 nm) beams are used to probe the Q-branch of the Raman transition. A significant resonance enhancement is obtained by tuning an ultraviolet probe beam (236 nm) into resonance with specific rotational transitions in the (v’=0, v”=1) vibrational band of the A2Σ+-X2Π electronic system of NO. ERE-CARS spectra are recorded at various heights within a hydrogen-air flame producing relatively low concentrations of NO over a Hencken burner. Good agreement is obtained between NO ERE-CARS measurements and the results of flame computations using UNICORN, a two-dimensional flame code. Excellent agreement between measured and calculated NO spectra is also obtained when using a modified version of the Sandia CARSFT code for heavily sooting acetylene-air flames (φ=0.8 to φ=1.6) on the same Hencken burner. Finally, NO concentration profiles are measured using ERE-CARS in a laminar, counter-flow, non-premixed hydrogen-air flame. Spectral scans are recorded by probing the Q1 (9.5), Q1 (13.5) and Q1 (17.5) Raman transitions. The measured shape of the [NO] profile is in good agreement with that predicted using the OPPDIF code, even without correcting for collisional effects. These comparisons between [NO] measurements and predictions establish the utility of ERE-CARS for detection of NO in flames with large temperature and concentration gradients as well as in sooting environments.

  5. Reduced nitric oxide in the rostral ventrolateral medulla enhances cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guo-Qing; Gao, Xing-Ya; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2004-02-25

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of nitric oxide (NO) in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) on the central integration of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) in normal rats and in rats with coronary ligation-induced chronic heart failure (CHF). Under alpha-chloralose and urethane anesthesia, mean arterial pressure, heart rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) were recorded at baseline and during elicitation of the CSAR evoked by electrical stimulation of the cardiac afferent sympathetic nerves in sino-aortic denervated and cervical vagotomized rats. A cannula was inserted into the left RVLM for microinjection of NO synthase inhibitor, S-methyl-L-thiocitruline (MeTC) or NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP). The CSAR was tested by electrical stimulation (5, 10, 20 and 30 Hz at 10 V for 1 ms) of the afferent cardiac sympathetic nerves. It was observed that (1) the responses of RSNA to stimulation were enhanced in rats with CHF; (2) MeTC (80 nmol) potentiated the responses of RSNA to stimulation in sham rats but not in rats with CHF; (3) SNAP (50 nmol) depressed the enhanced RSNA response to stimulation in CHF rats but had no effect in sham rats; and (4) MeTC increased the baseline RSNA and MAP only in sham rats, but SNAP inhibited the baseline RSNA and MAP in both sham and CHF rats. These results indicate that reductance of NO in the RVLM is involved in the augmentation of CSAR in CHF rats.

  6. Electrochemical enhancement of nitric oxide removal from simulated lean-burn engine exhaust via solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ta-Jen; Wu, Chung-Ying; Lin, Yu-Hsien

    2011-07-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) unit is constructed with Ni-YSZ as the anode, YSZ as the electrolyte, and La(0.6)Sr(0.4)CoO(3)-Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95) as the cathode. The SOFC operation is performed at 600 °C with a cathode gas simulating the lean-burn engine exhaust and at various fixed voltage, at open-circuit voltage, and with an inert gas flowing over the anode side, respectively. Electrochemical enhancement of NO decomposition occurs when an operating voltage is generated; higher O(2) concentration leads to higher enhancement. Smaller NO concentration results in larger NO conversion. Higher operating voltage and higher O(2) concentration can lead to both higher NO conversion and lower fuel consumption. The molar rate of the consumption of the anode fuel can be very much smaller than that of NO to N(2) conversion. This makes the anode fuel consumed in the SOFC-DeNO(x) process to be much less than the equivalent amount of ammonia consumed in the urea-based selective catalytic reduction process. Additionally, the NO conversion increases with the addition of propylene and SO(2) into the cathode gas. These are beneficial for the application of the SOFC-DeNO(x) technology on treating diesel and other lean-burn engine exhausts.

  7. Nitric oxide: a challenge to chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Lon

    2000-01-01

    The 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine recognized the biological significance of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is derived from the amino acid arginine. It is intimately involved with circulatory vessel dilation where, for example, it protects against heart attacks, and is the basis for new medications such as Sildenafil (Viagra). Nitric oxide acts as a neurotransmitter and can modulate many neurological reactions. The immune system uses nitric oxide to destroy pathogens by interfering with key enzymes. Nitric oxide is responsible for both osteoclastic and osteoblastic responses in bone and is a key player in the degenerative aspects of arthritis. The process of apoptosis employs nitric oxide in the orderly removal of unneeded cells. There is clear evidence that major signaling and control mechanisms exist in the body apart from the nervous system. Chiropractic is thus faced with the challenge of how to incorporate this new knowledge which conflicts with traditional chiropractic concepts.

  8. Simvastatin enhances induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Araki, Shunsuke; Dobashi, Kazushige; Asayama, Kohtaro; Shirahata, Akira

    2007-09-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) modulate the NO production via iNOS in adipocytes stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (L) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (T). Well-differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes significantly produced NO by LT-treatment. Pre-incubation with simvastatin, a lipophilic statin, pravastatin, a hydrophilic one, or Y27632, an inhibitor of Rho kinase, further enhanced the production of NO. The effect of simvastatin was offset by mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) but not by squalene. The mRNA level for iNOS parallelled the NO production. The NF-kappaB was activated by the LT-treatment and was further enhanced by simvastatin, pravastatin or Y27632 addition. Mevalonate and GGPP completely offset the effect of simvastatin. Statins and Y27632 also further increased the interleukin-6 secretion in the LT-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These results suggest that statins, especially lipophilic type, enhance induction of iNOS by inhibiting the small GTP-binding protein signal in adipocytes.

  9. Nitric oxide in marine photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Castellano, Immacolata; Patti, Francesco Paolo; Palumbo, Anna; Buia, Maria Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide is a versatile and powerful signaling molecule in plants. However, most of our understanding stems from studies on terrestrial plants and very little is known about marine autotrophs. This review summarizes current knowledge about the source of nitric oxide synthesis in marine photosynthetic organisms and its role in various physiological processes under normal and stress conditions. The interactions of nitric oxide with other stress signals and cross talk among secondary messengers are also highlighted.

  10. Nitrate reductase-mediated early nitric oxide burst alleviates oxidative damage induced by aluminum through enhancement of antioxidant defenses in roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengliang; Lu, Lingli; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Wenjing; Yu, Yan; Liu, Xiaoxia; Hu, Yan; Jin, Chongwei; Lin, Xianyong

    2014-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule involved in the physiological processes of plants. The role of NO release in the tolerance strategies of roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum) under aluminum (Al) stress was investigated using two genotypes with different Al resistances. • An early NO burst at 3 h was observed in the root tips of the Al-tolerant genotype Jian-864, whereas the Al-sensitive genotype Yang-5 showed no NO accumulation at 3 h but an extremely high NO concentration after 12 h. Stimulating NO production at 3 h in the root tips of Yang-5 with the NO donor relieved Al-induced root inhibition and callose production, as well as oxidative damage and ROS accumulation, while elimination of the early NO burst by NO scavenger aggravated root inhibition in Jian-864. • Synthesis of early NO in roots of Jian-864 was mediated through nitrate reductase (NR) but not through NO synthase. Elevated antioxidant enzyme activities were induced by Al stress in both wheat genotypes and significantly enhanced by NO donor, but suppressed by NO scavenger or NR inhibitor. • These results suggest that an NR-mediated early NO burst plays an important role in Al resistance of wheat through modulating enhanced antioxidant defense to adapt to Al stress.

  11. The nitric oxide producing reactions of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    King, S Bruce

    2003-03-01

    Hydroxyurea is used to treat a variety of cancers and sickle cell disease. Despite this widespread use, a complete mechanistic understanding of the beneficial actions of this compound remains to be understood. Hydroxyurea inhibits ribonucleotide reductase and increases the levels of fetal hemoglobin, which explains a portion of the effects of this drug. Administration of hydroxyurea to patients results in a significant increase in levels of iron nitrosyl hemoglobin, nitrite and nitrate suggesting the in vivo metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide. Formation of nitric oxide from hydroxyurea may explain a portion of the observed effects of hydroxyurea treatment. At the present, the mechanism or mechanisms of nitric oxide release, the identity of the in vivo oxidant and the site of metabolism remain to be identified. Chemical oxidation of hydroxyurea produces nitric oxide and nitroxyl, the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide. These oxidative pathways generally proceed through the nitroxide radical (2) or C-nitrosoformamide (3). Biological oxidants, including both iron and copper containing enzymes and proteins, also convert hydroxyurea to nitric oxide or its decomposition products in vitro and these reactions also occur through these intermediates. A number of other reactions of hydroxyurea including the reaction with ribonucleotide reductase and irradiation demonstrate the potential to release nitric oxide and should be further investigated. Gaining an understanding of the metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide will provide valuable information towards the treatment of these disorders and may lead to the development of better therapeutic agents.

  12. Enhanced nitric oxide-mediated autophagy contributes to the hepatoprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning during ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jun-Kyu; Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-08-31

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects against liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Autophagy is an essential cytoprotective system that is rapidly activated by multiple stressors. Nitric oxide (NO) acts as an inducer of IPC. We examined the impact of autophagy in liver IPC and its regulation by NO. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 60 min of hepatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion. IPC was achieved for 10 min of ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion prior to sustained ischemia. N(ω)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 15 mg/kg, i.v., all NOS inhibitor) and aminoguanidine (AG, 10 mg/kg, i.v., iNOS inhibitor) were injected 10 min before IPC. SB203580 (10 mg/kg, i.p., p38 inhibitor) was injected 30 min before IPC. I/R increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. IPC attenuated this increase, which was abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. Microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II levels increased and p62 protein levels decreased after I/R; these changes were augmented by IPC and abolished by L-NAME. I/R increased liver protein expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)12-Atg5 complex and lysosome-associated membrane protein-2. IPC augmented the expression of these proteins, which were abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. IPC also augmented the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK induced by I/R and this phosphorylation was abolished by L-NAME. Our findings suggest that IPC-mediated NO protects against I/R-induced liver injury by enhancing autophagic flux.

  13. Intravascular Glucose/Lactate Sensors Prepared with Nitric Oxide Releasing Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-Based Coatings for Enhanced Biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qinyi; Major, Terry C.; Bartlett, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous amperometric needle-type enzymatic glucose/lactate sensors intended for continuous monitoring are prepared with a novel nitric oxide (NO) releasing layer to improve device hemocompatibility. To create an underlying NO release coating, the sensors with immobilized enzymes (either glucose oxidase or lactate oxidase) are prepared with a thin layer of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) loaded with lipophilic diazeniumdiolate species that slowly release NO via a proton driven reaction. An outer thin layer (ca. 30 µm) of PurSil (polyurethane/dimethylsiloxane copolymer) limits the flux of glucose and lactate to the inner layer of enzyme, to provide the desired linear amperometric response. A 30 µm coating of PLGA containing 33 wt% of the appropriate NO donor (N-diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine, DBHD/N2O2) can release NO at a physiologically relevant rate > 1 × 10−10 mol min−1cm−2 for at least 7 d without influencing the analytical performance of the glucose/lactate sensors. In vitro, the sensors exhibit relatively stable amperometric response over a one-week period with high selectivity over interferences (e.g., ascorbic acid) required for blood monitoring applications. Glucose sensors implanted in the veins of rabbits for 8 h exhibit significantly enhanced hemocompatibility for the NO release sensors vs. corresponding controls (without NO release in same animals), with greatly reduced thrombus formation on their surfaces. Further, the analytical performance of the NO release glucose sensors are superior to controls placed in the veins of the same animals, with a greater accuracy in measuring blood glucose levels as evaluated using a Clark error grid type analysis. PMID:21592764

  14. Carbon monoxide enhances the chilling tolerance of recalcitrant Baccaurea ramiflora seeds via nitric oxide-mediated glutathione homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-gui; Chen, Jin-hui; Kong, Xiang-xiang; Todd, Christopher D; Yang, Yong-ping; Hu, Xiang-yang; Li, De-zhu

    2012-08-15

    Both carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) play fundamental roles in plant responses to environmental stress. Glutathione (GSH) homeostasis through the glutathione-ascorbate cycle regulates the cellular redox status and protects the plant from damage due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Most recalcitrant seeds are sensitive to chilling stress, but the roles of and cross talk among CO, NO, ROS, and GSH in recalcitrant seeds under low temperature are not well understood. Here, we report that the germination of recalcitrant Baccaurea ramiflora seeds shows sensitivity to chilling stress, but application of exogenous CO or NO markedly increased GSH accumulation, enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes involved in the glutathione-ascorbate cycle, decreased the content of H(2)O(2) and RNS, and improved the tolerance of seeds to low-temperature stress. Compared to orthodox seeds such as maize, only transient accumulation of CO and NO was induced and only a moderate increase in GSH was shown in the recalcitrant B. ramiflora seeds. Exogenous CO or NO treatment further increased the GSH accumulation and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity in B. ramiflora seeds under chilling stress. In contrast, suppressing CO or NO generation, removing GSH, or blocking GSNOR activity resulted in increases in ROS and RNS and impaired the germination of CO- or NO-induced seeds under chilling stress. Based on these results, we propose that CO acts as a novel regulator to improve the tolerance of recalcitrant seeds to low temperatures through NO-mediated glutathione homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition Enhances the Antitumor Effect of Radiation in the Treatment of Squamous Carcinoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Cardnell, Robert J. G.; Mikkelsen, Ross B.

    2011-01-01

    This study tests whether the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), combines favorably with ionizing radiation (IR) in controlling squamous carcinoma tumor growth. Animals bearing FaDu and A431 xenografts were treated with L-NNA in the drinking water. IR exposure was 10 Gy for tumor growth and survival studies and 4 Gy for ex vivo clonogenic assays. Cryosections were examined immunohistochemically for markers of apoptosis and hypoxia. Blood flow was assayed by fluorescent microscopy of tissue cryosections after i.v. injection of fluorospheres. Orally administered L-NNA for 24 hrs reduces tumor blood flow by 80% (p<0.01). Within 24 hrs L-NNA treatment stopped tumor growth for at least 10 days before tumor growth again ensued. The growth arrest was in part due to increased cell killing since a combination of L-NNA and a single 4 Gy IR caused 82% tumor cell killing measured by an ex vivo clonogenic assay compared to 49% by L-NNA or 29% by IR alone. A Kaplan-Meyer analysis of animal survival revealed a distinct survival advantage for the combined treatment. Combining L-NNA and IR was also found to be at least as effective as a single i.p. dose of cisplatin plus IR. In contrast to the in vivo studies, exposure of cells to L-NNA in vitro was without effect on clonogenicity with or without IR. Western and immunochemical analysis of expression of a number of proteins involved in NO signaling indicated that L-NNA treatment enhanced arginase-2 expression and that this may represent vasculature remodeling and escape from NOS inhibition. For tumors such as head and neck squamous carcinomas that show only modest responses to inhibitors of specific angiogenic pathways, targeting NO-dependent pro-survival and angiogenic mechanisms in both tumor and supporting stromal cells may present a potential new strategy for tumor control. PMID:21647438

  16. Busulphan-Cyclophosphamide Cause Endothelial Injury, Remodeling of Resistance Arteries and Enhanced Expression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashmi, Sulaiman; Boels, Piet J. M.; Zadjali, Fahad; Sadeghi, Behnam; Sällström, Johan; Hultenby, Kjell; Hassan, Zuzana; Arner, Anders; Hassan, Moustapha

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is a curative treatment for malignant and non malignant diseases. However, transplantation-related complications including cardiovascular disease deteriorate the clinical outcome and quality of life. We have investigated the acute effects of conditioning regimen on the pharmacology, physiology and structure of large elastic arteries and small resistance-sized arteries in a SCT mouse model. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aorta were dissected from Balb/c mice conditioned with busulphan (Bu) and cyclophosphamide (Cy). In vitro isometric force development and pharmacology, in combination with RT-PCR, Western blotting and electron microscopy were used to study vascular properties. Compared with controls, mesenteric resistance arteries from the Bu-Cy group had larger internal circumference, showed enhanced endothelium mediated relaxation and increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Bu-Cy treated animals had lower mean blood pressure and signs of endothelial injury. Aortas of treated animals had a higher reactivity to noradrenaline. We conclude that short-term consequences of Bu-Cy treatment divergently affect large and small arteries of the cardiovascular system. The increased noradrenaline reactivity of large elastic arteries was not associated with increased blood pressure at rest. Instead, Bu-Cy treatment lowered blood pressure via augmented microvascular endothelial dependent relaxation, increased expression of vascular eNOS and remodeling toward a larger lumen. The changes in the properties of resistance arteries can be associated with direct effects of the compounds on vascular wall or possibly indirectly induced via altered translational activity associated with the reduced hematocrit and shear stress. This study contributes to understanding the mechanisms that underlie the early effects of conditioning regimen on resistance arteries and may help in designing further investigations to understand the late

  17. Diclofenac enhances proinflammatory cytokine-induced phagocytosis of cultured microglia via nitric oxide production

    SciTech Connect

    Kakita, Hiroki; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Nagaya, Yoshiaki; Asai, Hayato; Hussein, Mohamed Hamed; Suzuki, Mieko; Kato, Shin; Saitoh, Shinji; Asai, Kiyofumi

    2013-04-15

    Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is a central nervous system complication with a high mortality rate, which is increased significantly by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (DCF). In the present study, we investigated the effects of DCF on brain immune cells (i.e. microglia) stimulated with three proinflammatory cytokines, namely tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interferon-γ. Similar to previous findings in astrocytes, all three cytokines induced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), as well as NO production, in microglia. The addition of DCF to the culture system augmented iNOS expression and NO production. Immunocytochemical analysis and the phagocytosis assay revealed that cytokine treatment induced morphological changes to and phagocytosis by the microglia. The addition of DCF to the culture system enhanced microglial activation, as well as the phagocytic activity of cytokine-stimulated microglia. Inhibitors of nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibited iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated microglia with or without DCF, suggesting that the NF-κB pathway is one of the main signaling pathways involved. The iNOS inhibitor N{sup G}-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) reduced both cytokine-induced phagocytosis and phagocytosis induced by the combination of cytokines plus DCF. Furthermore, the NO donor sodium nitroprusside induced phagocytosis, indicating that NO production is a key regulator of microglial phagocytosis. In conclusion, DCF acts synergistically with proinflammatory cytokines to increase the production of NO in microglia, leading to phagocytic activity of the activated microglia. These findings, together with previous observations regarding astrocytes, may explain the significant increase in mortality of IAE patients treated with DCF. - Highlights: ► Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is associated with a high mortality rate. ► Hyperimmunization in the brain is believed to be responsible for

  18. Simvastatin enhances the antihypertensive effect of ramipril in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients. Possible role of nitric oxide, oxidative stress, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Zaher, Ahmed O; Elkoussi, Alaa Eldin A; Abudahab, Lotfy H; Elbakry, Mohammed H; Elsayed, Elsayed Abu-Elwafa

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the effects of simvastatin on the blood pressure and on the antihypertensive activity of ramipril in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients were evaluated. In hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals, repeated administration of simvastatin slightly but significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure, enhanced its progressive reductions induced by repeated administration of ramipril and corrected the compromised lipid profile. Concomitantly, repeated administration of simvastatin, ramipril or simvastatin in combination with ramipril to these animals, increased nitric oxide (NO) production and decreased the elevated serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. The effects of combined treatment were greater than those of simvastatin or ramipril alone. In hypertensive hypercholesterolemic patients, repeated administration of ramipril decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, increased NO production, and decreased the elevated serum MDA and hs-CRP levels. Addition of simvastatin to ramipril therapy enhanced these effects and corrected the compromised lipid profile. Simvastatin but not ramipril inhibited the contractile responses of isolated aortic rings induced by angiotensin 11. l-arginine and acetylcholine enhanced, while l-NAME inhibited effects of simvastatin, and simvastatin in combination with ramipril on these contractile responses. These findings suggest that simvastatin exerts antihypertensive effect and enhances the antihypertensive effect of ramipril in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic animals and patients. In addition to its cholesterol-lowering effect, the ability of simvastatin to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction through increasing NO bioavailability and through suppression of oxidative stress and vascular inflammation and its ability to enhance the effect of ramipril on these parameters may play a pivotal role in these effects. © 2011 The Authors Fundamental and

  19. Concomitant Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibition Enhances Myocardial Protection by Inhaled Nitric Oxide in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Lux, Arpad; Pokreisz, Peter; Swinnen, Melissa; Caluwe, Ellen; Gillijns, Hilde; Szelid, Zsolt; Merkely, Bela; Janssens, Stefan P

    2016-02-01

    Enhanced cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling may attenuate myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R) and improve left ventricular (LV) functional recovery after myocardial infarction (MI). We investigated the cardioprotection afforded by inhaled NO (iNO), the phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5)-specific inhibitor tadalafil (TAD), or their combination (iNO+TAD) in C57Bl6J mice subjected to 6-minute left anterior descending artery ligation followed by reperfusion. We measured plasma and cardiac concentrations of cGMP during early reperfusion, quantified myocardial necrosis and inflammation by serial troponin-I (TnI) and myeloperoxidase-positive cell infiltration at day 3, and evaluated LV function and remodeling after 4 weeks using echocardiography and pressure-conductance catheterization. Administration of iNO, TAD, or both during I/R was safe and hemodynamically well tolerated. Compared with untreated mice (CON), only iNO+TAD increased plasma and cardiac-cGMP levels during early reperfusion (80 ± 12 versus 36 ± 6 pmol/ml and 0.15 ± 0.02 versus 0.05 ± 0.01 pmol/mg protein, P < 0.05 for both). Moreover, iNO+TAD reduced TnI at 4 hours to a greater extent (P < 0.001 versus CON) than either alone (P < 0.05 versus CON) and was associated with significantly less myocardial inflammatory cell infiltration at day 3. After 4 weeks and compared with CON, iNO+TAD was associated with increased fractional shortening (43 ± 1 versus 33 ± 2%, P < 0.01), larger stroke volumes (14.9 ± 1.2 versus 10.2 ± 0.9 μl, P < 0.05), enhanced septal and posterior wall thickening (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively), and attenuated LV dilatation (P < 0.001), whereas iNO or TAD alone conferred less benefit. Thus, iNO+TAD has superior efficacy to limit early reperfusion injury and attenuate adverse LV remodeling. Combination of inhaled NO with a long-acting PDE5 inhibitor may represent a promising strategy to reduce ischemic damage following reperfusion and better preserve LV

  20. Novel effects of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, K. L.; Martin, E.; Turko, I. V.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a simple free radical gas, elicits a surprisingly wide range of physiological and pathophysiological effects. NO interacts with soluble guanylate cyclase to evoke many of these effects. However, NO can also interact with molecular oxygen and superoxide radicals to produce reactive nitrogen species that can modify a number of macromolecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. NO can also interact directly with transition metals. Here, we have reviewed the non--3',5'-cyclic-guanosine-monophosphate-mediated effects of NO including modifications of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

  1. [Nitric oxide in dengue pathology].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ortega, M

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional molecule that is involved in citotoxic as well as citoprotective processes, it's synthesis is highly regulated by the cell because an alteration in NO production is associated with a variety of pathologies, such as Septic, Anaphylactic and Hemorrhagic Shock. The clinical feature of dengue virus infection has a spectrum that goes from mild, dengue fever, to a severe disease, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock. Here, some evidences are discussed that links NO with the pathology of the severe disease cause by dengue virus.

  2. Novel synthetic analogue of ACTH 4-10 (Semax) but not glycine prevents the enhanced nitric oxide generation in cerebral cortex of rats with incomplete global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bashkatova, V G; Koshelev, V B; Fadyukova, O E; Alexeev, A A; Vanin, A F; Rayevsky, K S; Ashmarin, I P; Armstrong, D M

    2001-03-09

    This work investigates whether nitric oxide production and lipid peroxidation contribute to the pathophysiology of ischemia and whether glycine and a novel Russian compound, Semax are neuroprotective via a mechanism involving the regulation nitric oxide (NO) and lipid peroxidation. In brief, nitric oxide and indices of lipid peroxidation were elevated following global ischemia. While glycine proved ineffective in reducing NO levels or ameliorating the neurological deficits following global ischemia, Semax proved to be highly effective in abating the rise in nitric oxide and restoring neurologic functioning.

  3. Nebivolol dilates human penile arteries and reverses erectile dysfunction in diabetic rats through enhancement of nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Javier; Wright, Harold M; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Begoña; La Fuente, José M; Gupta, Sandeep; Sáenz de Tejada, Iñigo

    2010-08-01

    Traditional beta-blockers have sometimes been associated with erectile dysfunction (ED). Nebivolol is a cardioselective β(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist that promotes vasodilation through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. We evaluated the effects of nebivolol on the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway, on erectile function and dysfunction, and in human penile vascular tissues. Erectile response to cavernosal nerve electrical stimulation in control and diabetes-induced ED rats were evaluated, along with serum nitrite/nitrate (NOx) concentration and plasma/tissue cGMP levels. Endothelium-dependent and sildenafil-induced relaxation of isolated human corpus cavernosum (HCC) and human penile resistance arteries (HPRA) were also determined. The effects of nebivolol on erectile function and dysfunction and on NO/cGMP-mediated responses. Treatment with nebivolol significantly potentiated erectile response in control rats, regardless of its effects on blood pressure. Nebivolol increased NOx and plasma cGMP by 3-fold and 2.75-fold, respectively, and significantly augmented the elevation of plasma cGMP produced by sildenafil. Nebivolol enhanced endothelium-dependent and sildenafil-induced relaxations of HCC tissue, and produced endothelium-dependent vasodilation of HPRA. Nebivolol, but not atenolol, significantly improved erectile response in diabetic rats (51.6%, 53.2%, and 87.1% of response at 3 Hz in nondiabetic rats, for vehicle-treated, atenolol-treated, and nebivolol-treated diabetic rats, respectively); after sildenafil administration, ED was completely reversed in nebivolol-treated diabetic rats (69.6% and 112% for diabetic rats treated with sildenafil and nebivolol plus sildenafil, respectively). Accordingly, nebivolol restored systemic NOx levels and cGMP content in penile tissue from these animals. Nebivolol in vivo activated the NO/cGMP pathway, enhanced erectile response and reversed ED in diabetic rats. Moreover, nebivolol in vitro

  4. The basics about nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Bruckdorfer, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a gas and a free radical which is now recognised to have very important physiological roles. It is synthesised enzymatically from the amino acid L-arginine in a number of tissues using the three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, one of which is inducible and can form much large amounts of NO. NO is important in the endothelium-dependent regulation of blood flow and pressure as well as inhibiting the activation of blood platelets. NO is recognised as a neurotransmitter at least in certain types of nerves. Along with other free radicals, NO is also important in the primary defence mechanisms against attack by micro-organisms. NO has a close interaction with iron-containing proteins and binds to haem. By this process NO activates a haem-containing enzyme called soluble guanylyl cyclase which is activated a thousand fold to produce the signalling molecule cyclic GMP. This has many effects at the molecular level to set in train the pathways which propagate the diverse physiological actions of NO. Although this pathway through cyclic GMP is important, this is by no means the only mechanism by which NO influences the activities of the cell. These alternative pathways depend on modification of the structure of enzymes and structural proteins in several different ways. Most of these modifications result from the actions of NO with other free radicals such as oxygen and superoxide anions to produce reactive oxidants. The oxidants modify the proteins by, among others, nitrosation and nitration of proteins of thiol groups and aromatic amino acids respectively. These changes introduce potential new subtleties to the effects on NO on cellular function which are only now being explored. Protein modifications by NO are even more evident in many inflammatory disorders and may account, at least to some extent, to the pathology seen in these conditions.

  5. Enhanced nitric oxide generation from nitric oxide synthases as the cause of increased peroxynitrite formation during acute restraint stress: Effects on carotid responsiveness to angiotensinergic stimuli in type-1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Josimar D; Pernomian, Larissa; Gomes, Mayara S; Moreira, Rafael P; do Prado, Alejandro F; da Silva, Carlos H T P; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species accumulation. Behavioral stress increases nitric oxide production, which may trigger a massive impact on vascular cells and accelerate cardiovascular complications under oxidative stress conditions such as Diabetes. For this study, type-1 Diabetes mellitus was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. After 28 days, cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II were obtained in endothelium-intact carotid rings from diabetic rats that underwent to acute restraint stress for 3h. The contractile response evoked by angiotensin II was increased in carotid arteries from diabetic rats. Acute restraint stress did not alter angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid arteries from normoglycaemic rats. However acute stress combined with Diabetes increased angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid rings. Western blot experiments and the inhibition of nitric oxide synthases in functional assays showed that neuronal, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms contribute to the increased formation of peroxynitrite and contractile hyperreactivity to angiotensin II in carotid rings from stressed diabetic rats. In summary, these findings suggest that the increased superoxide anion generation in carotid arteries from diabetic rats associated to the increased local nitric oxide synthases expression and activity induced by acute restrain stress were responsible for exacerbating the local formation of peroxynitrite and the contraction induced by angiotensin II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitric oxide fumigation for postharvest pest control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitric oxide fumigation is effective against all arthropod pests at various life stages tested. Nine insect pests at various life stages and bulb mites were subjected to nitric oxide fumigation treatments under ultralow oxygen conditions of =50 ppm O2 in 1.9L glass jars as fumigation chambers. The ...

  7. Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.

    2005-10-04

    A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

  8. UV Induced Oxidation of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde, F. (Inventor); Luecke, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated at least in part using in situ UV radiation sources. The sources of the oxidizing species include oxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen may be a component of the gaseous stream or added to the gaseous stream, preferably near a UV radiation source, and is converted to ozone by the UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is decomposed through a combination of vaporization and UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50% by volume and increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding vaporization within the flow channel of the gaseous stream and in the presence of the UV radiation sources.

  9. Analytical Chemistry of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research, owing primarily to its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. A requirement for understanding its origin, activity, and regulation is the need for accurate and precise measurement techniques. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO’s unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span pM to µM in physiological milieu, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with special focus on the fundamentals behind each technique and approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools or exploited to create novel NO sensors. PMID:20636069

  10. Nanocarriers for Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Juliana; Marotta-Oliveira, Samantha S.; Cicillini, Simone Aparecida; Eloy, Josimar de Oliveira; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a promising pharmaceutical agent that has vasodilative, antibacterial, and tumoricidal effects. To study the complex and wide-ranging roles of NO and to facilitate its therapeutic use, a great number of synthetic compounds (e.g., nitrosothiols, nitrosohydroxyamines, N-diazeniumdiolates, and nitrosyl metal complexes) have been developed to chemically stabilize and release NO in a controlled manner. Although NO is currently being exploited in many biomedical applications, its use is limited by several factors, including a short half-life, instability during storage, and potential toxicity. Additionally, efficient methods of both localized and systemic in vivo delivery and dose control are needed. One strategy for addressing these limitations and thus increasing the utility of NO donors is based on nanotechnology. PMID:21869934

  11. Analytical chemistry of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Hetrick, Evan M; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research primarily because of its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. To understand its origin, activity, and regulation, accurate and precise measurement techniques are needed. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO's unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span the picomolar-to-micromolar range in physiological milieus, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with a focus on the underlying mechanism of each technique and on approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools to create novel NO sensors.

  12. Nitric oxide enhances plant ultraviolet-B protection up-regulating gene expression of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Tossi, Vanesa; Amenta, Melina; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Cassia, Raúl

    2011-06-01

    The link between ultraviolet (UV)-B, nitric oxide (NO) and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway (PPBP) was studied in maize and Arabidopsis. The transcription factor (TF) ZmP regulates PPBP in maize. A genetic approach using P-rr (ZmP+) and P-ww (ZmP⁻) maize lines demonstrate that: (1) NO protects P-rr leaves but not P-ww from UV-B-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell damage; (2) NO increases flavonoid and anthocyanin content and prevents chlorophyll loss in P-rr but not in P-ww and (3) the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) blocks the UV-B-induced expression of ZmP and their targets CHS and CHI suggesting that NO plays a key role in the UV-B-regulated PPBP. Involvement of endogenous NO was studied in Arabidopsis nitric oxide dioxygenase (NOD) plants that express a NO dioxygenase gene under the control of a dexamethasone (DEX)-inducible promoter. Expression of HY5 and MYB12, TFs involved in PPBP regulation, was induced by UV-B, reduced by DEX in NOD plants and recovered by subsequent NO treatment. C4H regulates synapate esters synthesis and is UV-B-induced in a NO-independent pathway. Data indicate that UV-B perception increases NO concentration, which protects plant against UV-B by two ways: (1) scavenging ROS; and (2) up-regulating the expression of HY5, MYB12 and ZmP, resulting in the PPBP activation.

  13. Large enhancement in the heterogeneous oxidation rate of organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals in the presence of nitric oxide

    DOE PAGES

    Richards-Henderson, Nicole K.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2015-10-27

    In this paper we report an unexpectedly large acceleration in the effective heterogeneous OH reaction rate in the presence of NO. This 10–50 fold acceleration originates from free radical chain reactions, propagated by alkoxy radicals that form inside the aerosol by the reaction of NO with peroxy radicals, which do not appear to produce chain terminating products (e.g., alkyl nitrates), unlike gas phase mechanisms. Lastly, a kinetic model, constrained by experiments, suggests that in polluted regions heterogeneous oxidation plays a much more prominent role in the daily chemical evolution of organic aerosol than previously believed.

  14. Large enhancement in the heterogeneous oxidation rate of organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals in the presence of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Richards-Henderson, Nicole K.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2015-10-27

    In this paper we report an unexpectedly large acceleration in the effective heterogeneous OH reaction rate in the presence of NO. This 10–50 fold acceleration originates from free radical chain reactions, propagated by alkoxy radicals that form inside the aerosol by the reaction of NO with peroxy radicals, which do not appear to produce chain terminating products (e.g., alkyl nitrates), unlike gas phase mechanisms. Lastly, a kinetic model, constrained by experiments, suggests that in polluted regions heterogeneous oxidation plays a much more prominent role in the daily chemical evolution of organic aerosol than previously believed.

  15. Nitric oxide and virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Akaike, T; Maeda, H

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has complex and diverse functions in physiological and pathophysiological phenomena. The mechanisms of many events induced by NO are now well defined, so that a fundamental understanding of NO biology is almost established. Accumulated evidence suggests that NO and oxygen radicals such as superoxide are key molecules in the pathogenesis of various infectious diseases. NO biosynthesis, particularly through expression of an inducible NO synthase (iNOS), occurs in a variety of microbial infections. Although antimicrobial activity of NO is appreciated for bacteria and protozoa, NO has opposing effects in virus infections such as influenza virus pneumonia and certain other neurotropic virus infections. iNOS produces an excessive amount of NO for long periods, which allows generation of a highly reactive nitrogen oxide species, peroxynitrite, via a radical coupling reaction of NO with superoxide. Thus, peroxynitrite causes oxidative tissue injury through potent oxidation and nitration reactions of various biomolecules. NO also appears to affect a host's immune response, with immunopathological consequences. For example, overproduction of NO in virus infections in mice is reported to suppress type 1 helper T-cell-dependent immune responses, leading to type 2 helper T-cell-biased immunological host responses. Thus, NO may be a host response modulator rather than a simple antiviral agent. The unique biological properties of NO are further illustrated by our recent data suggesting that viral mutation and evolution may be accelerated by NO-induced oxidative stress. Here, we discuss these multiple roles of NO in pathogenesis of virus infections as related to both non-specific inflammatory responses and immunological host reactions modulated by NO during infections in vivo. PMID:11106932

  16. Sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Houseman, J.; Teixeira, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental study of several sampling tube and probe material compositions and designs aimed at preventing nitric oxide reduction when sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases. A 250,000 Btu/h furnace fired with technical grade methane was used for testing the sampling probes over a wide range of air-fuel mixtures. The results obtained include the finding that the use of stainless steel in probes creates inaccuracies in near-stoichiometric and fuel-rich sampling in hydrocarbon flames. For very fuel-rich flames, water cooling is needed even in quartz probes to prevent significant reduction of nitric oxide.-

  17. Distribution of nitric oxide in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mesáros, S; Grunfeld, S

    1997-01-01

    We report here the in vitro measurements of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system using a porphyrinic sensor specific for NO. Nitric oxide concentrations were measured directly in different parts of the heart and also in different arteries and veins, ranging from 100 microm to 5 mm in diameter. Highest NO. concentrations were found in the heart and particularly in the areas of aortic and pulmonary valves. The NO. concentration in the arteries was higher than in the veins. A clearcut positive correlation was obtained by plotting the vessel diameter and production of nitric oxide.

  18. Nitric oxide signaling in yeast.

    PubMed

    Astuti, Rika Indri; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    As a cellular signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) is widely conserved from microorganisms, such as bacteria, yeasts, and fungi, to higher eukaryotes including plants and mammals. NO is mainly produced by NO synthase (NOS) or nitrite reductase (NIR) activity. There are several NO detoxification systems, including NO dioxygenase (NOD) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). NO homeostasis based on the balance between NO synthesis and degradation is important for the regulation of its physiological functions because an excess level of NO causes nitrosative stress due to the high reactivity of NO and NO-derived compounds. In yeast, NO may be involved in stress responses, but NO and its signaling have been poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NOS orthologs in the genome. Even though the activities of NOS and NIR have been observed in yeast cells, the gene encoding NOS and the NO production mechanism catalyzed by NIR remain unclear. On the other hand, yeast cells employ NOD and GSNOR to maintain an intracellular redox balance following endogenous NO production, exogenous NO treatment, or environmental stresses. This article reviews NO metabolism (synthesis, degradation) and its regulation in yeast. The physiological roles of NO in yeast, including the oxidative stress response, are also discussed here. Such investigations into NO signaling are essential for understanding the NO-dependent genetic and physiological modulations. In addition to being responsible for the pathology and pharmacology of various degenerative diseases, NO signaling may be a potential target for the construction and engineering of industrial yeast strains.

  19. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  20. Pre-activation of mesenchymal stem cells with TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide enhances its paracrine effects on radiation-induced intestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Min, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Qi-Yi; Leung, Felix W.; Shi, Liu; Zhou, Yu; Yu, Tao; Wang, Chuan-Ming; An, Geng; Sha, Wei-Hong; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-CM) may represent a promising alternative to MSCs transplantation, however, the low concentrations of growth factors in non-activated MSC-CM hamper its clinical application. Recent data indicated that the paracrine potential of MSCs could be enhanced by inflammatory factors. Herein, we pre-activated bone-marrow-derived MSCs under radiation-induced inflammatory condition (MSCIEC-6(IR)) and investigated the evidence and mechanism for the differential effects of MSC-CMIEC-6(IR) and non-activated MSC-CM on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII). Systemic infusion of MSC-CMIEC-6(IR), but not non-activated MSC-CM, dramatically improved intestinal damage and survival of irradiated rats. Such benefits may involve the modulation of epithelial regeneration and inflammation, as indicated by the regeneration of intestinal epithelial/stem cells, the regulation of the pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. The mechanism for the superior paracrine efficacy of MSCIEC-6(IR) is related to a higher secretion of regenerative, immunomodulatory and trafficking molecules, including the pivotal factor IGF-1, induced by TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide partially via a heme oxygenase-1 dependent mechanism. Together, our findings suggest that pre-activation of MSCs with TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide enhances its paracine effects on RIII via a heme oxygenase-1 dependent mechanism, which may help us to maximize the paracrine potential of MSCs. PMID:25732721

  1. Enhancement of Nitric Oxide Release from Nitrosyl Hemoglobin and Nitrosyl Myoglobin by Red/Near Infrared Radiation: Potential Role in Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Nicole L; Keszler, Agnes; Pratt, Phillip; Bienengraber, Martin; Warltier, David C; Hogg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is an important messenger in numerous biological processes, such as angiogenesis, hypoxic vasodilation, and cardioprotection. Although nitric oxide synthases (NOS) produce the bulk of NO, there is increasing interest in NOS independent generation of NO in vivo, particularly during hypoxia or anoxia, where low oxygen tensions limit NOS activity. Interventions that can increase NO bioavailability have significant therapeutic potential. The use of far red and near infrared light (R/NIR) can reduce infarct size, protect neurons from methanol toxicity, and stimulate angiogenesis. How R/NIR modulates these processes in vivo and in vitro is unknown, but it has been suggested that increases in NO levels are involved. In this study we examined if R/NIR light could facilitate the release of NO from nitrosyl heme proteins. In addition, we examined if R/NIR light could enhance the protective effects of nitrite on ischemia and reperfusion injury in the rabbit heart. We show both in purified systems and in myocardium that R/NIR light can decay nitrosyl hemes and release NO, and that this released NO may enhance the cardioprotective effects of nitrite. Thus, the photodissociation to NO and its synergistic effect with sodium nitrite may represent a noninvasive and site specific means for increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:19328206

  2. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  3. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  4. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  5. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  8. Atg7 enhances host defense against infection via down-regulation of superoxide but up-regulation of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuefeng; Ye, Yan; Zhou, Xikun; Zhao, Kelei; Huang, Canhua; Wu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium that can cause serious infection in immunocompromised individuals. Although autophagy may augment immune responses against P. aeruginosa (Pa) infection in macrophages, the critical components and their role of autophagy in host defense are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pa infection-induced autophagy activates JAK2/STAT1α and increases nitric oxide (NO) production. Knocking down Atg7 resulted in increased IFN-γ release, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased SHP2 (Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2) activity, which led to lowered phosphorylation of JAK2/STAT1α and subdued expression of NOS2 (NO Synthase 2). In addition, we demonstrated the physiological relevance of dysregulated NO under Atg7 deficiency as atg7−/− mice were more susceptible to Pa infection with increased mortality and severe lung injury than wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, Pa infected-atg7−/− mice exhibited increased oxidation but decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and other organs compared to WT mice. Mechanistically, atg7 deficiency suppressed NOS2 activity by down-modulating JAK2/STAT1α, leading to decreased NO both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these findings revealed that the JAK2/STAT1α/NOS2 dysfunction leads to dysregulated immune responses, and worsened disease phenotypes. PMID:25535282

  9. Anticonvulsant drugs, oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Vega Rasgado, L A; Ceballos Reyes, G M; Vega-Diaz, M F

    2011-01-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is thought to play a fundamental role in the genesis and the spreading of epileptiform hyperactivity, although its function is unclear and controversial. As a free radical, NO may cause oxidative stress, which is emerging as an important mechanism in the etiology of seizure-induced neuronal death. Here we investigated the role of NO in seizure mechanisms through oxidative stress generation by studying the effect of anticonvulsant drugs such as amino oxyacetic acid (AAOA), valproate (VALP), diazepam (DIAZ) and gabapentin (GBPTNA) on oxidative stress in the brain, estimated as free carbonyls by the method of Dalle and Rossi, and by measuring NO by the indirect method based on the Griess reaction. Results show that, except for AAOA and VALP, anticonvulsants did not significantly affect or decreased free carbonyls, but reversed the oxidative stress produced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsions. Anticonvulsants except AAOA diminished NO levels and with the exception of VALP, counteracted the increase in NO generated by PTZ. Anticonvulsants decreased oxidative stress and NO especially in hippocampus (HI) and cortex (CX), and reversed PTZ effects on both parameters. PTZ diminished NO in HI, which could be explained since PTZ caused an increase on endothelial NO synthase but a decrease in neuronal NOS expression in this brain area. Since the drugs studied are modulating GABA levels, our results suggest that seizures generated by alterations in GABAergic transmission produce oxidative stress caused by NO, which can be reversed by anticonvulsants. The effects described differ among the brain regions studied and the NO synthase isoform affected.

  10. Nitric Oxide Synthases and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Sridhar, Arun; Györke, Sandor; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. There are multiple systems in the myocardium which contribute to redox homeostasis, and loss of homeostasis can result in oxidative stress. Potential sources of oxidants include nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which normally produce nitric oxide in the heart. Two NOS isoforms (1 and 3) are normally expressed in the heart. During pathologies such as heart failure, there is induction of NOS 2 in multiple cell types in the myocardium. In certain conditions, the NOS enzymes may become uncoupled, shifting from production of nitric oxide to superoxide anion, a potent free radical and oxidant. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for NOS in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Therapeutic approaches to reduce atrial fibrillation by modulation of NOS activity may be beneficial, although further investigation of this strategy is needed. PMID:22536189

  11. Nitric oxide production by Tunguska meteor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium chemical processes of nitric oxide formation are computed for the wake of the Tunguska meteor of 1908. The wake characteristics are derived by carrying out an optically-thick radiation field analysis for ablation of the meteoroid. The wake flow field is approximated by a one-dimensional, well-stirred reactor model. Known characteristics of the Tunguska event are imposed as constraints, and three controlling parameters - chemical composition, density, and velocity - are varied over a range around the values derived by Korobeinikov et al. (1976) and Petrov and Stulov (1975). The calculation shows that at least 19 million tons of nitric oxide is produced between the altitudes of 10 and 50 km. The anomalous atmospheric phenomena following the event are attributed to the reactions involving nitric oxide thus produced and atmospheric ozone. It is speculated that the nitric oxide produced by the event fertilized the area near the fall, causing the observed rapid plant growth.

  12. Nitric oxide-releasing indomethacin enhances susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection acting in the cell invasion and oxidative stress associated with anemia.

    PubMed

    Tatakihara, Vera Lucia Hideko; Malvezi, Aparecida Donizette; Panis, Carolina; Cecchini, Rubens; Zanluqui, Nagela Ghabdan; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Martins, Maria Isabel Lovo; da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2015-02-05

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Approximately 8 million people are thought to be affected with this disease worldwide. T. cruzi infection causes an intense inflammatory response, which is critical for the control of parasite proliferation and disease development. Nitric oxide-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) are an emergent class of pharmaceutical derivatives with promising utility as chemopreventive agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of NO-indomethacin on parasite burden, cell invasion, and oxidative stress in erythrocytes during the acute phase of infection. NO-indomethacin was dissolved in dimethyl formamide followed by i.p. administration of 50 ppm into mice 30 min after infection with 5×10(3) blood trypomastigote forms (Y strain). The drug was administered every day until the animals died. Control animals received 100 μL of drug vehicle via the same route. Within the NO-indomethacin-treatment group, parasitemia and mortality (100%) were higher and oxidative stress in erythrocytes, anemia, and entry of parasites into macrophages were significantly greater than that seen in controls. Increase in the entry and survival of intracellular T. cruzi was associated with inhibition of nitric oxide production by macrophages treated with NO-indomethacin (2.5 μM). The results of this study provide strong evidence that NO-NSAIDs potently inhibit nitric oxide production, suggesting that NO-NSAID-based therapies against infections would be difficult to design and would require caution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitric oxide synthase in tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Kurenni, D E; Thurlow, G A; Turner, R W; Moroz, L L; Sharkey, K A; Barnes, S

    1995-10-23

    Previous studies have indicated that nitric oxide, a labile freely diffusible biological messenger synthesized by nitric oxide synthase, may modulate light transduction and signal transmission in the retina. In the present work, the large size of retinal cells in tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) allowed the utilization of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase histochemistry and nitric oxide synthase immunocytochemistry to delineate the cell-specific intracellular localization of nitric oxide synthase. NADPH-diaphorase activity was highly concentrated in the outer retina, in rod and cone inner segment ellipsoids, and between and adjacent to the photoreceptor cell bodies in the outer nuclear layer. Examination of enzymatically isolated retinal cells indicated that outer nuclear layer NADPH-diaphorase activity was localized to the distal processes of the retinal glial (Müller) cells and to putative bipolar cell Landolt clubs. Less intense NADPH-diaphorase activity was seen in the photoreceptor inner segment myoid region, in a small number of inner nuclear layer cells, in cap-like configurations at the distal poles of cells in the ganglion cell layer and surrounding ganglion cell layer somata, and in punctate form within both plexiform layers, the pigment epithelium, and the optic nerve. Nitric oxide synthase-like immunoreactivity was similarly localized, but was also concentrated along a thin sublamina centered within the inner plexiform layer. The potential for nitric oxide generation at multiple retinal sites suggests that this molecule may play a number of roles in the processing of visual information in the retina.

  14. Nitric oxide synthase-like dependent NO production enhances heme oxygenase up-regulation in ultraviolet-B-irradiated soybean plants.

    PubMed

    Santa-Cruz, Diego M; Pacienza, Natalia A; Polizio, Ariel H; Balestrasse, Karina B; Tomaro, Maria L; Yannarelli, Gustavo G

    2010-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) has antioxidant properties and is up-regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ultraviolet-B-irradiated soybean plants. This study shows that nitric oxide (NO) protects against oxidative damage and that nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like activity is also required for HO-1 induction under UV-B radiation. Pre-treatments with sodium nitroprussiate (SNP), a NO-donor, prevented chlorophyll loss, H(2)O(2) and O(2)(*-) accumulation, and ion leakage in UV-B-treated plants. HO activity was significantly enhanced by NO and showed a positive correlation with HO-1 transcript levels. In fact, HO-1 mRNA levels were increased 2.1-fold in 0.8 mM SNP-treated plants, whereas subsequent UV-B irradiation augmented this expression up to 3.5-fold with respect to controls. This response was not observed using ferrocyanide, a SNP inactive analog, and was effectively blocked by 2-(4-carboxyphenil)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), a specific NO-scavenger. In addition, experiments carried out in the presence of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or tungsten, well-known inhibitors of NOS and nitrate reductase, showed that NOS is the endogenous source of NO that mediates HO-1 expression. In summary, we found that NO is involved in the signaling pathway leading to HO-1 up-regulation under UV-B, and that a balance between NO and ROS is important to trigger the antioxidant response against oxidative stress.

  15. Preconditioning c-Kit-positive Human Cardiac Stem Cells with a Nitric Oxide Donor Enhances Cell Survival through Activation of Survival Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Teng, Lei; Bennett, Edward; Cai, Chuanxi

    2016-04-29

    Cardiac stem cell therapy has shown very promising potential to repair the infarcted heart but is severely limited by the poor survival of donor cells. Nitric oxide (NO) has demonstrated cytoprotective properties in various cells, but its benefits are unknown specifically for human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs). Therefore, we investigated whether pretreatment of hCSCs with a widely used NO donor, diethylenetriamine nitric oxide adduct (DETA-NO), promotes cell survival. Results from lactate dehydrogenase release assays showed a dose- and time-dependent attenuation of cell death induced by oxidative stress after DETA-NO preconditioning; this cytoprotective effect was abolished by the NO scavenger. Concomitant up-regulation of several cell signaling molecules after DETA-NO preconditioning was observed by Western blotting, including elevated phosphorylation of NRF2, NFκB, STAT3, ERK, and AKT, as well as increased protein expression of HO-1 and COX2. Furthermore, pharmaceutical inhibition of ERK, STAT3, and NFκB activities significantly diminished NO-induced cytoprotection against oxidative stress, whereas inhibition of AKT or knockdown of NRF2 only produced a minor effect. Blocking PI3K activity or knocking down COX2 expression did not alter the protective effect of DETA-NO on cell survival. The crucial roles of STAT3 and NFκB in NO-mediated signaling pathways were further confirmed by stable expression of gene-specific shRNAs in hCSCs. Thus, preconditioning hCSCs with DETA-NO promotes cell survival and resistance to oxidative stress by activating multiple cell survival signaling pathways. These results will potentially provide a simple and effective strategy to enhance survival of hCSCs after transplantation and increase their efficacy in repairing infarcted myocardium. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Minicircle DNA-mediated endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene transfer enhances angiogenic responses of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bandara, Nadeeka; Gurusinghe, Saliya; Chen, Haiying; Chen, Shuangfeng; Wang, Le-Xin; Lim, Shiang Y; Strappe, Padraig

    2016-04-01

    Non-viral-based gene modification of adult stem cells with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) may enhance production of nitric oxide and promote angiogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial cells is a pleiotropic diffusible gas with positive effects on maintaining vascular tone and promoting wound healing and angiogenesis. Adult stem cells may enhance angiogenesis through expression of bioactive molecules, and their genetic modification to express eNOS may promote NO production and subsequent cellular responses. Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) were transfected with a minicircle DNA vector expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or eNOS. Transfected cells were analysed for eNOS expression and NO production and for their ability to form in vitro capillary tubules and cell migration. Transcriptional activity of angiogenesis-associated genes, CD31, VEGF-A, PDGFRα, FGF2, and FGFR2, were analysed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Minicircle vectors expressing GFP (MC-GFP) were used to transfect HEK293T cells and rBMSCs, and were compared to a larger parental vector (P-GFP). MC-GFP showed significantly higher transfection in HEK293T cells (55.51 ± 3.3 %) and in rBMSC (18.65 ± 1.05 %) compared to P-GFP in HEK293T cells (43.4 ± 4.9 %) and rBMSC (15.21 ± 0.22 %). MC-eNOS vectors showed higher transfection efficiency (21 ± 3 %) compared to P-eNOS (9 ± 1 %) and also generated higher NO levels. In vitro capillary tubule formation assays showed both MC-eNOS and P-eNOS gene-modified rBMSCs formed longer (14.66 ± 0.55 mm and 13.58 ± 0.68 mm, respectively) and a greater number of tubules (56.33 ± 3.51 and 51 ± 4, respectively) compared to controls, which was reduced with the NOS inhibitor L-NAME. In an in vitro wound healing assay, MC-eNOS transfected cells showed greater migration which was also reversed by L-NAME treatment. Finally, gene expression analysis in MC-eNOS transfected cells showed significant

  17. Application of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy to the Detection of Nitric Oxide, Carbonyl Sulphide, and Ethane--Breath Biomarkers of Serious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wojtas, Jacek

    2015-06-17

    The paper presents one of the laser absorption spectroscopy techniques as an effective tool for sensitive analysis of trace gas species in human breath. Characterization of nitric oxide, carbonyl sulphide and ethane, and the selection of their absorption lines are described. Experiments with some biomarkers showed that detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level is possible using this technique. Thanks to cavity enhanced spectroscopy application, detection limits at the ppb-level and short measurements time (<3 s) were achieved. Absorption lines of reference samples of the selected volatile biomarkers were probed using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser and a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator and difference frequency generator. Setup using the first source provided a detection limit of 30 ppb for nitric oxide and 250 ppb for carbonyl sulphide. During experiments employing a second laser, detection limits of 0.9 ppb and 0.3 ppb were obtained for carbonyl sulphide and ethane, respectively. The conducted experiments show that this type of diagnosis would significantly increase chances for effective therapy of some diseases. Additionally, it offers non-invasive and real time measurements, high sensitivity and selectivity as well as minimizing discomfort for patients. For that reason, such sensors can be used in screening for early detection of serious diseases.

  18. Application of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy to the Detection of Nitric Oxide, Carbonyl Sulphide, and Ethane—Breath Biomarkers of Serious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wojtas, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents one of the laser absorption spectroscopy techniques as an effective tool for sensitive analysis of trace gas species in human breath. Characterization of nitric oxide, carbonyl sulphide and ethane, and the selection of their absorption lines are described. Experiments with some biomarkers showed that detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level is possible using this technique. Thanks to cavity enhanced spectroscopy application, detection limits at the ppb-level and short measurements time (<3 s) were achieved. Absorption lines of reference samples of the selected volatile biomarkers were probed using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser and a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator and difference frequency generator. Setup using the first source provided a detection limit of 30 ppb for nitric oxide and 250 ppb for carbonyl sulphide. During experiments employing a second laser, detection limits of 0.9 ppb and 0.3 ppb were obtained for carbonyl sulphide and ethane, respectively. The conducted experiments show that this type of diagnosis would significantly increase chances for effective therapy of some diseases. Additionally, it offers non-invasive and real time measurements, high sensitivity and selectivity as well as minimizing discomfort for patients. For that reason, such sensors can be used in screening for early detection of serious diseases. PMID:26091398

  19. Autowave distribution of nitric oxide and its endogenous derivatives in biosystems strongly enhances their biological effects: A working hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Anatoly F; Mikoyan, Vasak D; Rubtsov, Nikolai M; Kubrina, Lioudmila N

    2010-11-01

    It is hypothesized that in cells producing nitric oxide (NO), NO and its endogenous derivatives (low-molecular S-nitrosothiols and dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiol-containing ligands) can move in the intracellular space not only by diffusion but also in an autowave mode. This hypothesis is based on the previously obtained data on autowave distribution of DNIC with glutathione following application of a drop of a solution of Fe(2+)+glutathione onto the surface of a thin layer of a S-nitrosoglutathione solution. The appearance of autowaves is conditioned by a self-regulating self-sustained system arising in the process. This system consists of self-convertible DNIC and S-nitrosothiols as well as free ferrous iron ions, thiols and NO and can function in the autowave regime for several seconds with subsequent passage to a steady state maintained by chemical equilibrium between DNIC and their constituent components (free Fe(2+) ions, thiols, S-nitrosothiols and NO). Possible advantages of autowave distribution of NO and its endogenous derivatives in the intracellular space over free diffusion, which might entail higher efficiency of their biological action, are discussed.

  20. Chronic inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis enhances both subventricular zone neurogenesis and olfactory learning in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Romero-Grimaldi, Carmen; Gheusi, Gilles; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Estrada, Carmen

    2006-11-01

    The ability to generate new neurons during the course of adult life is preserved in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the mammalian brain. These two regions constitute specifically regulated neurogenic niches, and provide newborn neurons involved in olfactory and spatial learning, respectively. Nitric oxide (NO) is a negative regulator of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone, whereas its role in the dentate gyrus remains controversial. Using systemic administration of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors to chronically inhibit NO production, we increased neural precursor proliferation in the subventricular zone as well as neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb, without modifying the number of mitotic cells or the granular cell layer thickness in the dentate gyrus. The same treatment specifically improved olfactory learning performance, whereas spatial learning and memory was unchanged, thus demonstrating that olfactory memory is closely associated with the level of ongoing neurogenesis in the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb. The anatomical specificity of the NOS inhibitor actions was not due to differences in the availability of NO, as demonstrated by immunohistochemical detection of neuronal NOS and S-nitrosylated proteins in both regions. Remarkably, the distinct NO sensitivity might result from a differential expression of epidermal growth factor receptor in precursor cells in both regions, as the proliferative effect of NOS inhibitors in the subventricular zone was restricted to the cells that expressed this receptor.

  1. Enhanced expression of haem oxygenase-1 by nitric oxide and antiinflammatory drugs in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, M J; Habib, A; Lebret, M; Créminon, C; Lévy-Toledano, S; Maclouf, J

    2000-05-01

    1. Haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can exert protective effects against oxidative stress and inflammation. Fibroblasts participate in inflammatory responses where they produce high levels of prostaglandins (PGs) and nitric oxide (NO). However, little is known of the presence of HO-1 in these cells and the possible interactions among these pathways. Incubation of cells with NO donors, spermine nonoate (SPNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), induced a dose- and time-dependent expression of HO-1 protein. 2. NO donors increased basal PGE(2) release although they reduced PGE(2) accumulated in the medium and cyclo-oxygenase (COX) activity when cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). COX-2 protein was weakly induced by SPNO in basal conditions and in the presence of LPS a synergy for HO-1 and COX-2 protein expression was observed. 3. Our results indicate that reactive oxygen species participate in the inductive effect of NO donors or LPS on HO-1 expression, whereas endogenous NO production may play a role in the mechanism of the synergy exhibited by SPNO and LPS on HO-1 and COX-2 expression. In this system, zinc protoporphyrin IX did not affect nitrite levels but reduced COX activity. 4. The selective COX-2 inhibitors SC58125 and NS398 as well as the non-selective COX inhibitor, indomethacin, strongly reduced PGE(2) synthesis and showed a synergy with NO donors in HO-1 and COX-2 induction. Addition of PGE(2) had no effect, suggesting a mechanism independent of PGs formation. 5. In inflammatory conditions a number of factors could cooperate to induce HO-1 and COX-2, with a positive regulation by COX inhibitors.

  2. Activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 coordinates dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase/PPAR-γ/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathways that enhance nitric oxide generation in human glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zaiming; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) degrades asymmetric dimethylarginine, which inhibits nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS). Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional factor that binds to antioxidant response elements and transcribes many antioxidant genes. Because the promoters of the human DDAH-1 and DDAH-2, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and PPAR-γ genes contain 2 to 3 putative antioxidant response elements, we hypothesized that they were regulated by Nrf2/antioxidant response element. Incubation of human renal glomerular endothelial cells with the Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone (20 μmol·L(-1)) significantly (P<0.05) increased NO and activities of NOS and DDAH and decreased asymmetric dimethylarginine. It upregulated genes for hemoxygenase-1, eNOS, DDAH-1, DDAH-2, and PPAR-γ and partitioned Nrf2 into the nucleus. Knockdown of Nrf2 abolished these effects. Nrf2 bound to one antioxidant response element on DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 and PPAR-γ promoters but not to the eNOS promoter. An increased eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (P-eNOSser-1177) expression with tert-butylhydroquinone was prevented by knockdown of PPAR-γ. Expression of Nrf2 was reduced by knockdown of PPAR-γ, whereas PPAR-γ was reduced by knockdown of Nrf2, thereby demonstrating 2-way positive interactions. Thus, Nrf2 transcribes HO-1 and other genes to reduce reactive oxygen species, and DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 to reduce asymmetric dimethylarginine and PPAR-γ to increase eNOS and its phosphorylation and activity thereby coordinating 3 pathways that enhance endothelial NO generation.

  3. [Retinal ischemia and nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Neroev, V V; Arkhipova, M M

    2003-01-01

    Retinal ischemia is the main chain in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases of the eye. It was established that nitric oxide (NO) plays the key role in the development of ischemia. Recent understanding of the NO role, as a universal regulator of the cellular and tissue metabolism, is presented. The authors' and published data were used to design a scheme of pathogenesis of retinal ischemia with regard for the NO role. NO can produce both positive and negative effects depending on a stage of the process, NO concentration and on a number of other factors if they are present. Initial stages of hypoxia/ischemia are accompanied by an activation of all forms of NO-synthases (NOS) caused by the influence of biologically active substances (cytokines, prostaglandins, serotonin, bradykinin, glycolisis suboxide products etc.). The activation of inducible NOS, which synthesize a bigger quantity of NO possessing a direct cytotoxic action and contributing to the production of highly toxic radical of peroxinitrit, is in the focus of attention. The damage of cellular structures due to free-radical processes leads to the development of endothelial, macrophage and thrombocyte malfunctions, which manifest itself through a reduced activity of endothelial NOS and through disruption of NO-dependent processes (vasospasm, an increased aggregation of platelets and a reduced fibrinolytic activity). A sharp reduction of NO synthesis substrate (L-arginine) is observed in patients with retinal ischemia. The aggravation of ischemia causes a decrease of NO synthesis due to an exhaustion of L-arginine and its intensified consumption in the course of free-radical processes. The use of NO-inhibitors and of NO-donors at different stages of retinal ischemia prevents the development of neovascularization and proliferation.

  4. Humming greatly increases nasal nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O N

    2002-07-15

    The paranasal sinuses are major producers of nitric oxide (NO). We hypothesized that oscillating airflow produced by humming would enhance sinus ventilation and thereby increase nasal NO levels. Ten healthy subjects took part in the study. Nasal NO was measured with a chemiluminescence technique during humming and quiet single-breath exhalations at a fixed flow rate. NO increased 15-fold during humming compared with quiet exhalation. In a two-compartment model of the nose and sinus, oscillating airflow caused a dramatic increase in gas exchange between the cavities. Obstruction of the sinus ostium is a central event in the pathogenesis of sinusitis. Nasal NO measurements during humming may be a useful noninvasive test of sinus NO production and ostial patency. In addition, any therapeutic effects of the improved sinus ventilation caused by humming should be investigated.

  5. Nitric Oxide Release Part I. Macromolecular Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Daniel A.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The roles of nitric oxide (NO) in physiology and pathophysiology merit the use of NO as a therapeutic for certain biomedical applications. Unfortunately, limited NO payloads, too rapid NO release, and the lack of targeted NO delivery have hindered the clinical utility of NO gas and low molecular weight NO donor compounds. A wide-variety of NO-releasing macromolecular scaffolds has thus been developed to improve NO’s pharmacological potential. In this tutorial review, we provide an overview of the most promising NO release scaffolds including protein, organic, inorganic, and hybrid organic-inorganic systems. The NO release vehicles selected for discussion were chosen based on their enhanced NO storage, tunable NO release characteristics, and potential as therapeutics. PMID:22362355

  6. Nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Robert P

    2002-12-01

    Inflammation is a process consisting of a complex of cytological and chemical reactions which occur in and around affected blood vessels and adjacent tissues in response to an injury caused by a physical, chemical or biological insult. Much work has been performed in the past several years investigating inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS, EC 1.14.13.39) and nitric oxide in inflammation. This has resulted in a rapid increase in knowledge about iNOS and nitric oxide. Nitric oxide formation from inducible NOS is regulated by numerous inflammatory mediators, often with contradictory effects, depending upon the type and duration of the inflammatory insult. Equine medicine appears to have benefited the most from the increased interest in this small, inflammatory mediator. Most of the information on nitric oxide in traditional veterinary species has been produced using models or naturally occurring inflammatory diseases of this species.

  7. Neural mechanisms in nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, M.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide is hypothesized to be an inhibitory modulator of central sympathetic nervous outflow, and deficient neuronal nitric oxide production to cause sympathetic overactivity, which then contributes to nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension. The biochemical and neuroanatomical basis for this concept revolves around nitric oxide modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission within brainstem vasomotor centers. The functional consequence of neuronal nitric oxide in blood pressure regulation is, however, marked by an apparent conflict in the literature. On one hand, conscious animal studies using sympathetic blockade suggest a significant role for neuronal nitric oxide deficiency in the development of nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension, and on the other hand, there is evidence against such a role derived from 'knock-out' mice lacking nitric-oxide synthase 1, the major source of neuronal nitric oxide.

  8. Neural mechanisms in nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, M.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide is hypothesized to be an inhibitory modulator of central sympathetic nervous outflow, and deficient neuronal nitric oxide production to cause sympathetic overactivity, which then contributes to nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension. The biochemical and neuroanatomical basis for this concept revolves around nitric oxide modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission within brainstem vasomotor centers. The functional consequence of neuronal nitric oxide in blood pressure regulation is, however, marked by an apparent conflict in the literature. On one hand, conscious animal studies using sympathetic blockade suggest a significant role for neuronal nitric oxide deficiency in the development of nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension, and on the other hand, there is evidence against such a role derived from 'knock-out' mice lacking nitric-oxide synthase 1, the major source of neuronal nitric oxide.

  9. Nitric oxide signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms mediates phosphodiesterase activity, decreased cyclic di-GMP levels, and enhanced dispersal.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Nicolas; Schleheck, David; Klebensberger, Janosch; Webb, Jeremy S; Hassett, Daniel J; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2009-12-01

    Bacteria in biofilms often undergo active dispersal events and revert to a free-swimming, planktonic state to complete the biofilm life cycle. The signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) was previously found to trigger biofilm dispersal in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa at low, nontoxic concentrations (N. Barraud, D. J. Hassett, S. H. Hwang, S. A. Rice, S. Kjelleberg, and J. S. Webb, J. Bacteriol. 188:7344-7353, 2006). NO was further shown to increase cell motility and susceptibility to antimicrobials. Recently, numerous studies revealed that increased degradation of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) by specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs) triggers a planktonic mode of growth in eubacteria. In this study, the potential link between NO and c-di-GMP signaling was investigated by performing (i) PDE inhibitor studies, (ii) enzymatic assays to measure PDE activity, and (iii) direct quantification of intracellular c-di-GMP levels. The results suggest a role for c-di-GMP signaling in triggering the biofilm dispersal event induced by NO, as dispersal requires PDE activity and addition of NO stimulates PDE and induces the concomitant decrease in intracellular c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, gene expression studies indicated global responses to low, nontoxic levels of NO in P. aeruginosa biofilms, including upregulation of genes involved in motility and energy metabolism and downregulation of adhesins and virulence factors. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of candidate genes and physiological characterization of the corresponding mutant strains uncovered that the chemotaxis transducer BdlA is involved in the biofilm dispersal response induced by NO.

  10. Overexpression of Glutamate Decarboxylase in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhances Their Immunosuppressive Properties and Increases GABA and Nitric Oxide Levels

    PubMed Central

    González, Marisol; Vilches, Rodrigo; Rojas, Pablo; Vásquez, Manuel; Kurte, Mónica; Vega-Letter, Ana María; Carrión, Flavio; Figueroa, Fernando; Rojas, Patricio; Irarrázabal, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter GABA has been recently identified as a potent immunosuppressive agent that targets both innate and adaptive immune systems and prevents disease progression of several autoimmunity models. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self-renewing progenitor cells that differentiate into various cell types under specific conditions, including neurons. In addition, MSC possess strong immunosuppressive capabilities. Upon cytokine priming, undifferentiated MSC suppress T-cell proliferation via cell-to-cell contact mechanisms and the secretion of soluble factors like nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and IDO. Although MSC and MSC-derived neuron-like cells express some GABAergic markers in vitro, the role for GABAergic signaling in MSC-mediated immunosuppression remains completely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that pro-inflammatory cytokines selectively regulate GAD-67 expression in murine bone marrow-MSC. However, expression of GAD-65 is required for maximal GABA release by MSC. Gain of function experiments using GAD-67 and GAD-65 co-expression demonstrates that GAD increases immunosuppressive function in the absence of pro-inflammatory licensing. Moreover, GAD expression in MSC evokes an increase in both GABA and NO levels in the supernatants of co-cultured MSC with activated splenocytes. Notably, the increase in NO levels by GAD expression was not observed in cultures of isolated MSC expressing GAD, suggesting crosstalk between these two pathways in the setting of immunosuppression. These results indicate that GAD expression increases MSC-mediated immunosuppression via secretion of immunosuppressive agents. Our findings may help reconsider GABAergic activation in MSC for immunological disorders. PMID:27662193

  11. Hydrogen sulfide enhances salt tolerance through nitric oxide-mediated maintenance of ion homeostasis in barley seedling roots

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Fei-Hua; He, En-Ming; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are emerging as messenger molecules involved in the modulation of plant physiological processes. Here, we investigated a signalling network involving H2S and NO in salt tolerance pathway of barley. NaHS, a donor of H2S, at a low concentration of either 50 or 100 μM, had significant rescue effects on the 150 mM NaCl-induced inhibition of plant growth and modulated the K+/Na+ balance by decreasing the net K+ efflux and increasing the gene expression of an inward-rectifying potassium channel (HvAKT1) and a high-affinity K+ uptake system (HvHAK4). H2S and NO maintained the lower Na+ content in the cytoplast by increasing the amount of PM H+-ATPase, the transcriptional levels of PM H+-ATPase (HvHA1) and Na+/H+ antiporter (HvSOS1). H2S and NO modulated Na+ compartmentation into the vacuoles with up-regulation of the transcriptional levels of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (HvVNHX2) and H+-ATPase subunit β (HvVHA-β) and increased in the protein expression of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (NHE1). H2S mimicked the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) by increasing NO production, whereas the function was quenched with the addition of NO scavenger. These results indicated that H2S increased salt tolerance by maintaining ion homeostasis, which were mediated by the NO signal. PMID:26213372

  12. Nitric oxide-releasing polymer incorporated ointment for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youngnam; Kim, Jihoon; Lee, Yeong Mi; Im, Sooseok; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-12-28

    This work demonstrates the development of nitric oxide-releasing ointment and its potential on efficient wound healing. Nitric oxide-releasing polymer was successfully synthesized, which is composed of biocompatible Pluronic F127, branched polyethylenimine and 1-substituted diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolates. The synthesized nitric oxide-releasing polymer was incorporated into the PEG-based ointment which not only facilitated nitric oxide release in a slow manner, but also served as a moisturizer to enhance the wound healing. As compared to control groups, the nitric oxide-releasing ointment showed the accelerated wound closure with enhanced re-epithelialization, collagen deposition, and blood vessel formation in vivo. Therefore, this nitric oxide-based ointment presents the promising potential for the efficient strategy to heal the cutaneous wound.

  13. Single-laser-shot detection of nitric oxide in reacting flows using electronic resonance enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Ning; Naik, Sameer V.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Lucht, Robert P.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2008-09-01

    Single-laser-shot electronic resonance enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) spectra of nitric oxide (NO) were generated using the 532 nm output of an injection-seeded Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser as the pump beam, a broadband dye laser at approximately 591 nm as the Stokes beam, and a 236 nm narrowband ultraviolet probe beam. Single-laser-shot ERE-CARS spectra of NO were acquired in an atmospheric-pressure hydrogen/air counterflow diffusion flame. The single-shot detection limit in this flame was found to be approximately 30 ppm, and the standard deviation of the measured NO concentration was found to be approximately 20% of the mean.

  14. Enhanced production of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in very long chain saturated fatty acid-accumulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Naotake; Shimada, Kazunori; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Kume, Atsumi; Kitamura, Yohei; Sumiyoshi, Katsuhiko; Kiyanagi, Takashi; Iesaki, Takafumi; Inoue, Nao; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Background Deterioration of peroxisomal β-oxidation activity causes an accumulation of very long chain saturated fatty acids (VLCSFA) in various organs. We have recently reported that the levels of VLCSFA in the plasma and/or membranes of blood cells were significantly higher in patients with metabolic syndrome and in patients with coronary artery disease than the controls. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of VLCSFA accumulation on inflammatory and oxidative responses in VLCSFA-accumulated macrophages derived from X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) protein (ALDP)-deficient mice. Results Elevated levels of VLCSFA were confirmed in macrophages from ALDP-deficient mice. The levels of nitric oxide (NO) production stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interluekin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70), were significantly higher in macrophages from ALDP-deficient mice than in those from wild-type mice. The inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression also showed an increase in macrophages from ALDP-deficient mice. Conclusion These results suggested that VLCSFA accumulation in macrophages may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases through the enhancement of inflammatory and oxidative responses. PMID:19038055

  15. Enhanced production of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in very long chain saturated fatty acid-accumulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Naotake; Shimada, Kazunori; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Kume, Atsumi; Kitamura, Yohei; Sumiyoshi, Katsuhiko; Kiyanagi, Takashi; Iesaki, Takafumi; Inoue, Nao; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-28

    Deterioration of peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity causes an accumulation of very long chain saturated fatty acids (VLCSFA) in various organs. We have recently reported that the levels of VLCSFA in the plasma and/or membranes of blood cells were significantly higher in patients with metabolic syndrome and in patients with coronary artery disease than the controls. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of VLCSFA accumulation on inflammatory and oxidative responses in VLCSFA-accumulated macrophages derived from X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) protein (ALDP)-deficient mice. Elevated levels of VLCSFA were confirmed in macrophages from ALDP-deficient mice. The levels of nitric oxide (NO) production stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interluekin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70), were significantly higher in macrophages from ALDP-deficient mice than in those from wild-type mice. The inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression also showed an increase in macrophages from ALDP-deficient mice. These results suggested that VLCSFA accumulation in macrophages may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases through the enhancement of inflammatory and oxidative responses.

  16. Nitric oxide inhibition of human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J B; Doty, E; Bonaventura, J; Haney, A F

    1995-08-01

    To determine the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on sperm motility in vitro. Normal human sperm separated by centrifugation through a discontinuous Percoll gradient and subsequent swim-up were incubated for up to 24 hours with NO donors, with and without the known NO quencher hemoglobin, as well as with agents that raise intracellular cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Sperm respiration was determined by a tetrazolium-formazan spectrophotometric assay. Andrology laboratory. Absolute sperm motility and respiration. Sperm incubated with the NO donors 1 mM nitroprusside, 100 to 125 microM 3-morpholinosydnonimine, and 25 to 125 microM pure nitric oxide gas dissolved in buffer were inhibited in motility in a dose-dependent fashion. The inhibition could be reversed by the NO quencher hemoglobin. Agents that raise cellular cGMP (dibutyryl cGMP or 8-bromo-cGMP) did not inhibit motility. Nitric oxide inhibited sperm respiration, as measured by the tetrazolium-formazan assay. Nitric oxide reduces sperm motility, possibly by a mechanism involving inhibition of cellular respiration independent of an elevation of intracellular cGMP. Nitric oxide elaborated in the female or male genital tract in vivo could adversely influence sperm function and fertility.

  17. Substituted 2-aminopyridines as inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, W K; Caldwell, C G; Chen, P; Durette, P L; Esser, C K; Lanza, T J; Kopka, I E; Guthikonda, R; Shah, S K; MacCoss, M; Chabin, R M; Fletcher, D; Grant, S K; Green, B G; Humes, J L; Kelly, T M; Luell, S; Meurer, R; Moore, V; Pacholok, S G; Pavia, T; Williams, H R; Wong, K K

    2000-09-04

    A series of substituted 2-aminopyridines was prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of human nitric oxide synthases (NOS). 4,6-Disubstitution enhanced both potency and specificity for the inducible NOS with the most potent compound having an IC50 of 28 nM.

  18. A Randomized Single Dose Parallel Study on Enhancement of Nitric Oxide in Serum and Saliva with the Use of Natural Sports Supplement in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Joby; Gopi, Sreeraj; Divya, Chandradhara

    2017-06-22

    Sports supplements that stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO) are widely promoted agents in the sports nutrition domain, and nitric oxide plays an important role to enhance the cardiovascular and physical fitness of the sports participants. The purpose of the study is to investigate whether oral intake of a sports nutritional supplement (Fitnox) is able to increase nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) levels in blood serum and saliva of healthy adults. Fitnox is a unique blend of Kaempferia parviflora methoxy flavones, pomegranate peel polyphenols, and Moringa oleifera leaf saponins. Twenty-four healthy male adults were equally divided and underwent the double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with a single oral dose of sports nutrition formulation (250 mg capsules); blood and saliva samples were analyzed at different time intervals by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After administration of Fitnox (250 mg capsule as single dose), NO3(-) and NO2(-) levels in serum and saliva were found to be significantly higher (p <.05) than in the placebo group in 24 hours. Pharmacokinetic parameters such as the area under the plasma concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-inf), AUC calculated to the last measured concentration (AUC0-t), maximum drug serum concentrations (Cmax), time of maximum concentration in serum observed (Tmax), and time required for the concentration of the drug to reach half of its original value (Thalf) were also statistically significant (p <.05) compared with the placebo. The results indicate that a single oral dose of Fitnox is able to increase the NO3(-) and NO2(-) levels considerably in the body relative to placebo for at least 12 hours. Therefore, Fitnox can improve the overall performance of sport participants and enhance physical endurance.

  19. L-citrulline immunostaining identifies nitric oxide production sites within neurons.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, G P T; Friedrich, V L; Holstein, G R

    2002-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of L-citrulline was analyzed in the adult rat brain and compared with that of traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide synthase. Light, transmission electron, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study tissue sections processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody against L-citrulline or polyclonal anti-neuronal nitric oxide synthase sera, and double immunofluorescence to detect neuronal nitric oxide synthase and L-citrulline co-localization. The results demonstrate that the same CNS regions and cell types are labeled by neuronal nitric oxide synthase polyclonal antisera and L-citrulline monoclonal antibodies, using both immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Short-term pretreatment with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor reduces L-citrulline immunostaining, but does not affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. In the vestibular brainstem, double immunofluorescence studies show that many, but not all, neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive cells co-express L-citrulline, and that local intracellular patches of intense L-citrulline accumulation are present in some neurons. Conversely, all L-citrulline-labeled neurons co-express neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Cells expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase alone are interpreted as neurons with the potential to produce nitric oxide under other stimulus conditions, and the subcellular foci of enhanced L-citrulline staining are viewed as intracellular sites of nitric oxide production. This interpretation is supported by ultrastructural observations of subcellular foci with enhanced L-citrulline and/or neuronal nitric oxide synthase staining that are located primarily at postsynaptic densities and portions of the endoplasmic reticulum. We conclude that nitric oxide is produced and released at focal sites within neurons that are identifiable using L-citrulline as a marker. Copyright 2002 IBRO

  20. L-citrulline immunostaining identifies nitric oxide production sites within neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinelli, G. P. T.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Holstein, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of L-citrulline was analyzed in the adult rat brain and compared with that of traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide synthase. Light, transmission electron, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study tissue sections processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody against L-citrulline or polyclonal anti-neuronal nitric oxide synthase sera, and double immunofluorescence to detect neuronal nitric oxide synthase and L-citrulline co-localization. The results demonstrate that the same CNS regions and cell types are labeled by neuronal nitric oxide synthase polyclonal antisera and L-citrulline monoclonal antibodies, using both immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Short-term pretreatment with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor reduces L-citrulline immunostaining, but does not affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. In the vestibular brainstem, double immunofluorescence studies show that many, but not all, neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive cells co-express L-citrulline, and that local intracellular patches of intense L-citrulline accumulation are present in some neurons. Conversely, all L-citrulline-labeled neurons co-express neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Cells expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase alone are interpreted as neurons with the potential to produce nitric oxide under other stimulus conditions, and the subcellular foci of enhanced L-citrulline staining are viewed as intracellular sites of nitric oxide production. This interpretation is supported by ultrastructural observations of subcellular foci with enhanced L-citrulline and/or neuronal nitric oxide synthase staining that are located primarily at postsynaptic densities and portions of the endoplasmic reticulum. We conclude that nitric oxide is produced and released at focal sites within neurons that are identifiable using L-citrulline as a marker. Copyright 2002 IBRO.

  1. Neutralizing a Surface Charge on the FMN Subdomain Increases the Activity of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase by Enhancing the Oxygen Reactivity of the Enzyme Heme-Nitric Oxide Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Fadlalla, Mohammed; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Panda, Koustubh; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric-oxide synthases (NOSs) are calmodulin-dependent flavoheme enzymes that oxidize l-Arg to nitric oxide (NO) and l-citrulline. Their catalytic behaviors are complex and are determined by their rates of heme reduction (kr), ferric heme-NO dissociation (kd), and ferrous heme-NO oxidation (kox). We found that point mutation (E762N) of a conserved residue on the enzyme's FMN subdomain caused the NO synthesis activity to double compared with wild type nNOS. However, in the absence of l-Arg, NADPH oxidation rates suggested that electron flux through the heme was slower in E762N nNOS, and this correlated with the mutant having a 60% slower kr. During NO synthesis, little heme-NO complex accumulated in the mutant, compared with ∼50–70% of the wild-type nNOS accumulating as this complex. This suggested that the E762N nNOS is hyperactive because it minimizes buildup of an inactive ferrous heme-NO complex during NO synthesis. Indeed, we found that kox was 2 times faster in the E762N mutant than in wild-type nNOS. The mutational effect on kox was independent of calmodulin. Computer simulation and experimental measures both indicated that the slower kr and faster kox of E762N nNOS combine to lower its apparent Km,O2 for NO synthesis by at least 5-fold, which in turn increases its V/Km value and enables it to be hyperactive in steady-state NO synthesis. Our work underscores how sensitive nNOS activity is to changes in the kox and reveals a novel means for the FMN module or protein-protein interactions to alter nNOS activity. PMID:19473991

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Enhancement in Myocardial Infarction Rat Model under Ultrasound Combined with Nitric Oxide Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jiayi; Ding, Jiandong; Shen, Xiangbo; Chen, Long; Bian, Yeping; Ma, Genshan; Yao, Yuyu; Yang, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effects of ultrasound combined with the homemade nitric oxide (NO) micro-bubble destruction on the in vitro proliferation, apoptosis, and migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Furthermore, we studied whether or not irradiation of the NO micro-bubble combined with bone-marrow derived MSC infusion had a better effect on treating myocardial infarction. The possible mechanism of MSC delivery into the infarcted myocardium was also investigated. Methods The murine bone marrow-derived MSCs were isolated, cultured, irradiated, and combined with different concentrations of NO microbubbles. MTT proliferation assay, annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection, migration assay, and RT-PCR were performed 24 h after the irradiation. The NO micro-bubbles was a intravenously injected, followed by the infusion of MSCs, which were labeled by CM-Dil. Myocardium was harvested 48 h later and the distribution of MSCs was observed by laser scanning confocal microscope after frozen sectioning. Echocardiography, histological examination, RT-PCR, and western blotting were performed four weeks after the cell transplantation. Results Ultrasound combined with 1:70 NO micro-bubbles had no significant impact on the proliferation or apoptosis of MSCs. Transwell chamber findings demonstrated that MSCs migrated more efficiently in group that underwent ultrasound combined with 1:70 NO micro-bubbles. The Real-time PCR results indicated that the expression of CXCR4 was much higher in the group undergoing ultrasound combined with 1:70 NO micro-bubbles. The normalized fluorescence intensity greatly increased in the group of US+NO micro-bubbles and the cardiac function was also markedly improved. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the capillary density was much greater in the group of US+NO micro-bubbles as compared to that of the other groups. RT-PCR and western blotting also revealed a higher SDF-1 and VEGF expression in the group of US+NO micro

  3. Enhancement of caffeine-induced locomotor hyperactivity produced by the combination with L-arginine or taurine in mice: Possible involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Ushijima, I; Hiraki, M; Kimura, M; Ono, Nobufumi

    2009-11-01

    Combinations of caffeine with L-arginine or with taurine can enhance the effect of caffeine, but the mechanisms remain elusive. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that stimulant effects of central nervous system nitric oxide (NO) may explain the beneficial effect of caffeine on combinations with amino acid, L-arginine or taurine. Caffeine increased the spontaneous locomotor activity dose-dependently (2-10 mg/kg) in mice. The locomotor activity induced by caffeine at a dose of 2 mg/kg was enhanced by combined administration of L-arginine at a dose of 600 mg/kg, or taurine at a dose of 400 mg/kg, respectively. For both combinations, enhancement was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) at a dose of 40 mg/kg. These results suggest that the enhancement induced by combining caffeine with amino acid might be regulated at least in part by NO in the central nervous system. Copyright 2009 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitric Oxide's Involvement in the Spectrum of Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Maia-de-Oliveira, João Paulo; Kandratavicius, Ludmyla; Nunes, Emerson Arcoverde; Machado-de-Sousa, João Paulo; Hallak, Jaime E; Dursun, Serdar Murat

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that dopaminergic abnormalities found in psychotic disorders may be secondary to nitric oxide dysfunctions. Nitric oxide seems to influence glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, both of which have been associated with psychosis. To search and review published works which examined the influence of nitric oxide in psychotic disorders subjects. The research was executed in the on-line collections of Pubmed and ISI Web of Science. The key aspects utilized were "Psychotic Disorders AND Nitric Oxide", "Psychosis AND Nitric Oxide","Schizotypal Personality Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", "Delusional Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", "Brief Psychotic Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", "Schizophreniform Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", "Schizoaffective Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", and "Schizophrenia AND Nitric Oxide". Empirical works utilizing human subjects, published in the last 10 years, in English language were included. Initially, the search yielded a total of 95 studies. Then, 39 were elected according to the inclusion requirements. The selected articles were divided into five groups: biochemical studies (n=15; 38.5%), genetic studies (n=11; 28.2%), postmortem studies (n=6; 15.4%), clinical trials (n=6; 15.4%), and case reports (n=1; 2.5%). The studies evaluated only schizophrenic or schizoaffective disorder subjects. The great majority of them found evidence of nitric oxide dysfunctions in psychosis. The results of the review strengthen the idea that nitric oxide has a key participation in psychotic disorders and deserves deeper investigation as a target for future pharmacological intervention.

  5. The role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum nitric oxide reductase in nitric oxide detoxification in soya bean root nodules.

    PubMed

    Meakin, G E; Jepson, B J N; Richardson, D J; Bedmar, E J; Delgado, M J

    2006-02-01

    The identification of nitric oxide-bound leghaemoglobin within soya bean nodules has led to the question of how Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids overcome the toxicity of this nitric oxide. It has previously been shown that one candidate for nitric oxide detoxification, the respiratory nitric oxide reductase, is expressed in soya bean nodules from plants supplied with nitrate. In this paper, the role of this enzyme in nitric oxide detoxification is assessed and discussion is provided on other possible B. japonicum nitric oxide detoxification systems.

  6. Carbon monoxide enhances salt tolerance by nitric oxide-mediated maintenance of ion homeostasis and up-regulation of antioxidant defence in wheat seedling roots.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanjie; Ling, Tengfang; Han, Yi; Liu, Kaili; Zheng, Qingsong; Huang, Liqin; Yuan, Xingxing; He, Ziyi; Hu, Bing; Fang, Lei; Shen, Zhenguo; Yang, Qing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2008-12-01

    Salt stress induced an increase in endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) production and the activity of the CO synthetic enzyme haem oxygenase (HO) in wheat seedling roots. In addition, a 50% CO aqueous solution, applied daily, not only resulted in the enhancement of CO release, but led to a significant reversal in dry weight (DW) and water loss caused by 150 mm NaCl treatment, which was mimicked by the application of two nitric oxide (NO) donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and diethylenetriamine NO adduct (DETA/NO). Further analyses showed that CO, as well as SNP, apparently up-regulated H(+)-pump and antioxidant enzyme activities or related transcripts, thus resulting in the increase of K/Na ratio and the alleviation of oxidative damage. Whereas, the CO/NO scavenger haemoglobin (Hb), NO scavenger or synthetic inhibitor methylene blue (MB) or N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) differentially blocked these effects. Furthermore, CO was able to mimic the effect of SNP by strongly increasing NO release in the root tips, whereas the CO-induced NO signal was quenched by the addition of l-NAME or cPTIO, the specific scavenger of NO. The results suggested that CO might confer an increased tolerance to salinity stress by maintaining ion homeostasis and enhancing antioxidant system parameters in wheat seedling roots, both of which were partially mediated by NO signal.

  7. Enhancement of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Activity by Low Molecular Weight Peptides Derived from Protamine: A Potential Therapy for Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Balijepalli, Anant S; Comstock, Adam T; Wang, Xuewei; Jensen, Gary C; Hershenson, Marc B; Zacharek, Mark A; Sajjan, Umadevi S; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2015-07-06

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key immune defense agent that is produced from l-arginine in the airways by leukocytes and airway epithelial cells, primarily via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Deficiencies in nasal NO levels have been associated with diseases such as primary ciliary dyskinesia and chronic rhinosinusitis. Herein, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept regarding a potential new therapeutic approach for such disorders. We show that arginine-rich low molecular weight peptides (LMWPs) derived from the FDA-approved protamine (obtained from salmon sperm) are effective at significantly raising NO production in both RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage and LA4 mouse epithelial cell lines. LMWP is produced using a stable, easily produced immobilized thermolysin gel column followed by size-exclusion purification. Monomeric l-arginine induces concentration-dependent increases in NO production in stimulated RAW 264.7 and LA4 cells, as measured by stable nitrite in the cell media. In stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, LMWP significantly increases iNOS expression and total NO production 12-24 h post-treatment compared to cells given equivalent levels of monomeric l-arginine. For stimulated LA4 cells, LMWPs are effective in significantly increasing NO production compared to equivalent l-arginine monomer concentrations over 24 h but do not substantially enhance iNOS expression. The use of the arginase inhibitor S-boronoethyl-l-cysteine in combination with LMWPs results in even higher NO production by stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and LA4 cells. Increases in NO due to LMWPs, compared to l-arginine, occur only after 4 h, which may be due to iNOS elevation rather than increased substrate availability.

  8. Enhanced aggressiveness of bystander cells in an anti-tumor photodynamic therapy model: Role of nitric oxide produced by targeted cells.

    PubMed

    Bazak, Jerzy; Fahey, Jonathan M; Wawak, Katarzyna; Korytowski, Witold; Girotti, Albert W

    2017-01-01

    The bystander effects of anti-cancer ionizing radiation have been widely studied, but far less is known about such effects in the case of non-ionizing photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that photodynamically-stressed prostate cancer PC3 cells can elicit nitric oxide (NO)-mediated pro-growth/migration responses in non-stressed bystander cells. A novel approach was used whereby both cell populations existed on a culture dish, but made no physical contact with one other. Visible light irradiation of target cells sensitized with 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX resulted in a striking upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) along with NO, the level of which increased after irradiation. Slower and less pronounced iNOS/NO upregulation was also observed in bystander cells. Activation of transcription factor NF-κB was implicated in iNOS induction in both targeted and bystander cells. Like surviving targeted cells, bystanders exhibited a significant increase in growth and migration rate, both responses being strongly attenuated by an iNOS inhibitor (1400W), a NO scavenger (cPTIO), or iNOS knockdown. Incubating bystander cells with conditioned medium from targeted cells failed to stimulate growth/migration, ruling out involvement of relatively long-lived stimulants. The following post-irradiation changes in pro-survival/pro-growth proteins were observed in bystander cells: upregulation of COX-2 and activation of protein kinases Akt and ERK1/2, NO again playing a key role. This is the first reported evidence for NO-enhanced bystander aggressiveness in the context of PDT. In the clinical setting, such effects could be averted through pharmacologic use of iNOS inhibitors as PDT adjuvants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Role of exhaled nitric oxide in asthma.

    PubMed

    Yates, D H

    2001-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an evanescent atmospheric gas, has recently been discovered to be an important biological mediator in animals and humans. Nitric oxide plays a key role within the lung in the modulation of a wide variety of functions including pulmonary vascular tone, nonadrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) transmission and modification of the inflammatory response. Asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and increased synthesis of NO and other highly reactive and toxic substances (reactive oxygen species). Pro- inflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha and IL-1beta are secreted in asthma and result in inflammatory cell recruitment, but also induce calcium- and calmodulin-independent nitric oxide synthases (iNOS) and perpetuate the inflammatory response within the airways. Nitric oxide is released by several pulmonary cells including epithelial cells, eosinophils and macrophages, and NO has been shown to be increased in conditions associated with airway inflammation, such as asthma and viral infections. Nitric oxide can be measured in the expired air of several species, and exhaled NO can now be rapidly and easily measured by the use of chemiluminescence analysers in humans. Exhaled NO is increased in steroid-naive asthmatic subjects and during an asthma exacerbation, although it returns to baseline levels with appropriate anti-inflammatory treatment, and such measurements have been proposed as a simple non-invasive method of measuring airway inflammation in asthma. Here the chemical and biological properties of NO are briefly discussed, followed by a summary of the methodological considerations relevant to the measurement of exhaled NO and its role in lung diseases including asthma. The origin of exhaled NO is considered, and brief mention made of other potential markers of airway inflammation or oxidant stress in exhaled breath.

  10. Naked eye detection of nitric oxide release from nitrosothiols aided by gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Priya, S; Kaviyarasan, T; Berchmans, Sheela

    2012-04-07

    In this work we have demonstrated that nitric oxide can be monitored spectrophotometrically using cyclodextrin encapsulated ferrocene. The detection course showed the colour change from yellow to blue which can be detected with the naked eye. Also we describe the catalytic effect of gold nanoparticles in enhancing nitric oxide release from S-nitrosothiols.

  11. BIOGENIC NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM CROPLAND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were determined during late spring and summer 1995 and the spring of 1996 from four agricultural soils on which four different crops were grown. These agricultural soils were located at four different sites throughout North Carolina. Emission rates ...

  12. Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G; Morris, S M

    1998-01-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in animal cells, serving as a precursor for the synthesis not only of proteins but also of nitric oxide, urea, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Of the enzymes that catalyse rate-controlling steps in arginine synthesis and catabolism, argininosuccinate synthase, the two arginase isoenzymes, the three nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes and arginine decarboxylase have been recognized in recent years as key factors in regulating newly identified aspects of arginine metabolism. In particular, changes in the activities of argininosuccinate synthase, the arginases, the inducible isoenzyme of nitric oxide synthase and also cationic amino acid transporters play major roles in determining the metabolic fates of arginine in health and disease, and recent studies have identified complex patterns of interaction among these enzymes. There is growing interest in the potential roles of the arginase isoenzymes as regulators of the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Physiological roles and relationships between the pathways of arginine synthesis and catabolism in vivo are complex and difficult to analyse, owing to compartmentalized expression of various enzymes at both organ (e.g. liver, small intestine and kidney) and subcellular (cytosol and mitochondria) levels, as well as to changes in expression during development and in response to diet, hormones and cytokines. The ongoing development of new cell lines and animal models using cDNA clones and genes for key arginine metabolic enzymes will provide new approaches more clearly elucidating the physiological roles of these enzymes. PMID:9806879

  13. BIOGENIC NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM CROPLAND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were determined during late spring and summer 1995 and the spring of 1996 from four agricultural soils on which four different crops were grown. These agricultural soils were located at four different sites throughout North Carolina. Emission rates ...

  14. Nitric oxide. Novel biology with clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Billiar, T R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author provides the reader with a view of the regulation and function of nitric oxide (NO), based on the three distinct enzyme isoforms that synthesize NO. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Nitric oxide is a short-lived molecule exhibiting functions as diverse as neurotransmission and microbial killing. Recent advances in the characterization of the enzymes responsible for NO synthesis and in the understanding of how NO interacts with targets have led to new insights into the many facets of this diverse molecule. METHODS: Nitric oxide is produced by one of three enzyme isoforms of NO synthesis. These enzymes vary considerably in their distribution, regulation, and function. Accordingly, the NO synthesis or lack of NO production will have consequences unique to that isoform. Therefore, this review summarizes the regulation and function of NO generated by each of the three isoforms. RESULTS: Nitric oxide exhibits many unique characteristics that allow this molecule to perform so many functions. The amount, duration, and location of the NO synthesis will depend on the isoform of NO synthase expressed. For each isoform, there probably are disease processes in which deficiency states exist. For induced NO synthesis, states of overexpression exist. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding the regulation and function of the enzymes that produce NO and the unique characteristics of each enzyme isoform is likely to lead to therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat a number of diseases. PMID:7537035

  15. Nitric oxide-releasing ruthenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chi-Ming; Liao, Kai-Jun; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2011-10-14

    Nitric oxide-releasing ruthenium nanoparticles were synthesized by the reaction of alkanethiolate-protected ruthenium nanoparticles with tert-butyl nitrite ((t)BuONO), and their water-soluble derivatives are able to deliver NO to proteins such as reduced myoglobin upon light irradiation in aqueous media.

  16. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  19. Nitric oxide enhances the sensitivity of alpaca melanocytes to respond to {alpha}-melanocyte-stimulating hormone by up-regulating melanocortin-1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yanjun; Cao, Jing; Wang, Haidong; Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Zhiwei; Bai, Rui; Hao, HuanQing; He, Xiaoyan; Fan, Ruiwen; Dong, Changsheng

    2010-06-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) and {alpha}-melanocyte-stimulating hormone ({alpha}-MSH) have been correlated with the synthesis of melanin. The NO-dependent signaling of cellular response to activate the hypothalamopituitary proopiomelanocortin system, thereby enhances the hypophysial secretion of {alpha}-MSH to stimulate {alpha}-MSH-receptor responsive cells. In this study we investigated whether an NO-induced pathway can enhance the ability of the melanocyte to respond to {alpha}-MSH on melanogenesis in alpaca skin melanocytes in vitro. It is important for us to know how to enhance the coat color of alpaca. We set up three groups for experiments using the third passage number of alpaca melanocytes: the control cultures were allowed a total of 5 days growth; the UV group cultures like the control group but the melanocytes were then irradiated everyday (once) with 312 mJ/cm{sup 2} of UVB; the UV + L-NAME group is the same as group UV but has the addition of 300 {mu}M L-NAME (every 6 h). To determine the inhibited effect of NO produce, NO produces were measured. To determine the effect of the NO to the key protein and gene of {alpha}-MSH pathway on melanogenesis, the key gene and protein of the {alpha}-MSH pathway were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western immunoblotting. The results provide exciting new evidence that NO can enhance {alpha}-MSH pathway in alpaca skin melanocytes by elevated MC1R. And we suggest that the NO pathway may more rapidly cause the synthesis of melanin in alpaca skin under UV, which at that time elevates the expression of MC1R and stimulates the keratinocytes to secrete {alpha}-MSH to enhance the {alpha}-MSH pathway on melanogenesis. This process will be of considerable interest in future studies.

  20. Nitric oxide enhances the sensitivity of alpaca melanocytes to respond to alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone by up-regulating melanocortin-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanjun; Cao, Jing; Wang, Haidong; Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Zhiwei; Bai, Rui; Hao, HuanQing; He, Xiaoyan; Fan, Ruiwen; Dong, Changsheng

    2010-06-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) have been correlated with the synthesis of melanin. The NO-dependent signaling of cellular response to activate the hypothalamopituitary proopiomelanocortin system, thereby enhances the hypophysial secretion of alpha-MSH to stimulate alpha-MSH-receptor responsive cells. In this study we investigated whether an NO-induced pathway can enhance the ability of the melanocyte to respond to alpha-MSH on melanogenesis in alpaca skin melanocytes in vitro. It is important for us to know how to enhance the coat color of alpaca. We set up three groups for experiments using the third passage number of alpaca melanocytes: the control cultures were allowed a total of 5 days growth; the UV group cultures like the control group but the melanocytes were then irradiated everyday (once) with 312 mJ/cm(2) of UVB; the UV+L-NAME group is the same as group UV but has the addition of 300 microM L-NAME (every 6h). To determine the inhibited effect of NO produce, NO produces were measured. To determine the effect of the NO to the key protein and gene of alpha-MSH pathway on melanogenesis, the key gene and protein of the alpha-MSH pathway were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western immunoblotting. The results provide exciting new evidence that NO can enhance alpha-MSH pathway in alpaca skin melanocytes by elevated MC1R. And we suggest that the NO pathway may more rapidly cause the synthesis of melanin in alpaca skin under UV, which at that time elevates the expression of MC1R and stimulates the keratinocytes to secrete alpha-MSH to enhance the alpha-MSH pathway on melanogenesis. This process will be of considerable interest in future studies.

  1. Possible Involvement of Nitric Oxide in Enhanced Liver Injury and Fibrogenesis during Cholestasis in Cytoglobin-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Thuy, Tuong Thi; Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2017-01-01

    This study clarified the role of Cygb, the fourth globin in mammals originally discovered in rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), in cholestatic liver disease. Bile duct ligation (BDL) augmented inflammatory reactions as revealed by increased infiltrating neutrophils, CD68+-macrophages, and chemokine expression in Cygb−/− mice. In these mice, impairment of bile canalicular indicated by the loss of CD10 expression, down-regulation of bile salt transporters, increased total bile acid, and massive apoptotic and necrotic hepatocytes occurred with the release of cytochrome c, activation of caspase 3, resulting in reduced animal survival compared to wild-type mice. In Cygb−/− mouse liver, all of NO metabolites and oxidative stress were increased. Treatment with NO inhibitor restrained all above phenotypes and restored CD10 expression in BDL Cygb−/− mice, while administration of NO donor aggravated liver damage in BDL-wild type mice to the same extent of BDL-Cygb−/− mice. N-acetylcysteine administration had a negligible effect in all groups. In mice of BDL for 1–3 weeks, expression of all fibrosis-related markers was significantly increased in Cygb−/− mice compared with wild-type mice. Thus, Cygb deficiency in HSCs enhances hepatocyte damage and inflammation in early phase and fibrosis development in late phase in mice subjected to BDL, presumably via altered NO metabolism. PMID:28157235

  2. Hydrogen sulfide potentiates interleukin-1{beta}-induced nitric oxide production via enhancement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Sun-Oh; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Oh, Gi-Su; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Lee, Bok-Soo; Lee, Seoul; Kim, Du Yong; Rhew, Hyun Yul; Lee, Kang-Min; Chung, Hun-Taeg . E-mail: htchung@wonkwang.ac.kr

    2006-07-07

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and nitric oxide (NO) are endogenously synthesized from L-cysteine and L-arginine, respectively. They might constitute a cooperative network to regulate their effects. In this study, we investigated whether H{sub 2}S could affect NO production in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated with interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). Although H{sub 2}S by itself showed no effect on NO production, it augmented IL-{beta}-induced NO production and this effect was associated with increased expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. IL-1{beta} activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and this activation was also enhanced by H{sub 2}S. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by the selective inhibitor U0126 inhibited IL-1{beta}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation, iNOS expression, and NO production either in the absence or presence of H{sub 2}S. Our findings suggest that H{sub 2}S enhances NO production and iNOS expression by potentiating IL-1{beta}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation through a mechanism involving ERK1/2 signaling cascade in rat VSMCs.

  3. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T) and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. Results We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS generation and that increased NO

  4. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Ohtsu, Iwao; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T) and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS generation and that increased NO plays an important

  5. PDE5 inhibitors enhance the lethality of pemetrexed through inhibition of multiple chaperone proteins and via the actions of cyclic GMP and nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L.; Poklepovic, Andrew; Gordon, Sarah; Dent, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors prevent the breakdown of cGMP that results in prolonged protein kinase G activation and the generation of nitric oxide. PDE5 inhibitors enhanced the anti-NSCLC cell effects of the NSCLC therapeutic pemetrexed. [Pemetrexed + sildenafil] activated an eIF2α – ATF4 – CHOP – Beclin1 pathway causing formation of toxic autophagosomes; activated a protective IRE1 – XBP-1 – chaperone induction pathway; and activated a toxic eIF2α – CHOP – DR4 / DR5 / CD95 induction pathway. [Pemetrexed + sildenafil] reduced the expression of c-FLIP-s, MCL-1 and BCL-XL that was blocked in a cell-type -dependent fashion by either over-expression of HSP90 / GRP78 / HSP70 / HSP27 or by blockade of eIF2α-CHOP signaling. Knock down of PKGI/II abolished the ability of sildenafil to enhance pemetrexed toxicity whereas pan-inhibition of NOS using L-NAME or knock down of [iNOS + eNOS] only partially reduced the lethal drug interaction. Pemetrexed reduced the ATPase activities of HSP90 and HSP70 in an ATM-AMPK-dependent fashion that was enhanced by sildenafil signaling via PKGI/II. The drug combination activated an ATM-AMPK-TSC2 pathway that was associated with reduced mTOR S2448 and ULK-1 S757 phosphorylation and increased ULK-1 S317 and ATG13 S318 phosphorylation. These effects were prevented by chaperone over-expression or by expression of an activated form of mTOR that prevented autophagosome formation and reduced cell killing. In two models of NSCLC, sildenafil enhanced the ability of pemetrexed to suppress tumor growth. Collectively we argue that the combination of [pemetrexed + PDE5 inhibitor] should be explored in a new NSCLC phase I trial. PMID:27903966

  6. Nitric oxide donors for cardiovascular implant applications.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Noora; de Mel, Achala; Alavijeh, Omid Sadeghi; Cousins, Brian G; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2013-01-14

    In an era of increased cardiovascular disease burden in the ageing population, there is great demand for devices that come in to contact with the blood such as heart valves, stents, and bypass grafts that offer life saving treatments. Nitric oxide (NO) elution from healthy endothelial tissue that lines the vessels maintains haemostasis throughout the vasculature. Surgical devices that release NO are desirable treatment options and N-diazeniumdiolates and S-nitrosothiols are recognized as preferred donor molecules. There is a keen interest to investigate newer methods by which NO donors can be retained within biomaterials so that their release and kinetic profiles can be optimized. A range of polymeric scaffolds incorporating microparticles and nanomaterials are presenting solutions to current challenges, and have been investigated in a range of clinical applications. This review outlines the application of NO donors for cardiovascular therapy using biomaterials that release NO locally to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia (IH) and enhance endothelialization in the fabrication of next generation cardiovascular device technology.

  7. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  8. Nitric oxide modulates sensitivity to ABA

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gas with crucial signaling functions in plant defense and development. As demonstrated by generating a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant with extremely low levels of NO (February 2010 issue of Plant Physiology), NO is synthesized in plants through mainly two different pathways involving nitrate reductase (NR/NIA) and NO Associated 1 (AtNOA1) proteins. Depletion of basal NO levels leads to a priming of ABA-triggered responses that causes hypersensitivity to this hormone and results in enhanced seed dormancy and decreased seed germination and seedling establishment in the triple mutant. NO produced under non-stressed conditions represses inhibition of seed developmental transitions by ABA. Moreover, NO plays a positive role in post-germinative vegetative development and also exerts a critical control of ABA-related functions on stomata closure. The triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant is hypersensitive to ABA in stomatal closure thus resulting in a extreme phenotype of resistance to drought. In the light of the recent discovery of PYR/PYL/RCAR as a family of potential ABA receptors, regulation of ABA sensitivity by NO may be exerted either directly on ABA receptors or on downstream signalling components; both two aspects that deserve our present and future attention. PMID:20168082

  9. Nitric oxide methods in seed biology.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Paul C; Libourel, Igor G L; Vitecek, Jan; Jones, Russell L

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitous signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in seed biology. Experiments with this biologically important gas require special provisions because NO in aerobic environments is readily converted into other oxides of nitrogen. In this chapter, we describe methods for the application of NO as a gas, and through the use of NO-donor compounds. We included information on the removal or reduction of NO with NO scavengers. Methods for detecting NO using NO-reactive fluorescent probes, and an apparatus incorporating an oxidizer column are also described.

  10. A selective nanosensing probe for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouma, P. I.; Kalyanasundaram, K.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of NO gas in exhaled human breath may be used to monitor oxidative stress and pulmonary diseases. Until now, only bulk, expensive, chemiluminescence-based NO monitors have been available to medicine. A nanosensing probe based on WO3 selectively detecting minute nitric oxide gas concentrations in the presence of interfering volatile compounds is presented. This is possible due to the chemical affinity of rhenium trioxide based phases to oxidizing gases. The NO nanoprobe is expected to lead to portable and affordable, noninvasive, single breath sampling, NO diagnostics.

  11. Bactericidal efficacy of nitric oxide-releasing silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.; Shin, Jae Ho; Stasko, Nathan A.; Johnson, C. Bryce; Wespe, Daniel A.; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    The utility of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing silica nanoparticles as a novel antibacterial is demonstrated against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles were prepared via co-condensation of tetraalkoxysilane with aminoalkoxysilane modified with diazeniumdiolate NO donors, allowing for the storage of large NO payloads. Comparison of the bactericidal efficacy of the NO-releasing nanoparticles to 1-[2-(carboxylato)pyrrolidin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PROLI/NO), a small molecule NO donor, demonstrated enhanced bactericidal efficacy of nanoparticle-derived NO and reduced cytotoxicity to healthy cells (mammalian fibroblasts). Confocal microscopy revealed that fluorescently-labeled NO-releasing nanoparticles associated with the bacteria, providing rationale for the enhanced bactericidal efficacy of the nanoparticles. Intracellular NO concentrations were measurable when the NO was delivered from nanoparticles as opposed to PROLI/NO. Collectively, these results demonstrate the advantage of delivering NO via nanoparticles for antimicrobial applications. PMID:19206623

  12. Nitric Oxide and the Biological Cascades Underlying Increased Neurogenesis, Enhanced Learning Ability, and Academic Ability as an Effect of Increased Bouts of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    HUNT, SAMUEL J.; NAVALTA, JAMES W.

    2012-01-01

    The consummate principle underlying all physiological research is corporeal adaptation at every level of the organism observed. With respect to humans, the body learns to function based on the external stimuli from the environment, beginning in the womb, throughout the developmental stages of life. Nitric Oxide (NO) appears to be the governor of the plasticity of several systems in mammals implicit in their proper development. It is the purpose of this review to describe the physiological pathways that lead to plasticity of not only the vasculature but also of the brain and how physical activity plays a key role in those alterations by initiating the mechanism that triggers NO production. Further, this review hopes to show a connection between these changes and learning, comprising both motor learning and cognitive learning. This review will show how NO plays a significant role in vascularization and neurogenesis, necessary to enhance the mind-body connection and comprehensive physical performance and adaptation. It is our belief that this review effectively demonstrates, using a multidisciplinary approach, the causal mechanisms underlying the increases in neurogenesis as related to improved learning and academic performance as a result of adequate bouts of physical activity of a vigorous nature. PMID:27182387

  13. Enhanced fidelity of diffusive nitric oxide signalling by the spatial segregation of source and target neurones in the memory centre of an insect brain.

    PubMed

    Ott, Swidbert R; Philippides, Andrew; Elphick, Maurice R; O'Shea, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The messenger molecule nitric oxide (NO) is a key mediator of memory formation that can diffuse in the brain over tens of micrometres. It would seem therefore that NO derived from many individual neurones may merge into a volume signal that is inevitably ambiguous, relatively unspecific and thus unreliable. Here we report on the neuronal architecture that supports the NO-cyclic GMP signalling pathway in the mushroom body of an insect brain, the key centre for associative learning. We show that, in the locust (Schistocerca gregaria), parallel axons of intrinsic neurones (Kenyon cells) form tubular NO-producing zones surrounding central cores of NO-receptive Kenyon cell axons, which do not produce NO. This segregated architecture requires NO to spread at physiological concentrations up to 60 microm from the tube walls into the central NO-receptive cores. By modelling NO diffusion we show that a segregated architecture, which requires NO to act at a distance, affords significant advantages over a system where the same sources and targets intermingle. Segregation enhances the precision of NO volume signals by reducing noise and ambiguity, achieving a reliable integration of the activity of thousands of NO-source neurones. In a neural structure that forms NO-dependent associations, these properties of the segregated architecture may reduce the likelihood of forming spurious memories.

  14. Nitric Oxide and the Biological Cascades Underlying Increased Neurogenesis, Enhanced Learning Ability, and Academic Ability as an Effect of Increased Bouts of Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Samuel J; Navalta, James W

    The consummate principle underlying all physiological research is corporeal adaptation at every level of the organism observed. With respect to humans, the body learns to function based on the external stimuli from the environment, beginning in the womb, throughout the developmental stages of life. Nitric Oxide (NO) appears to be the governor of the plasticity of several systems in mammals implicit in their proper development. It is the purpose of this review to describe the physiological pathways that lead to plasticity of not only the vasculature but also of the brain and how physical activity plays a key role in those alterations by initiating the mechanism that triggers NO production. Further, this review hopes to show a connection between these changes and learning, comprising both motor learning and cognitive learning. This review will show how NO plays a significant role in vascularization and neurogenesis, necessary to enhance the mind-body connection and comprehensive physical performance and adaptation. It is our belief that this review effectively demonstrates, using a multidisciplinary approach, the causal mechanisms underlying the increases in neurogenesis as related to improved learning and academic performance as a result of adequate bouts of physical activity of a vigorous nature.

  15. Acidic polysaccharide isolated from Phellinus linteus enhances through the up-regulation of nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha from peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gi-Young; Choi, Gap-Seong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Park, Yeong-Min

    2004-11-01

    Medicinal mushrooms are increasingly used to treat a wide variety of disease processes. Aqueous extract from the fruiting body or mycelia of Phellinus linteus has been reported to produce antitumor and immunomodulatory activities in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanisms underlying its tumoricidal effects are poorly understood. The tumoricidal activity of peritoneal macrophages (PM) cultured with acidic polysaccharide (PL) isolated from Phellinus linteus against B16 melanoma cells was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner; growth inhibition increased 4-fold with 200 microg/ml of PL. To further characterize the mechanisms of PL, we investigated the effects of PL on phagocytosis and the release of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). To investigate the phagocytosis of PM, the uptake of Dextran (Dex)-FITC between PL-untreated and PL-treated PM was compared. We found some augment in phagocytosis of PL-treated PM compared untreated group. PL stimulated a dose-dependent increase in NO and TNF-alpha, but not in ROI production in PM. We suggested that PL has cytotoxicity against Yac-1 cells through the up-regulation of NO and TNF-alpha production. Also, PL enhanced the expression of costimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules II in PM. The ability of PL upon the up-regulation of these surface molecules involved in antigen-presenting processes may, by inference, activate T-cell-mediated immunity against malignant cells in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that PL act as an effective immunomodulator and enhances the anti-tumoral activity of PM.

  16. Spermine oxidase is a regulator of macrophage host response to Helicobacter pylori: enhancement of antimicrobial nitric oxide generation by depletion of spermine

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Frye, Jeanetta W.; Casero, Robert A.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2013-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. We have reported that in H. pylori-activated macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) can kill the bacterium, iNOS protein expression is dependent on uptake of its substrate L-arginine (L-Arg), the polyamine spermine can inhibit iNOS translation by inhibiting L-Arg uptake, and inhibition of polyamine synthesis enhances NO-mediated bacterial killing. Because spermine oxidase (SMO), which back-converts spermine to spermidine, is induced in macrophages by H. pylori, we determined its role in iNOS-dependent host defense. SMO shRNA knockdown in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resulted in a marked decrease in H. pylori-stimulated iNOS protein, but not mRNA expression, and a 90% reduction in NO levels; NO production was also inhibited in primary murine peritoneal macrophages with SMO knockdown. There was an increase in spermine levels after H. pylori stimulation that rapidly decreased, while SMO knockdown caused a greater increase in spermine that was sustained. With SMO knockdown, L-Arg uptake and killing of H. pylori by macrophages was prevented. Overexpression of SMO by transfection of an expression plasmid prevented the H. pylori-stimulated increase in spermine levels, and led to increased L-Arg uptake, iNOS protein expression and NO production, and H. pylori killing. In two human monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP-1, overexpression of SMO caused a significant enhancement of NO production with H. pylori stimulation. By depleting spermine, SMO can abrogate the inhibitory effect of polyamines on innate immune responses to H. pylori by enhancing antimicrobial NO production. PMID:23820617

  17. Spermine oxidase is a regulator of macrophage host response to Helicobacter pylori: enhancement of antimicrobial nitric oxide generation by depletion of spermine.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P; Frye, Jeanetta W; Casero, Robert A; Wilson, Keith T

    2014-03-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. We have reported that in H. pylori-activated macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) can kill the bacterium, iNOS protein expression is dependent on uptake of its substrate L-arginine (L-Arg), the polyamine spermine can inhibit iNOS translation by inhibiting L-Arg uptake, and inhibition of polyamine synthesis enhances NO-mediated bacterial killing. Because spermine oxidase (SMO), which back-converts spermine to spermidine, is induced in macrophages by H. pylori, we determined its role in iNOS-dependent host defense. SMO shRNA knockdown in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resulted in a marked decrease in H. pylori-stimulated iNOS protein, but not mRNA expression, and a 90% reduction in NO levels; NO production was also inhibited in primary murine peritoneal macrophages with SMO knockdown. There was an increase in spermine levels after H. pylori stimulation that rapidly decreased, while SMO knockdown caused a greater increase in spermine that was sustained. With SMO knockdown, L-Arg uptake and killing of H. pylori by macrophages was prevented. The overexpression of SMO by transfection of an expression plasmid prevented the H. pylori-stimulated increase in spermine levels, and led to increased L-Arg uptake, iNOS protein expression and NO production, and H. pylori killing. In two human monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP-1, overexpression of SMO caused a significant enhancement of NO production with H. pylori stimulation. By depleting spermine, SMO can abrogate the inhibitory effect of polyamines on innate immune responses to H. pylori by enhancing antimicrobial NO production.

  18. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T.C. Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T.; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S.; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO) - a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  19. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  20. Nitric oxide and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J Woodrow; Liu, Yuzhen; Li, Xianghong; Ji, En-sheng

    2012-11-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disease, affecting 16% of the working age population. Although sleep apnea has a well-established connection to daytime sleepiness presumably mediated through repetitive sleep disruption, some other consequences are less well understood. Clinical, epidemiological, and physiological investigations have demonstrated a connection between sleep apnea and daytime hypertension. The elevation of arterial pressure is evident during waking, when patients are not hypoxic, and is mediated by sustained sympathoexcitation and by altered peripheral vascular reactivity. This review summarizes data suggesting that both the sympathoexcitation and the altered vascular reactivity are, at least in part, a consequence of reduced expression of nitric oxide synthase, in neural tissue and in endothelium. Reduced nitric oxide generation in central and peripheral sites of sympathoregulation and in endothelium together may, in part, explain the elevations in waking pressures observed in sleep apnea patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nitric oxide in the pulmonary vasculature.

    PubMed

    Coggins, Matthew P; Bloch, Kenneth D

    2007-09-01

    Homeostasis in the pulmonary vasculature is maintained by the actions of vasoactive compounds, including nitric oxide (NO). NO is critical for normal development of the pulmonary vasculature and continues to mediate normal vasoregulation in adulthood. Loss of NO bioavailability is one component of the endothelial dysfunction and vascular pathology found in pulmonary hypertension (PH). A broad research effort continues to expand our understanding of the control of NO production and NO signaling and has generated novel theories on the importance of pulmonary NO production in the control of the systemic vasculature. This understanding has led to exciting developments in our ability to treat PH, including inhaled NO and phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and to several promising directions for future therapies using nitric oxide-donor compounds, stimulators of soluble guanylate cyclase, progenitor cells expressing NO synthase (NOS), and NOS gene manipulation.

  2. Inducible nitric oxide synthase: Good or bad?

    PubMed

    Lind, Maggie; Hayes, Alan; Caprnda, Martin; Petrovic, Daniel; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter; Zulli, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are a family of isoforms responsible for the synthesis of the potent dilator nitric oxide (NO). Expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) occurs in conditions of inflammation, and produces large amounts of NO. In pathological conditions iNOS is regarded as a harmful enzyme and is proposed to be a major contributor to diseases of the cardiovascular system such as atherosclerosis. In this review, we address the notion that iNOS is a detrimental enzyme in disease and discuss its potentially beneficial roles. Additionally, we describe other molecules associated with iNOS in diseases such as atherosclerosis, and current research on therapeutic inhibitors tested to reduced pathology associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-07

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension.

  4. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26739766

  5. Evaluation of oxidative stress and nitric oxide levels in patients with oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Beevi, S Syed Sultan; Rasheed, A Muzib Hassanal; Geetha, A

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of oxidative stress and levels of nitric oxide in patients with oral cavity cancer by analyzing the levels of lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants and nitric oxide products. This prospective study was conducted on 15 patients with biopsy proven squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity with clinical stage III/IV and an equal number of age and sex matched healthy subjects. The levels of lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants and nitric oxide products were determined by colorimetric methods. Lipid peroxidation products like lipid hydroperoxide (LHP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide products like nitrite (NO(2)(-)), nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and total nitrite (TNO(2)(-)) were significantly elevated, whereas enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants were significantly lowered in oral cavity cancer patients when compared to normal healthy subjects. Enhanced lipid peroxidation with concomitant decrease in antioxidants is indicative of oxidative stress that provides evidence of the relationship between lipid peroxidation and oral cavity cancer. Increased nitric oxide production represents a general mechanism in its pathogenesis.

  6. Nitric oxide, malnutrition and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Brunini, Tatiana M C; Moss, Monique B; Siqueira, Mariana A S; Santos, Sérgio F F; Lugon, Jocemir R; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2007-04-01

    The conditionally essential amino acid L-arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, a key second messenger involved in physiological functions including endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. Extracellular L-arginine transport seems to be essential for the production of NO by the action of NO synthases (NOS), even when the intracellular levels of L-arginine are available in excess (L-arginine paradox). Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a complex clinical condition associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and thrombosis leading to cardiovascular events. Various studies document that markers of malnutrition and inflammation, such as low body mass index (BMI), C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). There is considerable literature demonstrating that a disturbance in the nitric oxide control mechanism plays a role in mediating the haemodynamic and haemostatic disorders present in CRF. Endogenous analogues of L-arginine, ADMA and L-NMMA, which can inhibit NO synthesis and L-arginine transport, are increased whilst L-arginine is reduced in plasma from all stages of CRF patients. In this context, the uptake of L-arginine in blood cells is increased in undialysed CRF patients and in patients treated by CAPD and haemodialysis. In platelets obtained from haemodialysis patients, the activation of L-arginine transport and NO production was limited to well-nourished patients. Impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity, coupled with malnutrition and inflammation, may contribute to increased incidence of atherothrombotic events in CRF. This article summarizes the current knowledge of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and malnutrition in CRF and briefly describes possible therapeutic interventions.

  7. Endogenous nitric oxide generation in protoplast chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Prommer, Judith; Watanabe, Masami

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : NO generation is studied in the protoplast chloroplasts. NO, ONOO ( - ) and ROS (O ( 2 ) ( - ) and H ( 2 ) O ( 2 ) ) are generated in chloroplasts. Nitric oxide synthase-like protein appears to be involved in NO generation. Nitric oxide stimulates chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast differentiation. The present study was conducted to better understand the process of NO generation in the leaf chloroplasts and protoplasts. NO, peroxynitrite and superoxide anion were investigated in the protoplasts and isolated chloroplasts using specific dyes, confocal laser scanning and light microscopy. The level of NO was highest after protoplast isolation and subsequently decreased during culture. Suppression of NO signal in the presence of PTIO, suggests that diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA) detected NO. Detection of peroxynitrite, a reaction product of NO and superoxide anion, further suggests NO generation. Moreover, generation of NO and peroxynitrite in the chloroplasts of wild-type Arabidopsis and their absence or weak signals in the leaf-derived protoplasts of Atnoa1 mutants confirmed the reactivity of DAF-2DA and aminophenyl fluorescein to NO and peroxynitrite, respectively. Isolated chloroplasts also showed signal of NO. Suppression of NO signal in the presence of 100 μM nitric oxide synthase inhibitors [L-NNA, Nω-nitro-L-arginine and PBIT, S,S'-1,3-phenylene-bis(1,2-ethanediyl)-bis-isothiourea] revealed that nitric oxide synthase-like system is involved in NO synthesis. Suppression of NO signal in the protoplasts isolated in the presence of cycloheximide suggests de novo synthesis of NO generating protein during the process of protoplast isolation. Furthermore, the lack of inhibition of NO production by sodium tungstate (250 μM) and inhibition by L-NNA, and PBIT suggest involvement NOS-like protein, but not nitrate reductase, in NO generation in the leaf chloroplasts and protoplasts.

  8. Nitric Oxide in Mammary Tumor Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    smaller level TIMP-3. This indicated that invasion stimulating effects of endogenous NO are, at least in part , mediated by downregulation TIMP-2 and...vasculature: Inhibition retards tumor growth in vivo. In: Moncada S, Feelisch M, Busse R, Higgs EA (eds) Biology of Nitric Oxide. Part 4: Enzymology...useful in treating certain human cancers either as single agents or as a part of combination therapies. I. Introduction duction of proliferation

  9. Nitric oxide and the paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Jon O

    2008-11-01

    The discovery within the paranasal sinuses for the production of nitric oxide (NO) has altered the traditional explanations of sinus physiology. This review article reports the ongoing investigation of sinus physiology beginning with the discovery of NO gas production in the paranasal sinuses that occurred in 1995, and the impact that finding has had both in the basic science and clinical arenas. It was shown that healthy paranasal sinus epithelium expresses an inducible NO synthase that continuously generates large amounts of NO, a pluripotent gaseous messenger with potent vasodilating, and antimicrobial activity. This NO can be measured noninvasively in nasally exhaled breath. The role of NO in the sinuses is likely to enhance local host defense mechanisms via direct inhibition of pathogen growth and stimulation of mucociliary activity. The NO concentration in a healthy sinus exceeds those that are needed for antibacterial effects in vitro. In patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and in cystic fibrosis, nasal NO is extremely low. This defect NO generation likely contributes to the great susceptibility to chronic sinusitis in these patients. In addition, the low-nasal NO is of diagnostic value especially in PCD, where nasal NO is very low or absent. Intriguingly, NO gas from the nose and sinuses is inhaled with every breath and reaches the lungs in a more diluted form to enhance pulmonary oxygen uptake via local vasodilation. In this sense NO may be regarded as an "aerocrine" hormone that is produced in the nose and sinuses and transported to a distal site of action with every inhalation. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Process for combined control of mercury and nitric oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C. D.; Mendelsohn, M. H.

    1999-11-03

    Continuing concern about the effects of mercury in the environment may lead to requirements for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. If such controls are mandated, the use of existing flue-gas cleanup systems, such as wet scrubbers currently employed for flue-gas desulfurization, would be desirable, Such scrubbers have been shown to be effective for capturing oxidized forms of mercury, but cannot capture the very insoluble elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) that can form a significant fraction of the total emissions. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have proposed and tested a concept for enhancing removal of Hg{sup 0}, as well as nitric oxide, through introduction of an oxidizing agent into the flue gas upstream of a scrubber, which readily absorbs the soluble reaction products. Recently, we developed a new method for introducing the oxidizing agent into the flue-gas stream that dramatically improved reactant utilization. The oxidizing agent employed was NOXSORB{trademark}, which is a commercial product containing chloric acid and sodium chlorate. When a dilute solution of this agent was introduced into a gas stream containing Hg{sup 0} and other typical flue-gas species at 300 F, we found that about 100% of the mercury was removed from the gas phase and recovered in process liquids. At the same time, approximately 80% of the nitric oxide was removed. The effect of sulfur dioxide on this process was also investigated and the results showed that it slightly decreased the amount of Hg{sup 0} oxidized while appearing to increase the removal of nitric oxide from the gas phase. We are currently testing the effects of variations in NOXSORB{trademark} concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, nitric oxide concentration, and reaction time (residence time). Preliminary economic projections based on the results to date indicate that the chemical cost for nitric oxide oxidation could be less than $5,000/ton removed, while for Hg{sup 0} oxidation it

  11. JS-K, a GST-activated nitric oxide donor prodrug, enhances chemo-sensitivity in renal carcinoma cells and prevents cardiac myocytes toxicity induced by Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingning; Ke, Longzhi; Zhang, Sai; Zeng, Xin; Fang, Zesong; Liu, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    Doxorubicin, a highly effective and widely used anthracycline antibiotic in multiple chemotherapy regimens, has been limited by its cardiotoxicity. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of nitric oxide donor prodrug JS-K on proliferation and apoptosis in renal carcinoma cells and cardiac myocytes toxicity induced by Doxorubicin and to explore possible p53-related mechanism in renal carcinoma cells. The effect of JS-K on anti-cancer activity of Doxorubicin was investigated in renal carcinoma cells via detecting cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, cell death and apoptosis and expressions of apoptotic-related proteins. Effect of p53 on the combination of JS-K and Doxorubicin was determined using p53 inhibitor Pifithrin-α and p53 activator III. Furthermore, the effect of JS-K on cardiac myocytes toxicity of Doxorubicin was investigated in H9c2 (2-1) cardiac myocytes via measuring cell growth, cell death and apoptosis, expressions of proteins involved in apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species. We demonstrated that JS-K could increase Doxorubicin-induced renal carcinoma cell growth suppression and apoptosis and could increase expressions of proteins that are involved in apoptosis. Additionally, Pifithrin-α reversed the promoting effect of JS-K on Doxorubicin-induced renal carcinoma cell apoptosis; conversely, the p53 activator III exacerbated the promoting effect of JS-K on Doxorubicin-induced renal carcinoma cell apoptosis. Furthermore, JS-K protected H9c2 (2-1) cardiac myocytes against Doxorubicin-induced toxicity and decreased Doxorubicin-induced reactive oxygen species production. JS-K enhances the anti-cancer activity of Doxorubicin in renal carcinoma cells by upregulating p53 expression and prevents cardiac myocytes toxicity of Doxorubicin by decreasing oxidative stress.

  12. Killing of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro by nitric oxide derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, K A; Awburn, M M; Cowden, W B; Clark, I A

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the in vitro susceptibility of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to killing by nitric oxide and related molecules. A saturated solution of nitric oxide did not inhibit parasite growth, but two oxidation products of nitric oxide (nitrite and nitrate ions) were toxic to the parasite in millimolar concentrations. Nitrosothiol derivatives of cysteine and glutathione were found to be about a thousand times more active (50% growth inhibitory concentration, approximately 40 microM) than nitrite. PMID:1879941

  13. Nitric oxide and thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Gaston, B

    1999-05-05

    S-Nitroso(sy)lation reactions have recently been appreciated to regulate protein function and mediate 'nitrosative' stress. S-Nitrosothiols (SNOs) have been identified in a variety of tissues, and represent a novel class of signaling molecules which may act independently of homolytic cleavage to NO - and, indeed, in a stereoselective fashion - or be metabolized to other bioactive nitrogen oxides. It is now appreciated that sulfur-NO interactions have critical physiological relevance to mammalian neurotransmission, ion channel function, intracellular signaling and antimicrobial defense. These reactions are promising targets for the development of new medical therapies.

  14. Oxidative stress, nitric oxide, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Di Stasio, Enrico; Romitelli, Federica; Santini, Stefano A; Zuppi, Cecilia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, oxidative stress has become focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence from research on several diseases show that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on this research, the emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the "final common pathway", through which risk factors of several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients.

  15. Oxidative Stress, Nitric Oxide, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Di Stasio, Enrico; Romitelli, Federica; Santini, Stefano A.; Zuppi, Cecilia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, oxidative stress has become focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence from research on several diseases show that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on this research, the emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the “final common pathway”, through which risk factors of several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients. PMID:20703435

  16. Experimental Assessment and Enhancement of Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Nitric Oxide in an Inverse Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, William P.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1997-01-01

    We have experimentally assessed the quantitative nature of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of NO concentration in a unique atmospheric pressure, laminar, axial inverse diffusion flame (IDF). The PLIF measurements were assessed relative to a two-dimensional array of separate laser saturated fluorescence (LSF) measurements. We demonstrated and evaluated several experimentally-based procedures for enhancing the quantitative nature of PLIF concentration images. Because these experimentally-based PLIF correction schemes require only the ability to make PLIF and LSF measurements, they produce a more broadly applicable PLIF diagnostic compared to numerically-based correction schemes. We experimentally assessed the influence of interferences on both narrow-band and broad-band fluorescence measurements at atmospheric and high pressures. Optimum excitation and detection schemes were determined for the LSF and PLIF measurements. Single-input and multiple-input, experimentally-based PLIF enhancement procedures were developed for application in test environments with both negligible and significant quench-dependent error gradients. Each experimentally-based procedure provides an enhancement of approximately 50% in the quantitative nature of the PLIF measurements, and results in concentration images nominally as quantitative as LSF point measurements. These correction procedures can be applied to other species, including radicals, for which no experimental data are available from which to implement numerically-based PLIF enhancement procedures.

  17. [Nitric oxide and the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Dzúrik, R; Spustová, V

    2001-02-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NO) is one of the crucial modulators of the vascular tonus. Apart from its effect on the cardiovascular system it exerts an effect also on other types of cells and ensures their functions.Specially comprehensive is its synthesis and action in the kidneys: NO is formed in the endothelial cells due to the activity of constitutional endothelial synthase (eNOS), in mesangial cells of inductive synthase (iNOS), in smooth muscle cells (vsmNOS), in tubular cells neuronal NOS (nNOS) and iNOS and in the macula densa nNOS. By modulation of the v.afferens it influences the blood flow through the glomeruli and filtration pressure in the glomeruli. It participates in the tubuloglomerular feedback: the cells of the macula densa produce NO via nNOS, the genetic transcription and translation of which as well as the kationic translation system ensure the transport of the L-arginine precursor and regulate very sensitively NO formation. The latter diffuses via the extraglomerular mesangium into the iuxtaglomerular apparatus where renin is forned.NO reduces proteinuria and renal proliferation. During renal insufficiency NO production is inhibited and in diabetes NO production is increased. Diabetic hyperfiltration and hypertrophy are ascribed to produced NO. Experimental studies contributed substantially to the knowledge of renal effects of NO. At present intensive clinical research has been started which, no doubt, will influence medical practice.

  18. Development of sensors for nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Glazier, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    The importance of nitric oxide (NO) in mammalian systems has recently been recognized. Interest in NO stems from the discovery of its role in several processes. Firstly, NO is found to be an endothelium-derived relaxing factor. Release of NO by endothelial cells lining blood vessels causes the surrounding smooth muscle of the vessel walls to relax. Secondly, it is known to inhibit the aggregation and adhesion of platelets in blood vessels. Thirdly, NO is believed to be formed by activated macrophage cells to assist in killing foreign cells. Lastly, NO acts in the brain both as a feedback messenger from post- to presynaptic nerve cells and as a conventional neurotransmitter affecting cells other than presynaptic nerve cells. In addition to these roles, it is likely that NO is involved in other processes given its reactivity and potential presence in all mammalian cells. Measurement of NO flux within biological systems is a challenging problem as NO is generated in the nanomolar to micromolar range and is subject to rapid oxidation. The three most common assay techniques for NO in biological systems include: (a) electron paramagnetic resonance detection, (b) hemoglobin oxidation, and (c) chemiluminescence detection with ozone. The authors have initiated research on the construction of a hemoglobin-based, fiber-optic sensor for the detection of nitric oxide in biological systems and progress toward this goal will be presented.

  19. Reduction of nitric oxide emissions from a combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, R.A.; Pritchard, H.O.

    1980-05-27

    A turbojet combustor and method for controlling nitric oxide emissions is provided by employing successive combustion zones wherein after combustion of an initial portion of the fuel in a primary combustion zone, the combustion products of the primary zone are combined with the remaining portion of fuel and additional plenum air and burned in a secondary combustion zone under conditions that result in low nitric oxide emissions. Low nitric oxide emissions are achieved by a novel turbojet combustor arrangement which provides flame stability by allowing stable combustion, which usually result in large emissions of nitric oxide in a primary combustion zone, to be accompanied by low nitric oxide emissions resulting from controlled fuel-lean combustion, ignited by the emission products from the primary zone, in a secondary combustion zone at a lower combustion temperature resulting in low emissions of nitric oxide.

  20. Nitric oxide control of lower genitourinary tract functions: a review.

    PubMed

    Burnett, A L

    1995-06-01

    It is apparent that evolving concepts of the regulatory basis for functions in the pelvis must take into account the role exerted by nitric oxide. A recently characterized messenger molecule, nitric oxide has been associated with numerous physiologic processes. Intense investigations of this molecule have extended its importance to several genitourinary functions. Penile erection, micturition, peristalsis of the male excurrent duct system, contractile properties of the prostate, and lumbosacral spinal cord neurotransmission are all functions that may transpire under some degree of control by nitric oxide. Impotence, urinary obstruction, or ejaculatory problems, in turn, may represent alterations of nitric oxide production or action. The strategic manipulation of nitric oxide or its mechanism of action, possibly by pharmacologic means, may restore or produce desired functional effects. These possibilities, therefore, suggest that the advancing knowledge of nitric oxide in the genitourinary tract may be of enormous clinical value in the future.

  1. Updated role of nitric oxide in disorders of erythrocyte function.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Marc J; Maley, Jason H; Lasker, George F; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2013-03-01

    Nitric oxide is a potent vasodilator that plays a critical role in disorders of erythrocyte function. Sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and banked blood preservation are three conditions where nitric oxide is intimately related to dysfunctional erythrocytes. These conditions are accompanied by hemolysis, thrombosis and vasoocclusion. Our understanding of the interaction between nitric oxide, hemoglobin, and the vasculature is constantly evolving, and by defining this role we can better direct trials aimed at improving the treatments of disorders of erythrocyte function. Here we briefly discuss nitric oxide's interaction with hemoglobin through the hypothesis regarding Snitrosohemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and myoglobin as nitrite reductases. We then review the current understanding of the role of nitric oxide in sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and banked blood, and discuss therapeutics in development to target nitric oxide in the treatment of some of these disorders.

  2. The Roles of Macrophages and Nitric Oxide in Interleukin-3-Enhanced HSV-Sr39tk-Mediated Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ching-Fang; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chiang, Chi-Shiun

    2013-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-sr39tk/GCV) system is a well-established prodrug system used in cancer gene therapy. However, this system is currently not effective enough to eradicate malignant tumors completely. This study aimed to evaluate whether co-expression of interleukin-3 (IL-3) could enhance the anti-tumor activity of HSV-sr39tk/GCV prodrug gene therapy using a murine TRAMP-C1 prostate tumor model. In vitro results demonstrated that HSV-sr39tk-transfected cells exhibited enhanced sensitivity to the GCV prodrug, which was not affected by co-expression of the mIL-3 gene. However, in vivo studies showed that co-expression of the mIL-3 gene significantly increased the HSV-sr39tk/GCV-induced tumor growth delay and even cured the tumor. The TRAMP-C1-specific immune response of spleen lymphocytes from mice bearing HSV-sr39tk- and IL-3-expressing TRAMP-C1 tumors was measured by ELISA. Results showed that IL-3-activated IL-4-dominant lymphocytes became IFN-γ- dominant lymphocytes after combined HSV-sr39tk/GCV therapy. The efficacy of combined therapies on tumor regression was reduced when macrophages populations were depleted by carrageenan or NO production was inhibited by administration of the iNOS inhibitor, L-NAME. These results suggest that utilizing a bicistronic vector to express HSV-sr39tk and the IL-3 gene induced an enhanced macrophage- or NO-dependent anti-tumor effect. PMID:23441198

  3. Centrally produced nitric oxide and the regulation of body fluid and blood pressure homeostases.

    PubMed

    Kadekaro, M; Summy-Long, J Y

    2000-01-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) tonically inhibits the basal release of vasopressin and oxytocin into plasma. 2. Nitric oxide inhibition on vasopressin secretion is removed, while that on oxytocin is enhanced, during water deprivation, hypovolaemia, moderate osmotic stimulation and angiotensin (Ang)II. This results in a preferential release of vasopressin over oxytocin that promotes conservation of water. 3. Nitric oxide facilitates drinking behaviour stimulated by water deprivation, osmotic stimulation, haemorrhage and AngII. Together with the hormonal response, NO produces a positive water balance during reductions in intracellular and intravascular volumes. 4. Nitric oxide produced within the central nervous system maintains resting arterial blood pressure partially by attenuating the pressor actions of AngII and prostaglandins. 5. Central production of NO is enhanced during osmotic stimulation to counterbalance the salt-induced pressor response. 6. Paradoxically, central production of NO is also enhanced during haemorrhage, presumably to maintain peripheral vasodilation and blood flow to vital organs.

  4. Enhancement of insulin-induced cutaneous vasorelaxation by exercise in rats: A role for nitric oxide and K(Ca2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri, Samireh; Hajizadeh, Sohrab; Mani, Ali R

    2011-02-10

    Insulin is a potent vasoactive hormone which induces vasodilatation at physiological concentrations. Aerobic exercise is known to improve insulin vasodilatory activity in humans and experimental animals. Since both insulin and physical training is known to activate K(ATP) and K(Ca2+) channels and increase nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, we hypothesized that insulin and exercise might use a common mechanism in mediating their vascular effect. The present study was carried out to investigate the role of NO, K(ATP) and K(Ca2+) channels in enhancement of insulin-induced cutaneous vasorelaxation by exercise in rats. Male Wistar rats were submitted to exercise training for 8weeks on a treadmill. Cutaneous microvascular response to insulin was recorded from soles skin using a laser Doppler flowmeter. Systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured using a tail-cuff during assessment of cutaneous blood flow. Subcutaneous injection of insulin induced a dose-dependent increase in skin blood flow in control rats which was significantly higher in exercised animals. Local inhibition of NO synthesis (l-NAME, 10(-4)M) was associated with a marked inhibitory effect on insulin-induced vasodilatation and this inhibition was significantly greater in exercised rats. Likewise, a selective K(Ca2+) channel blocker (iberiotoxin, 10(-9)M) inhibited insulin-induced vasodilatation and this inhibition was significantly exaggerated in exercised animals. Local K(ATP) blockade (glybenclamide, 10(-5)M) showed an identical response in sedentary and exercised animals. Insulin induced a marked vasodilatation in cutaneous microcirculation following aerobic exercise in rats. Both NO and K(Ca2+) channels might be involved in the genesis of this effect.

  5. Measuring nasal nitric oxide in allergic rhinitis patients.

    PubMed

    Nesic, V S; Djordjevic, V Z; Tomic-Spiric, V; Dudvarski, Z R; Soldatovic, I A; Arsovic, N A

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to compare two sampling methods for nasal nitric oxide in healthy individuals and allergic rhinitis patients, and to examine the within-subject reliability of nasal nitric oxide measurement. The study included 23 allergic rhinitis patients without concomitant asthma and 10 healthy individuals. For all participants, nitric oxide levels were measured non-invasively from the lungs through the mouth (i.e. the oral fractional exhaled nitric oxide) and the nose. Nasal nitric oxide was measured by two different methods: (1) nasal aspiration via one nostril during breath holding and (2) single-breath quiet exhalation against resistance through a tight facemask (i.e. the nasal fractional exhaled nitric oxide). Compared with healthy participants, allergic rhinitis patients had significantly higher average oral and nasal nitric oxide levels. All methods of nitric oxide measurement had excellent reliability. Nasal nitric oxide measurement is a useful and reliable clinical tool for diagnosing allergic rhinitis in patients without asthma in an out-patient setting.

  6. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  7. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-07-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission.

  8. New concepts in vascular nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Oeckler, R A; Wolin, M S

    2000-09-01

    Low levels of nitric oxide (NO) control the activities of guanylate cyclase and mitochondrial respiration. Increasing NO levels interact with multiple signaling systems through the formation of peroxynitrite and other oxidation products. Signaling mechanisms linked to NO participate in the prevention of acute responses such as vasoconstriction, thrombosis and the recruitment of inflammatory cells. In contrast, processes related to vascular remodeling, and responses to injury that are associated with the progression and adaptation to disease processes, are not as well understood. Many of the opposing processes involved in these adaptations may originate from the diverse signaling mechanisms that NO and its oxidized products can regulate in a cell-specific manner in the vessel wall.

  9. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    PubMed Central

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission. PMID:23713124

  10. Disruption of Nitric Oxide Signaling by Helicobacter pylori Results in Enhanced Inflammation by Inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Verriere, Thomas; Scull, Brooks P.; de Sablet, Thibaut; Glumac, Ashley; Lewis, Nuruddeen D.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    A strong cellular crosstalk exists between the pathogen Helicobacter pylori and high-output NO production. However, how NO and H. pylori interact to signal in gastric epithelial cells and modulate the innate immune response is unknown. We show that chemical or cellular sources of NO induce the anti-inflammatory effector heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in gastric epithelial cells through a pathway that requires NF-κB. However, H. pylori decreases NO-induced NF-κB activation, thereby inhibiting HO-1 expression. This inhibitory effect of H. pylori results from activation of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 by the H. pylori virulence factor CagA and by the host signaling molecules ERK1/2 and JNK. Consistent with these findings, HO-1 is downregulated in gastric epithelial cells of patients infected with cagA+, but not cagA− H. pylori. Enhancement of HO-1 activity in infected cells or in H. pylori-infected mice inhibits chemokine generation and reduces inflammation. These data define a mechanism by which H. pylori favors its own pathogenesis by inhibiting HO-1 induction through the action of CagA. PMID:21987660

  11. Polyphenols enhance platelet nitric oxide by inhibiting protein kinase C-dependent NADPH oxidase activation: effect on platelet recruitment.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, P; Di Santo, S; Buchetti, B; Sanguigni, V; Brunelli, A; Violi, F

    2006-06-01

    Several studies demonstrated an inverse association between polyphenol intake and cardiovascular events. Platelet recruitment is an important phase of platelet activation at the site of vascular injury, but it has never been investigated whether polyphenols influence platelet recruitment. The aim of the study was to analyze in vitro whether two polyphenols, quercetin and catechin, were able to affect platelet recruitment. Platelet recruitment was reduced by NO donors and by NADPH oxidase inhibitors and was enhanced by L-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase. Quercetin and catechin, but not single polyphenol, significantly inhibited platelet recruitment in a concentration-dependent fashion. The formation of superoxide anion was significantly inhibited in platelets incubated with quercetin and catechin but was unaffected by a single polyphenol. Incubation of platelets with quercetin and catechin resulted in inhibition of PKC and NADPH oxidase activation. Treatment of platelets with quercetin and catechin resulted in an increase of NO and also down-regulated the expression of GpIIb/IIIa glycoprotein. This study shows that the polyphenols quercetin and catechin synergistically act in reducing platelet recruitment via inhibition of PKC-dependent NADPH oxidase activation. This effect, resulting in NO-mediated platelet glycoprotein GpIIb/IIIa down-regulation, could provide a novel mechanism through which polyphenols reduce cardiovascular disease.

  12. Regulatory effects of anesthetics on nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenguo; Liu, Qin; Zhu, Xiao; Wu, Zhi; Li, Dongpei; Huang, Fang; He, Hongwen

    2016-04-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical gas in the biological system, which is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family. NO acts as a biological mediator and plays important roles in different systems in humans. The NO/NOS system exerts a broad spectrum of signaling functions involved in vasodilation, inflammation, oxidative stress, cardioprotection and neuroprotection. It has been demonstrated that intravenous and volatile anesthetics (such as propofol, ketamine, midazolam, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, etc.) modulate NO production through multiple mechanisms that may influence physiological and pathophysiological processes. This review focuses on the effects of different anesthetics on NO/NOS regulation in different disease conditions. Possible cellular mechanisms and intermediate role of NO/NOS in anesthetic-mediated organ protection are also discussed. It would be interesting to clarify the impact of anesthetics on NO/NOS regulation. This review gives an overview of the effects of different anesthetics on NO/NOS regulation and function in different physiologic and pathophysiologic states.

  13. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes.

  14. Nitric oxide in liver inflammation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sanz, Paloma; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Callejas, Nuria A; Goren, Nora; Casado, Marta; Zeini, Miriam; Boscá, Lisardo

    2002-12-01

    Hepatocytes express and release inflammatory mediators after challenge with bacterial cell wall molecules and proinflammatory cytokines. Nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) is expressed under these conditions and the high-output NO synthesis that follows contributes to the inflammatory response in this tissue and participates in the onset of several hepatopathies. However, in the course of liver regeneration, for example, after partial hepatectomy, NOS-2 is expressed at moderate levels and contributes to inhibit apoptosis and to favor progression in the cell cycle until the organ size and function are restored. The mechanisms involved in the regulation of NOS-2 expression under these conditions are revised.

  15. Nitric oxide as a surgical adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Aimee; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-08-01

    Advances in surgical technology have allowed for previously unconsidered therapeutic interventions. However, the complexity and invasiveness of surgical procedures are not without adverse consequences. Nitric oxide's fundamental role in a host of physiological processes, including angiogenesis, wound and bone healing, thromboresistance, smooth muscle relaxation and inflammation makes it a significant player in accelerating wound healing and mitigating the inflammation of ischemia reperfusion injury common to surgical procedures. In addition, the therapeutic properties of NO have been harnessed for the prophylactic treatment of implant infection and graft failure. In this article, we will discuss the mechanism by which NO mediates these processes, and its perioperative translational applications.

  16. Effect of premixing on nitric oxide formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Emissions from a simple 10-cm (4-in.) diameter tube combustor burning a premixed, gaseous propane/air mixture were measured. Inlet conditions included a temperature of 590 K (600 F), pressure of 5.5 atm, and reference velocity of 23 m/s (75 ft/s) for a range of equivalence ratios from the lean limit to slightly richer than stoichiometric. A nitric oxide emission index of 1 g NO2/kg fuel was measured for an equivalence ratio of 0.57.

  17. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  18. Nitric oxide and oxidative stress in placental explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Juvic M; Casart, Ysabel C; Camejo, María I

    2016-01-01

    Placental explant culture, and cellular cytolysis and cellular differentiation have been previously studied. However, oxidative stress and nitric oxide profiles have not been evaluated in these systems. The aim of this study was to determine the release of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide from placental explants cultured over a seven day period. Placental explants were maintained for seven days in culture and the medium was changed every 24 hours. The response was assessed in terms of syncytiotrophoblast differentiation (human chorionic gonadotropin, hCG), cellular cytolysis (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH), oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), and nitric oxide (NO). Levels of hCG increased progressively from day two to attain its highest level on days four and five after which it decreased gradually. In contrast, the levels of LDH, TBARS, and NO were elevated in the early days of placental culture when new syncytiotrophoblast from cytotrophoblast were forming and also in the last days of culture when tissue was declining. In conclusion, the levels of NO and lipid peroxidation follow a pattern similar to LDH and contrary to hCG. Future placental explant studies to evaluate oxidative stress and NO should consider the physiological changes inherent during the time of culture.

  19. Electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide: Saturation and Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Ning; Lucht, Robert P.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2010-08-01

    A theoretical analysis of electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of NO is described. The time-dependent density-matrix equations for the nonlinear ERE-CARS process are derived and manipulated into a form suitable for direct numerical integration. In the ERE-CARS configuration considered in this paper, the pump and Stokes beams are far from electronic-resonance. The visible 532 and 591 nm laser beams are used to excite Q-branch Raman resonances in the vibrational bands of the X Π2 electronic state of NO. An ultraviolet probe beam at 236 nm is used to excite P-, Q-, or R-branch transitions in the (v '=0, v″=1) band of the A Σ2+-X Π2 electronic system of NO molecule. Experimental spectra are obtained either by scanning the ultraviolet probe beam while keeping the Stokes frequency fixed (probe scans) or by scanning the Stokes frequency while keeping the probe frequency fixed (Stokes scans). The calculated NO ERE-CARS spectra are compared with experimental spectra, and good agreement is observed between theory and experiment in terms of spectral peak locations and relative intensities. The effects of saturation of the two-photon Raman-resonant Q-branch transitions, the saturation of a one-photon electronic-resonant P-, Q-, or R-branch transitions in the A Σ2+-X Π2 electronic system, and the coupling of these saturation processes are investigated. The coupling of the saturation processes for the probe and Raman transitions is complex and exhibits behavior similar to that observed in the electromagnetic induced transparency process. The probe scan spectra are significantly affected by Stark broadening due to the interaction of the pump and Stokes radiation with single-photon resonances between the upper vibration-rotation probe level in the A Σ2+ electronic levels and vibration-rotation levels in higher lying electronic levels. The ERE-CARS signal intensity is found to be much less sensitive to variations in the

  20. The response of thermospheric nitric oxide to an auroral storm

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The response of thermospheric nitric oxide (NO) to the auroral storm of September 19, 1984 is analyzed. Measurements of nitric oxide from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) ultraviolet spectrometer are compared with the calculations of a one-dimensional photochemical model of the lower thermosphere. The NCAR Thermospheric General Circulation Model (TGCM) is used to calculate the response of the background neutral atmosphere to auroral forcings such as Joule and particle heating. The output of the TGCM is used as input to the photochemical model. The time history of the auroral energy input is assessed using particle data from the NOAA 6 and 7 satellites. The SME NO measurements were made from 100 km to 140 km along two orbital tracks: one over the United States and one over Europe. The observations show a factor of 3 increase in NO at auroral latitudes for both orbits as a result of the storm. Nitric oxide at mid-latitudes also increased by a factor of 3 but only over the United States. Calculations of the mid-latitude NO response show that temperature increases which result from Joule heating lead to NO enhancements. A larger response is initially seen for altitudes greater than 120 km.

  1. Defective nitric oxide production by alveolar macrophages during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lasbury, Mark E; Liao, Chung-Ping; Hage, Chadi A; Durant, Pamela J; Tschang, Dennis; Wang, Shao-Hung; Zhang, Chen; Lee, Chao-Hung

    2011-04-01

    The effect of nitric oxide (NO) on Pneumocystis (Pc) organisms, the role of NO in the defense against infection with Pc, and the production of NO by alveolar macrophages (AMs) during Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) were investigated. The results indicate that NO was toxic to Pc organisms and inhibited their proliferation in culture. When the production of NO was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of rats with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl) ornithine, progression of Pc infection in immunocompetent rats was enhanced. Concentrations of NO in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from immunosuppressed, Pc-infected rats and mice were greatly reduced, compared with those from uninfected animals, and AMs from these animals were defective in NO production. However, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein concentrations were high in AMs from Pc-infected rats and mice. Immunoblot analysis showed that iNOS in AMs from Pc-infected rats existed primarily as a monomer, but the homo-dimerization of iNOS monomers was required for the production of NO. When iNOS dimerization cofactors, including calmodulin, were added to macrophage lysates, iNOS dimerization increased, whereas incubation of the same lysates with all cofactors except calmodulin did not rescue iNOS dimer formation. These data suggest that NO is important in the defense against Pc infection, but that the production of NO in AMs during PCP is defective because of the reduced dimerization of iNOS.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development.

  3. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage.

    PubMed

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Komur, Baran; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  4. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  5. Role of Nitric Oxide and CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein Transcription Factor in Statin-Dependent Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hariri, Moustafa; Soussi, Hiba; Hamade, Eva; Alam, Jawed; Habib, Aïda

    2013-01-01

    The effect of statins on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was compared in 2 murine cell lines, RAW 264.7 and J774A.1 cell lines, and in primary peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice. The role of endogenous nitric oxide and the type of transcription factors involved were explored. Simvastatin and fluvastatin induced HO-1. Pretreatment of cells with l-NMMA or 1400 W, two different nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, partially blocked statin-dependent induction of HO-1 in RAW 264.7 and J774A.1 but not in primary peritoneal macrophages. Induction of HO-1 by statins was dependent on p-38 MAP kinase activation in all types of macrophages. In RAW 264.7 cells, both statins increased the activity of reporter genes linked to the proximal 1.3 kbp promoter of HO-1 (EC50 of 1.4±0.3 µM for simvastatin and 0.6±0.03 µM for fluvastatin). This effect was significantly blocked by 1400 W (80±5.2% inhibition, p<0.02) and mevalonate, the direct metabolite of HMGCoA reductase. Gel retardation experiments implicated C/EBPβ, AP-1 but not USF, for both RAW 264.7 and primary peritoneal macrophages of C57BL/6 mice. Collectively we showed a differential role of endogenous nitric oxide between macrophage cell lines and primary macrophages and an effect of statins in the protection against inflammation by increasing HO-1 expression. PMID:23717538

  6. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingzi; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-10-01

    As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP)] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  7. Nitric oxide may mediate nipple erection.

    PubMed

    Tezer, Murat; Ozluk, Yasemin; Sanli, Oner; Asoglu, Oktar; Kadioglu, Ates

    2012-01-01

    The nipple is a specialized structure that can become erect by cold, sexual arousal, breast-feeding, or other tactile stimulations, which can induce the milk ejection reflex and sexual arousal because of intense sensory innervation. The studies that have been conducted thus far to identify the mechanism of nipple erection (NE) are not sufficient. It has been stated that NE occurs via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and smooth muscle contraction. The purposes of this study were to investigate the existence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the nipple-areola complex (NAC) to explain the NE mechanism. Considering that smooth muscle relaxation might be effective in NE, endothelial and neuronal NOS expression and localization were investigated via immunohistochemical methods on sagittal sections from 17 human NACs. The results of this study indicate that eNOS is expressed in the vascular endothelium, ductal epithelium, and smooth muscles, whereas nNOS is expressed in the neural fibers, smooth muscles, ductal epithelium, and vascular endothelium in the NAC. Sinusoidal spaces with endothelial layers similar to those found in penile cavernosal tissue are not found in the NAC. Various mediators are known to affect the function of the NAC smooth muscles; however, this study demonstrates that enzymes (eNOS and nNOS) that synthesize nitric oxide are expressed in the NAC.

  8. Nitric oxide synthase in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    López-Figueroa, M O; Møller, M

    1996-10-01

    The recent discovery of nitric oxide (NO) as a biological messenger molecule with unique characteristics has opened a new field in pineal research. This free radical gas is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from L-arginine. The activation of adrenoreceptors in the membrane of the pinealocytes mediates the increase in NO through a mechanism that involves G proteins. In the pinealocyte, NO stimulates guanylyl cyclase resulting in an increased intracellular content of cGMP. The role of cGMP in pineal metabolism, however, is still enigmatic. Using enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, the presence of NOS has been confirmed in the pineal gland of some species. In the rat and especially in the sheep, NOS is located in nerve fibres innervating the gland. These nerve fibres also contain the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), and are probably of parasympathetic origin. In cell cultures and tissue sections NOS immunoreactivity has been shown to be present in pinealocytes of the rat and bovine but not in the sheep. Finally, NOS is also present in the endothelial cells of the blood vessels of the pineal gland. Accordingly, in the mammalian pineal gland, NO is synthesized in both presynaptic nerve fibers and pinealocytes, as well as in blood vessels. However, the anatomical location of NO synthesis varies considerably among species. NO released in the pineal gland, might influence both the pineal metabolism and the blood flow of the gland.

  9. Nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide production is associated with salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min-Gui; Tian, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2007-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key molecule involved in many physiological processes in plants. To characterize roles of NO in tolerance of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to salt stress, effect of NaCl on Arabidopsis wild-type and mutant (Atnoa1) plants with an impaired in vivo NO synthase (NOS) activity and a reduced endogenous NO level was investigated. Atnoa1 mutant plants displayed a greater Na+ to K+ ratio in shoots than wild-type plants due to enhanced accumulation of Na+ and reduced accumulation of K+ when exposed to NaCl. Germination of Atnoa1 seeds was more sensitive to NaCl than that of wild-type seeds, and wild-type plants exhibited higher survival rates than Atnoa1 plants when grown under salt stress. Atnoa1 plants had higher levels of hydrogen peroxide than wild-type plants under both control and salt stress, suggesting that Atnoa1 is more vulnerable to salt and oxidative stress than wild-type plants. Treatments of wild-type plants with NOS inhibitor and NO scavenger reduced endogenous NO levels and enhanced NaCl-induced increase in Na+ to K+ ratio. Exposure of wild-type plants to NaCl inhibited NOS activity and reduced quantity of NOA1 protein, leading to a decrease in endogenous NO levels measured by NO-specific fluorescent probe. Treatment of Atnoa1 plants with NO donor sodium nitroprusside attenuated the NaCl-induced increase in Na+ to K+ ratio. Therefore, these findings provide direct evidence to support that disruption of NOS-dependent NO production is associated with salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

  10. Nitric oxide from a "green" perspective.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2015-02-15

    The molecule nitric oxide (NO) which is involved in practically all biochemical and physiological plant processes has become a subject for plant research. However, there remain many unanswered questions concerning how, where and when this molecule is enzymatically generated in higher plants. This mini-review aims to provide an overview of NO in plants for those readers unfamiliar with this field of research. The review will therefore discuss the importance of NO in higher plants at the physiological and biochemical levels, its involvement in designated nitro-oxidative stresses in response to adverse abiotic and biotic environmental conditions, NO emission/uptake from plants, beneficial plant-microbial interactions, and its potential application in the biotechnological fields of agriculture and food nutrition.

  11. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  12. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Siamwala, Jamila H.; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M. Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; T, Pradeep; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated limb deformities by 94% and 80% in chick and zebrafish embryos respectively. NO prevents limb deformities by promoting angiogenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inactivating caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. We conclude that NO secures angiogenesis in the thalidomide treated embryos to protect them from deformities. PMID:22997553

  13. Nitric Oxide--Some Old and New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainscough, Eric W.; Brodie, Andrew M.

    1995-01-01

    Because of the role it plays in physiology and neurobiology, there is a rebirth of interest in nitric oxide. It can affect enzyme and immune system regulation and cytotoxicity. Nitric oxide may represent a new class of signaling molecules--gases that pass through cells and vanish. Overactive neurons produce large amounts of NO which may be linked…

  14. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  15. Nitric Oxide--Some Old and New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainscough, Eric W.; Brodie, Andrew M.

    1995-01-01

    Because of the role it plays in physiology and neurobiology, there is a rebirth of interest in nitric oxide. It can affect enzyme and immune system regulation and cytotoxicity. Nitric oxide may represent a new class of signaling molecules--gases that pass through cells and vanish. Overactive neurons produce large amounts of NO which may be linked…

  16. Noise-Induced “Toughening” Effect in Wistar Rats: Enhanced Auditory Brainstem Responses Are Related to Calretinin and Nitric Oxide Synthase Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Juan C.; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Gabaldón-Ull, María C.; Jareño-Flores, Tania; Miller, Josef M.; Juiz, José M.

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate conditioning noise exposure may reduce a subsequent noise-induced threshold shift. Although this “toughening” effect helps to protect the auditory system from a subsequent traumatic noise exposure, the mechanisms that regulate this protective process are not fully understood yet. Accordingly, the goal of the present study was to characterize physiological processes associated with “toughening” and to determine their relationship to metabolic changes in the cochlea and cochlear nucleus (CN). Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were evaluated in Wistar rats before and after exposures to a sound conditioning protocol consisting of a broad-band white noise of 118 dB SPL for 1 h every 72 h, four times. After the last ABR evaluation, animals were perfused and their cochleae and brains removed and processed for the activity markers calretinin (CR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Toughening was demonstrated by a progressively faster recovery of the threshold shift, as well as wave amplitudes and latencies over time. Immunostaining revealed an increase in CR and nNOS levels in the spiral ganglion, spiral ligament, and CN in noise-conditioned rats. Overall, these results suggest that the protective mechanisms of the auditory toughening effect initiate in the cochlea and extend to the central auditory system. Such phenomenon might be in part related to an interplay between CR and nitric oxide signaling pathways, and involve an increased cytosolic calcium buffering capacity induced by the noise conditioning protocol. PMID:27065815

  17. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  18. Vasodilator responses of rat isolated tail artery enhanced by oxygen- dependent, photochemical release of nitric oxide from iron-sulphur-nitrosyls.

    PubMed

    Flitney, F W; Megson, I L; Thomson, J L; Kennovin, G D; Butler, A R

    1996-04-01

    1. The vasodilator properties and photochemical decomposition of two synthetic iron-sulphur-nitrosyl clusters (cluster A: [Fe4S4(NO)4], tetranitrosyl-tetra-mu 3-sulphido-tetrahedro-tetrairon; and B:[Fe4S3 (NO)7]-1, heptanitrosyl-tri-mu 3-thioxotetraferrate(-1)) have been investigated. Experiments were carried out on isolated, internally-perfused segments of rat tail artery. 2. Bolus injections (10 microliters) of A or B ( > 0.25 mM) delivered into the internal perfusate generated sustained (or S-type) vasodilator responses, characterized by a persistent plateau of reduced tone due to NO released from clusters which enter and become trapped within endothelial cells. Clusters were therefore irradiated with visible laser light (lambda = 457.9 or 514.5 nm) either (a) in solution, while passing through a glass tube en route to the artery; or (b) when retained within the endothelium, by illuminating the artery directly during the plateau of an S-type response. Irradiation produced an additional vasodilator response, the magnitude of which depended upon wavelength and laser beam energy. 3. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (100 microM), had no effect on light-induced vasodilator responses. However, they were (a) blocked entirely by adding oxyhaemoglobin (5 microM) to the internal perfusate; and (b) greatly enhanced by the enzyme superoxide dismutase (150 u ml-1). 4. Photolysis of cluster B was measured by absorption spectroscopy and by detecting NO released with an electrochemical sensor. The photochemical reaction was found to be oxygen-dependent. The half-time for inactivation of cluster-derived NO was measured by interposing different lengths of tubing (i.e. time delays) between the photolysis tube and NO sensor. The steady-state probe current decayed exponentially with increasing delay time, with a t 1/2 of 21 s. The amplitudes of vasodilator responses of the tail artery also decreased exponentially by increasing the time delay (t 1/2 = 58

  19. Supplementing essential amino acids with the nitric oxide precursor, l-arginine, enhances skeletal muscle perfusion without impacting anabolism in older men.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Phillips, Bethan E; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Williams, John P; Rankin, Debbie; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-10-06

    Postprandial limb blood flow and skeletal muscle microvascular perfusion reduce with aging. Here we tested the impact of providing bolus essential amino acids (EAA) in the presence and absence of the nitric oxide precursor, l-Arginine (ARG), upon skeletal muscle blood flow and anabolism in older men. Healthy young (YOUNG: 19.7 ± 0.5 y, N = 8) and older men (OLD, 70 ± 0.8 y, N = 8) received 15 g EAA or (older only) 15 g EAA +3 g ARG (OLD-ARG, 69.2 ± 1.2 y, N = 8). We quantified responses in muscle protein synthesis (MPS; incorporation of (13)C phenylalanine into myofibrillar proteins), leg and muscle microvascular blood flow (Doppler/contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)) and insulin/EAA in response to EEA ± ARG. Plasma EAA increased similarly across groups but argininemia was evident solely in OLD-ARG (∼320 mmol, 65 min post feed); increases in plasma insulin (to ∼13 IU ml(-1)) were similar across groups. Increases in femoral flow were evident in YOUNG >2 h after feeding; these effects were blunted in OLD and OLD-ARG. Increases in microvascular blood volume (MBV) occurred only in YOUNG and these effects were isolated to the early postprandial phase (+45% at ∼45 min after feeding) coinciding with detectable arterio-venous differences in EAA reflecting net uptake by muscle. Increases in microvascular flow velocity (MFV) and tissue perfusion (MBV × MFV) occurred (∼2 h) in YOUNG and OLD-ARG, but not OLD. Postprandial protein accretion was greater in YOUNG than OLD or OLD-ARG; the latter two groups being indistinguishable. Therefore, ARG rescues aspects of muscle perfusion in OLD without impacting anabolic blunting, perhaps due to the "rescue" being beyond the period of active EAA-uptake.

  20. Reduction of myeloid suppressor cell derived nitric oxide provides a mechanistic basis of lead enhancement of alloreactive CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, David G.; Hueber, Sara; Laiosa, Michael D.; Eckles, Kevin G.; McCabe, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    The persistent environmental toxicant and immunomodulator, lead (Pb), has been proposed to directly target CD4{sup +} T cells. However, our studies suggest that CD4{sup +} T cells are an important functional, yet indirect target. In order to identify the direct target of Pb in the immune system and the potential mechanism of Pb-induced immunotoxicity, myeloid suppressor cells (MSCs) were evaluated for their ability to modulate CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation after Pb exposure. Myeloid suppressor cells regulate the adaptive immune response, in part, by inhibiting the proliferation of CD4{sup +} T cells. It is thought that the mechanism of MSC-dependent regulation involves the release of the bioactive gas, nitric oxide (NO), blocking cell signaling cascades downstream of the IL-2 receptor and thus preventing T cells from entering cell-cycle. In mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), increasing numbers of MSCs suppressed T cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and this suppression is strikingly abrogated with 5 {mu}M lead (Pb) treatment. The Pb-sensitive MSC population is CD11b{sup +}, GR1{sup +}and CD11c{sup -} and thus phenotypically consistent with MSCs described in other literature. Inhibition of NO-synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for the production of NO, enhanced alloreactive T cell proliferation in MLC. Moreover, Pb attenuated NO production in MLC, and exogenous replacement of NO restored suppression in the presence of Pb. Significantly, MSC from iNOS-/- mice were unable to suppress T cell proliferation. An MSC-derived cell line (MSC-1) also suppressed T cell proliferation in MLC, and Pb disrupted this suppression by attenuating NO production. Additionally, Pb disrupted NO production in MSC-1 cells in response to treatment with interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and LPS or in response to concanavalin A-stimulated splenocytes. However, neither the abundance of protein nor levels of mRNA for the inducible isoform of NOS (iNOS) were altered with Pb

  1. Nitric Oxide Modulators: An Emerging Class of Medicinal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, S. R.; Satyanarayana, K.; Rao, M. N. A.; Pai, K. V.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide, a unique messenger in biological system, is ubiquitously present virtually in all tissues revealing its versatile nature of being involved in diverse physiological functions such as vascular tone, inhibition of platelet aggregation, cell adhesion, neurotransmission and enzyme and immune regulation. The tremendous advancements made in the past few decades in this area suggests that the nitric oxide modulation either by its exogenous release through nitric oxide donors or inhibition of its synthesis by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors in physiological milieu may provide newer clinical strategies for the treatment of some diseases. In this review, an attempt is made to document and understand the biological chemistry of different classes of nitric oxide modulators that would prove to be a fruitful area in the years to come. PMID:23798773

  2. Nitric oxide protects endothelium from cadmium mediated leakiness.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Priya, M Krishna; Swaminathan, Akila; Siamwala, Jamila H; Sinha, Swaraj; Veeriah, Vimal; Sonar, Punam; Jadhav, Vivek; Jaffar Ali, B M; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium targets the vascular endothelium causing endothelial dysfunction and leakiness of endothelial barrier. Nitric oxide plays a major role in mediating endothelial functions including angiogenesis, migration and permeability. The present study investigates the nitric oxide effects on cadmium induced endothelial leakiness. Results of ex vivo and in vitro permeability assays showed that even a sub-lethal dose of cadmium chloride (1 µM) was sufficient to induce leakiness of endothelial cells. Cadmium drastically altered the actin polymerisation pattern and membrane tension of these cells compared to controls. Addition of nitric oxide donor Spermine NONOate (SP) significantly blunted cadmium-mediated effects and recover endothelial cells integrity. Cadmium-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane leakiness are associated with the low nitric oxide availability and high reactive oxygen species generation. In brief, we show the protective role of nitric oxide against cadmium-mediated endothelial leakiness. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  3. Reduction of nitric oxide emissions from a combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. A.; Pritchard, H. O. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A turbojet combustor and method for controlling nitric oxide emissions by employing successive combustion zones is described. After combustion of an initial portion of the fuel in a primary combustion zone, the combustion products of the primary zone are combined with the remaining portion of fuel and additional plenum air and burned in a secondary combustion zone under conditions that result in low nitric oxide emissions. Low nitric oxide emissions are achieved by a novel turbojet combustor arrangement which provides flame stability by allowing stable combustion to be accompanied by low nitric oxide emissions resulting from controlled fuel-lean combustion (ignited by the emission products from the primary zone) in a secondary combustion zone at a lower combustion temperature resulting in low emission of nitric oxide.

  4. Sickle cell disease and nitric oxide: A paradigm shift?

    PubMed Central

    Mack, A. Kyle; Kato, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease is thought to result from the polymerization of hemoglobin S in red cells, under hypoxic conditions, resulting in the occlusion of blood vessels. Adhesion of cells to the venular endothelium also appears to play a role. Recent studies have also suggested that in addition to the polymerization of hemoglobin S in the red blood cell, a deficiency of the endogenous vasodilator, nitric oxide may be involved. Hemoglobin released as a result of hemolysis rapidly consumes nitric oxide resulting in a whole program of events that inhibit blood flow. Therapies directed at decreasing the destruction of nitric oxide, increasing the production of nitric oxide, or amplifying the nitric oxide response may prove beneficial. PMID:16517208

  5. Nitric Oxide Signaling and Neural Stem Cell Differentiation in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tao Li, Jessica; Somasundaram, Chandra; Bian, Ka; Xiong, Weijun; Mahmooduddin, Faiz; Nath, Rahul K.; Murad, Ferid

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to examine whether nitric oxide signaling plays a role in human embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural cells. This article reviews current literature on nitric oxide signaling and neural stem cell differentiation for potential therapeutic application to peripheral nerve regeneration. Methods: Human embryonic H9-stem cells were grown, maintained on mitomycin C–treated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder layer, cultured on Matrigel to be feeder-free, and used for all the experiments. Fluorescent dual-immunolabeling and confocal image analysis were used to detect the presence of the neural precursor cell markers nestin and nitric oxide synthase-1. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was used to determine the percentage of expression. Results: We have shown the confocal image of stage 1 human embryonic stem cells coexpressing nestin and nitric oxide synthase-1. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis indicated 24.3% positive labeling of nitric oxide synthase-1. Adding retinoic acid (10−6 M) to the culture medium increased the percent of nitric oxide synthase-1 positive cells to 33.9%. Combining retinoic acid (10−6 M) with 8-brom cyclic guanosine monophosphate (10−5 M), the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis demonstrated a further increase of nitric oxide synthase-1 positive cells to 45.4%. Our current results demonstrate a prodifferentiation potency of nitric oxide synthase-1, stimulated by retinoic acid with and without cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Conclusion: We demonstrated for the first time how nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling contributes to the development of neural precursors derived from human embryonic stem cells and enhances the differentiation of precursors toward functional neurons for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:20563304

  6. Plant pathogenic Streptomyces species produce nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in response to host signals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent intercellular signal for defense, development and metabolism in animals and plants. In mammals, highly regulated nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) generate NO. NOS homologs exist in some prokaryotes, but direct evidence for NO production by these proteins has been lacking...

  7. Production of nitric oxide and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in ovarian cystic tumors.

    PubMed

    Nomelini, Rosekeila Simões; de Abreu Ribeiro, Lívia Carolina; Tavares-Murta, Beatriz Martins; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2008-01-01

    Tumor sections from nonneoplastic (n = 15), benign (n = 28), and malignant ovarian tumors (n = 20) were obtained from 63 women. Immunohistochemistry of the tumor sections demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased in ovarian cancer samples compared to nonneoplastic or benign tumor samples. Using the Griess method, nitric oxide (NO) metabolite levels were also found to be elevated in malignant tumor samples compared to benign tumor samples (P < .05). For stage I ovarian cancer, intracystic NO levels >80 microM were more frequent than NO levels <80 microM, and iNOS expression in well-differentiated carcinomas was greater than in moderately/poorly differentiated carcinomas (P < .05). These data suggest an important role for NO in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  8. Production of Nitric Oxide and Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Ovarian Cystic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nomelini, Rosekeila Simões; Ribeiro, Lívia Carolina de Abreu; Tavares-Murta, Beatriz Martins; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2008-01-01

    Tumor sections from nonneoplastic (n = 15), benign (n = 28), and malignant ovarian tumors (n = 20) were obtained from 63 women. Immunohistochemistry of the tumor sections demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased in ovarian cancer samples compared to nonneoplastic or benign tumor samples. Using the Griess method, nitric oxide (NO) metabolite levels were also found to be elevated in malignant tumor samples compared to benign tumor samples (P < .05). For stage I ovarian cancer, intracystic NO levels >80 μM were more frequent than NO levels <80 μM, and iNOS expression in well-differentiated carcinomas was greater than in moderately/poorly differentiated carcinomas (P < .05). These data suggest an important role for NO in ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:19132106

  9. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Cavallaro, Alex; Delalat, Bahman; Harding, Frances J.; McInnes, Steven JP; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vasilev, Krasimir; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

  10. Nitric oxide signalling via cytoskeleton in plants.

    PubMed

    Yemets, Alla I; Krasylenko, Yuliya A; Lytvyn, Dmytro I; Sheremet, Yarina A; Blume, Yaroslav B

    2011-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in plant cell mediates processes of growth and development starting from seed germination to pollination, as well as biotic and abiotic stress tolerance. However, proper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of NO signalling in plants has just begun to emerge. Accumulated evidence suggests that in eukaryotic cells NO regulates functions of proteins by their post-translational modifications, namely tyrosine nitration and S-nitrosylation. Among the candidates for NO-downstream effectors are cytoskeletal proteins because of their involvement in many processes regulated by NO. This review discusses new insights in plant NO signalling focused mainly on the involvement of cytoskeleton components into NO-cascades. Herein, examples of NO-related post-translational modifications of cytoskeletal proteins, and also indirect NO impact, are discussed. Special attention is paid to plant α-tubulin tyrosine nitration as an emerging topic in plant NO research.

  11. The emerging multifaceted roles of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, P C; Schroeder, R A

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly reactive free radical with a multitude of organ specific regulatory functions. Since 1985, NO has been the subject of numerous research efforts and as a result, has been found to play a major role in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immune, and central nervous systems. In addition, deranged NO synthesis is the basis for a number of pathophysiologic states, such as atherosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension, pyloric stenosis, and the hypertension associated with renal failure. Traditional NO donors such as sodium nitroprusside and new pharmacologic NO adducts such as S-nitrosothiols may serve as exogenous sources of NO for the treatment of NO-deficient pathologic states. This review is an attempt to acquaint the surgical community with the fundamentals of NO biochemistry and physiology. Increased knowledge of its functions in normal homeostasis and pathologic states will enable physicians to better understand these disease processes and utilize new pharmacologic therapies. PMID:7717775

  12. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment. PMID:25114633

  13. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  14. Nitric oxide and hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-wu; Han, Cui-hong; Zhang, Pei-xi; Zheng, Juan; Liu, Kan; Sun, Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) refers to the damage to the lungs secondary to exposure to elevated oxygen partial pressure. HALI has been a concern in clinical practice with the development of deep diving and the use of normobaric as well as hyperbaric oxygen in clinical practice. Although the pathogenesis of HALI has been extensively studied, the findings are still controversial. Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger and has been considered as a signaling molecule involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although the role of NO in the occurrence and development of pulmonary diseases including HALI has been extensively studied, the findings on the role of NO in HALI are conflicting. Moreover, inhalation of NO has been approved as a therapeutic strategy for several diseases. In this paper, we briefly summarize the role of NO in the pathogenesis of HALI and the therapeutic potential of inhaled NO in HALI. PMID:27867474

  15. Recent developments in nitric oxide donor drugs

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M R; Megson, I L

    2007-01-01

    During the 1980s, the free radical, nitric oxide (NO), was discovered to be a crucial signalling molecule, with wide-ranging functions in the cardiovascular, nervous and immune systems. Aside from providing a credible explanation for the actions of organic nitrates and sodium nitroprusside that have long been used in the treatment of angina and hypertensive crises respectively, the discovery generated great hopes for new NO-based treatments for a wide variety of ailments. Decades later, however, we are still awaiting novel licensed agents in this arena, despite an enormous research effort to this end. This review explores some of the most promising recent advances in NO donor drug development and addresses the challenges associated with NO as a therapeutic agent. PMID:17401442

  16. Superhydrophobic nitric oxide-releasing xerogels.

    PubMed

    Storm, Wesley L; Youn, Jonghae; Reighard, Katelyn P; Worley, Brittany V; Lodaya, Hetali M; Shin, Jae Ho; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2014-08-01

    Superhydrophobic nitric oxide (NO)-releasing xerogels were prepared by spray-coating a fluorinated silane/silica composite onto N-diazeniumdiolate NO donor-modified xerogels. The thickness of the superhydrophobic layer was used to extend NO release durations from 59 to 105h. The resulting xerogels were stable, maintaining superhydrophobicity for up to 1month (the longest duration tested) when immersed in solution, with no leaching of silica or undesirable fragmentation detected. The combination of superhydrophobicity and NO release reduced viable Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by >2-logs. The killing effect of NO was demonstrated at longer bacterial contact times, with superhydrophobic NO-releasing xerogels resulting in 3.8-log reductions in adhered viable bacteria vs. controls. With no observed toxicity to L929 murine fibroblasts, NO-releasing superhydrophobic membranes may be valuable antibacterial coatings for implants as they both reduce adhesion and kill bacteria that do adhere.

  17. Nitric Oxide Signaling in the Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Buerk, Donald G.; Barbee, Kenneth A.; Jaron, Dov

    2013-01-01

    Several apparent paradoxes are evident when one compares mathematical predictions from models of nitric oxide (NO) diffusion and convection in vasculature structures with experimental measurements of NO (or related metabolites) in animal and human studies. Values for NO predicted from mathematical models are generally much lower than in vivo NO values reported in the literature for experiments, specifically with NO microelectrodes positioned at perivascular locations next to different sizes of blood vessels in the microcirculation and NO electrodes inserted into a wide range of tissues supplied by the microcirculation of each specific organ system under investigation. There continues to be uncertainty about the roles of NO scavenging by hemoglobin versus a storage function that may conserve NO, and other signaling targets for NO need to be considered. This review describes model predictions and relevant experimental data with respect to several signaling pathways in the microcirculation that involve NO. PMID:22196161

  18. Role of nitric oxide in thermotolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Yi; Zhou, Shuo; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Haijun

    2010-01-01

    A tCaM3 is a key factor in heat shock (HS) signal transduction. Nitric oxide (NO) is believed to mediate a variety of resistant reactions against environmental factors. Our experiments indicate that under heat stress NO induces thermotolerance. In order to do so, NO is signal molecule acting upstream of AtCaM3, stimulating the DNA-binding activity of HS transcription factors as well as the accumulation of heat shock proteins. As a novel HS signaling molecule, NO signal pathway is little known and several unexpected results are emerging. Herein we are discussing them and conclude that in order to obtain a more profound understanding of this new role of NO, detailed research will be needed in the future. PMID:21057186

  19. An intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Carroll, M. A.; Mcfarland, M.; Ridley, B. A.; Davis, D. D.; Bradshaw, J.; Rodgers, M. O.; Torres, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results from an intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted at Wallops Island, VA, in July 1983. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence system and two chemiluminescence instruments. The intercomparisons were performed with ambient air at NO mixing ratios ranging from 10 to 60 pptv and NO-enriched ambient air at mixing ratios from 20 to 170 pptv. All instruments sampled from a common manifold. The techniques exhibited a high degree of correlation among themselves and with changes in the NO mixing ratio. Agreement among the three techniques was placed at approximately + or - 30 percent. Within this level of agreement, no artifacts or species interferences were identified.

  20. Nitric oxide generating/releasing materials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hongying; Nacharaju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam; Friedman, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the impressive therapeutic potential of Nitric oxide (NO) remains an ongoing challenge. This paper describes several of the current strategies both with respect to the underlying chemistry and physics and to the applications where they have shown promise. Included in this overview are molecular systems such as NONOates that release NO through chemical reactions and delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles that can generate, store, transport and deliver NO and related bioactive forms of NO such as nitrosothiols. Although there has been much positive movement, it is clear that we are only at the early stages of knowing how to precisely produce, transport and deliver to targeted sites therapeutic levels of NO and related molecules. PMID:26855790

  1. Hypotensive effect of hydroxylamine, an endogenous nitric oxide donor and SSAO inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; Medina, M

    2007-01-01

    The endogenous compound hydroxylamine relaxes vascular smooth muscle in vitro, apparently through conversion to the vasodilator factor nitric oxide, but its effect on blood pressure has not been characterized. We found that in the anesthetized rat the amine elicits dose-related hypotension when administered by continuous iv infusion. In experiments designed to explore the mechanism of this effect, hydroxylamine was compared with the nitric oxide donor nitroprusside and the direct-acting vasodilator hydralazine, using pretreatments known to modify diverse mechanisms of vasodilation. Hydroxylamine hypotension was enhanced by the SSAO inhibitor isoniazid and the SSAO substrate methylamine, a pattern shared by hydralazine. Responses were blocked by the guanylate cyclase inhibitor methylene blue and were increased by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, a pattern shared by nitroprusside. It was concluded that hydroxylamine exerts hypotension partly through conversion to nitric oxide and partly by a "hydralazine-like" mechanism involving SSAO inhibition.

  2. Nitric oxide, human diseases and the herbal products that affect the nitric oxide signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Achike, Francis I; Kwan, Chiu-Yin

    2003-09-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) is formed enzymatically from l-arginine in the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Nitric oxide is generated constitutively in endothelial cells via sheer stress and blood-borne substances. Nitric oxide is also generated constitutively in neuronal cells and serves as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic nerve endings. Furthermore, NO can also be formed via enzyme induction in many tissues in the presence of cytokines. 2. The ubiquitous presence of NO in the living body suggests that NO plays an important role in the maintenance of health. Being a free radical with vasodilatory properties, NO exerts dual effects on tissues and cells in various biological systems. At low concentrations, NO can dilate the blood vessels and improve the circulation, but at high concentrations it can cause circulatory shock and induce cell death. Thus, diseases can arise in the presence of the extreme ends of the physiological concentrations of NO. 3. The NO signalling pathway has, in recent years, become a target for new drug development. The high level of flavonoids, catechins, tannins and other polyphenolic compounds present in vegetables, fruits, soy, tea and even red wine (from grapes) is believed to contribute to their beneficial health effects. Some of these compounds induce NO formation from the endothelial cells to improve circulation and some suppress the induction of inducible NOS in inflammation and infection. 4. Many botanical medicinal herbs and drugs derived from these herbs have been shown to have effects on the NO signalling pathway. For example, the saponins from ginseng, ginsenosides, have been shown to relax blood vessels (probably contributing to the antifatigue and blood pressure-lowering effects of ginseng) and corpus cavernosum (thus, for the treatment of men suffering from erectile dysfunction; however, the legendary aphrodisiac effect of ginseng may be an overstatement). Many plant extracts or

  3. Antenatal Insults Modify Newborn Olfactory Function By Nitric Oxide Produced From Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Yu, Lei; Yang, Yirong; Khalid, Syed; Luo, Kehuan; Jiang, Rugang; Ji, Haitao; Derrick, Matthew; Kay, Leslie; Silverman, Richard B.; Tan, Sidhartha

    2012-01-01

    Newborn feeding, maternal, bonding, growth and wellbeing depend upon intact odor recognition in the early postnatal period. Antenatal stress may affect postnatal odor recognition. We investigated the exact role of a neurotransmitter, nitric oxide (NO), in newborn olfactory function. We hypothesized that olfactory neuron activity depended on NO generated by neuronal NO synthase (NOS). Utilizing in vivo functional manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in a rabbit model of cerebral palsy we had shown previously that in utero hypoxia ischemia (H-I) at E22 (70% gestation) resulted in impaired postnatal response to odorants and poor feeding. With the same antenatal insult, we manipulated NO levels in the olfactory neuron in postnatal day 1 (P1) kits by administration of intranasal NO donors or a highly selective nNOS inhibitor. Olfactory function was quantitatively measured by the response to amyl acetate stimulation by MEMRI. The relevance of nNOS to normal olfactory development was confirmed by the increase of nNOS gene expression from fetal ages to P1 in olfactory epithelium and bulbs. In control kits, nNOS inhibition decreased NO production in the olfactory system and increased MEMRI slope enhancement. In H-I kits the MEMRI slope did not increase, implicating modification of endogenous NO-mediated olfactory function by the antenatal insult. NO donors as a source of exogenous NO did not significantly change function in either group. In conclusion, olfactory epithelium nNOS in newborn rabbits probably modulates olfactory signal transduction. Antenatal H-I injury remote from delivery may affect early functional development of the olfactory system by decreasing NO-dependent signal transduction. PMID:22836143

  4. Nitric oxide synthesis and signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ian D; Neill, Steven J; Hancock, John T

    2008-05-01

    As with all organisms, plants must respond to a plethora of external environmental cues. Individual plant cells must also perceive and respond to a wide range of internal signals. It is now well-accepted that nitric oxide (NO) is a component of the repertoire of signals that a plant uses to both thrive and survive. Recent experimental data have shown, or at least implicated, the involvement of NO in reproductive processes, control of development and in the regulation of physiological responses such as stomatal closure. However, although studies concerning NO synthesis and signalling in animals are well-advanced, in plants there are still fundamental questions concerning how NO is produced and used that need to be answered. For example, there is a range of potential NO-generating enzymes in plants, but no obvious plant nitric oxide synthase (NOS) homolog has yet been identified. Some studies have shown the importance of NOS-like enzymes in mediating NO responses in plants, while other studies suggest that the enzyme nitrate reductase (NR) is more important. Still, more published work suggests the involvement of completely different enzymes in plant NO synthesis. Similarly, it is not always clear how NO mediates its responses. Although it appears that in plants, as in animals, NO can lead to an increase in the signal cGMP which leads to altered ion channel activity and gene expression, it is not understood how this actually occurs. NO is a relatively reactive compound, and it is not always easy to study. Furthermore, its biological activity needs to be considered in conjunction with that of other compounds such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can have a profound effect on both its accumulation and function. In this paper, we will review the present understanding of how NO is produced in plants, how it is removed when its signal is no longer required and how it may be both perceived and acted upon.

  5. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release: activation of type 1 ryanodine receptor by endogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1.

  6. [Nitric oxide and anti-protozoan chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2004-06-01

    Constitutive nitric oxide (NO) is generated by constitutively expressed types of NO-synthase enzymes (NOS-I and -III), being involved in physiological processes such as nervous transmission and vasodilatation. Inducible NO, synthesized by the NO-synthase isoform NOS-II, is an anti-pathogen and tumoricidal agent. However, inducible NO production requires a tight control because of cytotoxic and immune-modulation activity. NO produced by human and canine macrophages has long been demonstrated to be involved in the intracellular killing of Leishmania. Mechanisms of parasite survival and persistence in the host have been throughly investigated, and include suppression of NOS-II and the parasite entry into NOS-II negative cells. Both intracellular and extracellular morphotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi are killed by NO in vitro and in vivo, although a role of NO in the pathogenesis of heart disease has been reported. Killing of extracellular protozoa such as Trichomonas vaginalis and Naegleria fowleri by activated macrophages is also mediated by NO. The main control of Plasmodium spp infection in human and murine hepatocytes, and in human monocytes is achieved by NO-mediated mechanisms. Protection from severe malaria in African children has been found associated with polymorphisms of the NOS-II promoter; however, a pathogenic role of endogenous NO has been documented in cerebral malaria. Although several macromolecules are putative NO targets, recent experimental work has shown that NO-releasing compounds inhibit cysteine proteases (CP) of P. falciparum, T. cruzi and L. infantum in a dose-dependent manner. CPs are present in a wide range of parasitic protozoa and appear to be relevant in several aspects of the life cycle and of the parasite-host relationships. Comparative analysis of 3-D amino acid sequence models of CPs from a broad range of living organisms, from viruses to mammals, suggests that the Sy atom of the Cys catalytic residue undergoes NO-dependent chemical

  7. The role of nitric oxide in experimental cerulein induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Um, Soon Ho; Kwon, Yong Dae; Kim, Chang Duck; Lee, Hong Sik; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Jae Hyun; Ryu, Ho Sang; Hyun, Jin Hai

    2003-08-01

    An enhanced formation of nitric oxide (NO), due to the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of shock and inflammation, but its role in acute pancreatitis still remains controversial. To clarify the role of NO in acute pancreatitis, the present experiment investigated the expression of iNOS and the effect of NOS inhibition on cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. Group I received intraperitoneal (ip) injection of normal saline. Group II received two ip injections of cerulein (20 microgram/kg). Group III received injections of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (30 mg/kg) with cerulein. Group IV received L-arginine (250 mg/kg) with cerulein and L-NAME. The expression of iNOS in the pancreas was examined by western blot analysis. The plasma concentration of NO metabolites was measured. The severity of pancreatitis was assessed by measuring serum amylase, pancreas water content and histopathological examination. Compared with controls, the cerulein group displayed significantly increased expression of iNOS and raised plasma NO metabolites. Treatment with L-NAME significantly decreased hyperamylasemia, plasma NO level, and the extent of pancreatic injury. Treatment with L-arginine reversed the effects of L-NAME. These findings suggest that an enhanced formation of NO by iNOS plays an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis, and inhibition of NO production has the beneficial effects in reducing pancreas injury.

  8. Mitochondrial nitric oxide metabolism in rat muscle during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Silvia; Boveris, Alberto

    2004-11-01

    In this study, heart and diaphragm mitochondria produced 0.69 and 0.77 nmol nitric oxide (NO)/min mg protein, rates that account for 67 and 24% of maximal cellular NO production, respectively. Endotoxemia and septic shock occur with an exacerbated inflammatory response that damages tissue mitochondria. Skeletal muscle seems to be one of the main target organs in septic shock, showing an increased NO production and early oxidative stress. The kinetic properties of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS) of heart and diaphragm were determined. For diaphragm, the KM values for O2 and L-Arg were 4.6 and 37 microM and for heart were 3.3 and 36 microM. The optimal pH for mtNOS activity was 6.5 for diaphragm and 7.0 for heart. A marked increase in mtNOS activity was observed in endotoxemic rats, 90% in diaphragm and 30% in heart. Diaphragm and heart mitochondrial O2*- and H2O2 production were 2- to 3-fold increased during endotoxemia and Mn-SOD activity showed a 2-fold increase in treated animals, whereas catalase activity was unchanged. One of the current hypotheses for the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex condition of septic shock is that the enhanced NO production by mtNOS leads to excessive peroxynitrite production and protein nitration in the mitochondrial matrix, causing mitochondrial dysfunction and contractile failure.

  9. Analytical techniques for assaying nitric oxide bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Parthasarathy, Deepa; Torregrossa, Ashley C; Mian, Asad; Bryan, Nathan S

    2012-06-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a diatomic free radical that is extremely short lived in biological systems (less than 1 second in circulating blood). NO may be considered one of the most important signaling molecules produced in our body, regulating essential functions including but not limited to regulation of blood pressure, immune response and neural communication. Therefore its accurate detection and quantification in biological matrices is critical to understanding the role of NO in health and disease. With such a short physiological half life of NO, alternative strategies for the detection of reaction products of NO biochemistry have been developed. The quantification of relevant NO metabolites in multiple biological compartments provides valuable information with regards to in vivo NO production, bioavailability and metabolism. Simply sampling a single compartment such as blood or plasma may not always provide an accurate assessment of whole body NO status, particularly in tissues. The ability to compare blood with select tissues in experimental animals will help bridge the gap between basic science and clinical medicine as far as diagnostic and prognostic utility of NO biomarkers in health and disease. Therefore, extrapolation of plasma or blood NO status to specific tissues of interest is no longer a valid approach. As a result, methods continue to be developed and validated which allow the detection and quantification of NO and NO-related products/metabolites in multiple compartments of experimental animals in vivo. The established paradigm of NO biochemistry from production by NO synthases to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to eventual oxidation to nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) may only represent part of NO's effects in vivo. The interaction of NO and NO-derived metabolites with protein thiols, secondary amines, and metals to form S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs), N-nitrosamines (RNNOs), and nitrosyl-heme respectively represent c

  10. Nitric oxide scavengers differentially inhibit ammonia oxidation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Laura A; Ross, Ashley A; Neufeld, Josh D

    2016-04-01

    Differential inhibitors are important for measuring the relative contributions of microbial groups, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), to biogeochemical processes in environmental samples. In particular, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) represents a nitric oxide scavenger used for the specific inhibition of AOA, implicating nitric oxide as an intermediate of thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation. This study investigated four alternative nitric oxide scavengers for their ability to differentially inhibit AOA and AOB in comparison to PTIO. Caffeic acid, curcumin, methylene blue hydrate and trolox were tested onNitrosopumilus maritimus, two unpublished AOA representatives (AOA-6f and AOA-G6) as well as the AOB representative Nitrosomonas europaea All four scavengers inhibited ammonia oxidation by AOA at lower concentrations than for AOB. In particular, differential inhibition of AOA and AOB by caffeic acid (100 μM) and methylene blue hydrate (3 μM) was comparable to carboxy-PTIO (100 μM) in pure and enrichment culture incubations. However, when added to aquarium sponge biofilm microcosms, both scavengers were unable to inhibit ammonia oxidation consistently, likely due to degradation of the inhibitors themselves. This study provides evidence that a variety of nitric oxide scavengers result in differential inhibition of ammonia oxidation in AOA and AOB, and provides support to the proposed role of nitric oxide as a key intermediate in the thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation pathway.

  11. The oral microbiome and nitric oxide homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hezel, M P; Weitzberg, E

    2015-01-01

    The tiny radical nitric oxide (NO) participates in a vast number of physiological functions including vasodilation, nerve transmission, host defence and cellular energetics. Classically produced by a family of specific enzymes, NO synthases (NOSs), NO signals via reactions with other radicals or transition metals. An alternative pathway for the generation of NO is the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway in which the inorganic anions nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) are reduced to NO and other reactive nitrogen intermediates. Nitrate and nitrite are oxidation products from NOS-dependent NO generation but also constituents in our diet, mainly in leafy green vegetables. Irrespective of origin, active uptake of circulating nitrate in the salivary glands, excretion in saliva and subsequent reduction to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria are all necessary steps for further NO generation. This central role of the oral cavity in regulating NO generation from nitrate presents a new and intriguing aspect of the human microbiome in health and disease. In this review, we present recent advances in our understanding of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway and specifically highlight the importance of the oral cavity as a hub for its function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Biomimetic and microbial reduction of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, W.T.; Le, U.; Ronda, S.

    1995-12-31

    The biomimetic reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) by dithiothreitol in the presence of cyanocobalamin and cobalt-centered porphyrins has been investigated. Reactions were monitored directly using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy vapor-phase spectra. Reaction rates were twofold faster for the corrin than for the cobalt-centered porphyrins. The stoichiometry showed the loss of two molecules of NO per molecule of N{sub 2}O produced. We have also demonstrated that the facultative anaerobe and chemoautotroph, Thiobacillus denitrificans, can be cultured anoxically in batch reactors using NO as a terminal electron acceptor with reduction to elemental nitrogen (N{sub 2}). We have proposed that the concentrated stream of NO{sub x}, as obtained from certain regenerable processes for the gas desulfurization and NO{sub x} removal, could be converted to N{sub 2} for disposal by contact with a culture of T. denitrificans. Four heterotrophic bacteria have also been identified that may be grown in batch cultures with succinate, yeast extract, or heat and alkali pretreated sewage sludge as carbon and energy sources and NO as a terminal electron acceptor. These are Paracoccus dentrificans, Pseudomonas denitrificans, Alcaligens denitrificans, and Thiophaera pantotropha.

  13. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  14. Nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide alterations in chronically stressed rats: a model for nitric oxide in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang-Feng; Lu, Yun-Rong; Shi, Li-Gen; Wu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Bo; Fu, Xin-Yan; Luo, Jian-Hong; Bao, Ai-Min

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and NO synthase-1 (NOS1) are involved in the stress response and in depression. We compared NOS-NO alterations in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) with alterations in major depressive disorder (MDD) in humans. In the hypothalamus of male CUS rats we determined NOS activity, and in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) we determined NOS1-immunoreactive (ir) cell densities and co-localization of NOS1 with stress-related neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OXT). We measured plasma NO levels and cortisol in male medicine-naïve MDD patients and plasma NO and corticosterone (CORT) in CUS rats. In the CUS rat total NOS activity in the hypothalamus (P=0.018) and NOS1-ir cell density in the PVN were both significantly decreased (P=0.018), while NOS1 staining was mainly expressed in OXT-ir neurons in this nucleus. Interestingly, plasma NO levels were significantly increased both in male CUS rats (P=0.001) and in male MDD patients (P<0.001). Plasma CORT levels were increased in male CUS rats (P=0.001), while male MDD patients did not show a significant change in cortisol levels. In conclusion, the changes in plasma and hypothalamic NOS-NO of CUS rats and MDD were similar. The male CUS rat model may thus help us with our investigation of the mechanism underlying NOS-NO alterations in depression.

  15. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Dendrimers as Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Slomberg, Danielle L.; Chudasama, Shalini L.; Lu, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of a series of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers was evaluated against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A direct comparison of the bactericidal efficacy between NO-releasing and control PPI dendrimers (i.e., non-NO-releasing) revealed both enhanced biocidal action of NO-releasing dendrimers and reduced toxicity against mammalian fibroblast cells. Antibacterial activity for the NO donor-functionalized PPI dendrimers was shown to be a function of both dendrimer size (molecular weight) and exterior functionality. In addition to minimal toxicity against fibroblasts, NO-releasing PPI dendrimers modified with styrene oxide exhibited the greatest biocidal activity (≥9.999% killing) against all bacterial strains tested. The N-diazeniumdiolate NO donor-functionalized PPI dendrimers presented in this study hold promise as effective NO-based therapeutics for combating bacterial infections. PMID:23013537

  16. Nitric oxide signalling: insect brains and photocytes.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Barry A; Aprille, June; Modica-Napolitano, Josephine

    2004-01-01

    The success of insects arises partly from extraordinary biochemical and physiological specializations. For example, most species lack glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and respiratory-gas transport proteins and thus allow oxygen to diffuse directly into cells. To counter the increased potential for oxidative damage, insect tissues rely on the indirect protection of the thioredoxin reductase pathway to maintain redox homoeostasis. Such specializations must impact on the control of reactive oxygen species and free radicals such as the signalling molecule NO. This chapter focuses on NO signalling in the insect central nervous system and in the light-producing lantern of the firefly. It is shown that neural NO production is coupled to both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The NO-mediated increase in cGMP evokes changes in spike activity of neurons controlling the gut and body wall musculature. In addition, maps of NO-producing and -responsive neurons make insects useful models for establishing the range and specificity of NO's actions in the central nervous system. The firefly lantern also provides insight into the interplay of tissue anatomy and cellular biochemistry in NO signalling. In the lantern, nitric oxide synthase is expressed in tracheal end cells that are interposed between neuron terminals and photocytes. Exogenous NO can activate light production and NO scavengers block evoked flashes. NO inhibits respiration in isolated lantern mitochondria and this can be reversed by bright light. It is proposed that NO controls flashes by transiently inhibiting oxygen consumption and permitting direct oxidation of activated luciferin. It is possible that light production itself contributes to the restoration of mitochondrial activity and consequent cessation of the flash.

  17. Atmospheric application of trace amounts of nitric oxide enhances tolerance to salt stress and improves nutritional quality in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Du, Shao-Ting; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Ran-Ran

    2015-04-15

    The increased salinity in greenhouses has become a problem of great concern. In this study, it was observed that the salt-induced oxidative damages (indicated by MDA, H2O2 and antioxidant enzymes, including POD, SOD and CAT) could be alleviated by application of NO gas. Consequently, although both photosynthesis and growth in plants were inhibited by NaCl stress, they were restored by NO gas application, and the fresh and dry biomasses of edible parts increased by 60% and 27% over NaCl stress treatment, respectively. Furthermore, gaseous NO application also significantly elevated the levels of several antioxidation-associated compounds such as proline, ascorbate, glutathione, total phenolics and flavonoids, as well as the total antioxidant capacity (indicated by DPPH scavenging activity) in NaCl-treated plants. Keeping in mind all of the above, we concluded that atmospheric application of trace amounts of nitric oxide gas could be an effective strategy for improving both biomass production and nutrition quality in spinach under salt stress.

  18. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  19. Piper sarmentosum increases nitric oxide production in oxidative stress: a study on human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ugusman, Azizah; Zakaria, Zaiton; Hui, Chua Kien; Nordin, Nor Anita Megat Mohd

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) possesses multiple anti-atherosclerotic properties. Hence, enhanced expression of eNOS and increased Nitric oxide levels may protect against the development of atherosclerosis. Piper sarmentosum is a tropical plant with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper sarmentosum on the eNOS and Nitric oxide pathway in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECS WERE DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS: control, treatment with 180 microM hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), treatment with 150 microg/mL aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum, and concomitant treatment with aqueous extract of PS and H(2)O(2) for 24 hours. Subsequently, HUVECs were harvested and eNOS mRNA expression was determined using qPCR. The eNOS protein level was measured using ELISA, and the eNOS activity and Nitric oxide level were determined by the Griess reaction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum showed a marked induction of Nitric oxide. Treatment with PS also resulted in increased eNOS mRNA expression, eNOS protein level and eNOS activity in HUVECs. Aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum may improve endothelial function by promoting NO production in HUVECs.

  20. Role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    PubMed

    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2000-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation induced in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by high-frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. The nitric oxide scavenger [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide ] and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester were administered before and after induction of potentiation. Both drugs completely prevented long-term potentiation, whereas they did not impede the potentiation build-up, or affect the already established potentiation. These results demonstrate that the induction, but not the maintenance of vestibular long-term potentiation, depends on the synthesis and release into the extracellular medium of nitric oxide. In addition, we analysed the effect of the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside on vestibular responses. Sodium nitroprusside induced long-term potentiation, as evidenced through the field potential enhancement and unit peak latency decrease. This potentiation was impeded by D, L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, and was reduced under blockade of synaptosomal platelet-activating factor receptors by ginkgolide B and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors by (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid. When reduced, potentiation fully developed following the washout of antagonist, demonstrating an involvement of platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in its full development. Potentiation induced by sodium nitroprusside was also associated with a decrease in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio, which persisted under ginkgolide B, indicating that nitric oxide increases glutamate release independently of platelet-activating factor-mediated presynaptic events. We suggest that nitric oxide, released after the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, acts as a retrograde messenger leading to an enhancement of glutamate release to a

  1. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  4. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  5. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  6. Calculated Effects of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karen E.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    1995-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the NASA Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. The study was conducted for standard facility conditions corresponding to Mach 6, 7, and 8 flight simulations. The analytically determined levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility are compared with experimentally measured levels. Results of the analysis indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, which corroborates the measured levels. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate how nitric oxide affects scramjet performance in terms of combustor pressure rise, heat release, and thrust performance. Results indicate minimal effects on engine performance for the test conditions of this investigation.

  7. Detection of nitric oxide by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-07-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges of detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different from those of transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems.

  8. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Coxiella burnetii Replication and Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Dale; Barrows, Lorraine F.; Lindstrom, Nicole M.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a recognized cytotoxic effector against facultative and obligate intracellular bacteria. This study examined the effect of nitric oxide produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) up-regulated in response to cytokine stimulation, or by a synthetic nitric oxide donor, on replication of obligately intracellular Coxiella burnetii in murine L-929 cells. Immunoblotting and nitrite assays revealed that C. burnetii infection of L-929 cells augments expression of iNOS up-regulated in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Infection in the absence of cytokine stimulation did not result in demonstrable up-regulation of iNOS expression or in increased nitrite production. Nitrite production by cytokine-treated cells was significantly inhibited by the iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea (SMT). Treatment of infected cells with IFN-γ and TNF-α or the synthetic nitric oxide donor 2,2′-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (DETA/NONOate) had a bacteriostatic effect on C. burnetii replication. Inhibition of replication was reversed upon addition of SMT to the culture medium of cytokine-treated cells. Microscopic analysis of infected cells revealed that nitric oxide (either cytokine induced or donor derived) inhibited formation of the mature (large) parasitophorous vacuole that is characteristic of C. burnetii infection of host cells. Instead, exposure of infected cells to nitric oxide resulted in the formation of multiple small, acidic vacuoles usually containing one C. burnetii cell. Removal of nitrosative stress resulted in the coalescence of small vacuoles to form a large vacuole harboring multiple C. burnetii cells. These experiments demonstrate that nitric oxide reversibly inhibits replication of C. burnetii and formation of the parasitophorous vacuole. PMID:12183564

  9. Measurements of nitric oxide after a nuclear burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghan, M.; Shaw, A.; Megill, L. R.; Sedlacek, W.; Guthals, P. R.; Fowler, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of ozone and nitric oxide in a nuclear cloud 7 days after the explosion are reported. No measurable increase above ambient density of either ozone or nitric oxide was found. Results from a chemistry model of the cloud do not agree with the measurement unless 'nonstandard' assumptions are made with regard to the operating chemical processes. A number of possible explanations of the results are discussed.

  10. Nitric oxide is required for tactile learning in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J D; Bonaventura, J; Kohm, A P

    1994-06-22

    Nitric oxide, produced by nitric oxide synthase in brain tissue, is essential for several different kinds of learning in vertebrates. We present the first evidence that it is also essential for learning in an invertebrate. Intramuscular injections of an inhibitor of the enzyme completely block touch learning in Octopus vulgaris. Eight control animals learned a touch paradigm, but none of eight synthase-inhibited ones learned it.

  11. Effects of nitric oxide on stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuchen; Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    2015-12-01

    The use of stem cells as a research tool and a therapeutic vehicle has demonstrated their great potential in the treatment of various diseases. With unveiling of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) universally present at various levels in nearly all types of body tissues, the potential therapeutic implication of nitric oxide (NO) has been magnified, and thus scientists have explored new treatment strategies involved with stem cells and NO against various diseases. As the functionality of NO encompasses cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems, NO is involved in stem cell differentiation, epigenetic regulation and immune suppression. Stem cells trigger cellular responses to external signals on the basis of both NO specific pathways and concerted action with endogenous compounds including stem cell regulators. As potency and interaction of NO with stem cells generally depend on the concentrations of NO and the presence of the cofactors at the active site, the suitable carriers for NO delivery is integral for exerting maximal efficacy of stem cells. The innovative utilization of NO functionality and involved mechanisms would invariably alter the paradigm of therapeutic application of stem cells. Future prospects in NO-involved stem cell research which promises to enhance drug discovery efforts by opening new era to improve drug efficacy, reduce drug toxicity and understand disease mechanisms and pathways, were also addressed.

  12. Applications of plasma sources for nitric oxide medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilets, Victor; Shekhter, Anatoly; Pekshev, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has important roles in the function of many tissues and organs. Wound healing processes are always accompanying by the increase of nitric oxide concentration in wound tissue. These facts suggest a possible therapeutic use of various NO donors for the acceleration of the wound healing and treatment of other diseases. Our previous studies indicated that gaseous NO flow produced by air-plasma generators acts beneficially on the wound healing. This beneficial effect could be caused by the mechanism involving peroxynitrite as an intermediate. As a result of mobilization of various antioxidant reactions more endogenous NO molecules become available as signaling molecules. to regulate the metabolic processes in wound tissue. In this paper different air plasma sources generated therapeutic concentrations of NO are discussed. The concentration of NO and other therapeutically important gas products are estimated by thermodynamic simulation. Synergy effects of NO with other plasma components are discussed as a factor enhancing therapeutic results. Some new medical application of plasma devices are presented. Advanced Plasma Therapies Inc.

  13. Nitric oxide transport in an axisymmetric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Xu, X Yun; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-10-07

    To test the hypothesis that disturbed flow can impede the transport of nitric oxide (NO) in the artery and hence induce atherogenesis, we used a lumen-wall model of an idealized arterial stenosis with NO produced at the blood vessel-wall interface to study the transport of NO in the stenosis. Blood flows in the lumen and through the arterial wall were simulated by Navier-Stokes equations and Darcy's Law, respectively. Meanwhile, the transport of NO in the lumen and the transport of NO within the arterial wall were modelled by advection-diffusion reaction equations. Coupling of fluid dynamics at the endothelium was achieved by the Kedem-Katchalsky equations. The results showed that both the hydraulic conductivity of the endothelium and the non-Newtonian viscous behaviour of blood had little effect on the distribution of NO. However, the blood flow rate, stenosis severity, red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-free layer and NO production rate at the blood vessel-wall interface could significantly affect the transport of NO. The theoretical study revealed that the transport of NO was significantly hindered in the disturbed flow region distal to the stenosis. The reduced NO concentration in the disturbed flow region might play an important role in the localized genesis and development of atherosclerosis.

  14. Nasal nitric oxide in unilateral sinus disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tseng, Hsiao-Jung; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Chen, Yi-Wei; Lee, Ta-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Unilateral sinus disease (USD) can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose before surgery. The application of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) for USD diagnosis and its surgical outcome in USD has not been reported in the literature. We prospectively enrolled sixty-six USD patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for fungal rhinosinusitis (n = 19), chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) without nasal polyps (n = 13), CRS with nasal polyps (n = 12) and sinonasal mass lesions (n = 22). nNO levels were measured preoperatively and at three and six months postoperatively. Correlations between nNO levels and potential clinical parameters, type of disease, disease severity, and disease-related quality of life (QOL) were assessed. Unlike bilateral CRS, in USD, nNO levels did not correlate with disease severity or postoperative QOL improvements. Except for fungus group, there were no differences in nNO levels between lesion and non-lesion sides in all the other groups. nNO levels on both sides were significantly elevated six months postoperatively in all groups. Fungal rhinosinusitis patients had the lowest preoperative nNO levels, and a cutoff of 239.3 ppb had the best sensitivity (79.0%) and specificity (87.2%) for preoperative diagnosis. While preoperative nNO levels cannot serve as an alternative marker for disease severity of USD, they were lower in fungal rhinosinusitis patients than in other USD patients and may be useful for more accurate diagnosis prior to surgery. PMID:28199369

  15. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-09

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  16. Effects of nitric oxide in mucociliary transport.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Eleonora Elisia Abra; Pinge, Marli Cardoso Martins; Andrade Neto, Otavio André; Pessoa, Nathália Gardin

    2009-01-01

    The airways are made up of ciliated epithelium which secretes mucous, protecting the respiratory tract from particles inhaled during breathing. Its is paramount to understand the physiology and the mechanisms involved in mucociliary activity. Literature suggests that Nitric oxide (NO), especially the one produced by iNOS expression, maintains the mucociliary function and the immune defense of the nasal cavity. to assess NO participation and the enzymatic pathways in the production of NO and mucociliary transport, using constructive and inductive NO synthetase inhibitors, L-NAME and aminoguanidine, respectively. frog palates were prepared and immersed in ringer (control), L-NAME or aminoguanidine solutions. The palates were immersed in these solutions for four periods of 15 minutes. Mucociliary transport measures were carried out before and after each exposure. control palates maintained stable their transportation speed. L-NAME increased, while aminoguanidine reduced mucous transportation velocity. unspecific cNOS block with L-NAME and relatively specific iNOS block with aminoguanidine results leads us to propose that depending on the pathway, the NO can increase or reduce mucociliary transport in frog palates.

  17. Nitric oxide and teratogenesis: an update.

    PubMed

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Ponzano, Adalisa

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), generated by NO synthase (NOS) enzymes, is an important bioactive molecule involved in the regulation of several biological phenomena that are crucial for organogenesis, including gene expression, cell growth, matrix remolding, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The expression of NOS isoforms in embryonic tissues is temporally and spatially regulated, and disruption of endogenous NO can lead to developmental defects. Maternal treatment with pan NOS inhibitors during early organogenesis caused severe malformations of the axial skeleton. In utero exposure during the fetal period induced limb reduction defects of vascular origin. Knock-out mice have been used to define the role of the various NOS isoforms on the origin of the abnormal development. Cardiovascular malformations, limb reduction defects, reduced growth and reduced survival have been observed in knock-out mice with targeted disruption of endothelial NOS (eNOS). Limited morphological changes were observed in mice lacking inducible NOS (iNOS) or neuronal NOS n(NOS). Results obtained with in vitro studies suggest that optimal levels of NO are required for neural tube closure. Disregulation of NO production was also recently proposed as a contributing mechanism in the origin of malformations associated with exposure to known environmental teratogens, such as valproic acid, thalidomide, copper deficiency, and diabetes.

  18. Modulation of nitric oxide bioavailability by erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Tse; Han, Tae H.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Vaughn, Mark W.; van Herle, Helga; Hein, Travis W.; Zhang, Cuihua; Kuo, Lih; Liao, James C.

    2001-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) activates soluble guanylyl cyclase in smooth muscle cells to induce vasodilation in the vasculature. However, as hemoglobin (Hb) is an effective scavenger of NO and is present in high concentrations inside the red blood cell (RBC), the bioavailability of NO would be too low to elicit soluble guanylyl cyclase activation in the presence of blood. Therefore, NO bioactivity must be preserved. Here we present evidence suggesting that the RBC participates in the preservation of NO bioactivity by reducing NO influx. The NO uptake by RBCs was increased and decreased by altering the degree of band 3 binding to the cytoskeleton. Methemoglobin and denatured hemoglobin binding to the RBC membrane or cytoskeleton also were shown to contribute to reducing the NO uptake rate of the RBC. These alterations in NO uptake by the RBC, hence the NO bioavailability, were determined to correlate with the vasodilation of isolated blood vessels. Our observations suggest that RBC membrane and cytoskeleton associated NO-inert proteins provide a barrier for NO diffusion and thus account for the reduction in the NO uptake rate of RBCs.

  19. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in the myocard.

    PubMed

    Buchwalow, I B; Schulze, W; Karczewski, P; Kostic, M M; Wallukat, G; Morwinski, R; Krause, E G; Müller, J; Paul, M; Slezak, J; Luft, F C; Haller, H

    2001-01-01

    Recognition of significance of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) in cardiovascular regulations has led to intensive research and development of therapies focused on NOS as potential therapeutic targets. However, the NOS isoform profile of cardiac tissue and subcellular localization of NOS isoforms remain a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of an inducible NOS isoform (NOS2) in cardiomyocytes. Employing a novel immunocytochemical technique of a catalyzed reporter deposition system with tyramide and electron microscopical immunocytochemistry complemented with Western blotting and RT-PCR, we detected NOS2 both in rat neonatal and adult cultured cardiomyocytes and in the normal myocard of adult rats as well as in the human myocard of patients with dilative cardiomyopathy. NOS2 was targeted predominantly to a particulate component of the cardiomyocyte--along contractile fibers, in the plasma membrane including T-tubules, as well as in the nuclear envelope, mitochondria and Golgi complex. Our results point to an involvement of NOS2 in maintaining cardiac homeostasis and contradict to the notion that NOS2 is expressed in cardiac tissue only in response to various physiological and pathogenic factors. NOS2 targeting to mitochondria and contractile fibers suggests a relationship of NO with contractile function and energy production in the cardiac muscle.

  20. Structures of human constitutive nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiying; Jamal, Joumana; Plaza, Carla; Pineda, Stephanie Hai; Chreifi, Georges; Jing, Qing; Cinelli, Maris A.; Silverman, Richard B.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals produce three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS): neuronal NOS (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The overproduction of NO by nNOS is associated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders; therefore, a desirable therapeutic goal is the design of drugs that target nNOS but not the other isoforms. Crystallography, coupled with computational approaches and medicinal chemistry, has played a critical role in developing highly selective nNOS inhibitors that exhibit exceptional neuroprotective properties. For historic reasons, crystallography has focused on rat nNOS and bovine eNOS because these were available in high quality; thus, their structures have been used in structure–activity–relationship studies. Although these constitutive NOSs share more than 90% sequence identity across mammalian species for each NOS isoform, inhibitor-binding studies revealed that subtle differences near the heme active site in the same NOS isoform across species still impact enzyme–inhibitor interactions. Therefore, structures of the human constitutive NOSs are indispensible. Here, the first structure of human neuronal NOS at 2.03 Å resolution is reported and a different crystal form of human endothelial NOS is reported at 1.73 Å resolution. PMID:25286850

  1. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs). Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry. PMID:24278729

  2. Nitric oxide reduces seed dormancy in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Paul C; Libourel, Igor G L; Jones, Russell L

    2006-01-01

    Dormancy is a property of many mature seeds, and experimentation over the past century has identified numerous chemical treatments that will reduce seed dormancy. Nitrogen-containing compounds including nitrate, nitrite, and cyanide break seed dormancy in a range of species. Experiments are described here that were carried out to further our understanding of the mechanism whereby these and other compounds, such as the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), bring about a reduction in seed dormancy of Arabidopsis thaliana. A simple method was devised for applying the products of SNP photolysis through the gas phase. Using this approach it was shown that SNP, as well as potassium ferricyanide (Fe(III)CN) and potassium ferrocyanide (Fe(II)CN), reduced dormancy of Arabidopsis seeds by generating cyanide (CN). The effects of potassium cyanide (KCN) on dormant seeds were tested and it was confirmed that cyanide vapours were sufficient to break Arabidopsis seed dormancy. Nitrate and nitrite also reduced Arabidopsis seed dormancy and resulted in substantial rates of germination. The effects of CN, nitrite, and nitrate on dormancy were prevented by the NO scavenger c-PTIO. It was confirmed that NO plays a role in reducing seed dormancy by using purified NO gas, and a model to explain how nitrogen-containing compounds may break dormancy in Arabidopsis is presented.

  3. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  4. Nitric oxide transport in an axisymmetric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Xu, X. Yun; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that disturbed flow can impede the transport of nitric oxide (NO) in the artery and hence induce atherogenesis, we used a lumen–wall model of an idealized arterial stenosis with NO produced at the blood vessel–wall interface to study the transport of NO in the stenosis. Blood flows in the lumen and through the arterial wall were simulated by Navier–Stokes equations and Darcy's Law, respectively. Meanwhile, the transport of NO in the lumen and the transport of NO within the arterial wall were modelled by advection–diffusion reaction equations. Coupling of fluid dynamics at the endothelium was achieved by the Kedem–Katchalsky equations. The results showed that both the hydraulic conductivity of the endothelium and the non-Newtonian viscous behaviour of blood had little effect on the distribution of NO. However, the blood flow rate, stenosis severity, red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-free layer and NO production rate at the blood vessel–wall interface could significantly affect the transport of NO. The theoretical study revealed that the transport of NO was significantly hindered in the disturbed flow region distal to the stenosis. The reduced NO concentration in the disturbed flow region might play an important role in the localized genesis and development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22593099

  5. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude.

    PubMed

    Beall, Cynthia M; Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2012-04-01

    This review summarizes published information on the levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid-phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500 m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24-48 h with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma, and/or red blood cells fell within 2h, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 h and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than those of their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma, and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell-associated nitrogen oxides were more than 200 times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree shown by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction, although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors' and the Tibetans' high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions, and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function under hypoxic

  6. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes published information on levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24–48 hours with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma and/or red blood cells fell within three hours, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 hours, and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell associated nitrogen oxides were more than two hundred times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree showed by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors’ and the Tibetans’ high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function

  7. Photocytotoxic effect of C60 fullerene against L1210 leukemic cells is accompanied by enhanced nitric oxide production and p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Franskevych, D V; Grynyuk, I I; Prylutska, S V; Pasichnyk, G V; Petukhov, D M; Drobot, L B; Matyshevska, O P; Ritter, U

    2016-06-01

    To estimate the combined action of C60 fullerene and light irradiation on viability of L1210 leukemic cells, nitric oxide (NO) generation, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and cell cycle distribution. Cell viability was assessed by MTT test. Light-emitting diode lamp (λ = 410-700 nm, 2.45 J/cm(2) ) was used for C60 fullerene photoexcitation. Nitrite level and NO-synthase activity were measured by Griess reaction and by conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, respectively. p38 MAPK activity was assessed by Western blot analysis. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. It was shown that light irradiation of C60 fullerene-treated L1210 cells was accompanied by 55% decrease of their viability at 48 h of culture. Nitrite level measured as an index of reactive NO generation was increased at the early period after C60 fullerene photoexcitation due to activation of both constitutive and inducible NO-synthase isoforms. The simultaneous activation of p38 MAPK was detected. Accumulation of L1210 cells in sub-G1 phase of cell cycle was observed after C60 fullerene photoexcitation. Photoexcited C60 fullerene exerts cytotoxic effect, at least in part, through triggering production of reactive NO species and activation of p38 kinase apoptotic pathways in L1210 leukemic cells.

  8. Utilising exhaled nitric oxide information to enhance diagnosis and therapy of respiratory disease - current evidence for clinical practice and proposals to improve the methodology.

    PubMed

    Högman, Marieann; Lehtimäki, Lauri; Dinh-Xuan, Anh Tuan

    2017-02-01

    A non-invasive tool to diagnose respiratory diseases and to follow treatment has long been looked-for. Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) is a promising marker of inflammation in asthma but nearly 25-years of research has shown that it works in only certain endotypes of asthma. The modelling of NO dynamics of the lung can give more information than a single FENO value. Areas covered: The estimation of the NO production in the conducting airways and in the gas exchange area has given new insight of the NO production in diseases beyond asthma. In this article, we discuss the importance of methodology for NO measurement in the exhaled breath and the indication of applying this technique to detect respiratory disorders. This narrative review is an attempt to examine and discuss the physiological basis underlying exhaled NO measurements and the clinical evidence of the usefulness of this method in asthma and various other respiratory disorders. Expert commentary: Estimation of the NO parameters would aid in our understanding of the NO dynamics of the lung and thereby give more knowledge how to interpret the measured FENO value in clinical practice.

  9. Nitric oxide-mediated antiplasmodial activity in human and murine hepatocytes induced by gamma interferon and the parasite itself: enhancement by exogenous tetrahydrobiopterin.

    PubMed Central

    Mellouk, S; Hoffman, S L; Liu, Z Z; de la Vega, P; Billiar, T R; Nussler, A K

    1994-01-01

    Expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase has been shown to inhibit the development of several pathogens, including fungi, bacteria, parasites, and viruses. However, there is still controversy as to whether this effector mechanism can inhibit the development of human pathogens. We now report that gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) induces the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum-infected primary human hepatocytes from cultures and that the antimalarial activity is dependent on NO. Infection with the parasite alone in the absence of added IFN-gamma caused a 10-fold increase in NO formation. Both spontaneous inhibition and IFN-gamma-induced inhibition of Plasmodium yoelii-infected murine hepatocytes were increased with the addition of the NO synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, or sepiapterin, which is converted to tetrahydrobiopterin. These results indicate that under in vitro conditions the parasite itself provides a signal that triggers induction of the NO pathway in human and murine hepatocytes and that NO formation in infected hepatocytes is limited by tetrahydrobiopterin availability. PMID:8063424

  10. Enhanced nitric oxide production during lead (Pb²⁺) exposure recovers protein expression but not presynaptic localization of synaptic proteins in developing hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Neal, April P; Stansfield, Kirstie H; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2012-02-23

    We have previously reported that lead (Pb(2+)) exposure results in both presynaptic and postsynaptic changes in developing neurons as a result of inhibition of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). NMDAR inhibition by Pb(2+) during synaptogenesis disrupts downstream trans-synaptic signaling of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and exogenous addition of BDNF can recover the effects of Pb(2+) on both presynaptic protein expression and presynaptic vesicular release. NMDAR activity can modulate other trans-synaptic signaling pathways, such as nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Thus, it is possible that other trans-synaptic pathways in addition to BDNF signaling may be disrupted by Pb(2+) exposure. The current study investigated whether exogenous addition of NO could recover the presynaptic vesicular proteins lost as a result of Pb(2+) exposure during synaptogenesis, namely Synaptophysin (Syn) and Synaptobrevin (Syb). We observed that exogenous addition of NO during Pb(2+) exposure results in complete recovery of whole-cell Syn levels and partial recovery of Syn and Syb synaptic targeting in Pb(2+)-exposed neurons.

  11. Water extract isolated from Chelidonium majus enhances nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-alpha production via nuclear factor-kappaB activation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hwan-Suck; An, Hyo-Jin; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Won, Jin-Hee; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-01-01

    Chelidonium majus is used to treat several inflammatory diseases and tumours. We have examined the effect of C. majus on nitric oxide (NO) production using mouse peritoneal macrophages. When C. majus was used in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma, 10 U mL(-1)), there was a marked cooperative induction of NO production. Treatment of rIFN-gamma plus C. majus (1 mgmL(-1)) in macrophages caused a significant increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. The increased production of NO and TNF-alpha from rIFN-gamma plus C. majus-stimulated cells was almost completely inhibited by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (100 microM). These findings demonstrated that C. majus increased the production of NO and TNF-alpha by rIFN-gamma-primed macrophages and suggested that NF-kappaB played a critical role in mediating the effects of C. majus.

  12. A metal chelate process for removal of nitric oxide from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohn, D.; Pham, E.K.; Chang, S.G.

    1994-12-31

    Control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in flue gases has been achieved by utilization of its high solubility in aqueous solutions. Unlike sulfur dioxide, nitric oxide (NO) has low solubility in aqueous solutions. Consequently, achieving simultaneous control of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide in flue gas has been difficult to achieve. Nitric oxide can be oxidized to nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), which is more soluble. However, many oxidants are expensive and some of the oxidant material may consumed by the oxidation of dissolved sulfur dioxide. Much of the effort of research for the control of nitric oxide has focused on the development of additives that enhance the solubility of nitric oxide in aqueous solutions. Of the additives investigated, the most promising compounds appear to be metal chelates which are capable of reacting with nitric oxide to form nitrosyl complexes. In recent years, we have investigated thiol-based ligands complexed with ferrous ions that have superior oxidation resistance and NO absorbing capacity. We report here the results of our study of a new thiol-based iron complex using 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonate (DMPS). It is superior to Fe{sup +2}(EDTA) chelate in three aspects: (1) the ability to reduce Fe{sup +3} to Fe{sup +2}, (2) the absence of nitrogen-sulfur byproducts, and (3) the ease of regeneration using electrochemical reduction. We present here results of the NO removal chemistry of Fe{sup +2}(DMPS){sub 2} and the electro-chemical regeneration of Fe{sup +2}(DMPS){sub 2}. Also presented are results of NO thermal desorption studies, which is an alternative regeneration method.

  13. Nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Carrasco-Yepez, Marisela; Miliar-García, Angel; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2007-07-01

    Free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri produces an acute and fatal infectious disease called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), whose pathophysiological mechanism is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in PAM. Although NO has a cytotoxic effect on various parasites, it is produced by others as part of the pathology, as is the case with Entamoeba histolytica. To test for the production of NO, we analyzed whether antibodies against mammalian NO synthase isoforms (neuronal, inducible, and endothelial) presented immunoreactivity to N. fowleri proteins. We found that the trophozoites produced NO in vitro. The Western blot results, which showed N. fowleri trophozoites, contained proteins that share epitopes with the three described mammalian NOS, but have relative molecular weights different than those described in the literature, suggesting that N. fowleri may contain undescribed NOS isoforms. Moreover, we found that trophozoites reacted to the NOS2 antibody, in amebic cultures as well as in the mouse brain infected with N. fowleri, suggesting that nitric oxide may participate in the pathogenesis of PAM. Further research aimed at determining whether N. fowleri contains active novel NOS isoforms could lead to the design of new therapies against this parasite.

  14. Nitric oxide-dependent penile erection in mice lacking neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, A. L.; Nelson, R. J.; Calvin, D. C.; Liu, J. X.; Demas, G. E.; Klein, S. L.; Kriegsfeld, L. J.; Dawson, V. L.; Dawson, T. M.; Snyder, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated as a mediator of penile erection, because the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (NOS) is localized to the penile innervation and NOS inhibitors selectively block erections. NO can also be formed by two other NOS isoforms derived from distinct genes, inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS). To clarify the source of NO in penile function, we have examined mice with targeted deletion of the nNOS gene (nNOS- mice). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mating behavior, electrophysiologically induced penile erection, isolated erectile tissue isometric tension, and eNOS localization by immunohistochemistry and Western blot were performed on nNOS- mice and wild-type controls. RESULTS: Both intact animal penile erections and isolated erectile tissue function are maintained in nNOS mice, in agreement with demonstrated normal sexual behaviors, but is stereospecifically blocked by the NOS inhibitor, L-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). eNOS is abundantly present in endothelium of penile vasculature and sinusoidal endothelium within the corpora cavemosa, with levels that are significantly higher in nNOS- mice than in wild-type controls. CONCLUSIONS: eNOS mediates NO-dependent penile erection in nNOS- animals and normal penile erection. These data clarify the role of nitric oxide in penile erection and may have implications for therapeutic agents with selective effects on NOS isoforms. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 5 PMID:8784782

  15. Nitric oxide-dependent penile erection in mice lacking neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Burnett, A L; Nelson, R J; Calvin, D C; Liu, J X; Demas, G E; Klein, S L; Kriegsfeld, L J; Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M; Snyder, S H

    1996-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated as a mediator of penile erection, because the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (NOS) is localized to the penile innervation and NOS inhibitors selectively block erections. NO can also be formed by two other NOS isoforms derived from distinct genes, inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS). To clarify the source of NO in penile function, we have examined mice with targeted deletion of the nNOS gene (nNOS- mice). Mating behavior, electrophysiologically induced penile erection, isolated erectile tissue isometric tension, and eNOS localization by immunohistochemistry and Western blot were performed on nNOS- mice and wild-type controls. Both intact animal penile erections and isolated erectile tissue function are maintained in nNOS mice, in agreement with demonstrated normal sexual behaviors, but is stereospecifically blocked by the NOS inhibitor, L-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). eNOS is abundantly present in endothelium of penile vasculature and sinusoidal endothelium within the corpora cavemosa, with levels that are significantly higher in nNOS- mice than in wild-type controls. eNOS mediates NO-dependent penile erection in nNOS- animals and normal penile erection. These data clarify the role of nitric oxide in penile erection and may have implications for therapeutic agents with selective effects on NOS isoforms.

  16. Direct chemiluminescence detection of nitric oxide in aqueous solutions using the natural nitric oxide target soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Woldman, Yakov Y; Sun, Jian; Zweier, Jay L; Khramtsov, Valery V

    2009-11-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical involved in many physiological processes including regulation of blood pressure, immune response, and neurotransmission. However, the measurement of extremely low, in some cases subnanomolar, physiological concentrations of nitric oxide presents an analytical challenge. The purpose of this methods article is to introduce a new highly sensitive chemiluminescence approach to direct NO detection in aqueous solutions using a natural nitric oxide target, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), which catalyzes the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and inorganic pyrophosphate. The suggested enzymatic assay uses the fact that the rate of the reaction increases by about 200 times when NO binds with sGC and, in so doing, provides a sensor for nitric oxide. Luminescence detection of the above reaction is accomplished by converting inorganic pyrophosphate into ATP with the help of ATP sulfurylase followed by light emission from the ATP-dependent luciferin-luciferase reaction. Detailed protocols for NO quantification in aqueous samples are provided. The examples of applications include measurement of NO generated by a nitric oxide donor (PAPA-NONOate), nitric oxide synthase, and NO gas dissolved in buffer. The method allows for the measurement of NO concentrations in the nanomolar range and NO generation rates as low as 100 pM/min.

  17. Stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis by the aqueous extract of Panax ginseng root in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, Roswitha; Moeslinger, Thomas; Kopp, Brigitte; Spieckermann, Paul Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of Panax ginseng root aqueous extracts upon inducible nitric oxide synthesis in RAW 264.7 cells. Panax ginseng root extract has been used in the Asian world for centuries as a traditional herb to enhance physical strength and resistance and is becoming more and more popular in Europe and North America. Incubation of murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells) with increasing amounts of aqueous extracts of Panax ginseng (0.05 – 0.8 μg μl−1) showed a dose dependent stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthesis. Polysaccharides isolated from Panax ginseng showed strong stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthesis, whereas a triterpene-enriched fraction from an aqueous extract of Panax ginseng did not show any stimulation. Inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression was enhanced in a dose dependent manner as revealed by immunoblotting when cells were incubated with increasing amounts of Panax ginseng extract. This was associated with an incline in inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA-levels as determined by semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction and electromobility shift assay studies indicated enhanced nuclear factor-κB DNA binding activity. As nitric oxide plays an important role in immune function, Panax ginseng treatment could modulate several aspects of host defense mechanisms due to stimulation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase. PMID:11739242

  18. SOIL NITROUS OXIDE, NITRIC OXIDE, AND AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM A RECOVERING RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents two years of seasonal nitric oxide, ammonia, and nitrous oxide trace gas fluxes measured in a recovering riparian zone with cattle excluded and in an adjacent riparian zone grazed by cattle. In the recovering riparian zone, average nitric oxide, ammonia, and ni...

  19. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  20. Nitric oxide scavenging by red cell microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; Christ, George J; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the important signaling molecule NO almost as fast as cell-free hemoglobin, about 1000 times faster than red-cell-encapsulated hemoglobin. The degree to which this fast reaction with NO by red cell microparticles influences NO bioavailability depends on several factors that are explored here. In the context of stored blood preserved in ADSOL, we find that both cell-free hemoglobin and red cell microparticles increase as a function of duration of storage, and the proportion of extra erythrocytic hemoglobin in the red cell microparticle fraction is about 20% throughout storage. Normalized by hemoglobin concentration, the NO-scavenging ability of cell-free hemoglobin is slightly higher than that of red cell microparticles as determined by a chemiluminescence NO-scavenging assay. Computational simulations show that the degree to which red cell microparticles scavenge NO will depend substantially on whether they enter the cell-free zone next to the endothelial cells. Single-microvessel myography experiments performed under laminar flow conditions demonstrate that microparticles significantly enter the cell-free zone and inhibit acetylcholine, endothelial-dependent, and NO-dependent vasodilation. Taken together, these data suggest that as little as 5 μM hemoglobin in red cell microparticles, an amount formed after the infusion of one unit of aged stored packed red blood cells, has the potential to reduce NO bioavailability and impair endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  1. Nitric oxide in the middle to upper thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siskind, David E.; Rusch, David W.

    1992-01-01

    The results of six rocket observations of thermospheric nitric oxide are reviewed and reconciled with the available laboratory photochemical data. The impact of the recently revised recommendation for the N (S-4) + O2 rate coefficient on photochemical models is assessed. Use of the new rate coefficient leads to significantly enhanced production of NO, particularly at F-region altitudes during solar maximum conditions. A comparison of photochemical calculations with the rocket profiles indicates that the new rate coefficient introduces a significant discrepancy which can be resolved if the recombination reaction of N + NO is temperature dependent. Calculations using the preposed rate coefficient predict the NO solar cycle variation at 180 km to be less than at 140 km, which is also in agreement with the observations.

  2. Insulin affects sperm capacity in pig through nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Saveria; Giordano, Francesca; Guido, Carmela; Rago, Vittoria; Carpino, Amalia

    2013-11-01

    Insulin (Ins) has recently been demonstrated to have the ability to induce the capacitation process in pig spermatozoa. In various mammalian species, capacitation has been linked to the nitric oxide (NO) signalling; therefore, this study investigated NO production in Ins-treated pig spermatozoa by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. For the same samples, sperm capacitation was evaluated by chlortetracycline staining, protein tyrosine phosphorylation pattern and acrosomal status. A significant increase of the intrasperm NO level and the activation of three capacitation indices were detected in response to Ins treatment. Conversely, sperm preincubation with an NO synthase inhibitor (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) or with the anti-Ins receptor β (IRβ) antibody reversed all of the Ins-related effects. These results suggest that Ins has the capacity to enhance intracellular NO concentrations in pig spermatozoa and indicate a possible NO implication upon Ins promotion of capacitation.

  3. Proliferation of macrophages due to the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis by oxidized low-density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Monika; Gruber, Miriam; Schmid, Diethart; Baran, Halina; Moeslinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is assumed to be a major causal agent in hypercholesteraemia-induced atherosclerosis. Because the proliferation of lipid-loaden macrophages within atherosclerotic lesions has been described, we investigated the dependence of macrophage proliferation on the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by hypochlorite oxidized LDL. Ox-LDL induces a dose dependent inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in lipopolysaccharide-interferon stimulated mouse macrophages (J774.A1) with concomitant macrophage proliferation as assayed by cell counting, tritiated-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cell protein. Native LDL did not influence macrophage proliferation and inducible nitric oxide synthesis. iNOS protein and mRNA was reduced by HOCl-oxidized LDL (0-40 µg/ml) as revealed by immunoblotting and competitive semiquantitative PCR. Macrophage proliferation was increased by the addition of the iNOS inhibitor L-NAME. The addition of ox-LDL to L-NAME containing incubations induced no further statistically significant increase in cell number. Nitric oxide donors decreased ox-LDL induced macrophage proliferation and nitric oxide scavengers restored macrophage proliferation to the initial values achieved by ox-LDL. The decrease of cytosolic DNA fragments in stimulated macrophages incubated with ox-LDL demonstrates that the proliferative actions of ox-LDL are associated with a decrease of NO-induced apoptosis. Our data show that inhibition of iNOS dependent nitric oxide production caused by hypochlorite oxidized LDL enhances macrophage proliferation. This might be a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26600745

  4. Nitric Oxide and Major Depressive Disorder: Pathophysiology and Treatment Implications.

    PubMed

    Kudlow, P; Cha, D S; Carvalho, A F; McIntyre, R S

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a multi-factorial and heterogeneous disease. Robust evidence suggests that inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of MDD for a subpopulation of individuals. However, it remains unclear what traits and/or states precede the onset of inflammation in this subpopulation of individuals with MDD. Several recent studies have implicated nitric oxide (NO) as a critical regulator of neuroinflammation, thus suggesting a possible role in the pathophysiology of MDD. The aim of this review is to evaluate the evidentiary base supporting the hypothesis that the increased hazard for developing MDD in certain subpopulations may be mediated, in part, by inflammogenic trait and/or state variations in NO signaling pathways. We conducted a non-systematic literature search for English language studies via PubMed and Google Scholar, from 1985 to October 2014. Replicated evidence suggests that NO has contrasting effects in the central nervous system (CNS). Low concentrations of NO are neuroprotective and mediate physiological signaling whereas higher concentrations mediate neuroinflammatory actions and are neurotoxic. Certain polymorphisms in the neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS1) are associated MDD. Furthermore, state variations (e.g. decreased levels of essential co-factor, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin [BH4], enhanced microglial cell activity) in the NO signaling pathway are associated with an increased risk of developing MDD. Increased concentrations of NO enhance the production of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, evidences suggest that abnormalities in NO signaling may constitute a trait-marker related to MDD pathophysiology, which could be explored for novel therapeutic targets.

  5. Enhanced Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation via Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Is Involved in the Preserved Vasodilation in Aortas from Metabolic Syndrome Rats.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kana; Kagota, Satomi; McGuire, John J; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilation via protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is preserved in mesenteric arteries from SHRSP.Z-Leprfa/IzmDmcr rats (SHRSP.ZF) with metabolic syndrome even though nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is attenuated. Therefore, we examined the PAR2 mechanisms underlying metabolic syndrome-resistant vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF aortas with ageing. In isolated aortas, the PAR2 agonist 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fly) caused vasodilation that was sustained in male SHRSP.ZF until 18 weeks of age, but was attenuated afterwards compared with age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (controls) at 23 weeks. In contrast, acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was impaired in SHRSP.ZF already at 18 weeks of age. Treatments of aortas with inhibitors of NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase abolished the sustained 2fly- and residual acetylcholine-induced vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF at 18 weeks of age. In the aortas of SHRSP.ZF, 8-bromo-cGMP-induced vasodilation, NO production and cGMP accumulation elicited by 2fly were not different from in the controls. PAR2 agonist increased phospho-Ser1177-eNOS protein content only in SHRSP.ZF aortas. These results indicate that vasodilation mediated by PAR2 is sustained even though NO-dependent relaxation is attenuated with ageing/exposure to metabolic disorders in large-caliber arteries from SHRSP.ZF. PAR2 stimulation of NO production via an additional pathway that targets phosphorylation of Ser1177-eNOS suggests a regulatory mechanism for sustaining agonist-mediated vasodilation in metabolic syndrome.

  6. Nitric oxide functions as a signal in plant disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Delledonne, M; Xia, Y; Dixon, R A; Lamb, C

    1998-08-06

    Recognition of an avirulent pathogen triggers the rapid production of the reactive oxygen intermediates superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This oxidative burst drives crosslinking of the cell wall, induces several plant genes involved in cellular protection and defence, and is necessary for the initiation of host cell death in the hypersensitive disease-resistance response. However, this burst is not enough to support a strong disease-resistance response. Here we show that nitric oxide, which acts as a signal in the immune, nervous and vascular systems, potentiates the induction of hypersensitive cell death in soybean cells by reactive oxygen intermediates and functions independently of such intermediates to induce genes for the synthesis of protective natural products. Moreover, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis compromise the hypersensitive disease-resistance response of Arabidopsis leaves to Pseudomonas syringae, promoting disease and bacterial growth. We conclude that nitric oxide plays a key role in disease resistance in plants.

  7. Effects of estrogen on nitric oxide biosynthesis and vasorelaxant activity in sheep uterine and renal arteries in vitro.

    PubMed

    Veille, J C; Li, P; Eisenach, J C; Massmann, A G; Figueroa, J P

    1996-03-01

    Our purpose was to determine whether estrogen alters the relaxation responses to bradykinin and superoxide dismutase of the uterine and renal arteries and to determine the role of nitric oxide in that response. Ten nulliparous, ovariectomized nonpregnant sheep received either estradiol-17beta or vehicle solution. In vitro studies evaluating vasorelaxation were done with either bradykinin or superoxide dismutase. The nitric oxide inhibitor nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester was used to determine the role of nitric oxide in this process. Nitric oxide synthase activity was assessed by measuring citrulline generation. We found a dose dependency of relaxation to bradykinin and superoxide dismutase. Estrogen enhanced this response in uterine arteries. Estrogen increased citrulline generation in uterine but not renal arteries. Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester blocked relaxation responses and citrulline generation in both arteries. In nonpregnant sheep we found that nitric oxide release and nitric oxide synthase activity is enhanced by estrogen in the uterine arteries but not in the renal arteries. Increases in nitric oxide synthase activity may be important in the hyperemic response of the uterus during estrus.

  8. Nitric Oxide Generating Polymeric Coatings for Subcutaneous Glucose Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-14

    required to fabricate implantable amperometric glucose sensors with outer polymeric coatings that slowly generate low levels of nitric oxide (NO...is aimed at exploring and optimizing the chemistries required to fabricate implantable amperometric glucose sensors with outer polymeric films that...34 Oral Presentation, The Tenth World Congress on Biosensors , May 16, 2008, Shanghai, China. -J. Yang, J. L. Welby, M. E. Meyerhoff, “Generic Nitric

  9. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  10. Expression and activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase correlate with ethanol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guang-Jin; Zhou, Xiao-Rong; Gong, Zuo-Jiong; Zhang, Pin; Sun, Xiao-Mei; Zheng, Shi-Hua

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression and activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in rats with ethanol-induced liver injury and their relation with liver damage, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression in the liver. METHODS: Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given fish oil (0.5 mL) along with ethanol or isocaloric dextrose daily via gastrogavage for 4 or 6 wk. Liver injury was assessed using serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and pathological analysis. Liver malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide contents, iNOS and eNOS activity were determined. NF-κB p65,iNOS, eNOS and TNF-α protein or mRNA expression in the liver were detected by immunohistochemistry or reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: Chronic ethanol gavage for 4 wk caused steatosis, inflammation and necrosis in the liver, and elevated serum ALT activity. Prolonged ethanol administration (6 wk) enhanced the liver damage. These responses were accompanied with increased lipid peroxidation, NO contents, iNOS activity and reduced eNOS activity. NF-κB p65, iNOS and TNF-α protein or mRNA expression were markedly induced after chronic ethanol gavage, whereas eNOS mRNA expression remained unchanged. The enhanced iNOS activity and expression were positively correlated with the liver damage, especially the necro-inflammation, activation of NF-κB, and TNF-α mRNA expression. CONCLUSION: iNOS expression and activity are induced in the liver after chronic ethanol exposure in rats, which are correlated with the liver damage, especially the necro-inflammation, activation of NF-κB and TNF-α expression. eNOS activity is reduced, but its mRNA expression is not affected. PMID:16688828

  11. Synthesis, nitric oxide release, and α-glucosidase inhibition of nitric oxide donating apigenin and chrysin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qin; Cheng, Ning; Yi, Wen-Bing; Peng, Sheng-Ming; Zou, Xiao-Qing

    2014-03-01

    α-Glucosidase (AG) play crucial roles in the digestion of carbohydrates. Inhibitors of α-glucosidase (AGIs) are promising candidates for the development of anti-diabetic drugs. Here, five series of apigenin and chrysin nitric oxide (NO)-donating derivatives were synthesised and evaluated for their AG inhibitory activity and NO releasing capacity in vitro. Except for 9a-c, twelve compounds showed remarkable inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase, with potency being better than that of acarbose and 1-deoxynojirimycin. All organic nitrate derivatives released low concentrations of NO in the presence of l-cysteine. Structure activity relationship studies indicated that 5-OH, hydrophobic coupling chain, and carbonyl groups of the coupling chain could enhance the inhibitory activity. Apigenin and chrysin derivatives therefore represents a new class of promising compounds that can inhibit α-glucosidase activity and supply moderate NO for preventing the development of diabetic complications.

  12. Protection by nitric oxide against liver inflammatory injury in animals carrying a nitric oxide synthase-2 transgene.

    PubMed

    Mojena, M; Hortelano, S; Castrillo, A; Diaz-Guerra, M J; Garcia-Barchino, M J; Saez, G T; Bosca, L

    2001-03-01

    The effect of pre-existent hepatic NO synthesis on liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharide was studied in animals carrying a nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) transgene under the control of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) promoter. These animals expressed NOS-2 in liver cells under fasting conditions. Lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in D-galactosamine-conditioned mice, which enhanced notably the effect of the endotoxin on the liver, was impaired in animals expressing NOS-2. This protection against inflammatory liver damage was dependent on NO synthesis and was caused by an inhibition of nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activity and an impairment of the synthesis of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor a and interleukin 1b. These data indicate that intrahepatic synthesis of NO protects liver by inhibiting the release of cascades of proinflammatory mediators and suggest a beneficial role for local delivery of NO in the control of liver injury.

  13. Nitric Oxide Formation by Meteoroids in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Park, Chul

    1976-01-01

    The process of nitric oxide formation during atmospheric entry of meteoroids is analyzed theoretically. An ablating meteoroid is assumed to be a point source in a uniform flow with a continuum regime evolving in its wake. The amount of nitric oxide produced by high-temperature reactions of air in the continuum regime is calculated by numerical integration of chemical-rate equations. This is accomplished by assuming that flow properties are constant across the reacting region, the radius of the region being determined from considerations of shock-wave formation and molecular diffusion. The results, when summed over the observed mass, velocity, and entry-angle distributions of meteoroids, provide annual global production rates of nitric oxide as a function of altitude. The peak production of nitric oxide is found to occur at altitudes between 9 x 10(exp 4) and 10(exp 5) m, the total annual rate being about 4 x 10(exp 7) kg. The present results suggest that the large concentration of nitric oxide observed below 9.5 x 10(exp 4) m could be attributed to meteoroids instead of photodissociation of nitrogen into metastable, 2D-state atoms, as has been previously hypothesized.

  14. Lack of small intestinal ulcerogenecity of nitric oxide-releasing indomethacin, NCX-530, in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Hase, S; Tanaka, A; Takeuchi, K

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the intestinal ulcerogenic property of nitric oxide-releasing indomethacin (NCX-530) in the rat, in comparison with indomethacin. Animals were given indomethacin or NCX-530 subcutaneously and killed 24 h later for macroscopic examination of the small intestine. A single administration of indomethacin (10 mg/kg) provoked damage, mainly in the jejunum and ileum, accompanied by an increase in myeloperoxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities as well as bacterial translocation. NCX-530 at an equimolar dose (14.2 mg/kg) caused no gross damage in the small intestine, nor any significant change in inducible nitric oxide synthase and myeloperoxidase activities or bacterial translocation. NOR-3, the nitric oxide donor (6.0 mg/kg), when administered subcutaneously together with indomethacin, significantly prevented the occurrence of intestinal lesions and other mucosal changes. Indomethacin reduced mucus and fluid secretions in the small intestine, while both NCX-530 and NOR-3 enhanced these secretions. NCX-530 reduced the mucosal prostaglandin E2 contents and exhibited an anti-inflammatory action against carrageenan-induced paw oedema, with equal effectiveness to indomethacin. NCX-530 does not cause intestinal damage, despite inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. The reduced intestinal toxicity of NCX-530 may be attributable to inhibition of enterobacterial translocation, partly by increasing the mucus and fluid secretions mediated by nitric oxide released from this compound.

  15. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nianzhen

    2002-01-01

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca2+ elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca2+ elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca2+ wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca2+ signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca2+-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca2+ signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca2+, possibly through store-operated Ca2+ channels. The NO-induced Ca2+ signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca2+ change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca2+ influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca2+ release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca2+ elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca2+ wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by

  16. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  17. Nitric oxide inhibits isoproterenol-stimulated adipocyte lipolysis through oxidative inactivation of the beta-agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, P; Cacho, J; Crespo, M D; Herrera, E; Ramos, P

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been implicated in the inhibition of catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis in adipose tissue by as yet unknown mechanisms. In the present study, it is shown that the nitric oxide donor, 2,2-diethyl-1-nitroso-oxyhydrazine, antagonized isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-induced lipolysis in rat adipocytes, freshly isolated from white adipose tissue, by decreasing the potency of the beta-agonist without affecting its efficacy. These data suggest that nitric oxide did not act downstream of the beta-adrenoceptor but reduced the effective concentration of isoproterenol. In support of the latter hypothesis, we found that pre-treatment of isoproterenol with nitric oxide abolished the lipolytic activity of the catecholamine. Spectroscopic data and HPLC analysis confirmed that the nitric oxide-mediated inactivation of isoproterenol was in fact because of the modification of the catecholamine through a sequence of oxidation reactions, which apparently involved the generation of an aminochrome. Similarly, aminochrome was found to be the primary product of isoproterenol oxidation by 3-morpholinosydnonimine and peroxynitrite. Finally, it was shown that nitric oxide released from cytokine-stimulated adipocytes attenuated the lipolytic effect of isoproterenol by inactivating the catecholamine. In contrast with very recent findings, which suggest that nitric oxide impairs the beta-adrenergic action of isoproterenol through intracellular mechanisms and not through a chemical reaction between NO and the catecholamine, we showed that nitric oxide was able to attenuate the pharmacological activity of isoproterenol in vitro as well as in a nitric oxide-generating cellular system through oxidation of the beta-agonist. These findings should be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies used to investigate the role of nitric oxide as a modulator of isoproterenol-stimulated signal transduction pathways. PMID:11023835

  18. Nitric oxide inhibits isoproterenol-stimulated adipocyte lipolysis through oxidative inactivation of the beta-agonist.

    PubMed

    Klatt, P; Cacho, J; Crespo, M D; Herrera, E; Ramos, P

    2000-10-15

    Nitric oxide has been implicated in the inhibition of catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis in adipose tissue by as yet unknown mechanisms. In the present study, it is shown that the nitric oxide donor, 2,2-diethyl-1-nitroso-oxyhydrazine, antagonized isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-induced lipolysis in rat adipocytes, freshly isolated from white adipose tissue, by decreasing the potency of the beta-agonist without affecting its efficacy. These data suggest that nitric oxide did not act downstream of the beta-adrenoceptor but reduced the effective concentration of isoproterenol. In support of the latter hypothesis, we found that pre-treatment of isoproterenol with nitric oxide abolished the lipolytic activity of the catecholamine. Spectroscopic data and HPLC analysis confirmed that the nitric oxide-mediated inactivation of isoproterenol was in fact because of the modification of the catecholamine through a sequence of oxidation reactions, which apparently involved the generation of an aminochrome. Similarly, aminochrome was found to be the primary product of isoproterenol oxidation by 3-morpholinosydnonimine and peroxynitrite. Finally, it was shown that nitric oxide released from cytokine-stimulated adipocytes attenuated the lipolytic effect of isoproterenol by inactivating the catecholamine. In contrast with very recent findings, which suggest that nitric oxide impairs the beta-adrenergic action of isoproterenol through intracellular mechanisms and not through a chemical reaction between NO and the catecholamine, we showed that nitric oxide was able to attenuate the pharmacological activity of isoproterenol in vitro as well as in a nitric oxide-generating cellular system through oxidation of the beta-agonist. These findings should be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies used to investigate the role of nitric oxide as a modulator of isoproterenol-stimulated signal transduction pathways.

  19. The red-vine-leaf extract AS195 increases nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide generation and decreases oxidative stress in endothelial and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Bölck, Birgit; Bizjak, Daniel Alexander; Stabenow, Christina Julia Annika; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-02-01

    The red-vine-leaf extract AS195 improves cutaneous oxygen supply and the microcirculation in patients suffering from chronic venous insufficiency. Regulation of blood flow was associated to nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent NO (nitric oxide) production, and endothelial and red blood cells (RBC) have been shown to possess respective NOS isoforms. It was hypothesized that AS195 positively affects NOS activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RBC. Because patients with microvascular disorders show increased oxidative stress which limits NO bioavailability, it was further hypothesized that AS195 increases NO bioavailability by decreasing the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increasing antioxidant capacity. Cultured HUVECs and RBCs from healthy volunteers were incubated with AS195 (100 μmol/L), tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP, 1 mmol/L) to induce oxidative stress and with both AS195 and TBHP. Endothelial and red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS) activation significantly increased after AS195 incubation. Nitrite concentration, a marker for NO production, increased in HUVEC but decreased in RBC after AS195 application possibly due to nitrite scavenging potential of flavonoids. S-nitrosylation of RBC cytoskeletal spectrins and RBC deformability were increased after AS195 incubation. TBHP-induced ROS were decreased by AS195, and antioxidative capacity was significantly increased in AS195-treated cells. TBHP also reduced RBC deformability, but reduction was attenuated by parallel incubation with AS195. Adhesion of HUVEC was also reduced after AS195 treatment. Red-vine-leaf extract AS195 increases NOS activation and decreases oxidative stress. Both mechanisms increase NO bioavailability, improve cell function, and may thus account for enhanced microcirculation in both health and disease.

  20. Hemorrhagic shock and nitric oxide release from erythrocytic nitric oxide synthase: A quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kejing; Pittman, Roland N.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2009-01-01

    A large loss of blood during hemorrhage can result in profound shock, a state of hypotension associated with hemodynamic abnormalities. One of the hypotheses to account for this collapse of homeostasis is that the production of nitric oxide (NO), a gas molecule that dilates blood vessels, is significantly impaired during hemorrhage, resulting in a mismatch between O2 delivery and the metabolic activity in the tissues. NO can be released from multiple sources in the vasculature. Recent studies have shown that erythrocytes express functional endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3), which potentially serves as an intraluminal NO source. NO delivery from this source is complex: Erythrocytes are not only NO producers but also act as potent sinks because of the high affinity of NO for hemoglobin. To test our hypothesis that the loss of erythrocytic NOS3 during hemorrhage contributes to NO deficiency-related shock, we have constructed a multicellular computational model that simulates NO production and transport to allow us to quantify the loss of NO under different hemorrhagic conditions. Our model shows that: (1) during mild hemorrhage and subsequent hemodilution (hematocrit >30%), NO from this intraluminal source is only slightly decreased in the vascular smooth muscle, but the NO level is significantly reduced under severe hemorrhagic conditions (hematocrit <30%); (2) whether a significant amount of NO from this source can be delivered to vascular smooth muscle is strongly dependent on the existence of a protective mechanism for NO delivery; (3) if the expression level of NOS3 on erythrocytes is similar to that on endothelial cells, we estimate ~13 pM NO at the vascular smooth muscle from this source when such a protective mechanism is involved. This study provides a basis for detailed studies to characterize the impairment of NO release pathways during hemorrhage and yield important insights for the development of resuscitation methods. PMID:19285090

  1. Hemorrhagic shock and nitric oxide release from erythrocytic nitric oxide synthase: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejing; Pittman, Roland N; Popel, Aleksander S

    2009-06-01

    A large loss of blood during hemorrhage can result in profound shock, a state of hypotension associated with hemodynamic abnormalities. One of the hypotheses to account for this collapse of homeostasis is that the production of nitric oxide (NO), a gas molecule that dilates blood vessels, is significantly impaired during hemorrhage, resulting in a mismatch between O(2) delivery and the metabolic activity in the tissues. NO can be released from multiple sources in the vasculature. Recent studies have shown that erythrocytes express functional endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3), which potentially serves as an intraluminal NO source. NO delivery from this source is complex: erythrocytes are not only NO producers but also act as potent sinks because of the high affinity of NO for hemoglobin. To test our hypothesis that the loss of erythrocytic NOS3 during hemorrhage contributes to NO deficiency-related shock, we have constructed a multicellular computational model that simulates NO production and transport to allow us to quantify the loss of NO under different hemorrhagic conditions. Our model shows that: (1) during mild hemorrhage and subsequent hemodilution (hematocrit >30%), NO from this intraluminal source is only slightly decreased in the vascular smooth muscle, but the NO level is significantly reduced under severe hemorrhagic conditions (hematocrit <30%); (2) whether a significant amount of NO from this source can be delivered to vascular smooth muscle is strongly dependent on the existence of a protective mechanism for NO delivery; (3) if the expression level of NOS3 on erythrocytes is similar to that on endothelial cells, we estimate approximately 13 pM NO at the vascular smooth muscle from this source when such a protective mechanism is involved. This study provides a basis for detailed studies to characterize the impairment of NO release pathways during hemorrhage and yield important insights for the development of resuscitation methods.

  2. Sleep-disordered breathing children: Measurement of nasal nitric oxide and fractional exhaled nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Zou, Y; Mai, F; Zhang, X; Liu, Y; Lin, X

    2016-03-01

    To assess the clinical significance of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) concentrations in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Enrolled in this study were 30 children with SDB and 15 healthy children. The nNO and FeNO concentrations were measured noninvasively using a NIOX MINO system (Aerocrine AB, Solna, Sweden). SPSS statistics 20.0 software (IBM SPSS statistics 20.0, Armonk, NY, USA) was used to analyze the data. The median (25th and 75th percentiles) nNO concentration of SDB children measured in parts per billion (ppb) was 111.0 (44.0; 349.0) ppb; FeNO concentration of SDB children was 12.0 (9.8; 14.0) ppb. The nNO concentration of healthy children was 52.0 (22.0; 139.0) ppb; FeNO concentration of healthy children was 12.0 (10.0; 16.0) ppb. Compared to healthy children, nNO concentration was significantly higher in children with SDB (Z = -2.215, P = 0.027). Correlation analysis showed that SDB children's nNO concentration directly correlated with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI; r = 0.429, P = 0.018), and inversely correlated with nadir oxygen saturation (SaO2; r = -0.482, P = 0.007). No other polysomnographic parameters significantly correlated with nNO concentration. Our data suggest that nNO concentration might be useful for diagnosis and evaluation of disease severity in SDB children. Furthermore, these results suggest that nNO concentration has a greater prognostic value than FeNO concentration.

  3. Estimation of the nitric oxide formed from hydroxylamine by Nitrosomonas

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. H.

    1965-01-01

    1. Nitric oxide that was produced by reducing nitrite with an excess of acidified potassium iodide under nitrogen in Warburg respirometer flasks was rapidly absorbed by a solution of permanganate in sodium hydroxide held in the side arm. A small amount of nitrous oxide (or nitrogen) that was also produced was not absorbed. 2. By using a quantitative method for the recovery of nitrite from samples of the alkaline permanganate, it was found that the sum of the nitrite N formed and the residual nitrous oxide N was equivalent to the nitrite N used to generate the gases. These results showed that alkaline permanganate completely oxidized nitric oxide to nitrite. The method was suitable for determining 0·4–20 μmoles of nitric oxide. 3. The technique was used to determine the nitric oxide content of the nitrogenous gas that was produced anaerobically from hydroxylamine by an extract of the autotrophic nitrifying micro-organism Nitrosomonas in the presence of methylene blue as electron acceptor. PMID:14342235

  4. Nitric oxide and changes of iron metabolism in exercise.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhong Ming

    2002-11-01

    Accumulated data imply that exercise itself might not lead to a true iron deficiency or 'sport anaemia' in a healthy athlete who has adequate iron intake. The higher prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in younger female athletes might be not due to exercise itself, but probably results from dietary choices, inadequate iron intake and menstruation. These factors can also induce iron deficiency or anaemia in the general population. However, exercise does affect iron metabolism, leading to low or sub-optimal iron status. The underlying mechanism is unknown. In this review, recent advances in the study of the effect of exercise on iron metabolism and nitric oxide, and the relationship between nitric oxide and iron status in exercise are discussed. A hypothesis that increased production of nitric oxide might contribute to sub-optimal iron status in exercise is proposed.

  5. Parameters controlling nitric oxide emissions from gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Mikus, T.

    1973-01-01

    Nitric oxide forms in the primary zone of gas turbine combustors where the burnt gas composition is close to stoichiometric and gas temperatures are highest. It has been found that combustor air inlet conditions, mean primary zone fuel-air ratio, residence time, and the uniformity of the primary zone are the most important variables affecting nitric oxide emissions. Relatively simple model of the flow in a gas turbine combustor, coupled with a rate equation for nitric oxide formation via the Zeldovich mechanism are shown to correlate the variation in measured NOx emissions. Data from a number of different combustor concepts are analyzed and shown to be in reasonable agreement with predictions. The NOx formulation model is used to assess the extent to which an advanced combustor concept, the NASA swirl can, has produced a lean well-mixed primary zone generally believed to be the best low NOx emissions burner type.

  6. Nitric oxide formation by meteoroids in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, G. P.; Park, C.

    1974-01-01

    The process of nitric oxide formation during atmospheric entry of meteoroids is analyzed theoretically. An ablating meteoroid is assumed to be a point source in a uniform flow with a continuum regime evolving in its wake. The amount of nitric oxide produced by high-temperature reactions of air in the continuum regime is calculated by numerical integration of chemical-rate equations. This is accomplished by assuming that flow properties are constant across the reacting region, its radius being determined from considerations of shock-wave formation and molecular diffusion. The results, when summed over the observed mass, velocity, and entry-angle distributions of meteoroids, provide annual global production rates of nitric oxide as a function of altitude. The peak production is found to occur between 90- and 100-km altitude, the total annual rate being around 40 million kg.

  7. Danggui Buxue Tang, Chinese Herbal Decoction Containing Astragali Radix and Angelicae Sinensis Radix, Induces Production of Nitric Oxide in Endothelial Cells: Signaling Mediated by Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Gong, Amy G W; Lau, K M; Zhang, Laura M L; Lin, H Q; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-03-01

    Danggui Buxue Tang, an ancient Chinese herbal decoction containing Astragali Radix and Angelicae Sinensis Radix at the weight ratio of 5:1, is used to mitigate menopausal syndromes in women. The pharmacological properties of Danggui Buxue Tang have been illustrated in bone development, blood enhancement, and immune stimulation. Here, we extended the possible pharmacological role of Danggui Buxue Tang in cardiovascular function. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the application of Danggui Buxue Tang induced the release of nitric oxide and the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt kinase in time- and dose-dependent manners. The robust activation of nitric oxide signaling, however, required the boiling of Astragali Radix and Angelicae Sinensis Radix together, i.e., as Danggui Buxue Tang instead of other herbal extracts. The Danggui Buxue Tang-induced phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt kinase in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were fully blocked by treatment with an endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME), a PI3K/Akt inhibitor (LY294002), and a Ca(2+) chelator (BAPTA-AM). In parallel, the blockage of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt activation subsequently fully abolished the Danggui Buxue Tang-induced nitric oxide production.

  8. Relationship between exhaled nitric oxide and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Frank, T L; Adisesh, A; Pickering, A C; Morrison, J F; Wright, T; Francis, H; Fletcher, A; Frank, P I; Hannaford, P

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if exhaled nitric oxide levels in children varied according to their asthmatic and atopic status. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured in a sample of 93 children attending the North West Lung Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom, for the clinical evaluation of a respiratory questionnaire being developed as a screening tool in general practice. The clinical assessment included full lung function, skin prick testing, and exercise challenge. Children were said to be asthmatic either by consensus decision of three independent consultant pediatricians, who reviewed all the clinical results except the nitric oxide measurements, or by positive exercise test. Atopic asthmatic children had higher geometric mean exhaled nitric oxide levels (consensus decision, 12.5 ppb [parts per billion] 95% CI, 8.3 to 18. 8; positive exercise test, 12.2 ppb 95% CI, 7.6 to 19.7) than did nonatopic asthmatic children (3.2 ppb 95% CI, 2.3 to 4.6; 3.2 ppb 95% CI, 2.0 to 5.0), atopic nonasthmatic children (3.8 ppb 95% CI, 2. 7 to 5.5; 5.7 ppb 95% CI, 4.1 to 8.0), or nonatopic nonasthmatic children (3.4 ppb 95% CI, 2.8 to 4.1; 3.5 ppb 95% CI, 3.0 to 4.1). Thus, exhaled nitric oxide was raised in atopic asthmatics but not in nonatopic asthmatics, and these nonatopic asthmatics had levels of exhaled nitric oxide similar to those of the nonasthmatics whether atopic or not.

  9. Structural and biological studies on bacterial nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Jeffrey K.; Li, Huiying; Jing, Qing; Kang, Soosung; Richo, Jerry; Silverman, Richard B.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by bacterial NOS functions as a cytoprotective agent against oxidative stress in Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus subtilis. The screening of several NOS-selective inhibitors uncovered two inhibitors with potential antimicrobial properties. These two compounds impede the growth of B. subtilis under oxidative stress, and crystal structures show that each compound exhibits a unique binding mode. Both compounds serve as excellent leads for the future development of antimicrobials against bacterial NOS-containing bacteria. PMID:24145412

  10. Recent Advances on Nitric Oxide in the Upper Airways.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco, Mauro; Bianco, Andrea; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Motta, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) originates from the upper airways, and takes action, to varying extents, in regulation, protection and defense, as well as in noxious processes. Nitric oxide retains important functions in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes of the human body, including vaso-regulation, antimicrobial activity, neurotransmission and respiration. This review article reports the ongoing investigations regarding the source, biology and relevance of NO within upper respiratory tract. In addition, we discuss the role of NO, originating from nasal and paranasal sinuses, in inflammatory disorders such as allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, primary ciliary dyskinesia, and cystic fibrosis.

  11. Nitric oxide emission from pulverized coal blend flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kopparthi, V.; Gollahalli, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    An experimental study of the nitric oxide emission from pulverized blended coal flames as a function of blending mass ratio is presented. Coals of three ranks (anthracite, bituminous, and lignite), and of the same rank (bituminous), but of different origin (Oklahoma and Wyoming mines), were used as fuels. Also, their blends (anthracite-bituminous, anthracite-lignite, lignite-bituminous, and Oklahoma-Wyoming coals) at mass ratios of 20:80, 40:60, 60:40, and 80:20 were studied. Correlations of nitric oxide emission index (mass/unit energy release) with blend mass ratio are presented.

  12. Use of inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide, an important signaling molecule with multiple regulatory effects throughout the body, is an important tool for the treatment of full-term and late-preterm infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and hypoxemic respiratory failure. Several randomized controlled trials have evaluated its role in the management of preterm infants ≤ 34 weeks' gestational age with varying results. The purpose of this clinical report is to summarize the existing evidence for the use of inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants and provide guidance regarding its use in this population.

  13. Enhanced Abscisic Acid-Mediated Responses in nia1nia2noa1-2 Triple Mutant Impaired in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-Dependent Nitric Oxide Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates a wide range of plant processes from development to environmental adaptation. Despite its reported regulatory functions, it remains unclear how NO is synthesized in plants. We have generated a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant that is impaired in nitrate reductase (NIA/NR)- and Nitric Oxide-Associated1 (AtNOA1)-mediated NO biosynthetic pathways. NO content in roots of nia1nia2 and noa1-2 plants was lower than in wild-type plants and below the detection limit in nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated biosynthesis of NO were thus active and responsible for most of the NO production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The nia1nia2noa1-2 plants displayed reduced size, fertility, and seed germination potential but increased dormancy and resistance to water deficit. The increasing deficiency in NO of nia1nia2, noa1-2, and nia1nia2noa1-2 plants correlated with increased seed dormancy, hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) in seed germination and establishment, as well as dehydration resistance. In nia1nia2noa1-2 plants, enhanced drought tolerance was due to a very efficient stomata closure and inhibition of opening by ABA, thus uncoupling NO from ABA-triggered responses in NO-deficient guard cells. The NO-deficient mutants in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated pathways in combination with the triple mutant will be useful tools to functionally characterize the role of NO and the contribution of both biosynthetic pathways in regulating plant development and defense. PMID:20007448

  14. Enhanced abscisic acid-mediated responses in nia1nia2noa1-2 triple mutant impaired in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-dependent nitric oxide biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José

    2010-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates a wide range of plant processes from development to environmental adaptation. Despite its reported regulatory functions, it remains unclear how NO is synthesized in plants. We have generated a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant that is impaired in nitrate reductase (NIA/NR)- and Nitric Oxide-Associated1 (AtNOA1)-mediated NO biosynthetic pathways. NO content in roots of nia1nia2 and noa1-2 plants was lower than in wild-type plants and below the detection limit in nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated biosynthesis of NO were thus active and responsible for most of the NO production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The nia1nia2noa1-2 plants displayed reduced size, fertility, and seed germination potential but increased dormancy and resistance to water deficit. The increasing deficiency in NO of nia1nia2, noa1-2, and nia1nia2noa1-2 plants correlated with increased seed dormancy, hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) in seed germination and establishment, as well as dehydration resistance. In nia1nia2noa1-2 plants, enhanced drought tolerance was due to a very efficient stomata closure and inhibition of opening by ABA, thus uncoupling NO from ABA-triggered responses in NO-deficient guard cells. The NO-deficient mutants in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated pathways in combination with the triple mutant will be useful tools to functionally characterize the role of NO and the contribution of both biosynthetic pathways in regulating plant development and defense.

  15. Nitric oxide regulates neutrophil migration through microparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Sarah; Dixon, Rachel; Norman, Keith; Hellewell, Paul; Ridger, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating neutrophil migration has been investigated. Human neutrophil migration to interleukin (IL)-8 (1 nmol/L) was measured after a 1-hour incubation using a 96-well chemotaxis plate assay. The NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced IL-8-induced migration by up to 45%. Anti-CD18 significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited both IL-8-induced and L-NAME enhanced migration. Antibodies to L-selectin or PSGL-1 had no effect on IL-8-induced migration but prevented the increased migration to IL-8 induced by L-NAME. L-NAME induced generation of neutrophil-derived microparticles that was significantly (P < 0.01) greater than untreated neutrophils or D-NAME. This microparticle formation was dependent on calpain activity and superoxide production. Only microparticles from L-NAME and not untreated or D-NAME-treated neutrophils induced a significant (P < 0.01) increase in IL-8-induced migration and transendothelial migration. Pretreatment of microparticles with antibodies to L-selectin (DREG-200) or PSGL-1 (PL-1) significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited this effect. The ability of L-NAME-induced microparticles to enhance migration was found to be dependent on the number of microparticles produced and not an increase in microparticle surface L-selectin or PSGL-1 expression. These data show that NO can modulate neutrophil migration by regulating microparticle formation.

  16. The potential of Angeli’s salt to decrease nitric oxide scavenging by plasma hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaojun; Azarov, Ivan; Jeffers, Anne; Presley, Tennille; Richardson, Jodi; King, S. Bruce; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Release of hemoglobin from the erythrocyte during intravascular hemolysis contributes to the pathology of a variety of diseased states. This effect is partially due to the enhanced ability of cell-free plasma hemoglobin, which is primarily found in the ferrous, oxygenated state, to scavenge nitric oxide. Oxidation of the cell-free hemoglobin to methemoglobin, which does not effectively scavenge nitric oxide, using inhaled nitric oxide has been shown to be effective in limiting pulmonary and systemic vasoconstriction. However, the ferric heme species may be reduced back to ferrous hemoglobin in plasma and has the potential to drive injurious redox chemistry. We propose that compounds that selectively convert cell-free hemoglobin to ferric, and ideally iron-nitrosylated heme species that do not actively scavenge nitric oxide would effectively treat intravascular hemolysis. We show here that nitroxyl, generated by Angeli’s salt (Sodium α-oxyhyponitrite, Na2N2O3), preferentially reacts with cell-free hemoglobin compared to that encapsulated in the red blood cell under physiologically relevant conditions. Nitroxyl oxidizes oxygenated ferrous hemoglobin to methemoglobin and can convert the methemoglobin to a more stable, less toxic species, iron-nitrosyl hemoglobin. These results support the notion that Angeli’s salt or a similar compound could be used to effectively treat conditions associated with intravascular hemolysis. PMID:18243145

  17. Oxidative damage involves in the inhibitory effect of nitric oxide on spore germination of Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tongfei; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2011-01-01

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on spore germination of Penicillium expansum were investigated and a possible mechanism was evaluated. The results indicated that NO released by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) significantly suppressed fungal growth. With the use of an oxidant sensitive probe and Western blot analysis, an increased level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and enhanced carbonylation damage were detected in spores of P. expansum under NO stress. Exogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbic acid (Vc) could increase the resistance of the spore to the inhibitory effect of NO. The activities of SOD and catalase (CAT), as well as ATP content in spores under NO stress were also lower than those in the control. We suggest that NO in high concentration induces the generation of ROS which subsequently causes severe oxidative damage to proteins crucial to the process of spore germination of P. expansum.

  18. Modulation of parathion toxicity by glucose feeding: Is nitric oxide involved?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jing . E-mail: jing.pope@okstate.edu; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Goad, John T.; Karanth, Subramanya; Pope, Carey

    2007-03-15

    Glucose feeding can markedly exacerbate the toxicity of the anticholinesterase insecticide, parathion. We determined the effects of parathion on brain nitric oxide and its possible role in potentiation of toxicity by glucose feeding. Adult rats were given water or 15% glucose in water for 3 days and challenged with vehicle or parathion (18 mg/kg, s.c.) on day 4. Functional signs, plasma glucose and brain cholinesterase, citrulline (an indicator of nitric oxide production) and high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were measured 1-3 days after parathion. Glucose feeding exacerbated cholinergic toxicity. Parathion increased plasma glucose (15-33%) and decreased cortical cholinesterase activity (81-90%), with no significant differences between water and glucose treatment groups. In contrast, parathion increased brain regional citrulline (40-47%) and decreased HEPs (18-40%) in rats drinking water, with significantly greater changes in glucose-fed rats (248-363% increase and 31-61% decrease, respectively). We then studied the effects of inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by 7-nitroindazole (7NI, 30 mg/kg, i.p. x4) on parathion toxicity and its modulation by glucose feeding. Co-exposure to parathion and 7NI led to a marked increase in cholinergic signs of toxicity and lethality, regardless of glucose intake. Thus, glucose feeding enhanced the accumulation of brain nitric oxide following parathion exposure, but inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis was ineffective at counteracting increased parathion toxicity associated with glucose feeding. Evidence is therefore presented to suggest that nitric oxide may play both toxic and protective roles in cholinergic toxicity, and its precise contribution to modulation by glucose feeding requires further investigation.

  19. Targeting Pulmonary Endothelial Hemoglobin α Improves Nitric Oxide Signaling and Reverses Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Roger A; Miller, Megan P; Hahn, Scott A; Galley, Joseph C; Bauer, Eileen; Bachman, Timothy; Hu, Jian; Sembrat, John; Goncharov, Dmitry; Mora, Ana L; Rojas, Mauricio; Goncharova, Elena; Straub, Adam C

    2017-08-11

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. Previous work showed that systemic artery endothelial cells express hemoglobin α to control nitric oxide diffusion, but the role of this system in the pulmonary circulation has not been evaluated. We hypothesize that up-regulation of hemoglobin α in pulmonary endothelial cells contributes to nitric oxide depletion and pulmonary vascular dysfunction in pulmonary hypertension. Co-cultures of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and distal pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells, lung tissue from control and pulmonary hypertensive lungs, and a mouse model of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension were used. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot analyses, spectrophotometry, and blood vessel myography experiments were performed in this study. We find increased expression of hemoglobin α in pulmonary endothelium from humans and mice with pulmonary hypertension compared to controls. In addition, we show up-regulation of hemoglobin α in human pulmonary endothelial cells co-cultured with pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in hypoxia. We treated pulmonary endothelial cells with a hemoglobin α mimetic peptide that disrupts the association of hemoglobin α with endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and found that cells treated with the peptide exhibited increased nitric oxide signaling compared to a scrambled peptide. Myography experiments using pulmonary arteries from hypoxic mice show that the hemoglobin α mimetic peptide enhanced vasodilation in response to acetylcholine. Our findings reveal that endothelial hemoglobin α functions as an endogenous scavenger of nitric oxide in the pulmonary endothelium. Targeting this pathway may offer a novel therapeutic target to increase endogenous levels of nitric oxide in pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Inducible nitric oxide synthase as a possible target in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2014-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important vasodilator produced by vascular endothelium. Its enzymatic formation is derived from three different synthases: neuronal (nNOS), endothelial (eNOS) and inducible (iNOS) synthases. While relatively small amounts of NO produced by eNOS are important to cardiovascular homeostasis, high NO levels produced associated with iNOS activity may have detrimental consequences to the cardiovascular system and contribute to hypertension. In this article, we reviewed current literature and found mounting evidence indicating that increased iNOS expression and activity contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension and its complications. Excessive amounts of NO produced by iNOS up-regulation can react with superoxide anions forming peroxynitrite, thereby promoting nitrosative stress and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, abnormal iNOS activity can up-regulate arginase activity, allowing it to compete with eNOS for L-arginine, thereby resulting in reduced NO bioavailability. This may also lead to eNOS uncoupling with enhanced production of superoxide anions instead of NO. All these alterations mediated by iNOS apparently contribute to hypertension and its complications. We also reviewed current evidence showing the effects of iNOS inhibitors on different animal models of hypertension. iNOS inhibition apparently exerts antihypertensive effects, decreases oxidative and nitrosative stress, and improves vascular function. Together, these studies highlight the possibility that iNOS is a potential pharmacological target in hypertension.

  1. Hypertension, nitric oxide, oxidants, and dietary plant polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Galleano, Monica; Pechanova, Olga; Fraga, Cesar G

    2010-12-01

    Fruits and vegetables are key foods whose high ingestion is associated with the improvement of numerous pathological conditions, including hypertension. Such health promoting actions have been increasingly ascribed to the antioxidant characteristics of different polyphenols in fruits and vegetables. Consequently, based on this assumption, many beverages and foods rich in polyphenols, grape, tea, cocoa, and soy products and many of their chemical constituents purified, are being studied both, as antioxidants and antihypertensive agents. This paper reviews the current evidence linking high polyphenol consumption with reductions in blood pressure. Basic chemical aspects of flavanols, flavonols, isoflavones and stilbenes, as possible responsible for the observed effects of those foods on blood pressure are included. Human interventions studies by using grapes and wine, cocoa and chocolate, black and green tea, soy products, and purified compounds ((+)-catequin, quercetin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate) are summarized. The discussed hypothesis, strongly supported by experimental data in animals, is that by regulating nitric oxide bioavailability, polyphenols present in fruits and vegetables affect endothelial function and as a consequence, blood pressure. Even when data are not definitive and many questions remain open, the whole evidence is encouraging to start considering diets that can provide a benefit to hypertensive subjects, and those benefits will be more significant in people that do not have controlled his/her elevated blood pressure.

  2. Estimates of nitric oxide production for lifting spacecraft reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1971-01-01

    The amount of nitric oxide which may be produced by heating of air during an atmospheric reentry of a lifting spacecraft is estimated by three different methods. Two assume nitrogen fixation by the process of sudden freezing, and the third is a computer calculation using chemical rate equations.

  3. Nitric oxide as a potent fumigant for postharvest pest control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is a great demand for safe and effective alternative fumigants to replace methyl bromide and other toxic fumigants for pest control. Nitric oxide, a common signal molecule in biological systems, was found to be effective and safe to control insects under ultralow oxygen conditions. Fumigatio...

  4. Nitric oxide emissions from a central California dairy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) were monitored downwind from a central California dairy facility during 2011 and 2012. NO concentrations at the dairy were significantly higher than the background levels during August 2011, but were indistinguishable from upwind concentrations during January, Apr...

  5. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  6. The levels of nitric oxide in megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Aydoğdu, İsmet; Bayraktar, Nihayet; Kuku, İrfan; Kuku, İrfan; Kaya, Emin

    2009-12-05

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between nitric oxide degradation products (nitrate and nitrite) levels and megaloblastic anemia which is treated with cyalocobalamin. A total of 30 patients with megaloblastic anemia (16 Male, 14 Female) were included in the study. Cyanocobalamin was administered (1.000 µg/day intramuscularly) until the reticulocyte crisis occurred to the normal range. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects (15 Male, 15 Female). Nitric oxide levels were measured before treatment and compared with the values obtained during peak reticulocyte count. Plasma direct nitrite, total nitrite and nitrate levels were 24,86±3,87, 60.56±7,01 and 36,02±5,24 in before treatment versus 15,48±3,05, 38,92±6,44 and 22,77±6,04 μmol/dl in after treatment, respectively. Plasma direct nitrite, total nitrite and nitrate levels were significantly lower in after treatment compared with the before treatment (p<0.001). Nitric oxide levels are seen to increase in megaloblastic anemia. This study suggested that abnormalities in the nitric oxide levels in megaloblastic anemia are restored by vitamin B12 replacement therapy.

  7. Apple fruit responses following exposure to nitric oxide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exogenous nitric oxide (.NO) applied as gas or generated from .NO releasing compounds has physiological activity in cut apple fruit tissues. Studies were conducted to characterize .NO production by whole fruit as well as to assess responses of whole fruit to exogenous .NO. .NO and ethylene product...

  8. Nitric oxide inhibition sustains vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, M. J.; Carnochan, P.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Hepatic parenchymal vasoconstriction increases cytotoxic drug uptake into hepatic metastases by increasing the tumour to liver blood flow ratio. Prolonged infusion of the vasoconstrictor vasopressin does not result in sustained vasoconstriction, and this may limit the benefit of vasopressin in infusional chemotherapy. We have assessed whether loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction is mediated by nitric oxide. Hepatic and tumour blood flow were continuously monitored, in an animal hepatic tumour model, by laser Doppler flowmetry. The response to regionally infused vasopressin and the nitric oxide inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were assessed over a 30 min infusion period. The vasopressin-induced vasoconstrictor effect diminished after 15 min despite continued infusion. Vasoconstriction was significantly prolonged when L-NAME was infused in addition to vasopressin. The increase in tumour to normal blood flow ratio was greater over the infusion period when L-NAME was co-administered with vasopressin. Our results suggest that the loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction seen in liver parenchyma after regional infusion is prevented by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-name and may be mediated by nitric oxide. PMID:7734317

  9. Modulation of nitric-oxide synthase by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Tonnessen, B H; Severson, S R; Hurt, R D; Miller, V M

    2000-11-01

    Effects of nicotine on arterial endothelium-dependent relaxations mediated by nitric oxide are controversial. Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that nicotine can directly alter activity of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS). NOS from aortic endothelial cells of untreated dogs and recombinant eNOS, neuronal NOS, and inducible NOS were used for these experiments. NOS activity was determined as conversion of L-[(3)H]arginine to L-[(3)H]citrulline in the absence or presence of nicotine (10(-7)-10(-3) M) in vitro. In separate assays, concentrations of cofactors NADPH, FAD, and tetrahydrobioprotein were reduced by half to assess for possible interaction with nicotine. With enzyme from aortic endothelial cells, total and calcium-dependent accumulation of citrulline increased by 30% in the presence of 10(-5) M nicotine. Nicotine dose dependently also increased citrulline accumulation by recombinant eNOS and neuronal NOS but not inducible NOS. Effects of nicotine on accumulation of citrulline by isolated eNOS and recombinant eNOS were further modulated by changes in the concentration of NADPH in the incubation solution. Our data demonstrate a significant effect of nicotine on eNOS-mediated citrulline accumulation. These results suggest that effects of nicotine on production of nitric oxide may depend on NADPH or oxygen radical interactions with NOS and thus may explain, in part, inconsistent findings of changes in production of endothelium-derived nitric oxide with nicotine administration.

  10. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2016-09-15

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

  11. Nitric oxide determination by amperometric carbon fiber microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Katrlík, Jaroslav; Zálesáková, Pavlína

    2002-05-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) amperometric microsensor was prepared by the modification of bare carbon fiber electrode by Nafion and cellulose acetate (CA). Detection limit, response time, reproducibility and influence of some possible interferences (nitrite, nitrate, arginine) were tested and evaluated. This sensor was used for in vitro determination of NO release from fresh porcine aorta induced by calcium ionophore A23187 (CI).

  12. Nitric oxide triggers a transient metabolic reprogramming in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    León, José; Costa, Álvaro; Castillo, Mari-Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates plant growth and development as well as responses to stress that enhanced its endogenous production. Arabidopsis plants exposed to a pulse of exogenous NO gas were used for untargeted global metabolomic analyses thus allowing the identification of metabolic processes affected by NO. At early time points after treatment, NO scavenged superoxide anion and induced the nitration and the S-nitrosylation of proteins. These events preceded an extensive though transient metabolic reprogramming at 6 h after NO treatment, which included enhanced levels of polyamines, lipid catabolism and accumulation of phospholipids, chlorophyll breakdown, protein and nucleic acid turnover and increased content of sugars. Accordingly, lipid-related structures such as root cell membranes and leaf cuticle altered their permeability upon NO treatment. Besides, NO-treated plants displayed degradation of starch granules, which is consistent with the increased sugar content observed in the metabolomic survey. The metabolic profile was restored to baseline levels at 24 h post-treatment, thus pointing up the plasticity of plant metabolism in response to nitroxidative stress conditions. PMID:27885260

  13. Oscillations of nitric oxide concentration in the perturbed denitrification pathway of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, I

    1992-01-01

    The metabolism of nitric oxide in Paracoccus denitrificans has been studied using a Clark-type electrode. The uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and the SH reagent N-ethylmaleimide, both of which released nitric oxide from cells respiring nitrite, were found to be efficient inhibitors of nitric oxide reductase activity. Control experiments with another uncoupler, pentachlorophenol, showed that the inhibitory effect of CCCP was not the result of a decrease in membrane potential. The denitrification pathway in cells with partly inhibited nitric oxide reductase, or in a reconstituted system containing purified nitric reductase and membrane vesicles, exhibited marked sustained oscillations of nitric oxide concentration. The occurrence of the oscillations was strictly dependent on the initial concentration of nitrite. The observed oscillatory kinetics is considered to reflect two regulatory signals destabilizing the denitrification pathway, namely the inhibition of nitric oxide reductase by nitric oxide and/or by nitrite. PMID:1325776

  14. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  15. Electron transfer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa CP1 in electrochemical reduction of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; He, Jiaxin; Li, Han; Zhang, Yongqing

    2016-10-01

    This study reports catalytic electro-chemical reduction of nitric oxide (NO) enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CP1. The current generated in the presence of bacteria was 4.36times that in the absence of the bacteria. The strain was able to catalyze electro-chemical reduction of NO via indirect electron transfer with an electrode, revealed by a series of cyclic voltammetry experiments. Soluble electron shuttles secreted into solution by live bacteria were responsible for the catalytic effects. The enhancement of NO reduction was also confirmed by detection of nitrous oxide; the level of this intermediate was 46.4% higher in the presence of bacteria than in controls, illustrated that the electron transfer pathway did not directly reduce nitric oxide to N2. The findings of this study may offer a new model for bioelectrochemical research in the field of NO removal by biocatalysts.

  16. Nitric oxide control of cardiac function: is neuronal nitric oxide synthase a key component?

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Claire E; Ashley, Euan A; Casadei, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to regulate cardiac function, both in physiological conditions and in disease states. However, several aspects of NO signalling in the myocardium remain poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the disparate functions ascribed to NO result from its generation by different isoforms of the NO synthase (NOS) enzyme, the varying subcellular localization and regulation of NOS isoforms and their effector proteins. Some apparently contrasting findings may have arisen from the use of non-isoform-specific inhibitors of NOS, and from the assumption that NO donors may be able to mimic the actions of endogenously produced NO. In recent years an at least partial explanation for some of the disagreements, although by no means all, may be found from studies that have focused on the role of the neuronal NOS (nNOS) isoform. These data have shown a key role for nNOS in the control of basal and adrenergically stimulated cardiac contractility and in the autonomic control of heart rate. Whether or not the role of nNOS carries implications for cardiovascular disease remains an intriguing possibility requiring future study. PMID:15306414

  17. Air contamination with nitric oxide: effect on exhaled nitric oxide response.

    PubMed

    Therminarias, A; Flore, P; Favre-Juvin, A; Oddou, M F; Delaire, M; Grimbert, F

    1998-03-01

    This study examines the response of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) concentration (ECNO) and quantity of exhaled NO over time (EVNO) in 10 healthy subjects breathing into five polyethylene bags, one in which synthetic air was free of NO and four in which NO was diluted to concentrations of 20 +/- 0.6, 49 +/- 0.8, 98 +/- 2, and 148 +/- 2 ppb, respectively. Each subject was connected to each bag for 10 min at random. Minute ventilation and ECNO were measured continuously, and EVNO was calculated continuously. ECNO and EVNO values were significantly higher for an inhaled NO concentration of 20 ppb than for NO-free air. Above 20 ppb, ECNO and EVNO increased linearly with inhaled NO concentration. It is reasonable to assume that a share of the quantity of inspired NO over time (InspVNO) because of air contamination by pollution is rejected by the ventilatory pathway. Insofar as InspVNO does not affect endogenous production or the metabolic fate of NO in the airway, this share may be estimated as being approximately one third of InspVNO, the remainder being taken by the endogenous pathway. Thus, air contamination by the NO resulting from pollution greatly increases the NO response in exhaled air.

  18. Inhaled nitric oxide augments nitric oxide transport on sickle cell hemoglobin without affecting oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Schechter, Alan N.; Shelhamer, James H.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Conway, Deirdre A.; Hrinczenko, Borys W.; Nichols, James S.; Pease-Fye, Margaret E.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Rodgers, Griffin P.; Ognibene, Frederick P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) inhalation has been reported to increase the oxygen affinity of sickle cell erythrocytes. Also, proposed allosteric mechanisms for hemoglobin, based on S-nitrosation of β-chain cysteine 93, raise the possibilty of altering the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease by inhibiting polymerization or by increasing NO delivery to the tissue. We studied the effects of a 2-hour treatment, using varying concentrations of inhaled NO. Oxygen affinity, as measured by P50, did not respond to inhaled NO, either in controls or in individuals with sickle cell disease. At baseline, the arterial and venous levels of nitrosylated hemoglobin were not significantly different, but NO inhalation led to a dose-dependent increase in mean nitrosylated hemoglobin, and at the highest dosage, a significant arterial-venous difference emerged. The levels of nitrosylated hemoglobin are too low to affect overall hemoglobin oxygen affinity, but augmented NO transport to the microvasculature seems a promising strategy for improving microvascular perfusion. PMID:10510334

  19. Nitric oxide synthase in acute alteration of nitric oxide levels after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sehba, Fatima A; Chereshnev, Igor; Maayani, Saul; Friedrich, Victor; Bederson, Joshua B

    2004-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with acute decreases and subsequent recovery of cerebral nitric oxide (NO) levels, but the mechanisms of these alterations are not known. In this study, we measured NO synthase (NOS) protein and kinetics to determine its involvement in the alterations of cerebral NO levels after SAH. The endovascular rat model of SAH was used. The number of NOS-1 (neuronal) and NOS-2 (inducible)-positive cells (0-96 h) was determined by counting immunoreactive cells in 8-microm cryostat sections. The tissue content of active NOS and its kinetic parameters were studied with an enzymatic l-citrulline assay. The number of NOS-1-positive cells increased between 1 and 3 hours after SAH, decreased to and below control values at 6 and 72 hours after SAH, and increased to control values 96 hours after SAH. The number of NOS-2-positive cells increased 1 hour after SAH, decreased to control values at 24 hours, and increased above control values 96 hours after SAH. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters (V(max), K(m), slope) of NOS remained unchanged at 10 and 90 minutes after SAH. NOS-1 and -2 proteins undergo a triphasic alteration after SAH, whereas the amount of active NOS and its kinetic parameters remain unchanged during the first 90 minutes after SAH. Depletion of NOS is not involved in the acute alterations of cerebral NO levels after SAH.

  20. Practical nitric oxide measurement employing a nitric oxide-selective electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimori, K.; Ishida, H.; Fukahori, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Murakami, E.

    1994-08-01

    An NO-selective electrode was developed as an easily applicable tool for a real-time nitric oxide (NO) measurement. The working electrode (0.2 mm diam) was made from Pt/Ir alloy coated with a three-layered membrane. The counterelectrode was made from a carbon fiber. When a stable NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine, was applied, the electrode current increased in a dose-dependent fashion. The current and calculated NO concentration showed a linear relationship in the range from 0.2 nM (S/N=1) to 1 μM of NO. The response of the electrode was 1.14±0.09 s. The effects of temperature, pH, and chemicals other than NO on the electrode current were also evaluated. Electrodes which were placed in the luminal side of rat aortic rings exhibited 30 pA of current due to NO generation induced by the addition of 10-6 M of acetylcholine. The current was eliminated in the presence of 50 μM NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase. Thus, this NO-selective electrode is applicable to real-time NO assay in biological systems.

  1. Inhaled nitric oxide in premature infants: effect on tracheal aspirate and plasma nitric oxide metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Posencheg, M A; Gow, A J; Truog, W E; Ballard, R A; Cnaan, A; Golombek, S G; Ballard, P L

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is a potential new therapy for prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and brain injury in premature infants. This study examined dose-related effects of iNO on NO metabolites as evidence of NO delivery. Study Design: A subset of 102 premature infants in the NO CLD trial, receiving 24 days of iNO (20 p.p.m. decreasing to 2 p.p.m.) or placebo, were analyzed. Tracheal aspirate (TA) and plasma samples collected at enrollment and at intervals during study gas were analyzed for NO metabolites. Result: iNO treatment increased NO metabolites in TA at 20 and 10 p.p.m. (1.7- to 2.3-fold vs control) and in plasma at 20, 10, and 5 p.p.m. (1.6- to 2.3-fold). In post hoc analysis, treated infants with lower metabolite levels at entry had an improved clinical outcome. Conclusion: iNO causes dose-related increases in NO metabolites in the circulation as well as lung fluid, as evidenced by TA analysis, showing NO delivery to these compartments. PMID:19812581

  2. Nitric oxide and pH modulation in gynaecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, Carlos; Araos, Joaquín; Naranjo, Luciano; Barros, Eric; Subiabre, Mario; Toledo, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Chiarello, Delia I; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Nitric oxide plays several roles in cellular physiology, including control of the vascular tone and defence against pathogen infection. Neuronal, inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms synthesize nitric oxide. Cells generate acid and base equivalents, whose physiological intracellular concentrations are kept due to membrane transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and Na(+) /HCO3(-) transporters, thus maintaining a physiological pH at the intracellular (~7.0) and extracellular (~7.4) medium. In several pathologies, including cancer, cells are exposed to an extracellular acidic microenvironment, and the role for these membrane transport mechanisms in this phenomenon is likely. As altered NOS expression and activity is seen in cancer cells and because this gas promotes a glycolytic phenotype leading to extracellular acidosis in gynaecological cancer cells, a pro-inflammatory microenvironment increasing inducible NOS expression in this cell type is feasible. However, whether abnormal control of intracellular and extracellular pH by cancer cells regards with their ability to synthesize or respond to nitric oxide is unknown. We, here, discuss a potential link between pH alterations, pH controlling membrane transport systems and NOS function. We propose a potential association between inducible NOS induction and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger expression and activity in human ovary cancer. A potentiation between nitric oxide generation and the maintenance of a low extracellular pH (i.e. acidic) is proposed to establish a sequence of events in ovarian cancer cells, thus preserving a pro-proliferative acidic tumour extracellular microenvironment. We suggest that pharmacological therapeutic targeting of Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and inducible NOS may have benefits in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

  3. Nitric oxide influences blood flow distribution in renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sigmon, D H; Beierwaltes, W H

    1994-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide contributes to the regulation of regional blood flow. Inhibition of endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthesis increases blood pressure and vascular resistance. Using the substrate antagonist N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester to block endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthesis, we tested the hypothesis that, in two-kidney, one clip renovascular hypertension, endothelium-derived nitric oxide plays an increased role in maintaining blood flow to the nonclipped kidney and other visceral organs compared with normotensive controls. This could be due to increased vascular shear stress, a primary stimulus for endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthesis, after the onset of hypertension. In hypertensive rats with mild renal artery stenosis, basal renal blood flow normalized by kidney weight was similar in the nonclipped and clipped kidneys. Basal blood pressure of controls was 98 +/- 2 mm Hg compared with 145 +/- 3 mm Hg in the two-kidney, one clip hypertensive rats. N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester increased blood pressure by 20 +/- 2 and 43 +/- 3 mm Hg in control and hypertensive rats, respectively. Compared with normotensive controls, basal resistance was higher in all organ beds in the hypertensive rats including brain, heart, intestine, and kidney. With the exception of the renal circulation, the increase in vascular resistance after N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester was greater in hypertensive rats compared with normotensive controls. In the hypertensive rats, N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester caused a similar increase in vascular resistance in both the nonclipped and clipped kidneys, and this was not different from normotensive controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Rate of Nitric Oxide Scavenging by hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Azarov, Ivan; He, Xiaojun; Jeffers, Anne; Basu, Swati; Ucer, Burak; Hantgan, Roy R.; Levy, Andrew; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin, released from the red cell, may play a major role in regulating the bioavailability of nitric oxide. The abundant serum protein haptoglobin, rapidly binds to free hemoglobin forming a stable complex accelerating its clearance. The haptoglobin gene is polymorphic with two classes of alleles denoted 1 and 2. We have previously demonstrated that the haptoglobin 1 protein-hemoglobin complex is cleared twice as fast as the haptoglobin 2 protein-hemoglobin complex. In this report we explored whether haptoglobin binding to hemoglobin reduces the rate of nitric oxide scavenging using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. We found that both the haptoglobin 1 and haptoglobin 2 protein complexes react with nitric oxide at the same rate as unbound cell-free hemoglobin. To confirm these results we developed a novel assay where free hemoglobin and hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin competed in the reaction with NO. The relative rate of the NO reaction was then determined by examining the amount of reacted species using analytical ultracentrifugation. Since complexation of hemoglobin with haptoglobin does not reduce NO scavenging, we propose that the haptoglobin genotype may influence nitric oxide bioavailability by determining the clearance rate of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex. We provide computer simulations showing that a two-fold difference in the rate of uptake of the haptoglobin hemoglobin complex by macrophages significantly affects nitric oxide bioavailability thereby providing a plausible explanation for why there is more vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage in individuals and transgenic mice homozygous for the Hp 2 allele. PMID:18364244

  5. Arginase regulates red blood cell nitric oxide synthase and export of cardioprotective nitric oxide bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiangning; Gonon, Adrian T; Sjöquist, Per-Ove; Lundberg, Jon O; Pernow, John

    2013-09-10

    The theory that red blood cells (RBCs) generate and release nitric oxide (NO)-like bioactivity has gained considerable interest. However, it remains unclear whether it can be produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), which is present in RBCs, and whether NO can escape scavenging by hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that arginase reciprocally controls NO formation in RBCs by competition with eNOS for their common substrate arginine and that RBC-derived NO is functionally active following arginase blockade. We show that rodent and human RBCs contain functional arginase 1 and that pharmacological inhibition of arginase increases export of eNOS-derived nitrogen oxides from RBCs under basal conditions. The functional importance was tested in an ex vivo model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inhibitors of arginase significantly improved postischemic functional recovery in rat hearts if administered in whole blood or with RBCs in plasma. By contrast, arginase inhibition did not improve postischemic recovery when administered with buffer solution or plasma alone. The protective effect of arginase inhibition was lost in the presence of a NOS inhibitor. Moreover, hearts from eNOS(-/-) mice were protected when the arginase inhibitor was given with blood from wild-type donors. In contrast, when hearts from wild-type mice were given blood from eNOS(-/-) mice, the arginase inhibitor failed to protect against ischemia-reperfusion. These results strongly support the notion that RBCs contain functional eNOS and release NO-like bioactivity. This process is under tight control by arginase 1 and is of functional importance during ischemia-reperfusion.

  6. The effects of auroral precipitation on atmospheric nitric oxide concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Lessard, M.; Fritz, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Pulsating Auroral Nitric Oxide Production in the Lower Ionosphere (PANOPLI) project addresses a science problem that has strong implications regarding the question of how solar variability may be related to climate change and terrestrial weather. Pulsating aurora is the ideal choice for studying auroral NO production since this type of aurora is caused by tens of keV electron precipitation (which is known to produce enhancements in thermospheric NO) and is a frequently occurring and long lasting phenomenon resulting in widespread auroral luminosity. The pulsating auroral precipitation results in a large transfer of power from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere-thermosphere and may be a significant contributor to thermospheric NO production, which is dependent on the energy flux and duration of the auroral precipitation. PANOPLI makes use of ground-based riometer measurements to characterize the electron precipitation causing pulsating aurora and determine the effects of pulsating aurora on the theremosphere-mesosphere NO reservoir. The inferred precipitating electron distribution function is input to a model to calculate the expected NO enhancement for comparison with NO enhancements inferred from ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements. This problem is particularly important because NO produced at low enough altitudes can transport downward to the stratosphere and chemically react with ozone causing depletion. Therefore, this work is a vital first step in quantifying the auroral contribution to ozone depletion. Previous studies have shown that the auroral contribution to atmospheric chemistry can be significant, with up to 60% of ozone depletion enhancements (above background levels) at 35-40 km altitude due to energetic electron precipitation (Randall et al., 2005).

  7. Nitric Oxide Directly Promotes Vascular Endothelial Insulin Transport

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Aileen X.; Aylor, Kevin; Barrett, Eugene J.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance strongly associates with decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction. In the vasculature, NO mediates multiple processes that affect insulin delivery, including dilating both resistance and terminal arterioles in skeletal muscle in vivo. However, whether NO directly regulates vascular endothelial cell (EC) insulin uptake and its transendothelial transport (TET) is unknown. We report in this article that l-NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) pretreatment blocked, whereas l-arginine and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) each enhanced, EC uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled insulin. SNP also partly or fully reversed the inhibition of EC insulin uptake caused by l-NAME, wortmannin, the Src inhibitor PP1, and tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, SNP promoted [125I]TyrA14insulin TET by ∼40%. Treatment with insulin with and without SNP did not affect EC cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, and the cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP did not affect FITC-insulin uptake. In contrast, treatment with insulin and SNP significantly increased EC protein S-nitrosylation, the colocalization of S-nitrosothiol (S-NO) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 and inhibited PTP1B activity. Moreover, a high-fat diet significantly inhibited EC insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and FITC-insulin uptake that was partially reversed by SNP in rats. Finally, inhibition of S-nitrosylation by knockdown of thioredoxin-interacting protein completely eliminated SNP-enhanced FITC-insulin uptake. We conclude that NO directly promotes EC insulin transport by enhancing protein S-nitrosylation. NO also inhibits PTP1B activity, thereby enhancing insulin signaling. PMID:23863813

  8. Up-regulation of cardiac nitric oxide synthase 1-derived nitric oxide after myocardial infarction in senescent rats.

    PubMed

    Damy, Thibaud; Ratajczak, Philippe; Robidel, Estelle; Bendall, Jennifer K; Oliviéro, Patricia; Boczkowski, Jorge; Ebrahimian, Talin; Marotte, Françoise; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Heymes, Christophe

    2003-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the development of heart failure, although the source, significance, and functional role of the different NO synthase (NOS) isoforms in this pathology are controversial. The presence of a neuronal-type NOS isoform (NOS1) in the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum has been recently discovered, leading to the hypothesis that NOS1-derived NO may notably alter myocardial inotropy. However, the regulation and role(s) of NOS1 in cardiac diseases remain to be determined. Using an experimental model of myocardial infarction (MI) in senescent rats, we demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac NOS1 expression and activity in MI, coupled with the translocation of this enzyme to the sarcolemma through interactions with caveolin-3. The enhanced NOS1 activity counteracts the decrease in cardiac NOS3 expression and activity observed in heart failure. We demonstrated an increased interaction between NOS1 and its regulatory protein HSP90 in post-MI hearts, a potential mechanism for the higher NOS1 activity in this setting. Finally, preferential in vivo inhibition of NOS1 activity enhanced basal post-MI left ventricular dysfunction in senescent rats. These results provide the first evidence that increased NOS1-derived NO production may play a significant role in the autocrine regulation of myocardial contractility after MI in aging rats.

  9. Impaired pulmonary artery contractile responses in a rat model of microgravity: role of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyhan, Daniel; Kim, Soonyul; Dunbar, Stacey; Li, Dechun; Shoukas, Artin; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    Vascular contractile hyporesponsiveness is an important mechanism underlying orthostatic intolerance after microgravity. Baroreceptor reflexes can modulate both pulmonary resistance and capacitance function and thus cardiac output. We hypothesized, therefore, that pulmonary vasoreactivity is impaired in the hindlimb-unweighted (HLU) rat model of microgravity. Pulmonary artery (PA) contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) and U-46619 (U4) were significantly decreased in the PAs from HLU vs. control (C) animals. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-5) M) enhanced the contractile responses in the PA rings from both C and HLU animals and completely abolished the differential responses to PE and U4 in HLU vs. C animals. Vasorelaxant responses to ACh were significantly enhanced in PA rings from HLU rats compared with C. Moreover, vasorelaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were also significantly enhanced. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and soluble guanlyl cyclase expression were significantly enhanced in PA and lung tissue from HLU rats. In marked contrast, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was unchanged in lung tissue. These data support the hypothesis that vascular contractile responsiveness is attenuated in PAs from HLU rats and that this hyporesponsiveness is due at least in part to increased nitric oxide synthase activity resulting from enhanced eNOS expression. These findings may have important implications for blood volume distribution and attenuated stroke volume responses to orthostatic stress after microgravity exposure.

  10. Nitric Oxide Improves Internal Iron Availability in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Magdalena; Beligni, María Verónica; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency impairs chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development. In leaves, most of the iron must cross several biological membranes to reach the chloroplast. The components involved in the complex internal iron transport are largely unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), a bioactive free radical, can react with transition metals to form metal-nitrosyl complexes. Sodium nitroprusside, an NO donor, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize (Zea mays) plants growing with an iron concentration as low as 10 μm Fe-EDTA in the nutrient solution. S-Nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, another NO donor, as well as gaseous NO supply in a translucent chamber were also able to revert the iron deficiency symptoms. A specific NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, blocked the effect of the NO donors. The effect of NO treatment on the photosynthetic apparatus of iron-deficient plants was also studied. Electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize plants revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. In contrast, in NO-treated maize plants, mesophyll chloroplast appeared completely developed. NO treatment did not increase iron content in plant organs, when expressed in a fresh matter basis, suggesting that root iron uptake was not enhanced. NO scavengers 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide and methylene blue promoted interveinal chlorosis in iron-replete maize plants (growing in 250 μm Fe-EDTA). Even though results support a role for endogenous NO in iron nutrition, experiments did not establish an essential role. NO was also able to revert the chlorotic phenotype of the iron-inefficient maize mutants yellow stripe1 and yellow stripe3, both impaired in the iron uptake mechanisms. All together, these results support a biological action of NO on the availability and/or delivery of metabolically active iron within the plant. PMID:12481068

  11. Adrenoreceptors and nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Conti, Valeria; Russomanno, Giusy; Corbi, Graziamaria; Izzo, Viviana; Vecchione, Carmine; Filippelli, Amelia

    2013-11-06

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is a small molecule that continues to attract much attention from the scientific community. Since its discovery, it has been evident that NO has a crucial role in the modulation of vascular tone. Moreover, NO is involved in multiple signal transduction pathways thus contributing to the regulation of many cellular functions. NO effects can be either dependent or independent on cGMP, and rely also upon several mechanisms such as the amount of NO, the compartmentalization of the enzymes responsible for its biosynthesis (NOS), and the local redox conditions. Several evidences highlighted the correlation among adrenoreceptors activity, vascular redox status and NO bioavailability. It was suggested a possible crosstalk between NO and oxidative stress hallmarks in the endothelium function and adaptation, and in sympathetic vasoconstriction control. Adrenergic vasoconstriction is a balance between a direct vasoconstrictive effect on smooth muscle and an indirect vasorelaxant action caused by α2- and β-adrenergic endothelial receptor-triggered NO release. An increased oxidative stress and a reduction of NO bioavailability shifts this equilibrium causing the enhanced vascular adrenergic responsiveness observed in hypertension. The activity of NOS contributes to manage the adrenergic pathway, thus supporting the idea that the endothelium might control or facilitate β-adrenergic effects on the vessels and the polymorphic variants in β2-receptors and NOS isoforms could influence aging, some pathological conditions and individual responses to drugs. This seems to be dependent, almost in part, on differences in the control of vascular tone exerted by NO. Given its involvement in such important mechanisms, the NO pathway is implicated in aging process and in both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular conditions. Thus, it is essential to pinpoint NO involvement in the regulation of vascular tone for the effective clinical/therapeutic management of

  12. Adrenoreceptors and nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Valeria; Russomanno, Giusy; Corbi, Graziamaria; Izzo, Viviana; Vecchione, Carmine; Filippelli, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is a small molecule that continues to attract much attention from the scientific community. Since its discovery, it has been evident that NO has a crucial role in the modulation of vascular tone. Moreover, NO is involved in multiple signal transduction pathways thus contributing to the regulation of many cellular functions. NO effects can be either dependent or independent on cGMP, and rely also upon several mechanisms such as the amount of NO, the compartmentalization of the enzymes responsible for its biosynthesis (NOS), and the local redox conditions. Several evidences highlighted the correlation among adrenoreceptors activity, vascular redox status and NO bioavailability. It was suggested a possible crosstalk between NO and oxidative stress hallmarks in the endothelium function and adaptation, and in sympathetic vasoconstriction control. Adrenergic vasoconstriction is a balance between a direct vasoconstrictive effect on smooth muscle and an indirect vasorelaxant action caused by α2- and β-adrenergic endothelial receptor-triggered NO release. An increased oxidative stress and a reduction of NO bioavailability shifts this equilibrium causing the enhanced vascular adrenergic responsiveness observed in hypertension. The activity of NOS contributes to manage the adrenergic pathway, thus supporting the idea that the endothelium might control or facilitate β-adrenergic effects on the vessels and the polymorphic variants in β2-receptors and NOS isoforms could influence aging, some pathological conditions and individual responses to drugs. This seems to be dependent, almost in part, on differences in the control of vascular tone exerted by NO. Given its involvement in such important mechanisms, the NO pathway is implicated in aging process and in both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular conditions. Thus, it is essential to pinpoint NO involvement in the regulation of vascular tone for the effective clinical/therapeutic management of

  13. Nitric oxide as a mediator of inflammation?—You had better believe it

    PubMed Central

    Grisham, Matthew B.

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide has enigmatic qualities in inflammation. In order to appreciate the precise contributions of nitric oxide to a pathophysiological process, one must account for enzyme source, coproduction of oxidants and antioxidant defences, time, rate of nitric oxide production, cellular source, peroxynitrite formation and effects on DNA (mutagenesis/apoptosis). We contend that there is ample evidence to consider nitric oxide as a molecular aggressor in inflammation, particularly chronic inflammation. Therapeutic benefit can be achieved by inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase and not the donation of additional nitric oxide. Furthermore, there is growing appreciation that nitric oxide and products derived thereof, are critical components linking the increased incidence of cancer in states of chronic inflammation. PMID:18475670

  14. Nitric Oxide as a Mediator of Oxidant Lung Injury Due to Paraquat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1994-08-01

    At low concentrations, nitric oxide is a physiological transmitter, but in excessive concentrations it may cause cell and tissue injury. We report that in acute oxidant injury induced by the herbicide paraquat in isolated guinea pig lungs, nitric oxide synthesis was markedly stimulated, as evidenced by increased levels of cyclic GMP in lung perfusate and of nitrite and L-citrulline production in lung tissue. All signs of injury, including increased airway and perfusion pressures, pulmonary edema, and protein leakage into the airspaces, were dose-dependently attenuated or totally prevented by either N^G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or N^ω-nitro-L-arginine, selective and competitive inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. Protection was reversed by excess L-arginine but not by its enantiomer D-arginine. When blood was added to the lung perfusate, the paraquat injury was moderated or delayed as it was when paraquat was given to anesthetized guinea pigs. The rapid onset of injury and its failure to occur in the absence of Ca2+ suggest that constitutive rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase was responsible for the stimulated nitric oxide synthesis. The findings indicate that nitric oxide plays a critical role in the production of lung tissue injury due to paraquat, and it may be a pathogenetic factor in other forms of oxidant tissue injury.

  15. Maternal magnesium sulfate fetal neuroprotective effects to the fetus: inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells activation in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Beloosesky, Ron; Khatib, Nizar; Ginsberg, Yuval; Anabosy, Saja; Shalom-Paz, Einat; Dahis, Masha; Ross, Michael G; Weiner, Zeev

    2016-09-01

    Maternal magnesium administration has been shown to protect the preterm fetus from white- and gray-matter injury, although the mechanism is unknown. The purpose of the study is to test the following hypotheses: (1) maternal infections/inflammation activate fetal neuronal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors that up-regulate neuronal nitric oxide synthase and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathways; and (2) maternal magnesium sulfate attenuates fetal brain neuronal nitric oxide synthase and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells activation through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Pregnant rats at embryonic day 16 and embryonic day 18 (n = 6, 48 total) received injections of intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide 500 μg/kg or saline at time 0. Dams were randomized for treatment with subcutaneous magnesium sulfate (270 mg/kg) or saline for 2 hours prior to and following lipopolysaccharide/saline injections. At 4 hours after lipopolysaccharide administration, fetal brains were collected from the 4 treatment groups (lipopolysaccharide/saline, lipopolysaccharide/magnesium sulfate, saline/magnesium sulfate, saline/saline), and phosphoneuronal nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p65, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 protein levels were determined by Western blot. An additional group of pregnant rats (n = 5) received N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor antagonist following the lipopolysaccharide injection to study magnesium sulfate protective mechanism. Lipopolysaccharide (lipopolysaccharide/saline) significantly increased fetal brain phosphoneuronal nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p65, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 protein levels compared to the saline/saline group at both embryonic day 16 (phosphoneuronal nitric oxide synthase 0.23 ± 0.01 vs 0.11 ± 0.01 U; nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells

  16. Alterations in Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Aged CNS

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Junyang; Na, Changhyun; Huh, Youngbuhm

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with neuronal loss, gross weight reduction of the brain, and glial proliferation in the cortex, all of which lead to functional changes in the brain. It is known that oxidative stress is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of aging; additionally, growing evidence suggests that excessive nitric oxide (NO) production contributes to the aging process. However, it is still unclear how NO plays a role in the aging process. This paper describes age-related changes in the activity of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for neurons containing nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in many CNS regions. Understanding these changes may provide a novel perspective in identifying the aging mechanism. PMID:22829960

  17. Phenolic compounds from plants as nitric oxide production inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Conforti, F; Menichini, F

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a diatomic free radical produced from L-arginine by constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthase (cNOS and iNOS) in numerous mammalian cells and tissues. Nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O2-) and their reaction product peroxynitrite (ONOO-) may be generated in excess during the host response against viral and antibacterial infections and contribute to some pathogenesis by promoting oxidative stress, tissue injury and, even, cancer. Oxidative damage, caused by action of free radicals, may initiate and promote the progression of a number of chronic diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes and inflammation. The mechanism of inflammation injury is attributed, in part, to release of reactive oxygen species from activated neutrophils and macrophages. ROS propagate inflammation by stimulating release of mediators such as NO and cytokines. The interest of the research is motivated by the current need to find new substances of natural origin which have demonstrated effectiveness in the described fields of application and low degree of toxicity for humans. Natural products provide a vast pool of NO inhibitors that can possibly be developed into clinical products. This article reviews some plenolic secondary metabolites from plants with NO inhibitory properties and their structure-activity relationship studies that can be focused for drug development programs.

  18. Nitric oxide in prepubertal rat ovary contribution of the ganglionic nitric oxide synthase system via superior ovarian nerve.

    PubMed

    Casais, Marilina; Delgado, Silvia Marcela; Vallcaneras, Sandra; Sosa, Zulema; Rastrilla, Ana María

    2007-02-01

    Both peripheral innervation and nitric oxide (NO) participate in ovarian steroidogenesis. Considering the existence of the nitric oxide/ nitric oxide synthase system in the peripheral neural system and in the ovary, the aim of this work was to analyze if the liberation of NO in the ovarian compartment of prepubertal rats is of ovarian and/or ganglionic origin. The analysis is carried out from a physiological point of view using the experimental coeliac ganglion--Superior Ovarian Nerve--ovary model with and without ganglionic cholinergic stimulus Acetylcholine (Ach) 10(-6) M. Non selective and selective inhibitors of the synthase nitric oxide enzyme were added to the ovarian and ganglionic compartment, and the liberation of nitrites (soluble metabolite of the nitric oxide) in the ovarian incubation liquid was measured. We found that the non-selective inhibitor L-nitro-arginina methyl ester (L-NAME) in the ovarian compartment decreased the liberation of nitrites, and that Aminoguanidine (AG) in two concentrations in a non-dose dependent form provoked the same effect. The addition of Ach in ganglion magnified the effect of the inhibitors of the NOS enzyme. The most relevant results after the addition of inhibitors in ganglion were obtained with AG 400 and 800 microM. The inhibition was made evident with and without the joint action of Ach in ganglion. These data suggest that the greatest production of NO in the ovarian compartment comes from the ovary, mainly the iNOS isoform, though the coeliac ganglion also contributes through the superior ovarian nerve but with less quantity.

  19. Nitric Oxide Donor Molsidomine Positively Modulates Myogenic Differentiation of Embryonic Endothelial Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Tirone, Mario; Conti, Valentina; Manenti, Fabio; Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; D’Orlando, Cristina; Azzoni, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic VE-Cadherin-expressing progenitors (eVE-Cad+), including hemogenic endothelium, have been shown to generate hematopoietic stem cells and a variety of other progenitors, including mesoangioblasts, or MABs. MABs are vessel-associated progenitors with multilineage mesodermal differentiation potential that can physiologically contribute to skeletal muscle development and regeneration, and have been used in an ex vivo cell therapy setting for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. There is currently a therapeutic need for molecules that could improve the efficacy of cell therapy protocols; one such good candidate is nitric oxide. Several studies in animal models of muscle dystrophy have demonstrated that nitric oxide donors provide several beneficial effects, including modulation of the activity of endogenous cell populations involved in muscle repair and the delay of muscle degeneration. Here we used a genetic lineage tracing approach to investigate whether the therapeutic effect of nitric oxide in muscle repair could derive from an improvement in the myogenic differentiation of eVE-Cad+ progenitors during embryogenesis. We show that early in vivo treatment with the nitric oxide donor molsidomine enhances eVE-Cad+ contribution to embryonic and fetal myogenesis, and that this effect could originate from a modulation of the properties of yolk sac hemogenic endothelium. PMID:27760216

  20. Regulation of cytochrome C peroxidase activity by nitric oxide and laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Osipov, A N; Stepanov, G O; Vladimirov, Yu A; Kozlov, A V; Kagan, V E

    2006-10-01

    Apoptosis can be induced by activation of so-called "death receptors" (extrinsic pathway) or multiple apoptotic factors (intrinsic pathway), which leads to release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. This event is considered to be a point of no return in apoptosis. One of the most important events in the development of apoptosis is the enhancement of cytochrome c peroxidase activity upon its interaction with cardiolipin, which modifies the active center of cytochrome c. In the present work, we have investigated the effects of nitric oxide on the cytochrome c peroxidase activity when cytochrome c is bound to cardiolipin or sodium dodecyl sulfate. We have observed that cytochrome c peroxidase activity, distinctly increased due to the presence of anionic lipids, is completely suppressed by nitric oxide. At the same time, nitrosyl complexes of cytochrome c, produced in the interaction with nitric oxide, demonstrated sensitivity to laser irradiation (441 nm) and were photolyzed during irradiation. This decomposition led to partial restoration of cytochrome c peroxidase activity. Finally, we conclude that nitric oxide and laser irradiation may serve as effective instruments for regulating the peroxidase activity of cytochrome c, and, probably, apoptosis.

  1. Inhaled nitric oxide aggravates phosgene model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Li; Hai, Chun-Xu; Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    The principal acute mode of action of inhaled phosgene gas is related to an increase alveolar fluid exudation under pathologic conditions. This paper considers some aspects in modeling phosgene-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in an acute rat bioassay and whether edema formation can be modulated by inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). Protein analysis in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is amongst the most sensitive method to quantify the phosgene-induced non-cardiogenic, pulmonary high-permeability edema following acute inhalation exposure. Maximum concentrations in BAL-protein occur within one day postexposure, typically within a latency period up to about 15 h as a consequence of an increasingly exhausted lymphatic drainage. An almost similar sensitivity was given by the functional endpoint 'enhanced pause (Penh)' when measured by non-invasive whole-body barometric plethysmography over a time period of 20 h. The magnitude of edema formation follows a concentration x time (C¹xt) relationship, although animal model-specific deviations may occur at very short exposure durations (1-20 min) due to a rodent-specific, reflexively induced transient decreased ventilation. This has to be accounted for when simulating accidental exposure scenarios to study the mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of fluid transport in this type of ALI. Therefore, a special focus has to be given to the dosimetry of inhaled phosgene, otherwise any change in effect magnitude, as a result of under-dosing of phosgene, may be misconceived as promising therapy. This study demonstrates that accidental exposures can be modeled best in rats by exposure durations of at least 20-30 min. Lung function measurements (Penh) show that pathophysiological effects appear to occur concomitant with the exposure to phosgene; however, its full clinical manifestation requires a gross imbalance of pulmonary fluid clearance. When applying this concept, post-phosgene exposure iNO at 1.5 ppm × 6 h or

  2. Platelet aggregation responses are critically regulated in vivo by endogenous nitric oxide but not by endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Tymvios, C; Moore, C; Jones, S; Solomon, A; Sanz-Rosa, D; Emerson, M

    2009-12-01

    Although exogenous nitric oxide (NO) clearly modifies platelet function, the role and the source of endogenous NO in vivo remain undefined. In addition, endothelial NO synthase (NOS-3) critically regulates vessel tone but its role in modulating platelet function is unclear. In this paper we have investigated the roles of endogenous NO and NOS-3 in regulating platelet function in vivo and determined the functional contribution made by platelet-derived NO. We used a mouse model for directly assessing platelet functional responses in situ in the presence of an intact vascular endothelium with supporting in vitro and molecular studies. Acute NOS inhibition by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) enhanced platelet aggregatory responses to thrombin and platelets were shown to be regulated primarily by NO sources external to the platelet. Elevation of endogenous NOS inhibitors to mimic effects reported in patients with cardiovascular diseases did not enhance platelet responses. Platelet responsiveness following agonist stimulation was not modified in male or female NOS-3(-/-) mice but responses in NOS-3(-/-) mice were enhanced by L-NAME. Platelets are regulated by endogenous NO in vivo, primarily by NO originating from the environment external to the platelet with a negligible or undetectable role of platelet-derived NO. Raised levels of endogenous NOS inhibitors, as reported in a range of diseases were not, in isolation, sufficient to enhance platelet activity and NOS-3 is not essential for normal platelet function in vivo due to the presence of bioactive NO following deletion of NOS-3.

  3. Photo-crosslinked Biodegradable Elastomers for Controlled Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Kibbe, Melina R.; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of nitric oxide (NO) has important applications in medicine, especially for procedures that involve the vasculature. We report photo-curable biodegradable poly(diol citrate) elastomers capable of slow release of NO. A methacrylated poly(diol citrate) macromonomer was prepared by polycondensation of citric acid with 1, 8-octanediol or 1, 12-dodecanediol followed by functionalization with 2-aminoethyl methacrylate. A miscible NO donor, diazeniumdiolated N, N-diethyldiethylenetriamine, was synthesized and incorporated into the polymer matrix. An elastomeric network was obtained via photo-polymerization of macromonomers upon UV irradiation within three minutes. Films and tubes of the NO-releasing crosslinked macromonomers exhibited strong tensile strength and radial compressive strength, respectively. They also exhibited cell compatibility and biodegradability in vitro. Sustained NO release under physiological conditions was achieved for at least one week. NO release enhanced the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells but inhibited the proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells. Photo-polymerizable NO-releasing materials provide a new approach for the localized and sustained delivery of NO to treat thrombosis and restenosis in the vasculature. PMID:24707352

  4. A Novel Protocol for Detection of Nitric Oxide in Plants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prachi; David, Anisha; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-01-01

    Detection of nitric oxide (NO) in plant cells is mostly undertaken using diaminofluorescein (DAF) dyes. Serious drawbacks and limitations have been identified in methods using DAF as a probe for NO detection. The present work reporting an alternative fluorescent probe for NO detection is thus proposed for varied applications in plant systems for physiological investigations. This method involves a simple, two-step synthesis, characterization, and application of MNIP-Cu {Copper derivative of [4-methoxy-2-(1H-napthol[2,3-d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol]} for specific and rapid binding with NO, leading to its detection in plant cells by epifluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Using sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) whole seedlings, hypocotyl segments, stigmas from capitulum, protoplasts, and isolated oil bodies, present investigations demonstrate the versatile nature of MNIP-Cu in applications for NO localization studies. MNIP-Cu can detect NO in vivo without any time lag (ex. 330-385 nm; em. 420-500 nm). It exhibits fluorescence both under anoxic and oxygen-rich conditions. This probe is specific to NO, which enhances its fluorescence due to MNIP-Cu complexing with NO and treatment with PTIO leads to quenching of fluorescence. It is relatively nontoxic when used at a concentration of up to 50 μM.

  5. Kinetic-dependent Killing of Oral Pathogens with Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, C.J.; Worley, B.V.; Sergesketter, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)–releasing silica nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-condensation of tetramethyl orthosilicate with aminosilanes and subsequent conversion of secondary amines to N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors. A series of ~150 nm NO-releasing particles with different NO totals and release kinetics (i.e., half-lives) were achieved by altering both the identity and mol% composition of the aminosilane precursors. Independent of identical 2 h NO-release totals, enhanced antibacterial action was observed against the periodontopathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis with extended NO-release kinetics at pH 7.4. Negligible bactericidal effect was observed against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans at pH 7.4, even when using NO-releasing silica particles with greater NO-release totals. However, antibacterial activity was observed against S. mutans at lower pH (6.4). This result was attributed to more rapid proton-initiated decomposition of the N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors and greater NO-release payloads. The data suggest a differential sensitivity to NO between cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria with implications for the future development of NO-releasing oral care therapeutics. PMID:26078424

  6. Nitric oxide-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Slomberg, Danielle L; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2014-02-01

    Secondary amine-functionalized chitosan oligosaccharides of different molecular weights (i.e., ~2500, 5000, 10,000) were synthesized by grafting 2-methyl aziridine from the primary amines on chitosan oligosaccharides, followed by reaction with nitric oxide (NO) gas under basic conditions to yield N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors. The total NO storage, maximum NO flux, and half-life of the resulting NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides were controlled by the molar ratio of 2-methyl aziridine to primary amines (e.g., 1:1, 2:1) and the functional group surrounding the N-diazeniumdiolates (e.g., polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains), respectively. The secondary amine-modified chitosan oligosaccharides greatly increased the NO payload over existing biodegradable macromolecular NO donors. In addition, the water-solubility of the chitosan oligosaccharides enabled their penetration across the extracellular polysaccharides matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and association with embedded bacteria. The effectiveness of these chitosan oligosaccharides at biofilm eradication was shown to depend on both the molecular weight and ionic characteristics. Low molecular weight and cationic chitosan oligosaccharides exhibited rapid association with bacteria throughout the entire biofilm, leading to enhanced biofilm killing. At concentrations resulting in 5-log killing of bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilms, the NO-releasing and control chitosan oligosaccharides elicited no significant cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblast L929 cells in vitro. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Chitosan Oligosaccharides as Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan; Slomberg, Danielle L.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary amine-functionalized chitosan oligosaccharides of different molecular weights (i.e., ~2500, 5000, 10000) were synthesized by grafting 2-methyl aziridine from the primary amines on chitosan oligosaccharides, followed by reaction with nitric oxide (NO) gas under basic conditions to yield N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors. The total NO storage, maximum NO flux, and half-life of the resulting NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides were controlled by the molar ratio of 2-methyl aziridine to primary amines (e.g., 1:1, 2:1) and the functional group surrounding the N-diazeniumdiolates (e.g., polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains), respectively. The secondary amine-modified chitosan oligosaccharides greatly increased the NO payload over existing biodegradable macromolecular NO donors. In addition, the water-solubility of the chitosan oligosaccharides enabled their penetration across the extracellular polysaccharides matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and association with embedded bacteria. The effectiveness of these chitosan oligosaccharides at biofilm eradication was shown to depend on both the molecular weight and ionic characteristics. Low molecular weight and cationic chitosan oligosaccharides exhibited rapid association with bacteria throughout the entire biofilm, leading to enhanced biofilm killing. At concentrations resulting in 5-log killing of bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, the NO-releasing and control chitosan oligosaccharides elicited no significant cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblast L929 cells in vitro. PMID:24268196

  8. Cytokines induce nitric oxide production in mouse osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Damoulis, P D; Hauschka, P V

    1994-06-15

    MC3T3-E1 mouse clonal osteogenic cells were incubated with interferon-gamma, interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and E. coli lipopolysaccharide. TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, and LPS caused a dose- and time-dependent increase of nitrite (NO2-), the stable metabolite of nitric oxide (NO), in conditioned media over 48 hours, while IFN gamma had a minimal effect. Different combinations of the same factors caused a synergistic enhancement of NO2- accumulation, except for IL-1 beta with LPS. The earliest detectable NO2- production was at 6-9 hours, with continued accumulation over 48 hours. NO2- production was inhibited dose-dependently by three arginine analogs known to be specific inhibitors of NO synthase, as well as by actinomycin D, cycloheximide, and dexamethasone; EGTA or indomethacin had a small inhibitory effect. It is concluded that osteoblast-like cells can be induced by proinflammatory cytokines and bacterial endotoxin to produce NO, which can play an important role in bone pathophysiology.

  9. Nitric oxide in the middle to upper thermosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E. ); Rusch, D.W. )

    1992-03-01

    The authors review the results of six rocket of thermospheric nitric oxide and attempt to reconcile them with the available laboratory photochemical data. Specifically, they assess the impact of the recently revised recommendation for the N({sup S}) + O{sub 2} rate coefficient on photochemical models. Use of the new rate coefficient lead to a significantly enhanced production of NO, particularly at F region altitudes during solar maximum conditions. A comparison of photochemical calculations with the rocket profiles indicates that the new rate coefficient introduces a significant discrepancy which can be resolved if the recombination reaction of N + NO is temperature dependent. The best fit value for the N + NO rate coefficient at thermospheric temperatures is 1.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} exp ({minus}(460 {plus minus} 60)T). The temperature dependence of this rate coefficient disagrees with the current recommendation from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, but it is in better agreement with another, earlier laboratory measurement. Calculations using the proposed rate coefficient predict the NO solar cycle variation at 180 m to be less than at 140 km which is also in agreement with the observations. It is likely that the use of these new rate coefficients will affect calculations of the thermal budget of the upper atmosphere as well as the downward transport of NO into the middle atmosphere.

  10. Circular dichroism in photoelectron images from aligned nitric oxide molecules.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Pratt, S T; Reid, K L

    2017-07-07

    We have used velocity map photoelectron imaging to study circular dichroism of the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) of nitric oxide following two-color resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization via selected rotational levels of the A (2)Σ(+), v(')=0 state. By using a circularly polarized pump beam and a counter-propagating, circularly polarized probe beam, cylindrical symmetry is preserved in the ionization process, and the images can be reconstructed using standard algorithms. The velocity map imaging set up enables individual ion rotational states to be resolved with excellent collection efficiency, rendering the measurements considerably simpler to perform than previous measurements conducted with a conventional photoelectron spectrometer. The results demonstrate that circular dichroism is observed even when cylindrical symmetry is maintained, and serve as a reminder that dichroism is a general feature of the multiphoton ionization of atoms and molecules. The observed PADs are in good agreement with calculations based on parameters extracted from previous experimental results obtained by using a time-of-flight electron spectrometer.

  11. Circular dichroism in photoelectron images from aligned nitric oxide molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ananya; Pratt, S. T.; Reid, K. L.

    2017-07-01

    We have used velocity map photoelectron imaging to study circular dichroism of the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) of nitric oxide following two-color resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization via selected rotational levels of the A 2Σ+, v'=0 state. By using a circularly polarized pump beam and a counter-propagating, circularly polarized probe beam, cylindrical symmetry is preserved in the ionization process, and the images can be reconstructed using standard algorithms. The velocity map imaging set up enables individual ion rotational states to be resolved with excellent collection efficiency, rendering the measurements considerably simpler to perform than previous measurements conducted with a conventional photoelectron spectrometer. The results demonstrate that circular dichroism is observed even when cylindrical symmetry is maintained, and serve as a reminder that dichroism is a general feature of the multiphoton ionization of atoms and molecules. The observed PADs are in good agreement with calculations based on parameters extracted from previous experimental results obtained by using a time-of-flight electron spectrometer.

  12. Direct microsensor measurement of nitric oxide production by the osteoclast.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S F; Adebanjo, O A; Moonga, B S; Awumey, E M; Malinski, T; Zaidi, M

    1999-05-27

    Nitric oxide (NO) triggers marked osteoclast retraction which closely resembles that due to Ca2+. The effect of Ca2+ has been attributed to a stimulated release of NO. Here, we show for the first time, by direct measurement with a microsensor, that osteoclasts do indeed produce NO and that this production is enhanced by a high Ca2+. We also show that the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, mimics the latter. Furthermore, osteoclasts on dentine produce more NO than osteoclasts on glass and NO release from dentine-plated osteoclasts is much less sensitive to stimulation by Ca2+. Finally, the microsomal Ca2+ store-depleting agent, thapsigargin, attenuates NO release only from osteoclasts on glass, suggesting that stored Ca2+ has the dominant effect in modulating NO release from non-resorbing cells. NO is a powerful inhibitor of bone resorption: a direct demonstration of its production is therefore strong evidence for a role in modulating osteoclast function. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Human leucocytes in asthenozoospermic patients: endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Buldreghini, E; Hamada, A; Macrì, M L; Amoroso, S; Boscaro, M; Lenzi, A; Agarwal, A; Balercia, G

    2014-12-01

    In a basic study at the Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, we evaluated the pattern of mRNA endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression in human blood leucocytes isolated from normozoospermic fertile and asthenozoospermic infertile men to elucidate any pathogenic involvement in sperm cell motility. Forty infertile men with idiopathic asthenozoospermia and 45 normozoospermic fertile donors, age-matched, were included. Semen parameters were evaluated, and expression analysis of mRNA was performed in human leucocytes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sperm volume, count, motility and morphology were determined, and eNOS expression and Western blotting analyses were performed. A positive correlation was observed between the concentrations of NO and the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. The mRNA of eNOS was more expressed in peripheral blood leucocytes isolated from asthenozoospermic infertile men versus those of fertile normozoospermic men (7.46 ± 0.38 versus 7.06 ± 0.56, P = 0.0355). A significant up-regulation of eNOS gene in peripheral blood leucocytes was 1.52-fold higher than that of fertile donors. It is concluded that eNOS expression and activity are enhanced in blood leucocytes in men with idiopathic asthenozoospermia.

  14. The role of nitric oxide in neurovascular coupling.

    PubMed

    Dormanns, K; Brown, R G; David, T

    2016-04-07

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a neurotransmitter known to act as a potent cerebral vasodilator. Its role in neurovascular coupling (NVC) is discussed controversially and one of the main unanswered questions is which cell type provides the governing source of NO for the regulation of vasodynamics. Mathematical modelling can be an appropriate tool to investigate the contribution of NO towards the key components of NVC and analyse underlying mechanisms. The lumped parameter model of a neurovascular unit, including neurons (NE), astrocytes (AC), smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells (EC), was extended to model the NO signalling pathway. Results show that NO leads to a general shift of the resting regional blood flow by dilating the arteriolar radius. Furthermore, dilation during neuronal activation is enhanced. Simulations show that potassium release is responsible for the fast onset of vascular response, whereas NO-modulated mechanisms maintain dilation. Wall shear stress-activated NO release from the EC leads to a delayed return to the basal state of the arteriolar radius. The governing source of vasodilating NO that diffuses into the SMC, which determine the arteriolar radius, depends on neuronal activation. In the resting state the EC provides the major contribution towards vasorelaxation, whereas during neuronal stimulation NO produced by the NE dominates.

  15. Nitric oxide accelerates seed germination in warm-season grasses.

    PubMed

    Sarath, Gautam; Bethke, Paul C; Jones, Russell; Baird, Lisa M; Hou, Guichuan; Mitchell, Robert B

    2006-05-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) significantly promoted germination of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. cv Kanlow) in the light and in the dark at 25 degrees C, across a broad range of concentrations. SNP also promoted seed germination in two other warm-season grasses. A chemical scavenger of NO inhibited germination and blocked SNP stimulation of seed germination. The phenolic (+)-catechin acted synergistically with SNP and nitrite in promoting seed germination. Acidified nitrite, an alternate NO donor also significantly stimulated seed germination. Interestingly, sodium cyanide, potassium ferricyanide and potassium ferrocyanide at 200 microM strongly enhanced seed germination as well, whereas potassium chloride was without effect. Ferrocyanide and cyanide stimulation of seed germination was blocked by an NO scavenger. Incubation of seeds with a fluorescent NO-specific probe provided evidence for NO production in germinating switchgrass seeds. Abscisic acid (ABA) at 10 microM depressed germination, inhibited root elongation and essentially abolished coleoptile emergence. SNP partially overcame ABA effects on radicle emergence but did not overcome the effects of ABA on coleoptile elongation. Light microscopy indicated extension of the radicle and coleoptiles in seeds maintained on water or on SNP after 2 days. In contrast, there was minimal growth of the radicle and coleoptile in ABA-treated seeds even after 3-4 days. These data indicate that seed germination of warm-season grasses is significantly influenced by NO signaling pathways and document that NO could be an endogenous trigger for release from dormancy in these species.

  16. [Nitric oxide and reflectory regulation of blood circulation in rats].

    PubMed

    Shapoval, L M; Moĭbenko, O O; Sahach, V F; Pobihaĭlo, L S; Dmytrenko, O V

    2003-01-01

    In acute experiments on anaesthetized with urethane normotensive rats we studied the ways of participation of nitric oxide (NO) in reflector control of the cardiovascular system by the medullary neurons within n.tractus solitarii (NTS), dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve (DNV), n. ambiguus (AMB), and the lateral reticular nucleus (LRN). Modulations of the activities of neuronal NO-synthase (nNOS) in the populations of the cardiovascular neurons within the medullary nuclei which are involved in the reflector cardiovascular control were induced by intramedullary injections of sodium nitroprusside as NO donor, L-arginine as NO precursor, L-NNA as an inhibitor of NOS, as well as by intraperetoneal injections of 7-nitroindazol (nNOS inhibitor). We have determined that stimulation of nNOS activity in the populations of the medullary neurons resulted in both remarkable shifts in the SAP level and in inhibiting the chemoreceptor reflector responses. After preliminary inhibiting nNOS chemoreceptor reflexes induced by epinephrine were found to be enhanced in most experiments.

  17. Neurovascular protection by ischaemic tolerance: role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino; Kahles, Timo; Gallo, Eduardo F; Anrather, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key mediator in the mechanisms of ischaemic tolerance induced by a wide variety of preconditioning stimuli. NO is involved in the brain protection that develops either early (minutes–hours) or late (days–weeks) after the preconditioning stimulus. However, the sources of NO and the mechanisms underlying the protective effects differ substantially. While in early preconditioning NO is produced by the endothelial and neuronal isoform of NO synthase, in delayed preconditioning NO is synthesized by the inducible or ‘immunological’ isoform of NO synthase. Furthermore, in early preconditioning, NO acts through the canonical cGMP pathway, possibly through protein kinase G and opening of mitochondrial KATP channels. In late preconditioning, the protection is mediated by peroxynitrite formed by the reaction of NO with superoxide derived from the enzyme NADPH oxidase. The mechanisms by which peroxynitrite exerts its protective effect may include improvement of post-ischaemic cerebrovascular function, leading to enhancement of blood flow to the ischaemic territory, and expression of prosurvival genes resulting in cytoprotection. The evidence suggests that NO can engage highly effective and multifunctional prosurvival pathways, which could be exploited for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular pathologies. PMID:21746790

  18. Involvement of nitric oxide system in experimental muscle crush injury.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, I; Abassi, Z; Coleman, R; Milman, F; Winaver, J; Better, O S

    1998-01-01

    Muscle crush injury is often complicated by hemodynamic shock, electrolyte disorders, and myoglobinuric renal failure. In this study, we examined the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) system in the development of muscle damage in an experimental model of crush injury induced by exertion of standardized mechanical pressure on tibialis muscle of rat. The intact limb served as a control. Four days after injury, the crushed muscle was characterized by extreme capillary vasodilatation as demonstrated by histological morphometric analysis. These changes were accompanied by muscle hyperperfusion as evaluated by measurements of femoral blood flow (ultrasonic flowmetry) and capillary blood flow (laser-doppler flowmetry). Treatment with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, largely decreased the hyperperfusion. Furthermore, the expression of the different NOS isoforms, assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and immunoreactive levels, determined by Western blot, revealed a remarkable induction of the inducible NOS in the crushed limb. Similarly, endothelial NOS mRNA increased gradually after the induction of muscle damage. In contrast, the major muscular NOS, i.e., neuronal isoform remained unchanged. In line with the alterations in the mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed parallel changes in the immunoreactive levels of the various NOS. These findings indicate that muscle crush is associated with activation of the NO system mainly due to enhancement of iNOS. This may contribute to NO-dependent extreme vasodilatation in the injured muscle and aggravate the hypovolemic shock after crush injury. PMID:9502774

  19. Hypergravity upregulates renal inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gun; Oh, Choong Sik; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to hypergravity severely decreases renal blood flow, potentially causing renal dysfunction. Nitric oxide (NO), which is endogenously synthesized by inducible NO synthase (iNOS), plays an important role in the regulation of renal function. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hypergravity exposure on the production of NO in kidneys. To determine whether hypergravity induces renal hypoxia and alters renal iNOS expression and NO production, mice were exposed to short-term hypergravity at +3Gz for 1 h. The time course of iNOS mRNA expression, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression, and NO production was examined. Renal HIF-1α levels were significantly elevated immediately after centrifugation, and this increase was sustained for 3 h post-exposure. iNOS mRNA levels were also significantly increased immediately after exposure and were maintained during the reoxygenation period. Immunohistochemical staining for iNOS revealed that the cortical tubular epithelium exhibited moderate to strong cytoplasmic iNOS immunoreactivity immediately after hypergravity exposure and during the reoxygenation period. The time course of NO production was similar to that of iNOS expression. Our results suggest that both hypoxia and reoxygenation might be involved in the upregulation of HIF-1α in the kidneys of mice exposed to hypergravity. Significant increases in renocortical iNOS expression immediately after centrifugation and during the reoxygenation period suggest that iNOS expression induced by hypergravity exposure might play a protective role against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in the renal cortex. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the role of iNOS and NO in kidneys exposed to hypergravity. PMID:27174912

  20. Characterization of exhaled nitric oxide: introducing a new reproducible method for nasal nitric oxide measurements.

    PubMed

    Palm, J P; Graf, P; Lundberg, J O; Alving, K

    2000-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is present in the human nasal airways and has been suggested to originate primarily from the paranasal sinuses. The aim of this study was to establish a new and reproducible method for measurement of nasal NO. Through repeated single-breath measurements the intra- and inter-individual variations of NO levels in nasally (into a tightly fitting mask covering the nose) and orally exhaled air were determined in healthy humans. Variations due to the methods used were investigated. The contribution of oral NO to the nasal exhalations by introducing a mouthwash procedure was also studied. This study shows distinct individual values of NO in nasally and orally exhaled air of healthy humans. Some diurnal variability was also found with a rise in NO in nasally and orally exhaled air over the day, but no, or little, day-to-day variability when comparing the results from separate mornings. There was no correlation between NO levels in nasally and orally exhaled air, whereas there was a strong correlation between NO levels in air exhaled through the left and right nostril. The levels of NO in air exhaled at 0.17 L x s(-1) through either nostril separately were higher than in air exhaled at the same flow rate through both nostrils simultaneously. After the introduction of a mouthwash procedure the level of NO in orally, but not nasally exhaled air was reduced. To conclude the method using nasal exhalation into a nose mask is highly reproducible. It is also suggested that subtracting the level of NO in orally exhaled air, after mouthwash, from that in nasally exhaled air, would adequately reflect nasal NO levels.

  1. Influence of atmospheric nitric oxide concentration on the measurement of nitric oxide in exhaled air

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, M.; Pelizzoni, A.; Majori, M.; Cuomo, A.; Munari, E. d.; Pesci, A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled air shows promise as a non-invasive method of detecting lung inflammation. However, variable concentrations of NO are measured in environmental air. The aim of this study was to verify a possible relationship between exhaled NO and atmospheric NO values during high atmospheric NO days.
METHOD—Exhaled air from 78 healthy non-smokers of mean age 35.3 years was examined for the presence of NO using a chemiluminescence NO analyser and NO levels were expressed as part per billion (ppb). The exhaled air from all the subjects was collected into a single bag and into two sequential bags. Before each test atmospheric NO was measured.
RESULTS—The mean (SE) concentration of exhaled NO collected into the single bag was 17.1 (0.6) ppb while the mean values of exhaled NO in bags 1 and 2 were 16.7 (1.3) ppb and 13.8 (1.2) ppb, respectively. The atmospheric NO concentrations registered before each test varied from 0.4 to 71 ppb. There was a significant correlation between exhaled NO in the single bag and atmospheric NO (r = 0.38,p = 0.001). The atmospheric NO concentration also correlated with exhaled NO both in bag 1 (r = 0.44, p = 0.0001) and in bag 2 (r= 0.42, p = 0.0001). These correlations disappeared with atmospheric NO concentrations lower than 35ppb.
CONCLUSIONS—These results indicate a relationship between atmospheric NO and NO levels measured in exhaled air, therefore exhaled NO should not be measured on very high atmospheric NO days.

 PMID:9828854

  2. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and nitric oxide function: new light through old windows.

    PubMed

    Bird, Ian M

    2011-09-01

    The principle mechanisms operating at the level of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) itself to control its activity are phosphorylation, the auto-regulatory properties of the protein itself, and Ca(2)(+)/calmodulin binding. It is now clear that activation of eNOS is greatest when phosphorylation of certain serine and threonine residues is accompanied by elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+](i). While eNOS also contains an autoinhibitory loop, Rafikov et al. (2011) present the evidence for a newly identified 'flexible arm' that operates in response to redox state. Boeldt et al. (2011) also review the evidence that changes in the nature of endothelial Ca(2)(+) signaling itself in different physiologic states can extend both the amplitude and duration of NO output, and a failure to change these responses in pregnancy is associated with preeclampsia. The change in Ca(2)(+) signaling is mediated through altering capacitative entry mechanisms inherent in the cell, and so many agonist responses using this mechanism are altered. The term 'adaptive cell signaling' is also introduced for the first time to describe this phenomenon. Finally NO is classically regarded as a regulator of vascular function, but NO has other actions. One proposed role is regulation of steroid biosynthesis but the physiologic relevance was unclear. Ducsay & Myers (2011) now present new evidence that NO may provide the adrenal with a mechanism to regulate cortisol output according to exposure to hypoxia. One thing all three of these reviews show is that even after several decades of study into NO biosynthesis and function, there are clearly still many things left to discover.

  3. Nitric Oxide Synthase-Dependent Nitric Oxide Production Is Associated with Salt Tolerance in Arabidopsis1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min-Gui; Tian, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key molecule involved in many physiological processes in plants. To characterize roles of NO in tolerance of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to salt stress, effect of NaCl on Arabidopsis wild-type and mutant (Atnoa1) plants with an impaired in vivo NO synthase (NOS) activity and a reduced endogenous NO level was investigated. Atnoa1 mutant plants displayed a greater Na+ to K+ ratio in shoots than wild-type plants due to enhanced accumulation of Na+ and reduced accumulation of K+ when exposed to NaCl. Germination of Atnoa1 seeds was more sensitive to NaCl than that of wild-type seeds, and wild-type plants exhibited higher survival rates than Atnoa1 plants when grown under salt stress. Atnoa1 plants had higher levels of hydrogen peroxide than wild-type plants under both control and salt stress, suggesting that Atnoa1 is more vulnerable to salt and oxidative stress than wild-type plants. Treatments of wild-type plants with NOS inhibitor and NO scavenger reduced endogenous NO levels and enhanced NaCl-induced increase in Na+ to K+ ratio. Exposure of wild-type plants to NaCl inhibited NOS activity and reduced quantity of NOA1 protein, leading to a decrease in endogenous NO levels measured by NO-specific fluorescent probe. Treatment of Atnoa1 plants with NO donor sodium nitroprusside attenuated the NaCl-induced increase in Na+ to K+ ratio. Therefore, these findings provide direct evidence to support that disruption of NOS-dependent NO production is associated with salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:17351048

  4. Exhaled nitric oxide in children after accidental exposure to chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Tschiedel, Eva; Groch, Manuela; Klepper, Jörg; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-08-01

    Chronic exposure to chlorine gas has been shown to cause occupational asthma. Acute inhalation of chlorine is known to cause airway inflammation and induce airway nitric oxide formation. Exhaled nitric oxide may therefore be a marker of airway damage after chlorine gas exposure. After accidental chlorine gas exposure in a swimming pool, exhaled nitric oxide and pulmonary function were repeatedly measured in 18 children over a 1-mo period. Symptomatic children with impaired pulmonary function had higher nitric oxide levels on the day after the exposure compared to day 8 and day 28. Differences in exhaled nitric oxide were more pronounced at a higher exhalation flow compared to lower flow, suggesting peripheral rather than central airway damage. This was in accordance with the observed changes in pulmonary function. No changes in exhaled nitric oxide were seen in asymptomatic children. These data suggest that acute chlorine gas exposure results in a mild increase of exhaled nitric oxide in symptomatic children.

  5. Was nitric oxide the first deep electron sink?

    PubMed

    Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; van Lis, Robert; Duval, Simon; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara; Russell, Michael J; Nitschke, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary histories of enzymes involved in chemiosmotic energy conversion indicate that a strongly oxidizing substrate was available to the last universal common ancestor before the divergence of Bacteria and Archaea. According to palaeogeochemical evidence, O(2) was not present beyond trace amounts on the early Earth. Based on recent phylogenetic, enzymatic and geochemical results, we propose that, in the earliest Archaean, nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives nitrate and nitrite served as strongly oxidizing substrates driving the evolution of a bioenergetic pathway related to modern dissimilatory denitrification. Aerobic respiration emerged later from within this ancestral pathway via adaptation of the enzyme NO reductase to its new substrate, dioxygen.

  6. Topological control of nitric oxide secretion by tantalum oxide nanodot arrays.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Udesh; Lee, Chia Hui; Huang, Chun-Chung; Chu, Ying Hao; Huang, Guewha S; Lin, Yan-Ren; Chen, Wen-Liang

    2015-11-09

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a very important role in the cardiovascular system as a major secondary messenger in signaling pathway. Its concentration regulates most of the important physiological indexes including the systemic blood pressure, blood flow, regional vascular tone and other cardiac functions. The effect of nanotopography on the NO secretion in cardiomyocytes has not been elucidated before. In this study, we report how the nanotopography can modulate the secretion profile of NO and attempt to elucidate the genetic pathways responsible for the same by using Tantalum Oxide nanodot arrays ranging from 10 to 200 nm. A series of nanodot arrays were fabricated with dot diameter ranging from 10 to 200 nm. Temporal NO release of cardiomyocytes was quantified when grown on different surfaces. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot were performed to verify the genetic pathways of NO release. After hours 24 of cell seeding, NO release was slowly enhanced by the increase of dot diameter from 10 nm up to 50 nm, mildly enhanced to a medium level at 100 nm, and increase rapidly to a high level at 200 nm. The temporal enhancement of NO release dropped dramatically on day 3. On day 5, a topology-dependent profile was established that maximized at 50 nm and dropped to control level at 200 nm. The NO releasing profile was closely associated with the expression patterns of genes associated with Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway [GPCR, PI3K, Akt, Bad, Bcl-2, NFκB(p65), eNOS], but less associated with Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) pathway (TNF-α, ILK, Akt, IκBα, NFκB, iNOS). Western blotting of Akt, eNOS, iNOS, and NFκB further validated that eNOS pathway was modulated by nanotopology. Based on the findings of the present study, 50, 100 nm can serve as the suitable nanotopography patterns for cardiac implant surface design. These two nanodot arrays promote NO secretion and can also promote the vascular smooth muscle relaxation. The results of this

  7. Nitric oxide ameliorates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Alka; Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2016-11-01

    In cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120, iron deficiency leads to oxidative stress with unavoidable consequences. Nitric oxide reduces pigment damage and supported the growth of Anabaena 7120 in iron-deficient conditions. Elevation in nitric oxide accumulation and reduced superoxide radical production justified the role of nitric oxide in alleviating oxidative stress in iron deficiency. Increased activities of antioxidative enzymes and higher levels of ROS scavengers (ascorbate, glutathione and thiol) in iron deficiency were also observed in the presence of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide also supported the membrane integrity of Anabaena cells and reduces protein and DNA damage caused by oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency. Results suggested that nitric oxide alleviates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

  8. Reductive activation of Cr(Vi) by nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Porter, Ryan; Jáchymová, Marie; Martásek, Pavel; Kalyanaraman, B; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2005-05-01

    Chromium(VI) is a recognized toxicant whose effects have been linked to its reduction to lower oxidation states. Although Cr(VI) is reduced by several systems, it is anticipated that its reduction by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) could have significant effects in endothelial and brain cells that express high constitutive levels of the enzyme. This possibility was examined by electron paramagnetic resonance that showed the formation of a stable Cr(V) species from NOS/Cr(VI). The formation of Cr(V) was calcium/calmodulin-independent indicating that Cr(VI) to Cr(V) reduction occurs at the flavin-containing domain of NOS. Accordingly, Cr(VI) reduction by the reductase domain of NOS and the chimera protein cytochrome-P450-reductase+tail-nNOS also generated Cr(V). Activation of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4))-free NOS with calcium/calmodulin diminished Cr(V) steady-state levels while increasing superoxide formation. Since SOD restored Cr(V) to control levels, this result was taken as evidence for a reaction between Cr(V) and superoxide. Supplementation of NOS with BH(4) cofactor not only failed to increase Cr(V) yields but generated superoxide and hydroxyl radical. Since the holoenzyme does not generate superoxide, this reaction indicated that Cr(V) mediates the oxidation of BH(4)-bound to the enzyme. In the presence of L-arginine, however, Cr(VI) neither enhances superoxide release nor inhibits NO formation from fully active NOS. This suggests that L-arginine protects BH(4) from Cr(V)-mediated oxidation. While Cr(V) was inactive toward NO, spin trapping experiments with 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl 5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide and oxygen consumption measurements showed that Cr(V) reacts with superoxide by a one-electron-transfer mechanism to generate oxygen and Cr(IV). Thus, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(V) by NOS occurs in resting and