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Sample records for nitrifying bacterial aggregates

  1. Microelectrode measurements of the activity distribution in nitrifying bacterial aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, D. de; Heuval, J.C. van den; Ottengraf, S.P.P. )

    1993-02-01

    Environmental problems caused by strongly increased ammonium emission by intensive agricultural and industrial activities, wastewater and waste gas purification plants are being redesigned. Since the growth rates and biomass yields of nitrifying organisms are low, their application in continuous-flow processes requires efficient retention of biomass, and development of bacterial aggregates with good settling properties is needed. In this study microelectrodes were used to study the activity distribution of bacterial aggregates in a biological fluidized-bed nitrification reactor with an external aerator. Measurements of ammonium, oxygen, nitrate, and pH were made. Results included the following: biomass yield was close to expected; the active nitrifying zone was limited to the outer 100 to 120 [mu]m of the aggregates; distribution of activity was determined by the penetration depth of oxygen during aggregate development; measurements of activity required the use of ammonium or nitrate microelectrodes, not oxygen microelectrodes alone. 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Assessment of bacterial community structure in nitrifying biofilm under inorganic carbon-sufficient and -limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyokwan; Chung, Yun-Chul; Yang, Heejeong; Lee, Changsoo; Aryapratama, Rio; Yoo, Young J; Lee, Seockheon

    2015-01-01

    In this work, nitrification and changes in the composition of the total bacterial community under inorganic carbon (IC)-limited conditions, in a nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor, was investigated. A culture-independent analysis of cloning and sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene was applied to quantify the bacterial diversity and to determine bacterial taxonomic assignment. IC concentrations had significant effects on the stability of ammonia-oxidation as indicated by the reduction of the nitrogen conversion rate with high NH4(+)-N loadings. The predominance of Nitrosomonas europaea was maintained in spite of changes in the IC concentration. In contrast, heterotrophic bacterial species contributed to a high bacterial diversity, and to a dynamic shift in the bacterial community structure, under IC-limited conditions. In this study, individual functions of heterotrophic bacteria were estimated based on taxonomic information. Possible key roles of coexisting heterotrophic bacteria are the assimilation of organic compounds of extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifiers, and biofilm formation by providing a filamentous structure and aggregation properties. PMID:25560266

  3. Assessment of bacterial community structure in nitrifying biofilm under inorganic carbon-sufficient and -limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyokwan; Chung, Yun-Chul; Yang, Heejeong; Lee, Changsoo; Aryapratama, Rio; Yoo, Young J; Lee, Seockheon

    2015-01-01

    In this work, nitrification and changes in the composition of the total bacterial community under inorganic carbon (IC)-limited conditions, in a nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor, was investigated. A culture-independent analysis of cloning and sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene was applied to quantify the bacterial diversity and to determine bacterial taxonomic assignment. IC concentrations had significant effects on the stability of ammonia-oxidation as indicated by the reduction of the nitrogen conversion rate with high NH4(+)-N loadings. The predominance of Nitrosomonas europaea was maintained in spite of changes in the IC concentration. In contrast, heterotrophic bacterial species contributed to a high bacterial diversity, and to a dynamic shift in the bacterial community structure, under IC-limited conditions. In this study, individual functions of heterotrophic bacteria were estimated based on taxonomic information. Possible key roles of coexisting heterotrophic bacteria are the assimilation of organic compounds of extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifiers, and biofilm formation by providing a filamentous structure and aggregation properties.

  4. 454 pyrosequencing-based characterization of the bacterial consortia in a well established nitrifying reactor.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Vargas, Rocio; Serrano-Silva, Nancy; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Luna-Guido, Marco; Thalasso, Frederic; Dendooven, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This present study aimed to characterize the bacterial community in a well-established nitrifying reactor by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. The laboratory-scale continuous stirred tank reactor has been supplied with ammonium (NH(4)(+)) as sole energy source for over 5 years, while no organic carbon has been added, assembling thus a unique planktonic community with a mean NH(4)(+) removal rate of 86 ± 1.4 mg NH(4)(+)-N/(L d). Results showed a nitrifying community composed of bacteria belonging to Nitrosomonas (relative abundance 11.0%) as the sole ammonia oxidizers (AOB) and Nitrobacter (9.3%) as the sole nitrite oxidizers (NOB). The Alphaproteobacteria (42.3% including Nitrobacter) were the most abundant class within the Proteobacteria (62.8%) followed by the Gammaproteobacteria (9.4%). However, the Betaproteobacteria (excluding AOB) contributed only 0.08%, confirming that Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria thrived in low-organic-load environments while heterotrophic Betaproteobacteria are not well adapted to these conditions. Bacteroidetes, known to metabolize extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifying bacteria and secondary metabolites of the decayed biomass, was the second most abundant phylum (30.8%). It was found that Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter sustained a broad population of heterotrophs in the reactor dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, in a 1:4 ratio of total nitrifiers to all heterotrophs. PMID:26360760

  5. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Corno, Gianluca; Coci, Manuela; Giardina, Marco; Plechuk, Sonia; Campanile, Floriana; Stefani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The release of antibiotics (AB) into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of AB-resistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and productivity. New approaches are required to study the response of microbial communities rather than individual resistance genes. In this study a chemostat-based experiment with 4 coexisting bacterial strains has been performed to mimicking the response of a freshwater bacterial community to the presence of antibiotics in low and high doses. Bacterial abundance rapidly decreased by 75% in the presence of AB, independently of their concentration, and remained constant until the end of the experiment. The bacterial community was mainly dominated by Aeromonas hydrophila and Brevundimonas intermedia while the other two strains, Micrococcus luteus and Rhodococcus sp. never exceed 10%. Interestingly, the bacterial strains, which were isolated at the end of the experiment, were not AB-resistant, while reassembled communities composed of the 4 strains, isolated from treatments under AB stress, significantly raised their performance (growth rate, abundance) in the presence of AB compared to the communities reassembled with strains isolated from the treatment without AB. By investigating the phenotypic adaptations of the communities subjected to the different treatments, we found that the presence of AB significantly increased co-aggregation by 5–6 fold. These results represent the first observation of co-aggregation as a successful strategy of AB resistance based on phenotype in aquatic bacterial communities, and can represent a fundamental step in the understanding of the effects of

  6. Impact of Short-Term Acidification on Nitrification and Nitrifying Bacterial Community Dynamics in Soilless Cultivation Media

    PubMed Central

    Levkovitch, Irit; Negreanu, Yael; Dowd, Scot; Frenk, Sammy; Silber, Avner

    2012-01-01

    Soilless medium-based horticulture systems are highly prevalent due to their capacity to optimize growth of high-cash crops. However, these systems are highly dynamic and more sensitive to physiochemical and pH perturbations than traditional soil-based systems, especially during nitrification associated with ammonia-based fertilization. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of nitrification-generated acidification on ammonia oxidation rates and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in soilless growth media. To achieve this goal, perlite soilless growth medium from a commercial bell pepper greenhouse was incubated with ammonium in bench-scale microcosm experiments. Initial quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers were significantly more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and therefore, research focused on this group. Ammonia oxidation rates were highest between 0 and 9 days, when pH values dropped from 7.4 to 4.9. Pyrosequencing of betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing amoA gene fragments indicated that r-strategist-like Nitrosomonas was the dominant ammonia-oxidizing bacterial genus during this period, seemingly due to the high ammonium concentration and optimal growth conditions in the soilless media. Reduction of pH to levels below 4.8 resulted in a significant decrease in both ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, with increased relative abundance of the r-strategist-like Nitrosospira. Nitrite oxidizers (Nitrospira and Nitrobacter) were on the whole more abundant and less sensitive to acidification than ammonia oxidizers. This study demonstrates that nitrification and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in high-N-load intensive soilless growth media may be significantly different from those in in-terra agricultural systems. PMID:22773643

  7. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Biofilms Initiated from Bacterial Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Melaugh, Gavin; Hutchison, Jaime; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Stephen P; Gordon, Vernita D; Allen, Rosalind J

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase so that it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the initial shape the aggregate forms on the surface, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play an important role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated cells is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the social evolution of biofilm communities. PMID:26934187

  8. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Biofilms Initiated from Bacterial Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Melaugh, Gavin; Hutchison, Jaime; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Stephen P; Gordon, Vernita D; Allen, Rosalind J

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase so that it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the initial shape the aggregate forms on the surface, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play an important role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated cells is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the social evolution of biofilm communities.

  9. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Biofilms Initiated from Bacterial Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Melaugh, Gavin; Hutchison, Jaime; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Stephen P.; Gordon, Vernita D.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase so that it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the initial shape the aggregate forms on the surface, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play an important role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated cells is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the social evolution of biofilm communities. PMID:26934187

  10. Abundance and Diversity of Bacterial Nitrifiers and Denitrifiers and Their Functional Genes in Tannery Wastewater Treatment Plants Revealed by High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Lu, Xin; Liu, Bo; Li, Yan; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrification/denitrification is frequently used to remove nitrogen from tannery wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia. However, information is limited about the bacterial nitrifiers and denitrifiers and their functional genes in tannery wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) due to the low-throughput of the previously used methods. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing, combined with molecular methods, were used to comprehensively characterize structures and functions of nitrification and denitrification bacterial communities in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of two full-scale tannery WWTPs. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that Proteobacteria and Synergistetes dominated in the aerobic and anaerobic sludge, respectively. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA gene cloning revealed that Nitrosomonas europaea dominated the ammonia-oxidizing community in the WWTPs. Metagenomic analysis showed that the denitrifiers mainly included the genera of Thauera, Paracoccus, Hyphomicrobium, Comamonas and Azoarcus, which may greatly contribute to the nitrogen removal in the two WWTPs. It is interesting that AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea had low abundance although both WWTPs demonstrated high ammonium removal efficiency. Good correlation between the qPCR and metagenomic analysis is observed for the quantification of functional genes amoA, nirK, nirS and nosZ, indicating that the metagenomic approach may be a promising method used to comprehensively investigate the abundance of functional genes of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in the environment. PMID:25420093

  11. Abundance and diversity of bacterial nitrifiers and denitrifiers and their functional genes in tannery wastewater treatment plants revealed by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Lu, Xin; Liu, Bo; Li, Yan; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrification/denitrification is frequently used to remove nitrogen from tannery wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia. However, information is limited about the bacterial nitrifiers and denitrifiers and their functional genes in tannery wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) due to the low-throughput of the previously used methods. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing, combined with molecular methods, were used to comprehensively characterize structures and functions of nitrification and denitrification bacterial communities in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of two full-scale tannery WWTPs. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that Proteobacteria and Synergistetes dominated in the aerobic and anaerobic sludge, respectively. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA gene cloning revealed that Nitrosomonas europaea dominated the ammonia-oxidizing community in the WWTPs. Metagenomic analysis showed that the denitrifiers mainly included the genera of Thauera, Paracoccus, Hyphomicrobium, Comamonas and Azoarcus, which may greatly contribute to the nitrogen removal in the two WWTPs. It is interesting that AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea had low abundance although both WWTPs demonstrated high ammonium removal efficiency. Good correlation between the qPCR and metagenomic analysis is observed for the quantification of functional genes amoA, nirK, nirS and nosZ, indicating that the metagenomic approach may be a promising method used to comprehensively investigate the abundance of functional genes of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in the environment. PMID:25420093

  12. Isolation, Characterization, and Aggregation of a Structured Bacterial Matrix Precursor*

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Liraz; Romero, Diego; Kayatekin, Can; Akabayov, Barak; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated groups of microbial cells that are embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is a network of biopolymers, mainly polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. ECM proteins serve a variety of structural roles and often form amyloid-like fibers. Despite the extensive study of the formation of amyloid fibers from their constituent subunits in humans, much less is known about the assembly of bacterial functional amyloid-like precursors into fibers. Using dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, and infrared spectroscopy, we show that our unique purification method of a Bacillus subtilis major matrix protein component results in stable oligomers that retain their native α-helical structure. The stability of these oligomers enabled us to control the external conditions that triggered their aggregation. In particular, we show that stretched fibers are formed on a hydrophobic surface, whereas plaque-like aggregates are formed in solution under acidic pH conditions. TasA is also shown to change conformation upon aggregation and gain some β-sheet structure. Our studies of the aggregation of a bacterial matrix protein from its subunits shed new light on assembly processes of the ECM within bacterial biofilms. PMID:23632024

  13. Investigation of Archaeal and Bacterial community structure of five different small drinking water networks with special regard to the nitrifying microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Nagymáté, Zsuzsanna; Homonnay, Zalán G; Márialigeti, Károly

    2016-01-01

    Total microbial community structure, and particularly nitrifying communities inhabiting five different small drinking water networks characterized with different water physical and chemical parameters was investigated, using cultivation-based methods and sequence aided Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. Ammonium ion, originated from well water, was only partially oxidized via nitrite to nitrate in the drinking water distribution systems. Nitrification occurred at low ammonium ion concentration (27-46μM), relatively high pH (7.6-8.2) and over a wide range of dissolved oxygen concentrations (0.4-9.0mgL(-1)). The nitrifying communities of the distribution systems were characterized by variable most probable numbers (2×10(2)-7.1×10(4) MPN L(-1)) and probably originated from the non-treated well water. The sequence aided T-RFLP method revealed that ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms and nitrite-oxidizing Bacteria (Nitrosomonas oligotropha, Nitrosopumilus maritimus, and Nitrospira moscoviensis, 'Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii') were present in different ratios in the total microbial communities of the distinct parts of the water network systems. The nitrate generated by nitrification was partly utilized by nitrate-reducing (and denitrifying) Bacteria, present in low MPN and characterized by sequence aided T-RFLP as Comamonas sp. and Pseudomonas spp. Different environmental factors, like pH, chemical oxygen demand, calculated total inorganic nitrogen content (moreover nitrite and nitrate concentration), temperature had important effect on the total bacterial and archaeal community distribution. PMID:27296965

  14. Bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation in a vortical flow

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Shahrzad; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial aggregation and patchiness play an important role in a variety of ecological processes such as competition, adaptation, epidemics, and succession. Here, we demonstrate that hydrodynamics of their environment can lead to their aggregation. This is specially important since microbial habitats are rarely at rest (e.g., ocean, blood stream, flow in porous media, and flow through membrane filtration processes). In order to study the dynamics of bacterial collection in a vortical flow, we utilize a microfluidic system to mimic some of the important microbial conditions at ecologically relevant spatiotemporal scales. We experimentally demonstrate the formation of “ring”-shaped bacterial collection patterns and subsequently the formation of biofilm streamers in a microfluidic system. Acoustic streaming of a microbubble is used to generate a vortical flow in a microchannel. Due to bacteria's finite-size, the microorganisms are directed to closed streamlines and trapped in the vortical flow. The collection of bacteria in the vortices occurs in a matter of seconds, and unexpectedly, triggers the formation of biofilm streamers within minutes. Swimming bacteria have a competitive advantage to respond to their environmental conditions. In order to investigate the role of bacterial motility on the rate of collection, two strains of Escherichia coli bacteria with different motilities are used. We show that the bacterial collection in a vortical flow is strongly pronounced for high motile bacteria. PMID:24339847

  15. Copper Complex in Poly(vinyl chloride) as a Nitric Oxide-Generating Catalyst for the Control of Nitrifying Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wonoputri, Vita; Gunawan, Cindy; Liu, Sanly; Barraud, Nicolas; Yee, Lachlan H; Lim, May; Amal, Rose

    2015-10-14

    In this study, catalytic generation of nitric oxide by a copper(II) complex embedded within a poly(vinyl chloride) matrix in the presence of nitrite (source of nitric oxide) and ascorbic acid (reducing agent) was shown to effectively control the formation and dispersion of nitrifying bacteria biofilms. Amperometric measurements indicated increased and prolonged generation of nitric oxide with the addition of the copper complex when compared to that with nitrite and ascorbic acid alone. The effectiveness of the copper complex-nitrite-ascorbic acid system for biofilm control was quantified using protein analysis, which showed enhanced biofilm suppression when the copper complex was used in comparison to that with nitrite and ascorbic acid treatment alone. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and LIVE/DEAD staining revealed a reduction in cell surface coverage without a loss of viability with the copper complex and up to 5 mM of nitrite and ascorbic acid, suggesting that the nitric oxide generated from the system inhibits proliferation of the cells on surfaces. Induction of nitric oxide production by the copper complex system also triggered the dispersal of pre-established biofilms. However, the addition of a high concentration of nitrite and ascorbic acid to a pre-established biofilm induced bacterial membrane damage and strongly decreased the metabolic activity of planktonic and biofilm cells, as revealed by CLSM with LIVE/DEAD staining and intracellular adenosine triphosphate measurements, respectively. This study highlights the utility of the catalytic generation of nitric oxide for the long-term suppression and removal of nitrifying bacterial biofilms. PMID:26418515

  16. Copper Complex in Poly(vinyl chloride) as a Nitric Oxide-Generating Catalyst for the Control of Nitrifying Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wonoputri, Vita; Gunawan, Cindy; Liu, Sanly; Barraud, Nicolas; Yee, Lachlan H; Lim, May; Amal, Rose

    2015-10-14

    In this study, catalytic generation of nitric oxide by a copper(II) complex embedded within a poly(vinyl chloride) matrix in the presence of nitrite (source of nitric oxide) and ascorbic acid (reducing agent) was shown to effectively control the formation and dispersion of nitrifying bacteria biofilms. Amperometric measurements indicated increased and prolonged generation of nitric oxide with the addition of the copper complex when compared to that with nitrite and ascorbic acid alone. The effectiveness of the copper complex-nitrite-ascorbic acid system for biofilm control was quantified using protein analysis, which showed enhanced biofilm suppression when the copper complex was used in comparison to that with nitrite and ascorbic acid treatment alone. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and LIVE/DEAD staining revealed a reduction in cell surface coverage without a loss of viability with the copper complex and up to 5 mM of nitrite and ascorbic acid, suggesting that the nitric oxide generated from the system inhibits proliferation of the cells on surfaces. Induction of nitric oxide production by the copper complex system also triggered the dispersal of pre-established biofilms. However, the addition of a high concentration of nitrite and ascorbic acid to a pre-established biofilm induced bacterial membrane damage and strongly decreased the metabolic activity of planktonic and biofilm cells, as revealed by CLSM with LIVE/DEAD staining and intracellular adenosine triphosphate measurements, respectively. This study highlights the utility of the catalytic generation of nitric oxide for the long-term suppression and removal of nitrifying bacterial biofilms.

  17. [Influence of various anions and biological macromolecules on bacterial aggregation in vitro].

    PubMed

    Belcourt, A

    1975-09-01

    The effects of various anions on experimental bacterial aggregation has been studied with Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 and Actinomyces viscosus X1, using an experimental system, based on the measurement of optical density in an aqueous polyethyleneglycol medium. Monovolent anions (acétate, chloride and fluoride) and sulphate had no effects on bacterial aggregation in salivary concentrations. However carbonate, mono and dihydrogenophosphates gave an important aggregation in relatively small saline concentrations. The study of the aggregation of Strep. mutans OMZ 175, grown in presence of sucrose for 12 to 96 hours, showed an increased aggregation of the micro-organims up to 24 hours. For longer incubation times, aggregation decreased. Finally a calcium precipitable salivary glycoprotein, at small concentrations, gave a bacterial aggregation of about 25% and may be important in dental plaque formation.

  18. Bacterial colonization and extinction on marine aggregates: stochastic model of species presence and abundance

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andrew M; Lyons, M Maille; Dobbs, Fred C; Drake, John M

    2013-01-01

    Organic aggregates provide a favorable habitat for aquatic microbes, are efficiently filtered by shellfish, and may play a major role in the dynamics of aquatic pathogens. Quantifying this role requires understanding how pathogen abundance in the water and aggregate size interact to determine the presence and abundance of pathogen cells on individual aggregates. We build upon current understanding of the dynamics of bacteria and bacterial grazers on aggregates to develop a model for the dynamics of a bacterial pathogen species. The model accounts for the importance of stochasticity and the balance between colonization and extinction. Simulation results suggest that while colonization increases linearly with background density and aggregate size, extinction rates are expected to be nonlinear on small aggregates in a low background density of the pathogen. Under these conditions, we predict lower probabilities of pathogen presence and reduced abundance on aggregates compared with predictions based solely on colonization. These results suggest that the importance of aggregates to the dynamics of aquatic bacterial pathogens may be dependent on the interaction between aggregate size and background pathogen density, and that these interactions are strongly influenced by ecological interactions and pathogen traits. The model provides testable predictions and can be a useful tool for exploring how species-specific differences in pathogen traits may alter the effect of aggregates on disease transmission. PMID:24340173

  19. Influence of calcium in extracellular DNA mediated bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Theerthankar; Sehar, Shama; Koop, Leena; Wong, Yie Kuan; Ahmed, Safia; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Manefield, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) has an important structural role in guaranteeing the integrity of the outer lipopolysaccharide layer and cell walls of bacterial cells. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) being part of the slimy matrix produced by bacteria promotes biofilm formation through enhanced structural integrity of the matrix. Here, the concurrent role of Ca(2+) and eDNA in mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation was studied for the first time using a variety of bacterial strains and the thermodynamics of DNA to Ca(2+) binding. It was found that the eDNA concentrations under both planktonic and biofilm growth conditions were different among bacterial strains. Whilst Ca(2+) had no influence on eDNA release, presence of eDNA by itself favours bacterial aggregation via attractive acid-base interactions in addition, its binding with Ca(2+) at biologically relevant concentrations was shown further increase in bacterial aggregation via cationic bridging. Negative Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values in iTC data confirmed that the interaction between DNA and Ca(2+) is thermodynamically favourable and that the binding process is spontaneous and exothermic owing to its highly negative enthalpy. Removal of eDNA through DNase I treatment revealed that Ca(2+) alone did not enhance cell aggregation and biofilm formation. This discovery signifies the importance of eDNA and concludes that existence of eDNA on bacterial cell surfaces is a key facilitator in binding of Ca(2+) to eDNA thereby mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation.

  20. A local PDE model of aggregation formation in bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavy-Waddy, Paul-Christopher; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2016-10-01

    We study pattern formation in a model of cyanobacteria motion recently proposed by Galante, Wisen, Bhaya and Levy. By taking a continuum limit of their model, we derive a novel fourth-order nonlinear parabolic PDE equation that governs the behaviour of the model. This PDE is {{u}t}=-{{u}xx}-{{u}xxxx}+α {{≤ft(\\frac{{{u}x}{{u}xx}}{u}\\right)}x} . We then derive the instability thresholds for the onset of pattern formation. We also compute analytically the spatial profiles of the steady state aggregation density. These profiles are shown to be of the form \\text{sec}{{\\text{h}}p} where the exponent p is related to the parameters of the model. Full numerical simulations give a favorable comparison between the continuum and the underlying discrete system, and show that the aggregation profiles are stable above the critical threshold.

  1. Bacterial density and community structure associated with aggregate size fractions of soil-feeding termite mounds.

    PubMed

    Fall, S; Nazaret, S; Chotte, J L; Brauman, A

    2004-08-01

    The building and foraging activities of termites are known to modify soil characteristics such as the heterogeneity. In tropical savannas the impact of the activity of soil-feeding termites ( Cubitermes niokoloensis) has been shown to affect the properties of the soil at the aggregate level by creating new soil microenvironments (aggregate size fractions) [13]. These changes were investigated in greater depth by looking at the microbial density (AODC) and the genetic structure (automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis: ARISA) of the communities in the different aggregate size fractions (i.e., coarse sand, fine sand, coarse silt, fine silt, and dispersible clays) separated from compartments (internal and external wall) of three Cubitermes niokoloensis mounds. The bacterial density of the mounds was significantly higher (1.5 to 3 times) than that of the surrounding soil. Within the aggregate size fractions, the termite building activity resulted in a significant increase in bacterial density within the coarser fractions (>20 mum). Multivariate analysis of the ARISA profiles revealed that the bacterial genetic structures of unfractionated soil and soil aggregate size fractions of the three mounds was noticeably different from the savanna soil used as a reference. Moreover, the microbial community associated with the different microenvironments in the three termite mounds revealed three distinct clusters formed by the aggregate size fractions of each mound. Except for the 2-20 mum fraction, these results suggest that the mound microbial genetic structure is more dependent upon microbial pool affiliation (the termite mound) than on the soil location (aggregate size fraction). The causes of the specificity of the microbial community structure of termite mound aggregate size fractions are discussed.

  2. Postfragmentation density function for bacterial aggregates in laminar flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Erin; Bortz, David M.; Dzul, Steve; Solomon, Michael; Younger, John

    2011-04-01

    The postfragmentation probability density of daughter flocs is one of the least well-understood aspects of modeling flocculation. We use three-dimensional positional data of Klebsiella pneumoniae bacterial flocs in suspension and the knowledge of hydrodynamic properties of a laminar flow field to construct a probability density function of floc volumes after a fragmentation event. We provide computational results which predict that the primary fragmentation mechanism for large flocs is erosion. The postfragmentation probability density function has a strong dependence on the size of the original floc and indicates that most fragmentation events result in clumps of one to three bacteria eroding from the original floc. We also provide numerical evidence that exhaustive fragmentation yields a limiting density inconsistent with the log-normal density predicted in the literature, most likely due to the heterogeneous nature of K. pneumoniae flocs. To support our conclusions, artificial flocs were generated and display similar postfragmentation density and exhaustive fragmentation.

  3. Co-composting of gelatin industry sludge combined with organic fraction of municipal solid waste and poultry waste employing zeolite mixed with enriched nitrifying bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Pandey, Akhilesh Kumar; Bundela, Pushpendra Singh; Wong, Jonathan W C; Li, Ronghua; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2016-08-01

    This work illustrates the co-composting of gelatin industry sludge (GIS) combined with organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and poultry waste (PW) employing 10% zeolite mixed with enriched nitrifying bacteria consortium (ENBC). Five piles of GIS were prepared mixed with OFMSW and PW at 2:1:0.5, 4:1:0.5, 6:1:0.5 and 8:1:0.5 and without GIS 0:1:0.5 (dry weight basis) served as control, while 10% zeolite mixed with ENBC was inoculated in all piles and composted for 42days. The Pile-4 with GIS, OFMSW and PW ratio 6:1:0.5 and 10% zeolite+ENBC were drastically reduced the nitrogen loss and enhance the mineralization rate as compare to other piles. The co-amendment of 6% GIS effectively buffered the pH between ∼7.5 to 8.0 and shortened the compost maturity period, while lower concentration of GIS was comparatively delayed the early decomposition. Therefore, our results suggested that suitability of 10% zeolite+ENBC with initial feedstock ratio 6:1:0.5 as the best formulation for the composting of GIS into value-added stable product.

  4. Co-composting of gelatin industry sludge combined with organic fraction of municipal solid waste and poultry waste employing zeolite mixed with enriched nitrifying bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Pandey, Akhilesh Kumar; Bundela, Pushpendra Singh; Wong, Jonathan W C; Li, Ronghua; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2016-08-01

    This work illustrates the co-composting of gelatin industry sludge (GIS) combined with organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and poultry waste (PW) employing 10% zeolite mixed with enriched nitrifying bacteria consortium (ENBC). Five piles of GIS were prepared mixed with OFMSW and PW at 2:1:0.5, 4:1:0.5, 6:1:0.5 and 8:1:0.5 and without GIS 0:1:0.5 (dry weight basis) served as control, while 10% zeolite mixed with ENBC was inoculated in all piles and composted for 42days. The Pile-4 with GIS, OFMSW and PW ratio 6:1:0.5 and 10% zeolite+ENBC were drastically reduced the nitrogen loss and enhance the mineralization rate as compare to other piles. The co-amendment of 6% GIS effectively buffered the pH between ∼7.5 to 8.0 and shortened the compost maturity period, while lower concentration of GIS was comparatively delayed the early decomposition. Therefore, our results suggested that suitability of 10% zeolite+ENBC with initial feedstock ratio 6:1:0.5 as the best formulation for the composting of GIS into value-added stable product. PMID:26897474

  5. Agricultural land usage transforms nitrifier population ecology.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Anthony D; McCalmont, Dylan; Meinhardt, Kelley A; Fransen, Steven C; Strand, Stuart; Brown, Sally; Stahl, David A

    2016-06-01

    Application of nitrogen fertilizer has altered terrestrial ecosystems. Ammonia is nitrified by ammonia and nitrite-oxidizing microorganisms, converting ammonia to highly mobile nitrate, contributing to the loss of nitrogen, soil nutrients and production of detrimental nitrogen oxides. Mitigating these costs is of critical importance to a growing bioenergy industry. To resolve the impact of management on nitrifying populations, amplicon sequencing of markers associated with ammonia and nitrite-oxidizing taxa (ammonia monooxygenase-amoA, nitrite oxidoreductase-nxrB, respectively) was conducted from long-term managed and nearby native soils in Eastern Washington, USA. Native nitrifier population structure was altered profoundly by management. The native ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community (comprised primarily by Nitrososphaera sister subclusters 1.1 and 2) was displaced by populations of Nitrosopumilus, Nitrosotalea and different assemblages of Nitrososphaera (subcluster 1.1, and unassociated lineages of Nitrososphaera). A displacement of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial taxa was associated with management, with native groups of Nitrosospira (cluster 2 related, cluster 3A.2) displaced by Nitrosospira clusters 8B and 3A.1. A shift in nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) was correlated with management, but distribution patterns could not be linked exclusively to management. Dominant nxrB sequences displayed only distant relationships to other NOB isolates and environmental clones. PMID:26526405

  6. Pyrosequencing Analysis of Bench-Scale Nitrifying BiofiltersRemoving Trihalomethanes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial biofilm communities in four nitrifying biofilters degrading regulated drinking water trihalomethanes were characterized by 454 pyrosequencing. The three most abundant phylotypes based on total diversity were Nitrosomonas (70%), Nitrobacter (14%), and Chitinophagace...

  7. Enhanced aerobic nitrifying granulation by static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Hua; Diao, Mu-He; Yang, Ying; Shi, Yi-Jing; Gao, Ming-Ming; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2012-04-01

    One of the main challenging issues for aerobic nitrifying granules in treating high strength ammonia wastewater is the long granulation time required for activated sludge to transform into aerobic granules. The present study provides a novel strategy for enhancing aerobic nitrifying granulation by applying an intensity of 48.0mT static magnetic field. The element analysis showed that the applied magnetic field could promote the accumulation of iron compounds in the sludge. And then the aggregation of iron decreased the full granulation time from 41 to 25days by enhancing the setting properties of granules and stimulating the secretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Long-term, cycle experiments and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) analysis proved that an intensity of 48.0mT magnetic field could enhance the activities and growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). These findings suggest that magnetic field is helpful and reliable for accelerating the aerobic nitrifying granulation.

  8. Identification and activities in situ of Nitrosospira and Nitrospira spp. as dominant populations in a nitrifying fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, A.; Beer, D. de; Amann, R.; Wagner, M.

    1998-09-01

    Bacterial aggregates from a chemolithoautotrophic, nitrifying fluidized bed reactor were investigated with microsensors and rRNA-based molecular techniques. The microprofiles of O{sub 2}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} demonstrated the occurrence of complete nitrification in the outer 125 {micro}m of the aggregates. The ammonia oxidizers were identified as members of the Nitrosospira group by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). No ammonia- or nitrate-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrosomonas or Nitrobacter, respectively, could be detected by FISH. To identify the nitrite oxidizers, a 16S ribosomal DNA clone library was constructed and screened by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and selected clones were sequenced. The organisms represented by these sequences formed two phylogenetically distinct clusters affiliated with the nitrite oxidizer Nitrospira moscoviensis. 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for in situ detection of these organisms. FISH analysis showed that the dominant populations of Nitrospira spp. and Nitrosospira spp. formed separate, dense clusters which were in contact with each other and occurred throughout the aggregate. A second, smaller, morphologically and genetically different population of Nitrospira spp. was restricted to the outer nitrifying zones.

  9. Diamidinium and iminium aromatics as new aggregators of the bacterial signaling molecule, c-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Ilana; Nakayama, Shizuka; Sintim, Herman O

    2012-01-15

    C-di-GMP has emerged as an important bacterial signaling molecule that is involved in biofilm formation. Small molecules that can form biologically inactive complexes with c-di-GMP have the potential to be used as anti-biofilm agents. Herein, we report that water-soluble diamidinium/iminium aromatics (such as berenil), which are traditionally considered as minor groove binders of nucleic acids, are capable of aggregating c-di-GMP into G-quadruplexes via π-stacking interactions. PMID:22217869

  10. ARK: Aggregation of Reads by K-Means for Estimation of Bacterial Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Koslicki, David; Chatterjee, Saikat; Shahrivar, Damon; Walker, Alan W.; Francis, Suzanna C.; Fraser, Louise J.; Vehkaperä, Mikko; Lan, Yueheng; Corander, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Estimation of bacterial community composition from high-throughput sequenced 16S rRNA gene amplicons is a key task in microbial ecology. Since the sequence data from each sample typically consist of a large number of reads and are adversely impacted by different levels of biological and technical noise, accurate analysis of such large datasets is challenging. Results There has been a recent surge of interest in using compressed sensing inspired and convex-optimization based methods to solve the estimation problem for bacterial community composition. These methods typically rely on summarizing the sequence data by frequencies of low-order k-mers and matching this information statistically with a taxonomically structured database. Here we show that the accuracy of the resulting community composition estimates can be substantially improved by aggregating the reads from a sample with an unsupervised machine learning approach prior to the estimation phase. The aggregation of reads is a pre-processing approach where we use a standard K-means clustering algorithm that partitions a large set of reads into subsets with reasonable computational cost to provide several vectors of first order statistics instead of only single statistical summarization in terms of k-mer frequencies. The output of the clustering is then processed further to obtain the final estimate for each sample. The resulting method is called Aggregation of Reads by K-means (ARK), and it is based on a statistical argument via mixture density formulation. ARK is found to improve the fidelity and robustness of several recently introduced methods, with only a modest increase in computational complexity. Availability An open source, platform-independent implementation of the method in the Julia programming language is freely available at https://github.com/dkoslicki/ARK. A Matlab implementation is available at http://www.ee.kth.se/ctsoftware. PMID:26496191

  11. Community Composition and Abundance of Bacterial, Archaeal and Nitrifying Populations in Savanna Soils on Contrasting Bedrock Material in Kruger National Park, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rughöft, Saskia; Herrmann, Martina; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Cesarz, Simone; Levick, Shaun R.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Savannas cover at least 13% of the global terrestrial surface and are often nutrient limited, especially by nitrogen. To gain a better understanding of their microbial diversity and the microbial nitrogen cycling in savanna soils, soil samples were collected along a granitic and a basaltic catena in Kruger National Park (South Africa) to characterize their bacterial and archaeal composition and the genetic potential for nitrification. Although the basaltic soils were on average 5 times more nutrient rich than the granitic soils, all investigated savanna soil samples showed typically low nutrient availabilities, i.e., up to 38 times lower soil N or C contents than temperate grasslands. Illumina MiSeq amplicon sequencing revealed a unique soil bacterial community dominated by Actinobacteria (20–66%), Chloroflexi (9–29%), and Firmicutes (7–42%) and an increase in the relative abundance of Actinobacteria with increasing soil nutrient content. The archaeal community reached up to 14% of the total soil microbial community and was dominated by the thaumarchaeal Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (43–99.8%), with a high fraction of sequences related to the ammonia-oxidizing genus Nitrosopshaera sp. Quantitative PCR targeting amoA genes encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase also revealed a high genetic potential for ammonia oxidation dominated by archaea (~5 × 107 archaeal amoA gene copies g−1 soil vs. mostly < 7 × 104 bacterial amoA gene copies g−1 soil). Abundances of archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes were positively correlated with soil nitrate, N and C contents. Nitrospira sp. was detected as the most abundant group of nitrite oxidizing bacteria. The specific geochemical conditions and particle transport dynamics at the granitic catena were found to affect soil microbial communities through clay and nutrient relocation along the hill slope, causing a shift to different, less diverse bacterial and archaeal communities at the footslope. Overall, our

  12. Association of running manner with bacterial community dynamics in a partial short-term nitrifying bioreactor for treatment of piggery wastewater with high ammonia content.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei-Li; Huang, Qiang; Miao, Li-Li; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2016-12-01

    Optimization of running parameters in a bioreactor requires detailed understanding of microbial community dynamics during the startup and running periods. Using a novel piggery wastewater treatment system termed "UASB + SHARON + ANAMMOX" constructed in our laboratory, we investigated microbial community dynamics using the Illumina MiSeq method, taking activated sludge samples at ~2-week intervals during a ~300-day period. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were further investigated by quantification of AOB amoA genes and construction of gene clone libraries. Major changes in bacterial community composition and dynamics occurred when running manner was changed from continuous flow manner (CFM) to sequencing batch manner (SBM), and when effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for practical treatment of real piggery wastewater was used as influent; differences among these three experimental groups were significant (R (2)  = 0.94, p < 0.01). When running manner was changed from CFM to SBM, relative abundance of the genus Nitrospira decreased sharply from 18.1 % on day 116 to 1.5 % on day 130, and to undetectable level thereafter. Relative abundance of the genus Nitrosomonas increased from ~0.67 % during the CFM period to 8.0 % by day 220, and thereafter decreased to a near-constant ~1.6 %. Environmental factors such as load ammonia, effluent ammonia, effluent nitrite, UASB effluent, pH, and DO levels collectively drove bacterial community dynamics and contributed to maintenance of effluent NH4 (+)-N/NO2 (-)-N ratio ~1. Theses results might provide useful clues for the control of the startup processes and maintaining high efficiency of such bioreactors. PMID:27637946

  13. Mucin biopolymers prevent bacterial aggregation by retaining cells in the free-swimming state

    PubMed Central

    Caldara, Marina; Friedlander, Ronn S.; Kavanaugh, Nicole L.; Aizenberg, Joanna; Foster, Kevin R.; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many species of bacteria form surface-attached communities known as biofilms. Surrounded in secreted polymers, these aggregates are difficult to both prevent and eradicate, posing problems for medicine and industry [1, 2]. Humans play host to hundreds of trillions of microbes that live adjacent to our epithelia and we are typically able to prevent harmful colonization. Mucus, the hydrogel overlying all wet epithelia in the body, can prevent bacterial contact with the underlying tissue. The digestive tract, for example, is lined by a firmly adherent mucus layer that is typically devoid of bacteria, followed by a second, loosely adherent layer that contains numerous bacteria [3]. Here, we investigate mucus's role as a principle arena for host-microbe interactions. Using defined in vitro assays, we found that mucin biopolymers, the main functional constituents of mucus, promote the motility of planktonic bacteria, and prevent their adhesion to underlying surfaces. The deletion of motility genes, however, allows Pseudomonas aeruginosa to overcome the dispersive effects of mucus and form suspended antibiotic-resistant flocs, which mirror the clustered morphology of immotile natural isolates found in the cystic fibrosis lung mucus [4, 5]. Mucus may offer new strategies to target bacterial virulence, such as the design of anti-biofilm coatings for implants. PMID:23142047

  14. Using mineral trioxide aggregate powder as an apical barrier: a bacterial leakage study.

    PubMed

    Milani, Amin Salem; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Pakdel, Mahdi Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used successfully for the treatment of necrotic immature teeth as part of a 2-step apical barrier. Recently, some researchers have used MTA powder instead of wet-mix MTA. It has also been used in a single-step approach in order to decrease the number of patient appointments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial microleakage of MTA powder in comparison with wet-mix MTA, in single or 2-step barrier approaches. This ex vivo study was carried out on 70 extracted single-rooted teeth. The canals were enlarged to simulate immature teeth. The prepared specimens were assigned to 4 experimental (n = 15) and 2 control (n = 5) groups. In Group 1, a wet paper point was placed in the canal following placement of wet-mix MTA. In Group 2, a dry paper point was placed on wet-mix MTA. In Group 3, the samples were treated similar to Group 1, but MTA powder was used instead of wet-mix MTA. In Group 4, the same procedures were followed as Group 3 except that a dry paper point was used. Microleakage of the samples was compared using a 2-chamber bacterial leakage apparatus. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the number of leaked samples or rate of leakage over time (P > 0.05) among the experimental groups. It can be concluded that MTA used in a single step approach has the same resistance against bacterial penetration as in a 2-step approach, and MTA powder provides the same sealing ability as wet-mix MTA. PMID:25184718

  15. Pyrosequencing and mid-infrared spectroscopy techniques reveal distinct aggregate stratification of soil bacterial communities and organic matter composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study integrated physical, chemical, and molecular techniques to assess relationships between soil bacterial community structures and the quantity and quality of soil organic carbon (SOC) at the soil microenvironment scale (e.g., within different aggregate size-fractions). To accomplish this g...

  16. Aggregate stratification assessment of soil bacterial communities and organic matter composition: Coupling pyrosequencing and mid-infrared spectroscopy techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study integrated physical, chemical, and molecular techniques to assess relationships between soil bacterial communities and the quantity and quality of soil organic carbon (SOC) at the soil microenvironment scale (e.g., within different aggregate size-fractions). To accomplish this goal soil ...

  17. Bacterial diversity of soil aggregates of different sizes in various land use conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina; Azida, Thakahova; Olga, Kutovaya

    2014-05-01

    The patterns of soil microbiome structure may be a universal and very sensitive indicator of soil quality (soil "health") used for optimization and biologization of agricultural systems. The understanding of how microbial diversity influenses, and is influenced by, the environment can only be attained by analyses at scales relevant to those at which processes influencing microbial diversity actually operate. The basic structural and functional unit of the soil is a soil aggregate, which is actually a microcosm of the associative co-existing groups of microorganisms that form characteristic ecological food chains. It is known that many important microbial processes occur in spatially segregated microenvironments in soil leading to a microscale biogeography. The Metagenomic library of typical chernozem in conditions of different land use systems was created. Total genomic DNA was extracted from 0.5 g of the frozen soil after mechanical destruction. Sample preparation and sequencing was performed on a GS Junior ("Roche»", Switzerland) according to manufacturer's recommendations, using the universal primers to the variable regions V4 gene 16S - rRNA - F515 (GTGCCAGCMGCCGCGGTAA) and R806 (GGACT-ACVSGGGTATCTAAT). It is shown that the system of land use is a stronger determinant of the taxonomic composition of the soil microbial community, rather than the size of the structural units. In soil samples from different land use systems the presence of accessory components was revealed. They may be used as indicators of processes of soil recovery, soil degradation or soil exhaustion processes occuring in the agroecosystems. The comparative analysis of microbial communities of chernozem aggregates investigated demonstrates the statistically valuable differences in the amount of bacterial phyla and Archean domain content as well as the species richness in aggregates of various size fractions. The occurrence of specific components in the taxonomic structure of micro-and macro-aggregates

  18. Dynamics of the diversity and structure of the overall and nitrifying microbial community in activated sludge along gradient copper exposures.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Fan; Ji, Min; Zhai, Hongyan; Dong, Zhao; Ye, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Diversity and composition of the microbial community, especially the nitrifiers, are essential to the treatment efficiency of wastewater in activated sludge systems. Heavy metals commonly present in the wastewater influent such as Cu can alter the community structure of nitrifiers and lower their activity. However, the dynamics of microbial community along a gradient of metal exposure have largely been unexplored, partially due to the limitations in traditional molecular methods. This study explored the dynamics regarding the diversity and community structures of overall and nitrifying microbial communities in activated sludge under intermittent Cu gradient loadings using Illumina sequencing. We created a new local nitrifying bacterial database for sequence BLAST searches. High Cu loadings (>10.9 mg/L) impoverished microbial diversity and altered the microbial community. Overall, Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum in the activated sludge system, in which Zoogloea, Thauera, and Dechloromonas (genera within the Rhodocyclaceae family of the Beta-proteobacteria class) were the dominant genera in the presence of Cu. The abundance of unclassified bacteria at the phylum level increased substantially with increasing Cu loadings. Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the predominant nitrifiers. The nitrifying bacterial community changed through increasing abundance and shifting to Cu-tolerant species to reduce the toxic effects of Cu. Our local nitrifying bacterial database helped to improve the resolution of bacterial identification. Our results provide insights into the dynamics of microbial community in response to various metal concentrations in activated sludge systems and improve our understanding regarding the effect of metals on wastewater treatment efficiency. PMID:27098258

  19. Novel bacterial isolate from Permian groundwater, capable of aggregating potential biofuel-producing microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Laughinghouse, Haywood D; Anderson, Matthew A; Chen, Feng; Willliams, Ernest; Place, Allen R; Zmora, Odi; Zohar, Yonathan; Zheng, Tianling; Hill, Russell T

    2012-03-01

    Increasing petroleum costs and climate change have resulted in microalgae receiving attention as potential biofuel producers. Little information is available on the diversity and functions of bacterial communities associated with biofuel-producing algae. A potential biofuel-producing microalgal strain, Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1, was grown in Permian groundwater. Changes in the bacterial community structure at three temperatures were monitored by two culture-independent methods, and culturable bacteria were characterized. After 9 days of incubation, N. oceanica IMET1 began to aggregate and precipitate in cultures grown at 30°C, whereas cells remained uniformly distributed at 15°C and 25°C. The bacterial communities in cultures at 30°C changed markedly. Some bacteria isolated only at 30°C were tested for their potential for aggregating microalgae. A novel bacterium designated HW001 showed a remarkable ability to aggregate N. oceanica IMET1, causing microalgal cells to aggregate after 3 days of incubation, while the total lipid content of the microalgal cells was not affected. Direct interaction of HW001 and N. oceanica is necessary for aggregation. HW001 can also aggregate the microalgae N. oceanica CT-1, Tetraselmis suecica, and T. chuii as well as the cyanobacterium Synechococcus WH8007. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons indicated the great novelty of this strain, which exhibited only 89% sequence similarity with any previously cultured bacteria. Specific primers targeted to HW001 revealed that the strain originated from the Permian groundwater. This study of the bacterial communities associated with potential biofuel-producing microalgae addresses a little-investigated area of microalgal biofuel research and provides a novel approach to harvest biofuel-producing microalgae by using the novel bacterium strain HW001.

  20. The Role of Thin Aggregative Fimbriae on Pathogenic Bacterial Transport Through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, A. E.; Fuka, D. R.; Marjerison, R. D.; Hay, A. G.; Zhang, W.; Caballero, L. A.; Zevi, Y.; Richards, B. K.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    Pathogenic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp., are responsible for many deaths worldwide every year. Their survival in the natural environment is enhanced by the production of biofilms, which provide a resistance to environmental stresses. However, it remains unclear how these biofilms affect the bacterias' ability to move through the soil matrix and potentially contaminate groundwater or water from drainage systems. In this presentation, we discuss the role of thin aggregative fimbriae (curli), a key biofilm component, on transport through porous media. An experiment was performed consisting of 96 sand columns created using a deep-well microtiter plate. We used well-characterized strains of E. coli, one with the ability to form curli and one without. Pulsing the E. coli strains through the sand column, mimicking natural leaching processes, showed less transport, by greater retention, in the strains that produce curli versus those strains that do not. In addition, when cultured in conditions unfavorable to curli production, transport between strains did not differ significantly. These preliminary results indicate that curli, and to a larger extent biofilms, could be an important component influencing the transport of bacterial strains through the soil matrix. This determination of pathogens' ability to move through the environment, as related to how well they form biofilms, will facilitate a better understanding of the fate of pathogenic bacteria in the environment.

  1. Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Production of Cellulose Influences Iron-Induced Bacterial Aggregation, Phagocytosis, and Induction of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Ellermann, Melissa; Huh, Eun Young; Liu, Bo; Carroll, Ian M; Tamayo, Rita; Sartor, R Balfour

    2015-10-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), a functionally distinct subset of resident intestinal E. coli associated with Crohn's disease, is characterized by enhanced epithelial adhesion and invasion, survival within macrophages, and biofilm formation. Environmental factors, such as iron, modulate E. coli production of extracellular structures, which in turn influence the formation of multicellular communities, such as biofilms, and bacterial interactions with host cells. However, the physiological and functional responses of AIEC to variable iron availability have not been thoroughly investigated. We therefore characterized the impact of iron on the physiology of AIEC strain NC101 and subsequent interactions with macrophages. Iron promoted the cellulose-dependent aggregation of NC101. Bacterial cells recovered from the aggregates were more susceptible to phagocytosis than planktonic cells, which corresponded with the decreased macrophage production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) p40. Prevention of aggregate formation through the disruption of cellulose production reduced the phagocytosis of iron-exposed NC101. In contrast, under iron-limiting conditions, where NC101 aggregation is not induced, the disruption of cellulose production enhanced NC101 phagocytosis and decreased macrophage secretion of IL-12 p40. Finally, abrogation of cellulose production reduced NC101 induction of colitis when NC101 was monoassociated in inflammation-prone Il10(-/-) mice. Taken together, our results introduce cellulose as a novel physiological factor that impacts host-microbe-environment interactions and alters the proinflammatory potential of AIEC.

  2. Influence of fullerene (C60) on soil bacterial communities: aqueous aggregate size and solvent co-introduction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Zhong-Hua; Bischoff, Marianne; Nies, Loring F.; Carroll, Natalie J.; Applegate, Bruce; Turco, Ronald F.

    2016-06-01

    Fullerene C60 nanoparticles are being used in broad range of applications. It is important to assess their potential impacts in the environment. We evaluated the effects of C60 introduced as aqueous suspensions of nC60 aggregates of different particle size or via organic solvents on soils with different organic matter contents in this study. Impacts of the application were evaluated by measuring total microbial biomass, metabolic activity and bacterial community structure. Results show that nC60 aggregates, introduced as an aqueous suspension, had size-dependent effects on soil bacterial community composition in the low organic matter system, but induced minimal change in the microbial biomass and metabolic activity in soils with both high and low organic matter contents. Fullerene C60, co-introduced via an organic solvent, did not influence the response of soil microbes to the organic solvents. Our results suggest that nC60 aggregates of smaller size may have negative impact on soil biota and soil organic matter may play a key role in modulating the environmental effect of nanomaterials.

  3. Influence of fullerene (C60) on soil bacterial communities: aqueous aggregate size and solvent co-introduction effects.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhong-Hua; Bischoff, Marianne; Nies, Loring F; Carroll, Natalie J; Applegate, Bruce; Turco, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    Fullerene C60 nanoparticles are being used in broad range of applications. It is important to assess their potential impacts in the environment. We evaluated the effects of C60 introduced as aqueous suspensions of nC60 aggregates of different particle size or via organic solvents on soils with different organic matter contents in this study. Impacts of the application were evaluated by measuring total microbial biomass, metabolic activity and bacterial community structure. Results show that nC60 aggregates, introduced as an aqueous suspension, had size-dependent effects on soil bacterial community composition in the low organic matter system, but induced minimal change in the microbial biomass and metabolic activity in soils with both high and low organic matter contents. Fullerene C60, co-introduced via an organic solvent, did not influence the response of soil microbes to the organic solvents. Our results suggest that nC60 aggregates of smaller size may have negative impact on soil biota and soil organic matter may play a key role in modulating the environmental effect of nanomaterials. PMID:27306076

  4. Influence of fullerene (C60) on soil bacterial communities: aqueous aggregate size and solvent co-introduction effects

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhong-Hua; Bischoff, Marianne; Nies, Loring F.; Carroll, Natalie J.; Applegate, Bruce; Turco, Ronald F.

    2016-01-01

    Fullerene C60 nanoparticles are being used in broad range of applications. It is important to assess their potential impacts in the environment. We evaluated the effects of C60 introduced as aqueous suspensions of nC60 aggregates of different particle size or via organic solvents on soils with different organic matter contents in this study. Impacts of the application were evaluated by measuring total microbial biomass, metabolic activity and bacterial community structure. Results show that nC60 aggregates, introduced as an aqueous suspension, had size-dependent effects on soil bacterial community composition in the low organic matter system, but induced minimal change in the microbial biomass and metabolic activity in soils with both high and low organic matter contents. Fullerene C60, co-introduced via an organic solvent, did not influence the response of soil microbes to the organic solvents. Our results suggest that nC60 aggregates of smaller size may have negative impact on soil biota and soil organic matter may play a key role in modulating the environmental effect of nanomaterials. PMID:27306076

  5. Dynamics of nitrifying bacterial communities in the Seine river and estuary as affected by changes in the treatment of Paris wastewater : a comparison of 2001-2003 vs 2012-2013 periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aissa Grouz, Najla; Billen, Gilles; Garnier, Josette; Mercier, Benjamin; Martinez, Anun

    2014-05-01

    The major branch of the Seine river from the confluence with the Marne river to the entrance of the estuary is deeply affected by the release of wastewater from the huge Paris agglomeration. In the first years of 2000, the largest part of the effluents were still discharged at the Seine-Aval (Achères) treatment plant with only a standard, low residence time, activated sludge treatment, thus releasing a high ammonium load. NH4 concentration as high as 7 mgN/l were frequently observed downstream from Paris agglomeration. Cébron et al. (2003, 2005) and Garnier et al. 2007 described in details how this massive reduced nitrogen concentrations triggered the growth of nitrifying bacteria, already present in the upstream Seine and Marne rivers, but also brought in large amount by the effluents of the wastewater treatment plant themselves. The decrease of ammonium concentration was slow, however, and was only completed 200 km downstream, in the upper estuarine area, where it causes a severe oxygen deficiency. Since 2007, important changes occurred in the treatment of nitrogen in the Parisian wastewater purification plants. In 2007, the Seine-Aval plant treated up to 90% of the ammonium contained in wastewater through nitrification, and 30% of the total supply of nitrates is treated by denitrification. These modifications have of course favorably affected the water quality of the Seine river: ammonium concentrations are reduced by a factor of 5 and the area of oxygen depletion in the upstream estuary is no more observed. However, nitrites, still released in the effluents, are a matter of concern for the water quality of the Seine downstream from Paris. Using measurements of potential microbial activities carried out with the same experimental protocol for the 2000-2003 and 2012-2013 periods, we here examine and model the dynamics of ammonium oxidizing and nitrite oxidizing microbial populations before and after the implementation of nitrification treatment of Paris

  6. The influence of ligand valency on aggregation mechanisms for inhibiting bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Sisu, Cristina; Baron, Andrew J; Branderhorst, Hilbert M; Connell, Simon D; Weijers, Carel A G M; de Vries, Renko; Hayes, Edward D; Pukin, Aliaksei V; Gilbert, Michel; Pieters, Roland J; Zuilhof, Han; Visser, Gerben M; Turnbull, W Bruce

    2009-01-26

    Divalent and tetravalent analogues of ganglioside GM1 are potent inhibitors of cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin. However, they show little increase in inherent affinity when compared to the corresponding monovalent carbohydrate ligand. Analytical ultracentrifugation and dynamic light scattering have been used to demonstrate that the multivalent inhibitors induce protein aggregation and the formation of space-filling networks. This aggregation process appears to arise when using ligands that do not match the valency of the protein receptor. While it is generally accepted that multivalency is an effective strategy for increasing the activity of inhibitors, here we show that the valency of the inhibitor also has a dramatic effect on the kinetics of aggregation and the stability of intermediate protein complexes. Structural studies employing atomic force microscopy have revealed that a divalent inhibitor induces head-to-head dimerization of the protein toxin en route to higher aggregates. PMID:19034953

  7. Characterization of bacterial communities associated with organic aggregates in a large, shallow, eutrophic freshwater lake (Lake Taihu, China).

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiangming; Gao, Guang; Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Liping; Chao, Jianying; Wang, Jianjun; Yang, Guijun

    2009-08-01

    Although organic-aggregate-associated bacteria play a pivotal role in microbial food webs and in the cycling of major elements, their community composition and diversity have not been extensively studied, especially in shallow freshwater systems. This study is among the first to explore intra-lake horizontal heterogeneity of organic-aggregate-associated bacterial community composition (OABC) in the large, shallow, and eutrophic Lake Taihu. During November 2006, samples were collected at four locations representing different trophic states and food web structures. Regional variability of OABC and diversity were studied by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and comparative analysis of four large 16S ribosomal RNA clone libraries. Our results demonstrate that OABC were numerically dominated by members of the beta-proteobacteria (19.2-38.6%), Bacteroidetes (3.6-20.0%), and alpha-proteobacteria (11.5-19.2%) groups. The dominance of the Bacteroidetes group was related to algae-based aggregates. Horizontal heterogeneity of OABC exists within habitats, suggesting that the trophic state of the water and the physicochemical properties of organic aggregates (OA) play a key role. Diverse bacterial communities found on OA were substantially different from free-living ones. Comparative statistical analyses of the habitats of OA-associated bacteria highlight the potential ecological importance of the exchange between OABC and the surrounding planktonic community. Lastly, we found at least 45% of sequences closely related to ones previously found in soils, sludge, sediments, and other habitats. This demonstrates that microorganisms from terrestrial and sediment habitats are an important component of OA.

  8. Contribution of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Capsule to Bacterial Aggregate and Biofilm Microstructures▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dzul, Stephen P.; Thornton, Margaret M.; Hohne, Danial N.; Stewart, Elizabeth J.; Shah, Aayush A.; Bortz, David M.; Solomon, Michael J.; Younger, John G.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the interaction between capsule production and hydrodynamic growth conditions on the internal and macroscopic structure of biofilms and spontaneously formed aggregates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Wild-type and capsule-deficient strains were studied as biofilms and under strong and mild hydrodynamic conditions. Internal organization of multicellular structures was determined with a novel image-processing algorithm for feature extraction from high-resolution confocal microscopy. Measures included interbacterial spacing and local angular alignment of individual bacteria. Macroscopic organization was measured via the size distribution of aggregate populations forming under various conditions. Compared with wild-type organisms, unencapsulated mutant organisms formed more organized aggregates with less variability in interbacterial spacing and greater interbacterial angular alignment. Internal aggregate structure was not detectably affected by the severity of hydrodynamic growth conditions. However, hydrodynamic conditions affected both wild-type and mutant aggregate size distributions. Bacteria grown under high-speed shaking conditions (i.e., at Reynolds' numbers beyond the laminar-turbulent transition) formed few multicellular aggregates while clumpy growth was common in bacteria grown under milder conditions. Our results indicate that both capsule and environment contribute to the structure of communities of K. pneumoniae, with capsule exerting influence at an interbacterial length scale and fluid dynamic forces affecting overall particle size. PMID:21239544

  9. Ecophysiological interaction between nitrifying bacteria and heterotrophic bacteria in autotrophic nitrifying biofilms as determined by microautoradiography-fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ito, Tsukasa; Okabe, Satoshi

    2004-03-01

    Ecophysiological interactions between the community members (i.e., nitrifiers and heterotrophic bacteria) in a carbon-limited autotrophic nitrifying biofilm fed only NH(4)(+) as an energy source were investigated by using a full-cycle 16S rRNA approach followed by microautoradiography (MAR)-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Phylogenetic differentiation (identification) of heterotrophic bacteria was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and FISH probes were designed to determine the community structure and the spatial organization (i.e., niche differentiation) in the biofilm. FISH analysis showed that this autotrophic nitrifying biofilm was composed of 50% nitrifying bacteria (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria [AOB] and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria [NOB]) and 50% heterotrophic bacteria, and the distribution was as follows: members of the alpha subclass of the class Proteobacteria (alpha-Proteobacteria), 23%; gamma-Proteobacteria, 13%; green nonsulfur bacteria (GNSB), 9%; Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB) division, 2%; and unidentified (organisms that could not be hybridized with any probe except EUB338), 3%. These results indicated that a pair of nitrifiers (AOB and NOB) supported a heterotrophic bacterium via production of soluble microbial products (SMP). MAR-FISH revealed that the heterotrophic bacterial community was composed of bacteria that were phylogenetically and metabolically diverse and to some extent metabolically redundant, which ensured the stability of the ecosystem as a biofilm. alpha- and gamma-Proteobacteria dominated the utilization of [(14)C]acetic acid and (14)C-amino acids in this biofilm. Despite their low abundance (ca. 2%) in the biofilm community, members of the CFB cluster accounted for the largest fraction (ca. 64%) of the bacterial community consuming N-acetyl-D-[1-(14)C]glucosamine (NAG). The GNSB accounted for 9% of the (14)C-amino acid-consuming bacteria and 27% of the [(14)C]NAG-consuming bacteria but did not utilize

  10. Nitrification and growth of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in the coastal North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veuger, Bart; Pitcher, Angela; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2013-04-01

    A dual stable isotope (15N and 13C) tracer approach in combination with compound-specific stable isotope analysis of bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipid biomarkers was used to investigate nitrification and the associated growth of autotrophic nitrifiers in the Dutch coastal North Sea. This study focusses on the stoichiometry between nitrification and DIC fixation by autotrophic nitrifiers as well as on the contributions of bacteria versus Thaumarchaeota to total autotrophic DIC-fixation by nitrifiers. Water from the dutch coastal North Sea was collected at weekly to biweekly intervals during the winter of 2007-2008. Watersamples were incubated with 15N-labeled ammonium and 15N was traced into nitrate and suspended material to quantify rates of nitrification and ammonium assimilation respectively. Growth of autotrophic nitrifiers was measured by incubating water samples with 13C-DIC in the presence and absence of nitrification inhibitors (nitrapyrin and chlorate) and subsequent analysis of 13C in bacterial phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs) and the Thaumarchaeotal biomarker crenarchaeol. Results revealed high nitrification rates with nitrification being the primary sink for ammonium. 13C-DIC fixation into bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipids was strongly reduced by the nitrification inhibitors (27-95%). The ratio between rates of nitrification versus DIC fixation by nitrifiers was higher or even much higher than typical values for autotrophic nitrifiers, indicating that little DIC was fixed relative to the amount of energy that was generated by nitrification, and hence that other other processes for C acquisition may have been relevant as well. The inhibitor-sensitive 13C-PLFA pool was dominated by the common PLFAs 16:0, 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω7c throughout the whole sampling period and occasionally also included the polyunsaturated fatty acids 18:2ω6c and 18:3ω3. Cell-specific 13C-DIC fixation activity of the nitrifying bacteria was much higher than that of the

  11. Influence of microbial community structure of seed sludge on the properties of aerobic nitrifying granules.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiwei; Li, Ting; Wang, Qiuxu; Pan, Yu; Li, Lixin

    2015-09-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of microbial community structure of seed sludge on the properties of aerobic nitrifying granules, these granules were cultivated with different seed sludge, and the variation of microbial community and dominant bacterial groups that impact the nitrogen removal efficiency of the aerobic nitrifying granules were analyzed and identified using 16s rDNA sequence and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles. The results presented here demonstrated that the influence of the community structure of seed sludge on the properties of aerobic nitrifying granules was remarkable, and the granules cultivated by activated sludge from a beer wastewater treatment plant showed better performance, with a stable sludge volume index (SVI) value of 20mL/g, high extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) content of 183.3mg/L, high NH4(+)-N removal rate of 89.42% and abundant microbial population with 10 dominant bacterial groups. This indicated that activated sludge with abundant communities is suitable for use as seed sludge in culturing aerobic nitrifying granules. PMID:26354703

  12. Bacterial Leakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Calcium-Enriched Mixture and Biodentine as Furcation Perforation Repair Materials in Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Nahid; Sadeghi, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adequate seal of iatrogenically perforated area within the root canal system can improve the long term treatment prognosis. This in vitro study evaluated the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and Biodentine in repair of furcation perforation in primary molars. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 freshly extracted primary mandibular second molars were randomly divided into three groups (n=17) and 10 teeth were put in negative (without perforation, n=5) and positive (perforated without repair, n=5) control groups. Turbidity was used as the criteria of bacterial leakage, when detected in the model of dual-chamber leakage. Data were analyzed using the Chi-Square and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in SPSS software. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: All positive samples showed turbidity, whereas none of the negative samples allowed bacterial leakage. There was no significant difference between the number of turbidity samples in repaired teeth with all test materials (P=0.13). No significant difference was also detected in the mean survival time (P>0.05). Conclusion: CEM cement and Biodentine showed promising results as perforation repair materials and can be recommended as suitable alternatives of MTA for repair of furcation perforation of primary molars. PMID:27471534

  13. Nitrification and growth of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in the coastal North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veuger, B.; Pitcher, A.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Nitrification and the associated growth of autotrophic nitrifiers, as well as the contributions of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota to total autotrophic C-fixation by nitrifiers were investigated in the Dutch coastal North Sea from October 2007 to March 2008. Rates of nitrification were determined by incubation of water samples with 15N-ammonium and growth of autotrophic nitrifiers was measured by incubation with 13C-DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon) in the presence and absence of nitrification inhibitors (nitrapyrin and chlorate) in combination with compound-specific stable isotope (13C) analysis of bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipid biomarkers. Net nitrification during the sampling period was evident from the concentration dynamics of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate. Measured nitrification rates were high (41-221 nmol N L-1 h-1). Ammonium assimilation was always substantially lower than nitrification - with nitrification on average contributing 89% (range 73-97%) to total ammonium consumption. 13C-DIC fixation into bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipids was strongly reduced by the nitrification inhibitors (27-95 %). The inhibitor-sensitive 13C-PLFA (phospholipid-derived fatty acid) pool was dominated by the common PLFAs 16:0, 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω7c throughout the whole sampling period and occasionally also included the polyunsaturated fatty acids 18:2ω6c and 18:3ω3. 13C-DIC fixation activity of the nitrifying bacteria was much higher than that of the nitrifying Thaumarchaeota throughout the whole sampling period, even during the peak in Thaumarchaeotal abundance and activity. This suggests that the contribution of autotrophic Thaumarchaeota to nitrification during winter in the coastal North Sea may have been smaller than expected from their gene abundance (16S rRNA and amoA (ammonia monooxygenase)). These results emphasize the importance of direct measurements of the actual activity of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota, rather than abundance measurements only, in order to

  14. Apical Sealing Ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Intermediate Restorative Material and Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement: A Bacterial Leakage Study

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Shahriar; Faramarzi, Farhad; Alikhani, Mohammad-Yousef; Farhadian, Maryam; Hendi, Seyedeh Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This in vitro study compared the apical sealing ability of three common root end filling materials namely mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), intermediate restorative material (IRM) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement using a bacterial leakage model. Methods and Materials: The study was conducted on 83 single-rooted human teeth. Tooth crowns were cut and root canals were prepared using the step-back technique. Apical 3 mm of the roots were cut and a three-mm-deep cavity was prepared using an ultrasonic instrument. The samples were divided into three groups (n=25) according to the root-end filling material including MTA, IRM and CEM cement. The roots were inserted into cut-end microtubes. After sterilization with ethylene oxide, microtubes were placed in sterile vials containing 10 mL of Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth and incubated at 37°C and 0.1 mL of Enterococcus faecalis suspension compatible with 0.5 McFarland standard (1.5×108 cell/ ml), which was refreshed daily. This procedure was continued for 70 days. The data were analyzed using the chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis and log rank tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: No significant difference was found in bacterial microleakage among three groups; MTA showed slightly (but not significantly) less microleakage than IRM and CEM. However, the difference in the mean time of microleakage was significant among the groups (P<0.04) and in MTA samples leakage occurred in a longer time than CEM (P<0.012). Conclusion: The three tested root end filling materials had equal sealing efficacy for preventing bacterial leakage. PMID:27790267

  15. Modeling bioaugmentation with nitrifiers in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Alberto; Munz, Giulio; Mori, Gualtiero; Makinia, Jacek; Lubello, Claudio; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2015-01-01

    Bioaugmentation with nitrifiers was studied using two pilot-scale membrane bioreactors, with the purpose of assessing the suitability of state-of-the-art activated sludge models (ASMs) in predicting the efficiency of bioaugmentation as a function of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that the temperature difference between seeding and seeded reactors (ΔT) affects bioaugmentation efficiency. Experimental data were accurately predicted when ΔT was within a range of up to 10 °C at the higher range, and when the temperature was significantly lower in the seeded reactor compared to the seeding one, standard ASMs overestimated the efficiency of bioaugmentation. A modified ASM, capable of accurately representing the behavior of seeded nitrifying biomass in the presence of high ΔT, would require the inclusion of the effect of temperature time gradients on nitrifiers. A simple linear correlation between ΔT and the Arrhenius coefficient was proposed as a preliminary step.

  16. Nitrification and growth of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in the coastal North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veuger, B.; Pitcher, A.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Nitrification and the associated growth of autotrophic nitrifiers, as well as the contributions of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota to total autotrophic C-fixation by nitrifiers were investigated in the Dutch coastal North Sea from October 2007 to March 2008. Rates of nitrification were determined by incubation of water samples with 15N-ammonium and growth of autotrophic nitrifiers was measured by incubation with 13C-DIC in the presence and absence of nitrification inhibitors (nitrapyrin and chlorate) in combination with compound-specific stable isotope (13C) analysis of bacterial- and Thaumarchaeotal lipid biomarkers. Net nitrification during the sampling period was evident from the concentration dynamics of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate. Measured nitrification rates were high (41-221 nmol N l-1h-1). Ammonium assimilation was always substantially lower than nitrification with nitrification on average contributing 89% (range 73-97%) to total ammonium consumption. 13C-DIC fixation into bacterial and Thaumarchaeotal lipids was strongly reduced by the nitrification inhibitors (27-95%). The inhibitor-sensitive 13C-PLFA pool was dominated by the common PLFAs 16:0, 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω7c throughout the whole sampling period and occasionally also included the polyunsaturated fatty acids 18:2ω6c and 18:3ω3. Cell-specific 13C-DIC fixation activity of the nitrifying bacteria was much higher than that of the nitrifying Thaumarchaeota throughout the whole sampling period, even during the peak in Thaumarchaeotal abundance and activity. This suggests that the contribution of autotrophic Thaumarchaeota to nitrification during winter in the coastal North Sea may have been smaller than expected from their gene abundance. These results emphasize the importance of direct measurements of the actual activity of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota, rather than abundance measurements only, in order to elucidate their biogeochemical importance. The ratio between rates of nitrification versus DIC

  17. Cyanate as an energy source for nitrifiers.

    PubMed

    Palatinszky, Marton; Herbold, Craig; Jehmlich, Nico; Pogoda, Mario; Han, Ping; von Bergen, Martin; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Karst, Søren M; Galushko, Alexander; Koch, Hanna; Berry, David; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing microorganisms are collectively responsible for the aerobic oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate and have essential roles in the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The physiology of nitrifiers has been intensively studied, and urea and ammonia are the only recognized energy sources that promote the aerobic growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea. Here we report the aerobic growth of a pure culture of the ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaeote Nitrososphaera gargensis using cyanate as the sole source of energy and reductant; to our knowledge, the first organism known to do so. Cyanate, a potentially important source of reduced nitrogen in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, is converted to ammonium and carbon dioxide in Nitrososphaera gargensis by a cyanase enzyme that is induced upon addition of this compound. Within the cyanase gene family, this cyanase is a member of a distinct clade also containing cyanases of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrospira. We demonstrate by co-culture experiments that these nitrite oxidizers supply cyanase-lacking ammonia oxidizers with ammonium from cyanate, which is fully nitrified by this microbial consortium through reciprocal feeding. By screening a comprehensive set of more than 3,000 publically available metagenomes from environmental samples, we reveal that cyanase-encoding genes clustering with the cyanases of these nitrifiers are widespread in the environment. Our results demonstrate an unexpected metabolic versatility of nitrifying microorganisms, and suggest a previously unrecognized importance of cyanate in cycling of nitrogen compounds in the environment.

  18. Taking Advantage of Electric Field Induced Bacterial Aggregation for the Study of Interactions between Bacteria and Macromolecules by Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sisavath, Nicolas; Got, Patrice; Charrière, Guillaume M; Destoumieux-Garzon, Delphine; Cottet, Hervé

    2015-07-01

    The quantification of interaction stoichiometry and binding constant between bacteria (or other microorganism) and (macro)molecules remains a challenging issue for which only a few adapted methods are available. In this paper, a new methodology was developed for the determination of the interaction stoichiometry and binding constant between bacteria and (macro)molecules. The originality of this work is to take advantage of the bacterial aggregation phenomenon to directly quantify the free ligand concentration in equilibrated bacteria-ligand mixtures using frontal analysis continuous capillary electrophoresis. The described methodology does not require any sample preparation such as filtration step or centrifugation. It was applied to the study of interactions between Erwinia carotovora and different generations of dendrigraft poly-L-lysines leading to quantitative information (i.e., stoichiometry and binding site constant). High stoichiometries in the order of 10(6)-10(7) were determined between nanometric dendrimer-like ligands and the rod-shaped micrometric bacteria. The effect of the dendrimer generation on the binding constant and the stoichiometry is discussed. Stoichiometries were compared with those obtained by replacing the bacteria by polystyrene microbeads to demonstrate the internalization of the ligands inside the bacteria and the increase of the specific surface via the formation of vesicles. PMID:26086209

  19. Exposure to the Functional Bacterial Amyloid Protein Curli Enhances Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation in Aged Fischer 344 Rats and Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu G.; Stribinskis, Vilius; Rane, Madhavi J.; Demuth, Donald R.; Gozal, Evelyne; Roberts, Andrew M.; Jagadapillai, Rekha; Liu, Ruolan; Choe, Kyonghwan; Shivakumar, Bhooma; Son, Francheska; Jin, Shunying; Kerber, Richard; Adame, Anthony; Masliah, Eliezer; Friedland, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded alpha-synuclein (AS) and other neurodegenerative disorder proteins display prion-like transmission of protein aggregation. Factors responsible for the initiation of AS aggregation are unknown. To evaluate the role of amyloid proteins made by the microbiota we exposed aged rats and transgenic C. elegans to E. coli producing the extracellular bacterial amyloid protein curli. Rats exposed to curli-producing bacteria displayed increased neuronal AS deposition in both gut and brain and enhanced microgliosis and astrogliosis compared to rats exposed to either mutant bacteria unable to synthesize curli, or to vehicle alone. Animals exposed to curli producing bacteria also had more expression of TLR2, IL-6 and TNF in the brain than the other two groups. There were no differences among the rat groups in survival, body weight, inflammation in the mouth, retina, kidneys or gut epithelia, and circulating cytokine levels. AS-expressing C. elegans fed on curli-producing bacteria also had enhanced AS aggregation. These results suggest that bacterial amyloid functions as a trigger to initiate AS aggregation through cross-seeding and also primes responses of the innate immune system. PMID:27708338

  20. Feasibility of EPS-producing bacterial inoculation to speed up the sand aggregation in the Gurbantunggut Desert, Northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Pan, Hui-Xia; Qiu, Dong; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2014-12-01

    Exopolymers are known to be useful in improving sand aggregation and the development of biological soil crusts (BSCs). A facultative bacterium KLBB0001 was isolated from BSCs in the Gurbantunggut Desert in northwestern China. With the strong effective production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), this strain exhibits a multifunctional role for sand stabilization and maintenance of water under laboratory conditions. Practical testing of the feasibility of its inoculation to speed up BSC recovery in the field was also conducted in this experiment. This strain stimulated the heterotrophic community assembly in the topsoil layer (0-2 cm) before the commencement of autotrophic cyanobacteria, while also significantly increasing the number of bacteria, actinomycetes, and content of total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus. However, the low nitrogenase activity (NA) (0.57 µmol/h) that was observed caused us to doubt the previous identification as Azotobacter Beijerinck that was based on physiological and biochemical properties. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that this strain was a member of the genus Paenibacillus. It exhibited the closest phylogenetic affinity and highest sequence similarity to the strain Paenibacillus mucilaginosus VKPM B-7519 (sequence similarity 99.698%), which is well known as a typical silicate-weathering bacteria that releases lots of nutritional ions from minerals and the soil. Because P. mucilaginosus can excrete carbonic anhydrase (CA) to capture atmospheric CO2 through hydration of CO2 , it is possible that KLBB0001 might use a similar strategy for heterotrophs in the BSCs to sequester CO2 from the air. Because of its potential role in the reestablishment of the BSC ecosystem due to its ability to improve water relations, sand stabilization, and chemical erosion, EPS-producing bacterial inoculation was concluded to be a suitable and effective treatment for BSC recovery

  1. Cyanate as energy source for nitrifiers

    PubMed Central

    Palatinszky, Marton; Herbold, Craig; Jehmlich, Nico; Pogoda, Mario; Han, Ping; von Bergen, Martin; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Karst, Søren M.; Galushko, Alexander; Koch, Hanna; Berry, David; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizers are collectively responsible for the aerobic oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate and play essential roles for the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The physiology of these nitrifying microbes has been intensively studied since the first experiments of Sergei Winogradsky more than a century ago. Urea and ammonia are the only recognized energy sources that promote the aerobic growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea. Here we report the aerobic growth of a pure culture of the ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaeote Nitrososphaera gargensis1 on cyanate as the sole source of energy and reductant, the first organism known to do so. Cyanate, which is a potentially important source of reduced nitrogen in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems2, is converted to ammonium and CO2 by this archaeon using a cyanase that is induced upon addition of this compound. Within the cyanase gene family, this cyanase is a member of a distinct clade that also contains cyanases of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrospira. We demonstrate by co-culture experiments that these nitrite-oxidizers supply ammonia-oxidizers lacking cyanase with ammonium from cyanate, which is fully nitrified by this consortium through reciprocal feeding. Screening of a comprehensive set of more than 3,000 publically available metagenomes from environmental samples revealed that cyanase-encoding genes clustering with the cyanases of these nitrifiers are widespread in the environment. Our results demonstrate an unexpected metabolic versatility of nitrifying microbes and suggest a previously unrecognized importance of cyanate for N-cycling in the environment. PMID:26222031

  2. Synthesis, aggregation and spectroscopic studies of novel water soluble metal free, zinc, copper and magnesium phthalocyanines and investigation of their anti-bacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Rıza; Akçay, Hakkı Türker; Beriş, Fatih Şaban; Sahin, Ertan; Bayrak, Hacer; Demirbaş, Ümit

    2014-12-10

    In this study, novel phthalonitrile derivative (3) was synthesized by the reaction between 4-nitrophthalonitrile (2) and a triazole derivative (1) containing pyridine moiety. Crystal structure of compound (3) was characterized by X-ray diffraction. New metal free and metallo-phthalocyanine complexes (Zn, Cu, and Mg) were synthesized using the phthalonitrile derivative (3). Cationic derivatives of these phthalocyanines (5, 7, 9, and 11) were prepared from the non-ionic phthalocyanines (4, 6, 8, and 10). All proposed structures were supported by instrumental methods. The aggregation behaviors of the phthalocyanines (4-11) were investigated in different solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), chloroform and water. Water soluble cationic Pcs (5, 7, 9, and 11) aggregated in water and sodium dodecyl sulfate was used to prevent the aggregation. The second derivatives of the UV-Vis spectra of aggregated Pcs were used for analyzing the Q and B bands of aggregated species. Thermal behaviors of the phthalocyanines were also studied. In addition, anti-bacterial properties of the phthalocyanines were investigated. We used four gram negative and two gram positive bacteria to determine antibacterial activity of these compounds. Compound 7 has the best activity against the all bacteria with 125μg/mL of MIC value. Compounds 4, 6, and 10 have the similar effect on the bacteria with 250μg/mL of MIC value.

  3. Synthesis, aggregation and spectroscopic studies of novel water soluble metal free, zinc, copper and magnesium phthalocyanines and investigation of their anti-bacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Rıza; Akçay, Hakkı Türker; Beriş, Fatih Şaban; Sahin, Ertan; Bayrak, Hacer; Demirbaş, Ümit

    2014-12-10

    In this study, novel phthalonitrile derivative (3) was synthesized by the reaction between 4-nitrophthalonitrile (2) and a triazole derivative (1) containing pyridine moiety. Crystal structure of compound (3) was characterized by X-ray diffraction. New metal free and metallo-phthalocyanine complexes (Zn, Cu, and Mg) were synthesized using the phthalonitrile derivative (3). Cationic derivatives of these phthalocyanines (5, 7, 9, and 11) were prepared from the non-ionic phthalocyanines (4, 6, 8, and 10). All proposed structures were supported by instrumental methods. The aggregation behaviors of the phthalocyanines (4-11) were investigated in different solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), chloroform and water. Water soluble cationic Pcs (5, 7, 9, and 11) aggregated in water and sodium dodecyl sulfate was used to prevent the aggregation. The second derivatives of the UV-Vis spectra of aggregated Pcs were used for analyzing the Q and B bands of aggregated species. Thermal behaviors of the phthalocyanines were also studied. In addition, anti-bacterial properties of the phthalocyanines were investigated. We used four gram negative and two gram positive bacteria to determine antibacterial activity of these compounds. Compound 7 has the best activity against the all bacteria with 125μg/mL of MIC value. Compounds 4, 6, and 10 have the similar effect on the bacteria with 250μg/mL of MIC value. PMID:24952089

  4. Interactions of Nitrifying Bacteria and Heterotrophs: Identification of a Micavibrio-Like Putative Predator of Nitrospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Dolinšek, Jan; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Wanek, Wolfgang; Wagner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic nitrifying bacteria release soluble organic compounds, which can be substrates for heterotrophic microorganisms. The identities of these heterotrophs and the specificities of their interactions with nitrifiers are largely unknown. In this study, we incubated nitrifying activated sludge with 13C-labeled bicarbonate and used stable isotope probing of 16S rRNA to monitor the flow of carbon from uncultured nitrifiers to heterotrophs. To facilitate the identification of heterotrophs, the abundant 16S rRNA molecules from nitrifiers were depleted by catalytic oligonucleotides containing locked nucleic acids (LNAzymes), which specifically cut the 16S rRNA of defined target organisms. Among the 13C-labeled heterotrophs were organisms remotely related to Micavibrio, a microbial predator of Gram-negative bacteria. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed a close spatial association of these organisms with microcolonies of nitrite-oxidizing sublineage I Nitrospira in sludge flocs. The high specificity of this interaction was confirmed by confocal microscopy and a novel image analysis method to quantify the localization patterns of biofilm microorganisms in three-dimensional (3-D) space. Other isotope-labeled bacteria, which were affiliated with Thermomonas, colocalized less frequently with nitrifiers and thus were commensals or saprophytes rather than specific symbionts or predators. These results suggest that Nitrospira spp. are subject to bacterial predation, which may influence the abundance and diversity of these nitrite oxidizers and the stability of nitrification in engineered and natural ecosystems. In silico screening of published next-generation sequencing data sets revealed a broad environmental distribution of the uncultured Micavibrio-like lineage. PMID:23335755

  5. Bacteria of the candidate phylum TM7 are prevalent in acidophilic nitrifying sequencing-batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Akiko; Kurogi, Takashi; Giang, Nguyen Minh; Yamada, Takeshi; Kamimoto, Yuki; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Hiraishi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory-scale acidophilic nitrifying sequencing-batch reactors (ANSBRs) were constructed by seeding with sewage-activated sludge and cultivating with ammonium-containing acidic mineral medium (pH 4.0) with or without a trace amount of yeast extract. In every batch cycle, the pH varied between 2.7 and 4.0, and ammonium was completely converted to nitrate. Attempts to detect nitrifying functional genes in the fully acclimated ANSBRs by PCR with previously designed primers mostly gave negative results. 16S rRNA gene-targeted PCR and a subsequent denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that a marked change occurred in the bacterial community during the overall period of operation, in which members of the candidate phylum TM7 and the class Gammaproteobacteria became predominant at the fully acclimated stage. This result was fully supported by a 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, as the major phylogenetic groups of clones detected (>5% of the total) were TM7 (33%), Gammaproteobacteria (37%), Actinobacteria (10%), and Alphaproteobacteria (8%). Fluorescence in situ hybridization with specific probes also demonstrated the prevalence of TM7 bacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. These results suggest that previously unknown nitrifying microorganisms may play a major role in ANSBRs; however, the ecophysiological significance of the TM7 bacteria predominating in this process remains unclear.

  6. Comparative analysis of nitrifying bacteria associated with freshwater and marine aquaria.

    PubMed Central

    Hovanec, T A; DeLong, E F

    1996-01-01

    Three nucleic acid probes, two for autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria of the beta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria and one for alpha subdivision nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, were developed and used to study nitrifying bacterial phylotypes associated with various freshwater and seawater aquarium biofilters. Nitrosomonas europaea and related species were detected in all nitrifying seawater systems and accounted for as much as 20% of the total eubacterial rRNA. In contrast, nitrifying bacteria belonging to the beta-proteobacterial subdivision were detected in only two samples from freshwater aquaria showing vigorous nitrification rates. rRNA originating from nitrite-oxidizing alpha subdivision proteobacteria was not detected in samples from either aquarium environment. The data obtained indicate that chemolithotrophic ammonia oxidation in the freshwater aquaria was not due to beta-proteobacterial phylotypes related to members of the genus Nitrosomonas and their close relatives, the organisms usually implicated in freshwater nitrification. It is likely that nitrification in natural environments is even more complex than nitrification in these simple systems and is less well characterized with regard to the microorganisms responsible. PMID:8702281

  7. Culture-independent detection of 'TM7' bacteria in a streptomycin-resistant acidophilic nitrifying process

    SciTech Connect

    Kurogi, T.; Linh, N. T. T.; Kuroki, T.; Yamada, T.; Hiraishi, A.

    2014-02-20

    Nitrification in biological wastewater treatment processes has been believed for long time to take place under neutral conditions and is inhibited under acidic conditions. However, we previously constructed acidophilic nitrifying sequencing-batch reactors (ANSBRs) being capable of nitrification at < pH 4 and harboring bacteria of the candidate phylum 'TM7' as the major constituents of the microbial community. In light of the fact that the 16S rRNA of TM7 bacteria has a highly atypical base substitution possibly responsible for resistance to streptomycin at the ribosome level, this study was undertaken to construct streptomycin-resistant acidophilic nitrifying (SRAN) reactors and to demonstrate whether TM7 bacteria are abundant in these reactors. The SRAN reactors were constructed by seeding with nitrifying sludge from an ANSBR and cultivating with ammonium-containing mineral medium (pH 4.0), to which streptomycin at a concentration of 10, 30 and 50 mg L{sup −1} was added. In all reactors, the pH varied between 2.7 and 4.0, and ammonium was completely converted to nitrate in every batch cycle. PCR-aided denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that some major clones assigned to TM7 bacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were constantly present during the overall period of operation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with specific oligonucleotide probes also showed that TM7 bacteria predominated in all SRAN reactors, accounting for 58% of the total bacterial population on average. Although the biological significance of the TM7 bacteria in the SRAN reactors are unknown, our results suggest that these bacteria are possibly streptomycin-resistant and play some important roles in the acidophilic nitrifying process.

  8. Culture-independent detection of "TM7" bacteria in a streptomycin-resistant acidophilic nitrifying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurogi, T.; Linh, N. T. T.; Kuroki, T.; Yamada, T.; Hiraishi, A.

    2014-02-01

    Nitrification in biological wastewater treatment processes has been believed for long time to take place under neutral conditions and is inhibited under acidic conditions. However, we previously constructed acidophilic nitrifying sequencing-batch reactors (ANSBRs) being capable of nitrification at < pH 4 and harboring bacteria of the candidate phylum "TM7" as the major constituents of the microbial community. In light of the fact that the 16S rRNA of TM7 bacteria has a highly atypical base substitution possibly responsible for resistance to streptomycin at the ribosome level, this study was undertaken to construct streptomycin-resistant acidophilic nitrifying (SRAN) reactors and to demonstrate whether TM7 bacteria are abundant in these reactors. The SRAN reactors were constructed by seeding with nitrifying sludge from an ANSBR and cultivating with ammonium-containing mineral medium (pH 4.0), to which streptomycin at a concentration of 10, 30 and 50 mg L-1 was added. In all reactors, the pH varied between 2.7 and 4.0, and ammonium was completely converted to nitrate in every batch cycle. PCR-aided denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that some major clones assigned to TM7 bacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were constantly present during the overall period of operation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with specific oligonucleotide probes also showed that TM7 bacteria predominated in all SRAN reactors, accounting for 58% of the total bacterial population on average. Although the biological significance of the TM7 bacteria in the SRAN reactors are unknown, our results suggest that these bacteria are possibly streptomycin-resistant and play some important roles in the acidophilic nitrifying process.

  9. Nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) biofilm and biomass response to long term exposure to 1 °C.

    PubMed

    Hoang, V; Delatolla, R; Abujamel, T; Mottawea, W; Gadbois, A; Laflamme, E; Stintzi, A

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to investigate moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) nitrification rates, nitrifying biofilm morphology, biomass viability as well as bacterial community shifts during long-term exposure to 1 °C. Long-term exposure to 1 °C is the key operational condition for potential ammonia removal upgrade units to numerous northern region treatment systems. The average laboratory MBBR ammonia removal rate after long-term exposure to 1 °C was measured to be 18 ± 5.1% as compared to the average removal rate at 20 °C. Biofilm morphology and specifically the thickness along with biomass viability at various depths in the biofilm were investigated using variable pressure electron scanning microscope (VPSEM) imaging and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) imaging in combination with viability live/dead staining. The biofilm thickness along with the number of viable cells showed significant increases after long-term exposure to 1 °C. Hence, this study observed nitrifying bacteria with higher activities at warm temperatures and a slightly greater quantity of nitrifying bacteria with lower activities at cold temperatures in nitrifying MBBR biofilms. Using DNA sequencing analysis, Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira (ammonia oxidizers) as well as Nitrospira (nitrite oxidizer) were identified and no population shift was observed between 20 °C and after long-term exposure to 1 °C.

  10. Cell adhesion, ammonia removal and granulation of autotrophic nitrifying sludge facilitated by N-acyl-homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Li, An-Jie; Hou, Bao-Lian; Li, Mei-Xi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, six N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules (C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL and 3-oxo-C10-HSL) were each dosed into a bioreactor and seeded using autotrophic nitrifying sludge (ANS). The effects of the AHLs on cell adhesion, nitrification and sludge granulation were investigated. The results indicated that the efficiencies of cell adhesion and ammonia removal both had a close correlation with the side chain length and β position substituent group of the AHLs. The best-performing AHL in terms of accelerating bacterial attached-growth was 3-oxo-C6-HSL, whereas C6-HSL outperformed the others in terms of the ammonia degradation rate. The addition of 3-oxo-C6-HSL or C6-HSL increased the biomass growth rate, microbial activity, extracellular proteins and nitrifying bacteria, which can accelerate the formation of nitrifying granules. Consequently, selecting AHL molecules that could improve bacteria in attached-growth mode and nitrification efficiency simultaneously will most likely facilitate the rapid granulation of nitrifying sludge.

  11. Morphometric Evaluation of Interrenal Gland and Kidney Macrophages Aggregates in Normal Healthy Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and after Bacterial Challenge with Yersinia ruckeri

    PubMed Central

    Gregori, Michela; Miragliotta, Vincenzo; Leotta, Roberto; Cecchini, Stefano; Prearo, Marino; Abramo, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage aggregates (MA) occur in various organs of fish as discrete aggregations of pigmented macrophages. The study presented herein investigates the quantitative modifications from normal anatomical condition, of interrenal gland (IG) and kidney MA in six treatment groups of adult rainbow trout submitted to either specific or aspecific immune stimulation and subsequently challenged with Yersinia ruckeri. Routinely stained tissue sections from both IG and kidney were analysed. The percentage of tissues occupied by MA and the MA density (number/mm2) were calculated on at least 10 randomly selected nonoverlapping fields taken from each tissue section. MA morphometric findings from challenged fish were compared to those from a control group. Results showed that fish from control group displayed a statistically significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of tissue occupied by MA and MA density. Among different treatment groups, anti-Yersinia ruckeri immunized fish, which did not show clinical signs of disease after bacterial challenge, displayed higher values of morphometric parameters compared with symptomatic fish from other groups. Our study demonstrates that the quantification of the area occupied by MA might be an efficient parameter to evaluate the general condition of a salmonid population since it positively correlates with the health status and negatively with stress factor such as the acute bacterial infection. PMID:24719776

  12. Morphometric Evaluation of Interrenal Gland and Kidney Macrophages Aggregates in Normal Healthy Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and after Bacterial Challenge with Yersinia ruckeri.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Michela; Miragliotta, Vincenzo; Leotta, Roberto; Cecchini, Stefano; Prearo, Marino; Abramo, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage aggregates (MA) occur in various organs of fish as discrete aggregations of pigmented macrophages. The study presented herein investigates the quantitative modifications from normal anatomical condition, of interrenal gland (IG) and kidney MA in six treatment groups of adult rainbow trout submitted to either specific or aspecific immune stimulation and subsequently challenged with Yersinia ruckeri. Routinely stained tissue sections from both IG and kidney were analysed. The percentage of tissues occupied by MA and the MA density (number/mm(2)) were calculated on at least 10 randomly selected nonoverlapping fields taken from each tissue section. MA morphometric findings from challenged fish were compared to those from a control group. Results showed that fish from control group displayed a statistically significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of tissue occupied by MA and MA density. Among different treatment groups, anti-Yersinia ruckeri immunized fish, which did not show clinical signs of disease after bacterial challenge, displayed higher values of morphometric parameters compared with symptomatic fish from other groups. Our study demonstrates that the quantification of the area occupied by MA might be an efficient parameter to evaluate the general condition of a salmonid population since it positively correlates with the health status and negatively with stress factor such as the acute bacterial infection. PMID:24719776

  13. Thioflavin-S staining of bacterial inclusion bodies for the fast, simple, and inexpensive screening of amyloid aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pouplana, S; Espargaro, A; Galdeano, C; Viayna, E; Sola, I; Ventura, S; Muñoz-Torrero, D; Sabate, R

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation is linked to a large number of human disorders, from neurodegenerative diseases as Alzheimer's disease (AD) or spongiform encephalopathies to non-neuropathic localized diseases as type II diabetes and cataracts. Because the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies (IBs) during recombinant protein production in bacteria has been recently shown to share mechanistic features with amyloid self-assembly, bacteria have emerged as a tool to study amyloid aggregation. Herein we present a fast, simple, inexpensive and quantitative method for the screening of potential anti-aggregating drugs. This method is based on monitoring the changes in the binding of thioflavin-S to intracellular IBs in intact Eschericchia coli cells in the presence of small chemical compounds. This in vivo technique fairly recapitulates previous in vitro data. Here we mainly use the Alzheimer's related β-amyloid peptide as a model system, but the technique can be easily implemented for screening inhibitors relevant for other conformational diseases simply by changing the recombinant amyloid protein target. Indeed, we show that this methodology can be also applied to the evaluation of inhibitors of the aggregation of tau protein, another amyloidogenic protein with a key role in AD.

  14. Modeling of trihalomethane cometabolism in nitrifying biofilters.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2007-01-01

    The computer program AQUASIM was used to model biofilter experiments seeded with Lake Austin, Texas mixed-culture nitrifiers. These biofilters degraded four trihalomethanes (THMs) (trichloromethane (TCM) or chloroform, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), tribromomethane (TBM) or bromoform) commonly found in treated drinking water. Apparent steady-state data from the biofilter experiments and supporting batch experiments were used to estimate kinetic parameters for TCM, DBCM and ammonia degradation. Subsequently, the model was verified against other experimental biofilter data. To allow for full-scale simulations, BDCM and TBM rate constants were estimated using data from batch kinetic studies. Finally, the model was used to simulate full-scale filter performance under different filter surface loading rates and THM speciation seen in practice. Overall, total THM removals ranged from 16% to 54% in these simulations with influent total THM concentrations of 75-82microg/L, which illustrates the potential of THM cometabolism to have a significant impact on treated water quality.

  15. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant to Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended culture batch kine...

  16. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant to Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended cultur...

  17. Performance and Biofilm Activity of Nitrifying Biofilters Removing Trihalomethanes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrifying biofilters seeded with three different mixed-culture sources degraded trichloromethane (TCM) and dibromochloromethane (DBCM). In addition, resuspended biofilm degraded TCM, bromododichloromethane (BDCM), DBCM, and tribromomethane (TBM) in backwash batch kinetic tests,...

  18. In Situ Identification and Stratification of Monochloramine Inhibition Effects on Nitrifying Biofilms as Determined by the Use of Microelectrodes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nitrifying biofilm grown in an annular biofilm reactor and the microbial deactivation achieved after monochloramine treatment were investigated using microelectrodes. The nitrifying biofilm ammonium microprofile was measured and the effect of monochloramine on nitrifying bio...

  19. A Spectroscopic Study of the Aggregation State of the Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 in Bacterial versus Host Cell Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Bonucci, Alessio; Caldaroni, Elena; Balducci, Enrico; Pogni, Rebecca

    2015-11-17

    The LL-37 antimicrobial peptide is the only cathelicidin peptide found in humans that has antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties. Because it exerts also chemotactic and angiogenetic activity, LL-37 is involved in promoting wound healing, reducing inflammation, and strengthening the host immune response. The key to the effectiveness of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) lies in the different compositions of bacterial versus host cell membranes. In this context, antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and two variants were studied in the presence of model membranes with different lipid compositions and charges. The investigation was performed using an experimental strategy that combines the site-directed spin labeling-electron paramagnetic resonance technique with circular dichroism and fluorescence emission spectroscopies. LL-37 interacts with negatively charged membranes forming a stable aggregate, which can likely produce toroidal pores until the amount of bound peptide exceeds a critical concentration. At the same time, we have clearly detected an aggregate with a higher oligomeric degree for interaction of LL-37 with neutral membranes. These data confirm the absence of cell selectivity of the peptide and a more complex role in stimulating host cells.

  20. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-04-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was dominant in all samples. Gammaproteobacteria were also detected, mainly in Low Flow sequence libraries, and were affiliated with known methanotrophs and decomposers. The cooccurrence of sulfur reducers from the Deltaproteobacteria and the Epsilonproteobacteria suggests internal sulfur cycling within these habitats. Other phyla detected included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Statistically significant relationships between sequence library composition and habitat type suggest a predictable pattern for High Flow and Low Flow environments. Most sequences significantly more represented in High Flow libraries were related to sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, while mainly heterotrophic groups were more represented in Low Flow libraries. Differences in temperature, available energy for metabolism, and stability between High Flow and Low Flow habitats potentially explain their distinct bacterial communities.

  1. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-04-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was dominant in all samples. Gammaproteobacteria were also detected, mainly in Low Flow sequence libraries, and were affiliated with known methanotrophs and decomposers. The cooccurrence of sulfur reducers from the Deltaproteobacteria and the Epsilonproteobacteria suggests internal sulfur cycling within these habitats. Other phyla detected included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Statistically significant relationships between sequence library composition and habitat type suggest a predictable pattern for High Flow and Low Flow environments. Most sequences significantly more represented in High Flow libraries were related to sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, while mainly heterotrophic groups were more represented in Low Flow libraries. Differences in temperature, available energy for metabolism, and stability between High Flow and Low Flow habitats potentially explain their distinct bacterial communities. PMID:23401293

  2. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-01-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was dominant in all samples. Gammaproteobacteria were also detected, mainly in Low Flow sequence libraries, and were affiliated with known methanotrophs and decomposers. The cooccurrence of sulfur reducers from the Deltaproteobacteria and the Epsilonproteobacteria suggests internal sulfur cycling within these habitats. Other phyla detected included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Deinococcus–Thermus. Statistically significant relationships between sequence library composition and habitat type suggest a predictable pattern for High Flow and Low Flow environments. Most sequences significantly more represented in High Flow libraries were related to sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, while mainly heterotrophic groups were more represented in Low Flow libraries. Differences in temperature, available energy for metabolism, and stability between High Flow and Low Flow habitats potentially explain their distinct bacterial communities. PMID:23401293

  3. Community structures and activities of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in industrial wastewater-treating biofilms.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hisashi; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ito, Tsukasa; Okabe, Satoshi

    2006-07-01

    The bacterial community structure, in situ spatial distributions and activities of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in biofilms treating industrial wastewater were investigated by combination of the 16S rRNA gene clone analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microelectrodes. These results were compared with the nitrogen removal capacity of the industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWTP). Both nitrification and denitrification occurred in the primary denitrification (PD) tank and denitrification occurred in the secondary denitrification (SD) tank. In contrast, nitrification and denitrification rates were very low in the nitrification (N) tank. 16S rRNA gene clone sequence analysis revealed that the bacteria affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria, followed by Betaproteobacteria, were numerically important microbial groups in three tanks. The many clones affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria were closely related to the denitrifying bacteria (e.g., Hyphomicrobium spp., Rhodopseudomonas palustris, and Rhodobacter spp.). In addition, Methylophilus leisingeri affiliated with Betaproteobacteria, which favorably utilized methanol, was detected only in the SD-tank to which methanol was added. Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosomonas marina were detected as the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria affiliated with Betaproteobacteria throughout this plant, although the dominant species of them was different among three tanks. Nitrifying bacteria were mainly detected in the upper parts of the PD-biofilm whereas their populations were low in the upper parts of the N-biofilm. The presence of denitrifying bacteria affiliated with Hyphomicrobium spp. in SD- and N-biofilms was verified by FISH analysis. Microelectrode measurements showed that the nitrifying bacteria present in the N- and PD-biofilms were active and the bacteria present in the SD-biofilm could denitrify. PMID:16477661

  4. Enhanced biodegradation of iopromide and trimethoprim in nitrifying activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Batt, Angela L; Kim, Sungpyo; Aga, Diana S

    2006-12-01

    Iopromide (an X-ray contrast agent) and trimethoprim (an antibacterial drug) are frequently detected pharmaceuticals in effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and in surface waters due to their persistence and high usage. Laboratory-scale experiments showed that a significantly higher removal rate in nitrifying activated sludge as compared to conventional activated sludge was observed for both iopromide and trimethoprim. When the activity of the nitrifying bacteria was inhibited, the percent removal of iopromide decreased from 97 to 86% while trimethoprim removal decreased from 70 to 25%. The metabolite of iopromide identified when nitrification was not inhibited was a dehydroxylated iopromide at the two side chains. However, when the nitrifying bacteria were inhibited the metabolite identified was a carboxylate, formed during the oxidation of the primary alcohol on the side chain of iopromide. These results suggest that the nitrifying bacteria are important in the observed biodegradation of iopromide in the activated sludge with higher solid retention time (SRT). Results from the laboratory-scale study were corroborated by the observed removal efficiencies in a full-scale municipal WWTP, which showed that iopromide (ranging from 0.10 to 0.27 microg/L) and trimethoprim (ranging from 0.0.08 to 0.53 microg/L) were removed more effectively in the nitrifying activate sludge which has a higher SRT (49 days) than in the conventional activated sludge (SRT of 6 days). In nitrifying activated sludge, the percent removal of iopromide in the WWTP reached 61%, while in conventional activated sludge, average removal was negligible. For trimethoprim, removal was limited to about 1% in the conventional activated sludge, while in the nitrifying activated sludge, the removal was increased to 50%.

  5. Modeling of trihalomethane cometabolism in nitrifying biofilters.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2007-01-01

    The computer program AQUASIM was used to model biofilter experiments seeded with Lake Austin, Texas mixed-culture nitrifiers. These biofilters degraded four trihalomethanes (THMs) (trichloromethane (TCM) or chloroform, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), tribromomethane (TBM) or bromoform) commonly found in treated drinking water. Apparent steady-state data from the biofilter experiments and supporting batch experiments were used to estimate kinetic parameters for TCM, DBCM and ammonia degradation. Subsequently, the model was verified against other experimental biofilter data. To allow for full-scale simulations, BDCM and TBM rate constants were estimated using data from batch kinetic studies. Finally, the model was used to simulate full-scale filter performance under different filter surface loading rates and THM speciation seen in practice. Overall, total THM removals ranged from 16% to 54% in these simulations with influent total THM concentrations of 75-82microg/L, which illustrates the potential of THM cometabolism to have a significant impact on treated water quality. PMID:17129595

  6. Enhanced transformation of tetrabromobisphenol a by nitrifiers in nitrifying activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangjie; Jiang, Bingqi; Nastold, Peter; Kolvenbach, Boris Alexander; Chen, Jianqiu; Wang, Lianhong; Guo, Hongyan; Corvini, Philippe François-Xavier; Ji, Rong

    2015-04-01

    The fate of the most commonly used brominated flame retardant, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), in wastewater treatment plants is obscure. Using a (14)C-tracer, we studied TBBPA transformation in nitrifying activated sludge (NAS). During the 31-day incubation, TBBPA transformation (half-life 10.3 days) was accompanied by mineralization (17% of initial TBBPA). Twelve metabolites, including those with single benzene ring, O-methyl TBBPA ether, and nitro compounds, were identified. When allylthiourea was added to the sludge to completely inhibit nitrification, TBBPA transformation was significantly reduced (half-life 28.9 days), formation of the polar and single-ring metabolites stopped, but O-methylation was not significantly affected. Abiotic experiments confirmed the generation of mono- and dinitro-brominated forms of bisphenol A in NAS by the abiotic nitration of TBBPA by nitrite, a product of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms (AOMs). Three biotic (type II ipso-substitution, oxidative skeletal cleavage, and O-methylation) and one abiotic (nitro-debromination) pathways were proposed for TBBPA transformation in NAS. Apart from O-methylation, AOMs were involved in three other pathways. Our results are the first to provide information about the complex metabolism of TBBPA in NAS, and they are consistent with a determining role for nitrifiers in TBBPA degradation by initiating its cleavage into single-ring metabolites that are substrates for the growth of heterotrophic bacteria. PMID:25754048

  7. Enumeration and activity of nitrifying bacteria in zeoponic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGilloway, Robyn Leigh

    Regenerative life-support systems are needed for long-term space missions. One component of a proposed life-support system is the use of zeoponic growth substrates, which slowly release NH4 into 'soil' solution for the production of plants. Nitrifying bacteria that convert NH4 to NO3 are among the important microbial components of these systems. Some evidence suggests that a balance between NH4 and NO3 is desirable in promoting plant growth and seed development. Therefore, enumeration of nitrifying bacteria and evaluation of the kinetics of nitrification in zeoponic substrates warrants investigation. A method for rapid detection and enumeration of a commercial inoculum of nitrifying bacteria in a zeoponic substrate was developed using a most probable number (MPN)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach, and a TaqMan probe-based assay. The detection limit of the MPN-PCR methodology was 2,000 cells per assay. Detection sensitivity for the TaqMan assay was determined to be 60 cells. The quantitative assay demonstrated that the zeoponic substrate was capable of supporting 105 to 107 Nitrobacter cells g-1 substrate. The MPN-PCR method and TaqMan probe-based assay can be effective and rapid approaches to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in zeoponic substrates. Column studies and a growth chamber study were conducted to evaluate the production of NO2 and NO3, and nitrifier populations in zeoponic substrates. The zeoponic substrate provided a readily available source of NH4, and nitrifying bacteria were active in the substrate. Quantities of NH4 oxidized, 10 mug N g-1 h-1, to NO2 and NO3 in inoculated zeoponic substrate were in excess of plant uptake. Acidification as a result of NH4 oxidation resulted in decline of pH to 5.5. The zeoponic substrate showed limited pH buffering capacity. Survival of nitrifying bacteria during periods of desiccation was evaluated, as the zeoponic substrate would likely be stored in an air-dry state between croppings. Substrate was enriched for

  8. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  9. Kinetics of bacterial phospholipase C activity at micellar interfaces: effect of substrate aggregate microstructure and a model for the kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasmeet; Ranganathan, Radha; Hajdu, Joseph

    2008-12-25

    Activity at micellar interfaces of bacterial phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on phospholipids solubilized in micelles was investigated with the goal of elucidating the role of the interface microstructure and developing further an existing kinetic model. Enzyme kinetics and physicochemical characterization of model substrate aggregates were combined, thus enabling the interpretation of kinetics in the context of the interface. Substrates were diacylphosphatidylcholine of different acyl chain lengths in the form of mixed micelles with dodecyldimethylammoniopropanesulfonate. An early kinetic model, reformulated to reflect the interfacial nature of the kinetics, was applied to the kinetic data. A better method of data treatment is proposed, use of which makes the presence of microstructure effects quite transparent. Models for enzyme-micelle binding and enzyme-lipid binding are developed, and expressions incorporating the microstructural properties are derived for the enzyme-micelle dissociation constant K(s) and the interface Michaelis-Menten constant, K(M). Use of these expressions in the interface kinetic model brings excellent agreement between the kinetic data and the model. Numerical values for the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are determined. Enzyme-lipid binding is found to be an activated process with an acyl chain length dependent free energy of activation that decreases with micelle lipid molar fraction with a coefficient of about -15RT and correlates with the tightness of molecular packing in the substrate aggregate. Thus, the physical insight obtained includes a model for the kinetic parameters that shows that these parameters depend on the substrate concentration and acyl chain length of the lipid. Enzyme-micelle binding is indicated to be hydrophobic and solvent mediated with a dissociation constant of 1.2 mM.

  10. Effect of post space preparation on the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and Gutta-percha: A bacterial leakage study

    PubMed Central

    Metgud, Sandeep S; Shah, Harsh H; Hiremath, Hemalatha T; Agarwal, Deepali; Reddy, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of post space preparation on the sealing ability of teeth obturated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Gutta-percha. Materials and Methods: Fifty intact human mandibular premolars, after decoronation and biomechanical preparation, were randomly divided into three experimental groups. In Group A (n = 10), the canals were obturated with Gutta-percha using cold lateral compaction technique, followed by immediate post space preparation. In Group B (n = 10), the canals were obturated with 8 mm of MTA and in Group C (n = 10), sectional obturation with 4 mm of MTA was done, followed by delayed post space preparation. All specimens were subjected to bacterial leakage analysis, and the occurrence of turbidity was checked. Results: All specimens in the lateral compaction group leaked. The mean number of days at which leakage was observed in Groups A, B and C were 18.5 days, 93.6 days and 95.5 days. Conclusions: MTA can be considered as an alternative to Gutta-percha as an apical third restorative material for teeth indicated for post and core, as it demonstrates better-sealing ability compared with Gutta-percha. Further, the removal of set MTA for post space preparation does not disrupt the integrity of the remaining apical MTA. PMID:26180414

  11. Tracking the dynamics of heterotrophs and nitrifiers in moving-bed biofilm reactors operated at different COD/N ratios.

    PubMed

    Bassin, J P; Abbas, B; Vilela, C L S; Kleerebezem, R; Muyzer, G; Rosado, A S; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Dezotti, M

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the impact of COD/N ratio and feeding regime on the dynamics of heterotrophs and nitrifiers in moving-bed biofilm reactors was addressed. Based on DGGE analysis of 16S rRNA genes, the influent COD was found to be the main factor determining the overall bacterial diversity. The amoA-gene-based analysis suggested that the dynamic behavior of the substrate in continuous and pulse-feeding reactors influenced the selection of specific ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) strains. Furthermore, AOB diversity was directly related to the applied COD/N ratio and ammonium-nitrogen load. Maximum specific ammonium oxidation rates observed under non-substrate-limiting conditions were observed to be proportional to the fraction of nitrifiers within the bacterial community. FISH analysis revealed that Nitrosomonas genus dominated the AOB community in all reactors. Moreover, Nitrospira was found to be the only nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the fully autotrophic system, whereas Nitrobacter represented the dominant NOB genus in the organic carbon-fed reactors. PMID:26025351

  12. 3-D analysis of bacterial cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using complementary microscopy tomography approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmid, G; Zeitvogel, F; Hao, L; Ingino, P; Floetenmeyer, M; Stierhof, Y-D; Schroeppel, B; Burkhardt, C J; Kappler, A; Obst, M

    2014-07-01

    The formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates as a consequence of bacterial iron oxidation is an environmentally widespread process with a number of implications for processes such as sorption and coprecipitation of contaminants and nutrients. Whereas the overall appearance of such aggregates is easily accessible using 2-D microscopy techniques, the 3-D and internal structure remain obscure. In this study, we examined the 3-D structure of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using a combination of advanced 3-D microscopy techniques. We obtained 3-D structural and chemical information on different cellular encrustation patterns at high spatial resolution (4-200 nm, depending on the method): more specifically, (1) cells free of iron minerals, (2) periplasm filled with iron minerals, (3) spike- or platelet-shaped iron mineral structures, (4) bulky structures on the cell surface, (5) extracellular iron mineral shell structures, (6) cells with iron mineral filled cytoplasm, and (7) agglomerations of extracellular globular structures. In addition to structural information, chemical nanotomography suggests a dominant role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in controlling the formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates. Furthermore, samples in their hydrated state showed cell-(iron)mineral aggregates in pristine conditions free of preparation (i.e., drying/dehydration) artifacts. All these results were obtained using 3-D microscopy techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tomography, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography, scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) tomography, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). It turned out that, due to the various different contrast mechanisms of the individual approaches, and due to the required sample preparation steps, only the combination of these techniques was able to provide a

  13. Population dynamics and in situ kinetics of nitrifying bacteria in autotrophic nitrifying biofilms as determined by real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Kindaichi, Tomonori; Kawano, Yoshiko; Ito, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2006-08-20

    Population dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and uncultured Nitrospira-like nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) dominated in autotrophic nitrifying biofilms were determined by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTQ-PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Although two quantitative techniques gave the comparable results, the RTQ-PCR assay was easier and faster than the FISH technique for quantification of both nitrifying bacteria in dense microcolony-forming nitrifying biofilms. Using this RTQ-PCR assay, we could successfully determine the maximum specific growth rate (mu = 0.021/h) of uncultured Nitrospira-like NOB in the suspended enrichment culture. The population dynamics of nitrifying bacteria in the biofilm revealed that once they formed the biofilm, the both nitrifying bacteria grew slower than in planktonic cultures. We also calculated the spatial distributions of average specific growth rates of both nitrifying bacteria in the biofilm based on the concentration profiles of NH4+, NO2-, and O2, which were determined by microelectrodes, and the double-Monod model. This simple model estimation could explain the stratified spatial distribution of AOB and Nitrospira-like NOB in the biofilm. The combination of culture-independent molecular techniques and microelectrode measurements is a very powerful approach to analyze the in situ kinetics and ecophysiology of nitrifying bacteria including uncultured Nitrospira-like NOB in complex biofilm communities.

  14. Diversity of nitrifying bacteria in a full-scale petroleum refinery wastewater treatment plant experiencing unstable nitrification.

    PubMed

    Figuerola, Eva L M; Erijman, Leonardo

    2010-09-15

    We have investigated bacterial populations relevant to nitrification in a full-scale activated sludge plant receiving wastewater from a petroleum refinery showing unstable nitrification. Inhibition of ammonia oxidation was related to phenol concentration according to a model of non-competitive inhibition. While the number of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) did not correlate with nitrification performance, the total number of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) dropped considerably during periods of nitrite accumulation or no nitrification. Diversity of nitrifiers in the sludge of the full-scale facility was examined at a time of full nitrification with the construction of clone libraries of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene and of the 16S rRNA gene of NOB. Nucleotide sequences of amoA gene belonged to one dominant population, associated with Nitrosomonas europaea, and to a minor population related to the Nitrosomonas nitrosa lineage. The majority of sequences retrieved in the NOB-like clone library also clustered within a single operational taxonomic unit. The high dominance of Nitrobacter over Nitrospira and the low diversity of nitrifying bacteria observed in this wastewater treatment plant might account for the increased risk of failure in the presence of disturbances.

  15. The effects of salinity on nitrification using halophilic nitrifiers in a Sequencing Batch Reactor treating hypersaline wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Ding, Jie-Ran; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    With annual increases in the generation and use of saline wastewater, the need to avoid environmental problems such as eutrophication is critical. A previous study identified ways to start up a halophilic sludge domesticated from estuarine sediments to remove nitrogen from wastewater with a salinity of 30 g/L. This investigation expands that work to explore the impact of salinity on nitrogen removal. This study demonstrated that the mixed halophilic consortia removed nitrogen from wastewater with a salinity of 30-85 g/L. A kinetic analysis showed that halophilic nitrifiers selected based on hypersalinity were characterized by low Ks, μmax and specific ammonium oxidization rates. This explains the decrease in ammonium removal efficiency in the high salinity operational phases. Salinity inhibited ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) activity, as well as the number of dominant AOB, but did not significantly affect the AOB dominant species. Three most dominant AOB lineages in the halophilic sludge were Nitrosomonas marina, Nitrosomonas europaea, and Nitrosococcus mobilis. Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosococcus mobilis were mainly affected by salinity, while nitrite accumulation and ammonia loading played the key role in determining the abundance of Nitrosococcus mobilis and Nitrosococcus europaea. The study contributes insights about shifts in halophilic nitrifying bacterial populations. PMID:27109617

  16. The effects of salinity on nitrification using halophilic nitrifiers in a Sequencing Batch Reactor treating hypersaline wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Ding, Jie-Ran; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    With annual increases in the generation and use of saline wastewater, the need to avoid environmental problems such as eutrophication is critical. A previous study identified ways to start up a halophilic sludge domesticated from estuarine sediments to remove nitrogen from wastewater with a salinity of 30 g/L. This investigation expands that work to explore the impact of salinity on nitrogen removal. This study demonstrated that the mixed halophilic consortia removed nitrogen from wastewater with a salinity of 30–85 g/L. A kinetic analysis showed that halophilic nitrifiers selected based on hypersalinity were characterized by low Ks, μmax and specific ammonium oxidization rates. This explains the decrease in ammonium removal efficiency in the high salinity operational phases. Salinity inhibited ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) activity, as well as the number of dominant AOB, but did not significantly affect the AOB dominant species. Three most dominant AOB lineages in the halophilic sludge were Nitrosomonas marina, Nitrosomonas europaea, and Nitrosococcus mobilis. Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosococcus mobilis were mainly affected by salinity, while nitrite accumulation and ammonia loading played the key role in determining the abundance of Nitrosococcus mobilis and Nitrosococcus europaea. The study contributes insights about shifts in halophilic nitrifying bacterial populations. PMID:27109617

  17. Quantitative response of nitrifying and denitrifying communities to environmental variables in a full-scale membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Silván, C; Vílchez-Vargas, R; Arévalo, J; Gómez, M A; González-López, J; Pieper, D H; Rodelas, B

    2014-10-01

    The abundance and transcription levels of specific gene markers of total bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrospira-like) and denitrifiers (N2O-reducers) were analyzed using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and reverse-transcription qPCR during 9 months in a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating urban wastewater. A stable community of N-removal key players was developed; however, the abundance of active populations experienced sharper shifts, demonstrating their fast adaptation to changing conditions. Despite constituting a small percentage of the total bacterial community, the larger abundances of active populations of nitrifiers explained the high N-removal accomplished by the MBR. Multivariate analyses revealed that temperature, accumulation of volatile suspended solids in the sludge, BOD5, NH4(+) concentration and C/N ratio of the wastewater contributed significantly (23-38%) to explain changes in the abundance of nitrifiers and denitrifiers. However, each targeted group showed different responses to shifts in these parameters, evidencing the complexity of the balance among them for successful biological N-removal.

  18. Quantitative response of nitrifying and denitrifying communities to environmental variables in a full-scale membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Silván, C; Vílchez-Vargas, R; Arévalo, J; Gómez, M A; González-López, J; Pieper, D H; Rodelas, B

    2014-10-01

    The abundance and transcription levels of specific gene markers of total bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrospira-like) and denitrifiers (N2O-reducers) were analyzed using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and reverse-transcription qPCR during 9 months in a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating urban wastewater. A stable community of N-removal key players was developed; however, the abundance of active populations experienced sharper shifts, demonstrating their fast adaptation to changing conditions. Despite constituting a small percentage of the total bacterial community, the larger abundances of active populations of nitrifiers explained the high N-removal accomplished by the MBR. Multivariate analyses revealed that temperature, accumulation of volatile suspended solids in the sludge, BOD5, NH4(+) concentration and C/N ratio of the wastewater contributed significantly (23-38%) to explain changes in the abundance of nitrifiers and denitrifiers. However, each targeted group showed different responses to shifts in these parameters, evidencing the complexity of the balance among them for successful biological N-removal. PMID:25043345

  19. Modelling cometabolic biotransformation of organic micropollutants in nitrifying reactors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E; Carballa, M; Omil, F; Lema, J M

    2014-11-15

    Cometabolism is the ability of microorganisms to degrade non-growth substrates in the presence of primary substrates, being the main removal mechanism behind the biotransformation of organic micropollutants in wastewater treatment plants. In this paper, a cometabolic Monod-type kinetics, linking biotransformation of micropollutants with primary substrate degradation, was applied to a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) reactor operated under different operational conditions (hydraulic retention time (HRT) and nitrifying activity). A dynamic model of the bioreactor was built taking into account biotransformation, sorption and volatilization. The micropollutant transformation capacity (Tc), the half-saturation constant (Ksc) and the solid-liquid partitioning coefficient (Kd) of several organic micropollutants were estimated at 25 °C using an optimization algorithm to fit experimental data to the proposed model with the cometabolic Monod-type biotransformation kinetics. The cometabolic Monod-type kinetic model was validated under different HRTs (1.0-3.7 d) and nitrification rates (0.12-0.45 g N/g VSS d), describing more accurately the fate of those compounds affected by the biological activity of nitrifiers (ibuprofen, naproxen, erythromycin and roxithromycin) compared to the commonly applied pseudo-first order micropollutant biotransformation kinetics, which does not link biotransformation of micropollutants to consumption of primary substrate. Furthermore, in contrast to the pseudo-first order biotransformation constant (k(biol)), the proposed cometabolic kinetic coefficients are independent of operational conditions such as the nitrogen loading rate applied. Also, the influence of the kinetic parameters on the biotransformation efficiency of NAS reactors, defined as the relative amount of the total inlet micropollutant load being biotransformed, was assessed considering different HRTs and nitrification rates.

  20. Modelling cometabolic biotransformation of organic micropollutants in nitrifying reactors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E; Carballa, M; Omil, F; Lema, J M

    2014-11-15

    Cometabolism is the ability of microorganisms to degrade non-growth substrates in the presence of primary substrates, being the main removal mechanism behind the biotransformation of organic micropollutants in wastewater treatment plants. In this paper, a cometabolic Monod-type kinetics, linking biotransformation of micropollutants with primary substrate degradation, was applied to a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) reactor operated under different operational conditions (hydraulic retention time (HRT) and nitrifying activity). A dynamic model of the bioreactor was built taking into account biotransformation, sorption and volatilization. The micropollutant transformation capacity (Tc), the half-saturation constant (Ksc) and the solid-liquid partitioning coefficient (Kd) of several organic micropollutants were estimated at 25 °C using an optimization algorithm to fit experimental data to the proposed model with the cometabolic Monod-type biotransformation kinetics. The cometabolic Monod-type kinetic model was validated under different HRTs (1.0-3.7 d) and nitrification rates (0.12-0.45 g N/g VSS d), describing more accurately the fate of those compounds affected by the biological activity of nitrifiers (ibuprofen, naproxen, erythromycin and roxithromycin) compared to the commonly applied pseudo-first order micropollutant biotransformation kinetics, which does not link biotransformation of micropollutants to consumption of primary substrate. Furthermore, in contrast to the pseudo-first order biotransformation constant (k(biol)), the proposed cometabolic kinetic coefficients are independent of operational conditions such as the nitrogen loading rate applied. Also, the influence of the kinetic parameters on the biotransformation efficiency of NAS reactors, defined as the relative amount of the total inlet micropollutant load being biotransformed, was assessed considering different HRTs and nitrification rates. PMID:25150522

  1. Intensified nitrogen removal in immobilized nitrifier enhanced constructed wetlands with external carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Ambrose, Richard F; Ullman, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen removal performance response of twelve constructed wetlands (CWs) to immobilized nitrifier pellets and different influent COD/N ratios (chemical oxygen demand: total nitrogen in influent) were investigated via 7-month experiments. Nitrifier was immobilized on a carrier pellet containing 10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), 2.0% sodium alginate (SA) and 2.0% calcium chloride (CaCl2). A batch experiment demonstrated that 73% COD and 85% ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) were degraded using the pellets with immobilized nitrifier cells. In addition, different carbon source supplement strategies were applied to remove the nitrate (NO3-N) transformed from NH4-N. An increase in COD/N ratio led to increasing reduction in NO3-N. Efficient nitrification and denitrification promoted total nitrogen (TN) removal in immobilized nitrifier biofortified constructed wetlands (INB-CWs). The results suggested that immobilized nitrifier pellets combined with high influent COD/N ratios could effectively improve the nitrogen removal performance in CWs.

  2. Anammox enrichment from reject water on blank biofilm carriers and carriers containing nitrifying biomass: operation of two moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR).

    PubMed

    Zekker, Ivar; Rikmann, Ergo; Tenno, Toomas; Lemmiksoo, Vallo; Menert, Anne; Loorits, Liis; Vabamäe, Priit; Tomingas, Martin; Tenno, Taavo

    2012-07-01

    The anammox bacteria were enriched from reject water of anaerobic digestion of municipal wastewater sludge onto moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system carriers-the ones initially containing no biomass (MBBR1) as well as the ones containing nitrifying biomass (MBBR2). Duration of start-up periods of the both reactors was similar (about 100 days), but stable total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency occurred earlier in the system containing nitrifying biomass. Anammox TN removal efficiency of 70% was achieved by 180 days in both 20 l volume reactors at moderate temperature of 26.0°C. During the steady state phase of operation of MBBRs the average TN removal efficiencies and maximum TN removal rates in MBBR1 were 80% (1,000 g-N/m(3)/day, achieved by 308 days) and in MBBR2 85% (1,100 g-N/m(3)/day, achieved by 266 days). In both reactors mixed bacterial cultures were detected. Uncultured Planctomycetales bacterium clone P4, Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii and uncultured Nitrospira sp. clone 53 were identified by PCR-DGGE from the system initially containing blank biofilm carriers as well as from the nitrifying biofilm system; from the latter in addition to these also uncultured ammonium oxidizing bacterium clone W1 and Nitrospira sp. clone S1-62 were detected. FISH analysis revealed that anammox microorganisms were located in clusters in the biofilm. Using previously grown nitrifying biofilm matrix for anammox enrichment has some benefits over starting up the process from zero, such as less time for enrichment and protection against severe inhibitions in case of high substrate loading rates.

  3. Soil environmental conditions and microbial build-up mediate the effect of plant diversity on soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities in temperate grasslands.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Xavier; Schmid, Bernhard; Poly, Franck; Barnard, Romain L; Niklaus, Pascal A; Guillaumaud, Nadine; Habekost, Maike; Oelmann, Yvonne; Philippot, Laurent; Salles, Joana Falcao; Schloter, Michael; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Weigelt, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Random reductions in plant diversity can affect ecosystem functioning, but it is still unclear which components of plant diversity (species number - namely richness, presence of particular plant functional groups, or particular combinations of these) and associated biotic and abiotic drivers explain the observed relationships, particularly for soil processes. We assembled grassland communities including 1 to 16 plant species with a factorial separation of the effects of richness and functional group composition to analyze how plant diversity components influence soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities (NEA and DEA, respectively), the abundance of nitrifiers (bacterial and archaeal amoA gene number) and denitrifiers (nirK, nirS and nosZ gene number), and key soil environmental conditions. Plant diversity effects were largely due to differences in functional group composition between communities of identical richness (number of sown species), though richness also had an effect per se. NEA was positively related to the percentage of legumes in terms of sown species number, the additional effect of richness at any given legume percentage being negative. DEA was higher in plots with legumes, decreased with increasing percentage of grasses, and increased with richness. No correlation was observed between DEA and denitrifier abundance. NEA increased with the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria. The effect of richness on NEA was entirely due to the build-up of nitrifying organisms, while legume effect was partly linked to modified ammonium availability and nitrifier abundance. Richness effect on DEA was entirely due to changes in soil moisture, while the effects of legumes and grasses were partly due to modified nitrate availability, which influenced the specific activity of denitrifiers. These results suggest that plant diversity-induced changes in microbial specific activity are important for facultative activities such as denitrification, whereas changes

  4. The effect of sodium chloride on the two-step kinetics of the nitrifying process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Omar; Aspé, Estrella; Martí, María C; Roeckel, Marlene

    2004-01-01

    Sodium chloride affects the transformation rate of several compounds in bioreactors. Most authors report a decrease in microorganism activity at increasing salt concentrations. In this work, a kinetic model that relates sodium chloride concentration with the rates of each step of the nitrification process is proposed; thus, the effect of sodium chloride concentration (0 to 60 g/L) on the nitritation and nitratation rates was separately studied. To carry out the independent study of each step, a combination of the respirometric method with sodium azide, an inhibitor of the nitratation step, was performed. The dot-blot hybridization technique with 16S rRNA-targeted probes was used to determine the ammonia-oxidizing and nitrite-oxidizing bacterial fraction, then it was possible to relate the culture's function with its biological composition. Rates of both steps were linearly reduced at increasing salt concentrations: the nitratation rate was more affected than the nitritation rate. Simulations carried out in a nitrifying sequencing batch reactor indicate that nitrite might accumulate at high salt concentrations. Sodium chloride exerts a reversible inhibition on ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation.

  5. Population Ecology of Nitrifiers in a Stream Receiving Geothermal Inputs of Ammonium

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, A. Bryce

    1983-01-01

    The distribution, activity, and generic diversity of nitrifying bacteria in a stream receiving geothermal inputs of ammonium were studied. The high estimated rates of benthic nitrate flux (33 to 75 mg of N · m−2 · h−1) were a result of the activity of nitrifiers located in the sediment. Nitrifying potentials and ammonium oxidizer most probable numbers in the sediments were at least one order of magnitude higher than those in the waters. Nitrifiers in the oxygenated surface (0 to 2 cm) sediments were limited by suboptimal temperature, pH, and substrate level. Nitrifiers in deep (nonsurface) oxygenated sediments did not contribute significantly to the changes measured in the levels of inorganic nitrogen species in the overlying waters and presumably derived their ammonium supply from ammonification within the sediment. Ammonium-oxidizing isolates obtained by a most-probable number nonenrichment procedure were species of either Nitrosospira or Nitrosomonas, whereas all those obtained by an enrichment procedure (i.e., selective culture) were Nitrosomonas spp. The efficiency of the most-probable-number method for enumerating ammonium oxidizers was calculated to be between 0.05 and 2.0%, suggesting that measurements of nitrifying potentials provide a better estimate of nitrifying populations. PMID:16346261

  6. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  7. N2O emissions from full-scale nitrifying biofilters.

    PubMed

    Bollon, Julien; Filali, Ahlem; Fayolle, Yannick; Guerin, Sabrina; Rocher, Vincent; Gillot, Sylvie

    2016-10-01

    A full-scale nitrifying biofilter was continuously monitored during two measurement periods (September 2014; February 2015) during which both gaseous and liquid N2O fluxes were monitored on-line. The results showed diurnal and seasonal variations of N2O emissions. A statistical model was run to determine the main operational parameters governing N2O emissions. Modification of the distribution between the gas phase and the liquid phase was observed related to the effects of temperature and aeration flow on the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa). With similar nitrification performance values, the N2O emission factor was twice as high during the winter campaign. The increase in N2O emissions in winter was correlated to higher effluent nitrite concentrations and suspected increased biofilm thickness.

  8. Removal of pharmaceutically active compounds in nitrifying-denitrifying plants.

    PubMed

    Suárez, S; Ramil, M; Omil, F; Lema, J M

    2005-01-01

    The behaviour of nine pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) of different diagnostic groups is studied during a nitrifying-denitrifying process in an activated sludge system. The compounds selected cover a wide range of frequently used substances such as anti-epileptics (carbamazepine), tranquillisers (diazepam), anti-depressants (fluoxetine and citalopram), anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen, naproxen and diclofenac) and estrogens (estradiol and ethinylestradiol). The main objective of this research is to investigate the effect of acclimation of biomass on the removal rates of these compounds, either by maintaining a high sludge retention time or at long-term operation. The removal rates achieved for nitrogen and carbon in the experimental unit exceed 90% and were not affected by the addition of PhACs. Carbamazepine, diazepam and diclofenac were only removed to a small extent. On the other hand, higher removal rates have been observed for naproxen and ibuprofen (68% and 82%), respectively. PMID:16312946

  9. The BR domain of PsrP interacts with extracellular DNA to promote bacterial aggregation; structural insights into pneumococcal biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Tim; Mikaelsson, Cecilia; Beaussart, Audrey; Kikhney, Alexey; Deshmukh, Maya; Wolniak, Sebastian; Pathak, Anuj; Ebel, Christine; Löfling, Jonas; Fogolari, Federico; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Svergun, Dmitri; Nygren, Per-Åke; Achour, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    The major human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of disease and death worldwide. Pneumococcal biofilm formation within the nasopharynx leads to long-term colonization and persistence within the host. We have previously demonstrated that the capsular surface-associated pneumococcal serine rich repeat protein (PsrP), key factor for biofilm formation, binds to keratin-10 (KRT10) through its microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM)-related globular binding region domain (BR187–385). Here, we show that BR187–385 also binds to DNA, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and size exclusion chromatography. Further, heterologous expression of BR187–378 or the longer BR120–378 construct on the surface of a Gram-positive model host bacterium resulted in the formation of cellular aggregates that was significantly enhanced in the presence of DNA. Crystal structure analyses revealed the formation of BR187–385 homo-dimers via an intermolecular β-sheet, resulting in a positively charged concave surface, shaped to accommodate the acidic helical DNA structure. Furthermore, small angle X-ray scattering and circular dichroism studies indicate that the aggregate-enhancing N-terminal region of BR120–166 adopts an extended, non-globular structure. Altogether, our results suggest that PsrP adheres to extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix and thus promotes pneumococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27582320

  10. The BR domain of PsrP interacts with extracellular DNA to promote bacterial aggregation; structural insights into pneumococcal biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Tim; Mikaelsson, Cecilia; Beaussart, Audrey; Kikhney, Alexey; Deshmukh, Maya; Wolniak, Sebastian; Pathak, Anuj; Ebel, Christine; Löfling, Jonas; Fogolari, Federico; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Dufrêne, Yves F; Svergun, Dmitri; Nygren, Per-Åke; Achour, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    The major human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of disease and death worldwide. Pneumococcal biofilm formation within the nasopharynx leads to long-term colonization and persistence within the host. We have previously demonstrated that the capsular surface-associated pneumococcal serine rich repeat protein (PsrP), key factor for biofilm formation, binds to keratin-10 (KRT10) through its microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM)-related globular binding region domain (BR187-385). Here, we show that BR187-385 also binds to DNA, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and size exclusion chromatography. Further, heterologous expression of BR187-378 or the longer BR120-378 construct on the surface of a Gram-positive model host bacterium resulted in the formation of cellular aggregates that was significantly enhanced in the presence of DNA. Crystal structure analyses revealed the formation of BR187-385 homo-dimers via an intermolecular β-sheet, resulting in a positively charged concave surface, shaped to accommodate the acidic helical DNA structure. Furthermore, small angle X-ray scattering and circular dichroism studies indicate that the aggregate-enhancing N-terminal region of BR120-166 adopts an extended, non-globular structure. Altogether, our results suggest that PsrP adheres to extracellular DNA in the biofilm matrix and thus promotes pneumococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27582320

  11. Nitrous oxide production from sequencing batch reactor sludge under nitrifying conditions: effect of nitrite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gong, Youkui; Wang, Shuying; Wang, Sai; Peng, Yongzhen

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas which contributes to the destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer, can be emitted from nitrifying processes during wastewater treatment. The pathway of N2O production was studied using a lab-scale nitrifying reactor. Allylthiourea was used to inhibit NH4+ oxidation and provide information on processes that happen under nitrifying condition. Our study confirmed that besides heterotrophic bacteria, ammonium-oxidizing bacteria could perform denitrification processes, during which NO2- was the electron acceptor and NH4+ was the electron donor, with N2 and N2O as final products. The relative contribution of the heterotrophic denitrification process to total N2O emissions varied from 46.1% to 60.4% depending on NO2(-)-N addition. Correspondingly, 21.8% to 51.5% of total N2O emissions can be attributed to nitrifier denitrification. Little N2O is emitted during the NO2- oxidation process.

  12. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under drinking water relevant conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Three batch reactors were used in each ...

  13. Emergent macrophytes select for nitrifying and denitrifying microorganisms in constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trias, Rosalia; Ramió Pujol, Sara; Bañeras, Lluis

    2014-05-01

    The use of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment is a reliable low-cost alternative that has been widely developed during the last years. Several processes involving plants, sediments, and microbial communities contribute to nitrogen removal in wetlands. Vegetation plays an important role in this process, not only by nutrient assimilation but also by the stimulation of the plant associated microbiota. Plants supply oxygen at the close proximity of the root surface that may favour ammonia oxidizers. At the same time, exudation of organic compounds potentially speeds-up denitrification in the anoxic environment. The aim of this work was to understand the plant-microbe interactions at the root level in the Empuriabrava free water surface constructed wetland (Spain). The roots of the macrophytes Typha latifolia, Typha angustifolia, Phragmites australis and Bolboschoenus maritimus were sampled at four dates from January to September 2012, covering all the stages of plant growth. Additionally, sediment surrounding vegetation and non-vegetated sediments were sampled. Microbial community structure was analysed by pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA and functional genes (nirK, nirS, nosZ and amoA). Bacterial communities were significantly different in sediments of the vegetated areas compared to the root surface. Plant roots exhibited a higher proportion of proteobacteria whereas Actinobacteria were dominant in sediments. The nitrifiers Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrosococcus sp. accounted for less than 1% of all sequences. Archaeal communities were dominated by the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Groups C2 and C3 and Methanomicrobia. Higher relative abundances of MCG were found in roots of P. australis, B. maritimus and T. angustifolia. Ammonia oxidizing archaea accounted for less than 0.1% of all sequences but were consistently more abundant in sediment samples compared to roots. NirK and NirS-type bacterial communities showed clearly distinct distribution

  14. Exploration of three heterotrophic nitrifying strains from a tilapia pond for their characteristics of inorganic nitrogen use and application in aquaculture water.

    PubMed

    Fan, Limin; Chen, Jiazhang; Liu, Qi; Wu, Wei; Meng, Shunlong; Song, Chao; Qu, Jianhong; Xu, Pao

    2015-03-01

    Three heterotrophic nitrifying bacterial strains, HLf01, HBf01 and HHf01, were isolated from a pond where genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT) (Oreochromis niloticus) was intensively cultured during the annual peak breeding period. Analysis of biochemical, morphological characteristics and sequences analysis of 16S rDNA identified strains HLf01 and HBf01 as Pseudomonas sp., and strain HHf01 as Acinetobacter baumannii. Further analysis of heterotrophic nitrifying medium inorganic nitrogen used showed that most of the ammonia nitrogen was removed after 48 h. Strains HBf01 and HHf01 removed 67.9% and 76.7% of the total ammonia nitrogen after 24 h, recording the mass ratio of carbon to nitrogen used as 10.6 to 1 and 11.7 to 1, respectively. Strain HLf01 used a C:N ratio of 22.7 to 1 with a total of 43.8% ammonia nitrogen removed. In denitrifying media, strains HBf01 and HHf01 may have used nitrate and nitrite as the sole nitrogen source by strain HLf01. Generally, all the three strains used nitrogen in the order ammonia > nitrite > nitrate when all the three nitrogen forms were recorded present. Although the bacterial strains consumed dissolved organic carbon, it was limited when ammonia was the main source of nitrogen compared with other forms of inorganic nitrogen. Also, the test of the three strains on aquaculture water showed similar results of efficiency of ammonia nitrogen removal with the test of inorganic nitrogen use.

  15. Exploration of three heterotrophic nitrifying strains from a tilapia pond for their characteristics of inorganic nitrogen use and application in aquaculture water.

    PubMed

    Fan, Limin; Chen, Jiazhang; Liu, Qi; Wu, Wei; Meng, Shunlong; Song, Chao; Qu, Jianhong; Xu, Pao

    2015-03-01

    Three heterotrophic nitrifying bacterial strains, HLf01, HBf01 and HHf01, were isolated from a pond where genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT) (Oreochromis niloticus) was intensively cultured during the annual peak breeding period. Analysis of biochemical, morphological characteristics and sequences analysis of 16S rDNA identified strains HLf01 and HBf01 as Pseudomonas sp., and strain HHf01 as Acinetobacter baumannii. Further analysis of heterotrophic nitrifying medium inorganic nitrogen used showed that most of the ammonia nitrogen was removed after 48 h. Strains HBf01 and HHf01 removed 67.9% and 76.7% of the total ammonia nitrogen after 24 h, recording the mass ratio of carbon to nitrogen used as 10.6 to 1 and 11.7 to 1, respectively. Strain HLf01 used a C:N ratio of 22.7 to 1 with a total of 43.8% ammonia nitrogen removed. In denitrifying media, strains HBf01 and HHf01 may have used nitrate and nitrite as the sole nitrogen source by strain HLf01. Generally, all the three strains used nitrogen in the order ammonia > nitrite > nitrate when all the three nitrogen forms were recorded present. Although the bacterial strains consumed dissolved organic carbon, it was limited when ammonia was the main source of nitrogen compared with other forms of inorganic nitrogen. Also, the test of the three strains on aquaculture water showed similar results of efficiency of ammonia nitrogen removal with the test of inorganic nitrogen use. PMID:25441443

  16. Effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on denitrifying and nitrifying popualtions at terrestrial CO2 leakeage analogous sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christine, Dictor Marie; Catherine, Joulian; Valerie, Laperche; Stephanie, Coulon; Dominique, Breeze

    2010-05-01

    CO2 capture and geological storage (CCS) is recognized to be an important option for carbon abatement in Europe. One of the risks of CCS is the leakage from storage site. A laboratory was conducted on soil samples sampled near-surface from a CO2 leakage analogous site (Latera, Italy) in order to evaluate the impact of an elevated soil CO2 concentration on terrestrial bacterial ecosystems form near surface terrestrial environments and to determine a potential bacterial indicator of CO2 leakage from storage site. Surveys were conducted along a 50m long transect across the vent centre, providing a spectrum of CO2 flux rates, soil gas concentrations and compositions (Beaubien et al., 2007). A bacterial diversity studies, performed by CE-SSCP technique, on a soil profile with increasing CO2 soil concentrations (from 0.3% to 100%) showed that a change on bacterial diversity was noted when CO2 concentration was above 50 % of CO2. From this result, 3 soil samples were taken at 70 cm depth in 3 distinct zones (background soil CO2 content, soil CO2 content of 20% and soil CO2 content of 50%). Then theses soil samples were incubated under closed jars flushed with different air atmospheres (20, 50 and 90 % of CO2) during 18 months. At initial, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months, some soil samples were collected in order to estimate the denitrifying, nitrifying activities as a function of CO2 concentration content and times. Theses enzymatic activities were chosen because one occurs under anaerobic conditions (denitrification) and the other occurs under aerobic conditions (nitrification). Both of them were involved in the nitrogen cycle and are major actors of soil function and groundwater quality preservation. Metabolic diversity using BIOLOG Ecoplates was determined on every soil samples. Physico-chemical parameters (e.g. pH, bulk chemistry, mineralogy) were analyzed to have some information about the evolution of the soil during the incubation with increasing soil CO2 concentrations

  17. Impacts of different N management regimes on nitrifier and denitrifier communities and N cycling in soil microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Angela Y. Y.; Hristova, Krassimira; Scow, Kate M.; Six, Johan

    2011-01-01

    hypothesis was also not corroborated because canonical correspondence analyses revealed that AOB and denitrifier abundances were decoupled from potential gross N mineralization and nitrification rates and from inorganic N concentrations. Our third hypothesis was supported by the overall larger nitrifier, denitrifier, and total bacterial communities measured in the soil microaggregates compared to the cPOM and silt-and-clay. These results suggest that the microaggregates are microenvironments that preferentially stabilize C, and concomitantly promote the growth of nitrifier and denitrifier communities, thereby serving as potential hotspots for N2O losses. PMID:21339865

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  19. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  20. [Distribution Characteristics of Nitrifiers and Denitrifiers in the River Sediments of Tongling City].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian-hua; Dou, Zhi-yong; Sun, Qing-ye

    2016-04-15

    Rivers in mining areas were influenced by contaminants such as nitrogen, phosphorus and organic matter due to domestic and agricultural wastewater discharge in addition to pollutants caused by mining activities. In this study, surface sediment samples of rivers in Tongling city were collected to address the effect of season and pollution type on the abundance of nitrifiers and denitrifiers using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) technique targeting at the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) and nitrite reductase (nir) genes. The results showed that the average ahundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AGA) (ranging from 1.74 x 10⁵ to 1.45 x 10⁸ copies · g⁻¹) was 4.39 times that of ammonia oxidizing hacteria (AGH) (ranging from 1.39 x 10⁵ to 3.39 x 10⁷ copies · g⁻¹); and the average abundance of nirK gene (ranging from 4.45 x 10⁶ to 1.51 x 10⁸ copies · g) was almost a thirtieth part of nirS gene (ranging from 1.69 x 10⁷ to 8.55 x 10⁹ copies · g⁻¹). The abundance of AOA was higher in spring and autumn, and lower in summer and winter. And sediment AOB abundance was higher in spring and winter than in summer and autumn. Meanwhile, the abundance of nir genes was in the order of spring (nirS )/autumn (nirK) > summer > winter > autumn (nirS )/spring (nirK). Moreover, the abundance of bacterial and archaeal arnoA and nirS genes in sediments influenced by mine pollution was generally higher than that in sediments influenced by agricultural non-point pollution, whereas the abundance of nirK gene showed an opposite trend. PMID:27548957

  1. Ralstonia insidiosa induces cell aggregation by Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm formation is an important strategy for foodborne bacterial pathogens to survive in stressful environments such as fresh produce processing facilities. Bacterial cell aggregation strongly promotes the initiation of microcolonies and the formation of biofilms on abiological surfaces. We previ...

  2. Establishment and Early Succession of Bacterial Communities in Monochloramine-Treated Drinking Water Biofilms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monochloramine is increasingly used as a drinking water disinfectant because it forms lower levels of regulated disinfection by-products. While its use has been shown to increase nitrifying bacteria, little is known about the bacterial succession within biofilms in monochloramin...

  3. [Isolation of heterotrophic nitrifiers which can tolerate high concentration of ammonia-nitrogen and the optimization of their nitrogen removal efficiency in wastewater].

    PubMed

    Si, Wen-Gong; Lü, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Chao

    2011-11-01

    The removal capabilities and tolerance of high concentration of ammonia-nitrogen of heterotrophic nitrifiers were studied. Methods included multi-point sampling, domestication, gradient dilution of domestication liquid, color indicator as rapid nitrification detection and isolation from streaking plate were conducted to screen heterotrophic nitrifiers. The strains were identified according to the sequence analysis of 16S rDNA. After inoculating the strains into ammonia-nitrogen wastewater, changes of nitrogen compounds were measured in order to understand their denitrification characteristics. The denitrification efficiency was optimized by improving the C/N ratio, changing the compatibility of the strains and mixing the compatible strains with the domesticated bacterial suspension. Finally 8 high-efficiency heterotrohic nitrifiers were obtained, and named as N1-N8 respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 8 strains belonged to Comamonas genus, Rhodococcus genus, Pseudomonos genus, Arthrobacter genus and Paracoccus genus, respectively. When the initial concentration of ammonia nitrogen was 256.9 mg x L(-1) and the C/N was 5.5 of the artificial wastewater, the removal rates of ammonia nitrogen by the strains were about 65%-80%, and the stain N4 was the best. When the C/N ratio of the wastewater increased to 8.0, the ammonia nitrogen removal rates of the strains correspondingly increased to about 80% -90%. As the strains compatibility, the denitrification rate of N4 + N5 + N6 was 88.2% in the artificial wastewater with initial ammonia nitrogen concentration was 261.1 mg x L(-1) and initial C/N ratio was 5.5, which was higher than that of any single strain. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate could reach to 99.8% when N4 + N5 + N6 were combined with the domesticated bacterial suspension. In the artificial wastewater, when the initial ammonia nitrogen increased to 446.9 mg x L(-1) and the C/N ratio decreased to 3.2, the ammonia nitrogen removal rate of the mixed

  4. Selective isolation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from autotrophic nitrifying granules by applying cell-sorting and sub-culturing of microcolonies.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Hirotsugu; Kumagai, Asami; Ushiki, Norisuke; Momiuchi, Kengo; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification is a key process in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and biological wastewater treatment that consists of two stepwise reactions, ammonia oxidation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) or archaea followed by nitrite oxidation by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. One of the representatives of the AOB group is Nitrosomonas mobilis species. Although a few pure strains of this species have been isolated so far, approaches to their preservation in pure culture have not been established. Here, we report isolation of novel members of the N. mobilis species from autotrophic nitrifying granules used for ammonia-rich wastewater treatment. We developed an isolation method focusing on microcolonies formation of nitrifying bacteria. Two kinds of distinctive light scattering signatures in a cell-sorting system enabled to separate microcolonies from single cells and heterogeneous aggregates within granule samples. Inoculation of a pure microcolony into 96-well microtiter plates led to successful sub-culturing and increased probability of isolation. Obtained strain Ms1 is cultivated in the liquid culture with relatively high ammonia or nitrite concentration, not extremely slow growing. Considering environmental clones that were closely related to N. mobilis and detected in various environments, the availability of this novel strain would facilitate to reveal this member's ecophysiology in a variety of habitats. PMID:26528282

  5. Performance and biofilm activity of nitrifying biofilters removing trihalomethanes.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2011-02-01

    Nitrifying biofilters seeded with three different mixed-culture sources removed trichloromethane (TCM) and dibromochloromethane (DBCM) with removals reaching 18% for TCM and 75% for DBCM. In addition, resuspended biofilm removed TCM, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), DBCM, and tribromomethane (TBM) in backwash batch kinetic tests, demonstrating that the biofilters contained organisms capable of biotransforming the four regulated trihalomethanes (THMs) commonly found in treated drinking water. Upon the initial and subsequent increased TCM addition, total ammonia nitrogen (TOTNH(3)) removal decreased and then reestablished, indicating an adjustment by the biofilm bacteria. In addition, changes in DBCM removal indicated a change in activity related to DBCM. The backwash batch kinetic tests provided a useful tool to evaluate the biofilm's bacteria. Based on these experiments, the biofilters contained bacteria with similar THM removal kinetics to those seen in previous batch kinetic experiments. Overall, performance or selection does not seem based specifically on nutrients, source water, or source cultures and most likely results from THM product toxicity, and the use of GAC media appeared to offer benefits over anthracite for biofilter stability and long-term performance, although the reasons for this advantage are not apparent based on research to date.

  6. Performance and biofilm activity of nitrifying biofilters removing trihalomethanes.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2011-02-01

    Nitrifying biofilters seeded with three different mixed-culture sources removed trichloromethane (TCM) and dibromochloromethane (DBCM) with removals reaching 18% for TCM and 75% for DBCM. In addition, resuspended biofilm removed TCM, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), DBCM, and tribromomethane (TBM) in backwash batch kinetic tests, demonstrating that the biofilters contained organisms capable of biotransforming the four regulated trihalomethanes (THMs) commonly found in treated drinking water. Upon the initial and subsequent increased TCM addition, total ammonia nitrogen (TOTNH(3)) removal decreased and then reestablished, indicating an adjustment by the biofilm bacteria. In addition, changes in DBCM removal indicated a change in activity related to DBCM. The backwash batch kinetic tests provided a useful tool to evaluate the biofilm's bacteria. Based on these experiments, the biofilters contained bacteria with similar THM removal kinetics to those seen in previous batch kinetic experiments. Overall, performance or selection does not seem based specifically on nutrients, source water, or source cultures and most likely results from THM product toxicity, and the use of GAC media appeared to offer benefits over anthracite for biofilter stability and long-term performance, although the reasons for this advantage are not apparent based on research to date. PMID:21195446

  7. Influence of water quality on nitrifier regrowth in two full-scale drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel B; Van Dyke, Michele I; Anderson, William B; Huck, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    The potential for regrowth of nitrifying microorganisms was monitored in 2 full-scale chloraminated drinking water distribution systems in Ontario, Canada, over a 9-month period. Quantitative PCR was used to measure amoA genes from ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and these values were compared with water quality parameters that can influence nitrifier survival and growth, including total chlorine, ammonia, temperature, pH, and organic carbon. Although there were no severe nitrification episodes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected at low concentrations in samples collected from both distribution systems. A culture-based presence-absence test confirmed the presence of viable nitrifiers. AOB were usually present in similar or greater numbers than AOA in both systems. As well, AOB showed higher regrowth potential compared with AOA in both systems. Statistically significant correlations were measured between several water quality parameters of relevance to nitrification. Total chlorine was negatively correlated with both nitrifiers and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria, and ammonia levels were positively correlated with nitrifiers. Of particular importance was the strong correlation between HPC and AOB, which reinforced the usefulness of HPC as an operational parameter to measure general microbiological conditions in distribution systems. PMID:26518069

  8. Influence of water quality on nitrifier regrowth in two full-scale drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel B; Van Dyke, Michele I; Anderson, William B; Huck, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    The potential for regrowth of nitrifying microorganisms was monitored in 2 full-scale chloraminated drinking water distribution systems in Ontario, Canada, over a 9-month period. Quantitative PCR was used to measure amoA genes from ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and these values were compared with water quality parameters that can influence nitrifier survival and growth, including total chlorine, ammonia, temperature, pH, and organic carbon. Although there were no severe nitrification episodes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected at low concentrations in samples collected from both distribution systems. A culture-based presence-absence test confirmed the presence of viable nitrifiers. AOB were usually present in similar or greater numbers than AOA in both systems. As well, AOB showed higher regrowth potential compared with AOA in both systems. Statistically significant correlations were measured between several water quality parameters of relevance to nitrification. Total chlorine was negatively correlated with both nitrifiers and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria, and ammonia levels were positively correlated with nitrifiers. Of particular importance was the strong correlation between HPC and AOB, which reinforced the usefulness of HPC as an operational parameter to measure general microbiological conditions in distribution systems.

  9. Intensified nitrogen removal in immobilized nitrifier enhanced constructed wetlands with external carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Ambrose, Richard F; Ullman, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen removal performance response of twelve constructed wetlands (CWs) to immobilized nitrifier pellets and different influent COD/N ratios (chemical oxygen demand: total nitrogen in influent) were investigated via 7-month experiments. Nitrifier was immobilized on a carrier pellet containing 10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), 2.0% sodium alginate (SA) and 2.0% calcium chloride (CaCl2). A batch experiment demonstrated that 73% COD and 85% ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) were degraded using the pellets with immobilized nitrifier cells. In addition, different carbon source supplement strategies were applied to remove the nitrate (NO3-N) transformed from NH4-N. An increase in COD/N ratio led to increasing reduction in NO3-N. Efficient nitrification and denitrification promoted total nitrogen (TN) removal in immobilized nitrifier biofortified constructed wetlands (INB-CWs). The results suggested that immobilized nitrifier pellets combined with high influent COD/N ratios could effectively improve the nitrogen removal performance in CWs. PMID:27396293

  10. Application of ion trap-MS with H/D exchange and QqTOF-MS in the identification of microbial degradates of trimethoprim in nitrifying activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Peter; Ferguson, P Lee; Pérez, Sandra; Aga, Diana S

    2005-07-01

    In this work, the identification of two microbial degradation products of the antimicrobial trimethoprim (290 Da) is described. The structural elucidation of the metabolites, which were produced by nitrifying activated sludge bacteria in a small-scale laboratory batch reactor, was accomplished by electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry conducting consecutive fragmentation steps (MS(n)) combined with H/D-exchange experiments. Although one metabolite corresponded to alpha-hydroxytrimethoprim (306 Da), oxidation of the aromatic ring within the diaminopyrimidine substructure was determined for the second degradate (324 Da). Accurate mass measurements of the two metabolites were provided by a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometer operated in MS/MS mode. With absolute mass errors of <5 mDa, it allowed us to confirm the proposed elemental composition for the protonated precursor ions as well as for a series of fragment ions that were previously identified by ion trap mass spectrometry. The study emphasized the potential of nitrifying activated sludge bacteria for breaking down an environmentally relevant pharmaceutical that is otherwise poorly degradable by a bacterial community encountered in conventional activated sludge.

  11. Real-time PCR quantification of nitrifying bacteria in a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Harms, Gerda; Layton, Alice C; Dionisi, Hebe M; Gregory, Igrid R; Garrett, Victoria M; Hawkins, Shawn A; Robinson, Kevin G; Sayler, Gary S

    2003-01-15

    Real-time PCR assays using TaqMan or Molecular Beacon probes were developed and optimized for the quantification of total bacteria, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria Nitrospira, and Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) using a single-sludge nitrification process. The targets for the real-time PCR assays were the 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) for bacteria and Nitrospira spp. and the amoA gene for N. oligotropha. A previously reported assay for AOB 16S rDNA was also tested for its application to activated sludge. The Nitrospira 16S rDNA, AOB 16S rDNA, and N. oligotropha-like amoA assays were log-linear over 6 orders of magnitude and the bacterial 16S rDNA real-time PCR assay was log-linear over 4 orders of magnitude with DNA standards. When these real-time PCR assays were applied to DNA extracted from MLSS, dilution of the DNA extracts was necessary to prevent PCR inhibition. The optimal DNA dilution range was broad for the bacterial 16S rDNA (1000-fold) and Nitrospira 16S rDNA assays (2500-fold) but narrow for the AOB 16S rDNA assay (10-fold) and N. oligotropha-like amoA real-time PCR assay (5-fold). In twelve MLSS samples collected over one year, mean cell per L values were 4.3 +/- 2.0 x 10(11) for bacteria, 3.7 +/- 3.2 x 10(10) for Nitrospira, 1.2 +/- 0.9 x 10(10) for all AOB, and 7.5 +/- 6.0 x 10(9) for N. oligotropha-like AOB. The percent of the nitrifying population was 1.7% N. oligotropha-like AOB based on the N. oligotropha amoA assay, 2.9% total AOB based on the AOB 16S rDNA assay, and 8.6% nitrite-oxidizing bacteria based on the Nitrospira 16S rDNA assay. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the wastewater treatment plant were estimated to oxidize 7.7 +/- 6.8 fmol/hr/cell based on the AOB 16S rDNA assay and 12.4 +/- 7.3 fmol/hr/cell based on the N. oligotropha amoA assay.

  12. Nitrification at full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants: Evaluation of inhibition and bioaugmentation of nitrifiers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao L; Chen, Hongping

    2015-08-01

    Batch nitrification tests were conducted with sludge and wastewater streams obtained from field implementations to evaluate nitrification inhibition and efficiency of a nitrifiers bioaugmentation technology at full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The results showed that the substrate organic carbon and pH of wastewater streams were inhibitory factors to nitrification and the low pH was the cause of the WWTP experiencing poor nitrification. An ammonia-nitrogen removal rate of 0.21mg-N/gMLVSS-h was observed at pH 6.5, while the rate increased to 0.54mg-N/gMLVSS-h with an introduction of 6% bioaugmented nitrifiers, indicating that the integrated side-stream nitrifiers bioaugmentation process was beneficial in improving nitrification efficiency, even under low pH conditions not conducive to nitrification. The study provides new insights into effective upgrading of municipal WWTPs exposed to poor nitrification.

  13. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  14. A titrimetric respirometer measuring the nitrifiable nitrogen in wastewater using insensor-experiment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Z; Bogaert, H

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of nitrifiable nitrogen contained in wastewater by combining the existing respirometric and titrimetric principles is reported. During an in-sensor-experiment using nitrifying activated sludge, both the dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH in the mixed liquor were measured, and the pH was controlled at a set-point through titration of base or acid. A combination of the oxygen uptake rate (OUR), which was obtained from the measured DO signal, and the titration data allowed calculation of the nitrifiable nitrogen and the short-term biological oxygen demand (BOD) of the wastewater sample that was initially added to the sludge. The calculation was based solely on stoichiometric relationships. The approach was preliminarily tested with two types of wastewaters using a prototype sensor. Good correlation was obtained.

  15. Interaction of Operational and Physicochemical Factors Leading to Gordonia amarae-Like Foaming in an Incompletely Nitrifying Activated Sludge Plant

    PubMed Central

    Asvapathanagul, Pitiporn; Huang, Zhonghua; Gedalanga, Phillip B.; Baylor, Amber

    2012-01-01

    The overgrowth of Gordonia amarae-like bacteria in the mixed liquor of an incompletely nitrifying water reclamation plant was inversely correlated with temperature (r = −0.78; P < 0.005) and positively correlated with the solids retention time (SRT) obtained a week prior to sampling (r = 0.67; P < 0.005). Drops followed by spikes in the food-to-mass ratio (0.18 to 0.52) and biochemical oxygen demand concentrations in primary effluent (94 to 298 mg liter−1) occurred at the initiation of G. amarae-like bacterial growth. The total bacterial concentration did not increase as concentrations of G. amarae-like cells increased, but total bacterial cell concentrations fluctuated in a manner similar to that of G. amarae-like bacteria in the pseudo-steady state. The ammonium ion removal rate (percent) was inversely related to G. amarae-like cell concentrations during accelerated growth and washout phases. The dissolved oxygen concentration decreased as the G. amarae-like cell concentration decreased. The concentrations of G. amarae-like cells peaked (2.47 × 109 cells liter−1) approximately 1.5 months prior to foaming. Foaming occurred during the late pseudo-steady-state phase, when temperature declines reversed. These findings suggested that temperature changes triggered operational and physicochemical changes favorable to the growth of G. amarae-like bacteria. Fine-scale quantitative PCR (qPCR) monitoring at weekly intervals allowed a better understanding of the factors affecting this organism and indicated that frequent sampling was required to obtain statistical significance with factors changing as the concentrations of this organism increased. Furthermore, the early identification of G. amarae-like cells when they are confined to mixed liquor (107 cells liter−1) allows management strategies to prevent foaming. PMID:22983974

  16. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  17. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  19. A sensitive crude oil bioassay indicates that oil spills potentially induce a change of major nitrifying prokaryotes from the archaea to the bacteria.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Garcia, Juan C; Barreto, Patricia D; Molina, Gabriela A; Barreto, Jose C

    2012-05-01

    The sensitivity of nitrifiers to crude oil released by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Gulf of Mexico was examined using characterized ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea to develop a bioassay and to gain further insight into the ecological response of these two groups of microorganisms to marine oil spills. Inhibition of nitrite production was observed among all the tested ammonia-oxidizing organisms at 100 ppb crude oil. Nitrosopumilus maritimus, a cultured representative of the abundant Marine Group I Archaea, showed 20% inhibition at 1 ppb, a much greater degree of sensitivity to petroleum than the tested ammonia-oxidizing and heterotrophic bacteria. The differing susceptibility may have ecological significance since a shift to bacterial dominance in response to an oil spill could potentially persist and alter trophic interactions influenced by availability of different nitrogen species. PMID:22327114

  20. A sensitive crude oil bioassay indicates that oil spills potentially induce a change of major nitrifying prokaryotes from the archaea to the bacteria.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Garcia, Juan C; Barreto, Patricia D; Molina, Gabriela A; Barreto, Jose C

    2012-05-01

    The sensitivity of nitrifiers to crude oil released by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Gulf of Mexico was examined using characterized ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea to develop a bioassay and to gain further insight into the ecological response of these two groups of microorganisms to marine oil spills. Inhibition of nitrite production was observed among all the tested ammonia-oxidizing organisms at 100 ppb crude oil. Nitrosopumilus maritimus, a cultured representative of the abundant Marine Group I Archaea, showed 20% inhibition at 1 ppb, a much greater degree of sensitivity to petroleum than the tested ammonia-oxidizing and heterotrophic bacteria. The differing susceptibility may have ecological significance since a shift to bacterial dominance in response to an oil spill could potentially persist and alter trophic interactions influenced by availability of different nitrogen species.

  1. Nitrification in the intertidal zone: influence of effluent type and effect of tannin on nitrifiers.

    PubMed

    Bohlool, B B; Schmidt, E L; Beasley, C

    1977-11-01

    Nitrification by intertidal sediments was measured by using a tide simulator that approximated the cycle of seawater on tidal flats. Sediments were chosen from sites affected by industrial and municipal effluents and pastoral seepage and runoff. The ability of sediments from different sites to nitrify endogenous nitrogen varied markedly. All sites exhibited an initial lag before activity commenced. The duration of this lag and the rate of nitrate production were different at each site. The sediments were also capable of oxidizing NH3-N supplied to them in seawater. This "nitrification potential" was highest at sites receiving nitrogenous effluents (slaughterhouse and sewage), but was also substantial in sediments affected by bark extract effluent and pasture runoff. The lowest potential and the longest lag were exhibited by sediments in an apple cannery effluent area. Enrichment cultures of nitrifying microorganisms were obtained from all sites using NH4+ as a source of energy, but enrichments for nitrite oxidizers were unsuccessful. Concentrated pine bark tannins, similar in origin to those in effluents at the well-nitrifying chipmill site, were tested for toxicity to pure cultures of nitrifying bacteria. Two Nitrobacter strains and one Nitrosomonas strain were unaffected by tannins even at 5 mg/ml. A Nitrosolobus and a Nitrosospira strain were inhibited partially at 5 mg/ml and only slightly or not at all at 1 mg/ml.

  2. Transcriptional and physiological responses of nitrifying bacteria to heavy metal inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy metals have been shown to inhibit nitrification, a key process in the removal of nitrogen in wastewater treatment plants. In the present study, the effects of nickel, zinc, lead and cadmium on nitrifying enrichment cultures were studied in batch reactors. The transcriptiona...

  3. Assessment of bacterial and structural dynamics in aerobic granular biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Weissbrodt, David G.; Neu, Thomas R.; Kuhlicke, Ute; Rappaz, Yoan; Holliger, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) is based on self-granulated flocs forming mobile biofilms with a gel-like consistence. Bacterial and structural dynamics from flocs to granules were followed in anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBR) fed with synthetic wastewater, namely a bubble column (BC-SBR) operated under wash-out conditions for fast granulation, and two stirred-tank enrichments of Accumulibacter (PAO-SBR) and Competibacter (GAO-SBR) operated at steady-state. In the BC-SBR, granules formed within 2 weeks by swelling of Zoogloea colonies around flocs, developing subsequently smooth zoogloeal biofilms. However, Zoogloea predominance (37–79%) led to deteriorated nutrient removal during the first months of reactor operation. Upon maturation, improved nitrification (80–100%), nitrogen removal (43–83%), and high but unstable dephosphatation (75–100%) were obtained. Proliferation of dense clusters of nitrifiers, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter from granule cores outwards resulted in heterogeneous bioaggregates, inside which only low abundance Zoogloea (<5%) were detected in biofilm interstices. The presence of different extracellular glycoconjugates detected by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis showed the complex nature of the intracellular matrix of these granules. In the PAO-SBR, granulation occurred within two months with abundant and active Accumulibacter populations (56 ± 10%) that were selected under full anaerobic uptake of volatile fatty acids and that aggregated as dense clusters within heterogeneous granules. Flocs self-granulated in the GAO-SBR after 480 days during a period of over-aeration caused by biofilm growth on the oxygen sensor. Granules were dominated by heterogeneous clusters of Competibacter (37 ± 11%). Zoogloea were never abundant in biomass of both PAO- and GAO-SBRs. This study showed that Zoogloea, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter affiliates can form granules, and that the granulation mechanisms rely on the dominant

  4. Granulation, control of bacterial contamination, and enhanced lipid accumulation by driving nutrient starvation in coupled wastewater treatment and Chlorella regularis cultivation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dandan; Li, Yunbao; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Chaofan; Wang, Di

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial contamination and biomass harvesting are still challenges associated with coupling of microalgae and wastewater treatment technology. This study investigated aggregation, bacterial growth, lipid production, and pollutant removal during bacteria contaminated Chlorella regularis cultivation under nutrient starvation stress, by supposing the C/N/P ratios of the medium to 14/1.4/1 (MB₂.₅) and 44/1.4/1 (MB₄.₀), respectively. Granules of 500-650 μm were formed in the bacteria contaminated inoculum; however, purified C. regularis were generally suspended freely in the medium, indicating that bacterial presence was a prerequisite for granulation. Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) analysis showed that polysaccharides were dominant in granules, while protein mainly distributed in the outer layer. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed Sphingobacteriales bacterium and Sphingobacterium sp. are vital organisms involved in the flocculation of microalgae, and nitrifiers (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) could co-exist in the granular. Both EPS and DGGE results further supported that bacteria played key roles in granulation. C. regularis was always dominant and determined the total biomass concentration during co-cultivation, but bacterial growth was limited owing to nutrient deficiency. Starvation strategy also contributed to enhancement of lipid accumulation, as lipid content in MB₄.₀ with a greater C/N/P led to the greatest increase in the starvation period, and the maximum lipid productivity reached 0.057 g/(L·day). Chemical oxygen demand and nitrogen removal in MB₄.₀ reached 92 and 96%, respectively, after 3 days of cultivation. Thus, cultivation of microalgae in high C/N/P wastewater enabled simultaneous realization of biomass granulation, bacterial overgrowth limitation, enhanced lipid accumulation, and wastewater purification.

  5. Effects of Grazing by Flagellates on Competition for Ammonium between Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Chemostats

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Frank J. M.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1992-01-01

    The enhanced mineralization of organic nitrogen by bacteriophagous protozoa is thought to favor the nitrification process in soils, in which nitrifying bacteria have to compete with heterotrophic bacteria for the available ammonium. To obtain more insight into this process, the influence of grazing by the bacteriovorous flagellate Adriamonas peritocrescens on the competition for limiting amounts of ammonium between the ammonium-oxidizing species Nitrosomonas europaea and the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis was studied in the presence of Nitrobacter winogradskyi in continuous cultures at dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h-1. The ammonium concentration in the reservoir was maintained at 2 mM, whereas the glucose concentration was increased stepwise from 0 to 7 mM. A. globiformis won the competition for limiting amounts of ammonium when the glucose concentration in the reservoirs increased, in agreement with previously described experiments in which the flagellates were not included. The numbers of nitrifying bacteria decreased as the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria rose with increasing glucose concentrations. Critical C/N ratios, i.e., ratios between glucose and ammonium in the reservoirs at which no nitrate was found in the culture vessels, of 12.5 and 10.5 were determined at dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h-1, respectively. Below these critical values, coexistence of the competing species was found. The numbers of nitrifying bacteria decreased more in the presence of flagellates than in their absence, presumably by selective predation on the nitrifying bacteria, either in the liquid culture or on the glass wall of the culture vessels. Despite this, the rate of nitrate production did not decrease more in the presence of flagellates than in their absence. This demonstrates that no correlation has to be expected between numbers of nitrifying bacteria and their activity and that a constant nitrification rate per cell cannot be assumed for nitrifying

  6. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  7. Competition for Ammonium between Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Continuously Percolated Soil Columns

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Frank J. M.; Duyts, Hendrik; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1992-01-01

    Although the absence of nitrate formation in grassland soils rich in organic matter has often been reported, low numbers of nitrifying bacteria are still found in these soils. To obtain more insight into these observations, we studied the competition for limiting amounts of ammonium between the chemolithotrophic ammonium-oxidizing species Nitrosomonas europaea and the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis in the presence of Nitrobacter winogradskyi with soil columns containing calcareous sandy soil. The soil columns were percolated continuously at a dilution rate of 0.007 h-1, based on liquid volumes, with medium containing 5 mM ammonium and different amounts of glucose ranging from 0 to 12 mM.A. globiformis was the most competitive organism for limiting amounts of ammonium. The numbers of N. europaea and N. winogradskyi cells were lower at higher glucose concentrations, and the potential ammonium-oxidizing activities in the uppermost 3 cm of the soil columns were nonexistent when at least 10 mM glucose was present in the reservoir, although 107 nitrifying cells per g of dry soil were still present. This result demonstrated that there was no correlation between the numbers of nitrifying bacteria and their activities. The numbers and activities of N. winogradskyi cells decreased less than those of N. europaea cells in all layers of the soil columns, probably because of heterotrophic growth of the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria on organic substrates excreted by the heterotrophic bacteria or because of nitrate reduction at reduced oxygen concentrations by the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. Our conclusion was that the nitrifying bacteria were less competitive than the heterotrophic bacteria for ammonium in soil columns but that they survived as viable inactive cells. Inactive nitrifying bacteria may also be found in the rhizosphere of grassland plants, which is rich in organic carbon. They are possibly reactivated during periods of net mineralization. PMID:16348787

  8. Role of Multicellular Aggregates in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin; Rodesney, Chris; Roberts, Aled E. L.; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends markedly on the density of surrounding single cells, i.e., the level of competition for growth resources. When competition between aggregates and single cells is low, an aggregate has a growth disadvantage because the aggregate interior has poor access to growth resources. However, if competition is high, aggregates exhibit higher fitness, because extending vertically above the surface gives cells at the top of aggregates better access to growth resources. Other advantages of seeding by aggregates, such as earlier switching to a biofilm-like phenotype and enhanced resilience toward antibiotics and immune response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation. PMID:27006463

  9. Marine bacterial degradation of brominated methanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; Lidstrom, M.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Brominated methanes are ozone-depleting compounds whose natural sources include marine algae such as kelp. Brominated methane degradation by bacteria was investigated to address whether bacterial processes might effect net emission of these compounds to the atmosphere. Bacteria in seawater collected from California kelp beds degraded CH2Br2 but not CHBr3. Specific inhibitors showed that methanotrophs and nitrifiers did not significantly contribute to CH2Br2 removal. A seawater enrichment culture oxidized 14CH2Br2 to 14CO2 as well as 14CH3Br to 14CO2. The rates of CH2Br2 degradation in laboratory experiments suggest that bacterial degradation of CH2Br2 in a kelp bed accounts for <1% of the CH2Br2 produced by the kelp. However, the half-life of CH2Br2 due to bacterial removal appears faster than hydrolysis and within an order of magnitude of volatilization to the atmosphere.Brominated methanes are ozone-depleting compounds whose natural sources include marine algae such as kelp. Brominated methane degradation by bacteria was investigated to address whether bacterial processes might effect net emission of these compounds to the atmosphere. Bacteria in seawater collected from California kelp beds degraded CH2Br2 but not CHBr3. Specific inhibitors showed that methanotrophs and nitrifiers did not significantly contribute to CH2Br2 removal. A seawater enrichment culture oxidized 14CH2Br2 to 14CO2 as well as 14CH3Br to 14CO2. The rates of CH2Br2 degradation in laboratory experiments suggest that bacterial degradation of CH2Br2 in a kelp bed accounts for <1% of the CH2Br2 produced by the kelp. However, the half-life of CH2Br2 due to bacterial removal appears faster than hydrolysis and within an order of magnitude of volatilization to the atmosphere.

  10. Meso and micro-scale response of post carbon removal nitrifying MBBR biofilm across carrier type and loading.

    PubMed

    Young, Bradley; Banihashemi, Bahman; Forrest, Daina; Kennedy, Kevin; Stintzi, Alain; Delatolla, Robert

    2016-03-15

    This study investigates the effects of three specific moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carrier types and two surface area loading rates on biofilm thickness, morphology and bacterial community structure of post carbon removal nitrifying MBBR systems along with the effects of carrier type and loading on ammonia removal rates and effluent solids settleability. The meso and micro analyses show that the AOB kinetics vary based on loading condition, but irrespective of carrier type. The meso-scale response to increases in loading was shown to be an increase in biofilm thickness with higher surface area carriers being more inclined to develop and maintain thicker biofilms. The pore spaces of these higher surface area to volume carriers also demonstrated the potential to become clogged at higher loading conditions. Although the biofilm thickness increased during higher loading conditions, the relative percentages of both the embedded viable and non-viable cells at high and conventional loading conditions remained stable; indicating that the reduced ammonia removal kinetics observed during carrier clogging events is likely due to the observed reduction in the surface area of the attached biofilm. Microbial community analyses demonstrated that the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacteria for all carriers is Nitrosomonas while the dominant nitrite oxidizing bacteria is Nitrospira. The research showed that filamentous species were abundant under high loading conditions, which likely resulted in the observed reduction in effluent solids settleability at high loading conditions as opposed to conventional loading conditions. Although the settleability of the effluent solids was correlated to increases in abundances of filamentous organisms in the biofilm, analyzed using next generation sequencing, the ammonia removal rate was not shown to be directly correlated to specific meso or micro-scale characteristics. Instead post carbon removal MBBR ammonia removal kinetics were shown to be

  11. Multiscale simulation of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Popel, A. S.

    2004-11-01

    In humans and other mammals, aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is a major determinant to blood viscosity in microcirculation under physiological and pathological conditions. Elevated levels of aggregation are often related to cardiovascular diseases, bacterial infection, diabetes, and obesity. Aggregation is a multiscale phenomenon that is governed by the molecular bond formation between adjacent cells, morphological and rheological properties of the cells, and the motion of the extra-cellular fluid in which the cells circulate. We have developed a simulation technique using front tracking methods for multiple fluids that includes the multiscale characteristics of aggregation. We will report the first-ever direct computer simulation of aggregation of deformable cells in shear flows. We will present results on the effect of shear rate, strength of the cross-bridging bonds, and the cell rheological properties on the rolling motion, deformation and subsequent breakage of an aggregate.

  12. Two-step nitrification in a pure moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment: nitrifying and denitrifying microbial populations and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Díaz, J C; González-Martínez, A; Muñío, M M; Poyatos, J M

    2015-12-01

    The moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor (MBBR-MBR) is a novel solution to conventional activated sludge processes and membrane bioreactors. In this study, a pure MBBR-MBR was studied. The pure MBBR-MBR mainly had attached biomass. The bioreactor operated with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9.5 h. The kinetic parameters for heterotrophic and autotrophic biomasses, mainly nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), were evaluated. The analysis of the bacterial community structure of the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), NOB, and denitrifying bacteria (DeNB) from the pure MBBR-MBR was carried out by means of pyrosequencing to detect and quantify the contribution of the nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in the total bacterial community. The relative abundance of AOB, NOB, and DeNB were 5, 1, and 3%, respectively, in the mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS), and these percentages were 18, 5, and 2%, respectively, in the biofilm density (BD) attached to carriers. The pure MBBR-MBR had a high efficiency of total nitrogen (TN) removal of 71.81±16.04%, which could reside in the different bacterial assemblages in the fixed biofilm on the carriers. In this regard, the kinetic parameters for autotrophic biomass had values of YA=2.3465 mg O2 mg N(-1), μm, A=0.7169 h(-1), and KNH=2.0748 mg NL(-1).

  13. Co-cultivation of microalgae and nitrifiers for higher biomass production and better carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Holland, Mark; Starosvetsky, Jeanna; Armon, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study co-cultivation of nitrifiers with microalgae as a non-intrusive technique for selective removal of oxygen generated by microalgae. Biomass concentration was, at least, 23% higher in mixed-cultures where nitrifiers kept the dissolved oxygen concentration below 9.0μLL(-1) than in control Chlorella vulgaris axenic-cultures where the concentration of dissolved oxygen was higher than 10.0μLL(-1). This approach to eliminating oxygen inhibition of microalgal growth could become the basis for the development of advanced microalgae reactors for removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, and concentrated CO2 streams. CO2 sequestration would become a chemically and geologically safer and environmentally more sound technology provided it uses microalgal, or other biomass, instead of CO2, for carbon storage. PMID:27584904

  14. Co-cultivation of microalgae and nitrifiers for higher biomass production and better carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Holland, Mark; Starosvetsky, Jeanna; Armon, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study co-cultivation of nitrifiers with microalgae as a non-intrusive technique for selective removal of oxygen generated by microalgae. Biomass concentration was, at least, 23% higher in mixed-cultures where nitrifiers kept the dissolved oxygen concentration below 9.0μLL(-1) than in control Chlorella vulgaris axenic-cultures where the concentration of dissolved oxygen was higher than 10.0μLL(-1). This approach to eliminating oxygen inhibition of microalgal growth could become the basis for the development of advanced microalgae reactors for removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, and concentrated CO2 streams. CO2 sequestration would become a chemically and geologically safer and environmentally more sound technology provided it uses microalgal, or other biomass, instead of CO2, for carbon storage.

  15. Distribution of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria in a polluted river (the Passaic).

    PubMed Central

    Matulewich, V A; Finstein, M S

    1978-01-01

    The abundance of nitrifying bacteria, determined by most-probable-number procedures, within habitats of the Passaic River was as follows: rooted aquatic plants greater than algae approximately equal to rocks greater than sediments greater than greater than water. On the average, NH4+ oxidizers were 540-fold more abundant in the topmost 1 cm of sediment than in the water, and NO2- oxidizers were 250-fold more abundant. The population densities in this surface sediment at two nearby stations, one with a predominantly mineral stream bed and the other an organic ooze, did not differ significantly. Large numbers of nitrifiers were present to a depth of about 5 cm in a mineral sediment core. PMID:623474

  16. Succession of Protists on Estuarine Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wörner; Zimmerman-Timm; Kausch

    2000-08-01

    Colonization by and succession of bacteria and bacterivorous protists on laboratory-made aggregates were determined over a period of 14 days during winter and spring in 1997. Aggregates were generated from natural water from the limnetic zone of the Elbe Estuary using a tilting tube roller system. Within 1 h after the beginning of the experiments, macroaggregates started to form. Aggregates reached a maximum size of 1 mm with a tendency toward large sizes at the end of the experiment after the 10th day. On the first day, high bacterial densities of more than 10(9) cells ml(-1) were detected within the aggregates. The abundances of flagellates and ciliates within aggregates were also two or three orders of magnitude higher than in the surrounding water. Densities of aggregate associated organisms are comparable to those occuring in sediments. The first protistan colonizers on the aggregates were small heterotrophic flagellates, such as choanoflagellates and small euglenids. Later, beginning on the 4th day, small sarcodines and ciliates became abundant. The most abundant ciliates associated with aggregates were small species of the Hypotrichia, Cyrtophorida, and Hymenostomata. After 9 days, large omnivorous and carnivorous ciliates, such as large members of the Hypotrichia and the Pleurostomatida, occurred. In spring, large heterotrophic flagellates and amebae also appeared at this time. These findings indicated the existence of a succession of protists on newly formed aggregates and a microbial food net within the aggregates based on bacterial production. Additionally, most of the species observed during this study were adapted for living on surfaces. In natural environments they are more common in benthic than in pelagic environments. For them, aggregates are havens in the water column comparable to sediment communities.

  17. Diversity and distribution of amoA-type nitrifying and nirS-type denitrifying microbial communities in the Yangtze River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xie, X.; Jiao, N.; Hsiao, S. S.-Y.; Kao, S.-J.

    2014-04-01

    Coupled nitrification-denitrification plays a critical role in the removal of excess nitrogen, which is chiefly caused by humans, to mitigate estuary and coastal eutrophication. Despite its obvious importance, limited information about the relationships between nitrifying and denitrifying microbial communities in estuaries, and their controlling factors have been documented. We investigated the nitrifying and denitrifying microbial communities in the estuary of turbid subtropical Yangtze River (YRE), the largest river in Asia, by analyzing the ammonia monooxygenase gene amoA, including archaeal and bacterial amoA, and the dissimilatory nitrite reductase gene nirS using clone libraries and quantitative PCR (qPCR). The diversity indices and rarefaction analysis revealed a quite low diversity for both β-proteobacterial and archaeal amoA genes, but qPCR data showed significantly higher amoA gene copy numbers for archaea than β-proteobacteria. Compared with the amoA gene, a significantly higher level of diversity but lower gene copy numbers were found for the nirS gene. Nitrification and denitrification rates based on 15N incubation experiments supported gene abundance data as denitrification rates were below detection limit, suggesting lower denitrification than nitrification potential. In general, the abundances of the amoA and nirS genes were significantly higher in the bottom samples than the surface ones, and in the high-turbidity river mouth, were significantly higher in the particle-associated (> 3 μm) than the free-living (0.2 ~ 3 μm) communities. Notably, positive correlations between the amoA and nirS gene abundances suggested potential gene-based coupling between nitrification and denitrification, especially for the particle-associated assemblages. Statistical analysis of correlations between the community structure, gene abundances and environmental variables further revealed that dissolved oxygen and total suspended material might be the key factors

  18. Chronic impact of tetracycline on nitrification kinetics and the activity of enriched nitrifying microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Katipoglu-Yazan, Tugce; Merlin, Christophe; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Ubay-Cokgor, Emine; Orhon, Derin

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the chronic impact of tetracycline on biomass with enriched nitrifying community sustained in a lab-scale activated sludge system. For this purpose, a fill and draw reactor fed with 100 mg COD/L of peptone mixture and 50 mg N/L of ammonia was sustained at a sludge age of 15 days. At steady-state, the reactor operation was continued with a daily tetracycline dosing of 50 mg/L for more than 40 days, with periodic monitoring of the microbial composition, the nitrifying bacteria abundance, as well as the amoA and 16S rRNA gene activity, using molecular techniques. Changes in the kinetics of nitrification were quantified by modelling concentration profiles of major nitrogen fractions and oxygen uptake rate profiles derived from parallel batch experiments. Activated sludge modeling results indicated inhibitory impact of tetracycline on the growth of nitrifiers with a significant increase of the half saturation coefficients in corresponding rate equations. Tetracycline also inactivated biomass components of the enriched culture at a gradually increasing rate with time of exposure, leading to total collapse of nitrification. Molecular analyses revealed significant changes in the composition of the microbial community throughout the observation period. They also showed that continuous exposure to tetracycline inflicted significant reduction in amoA mRNA and 16S rRNA levels directly affecting nitrification. The chronic impact was much more pronounced on the ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community. These observations explained the basis of numerical changes identified in the growth kinetics of nitrifiers under stress conditions.

  19. Chronic impact of tetracycline on nitrification kinetics and the activity of enriched nitrifying microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Katipoglu-Yazan, Tugce; Merlin, Christophe; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Ubay-Cokgor, Emine; Orhon, Derin

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the chronic impact of tetracycline on biomass with enriched nitrifying community sustained in a lab-scale activated sludge system. For this purpose, a fill and draw reactor fed with 100 mg COD/L of peptone mixture and 50 mg N/L of ammonia was sustained at a sludge age of 15 days. At steady-state, the reactor operation was continued with a daily tetracycline dosing of 50 mg/L for more than 40 days, with periodic monitoring of the microbial composition, the nitrifying bacteria abundance, as well as the amoA and 16S rRNA gene activity, using molecular techniques. Changes in the kinetics of nitrification were quantified by modelling concentration profiles of major nitrogen fractions and oxygen uptake rate profiles derived from parallel batch experiments. Activated sludge modeling results indicated inhibitory impact of tetracycline on the growth of nitrifiers with a significant increase of the half saturation coefficients in corresponding rate equations. Tetracycline also inactivated biomass components of the enriched culture at a gradually increasing rate with time of exposure, leading to total collapse of nitrification. Molecular analyses revealed significant changes in the composition of the microbial community throughout the observation period. They also showed that continuous exposure to tetracycline inflicted significant reduction in amoA mRNA and 16S rRNA levels directly affecting nitrification. The chronic impact was much more pronounced on the ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community. These observations explained the basis of numerical changes identified in the growth kinetics of nitrifiers under stress conditions. PMID:25616640

  20. Influence of nitrifying conditions on the biodegradation and sorption of emerging micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E; Omil, F; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2012-10-15

    High biodegradation efficiencies of different emerging micropollutants were obtained with nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) working at high nitrogen loading rates (NLR), that boosted the development of biomass with high nitrifying activities (>1 g N-NH(4)(+)/g VSS d). Come-tabolic biodegradation seemed to be responsible for the removal of most compounds due to the action of the ammonium monooxygenase enzyme. NAS showed a different affinity for each compound, probably due to steric hindrance, activation energy limitations or the presence of specific functional groups. Increasing loading rates of micropollutants were removed at shorter hydraulic retention times, although the biodegradation efficiencies of compounds with slow/intermediate kinetics, such as fluoxetine, erythromycin, roxithromycin and trimethoprim, diminished due to kinetic and/or stoichiometric limitations. Solids retention time, always above the minimum to avoid the washout of nitrifiers, did not enhance the biodegradation of any of the selected compounds, with the exception of diclofenac. Regarding sorption, the solid-liquid distribution coefficients (K(d)) obtained in NAS were very similar to those found in conventional activated sludge by other authors. No correlation between K(d) values and any of the operational parameters was found for the selected substances. PMID:22877882

  1. Hydroxylamine diffusion can enhance N₂O emissions in nitrifying biofilms: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Sabba, Fabrizio; Picioreanu, Cristian; Pérez, Julio; Nerenberg, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants can be significant sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, little is known about N2O emissions from biofilm processes. We adapted an existing suspended-growth mathematical model to explore N2O emissions from nitrifying biofilms. The model included N2O formation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) via the hydroxylamine and the nitrifier denitrification pathways. Our model suggested that N2O emissions from nitrifying biofilms could be significantly greater than from suspended growth systems under similar conditions. The main cause was the formation and diffusion of hydroxylamine, an AOB nitrification intermediate, from the aerobic to the anoxic regions of the biofilm. In the anoxic regions, hydroxylamine oxidation by AOB provided reducing equivalents used solely for nitrite reduction to N2O, since there was no competition with oxygen. For a continuous system, very high and very low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations resulted in lower emissions, while intermediate values led to higher emissions. Higher bulk ammonia concentrations and greater biofilm thicknesses increased emissions. The model effectively predicted N2O emissions from an actual pilot-scale granular sludge reactor for sidestream nitritation, but significantly underestimated the emissions when the NH2OH diffusion coefficient was assumed to be minimal. This numerical study suggests an unexpected and important role of hydroxylamine in N2O emission in biofilms.

  2. Links among nitrification, nitrifier communities, and edaphic properties in contrasting soils receiving dairy slurry.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Ann-Marie; Honeycutt, C Wayne; Vandemark, George; Griffin, Timothy S; Larkin, Robert P; He, Zhongqi; Wienhold, Brian J; Sistani, Karamat R; Albrecht, Stephan L; Woodbury, Bryan L; Torbert, Henry A; Powell, J Mark; Hubbard, Robert K; Eigenberg, Roger A; Wright, Robert J; Alldredge, J Richard; Harsh, James B

    2012-01-01

    Soil biotic and abiotic factors strongly influence nitrogen (N) availability and increases in nitrification rates associated with the application of manure. In this study, we examine the effects of edaphic properties and a dairy (Bos taurus) slurry amendment on N availability, nitrification rates and nitrifier communities. Soils of variable texture and clay mineralogy were collected from six USDA-ARS research sites and incubated for 28 d with and without dairy slurry applied at a rate of ~300 kg N ha(-1). Periodically, subsamples were removed for analyses of 2 M KCl extractable N and nitrification potential, as well as gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). Spearman coefficients for nitrification potentials and AOB copy number were positively correlated with total soil C, total soil N, cation exchange capacity, and clay mineralogy in treatments with and without slurry application. Our data show that the quantity and type of clay minerals present in a soil affect nitrifier populations, nitrification rates, and the release of inorganic N. Nitrogen mineralization, nitrification potentials, and edaphic properties were positively correlated with AOB gene copy numbers. On average, AOA gene copy numbers were an order of magnitude lower than those of AOB across the six soils and did not increase with slurry application. Our research suggests that the two nitrifier communities overlap but have different optimum environmental conditions for growth and activity that are partly determined by the interaction of manure-derived ammonium with soil properties. PMID:22218194

  3. Links among nitrification, nitrifier communities, and edaphic properties in contrasting soils receiving dairy slurry.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Ann-Marie; Honeycutt, C Wayne; Vandemark, George; Griffin, Timothy S; Larkin, Robert P; He, Zhongqi; Wienhold, Brian J; Sistani, Karamat R; Albrecht, Stephan L; Woodbury, Bryan L; Torbert, Henry A; Powell, J Mark; Hubbard, Robert K; Eigenberg, Roger A; Wright, Robert J; Alldredge, J Richard; Harsh, James B

    2012-01-01

    Soil biotic and abiotic factors strongly influence nitrogen (N) availability and increases in nitrification rates associated with the application of manure. In this study, we examine the effects of edaphic properties and a dairy (Bos taurus) slurry amendment on N availability, nitrification rates and nitrifier communities. Soils of variable texture and clay mineralogy were collected from six USDA-ARS research sites and incubated for 28 d with and without dairy slurry applied at a rate of ~300 kg N ha(-1). Periodically, subsamples were removed for analyses of 2 M KCl extractable N and nitrification potential, as well as gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). Spearman coefficients for nitrification potentials and AOB copy number were positively correlated with total soil C, total soil N, cation exchange capacity, and clay mineralogy in treatments with and without slurry application. Our data show that the quantity and type of clay minerals present in a soil affect nitrifier populations, nitrification rates, and the release of inorganic N. Nitrogen mineralization, nitrification potentials, and edaphic properties were positively correlated with AOB gene copy numbers. On average, AOA gene copy numbers were an order of magnitude lower than those of AOB across the six soils and did not increase with slurry application. Our research suggests that the two nitrifier communities overlap but have different optimum environmental conditions for growth and activity that are partly determined by the interaction of manure-derived ammonium with soil properties.

  4. Microbial aggregates in anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kosaric, N; Blaszczyk, R

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon aggregation of anaerobic bacteria gives an opportunity to speed up the digestion rate during methanogenesis. The aggregates are mainly composed of methanogenic bacteria which convert acetate and H2/CO2 into methane. Other bacteria are also included in the aggregates but their concentration is rather small. The aggregates may also be formed during acetogenesis or even hydrolysis but such aggregates are not stable and disrupt quickly when not fed. A two stage process seems to be suitable when high concentrated solid waste must be treated. Special conditions are necessary to promote aggregate formation from methanogenic bacteria but aggregates once formed are stable without feeding even for a few years. The structure, texture and activity of bacterial aggregates depend on several parameters: (1)--temperature and pH, (2)--wastewater composition and (3)--hydrodynamic conditions within the reactor. The common influence of all these parameters is still rather unknown but some recommendations may be given. Temperature and pH should be maintained in the range which is optimal for methanogenic bacteria e.g. a temperature between 32 and 50 degrees C and a value pH between 6.5 and 7.5. Wastewaters should contain soluble wastes and the specific loading rate should be around one kgCOD(kgVSS)-1 d-1. The concentration of the elements influences aggregate composition and probably structure and texture. At high calcium concentration a change in the colour of the granules has been observed. Research is necessary to investigate the influence of other elements and organic toxicants on maintenance of the aggregates. Hydrodynamic conditions seem to influence the stability of the granules over long time periods. At low liquid stream rates, aggregates may starve and lysis within the aggregates is possible which results in hollowing of aggregates and their floating. At high liquid stream rates the aggregates may be disrupted and washed out of the reactor as a flocculent

  5. Diversity, Abundance, and Potential Activity of Nitrifying and Nitrate-Reducing Microbial Assemblages in a Subglacial Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, M. L.; Boyd, E. S.; Lange, R. K.; Mitchell, A. C.; Havig, J. R.; Hamilton, T. L.; Lafreniere, M. J.; Shock, E.; Peters, J.

    2011-12-01

    Ice currently covers 11% of the terrestrial landmass and has covered significantly greater portions of the planet during Earth's history. Significant microbial populations have been documented in all subglacial settings sampled to date. Recent research has demonstrated sizable volumes of subglacial sediment beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet that are greater than 1km thick in places and where sampled active microbial populations have been documented. Collectively this suggests subglacial microbial populations may impact global biogeochemical cycles on glacial-interglacial timescales, however, nitrogen cycling in subglacial systems is poorly understood. Subglacial sediments sampled from beneath Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada harbor a diverse assemblage of potential nitrifiers, nitrate reducers, and diazotrophs, as assessed by amoA, narG, and nifH gene biomarker diversity. Archaeal amoA genes were less abundant and less diverse than bacterial amoA. Nitrification and nitrate reduction were measured in microcosms incubated at 4 degrees Celsius indicating the potential for these processes to occur in situ. Subglacial sediment porewaters and bulk meltwaters have low concentrations of dissolved inorganic and organic nitrogen compounds and a high C/N ratio of dissolved organic matter in sediment porewaters, indicating that the sediment communities are N limited. This may reflect the combined biological activities of organic N mineralization, nitrification, and nitrate reduction. Despite evidence for N limitation and detection of nifH, biological nitrogen fixation was not detected in subglacial sediment microcosm experiments at 4 degrees Celsius. Collectively, our results suggest a role for nitrification and nitrate reduction in sustaining microbial communities in subglacial environments.

  6. Different response of nitrifiers and denitrifiers to re-wetting shape the NO release from soils in laboratory incubation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Thomas; Wu, Dianming; Song, Guozheng; Pommerenke, Bianca; Braker, Gesche

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory incubation studies incubating soils at a wide range of soil moistures, soil temperatures and mixing ratios of NO in the headspace and inorganic nutrient contents (NH4+,NO3-, NO2-) showed that release rates of NO follow an exponential function with increasing soil temperature and an optimum function for soil moisture. This approach assumes that environmental factors play the dominant role in shaping an ecosystem and thereby microbial communities and control the NO release from soil. We determined the NO release rate for a dryland farming soil under flooding irrigation in Xinjiang, China, a mid-latitude agricultural soil (Mainz, Germany), and a rice paddy (Ambai, India) upon wetting and subsequent drying out of soils. Only the release rate for the mid-latitude agricultural soil followed an optimum function for soil moisture. Release rates for the dryland farming soil and rice paddy, however, followed a two maxima function with distinct maxima at higher and lower soil moisture. Acknowledgement of two distinct maxima is critical for more accurately assessing regional biogenic NO emissions of soils under field conditions. To analyse the response of nitrifiers and denitrifiers involved in NO turnover in more detail we linked molecular analysis of functional gene expression (nirK and nirS, bacterial and archaeal amoA) and microbial community composition to NO release rates. We could show that the maximal transcriptional activity of denitrifiers and ammonia oxidizers differs with soil moisture and that higher transcriptional activity of nirS-type denitrifiers at higher soil moisture and of archaeal ammonia oxidizers at lower soil moisture may explain the two maxima for NO release.

  7. A comprehensive study on algal-bacterial communities shift during thiocyanate degradation in a microalga-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Byung-Gon; Kim, Woong; Nam, Kibok; Kim, Sungwhan; Lee, Bongsoo; Park, Min S; Yang, Ji-Won

    2015-09-01

    Changes in algal and bacterial communities during thiocyanate (SCN(-)) decomposition in a microalga-mediated process were studied. Pyrosequencing indicated that Thiobacillus bacteria and Micractinium algae predominated during SCN(-) hydrolysis, even after its complete degradation. Principal components analysis and evenness profiles (based on the Pareto-Lorenz curve) suggested that the changes in the bacterial communities were driven by nitrogen and sulfur oxidation, pH changes, and photoautotrophic conditions. The populations of predominant microalgae remained relatively stable during SCN(-) hydrolysis, but the proportion of bacteria - especially nitrifying bacteria - fluctuated. Thus, the initial microalgal population may be crucial in determining which microorganisms dominate when the preferred nitrogen source becomes limited. The results also demonstrated that microalgae and SCN(-)-hydrolyzing bacteria can coexist, that microalgae can be effectively used with these bacteria to completely treat SCN(-), and that the structure of the algal-bacterial community is more stable than the community of nitrifying bacteria alone during SCN(-) degradation.

  8. A comprehensive study on algal-bacterial communities shift during thiocyanate degradation in a microalga-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Byung-Gon; Kim, Woong; Nam, Kibok; Kim, Sungwhan; Lee, Bongsoo; Park, Min S; Yang, Ji-Won

    2015-09-01

    Changes in algal and bacterial communities during thiocyanate (SCN(-)) decomposition in a microalga-mediated process were studied. Pyrosequencing indicated that Thiobacillus bacteria and Micractinium algae predominated during SCN(-) hydrolysis, even after its complete degradation. Principal components analysis and evenness profiles (based on the Pareto-Lorenz curve) suggested that the changes in the bacterial communities were driven by nitrogen and sulfur oxidation, pH changes, and photoautotrophic conditions. The populations of predominant microalgae remained relatively stable during SCN(-) hydrolysis, but the proportion of bacteria - especially nitrifying bacteria - fluctuated. Thus, the initial microalgal population may be crucial in determining which microorganisms dominate when the preferred nitrogen source becomes limited. The results also demonstrated that microalgae and SCN(-)-hydrolyzing bacteria can coexist, that microalgae can be effectively used with these bacteria to completely treat SCN(-), and that the structure of the algal-bacterial community is more stable than the community of nitrifying bacteria alone during SCN(-) degradation. PMID:25911193

  9. Development of Denitrifying and Nitrifying Bacteria and Their Co-occurrence in Newly Created Biofilms in Urban Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaessen, T. N.; Martí Roca, E.; Pinay, G.; Merbt, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Biofilms play a pivotal role on nutrient cycling in streams, which ultimately dictates the export of nutrients to downstream ecosystems. The extent to which biofilms influence the concentration of dissolved nutrients, oxygen and pH in the water column may be determined by the composition of the microbial assemblages and their activity. Evidence of biological interactions among bacteria and algae are well documented. However, the development, succession and co-occurence of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria remain poorly understood. These bacteria play a relevant role on the biogeochemical process associated to N cycling, and their relative abundance can dictate the fate of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in streams. In particular, previous studies indicated that nitrifiers are enhanced in streams receiving inputs from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents due to both increases in ammonium concentration and inputs of nitrifiers. However, less is known about the development of denitrifiers in receiving streams, although environmental conditions seem to favor it. We conducted an in situ colonization experiment in a stream receiving effluent from a WWTP to examine how this input influences the development and co-occurrence of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. We placed artificial substrata at different locations relative to the effluent and sampled them over time to characterize the developed biofilm in terms of bulk measurements (organic matter content and algae) as well as in terms of abundance of nitrifiers and denitrifiers (using qPCR). The results of this study contribute to a better understanding of the temporal dynamics of denitrifiers and nitrifiers in relation to the developed organic matter, dissolved oxygen and pH and the biomass accrual in stream biofilms under the influence of nutrients inputs from WWTP effluent. Ultimately, the results provide insights on the potential role of nitrifiers and denitrifiers on N cycling in WWTP effluent receiving

  10. Characterization of the microbial community in a lotic environment to assess the effect of pollution on nitrifying and potentially pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, J D; Araújo, L X; da Silva, V L; Diniz, C G; Cesar, D E; Del'Duca, A; Coelho, C M

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate microbes involved in the nitrogen cycle and potentially pathogenic bacteria from urban and rural sites of the São Pedro stream. Water samples were collected from two sites. A seasonal survey of bacterial abundance was conducted. The dissolved nutrient content was analysed. PCR and FISH analysis were performed to identify and quantify microbes involved in the nitrogen cycle and potentially pathogenic bacteria. The seasonal survey revealed that the bacterial abundance was similar along the year on the rural area but varied on the urban site. Higher concentration of dissolved nutrients in the urban area indicated a eutrophic system. Considering the nitrifying microbes, the genus Nitrobacter was found, especially in the urban area, and may act as the principal bacteria in converting nitrite into nitrate at this site. The molecular markers napA, amoA, and nfrA were more accumulated at the urban site, justifying the higher content of nutrients metabolised by these enzymes. Finally, high intensity of amplicons from Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Bacteroides/Prevotella/Porphyromonas, Salmonella, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and the diarrheagenic lineages of E. coli were observed at the urban site. These results indicate a change in the structure of the microbial community imposed by anthrophic actions. The incidence of pathogenic bacteria in aquatic environments is of particular importance to public health, emphasising the need for sewage treatment to minimise the environmental impacts associated with urbanisation. PMID:25296210

  11. Characterization of the microbial community in a lotic environment to assess the effect of pollution on nitrifying and potentially pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, J D; Araújo, L X; da Silva, V L; Diniz, C G; Cesar, D E; Del'Duca, A; Coelho, C M

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate microbes involved in the nitrogen cycle and potentially pathogenic bacteria from urban and rural sites of the São Pedro stream. Water samples were collected from two sites. A seasonal survey of bacterial abundance was conducted. The dissolved nutrient content was analysed. PCR and FISH analysis were performed to identify and quantify microbes involved in the nitrogen cycle and potentially pathogenic bacteria. The seasonal survey revealed that the bacterial abundance was similar along the year on the rural area but varied on the urban site. Higher concentration of dissolved nutrients in the urban area indicated a eutrophic system. Considering the nitrifying microbes, the genus Nitrobacter was found, especially in the urban area, and may act as the principal bacteria in converting nitrite into nitrate at this site. The molecular markers napA, amoA, and nfrA were more accumulated at the urban site, justifying the higher content of nutrients metabolised by these enzymes. Finally, high intensity of amplicons from Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Bacteroides/Prevotella/Porphyromonas, Salmonella, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and the diarrheagenic lineages of E. coli were observed at the urban site. These results indicate a change in the structure of the microbial community imposed by anthrophic actions. The incidence of pathogenic bacteria in aquatic environments is of particular importance to public health, emphasising the need for sewage treatment to minimise the environmental impacts associated with urbanisation.

  12. Pyruvic Oxime Nitrification and Copper and Nickel Resistance by a Cupriavidus pauculus, an Active Heterotrophic Nitrifier-Denitrifier

    PubMed Central

    Linchangco, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrophic nitrifiers synthesize nitrogenous gasses when nitrifying ammonium ion. A Cupriavidus pauculus, previously thought an Alcaligenes sp. and noted as an active heterotrophic nitrifier-denitrifier, was examined for its ability to produce nitrogen gas (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) while heterotrophically nitrifying the organic substrate pyruvic oxime [CH3–C(NOH)–COOH]. Neither N2 nor N2O were produced. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the organism is a member of a genus (Cupriavidus) known for its resistance to metals and its metabolism of xenobiotics. The microbe (a Cupriavidus pauculus designated as C. pauculus strain UM1) was examined for its ability to perform heterotrophic nitrification in the presence of Cu2+ and Ni2+ and to metabolize the xenobiotic phenol. The bacterium heterotrophically nitrified well when either 1 mM Cu2+ or 0.5 mM Ni2+ was present in either enriched or minimal medium. The organism also used phenol as a sole carbon source in either the presence or absence of 1 mM Cu2+ or 0.5 mM Ni2+. The ability of this isolate to perform a number of different metabolisms, its noteworthy resistance to copper and nickel, and its potential use as a bioremediation agent are discussed. PMID:25580463

  13. Archaeal and Bacterial Diversity and Enzymatic Activities Associated With Particulate Matter in the Laptev Sea, a River-Impacted Arctic Shelf Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. T.; Deming, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Arctic Ocean shelves are influenced by riverine input of terrestrial, relatively refractory particulate organic matter (POM) as well as fresh material from marine phytoplankton blooms. The fate of organic particles and aggregates depends in large part on their associated microbes and the effectiveness of hydrolytic enzymes. The Laptev Sea provides an ideal setting to test for connections between Archaeal and Bacterial communities, the quality of the POM they colonize, and the activities of extracellular enzymes. Aboard the Russian icebreaker Kapitan Dranitsyn during the NABOS 2005 cruise to the Laptev Sea, we sampled various size fractions of particulate matter, from 0.2 to 70 μm. Patterns of Archaeal and Bacterial diversity were analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Extracellular enzymatic activities were evaluated using fluorescent substrate analogs. Thus far, we have observed a statistically significant difference between particle-associated and free-living Bacteria, many of which appear (by clone library) to be gamma-proteobacteria or CFB. Bacterial community richness associated with the largest particle fractions, where protease and glucosidase activities were the highest, was best explained by indicators of primary productivity (chlorophyll a and phaeopigments), while richness associated with smaller size fractions was best explained by general particle indicators (and depth and salinity). In contrast, particle-associated Archaea were not significantly different from their free-living counterparts. Archaeal clone library results indicate a predominance of Marine Group 1 Crenarchaea, the group containing a recently isolated nitrifying Archaeon. Given all these results, we hypothesize that in the Laptev Sea cold-active Bacteria are the primary agents in the enzymatic degradation of POM, whether terrestrial or marine, while Archaea play other roles in the elemental cycles of Arctic waters, perhaps especially in the nitrogen

  14. Meso and micro-scale response of post carbon removal nitrifying MBBR biofilm across carrier type and loading.

    PubMed

    Young, Bradley; Banihashemi, Bahman; Forrest, Daina; Kennedy, Kevin; Stintzi, Alain; Delatolla, Robert

    2016-03-15

    This study investigates the effects of three specific moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carrier types and two surface area loading rates on biofilm thickness, morphology and bacterial community structure of post carbon removal nitrifying MBBR systems along with the effects of carrier type and loading on ammonia removal rates and effluent solids settleability. The meso and micro analyses show that the AOB kinetics vary based on loading condition, but irrespective of carrier type. The meso-scale response to increases in loading was shown to be an increase in biofilm thickness with higher surface area carriers being more inclined to develop and maintain thicker biofilms. The pore spaces of these higher surface area to volume carriers also demonstrated the potential to become clogged at higher loading conditions. Although the biofilm thickness increased during higher loading conditions, the relative percentages of both the embedded viable and non-viable cells at high and conventional loading conditions remained stable; indicating that the reduced ammonia removal kinetics observed during carrier clogging events is likely due to the observed reduction in the surface area of the attached biofilm. Microbial community analyses demonstrated that the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacteria for all carriers is Nitrosomonas while the dominant nitrite oxidizing bacteria is Nitrospira. The research showed that filamentous species were abundant under high loading conditions, which likely resulted in the observed reduction in effluent solids settleability at high loading conditions as opposed to conventional loading conditions. Although the settleability of the effluent solids was correlated to increases in abundances of filamentous organisms in the biofilm, analyzed using next generation sequencing, the ammonia removal rate was not shown to be directly correlated to specific meso or micro-scale characteristics. Instead post carbon removal MBBR ammonia removal kinetics were shown to be

  15. Application of toxicity monitor using nitrifying bacteria biosensor to sewerage systems.

    PubMed

    Inui, T; Tanaka, Y; Okayas, Y; Tanaka, H

    2002-01-01

    Toxic substances may be included in wastewater influent and can damage biological processing of wastewater treatment, therefore continuous toxic-monitoring of wastewater influent is needed. This paper describes the potential toxic-monitoring applications of the toxicity monitor using a nitrifying bacteria biosensor to sewerage systems. The results of sensitivity tests show that aspects of wastewater do not affect the sensor sensitivity and confirm that the sensor can be applied to wastewater monitoring as it is. The monitor with a prototype of filtration system installed in a wastewater treatment plant is able to operate continuously for one month at least after the modification of filtration system and the optimization of operation conditions.

  16. Development of Novel Random Network Theory-Based Approaches to Identify Network Interactions among Nitrifying Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cindy

    2015-07-17

    The interactions among different microbial populations in a community could play more important roles in determining ecosystem functioning than species numbers and their abundances, but very little is known about such network interactions at a community level. The goal of this project is to develop novel framework approaches and associated software tools to characterize the network interactions in microbial communities based on high throughput, large scale high-throughput metagenomics data and apply these approaches to understand the impacts of environmental changes (e.g., climate change, contamination) on network interactions among different nitrifying populations and associated microbial communities.

  17. Nitrification treatment of swine wastewater with acclimated nitrifying sludge immobilized in polymer pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Vanotti, M.B.; Hunt, P.G.

    2000-04-01

    Nitrification of ammonia (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) is a critical component for improved systems of animal wastewater treatment. One of the most effective processes uses nitrifying microorganisms encapsulated in polymer resins. It is used in Japan in municipal wastewater treatment plants for higher nitrification rates, shorter hydraulic retention times (HRT), and lower aeration treatment cost. The authors evaluated whether this technology could be adapted for treatment of higher-strength lagoon swine wastewaters containing {approximately}230 mg NH{sub 4}-N/L and 195 mg BOD{sub 5}/L. A culture of acclimated lagoon nitrifying sludge (ALNS) was prepared from a nitrifying biofilm developed in an overland flow soil using fill-and-draw cultivation. The ALNS was successfully immobilized in 3- to 5-mm polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer pellets by a PVA-freezing method. Swine wastewater was treated in aerated, suspended bioreactors with a 15% (w/v) pellet concentration using batch and continuous flow treatment. Alkalinity was supplemented with inorganic carbon to maintain the liquid pH within an optimum range (7.7--8.4). In batch treatment, only 14 h were needed for nitrification of NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Ammonia was nitrified readily, decreasing at a rate of 16.1 mg NH{sub 4}-N/L h. In contrast, it took 10 d for a control (no-pellets) aerated reactor to start nitrification; furthermore, 70% of the N was lost by air stripping. Without alkalinity supplements, the pH of the liquid fell to 6.0--6.2, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} oxidation stopped. In continuous flow treatment, nitrification efficiencies of 95% were obtained with NH{sub 4}{sup +} loading rates of 418 mg-N/L-reactor d (2.73 g-N/g-pellet d) and an HRT of 12 h. The rate of nitrification obtained with HRT of 4 h was 567 mg-N/L d. In all cases, the NH{sub 4}-N removed was entirely recovered in oxidized N forms. Nitrification rates obtained in this work were not greatly affected by high NH{sub 4}{sup +} or BOD concentration of swine

  18. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  19. Evidence of soluble microbial products accelerating chloramine decay in nitrifying bulk water samples.

    PubMed

    Bal Krishna, K C; Sathasivan, Arumugam; Chandra Sarker, Dipok

    2012-09-01

    The discovery of a microbially derived soluble product that accelerates chloramine decay is described. Nitrifying bacteria are believed to be wholly responsible for rapid chloramine loss in drinking water systems. However, a recent investigation showed that an unidentified soluble agent significantly accelerated chloramine decay. The agent was suspected to be either natural organic matter (NOM) or soluble microbial products (SMPs). A laboratory scale reactor was fed chloraminated reverse osmosis (RO) treated water to eliminate the interference from NOM. Once nitrification had set in, experiments were conducted on the reactor and feed waters to determine the identity of the component. The study showed the presence of SMPs released by microbes in severely nitrified waters. Further experiments proved that the SMPs significantly accelerated chloramine decay, probably through catalytic reaction. Moreover, application of common protein denaturing techniques stopped the reaction implying that the compound responsible was likely to be a protein. This significant finding will pave the way for better control of chloramine in the distribution systems.

  20. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Juan P; Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E

    2016-06-21

    Chloramines are the second most used secondary disinfectant by United States water utilities. However, chloramination may promote nitrifying bacteria. Recently, monochloramine cometabolism by the pure culture ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, was shown to increase monochloramine demand. The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under more relevant drinking water conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Four types of batch kinetic experiments were conducted: (1) positive controls to estimate ammonia kinetic parameters, (2) negative controls to account for biomass reactivity, (3) utilization associated product (UAP) controls to account for UAP reactivity, and (4) cometabolism experiments to estimate cometabolism kinetic parameters. Kinetic parameters were estimated in AQUASIM with a simultaneous fit to the experimental data. Cometabolism kinetics were best described by a first-order model. Monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism accounted for 30% of the observed monochloramine loss. These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in mixed cultures similar to those found in drinking water distribution systems; therefore, monochloramine cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27196729

  1. Competition for Ammonium between Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Dual Energy-Limited Chemostats

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Frank J. M.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1991-01-01

    The absence of nitrification in soils rich in organic matter has often been reported. Therefore, competition for limiting amounts of ammonium between the chemolithotrophic ammonium-oxidizing species Nitrosomonas europaea and the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis was studied in the presence of Nitrobacter winogradskyi in continuous cultures at dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h−1. Ammonium limitation of A. globiformis was achieved by increasing the glucose concentration in the reservoir stepwise from 0 to 5 mM while maintaining the ammonium concentration at 2 mM. The numbers of N. europaea and N. winogradskyi cells decreased as the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria rose with increasing glucose concentrations for both dilution rates. Critical carbon-to-nitrogen ratios of 11.6 and 9.6 were determined for the dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h−1, respectively. Below these critical values, coexistence of the competing species was found in steady-state situations. Although the numbers were strongly reduced, the nitrifying bacteria were not fully outcompeted by the heterotrophic bacteria above the critical carbon-to-nitrogen ratios. Nitrifying bacteria could probably maintain themselves in the system above the critical carbon-to-nitrogen ratios because they are attached to the glass wall of the culture vessels. The numbers of N. europaea decreased more than did those of N. winogradskyi. This was assumed to be due to heterotrophic growth of the latter species on organic substrates excreted by the heterotrophic bacteria. PMID:16348588

  2. Influence of temperature on phenanthrene toxicity towards nitrifying bacteria in three soils with different properties.

    PubMed

    Suszek-Łopatka, Beata; Maliszewska-Kordybach, Barbara; Klimkowicz-Pawlas, Agnieszka; Smreczak, Bożena

    2016-09-01

    This study focused on the combined effect of environmental conditions (temperature) and contamination (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) on the activity of soil microorganisms (nitrifying bacteria). Phenanthrene (Phe) at five contamination levels (0, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 mg kg(-1) dry mass of soil) was employed as a model PAH compound in laboratory experiments that were conducted at three temperatures (i.e., 20 °C (recommended by ISO 15685 method), 15 and 30 °C). Three soils with different properties were used in these studies, and the activity of the nitrifying bacteria was assessed based on nitrification potential (NP) determinations. For the statistical evaluation of the results, the ANCOVA (analysis of covariance) method for three independent variables (i.e., temperature, phenanthrene concentration, soil matrix (as a qualitative variable)) and their interactions was employed. The results indicated on the significant interaction of all studied factors. Temperature influenced the toxicity of Phe towards NP, and this effect was related to the Phe concentration as well as was varied for the different soils. A low content of soil organic matter (controlling bioavailability of phenanthrene to soil microorganisms) enhanced the combined effect of temperature and Phe toxicity, and a high biological activity of the soil (high NP values) increased the effect of high temperature on the Phe stimulatory influence. The results indicate that the temperature should not be neglected in tests evaluating PAH ecotoxicity, especially for reliable ecological risk assessment. PMID:27394082

  3. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Juan P; Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E

    2016-06-21

    Chloramines are the second most used secondary disinfectant by United States water utilities. However, chloramination may promote nitrifying bacteria. Recently, monochloramine cometabolism by the pure culture ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, was shown to increase monochloramine demand. The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under more relevant drinking water conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Four types of batch kinetic experiments were conducted: (1) positive controls to estimate ammonia kinetic parameters, (2) negative controls to account for biomass reactivity, (3) utilization associated product (UAP) controls to account for UAP reactivity, and (4) cometabolism experiments to estimate cometabolism kinetic parameters. Kinetic parameters were estimated in AQUASIM with a simultaneous fit to the experimental data. Cometabolism kinetics were best described by a first-order model. Monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism accounted for 30% of the observed monochloramine loss. These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in mixed cultures similar to those found in drinking water distribution systems; therefore, monochloramine cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in drinking water distribution systems.

  4. Effectiveness of breakpoint chlorination to reduce accelerated chemical chloramine decay in severely nitrified bulk waters.

    PubMed

    Bal Krishna, K C; Sathasivan, Arumugam; Kastl, George

    2014-12-01

    Rectifying the accelerated chloramine decay after the onset of nitrification is a major challenge for water utilities that employ chloramine as a disinfectant. Recently, the evidence of soluble microbial products (SMPs) accelerating chloramine decay beyond traditionally known means was reported. After the onset of nitrification, with an intention to inactivate nitrifying bacteria and thus maintaining disinfectant residuals, breakpoint chlorination followed by re-chloramination is usually practiced by water utilities. However, what actually breakpoint chlorination does beyond known effects is not known, especially in light of the new finding of SMPs. In this study, experiments were conducted using severely nitrified chloraminated water samples (chloramine residuals <0.5 mg Cl2 L−1, nitrite residuals >0.1 mg N L−1 and an order of magnitude higher chloramine decay rate compared to normal decay) obtained from two laboratory scale systems operated by feeding natural organic matter (NOM) containing and NOM free waters. Results showed that the accelerated decay of chloramine as a result of SMPs can be eliminated by spiking higher free chlorine residuals (about 0.92 ± 0.03 to 1.16 ± 0.12 mg Cl2 L−1) than the stoichiometric requirement for breakpoint chlorination and nitrite oxidation. Further, accelerated initial chlorine decay showed chlorine preferentially reacts with nitrite and ammonia before destroying SMPs. This study, clearly demonstrated there is an additional demand from SMPs that needs to be satisfied to effectively recover disinfection residuals in subsequent re-chloramination. PMID:25461936

  5. Production of NO2/-/ and N2O by nitrifying bacteria at reduced concentrations of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goreau, T. J.; Kaplan, W. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Valois, F. W.; Watson, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of oxygen concentration on the production of NO2(-) and N2O by nitrifying marine bacteria of the genus Nitrosomonas is investigated. Pure cultures of the ammonium-oxiding bacteria isolated from the Western Tropical Atlantic Ocean were grown at oxygen partial pressures from 0.005 to 0.2 atm, and concentrations of N2O in the air above the growth medium and dissolved NO2(-) were determined. Decreasing oxygen concentrations are observed to induce a marked decrease in NO2(-) production rates and increase in N2O evolution, leading to an increase of the relative yield of N2O with respect to NO2(-) from 0.3% to nearly 10%. Similar yields of N2O at atmospheric oxygen levels are found for nitrifying bacteria of the genera Nitrosomonas, Nitrosolobus, Nitrosospira and Nitrosococcus, while nitrite-oxydizing bacteria and a dinoflagellate did not produce detectable quantities of N2O. Results support the view that nitrification is a major source of N2O in the environment.

  6. Online estimation of wastewater nitrifiable nitrogen, nitrification and denitrification rates, using ORP and DO dynamics.

    PubMed

    Spérandio, M; Queinnec, I

    2004-01-01

    Biological nitrogen removal is susceptible to disturbances in activated sludge processes. Significant improvement of performances are obtained by controlling the process taking into account wastewater modifications and sludge activity. In this work a specific sensor is developed, based on oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements performed in a completely mixed reactor which can be the activated sludge basin itself. This reactor is continuously fed by wastewater and sludge issued from the recirculation stream of the process, and submitted to alternating aeration. DO profiles and ORP bending point are linked to nitrification and denitrification in the sensor. Signal dynamics are treated with a physical model for simultaneously estimating nitrifiable nitrogen concentration in wastewater, nitrification rate, and denitrification rate. Results show very good prediction of experimental oxygen profiles and the software sensor allows us to recalculate nitrate and ammonia profiles in the reactor with a good accuracy. The estimation of nitrifiable nitrogen and removal rates has been validated experimentally. The system allows us to follow highly variable influent nitrogen concentration, toxic events, and changes in the COD concentration or quality in wastewater. PMID:14979535

  7. Tracking and quantification of nitrifying bacteria in biofilm and mixed liquor of a partial nitrification MBBR pilot plant using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Abzazou, Tarik; Araujo, Rosa M; Auset, María; Salvadó, Humbert

    2016-01-15

    A moving bead biofilm reactor (MBBR) pilot plant was implemented as a partial nitrification process for pre-treatment of ammonium-rich liquors (676 ± 195 mg L(-1)), and studied for 479 days under variations in hydraulic retention time. The main purpose of this work, was the study of dynamics abundance of total bacteria and single-cells nitrifying bacteria belonging to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in biofilms and mixed liquor of the plant. The microbial monitoring was successfully achieved using fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with flocs disaggregation protocol as a useful microbial monitoring tool. A partial nitrification process with a N-NH4(+) removal rate of about 38.6 ± 14.8% was successfully achieved at 211 days after start-up, with a clear dominance of AOB, which accounted for 11.3 ± 17.0% of total bacterial cells compared with only 2.1 ± 4.0% of NOB. The effluent obtained was subsequently supplied to an Anammox reactor for complete ammonium treatment. PMID:26473713

  8. Tracking and quantification of nitrifying bacteria in biofilm and mixed liquor of a partial nitrification MBBR pilot plant using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Abzazou, Tarik; Araujo, Rosa M; Auset, María; Salvadó, Humbert

    2016-01-15

    A moving bead biofilm reactor (MBBR) pilot plant was implemented as a partial nitrification process for pre-treatment of ammonium-rich liquors (676 ± 195 mg L(-1)), and studied for 479 days under variations in hydraulic retention time. The main purpose of this work, was the study of dynamics abundance of total bacteria and single-cells nitrifying bacteria belonging to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in biofilms and mixed liquor of the plant. The microbial monitoring was successfully achieved using fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with flocs disaggregation protocol as a useful microbial monitoring tool. A partial nitrification process with a N-NH4(+) removal rate of about 38.6 ± 14.8% was successfully achieved at 211 days after start-up, with a clear dominance of AOB, which accounted for 11.3 ± 17.0% of total bacterial cells compared with only 2.1 ± 4.0% of NOB. The effluent obtained was subsequently supplied to an Anammox reactor for complete ammonium treatment.

  9. Diversity and distribution of amoA-type nitrifying and nirS-type denitrifying microbial communities in the Yangtze River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xie, X.; Jiao, N.; Hsiao, S. S.-Y.; Kao, S.-J.

    2013-11-01

    Coupled nitrification-denitrification plays a critical role in the removal of excess nitrogen, which is chiefly caused by humans, to mitigate estuary and coastal eutrophication. Despite its obvious importance, limited information about the relationships between nitrifying and denitrifying microbial communities in estuaries, and their controlling factors have been documented. By analyzing the ammonia monooxygenase gene amoA, including archaeal and bacterial amoA, and the dissimilatory nitrite reductase gene nirS using clone libraries and quantitative PCR (qPCR), we investigated the nitrifying and denitrifying microbial communities in the estuary of turbid subtropical Yangtze River (YRE), the largest river in Asia. The diversity indices and rarefaction analysis revealed a quite low diversity for both β-proteobacterial and archaeal amoA genes, but qPCR data showed significantly higher amoA gene copy numbers for archaea than β-proteobacteria, suggesting that the archaea might play a dominant role in nitrification in the YRE. Compared with the amoA gene, a distinctly higher level of diversity but lower gene copy numbers were found for thenirS gene suggesting lower denitrification than nitrification potential. 15N incubation experiments indicated that nitrification rates were strongly correlated with amoA gene abundances while denitrification rates were below detection limit. In general, the abundances of the amoA and nirS genes were significantly higher in the bottom samples than the surface ones, and in the high-turbidity river mouth, were distinctly higher in the particle-associated (> 3 μm) than the free-living (0.2 ~ 3 μm) communities. Notably, analysis of correlations between the gene abundances suggested potential gene-based coupling between nitrification and denitrification, especially for the particle-associated assemblages. Statistical analysis of correlations between the community structure, gene abundances and environmental variables further revealed that

  10. Removal of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) under nitrifying and denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Sonia; Lema, Juan M; Omil, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    The contribution of volatilization, sorption and transformation to the removal of 16 Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in two lab-scale conventional activated sludge reactors, working under nitrifying (aerobic) and denitrifying (anoxic) conditions for more than 1.5 years, have been assessed. Pseudo-first order biological degradation rate constants (k(biol)) were calculated for the selected compounds in both reactors. Faster degradation kinetics were measured in the nitrifying reactor compared to the denitrifying system for the majority of PPCPs. Compounds could be classified according to their k(biol) into very highly (k(biol)>5Lg(SS)(-1)d(-1)), highly (175%) and anoxic (>65%) conditions, whereas naproxen (NPX), ethinylestradiol (EE2), roxithromycin (ROX) and erythromycin (ERY) were only significantly transformed in the aerobic reactor (>80%). The anti-depressant citalopram (CTL) was moderately biotransformed under both, aerobic and anoxic conditions (>60% and >40%, respectively). Some compounds, as carbamazepine (CBZ), diazepam (DZP), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and trimethoprim (TMP), manifested high resistance to biological transformation. Solids Retention Time (SRT(aerobic) >50d and <50d; SRT(anoxic) >20d and <20d) had a slightly positive effect on the removal of FLX, NPX, CTL, EE2 and natural estrogens (increase in removal efficiencies <10%). Removal of diclofenac (DCF) in the aerobic reactor was positively affected by the development of nitrifying biomass and increased from 0% up to 74%. Similarly, efficient anoxic transformation of ibuprofen (75%) was observed after an adaptation period of 340d. Temperature (16-26 degrees C) only had a slight effect on the removal of

  11. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  12. Population dynamics of nitrifying bacteria for nitritation achieved in Johannesburg (JHB) process treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Bai, Xinlong; Zhang, Limin; Wang, Anqi; Peng, Yongzhen

    2014-06-01

    Population dynamic of nitrifying bacteria was investigated for nitrogen removal from municipal wastewater. Nitritation was established with nitrite accumulation ratios above 85%. Quantitative PCR indicated that Nitrospira was dominant nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and Nitrobacter was few. During nitritation achieving, Nitrobacter was firstly eliminated, along with inhibition of Nitrospira bioactivities, then Nitrospira percentage declined and was finally washed out. Nitritation establishment depended on inhibiting and eliminating of NOB rather than ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) enriching. This is the first study where population dynamics of Nitrobacter and Nitrospira were investigated to reveal mechanism of nitritation in a continuous-flow process. Phylogenetic analysis of AOB indicated that Nitrosomonas-like cluster and Nitrosomonas oligotropha were dominant AOB, accounting for 81.6% of amoA gene clone library. Community structure of AOB was similar to that of complete nitrification system with long hydraulic retention time, but different from that of nitritation reactor with low DO concentration.

  13. A paradigm shift towards low-nitrifying production systems: the role of biological nitrification inhibition (BNI)

    PubMed Central

    Subbarao, G. V.; Sahrawat, K. L.; Nakahara, K.; Rao, I. M.; Ishitani, M.; Hash, C. T.; Kishii, M.; Bonnett, D. G.; Berry, W. L.; Lata, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Agriculture is the single largest geo-engineering initiative that humans have initiated on planet Earth, largely through the introduction of unprecedented amounts of reactive nitrogen (N) into ecosystems. A major portion of this reactive N applied as fertilizer leaks into the environment in massive amounts, with cascading negative effects on ecosystem health and function. Natural ecosystems utilize many of the multiple pathways in the N cycle to regulate N flow. In contrast, the massive amounts of N currently applied to agricultural systems cycle primarily through the nitrification pathway, a single inefficient route that channels much of this reactive N into the environment. This is largely due to the rapid nitrifying soil environment of present-day agricultural systems. Scope In this Viewpoint paper, the importance of regulating nitrification as a strategy to minimize N leakage and to improve N-use efficiency (NUE) in agricultural systems is highlighted. The ability to suppress soil nitrification by the release of nitrification inhibitors from plant roots is termed ‘biological nitrification inhibition’ (BNI), an active plant-mediated natural function that can limit the amount of N cycling via the nitrification pathway. The development of a bioassay using luminescent Nitrosomonas to quantify nitrification inhibitory activity from roots has facilitated the characterization of BNI function. Release of BNIs from roots is a tightly regulated physiological process, with extensive genetic variability found in selected crops and pasture grasses. Here, the current status of understanding of the BNI function is reviewed using Brachiaria forage grasses, wheat and sorghum to illustrate how BNI function can be utilized for achieving low-nitrifying agricultural systems. A fundamental shift towards ammonium (NH4+)-dominated agricultural systems could be achieved by using crops and pastures with high BNI capacities. When viewed from an agricultural and

  14. Differential sensitivity of nitrifying bacteria to silver nanoparticles in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Li, Mengyan; Michels, Camila; Moreira-Soares, Hugo; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2014-10-01

    Nitrification is known as one of the most sensitive processes affected when activated sludge is exposed to antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The impact of AgNPs and their released silver ions (Ag(+) ) on the abundance, activity, and diversity of different nitrifying bacteria in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), however, is poorly understood. The present study investigated the impacts of 2 sizes of AgNPs (5 nm and 35 nm) and Ag(+) ions on the nitrifier community in activated sludge, including both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were more sensitive to AgNPs than the NOB; a 5-d and 7-d exposure of activated sludge to 35 nm AgNPs (40 ppm) significantly reduced AOB abundance to 24% and 19%, respectively. This finding was confirmed further by a decrease in activated sludge ammonia oxidation activity measured by (14) C-labeled bicarbonate uptake. In contrast, neither AgNPs (up to 40 ppm) nor Ag(+) (1 ppm) affected the abundance of NOB. Both 5 nm and 35 nm AgNPs decreased the diversity of AOB, as indicated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) primers, although some unknown Nitrosomonas species were relatively resistant to AgNPs. The generally greater resistance of NOB than AOB to AgNPs suggests that the accumulation of bacteriostatic nitrite in WWTPs is unlikely to be exacerbated due to the accidental or incidental release of AgNPs.

  15. Removal of micropollutants during tertiary wastewater treatment by biofiltration: Role of nitrifiers and removal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rattier, M; Reungoat, J; Keller, J; Gernjak, W

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which a suite of organic micropollutants (MPs) can be removed by biological filtration and the role of bioavailability and ammonia oxidizing microorganisms (AOMs) in the biodegradation process. During approximately one year, laboratory-scale columns with 8 min empty bed contact time (EBCT) and packed with anthracite as filter media were used for treating a tertiary effluent spiked with a broad range of MPs at a target concentration of 2 μg L(-1). In parallel columns, aerobic biomass growth was inhibited by using either the biocide sodium azide (500 mg L(-1) NaN3) or allylthiourea (5 mg L(-1) ATU), specifically inhibiting nitrifying bacteria. Once the biomass had colonized the media, around 15% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contained in the untreated tertiary effluent was removed by non-inhibited columns. The removal of several MPs increased over time indicating the relevance of biological activity for the removal of MPs, while the negative control, the NaN3 inhibited column, showed no significant removal. Out of 33 MPs, 19 were recalcitrant (<25%) to biodegradation under aerobic conditions with the others exhibiting a diverse range of removal efficiency up to 95%. Through inhibition by ATU it was shown that nitrifying bacteria were clearly having a role in the degradation of several MPs, whereas the removal of other MPs was not affected by the presence of the nitrification inhibitor. A relationship between the qualitative assessment of sorption of MPs on granular activated carbon (GAC) and their removal efficiency by biodegradation on anthracite was observed. This result suggested that the affinity of the MPs for GAC media could be a useful indicator of the bioavailability of compounds during biofiltration on anthracite. PMID:24565800

  16. [Flow model of internal-loop granular sludge bed nitrifying reactor].

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Zheng, Ping

    2003-11-01

    Internal-loop granular sludge bed nitrifying reactor is a new type of aerobic nitrifying equipment and has shown a good potential for nitrification. To study the flow pattern and construct the flow model, the tracer tests were performed using pulse stimulus-response technique. Based on the experimental results, the flow pattern in the settling section and the circulating section of reactor were analyzed by axial dispersion model and tank-in-series model, respectively. The dispersion number D/uL of 0.00148 in the settling section indicates that its flow pattern is similar to plug flow reactor (PFR), and the series number N of 1.021 in the circulating section indicates that its flow pattern is similar to continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). During steady state, the theoretic hydraulic retention time is 360 min, and the actual hydraulic retention time is 341.2 min. The percentage of dead space in the reactor is 5.22%, thereinto the dead space caused by biomass (db ) is 0.75 % and the hydraulic dead space (dh) is 4.47%, which shows that the structural performance of the reactor is excellent. Based on the experiments and analysis, a model of CSTR and PFR in series was constructed. The actual hydraulic retention time distribution of the reactor is in good agreement with the model predictions. Since the relative error between them is 8.56%, the model is accurate to describe the flow pattern. The results have laid a foundation for the kinetic model of the reactor and will be helpful for its design and operation.

  17. Estimation of nitrite in source-separated nitrified urine with UV spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Mašić, Alma; Santos, Ana T L; Etter, Bastian; Udert, Kai M; Villez, Kris

    2015-11-15

    Monitoring of nitrite is essential for an immediate response and prevention of irreversible failure of decentralized biological urine nitrification reactors. Although a few sensors are available for nitrite measurement, none of them are suitable for applications in which both nitrite and nitrate are present in very high concentrations. Such is the case in collected source-separated urine, stabilized by nitrification for long-term storage. Ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry in combination with chemometrics is a promising option for monitoring of nitrite. In this study, an immersible in situ UV sensor is investigated for the first time so to establish a relationship between UV absorbance spectra and nitrite concentrations in nitrified urine. The study focuses on the effects of suspended particles and saturation on the absorbance spectra and the chemometric model performance. Detailed analysis indicates that suspended particles in nitrified urine have a negligible effect on nitrite estimation, concluding that sample filtration is not necessary as pretreatment. In contrast, saturation due to very high concentrations affects the model performance severely, suggesting dilution as an essential sample preparation step. However, this can also be mitigated by simple removal of the saturated, lower end of the UV absorbance spectra, and extraction of information from the secondary, weaker nitrite absorbance peak. This approach allows for estimation of nitrite with a simple chemometric model and without sample dilution. These results are promising for a practical application of the UV sensor as an in situ nitrite measurement in a urine nitrification reactor given the exceptional quality of the nitrite estimates in comparison to previous studies.

  18. COMETABOLISM OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS BY NITRIFYING BACTERIA: KINETICS, SUBSTRATE INTERACTIONS, TOXICITY EFFECTS, AND BACTERIAL RESPONSE. (R825689C013)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Nitrification: Batch and Biofilm Inactivation Studies, Model Nitrifying Biofilm Investigations, and Evaluation of Operational Responses to Nitrification Episodes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies are currently underway to help fill knowledge gaps that exist in the general understanding of nitrification episodes. One of these gaps includes the need for growth and inactivation kinetic parameters for nitrifiers representative of those inhabiting distribution systems ...

  20. Gut bacteria mediate aggregation in the German cockroach

    PubMed Central

    Wada-Katsumata, Ayako; Zurek, Ludek; Nalyanya, Godfrey; Roelofs, Wendell L.; Zhang, Aijun; Schal, Coby

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica, is regulated by fecal aggregation agents (pheromones), including volatile carboxylic acids (VCAs). We demonstrate that the gut microbial community contributes to production of these semiochemicals. Chemical analysis of the fecal extract of B. germanica revealed 40 VCAs. Feces from axenic cockroaches (no microorganisms in the alimentary tract) lacked 12 major fecal VCAs, and 24 of the remaining compounds were represented at extremely low amounts. Olfactory and aggregation bioassays demonstrated that nymphs strongly preferred the extract of control feces over the fecal extract of axenic cockroaches. Additionally, nymphs preferred a synthetic blend of 6 fecal VCAs over a solvent control or a previously identified VCA blend. To test whether gut bacteria contribute to the production of fecal aggregation agents, fecal aerobic bacteria were cultured, isolated, and identified. Inoculation of axenic cockroaches with individual bacterial taxa significantly rescued the aggregation response to the fecal extract, and inoculation with a mix of six bacterial isolates was more effective than with single isolates. The results indicate that the commensal gut microbiota contributes to production of VCAs that act as fecal aggregation agents and that cockroaches discriminate among the complex odors that emanate from a diverse microbial community. Our results highlight the pivotal role of gut bacteria in mediating insect–insect communication. Moreover, because the gut microbial community reflects the local environment, local plasticity in fecal aggregation pheromones enables colony-specific odors and fidelity to persistent aggregation sites. PMID:26644557

  1. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  2. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale.

    PubMed

    Stubbendieck, Reed M; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  3. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    PubMed Central

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  4. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  5. Planktonic Aggregates of Staphylococcus aureus Protect against Common Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Haaber, Jakob; Cohn, Marianne Thorup; Frees, Dorte; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Ingmer, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cells are mostly studied during planktonic growth although in their natural habitats they are often found in communities such as biofilms with dramatically different physiological properties. We have examined another type of community namely cellular aggregates observed in strains of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. By laser-diffraction particle–size analysis (LDA) we show, for strains forming visible aggregates, that the aggregation starts already in the early exponential growth phase and proceeds until post-exponential phase where more than 90% of the population is part of the aggregate community. Similar to some types of biofilm, the structural component of S. aureus aggregates is the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA). Importantly, PIA production correlates with the level of aggregation whether altered through mutations or exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of selected antibiotics. While some properties of aggregates resemble those of biofilms including increased mutation frequency and survival during antibiotic treatment, aggregated cells displayed higher metabolic activity than planktonic cells or cells in biofilm. Thus, our data indicate that the properties of cells in aggregates differ in some aspects from those in biofilms. It is generally accepted that the biofilm life style protects pathogens against antibiotics and the hostile environment of the host. We speculate that in aggregate communities S. aureus increases its tolerance to hazardous environments and that the combination of a biofilm-like environment with mobility has substantial practical and clinical importance. PMID:22815921

  6. Linking nitrifying biofilm characteristics and nitrification performance in moving-bed biofilm reactors for polluted raw water pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuangfu; Wang, Yayi; He, Weitao; Xing, Meiyan; Wu, Min; Yang, Jian; Gao, Naiyun; Sheng, Guangyao; Yin, Daqiang; Liu, Shanhu

    2013-10-01

    Biofilm physiology was characterized by four biofilm constituents, i.e., polysaccharides, proteins (PN), humic-like substances and phospholipids (PL), for the first time to explore the relationships between biofilm characteristics and nitrification performance in moving-bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) designed for pretreatment of polluted raw surface water for potable supply. The biofilm compositions depended highly on the balance of microbial decay and nitrification processes. The increased ammonia loading greatly regulated the community structure, promoting the dominance of nitrifiers and their proportions in the nitrifying biofilm. Nitrification rate and activity correlated linearly with the fractions of volatile solids (VS), PN and PL, which were related to nitrification processes in the biofilm. The specific biofilm activity demonstrated an exponential-asymptotic relationship with ratios of PN/VS and PL/VS. Thus, analyzing biofilm characteristics can be valid for estimating nitrification performance in MBBRs, and may offer engineers with basis to optimize MBBR design and operation.

  7. Effect of Algal Inoculation on COD and Nitrogen Removal, and Indigenous Bacterial Dynamics in Municipal Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangho; Lee, Jaejin; Shukla, Sudheer Kumar; Park, Joonhong; Lee, Tae Kwon

    2016-05-28

    The effects of algal inoculation on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN) removal, and indigenous bacterial dynamics were investigated in municipal wastewater. Experiments were conducted with municipal wastewater inoculated with either Chlorella vulgaris AG10032, Selenastrum gracile UTEX 325, or Scenedesmus quadricauda AG 10308. C. vulgaris and S. gracile as fast growing algae in municipal wastewater, performed high COD and TN removal in contrast to Sc. quadricauda. The indigenous bacterial dynamics revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplification showed different bacterial shifts in response to different algal inoculations. The dominant bacterial genera of either algal case were characterized as heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria. Our results suggest that selection of indigenous bacteria that symbiotically interact with algal species is important for better performance of wastewater treatment. PMID:26930350

  8. Effect of Algal Inoculation on COD and Nitrogen Removal, and Indigenous Bacterial Dynamics in Municipal Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangho; Lee, Jaejin; Shukla, Sudheer Kumar; Park, Joonhong; Lee, Tae Kwon

    2016-05-28

    The effects of algal inoculation on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN) removal, and indigenous bacterial dynamics were investigated in municipal wastewater. Experiments were conducted with municipal wastewater inoculated with either Chlorella vulgaris AG10032, Selenastrum gracile UTEX 325, or Scenedesmus quadricauda AG 10308. C. vulgaris and S. gracile as fast growing algae in municipal wastewater, performed high COD and TN removal in contrast to Sc. quadricauda. The indigenous bacterial dynamics revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplification showed different bacterial shifts in response to different algal inoculations. The dominant bacterial genera of either algal case were characterized as heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria. Our results suggest that selection of indigenous bacteria that symbiotically interact with algal species is important for better performance of wastewater treatment.

  9. Nitrogen-removal performance and community structure of nitrifying bacteria under different aeration modes in an oxidation ditch.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chang-Zi; Fu, Wei; Chen, Xue-Mei; Peng, Dang-Cong; Jin, Peng-Kang

    2013-07-01

    Oxidation-ditch operation modes were simulated using sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with alternate stirring and aerating. The nitrogen-removal efficiencies and nitrifying characteristics of two aeration modes, point aeration and step aeration, were investigated. Under the same air-supply capacity, oxygen dissolved more efficiently in the system with point aeration, forming a larger aerobic zone. The nitrifying effects were similar in point aeration and step aeration, where the average removal efficiencies of NH4(+) N were 98% and 96%, respectively. When the proportion of anoxic and oxic zones was 1, the average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) were 45% and 66% under point aeration and step aeration, respectively. Step aeration was more beneficial to both anoxic denitrification and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). The maximum specific ammonia-uptake rates (AUR) of point aeration and step aeration were 4.7 and 4.9 mg NH4(+)/(gMLVSS h), respectively, while the maximum specific nitrite-uptake rates (NUR) of the two systems were 7.4 and 5.3 mg NO2(-)-N/(gMLVSS h), respectively. The proportions of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to all bacteria were 5.1% under point aeration and 7.0% under step aeration, and the proportions of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) reached 6.5% and 9.0% under point and step aeration, respectively. The dominant genera of AOB and NOB were Nitrosococcus and Nitrospira, which accounted for 90% and 91%, respectively, under point aeration, and the diversity of nitrifying bacteria was lower than under step aeration. Point aeration was selective of nitrifying bacteria. The abundance of NOB was greater than that of AOB in both of the operation modes, and complete transformation of NH4(+) N to NO3(-)-N was observed without NO2(-)-N accumulation.

  10. [Effect of Low-concentration Ciprofloxacin on the Nitrification and Nitrifying Microorganisms of Biofilms in Biological Aerated Filter].

    PubMed

    He, Shi; Gu, Chao-chao; Wei, Xin; Huang, Sheng-lin; Liu, Zhen-hong; Xue, Gang; Gao, Pin

    2016-04-15

    Effect of low-concentration ciprofloxacin (CIP) on nitrification and nitrifying microorganisms of biofilms was studied in biological aerated filters (BAF). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to determine the abundance variance of four ciprofloxacin resistance genes (CIP-ARGs) during nitrification in biofilms. The correlations between the abundances of CIP-ARGs and nitrifying microorganisms were also discussed. The results showed that CIP had little influence on the ammonium oxidation process of biofilm microorganisms, whereas inhibition of the nitrite oxidation process was found. The quantitative results of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) including Nitrobacter and Nitrospira indicated that the inhibition on the transformation of nitrite was resulted from the inhibition on Nitrobacter and Nitrospira. In addition, little influence of CIP on the relative abundance of aac and qepA in biofilms was found, but the influence on parC and oqxB was great. The abundance of Nitrotacter exhibited significant positive correlation with the abundance of parC. Similar significant correlation was also found between the abundances of Nitrospira and oqxB. It could be speculated that the genetic elements of different nitrifying microorganisms in biofilms possibly carried CIP-ARGs. PMID:27548973

  11. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  12. Aggregates of a cationic porphyrin as supramolecular probes for biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Occhiuto, Ilaria Giuseppina; Samperi, Mario; Trapani, Mariachiara; De Luca, Giovanna; Romeo, Andrea; Pasternack, Robert F; Scolaro, Luigi Monsù

    2015-12-01

    The copper(II) derivative of the dicationic trans-bis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)diphenylporphyrin (t-CuPagg) forms large fractal aggregates in aqueous solution under moderate ionic strength conditions. A kinetic investigation of the aggregation process allows for a choice of experimental conditions to quickly obtain stable assemblies in solution. These positively charged aggregates are able to interact efficiently with negatively charged chiral species, (including bacterial spores) leading to induced circular dichroism signals in the Soret region of the porphyrin, now acting as a sensitive chiroptical probe. PMID:26490712

  13. Aggregates of a cationic porphyrin as supramolecular probes for biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Occhiuto, Ilaria Giuseppina; Samperi, Mario; Trapani, Mariachiara; De Luca, Giovanna; Romeo, Andrea; Pasternack, Robert F; Scolaro, Luigi Monsù

    2015-12-01

    The copper(II) derivative of the dicationic trans-bis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)diphenylporphyrin (t-CuPagg) forms large fractal aggregates in aqueous solution under moderate ionic strength conditions. A kinetic investigation of the aggregation process allows for a choice of experimental conditions to quickly obtain stable assemblies in solution. These positively charged aggregates are able to interact efficiently with negatively charged chiral species, (including bacterial spores) leading to induced circular dichroism signals in the Soret region of the porphyrin, now acting as a sensitive chiroptical probe.

  14. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  15. Protein aggregation in bacteria: the thin boundary between functionality and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Natalia G; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Van Eldere, Johan

    2013-09-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of proteins have a negative impact on all living organisms. In recent years, aggregation has been studied in detail due to its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, and type II diabetes--all associated with accumulation of amyloid fibrils. This research highlighted the central importance of protein homeostasis, or proteostasis for short, defined as the cellular state in which the proteome is both stable and functional. It implicates an equilibrium between synthesis, folding, trafficking, aggregation, disaggregation and degradation. In accordance with the eukaryotic systems, it has been documented that protein aggregation also reduces fitness of bacterial cells, but although our understanding of the cellular protein quality control systems is perhaps most detailed in bacteria, the use of bacterial proteostasis as a drug target remains little explored. Here we describe protein aggregation as a normal physiological process and its role in bacterial virulence and we shed light on how bacteria defend themselves against the toxic threat of aggregates. We review the impact of aggregates on bacterial viability and look at the ways that bacteria use to maintain a balance between aggregation and functionality. The proteostasis in bacteria can be interrupted via overexpression of proteins, certain antibiotics such as aminoglycosides, as well as antimicrobial peptides--all leading to loss of cell viability. Therefore intracellular protein aggregation and disruption of proteostatic balance in bacteria open up another strategy that should be explored towards the discovery of new antimicrobials.

  16. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  17. Physiological and transcriptional responses of nitrifying bacteria exposed to copper in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Fan; Zhai, Hongyan; Ji, Min; Zhang, Hongyang; Dong, Zhao

    2016-01-15

    Cu inhibition of gene transcription in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were rarely studied simultaneously in activated sludge. In this study, the transcription of amoA (for AOB) and nxrB (for NOB), nitrification efficiencies, AOB and NOB respiratory rates, and Cu distribution were simultaneously investigated. Modeling the relationships among the aforementioned parameters revealed that in complex activated sludge systems, nitrification efficiency was an insensitive parameter for showing Cu inhibition. Respiration activities and gene transcription were sensitive to Cu and positively correlated with each other. The transcription of amoA and nxrB genes indicated that the Cu had different inhibitory effects on AOB and NOB. AOB were more susceptible to Cu toxicity than NOB. Moreover, the degree of Cu inhibition on ammonia oxidation was greater than on nitrite oxidation. The analysis and related modeling results indicate that the inhibitory actions of Cu on nitrifying bacteria could mainly be attributed to intracellular Cu. The findings from this study provide insight into the mechanism of Cu inhibition on nitrification in complex activated sludge systems. PMID:26348150

  18. Chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on the metabolic activity and composition of enriched nitrifying microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Katipoglu-Yazan, Tugce; Merlin, Christophe; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Ubay-Cokgor, Emine; Orhon, Derin

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) on activated sludge sustaining an enriched nitrifying biomass. For this purpose, a laboratory scale fill and draw reactor was operated with 100 mg COD/L of peptone mixture and 50 mg N/L of ammonia at a sludge age of 15 days. Additionally, the biomass was exposed to a daily SMX dose of 50 mg/L once the reactor reached steady-state conditions. The reactor performance and microbial composition were monitored for 37 days with conventional parameters and molecular techniques based on the gene for ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) and the prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA gene cloning analyses suggested a microbial community change concurrent with the addition of SMX. Specifically, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (qPCR/RT-qPCR) revealed a significant reduction in the levels and activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, the acclimation period ended with high amoA mRNA levels and improved nitrification efficiency. Partial degradation of SMX by heterotrophic bacteria was also observed.

  19. Proton translocation during denitrification by a nitrifying--denitrifying Alcaligenes sp.

    PubMed

    Castignetti, D; Hollocher, T C

    1983-04-01

    A heterotrophic nitrifying Alcaligenes sp. from soil was grown as a denitrifier on nitrate and subjected to oxidant pulse experiments to ascertain the apparent efficiencies of proton translocations during O2 and nitrogen-oxide respirations. With endogenous substrate as the reducing agent the leads to H+/2e- ratios, extrapolated to zero amount of oxidant per pulse, were 9.4, 3.7, 4.3 and 3.5 for O2, nitrate, nitrite and N2O, respectively. The value for O2 and those for the N-oxides are, respectively, somewhat larger and smaller than corresponding values for Paracoccus denitrificans. None of the three permeant ions employed with the Alcaligenes sp. (valinomycin-K+, thiocyanate and triphenylmethylphosphonium) was ideal for all purposes. Thiocyanate provided highest ratios for O2 but abolished the oxidant pulse response for nitrate and N2O. Valinomycin was slow to penetrate to the cytoplasmic membrane and relatively high concentrations were required for optimal performance. Triphenylmethylphosphonium enhanced passive proton permeability and diminished proton translocation at concentrations required to realize the maximal oxidant pulse response. PMID:6311094

  20. Application of high rate nitrifying trickling filters for potable water treatment.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Ben; Holmes, Mike; Cromar, Nancy; Fallowfield, Howard

    2008-11-01

    The interference of ammonia with chlorination is a prevalent problem encountered by water treatment plants located throughout South East Asia. The efficacy of high rate, plastic-packed trickling filters as a pre-treatment process to remove low concentrations of ammonia from polluted surface water was investigated. This paper presents the findings from a series of pilot experiments, which were designed to investigate the effect of specific conditions-namely low ammonia feed concentrations (0.5-5.0 mg NH(4)-NL(-1)), variations in hydraulic surface load (72.5-145 m(3)m(-2)d(-1)) and high suspended solid loads (51+/-25 mgL(-1))-on filter nitrifying capacity. The distribution of nitrification activity throughout a trickling filter bed was also characterised. Results confirmed that high hydraulic rate trickling filters were able to operate successfully, under ammonia-N concentrations some 10- to 50-fold lower and at hydraulic loading rates 30-100 times greater than those of conventional wastewater applications. Mass transport limitations posed by low ammonia-N concentrations on overall filter performance were insignificant, where apparent nitrification rates (0.4-1.6 g NH(4)-Nm(-2)d(-1)), equivalent to that of wastewater filters were recorded. High inert suspended solid loadings had no adverse effect on nitrification. Results imply that implementation of high rate trickling filters at the front-end of a water treatment train would reduce the ammonia-related chlorine demand, thereby offering significant cost savings. PMID:18752823

  1. Removal of triclosan in nitrifying activated sludge: effects of ammonia amendment and bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Gyun; Cho, Kun-Ching; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated two possible strategies, increasing ammonia oxidation activity and bioaugmenting with triclosan-degrader Sphingopyxis strain KCY1, to enhance triclosan removal in nitrifying activated sludge (NAS). Triclosan (2 mg L(-1)) was removed within 96-h in NAS bioreactors amended with 5, 25 and 75 mg L(-1) of ammonium (NH4-N). The fastest triclosan removal was observed in 25 mg NH4-NL(-1) amended-bioreactors where high ammonia oxidation occurred. Inhibition of ammonia oxidation and slower triclosan removal were observed in 75 mg NH4-NL(-1) amended-bioreactors. Triclosan removal was correlated to the molar ratio of the amount of nitrate produced to the amount of ammonium removed. Bioaugmentation with strain KCY1 did not enhance triclosan removal in the bioreactors with active ammonia oxidation. Approximately 36-42% and 59% of triclosan added were removed within 24-h by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and unknown triclosan-degrading heterotrophs, respectively. The results suggested that increasing ammonia oxidation activity can be an effective strategy to enhance triclosan removal in NAS. PMID:25655440

  2. Attempts to improve nitrogen utilization efficiency of aquaponics through nitrifies addition and filler gradation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yina; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Huijun; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Jinhe; Yan, Runxin

    2016-04-01

    Aquaponics has attracted worldwide attention in recent years and is considered as an alternative technology for conventional aquaculture. In this study, common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and pakchoi (Brassica chinensis) were cultured in lab-scale aquaponics, and attempts were conducted to enhance its nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUE) through two optimization methods, i.e., nitrifies addition (NA) and filler gradation (FG). Results showed that NA and FG could improve the NUE of aquaponics by 8.8 and 16.0%, respectively, compared with control. The total ammonia (TAN) and nitrite (NO2(-)) concentrations in NA and FG systems were maintained at relatively low level (TAN < 0.5 mg/L, NO2(-) < 0.1 mg/L), which demonstrated that both the NA and FG could provide non-toxic water environment for fish culture. Nitrous oxide conversion ratio of the control, NA, and FG were 0.8, 1.2, and 1.7%, respectively, indicating that media-based aquaponics also contributed to global warming. Although the two proposed attempts in this study caused more N2O emission, they made new breakthrough in improving the NUE of aquaponics.

  3. Attempts to improve nitrogen utilization efficiency of aquaponics through nitrifies addition and filler gradation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yina; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Huijun; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Jinhe; Yan, Runxin

    2016-04-01

    Aquaponics has attracted worldwide attention in recent years and is considered as an alternative technology for conventional aquaculture. In this study, common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and pakchoi (Brassica chinensis) were cultured in lab-scale aquaponics, and attempts were conducted to enhance its nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUE) through two optimization methods, i.e., nitrifies addition (NA) and filler gradation (FG). Results showed that NA and FG could improve the NUE of aquaponics by 8.8 and 16.0%, respectively, compared with control. The total ammonia (TAN) and nitrite (NO2(-)) concentrations in NA and FG systems were maintained at relatively low level (TAN < 0.5 mg/L, NO2(-) < 0.1 mg/L), which demonstrated that both the NA and FG could provide non-toxic water environment for fish culture. Nitrous oxide conversion ratio of the control, NA, and FG were 0.8, 1.2, and 1.7%, respectively, indicating that media-based aquaponics also contributed to global warming. Although the two proposed attempts in this study caused more N2O emission, they made new breakthrough in improving the NUE of aquaponics. PMID:26645232

  4. Chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on the metabolic activity and composition of enriched nitrifying microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Katipoglu-Yazan, Tugce; Merlin, Christophe; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Ubay-Cokgor, Emine; Orhon, Derin

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) on activated sludge sustaining an enriched nitrifying biomass. For this purpose, a laboratory scale fill and draw reactor was operated with 100 mg COD/L of peptone mixture and 50 mg N/L of ammonia at a sludge age of 15 days. Additionally, the biomass was exposed to a daily SMX dose of 50 mg/L once the reactor reached steady-state conditions. The reactor performance and microbial composition were monitored for 37 days with conventional parameters and molecular techniques based on the gene for ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) and the prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA gene cloning analyses suggested a microbial community change concurrent with the addition of SMX. Specifically, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (qPCR/RT-qPCR) revealed a significant reduction in the levels and activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, the acclimation period ended with high amoA mRNA levels and improved nitrification efficiency. Partial degradation of SMX by heterotrophic bacteria was also observed. PMID:27235775

  5. Removal of triclosan in nitrifying activated sludge: effects of ammonia amendment and bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Gyun; Cho, Kun-Ching; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated two possible strategies, increasing ammonia oxidation activity and bioaugmenting with triclosan-degrader Sphingopyxis strain KCY1, to enhance triclosan removal in nitrifying activated sludge (NAS). Triclosan (2 mg L(-1)) was removed within 96-h in NAS bioreactors amended with 5, 25 and 75 mg L(-1) of ammonium (NH4-N). The fastest triclosan removal was observed in 25 mg NH4-NL(-1) amended-bioreactors where high ammonia oxidation occurred. Inhibition of ammonia oxidation and slower triclosan removal were observed in 75 mg NH4-NL(-1) amended-bioreactors. Triclosan removal was correlated to the molar ratio of the amount of nitrate produced to the amount of ammonium removed. Bioaugmentation with strain KCY1 did not enhance triclosan removal in the bioreactors with active ammonia oxidation. Approximately 36-42% and 59% of triclosan added were removed within 24-h by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and unknown triclosan-degrading heterotrophs, respectively. The results suggested that increasing ammonia oxidation activity can be an effective strategy to enhance triclosan removal in NAS.

  6. Effect of application solvents on heterotrophic and nitrifying populations in soil microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.L.; Sardo, M.A.; Thompson, T.L.; Miller, R.M.

    1997-03-01

    Agricultural practices may cause contamination of soil and ground water with a combination of organic compounds (pesticides and fuel) and nitrogen fertilizers. In coupled microcosm studies that monitored the mineralization of naphthalene and the nitrification of ammonia, it was observed that the solvent (dichloromethane) used to apply naphthalene to the soil inhibited nitrification, although there was no effect on naphthalene mineralization. Further studies were performed with a series of application solvents: methanol, acetonitrile, trichloromethane, and dichloromethane. Soil and solvent were allowed to equilibrate with ambient air for various times before capping and incubation of microcosms. Results indicated that dichloromethane equilibrated for 5 mins inhibited nitrification for at least 3 weeks relative to the control (water). Acetonitrile and trichloromethane similarly inhibited nitrification. Methanol and dichloromethane equilibrated for 60 mins also significantly delayed nitrification, although to a lesser extent. Inhibition of nitrification was not permanent, and nitrification activity was eventually restored in all systems tested. None of the solvents inhibited mineralization of the added carbon source. These results indicate that special care must be taken to ensure that applications solvents do not affect the activity of sensitive microbial populations, such as the nitrifiers, that may be part of a study.

  7. Bacterial Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... very quickly, and if left untreated, can cause blindness. The bacteria usually responsible for this type of ... to intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, e.g. snow blindness or welder's arc eye). Next Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ...

  8. Physical soil architectural traits are functionally linked to carbon decomposition and bacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Rabbi, S M F; Daniel, H; Lockwood, P V; Macdonald, C; Pereg, L; Tighe, M; Wilson, B R; Young, I M

    2016-01-01

    Aggregates play a key role in protecting soil organic carbon (SOC) from microbial decomposition. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of pore geometry on the organic carbon decomposition rate and bacterial diversity in both macro- (250-2000 μm) and micro-aggregates (53-250 μm) using field samples. Four sites of contrasting land use on Alfisols (i.e. native pasture, crop/pasture rotation, woodland) were investigated. 3D Pore geometry of the micro-aggregates and macro-aggregates were examined by X-ray computed tomography (μCT). The occluded particulate organic carbon (oPOC) of aggregates was measured by size and density fractionation methods. Micro-aggregates had 54% less μCT observed porosity but 64% more oPOC compared with macro-aggregates. In addition, the pore connectivity in micro-aggregates was lower than macro-aggregates. Despite both lower μCT observed porosity and pore connectivity in micro-aggregates, the organic carbon decomposition rate constant (Ksoc) was similar in both aggregate size ranges. Structural equation modelling showed a strong positive relationship of the concentration of oPOC with bacterial diversity in aggregates. We use these findings to propose a conceptual model that illustrates the dynamic links between substrate, bacterial diversity, and pore geometry that suggests a structural explanation for differences in bacterial diversity across aggregate sizes. PMID:27615807

  9. Physical soil architectural traits are functionally linked to carbon decomposition and bacterial diversity

    PubMed Central

    Rabbi, S. M. F.; Daniel, H.; Lockwood, P. V.; Macdonald, C.; Pereg, L.; Tighe, M.; Wilson, B. R.; Young, I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aggregates play a key role in protecting soil organic carbon (SOC) from microbial decomposition. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of pore geometry on the organic carbon decomposition rate and bacterial diversity in both macro- (250–2000 μm) and micro-aggregates (53–250 μm) using field samples. Four sites of contrasting land use on Alfisols (i.e. native pasture, crop/pasture rotation, woodland) were investigated. 3D Pore geometry of the micro-aggregates and macro-aggregates were examined by X-ray computed tomography (μCT). The occluded particulate organic carbon (oPOC) of aggregates was measured by size and density fractionation methods. Micro-aggregates had 54% less μCT observed porosity but 64% more oPOC compared with macro-aggregates. In addition, the pore connectivity in micro-aggregates was lower than macro-aggregates. Despite both lower μCT observed porosity and pore connectivity in micro-aggregates, the organic carbon decomposition rate constant (Ksoc) was similar in both aggregate size ranges. Structural equation modelling showed a strong positive relationship of the concentration of oPOC with bacterial diversity in aggregates. We use these findings to propose a conceptual model that illustrates the dynamic links between substrate, bacterial diversity, and pore geometry that suggests a structural explanation for differences in bacterial diversity across aggregate sizes. PMID:27615807

  10. Physical soil architectural traits are functionally linked to carbon decomposition and bacterial diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbi, S. M. F.; Daniel, H.; Lockwood, P. V.; MacDonald, C.; Pereg, L.; Tighe, M.; Wilson, B. R.; Young, I. M.

    2016-09-01

    Aggregates play a key role in protecting soil organic carbon (SOC) from microbial decomposition. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of pore geometry on the organic carbon decomposition rate and bacterial diversity in both macro- (250–2000 μm) and micro-aggregates (53–250 μm) using field samples. Four sites of contrasting land use on Alfisols (i.e. native pasture, crop/pasture rotation, woodland) were investigated. 3D Pore geometry of the micro-aggregates and macro-aggregates were examined by X-ray computed tomography (μCT). The occluded particulate organic carbon (oPOC) of aggregates was measured by size and density fractionation methods. Micro-aggregates had 54% less μCT observed porosity but 64% more oPOC compared with macro-aggregates. In addition, the pore connectivity in micro-aggregates was lower than macro-aggregates. Despite both lower μCT observed porosity and pore connectivity in micro-aggregates, the organic carbon decomposition rate constant (Ksoc) was similar in both aggregate size ranges. Structural equation modelling showed a strong positive relationship of the concentration of oPOC with bacterial diversity in aggregates. We use these findings to propose a conceptual model that illustrates the dynamic links between substrate, bacterial diversity, and pore geometry that suggests a structural explanation for differences in bacterial diversity across aggregate sizes.

  11. Fibronectin Aggregation and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of fibronectin (FN) assembly and the self-association sites are still unclear and contradictory, although the N-terminal 70-kDa region (I1–9) is commonly accepted as one of the assembly sites. We previously found that I1–9 binds to superfibronectin, which is an artificial FN aggregate induced by anastellin. In the present study, we found that I1–9 bound to the aggregate formed by anastellin and a small FN fragment, III1–2. An engineered disulfide bond in III2, which stabilizes folding, inhibited aggregation, but a disulfide bond in III1 did not. A gelatin precipitation assay showed that I1–9 did not interact with anastellin, III1, III2, III1–2, or several III1–2 mutants including III1–2KADA. (In contrast to previous studies, we found that the III1–2KADA mutant was identical in conformation to wild-type III1–2.) Because I1–9 only bound to the aggregate and the unfolding of III2 played a role in aggregation, we generated a III2 domain that was destabilized by deletion of the G strand. This mutant bound I1–9 as shown by the gelatin precipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, and it inhibited FN matrix assembly when added to cell culture. Next, we introduced disulfide mutations into full-length FN. Three disulfide locks in III2, III3, and III11 were required to dramatically reduce anastellin-induced aggregation. When we tested the disulfide mutants in cell culture, only the disulfide bond in III2 reduced the FN matrix. These results suggest that the unfolding of III2 is one of the key factors for FN aggregation and assembly. PMID:21949131

  12. Bacterial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C.; Powers, Thomas R.; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid–solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions. PMID:22411815

  13. Effects of Cr(III) and CR(VI) on nitrification inhibition as determined by SOUR, function-specific gene expression and 16S rRNA sequence analysis of wastewater nitrifying enrichments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on ammonia oxidation, the transcriptional responses of functional genes involved in nitrification and changes in 16S rRNA level sequences were examined in nitrifying enrichment cultures. The nitrifying bioreactor was operated as a continuous react...

  14. Uncultured bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Eun; Lee, Jinhwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Myeong, Jeong-In; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) was investigated using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to understand the roles of bacterial communities in the system. The RAS was operated at nine different combinations of temperature (15°C, 20°C, and 25°C) and salinity (20‰, 25‰, and 32.5‰). Samples were collected from five or six RAS tanks (biofilters) for each condition. Fifty samples were analyzed. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were most common (sum of both phyla: 67.2% to 99.4%) and were inversely proportional to each other. Bacteria that were present at an average of ≥ 1% included Actinobacteria (2.9%) Planctomycetes (2.0%), Nitrospirae (1.5%), and Acidobacteria (1.0%); they were preferentially present in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters. The three biofilters showed higher diversity than other RAS tanks (aerated biofilters, floating bed biofilters, and fish tanks) from phylum to operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level. Samples were clustered into several groups based on the bacterial communities. Major taxonomic groups related to family Rhodobacteraceae and Flavobacteriaceae were distributed widely in the samples. Several taxonomic groups like [Saprospiraceae], Cytophagaceae, Octadecabacter, and Marivita showed a cluster-oriented distribution. Phaeobacter and Sediminicola-related reads were detected frequently and abundantly at low temperature. Nitrifying bacteria were detected frequently and abundantly in the three biofilters. Phylogenetic analysis of the nitrifying bacteria showed several similar OTUs were observed widely through the biofilters. The diverse bacterial communities and the minor taxonomic groups, except for Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, seemed to play important roles and seemed necessary for nitrifying activity in the RAS, especially in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters. PMID:27033205

  15. Uncultured bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Eun; Lee, Jinhwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Myeong, Jeong-In; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) was investigated using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to understand the roles of bacterial communities in the system. The RAS was operated at nine different combinations of temperature (15°C, 20°C, and 25°C) and salinity (20‰, 25‰, and 32.5‰). Samples were collected from five or six RAS tanks (biofilters) for each condition. Fifty samples were analyzed. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were most common (sum of both phyla: 67.2% to 99.4%) and were inversely proportional to each other. Bacteria that were present at an average of ≥ 1% included Actinobacteria (2.9%) Planctomycetes (2.0%), Nitrospirae (1.5%), and Acidobacteria (1.0%); they were preferentially present in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters. The three biofilters showed higher diversity than other RAS tanks (aerated biofilters, floating bed biofilters, and fish tanks) from phylum to operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level. Samples were clustered into several groups based on the bacterial communities. Major taxonomic groups related to family Rhodobacteraceae and Flavobacteriaceae were distributed widely in the samples. Several taxonomic groups like [Saprospiraceae], Cytophagaceae, Octadecabacter, and Marivita showed a cluster-oriented distribution. Phaeobacter and Sediminicola-related reads were detected frequently and abundantly at low temperature. Nitrifying bacteria were detected frequently and abundantly in the three biofilters. Phylogenetic analysis of the nitrifying bacteria showed several similar OTUs were observed widely through the biofilters. The diverse bacterial communities and the minor taxonomic groups, except for Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, seemed to play important roles and seemed necessary for nitrifying activity in the RAS, especially in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters.

  16. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  17. Ecology of Nitrogen Fixing, Nitrifying, and Denitrifying Microorganisms in Tropical Forest Soils.

    PubMed

    Pajares, Silvia; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2016-01-01

    Soil microorganisms play important roles in nitrogen cycling within forest ecosystems. Current research has revealed that a wider variety of microorganisms, with unexpected diversity in their functions and phylogenies, are involved in the nitrogen cycle than previously thought, including nitrogen-fixing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea, heterotrophic nitrifying microorganisms, and anammox bacteria, as well as denitrifying bacteria, archaea, and fungi. However, the vast majority of this research has been focused in temperate regions, and relatively little is known regarding the ecology of nitrogen-cycling microorganisms within tropical and subtropical ecosystems. Tropical forests are characterized by relatively high precipitation, low annual temperature fluctuation, high heterogeneity in plant diversity, large amounts of plant litter, and unique soil chemistry. For these reasons, regulation of the nitrogen cycle in tropical forests may be very different from that of temperate ecosystems. This is of great importance because of growing concerns regarding the effect of land use change and chronic-elevated nitrogen deposition on nitrogen-cycling processes in tropical forests. In the context of global change, it is crucial to understand how environmental factors and land use changes in tropical ecosystems influence the composition, abundance and activity of key players in the nitrogen cycle. In this review, we synthesize the limited currently available information regarding the microbial communities involved in nitrogen fixation, nitrification and denitrification, to provide deeper insight into the mechanisms regulating nitrogen cycling in tropical forest ecosystems. We also highlight the large gaps in our understanding of microbially mediated nitrogen processes in tropical forest soils and identify important areas for future research. PMID:27468277

  18. Impact of Heavy Metals on Transcriptional and Physiological Activity of Nitrifying Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vikram; Li, Xuan; Elk, Michael; Chandran, Kartik; Impellitteri, Christopher A; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2015-11-17

    Heavy metals can inhibit nitrification, a key process for nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment. The transcriptional responses of amoA, hao, nirK, and norB were measured in conjunction with specific oxygen uptake rate (sOUR) for nitrifying enrichment cultures exposed to different metals (Ni(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II)). There was significant decrease in sOUR with increasing concentrations for Ni(II) (0.03-3 mg/L), Zn(II) (0.1-10 mg/L), and Cd(II) (0.03-1 mg/L) (p < 0.05). However, no considerable changes in sOUR were observed with Pb(II) (1-100 mg/L), except at a dosage of 1000 mg/L causing 84% inhibition. Based on RT-qPCR data, the transcript levels of amoA and hao decreased when exposed to Ni(II) dosages. Slight up-regulation of amoA, hao, and nirK (0.5-1.5-fold) occurred after exposure to 0.3-3 mg/L Zn(II), although their expression decreased for 10 mg/L Zn(II). With the exception of 1000 mg/L Pb(II), stimulation of all genes occurred on Cd(II) and Pb(II) exposure. While overall the results show that RNA-based function-specific assays can be used as potential surrogates for measuring nitrification activity, the degree of inhibition inferred from sOUR and gene transcription is different. We suggest that variations in transcription of functional genes may supplement sOUR based assays as early warning indicators of upsets in nitrification. PMID:26501957

  19. Community Structure and Activity Dynamics of Nitrifying Bacteria in a Phosphate-Removing Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Gieseke, Armin; Purkhold, Ulrike; Wagner, Michael; Amann, Rudolf; Schramm, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    The microbial community structure and activity dynamics of a phosphate-removing biofilm from a sequencing batch biofilm reactor were investigated with special focus on the nitrifying community. O2, NO2−, and NO3− profiles in the biofilm were measured with microsensors at various times during the nonaerated-aerated reactor cycle. In the aeration period, nitrification was oxygen limited and restricted to the first 200 μm at the biofilm surface. Additionally, a delayed onset of nitrification after the start of the aeration was observed. Nitrate accumulating in the biofilm in this period was denitrified during the nonaeration period of the next reactor cycle. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed three distinct ammonia-oxidizing populations, related to the Nitrosomonas europaea, Nitrosomonas oligotropha, and Nitrosomonas communis lineages. This was confirmed by analysis of the genes coding for 16S rRNA and for ammonia monooxygenase (amoA). Based upon these results, a new 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe specific for the Nitrosomonas oligotropha lineage was designed. FISH analysis revealed that the first 100 μm at the biofilm surface was dominated by members of the N. europaea and the N. oligotropha lineages, with a minor fraction related to N. communis. In deeper biofilm layers, exclusively members of the N. oligotropha lineage were found. This separation in space and a potential separation of activities in time are suggested as mechanisms that allow coexistence of the different ammonia-oxidizing populations. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria belonged exclusively to the genus Nitrospira and could be assigned to a 16S rRNA sequence cluster also found in other sequencing batch systems. PMID:11229931

  20. Ecology of Nitrogen Fixing, Nitrifying, and Denitrifying Microorganisms in Tropical Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, Silvia; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil microorganisms play important roles in nitrogen cycling within forest ecosystems. Current research has revealed that a wider variety of microorganisms, with unexpected diversity in their functions and phylogenies, are involved in the nitrogen cycle than previously thought, including nitrogen-fixing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea, heterotrophic nitrifying microorganisms, and anammox bacteria, as well as denitrifying bacteria, archaea, and fungi. However, the vast majority of this research has been focused in temperate regions, and relatively little is known regarding the ecology of nitrogen-cycling microorganisms within tropical and subtropical ecosystems. Tropical forests are characterized by relatively high precipitation, low annual temperature fluctuation, high heterogeneity in plant diversity, large amounts of plant litter, and unique soil chemistry. For these reasons, regulation of the nitrogen cycle in tropical forests may be very different from that of temperate ecosystems. This is of great importance because of growing concerns regarding the effect of land use change and chronic-elevated nitrogen deposition on nitrogen-cycling processes in tropical forests. In the context of global change, it is crucial to understand how environmental factors and land use changes in tropical ecosystems influence the composition, abundance and activity of key players in the nitrogen cycle. In this review, we synthesize the limited currently available information regarding the microbial communities involved in nitrogen fixation, nitrification and denitrification, to provide deeper insight into the mechanisms regulating nitrogen cycling in tropical forest ecosystems. We also highlight the large gaps in our understanding of microbially mediated nitrogen processes in tropical forest soils and identify important areas for future research. PMID:27468277

  1. Biofilm Thickness Influences Biodiversity in Nitrifying MBBRs-Implications on Micropollutant Removal.

    PubMed

    Torresi, Elena; Fowler, S Jane; Polesel, Fabio; Bester, Kai; Andersen, Henrik R; Smets, Barth F; Plósz, Benedek Gy; Christensson, Magnus

    2016-09-01

    In biofilm systems for wastewater treatment (e.g., moving bed biofilms reactors-MBBRs) biofilm thickness is typically not under direct control. Nevertheless, biofilm thickness is likely to have a profound effect on the microbial diversity and activity, as a result of diffusion limitation and thus substrate penetration in the biofilm. In this study, we investigated the impact of biofilm thickness on nitrification and on the removal of more than 20 organic micropollutants in laboratory-scale nitrifying MBBRs. We used novel carriers (Z-carriers, AnoxKaldnes) that allowed controlling biofilm thickness at 50, 200, 300, 400, and 500 μm. The impact of biofilm thickness on microbial community was assessed via 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) abundance quantification through quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results from batch experiments and microbial analysis showed that (i) the thickest biofilm (500 μm) presented the highest specific biotransformation rate constants (kbio, L g(-1) d(-1)) for 14 out of 22 micropollutants; (ii) biofilm thickness positively associated with biodiversity, which was suggested as the main factor for the observed enhancement of kbio; (iii) the thinnest biofilm (50 μm) exhibited the highest nitrification rate (gN d(-1) g(-1)), amoA gene abundance and kbio values for some of the most recalcitrant micropollutants (i.e., diclofenac and targeted sulfonamides). Although thin biofilms favored nitrification activity and the removal of some micropollutants, treatment systems based on thicker biofilms should be considered to enhance the elimination of a broad spectrum of micropollutants. PMID:27477857

  2. The response of nitrifying microbial assemblages to ammonium (NH4+) enrichment from salmon farm activities in a northern Chilean Fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo-Patrone, Claudia; Hernández, Klaudia; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Olsen, Lasse Mork; Molina, Verónica

    2015-12-01

    The consequences of aquaculture include alterations in nitrogen cycling in aquatic environments that may lead to ecosystem degradation. Herein salmon aquaculture release of ammonium (NH4+) to the water column and its effects on natural archaea and bacteria ammonia-oxidizers (AOA and AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) community structure were studied in the Comau fjord using molecular approaches, such as: cloning (AOA and AOB richness), qPCR for C. Nitrosopumilus maritimus (AOA) and Nitrospina sp. (NOB) abundance (DNA) and RT-qPCR only for Nitrospina sp activity (RNA). Sampling was carried out in brackish (0.7-25 salinity, <5 m depth) and marine (>30 salinity, 25 m depth) waters during contrasting salmon production periods: rest (winter 2012), growth and harvest (summer and winter 2013). During the rest period, the highest NH4+ concentration was observed at Vodudahue River, whereas during productive periods NH4+ accumulated in the brackish layer inside salmon cages and in the vicinty (up to 700 m distance from the cages). The nitrifier community from the fjord reference station (Stn-C) was characterized by C. N. maritimus (AOA) and Nitrosomonas sp. (AOB) sequences affiliated with cosmopolitan ecotypes (e.g., marine, freshwater, hydrothermal), maxima abundances of C. N. maritimus (AOA) and Nitrospina sp. and extreme ranges of Nitrospina sp. activity occurred in the brackish layer. During productive periods, abundances of C. N. maritimus were co-varied with NH4+ concentrations inside salmon cages (summer) and the adjacent areas (winter). Productive periods were characterized by lower abundances but more homogeneity between brackish and marine areas than for the Stn-C nitrifiers. The physiological state of Nitrospina sp. estimated from cDNA:DNA ratios indicated higher growth during winter 2013 associated with NH4+ enrichment derived from production and river input. Our results suggest that in Comau Fjord, NH4+ enrichment events occur during salmon production and

  3. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  4. Invasive dreissenid mussels and benthic algae in Lake Michigan: characterizing effects on sediment bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip O; McLellan, Sandra L; Graham, Linda E; Young, Erica B

    2015-01-01

    Dreissenid mussels have invaded the Laurentian Great Lakes causing dramatic changes to benthic-pelagic interactions. Despite research on food web impacts, there is limited data on mussel effects on benthic bacterial communities. This study examined effects of dreissenid mussels and benthic algae on sediment bacterial community composition and diversity. Triplicate experimental sediment plus lake water microcosms were used and either mussels, benthic algae or both were added. Changes in water nutrient chemistry and sediment bacterial communities were monitored using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, over 21 days. When mussels were present, nitrate and soluble reactive P increased significantly as the dominant N and P forms. Bacterial diversity increased in all microcosms, although bacterial community composition was distinct between treatment. Higher nitrate in mussel microcosms was accompanied by increases in nitrifying taxa (Nitrospira, Nitrosomonas), which are important in oxidizing mussel-excreted ammonium. Microcosms with algal additions showed increases in bacterial taxa capable of degrading algal cellulose, and Pelagibacter (SAR11) disappeared from all but control microcosms. This study suggests that bacterial communities in lake sediments respond to mussels and algae. Functional analysis of bacterial communities provides insights into changes in microbially mediated benthic nutrient transformations associated with invasive dreissenid mussels and benthic algae in lake ecosystems.

  5. Bacterially mediated mineralization of vaterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Rodriguez-Gallego, Manuel

    2007-03-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a common soil bacterium, plays an active role in the formation of spheroidal vaterite. Bacterial production of CO 2 and NH 3 and the transformation of the NH 3 to NH4+ and OH -, thus increasing solution pH and carbonate alkalinity, set the physicochemical conditions (high supersaturation) leading to vaterite precipitation in the microenvironment around cells, and directly onto the surface of bacterial cells. In the latter case, fossilization of bacteria occurs. Vaterite crystals formed by aggregation of oriented nanocrystals with c-axis normal to the bacterial cell-wall, or to the core of the spherulite when bacteria were not encapsulated. While preferred orientation of vaterite c-axis appears to be determined by electrostatic affinity (ionotropic effect) between vaterite crystal (0001) planes and the negatively charged functional groups of organic molecules on the bacterium cell-wall or on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), analysis of the changes in the culture medium chemistry as well as high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations point to polymorph selection by physicochemical (kinetic) factors (high supersaturation) and stabilization by organics, both connected with bacterial activity. The latter is in agreement with inorganic precipitation of vaterite induced by NH 3 and CO 2 addition in the protein-rich sterile culture medium. Our results as well as recent studies on vaterite precipitation in the presence of different types of bacteria suggest that bacterially mediated vaterite precipitation is not strain-specific, and could be more common than previously thought.

  6. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baul, Upayan Vemparala, Satyavani; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2014-08-28

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  7. Thaumarchaeotes abundant in refinery nitrifying sludges express amoA but are not obligate autotrophic ammonia oxidizers.

    PubMed

    Mussmann, Marc; Brito, Ivana; Pitcher, Angela; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Müller, Anneliese; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael; Head, Ian M

    2011-10-01

    Nitrification is a core process in the global nitrogen cycle that is essential for the functioning of many ecosystems. The discovery of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the phylum Thaumarchaeota has changed our perception of the microbiology of nitrification, in particular since their numerical dominance over ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in many environments has been revealed. These and other data have led to a widely held assumption that all amoA-encoding members of the Thaumarchaeota (AEA) are autotrophic nitrifiers. In this study, 52 municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants were screened for the presence of AEA and AOB. Thaumarchaeota carrying amoA were detected in high abundance only in four industrial plants. In one plant, thaumarchaeotes closely related to soil group I.1b outnumbered AOB up to 10,000-fold, and their numbers, which can only be explained by active growth in this continuous culture system, were two to three orders of magnitude higher than could be sustained by autotrophic ammonia oxidation. Consistently, (14)CO(2) fixation could only be detected in AOB but not in AEA in actively nitrifying sludge from this plant via FISH combined with microautoradiography. Furthermore, in situ transcription of archaeal amoA, and very weak in situ labeling of crenarchaeol after addition of (13)CO(2), was independent of the addition of ammonium. These data demonstrate that some amoA-carrying group I.1b Thaumarchaeota are not obligate chemolithoautotrophs.

  8. Carrier effects on tertiary nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor: An examination of performance, biofilm and biologically produced solids.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Daina; Delatolla, Robert; Kennedy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly stricter ammonia and nitrogen release regulations with respect to wastewater effluents are creating a need for tertiary treatment systems. The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) is being considered as an upgrade option for an increasing number of wastewater treatment facilities due to its small footprint and ease of operation. Despite the MBBRs creation as a system to remove nitrogen, recent research on MBBR systems showing that the system's performance is directly related to carrier surface area and is irrespective of carrier shape and type has been performed exclusively on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal systems. Furthermore, the influence of carrier type on the solids produced by MBBR systems has also been exclusively studied for COD removal systems. This work investigates the effects of three specific carrier types on ammonia removal rates, biofilm morphology, along with solids production and settleability of tertiary nitrifying MBBR systems. The study concludes that carrier type has no significant effect on tertiary nitrifying MBBR system performance under steady, moderate loading conditions. The research does however highlight the propensity of greater surface area to volume carriers to become clogged under high loading conditions and that the high surface area carriers investigated in this study required longer adjustment periods to changes in loading after becoming clogged.

  9. Shifts in the microbial community, nitrifiers and denitrifiers in the biofilm in a full-scale rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xingxing; Guo, Feng; Ju, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2014-07-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the microbial community shifts, especially nitrifiers and denitrifiers, in the biofilm of two rotating biological contactor (RBC) trains with different running times along the plug flowpath. The microbial consortia were profiled using multiple approaches, including 454 high-throughput sequencing of the V3-V4 region of 16S rRNA gene, clone libraries, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results demonstrated that (1) the overall microbial community at different locations had distinct patterns, that is, there were similar microbial communities at the beginnings of the two RBC trains and completely different populations at the ends of the two RBC trains; (2) nitrifiers, including ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB, Nitrosomonas) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB, Nitrospira), increased in relative abundance in the biofilm along the flowpath, whereas denitrifiers (Rhodanobacter, Paracoccus, Thauera, and Azoarcus) markedly decreased; (3) the AOA were subdominant to the AOB in all sampled sections; and (4) strong ecological associations were shown among different bacteria. Overall, the results of this study provided more comprehensive information regarding the biofilm community composition and assemblies in full-scale RBCs.

  10. Removal of trace organic contaminants by nitrifying activated sludge and whole-cell and crude enzyme extract of Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shufan; Hai, Faisal I; Nghiem, Long D; Roddick, Felicity; Price, William E

    2013-01-01

    The resistance of certain anthropogenic trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) to conventional wastewater treatment and their potential adverse effects on human and ecological health raise significant concerns and have prompted research on their bioremediation by white-rot fungi. This study compared the removal efficiencies of four widespread TrOCs: carbamazepine (CBZ), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), bisphenol A (BPA) and diclofenac (DCF), by nitrifying activated sludge as well as whole-cell and extracellular enzyme (laccase) extract of the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Fungal whole-cell culture removed only BPA and DCF but with high efficiencies (>90%) while the mixed nitrifying culture removed all compounds, although by levels of only 5-40%. Rapid initial sorption on fungal mycelium (44 ± 13% for DCF) was observed; however, biodegradation governed the overall removal. Performance comparison between fungal whole-cell and extracellular extract revealed that, unlike BPA, a catalytic pathway independent of extracellular laccase was responsible for DCF removal. Addition of mediator (1-hydroxybenzotriazole) to extracellular extract improved the removal of SMX which bears an electron donor group, but not that of the resistant compound CBZ. PMID:23508144

  11. Management of Microbial Communities through Transient Disturbances Enhances the Functional Resilience of Nitrifying Gas-Biofilters to Future Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Poly, Franck; Malhautier, Luc; Pommier, Thomas; Lerondelle, Catherine; Verstraete, Willy; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis; Le Roux, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities have a key role for the performance of engineered ecosystems such as waste gas biofilters. Maintaining constant performance despite fluctuating environmental conditions is of prime interest, but it is highly challenging because the mechanisms that drive the response of microbial communities to disturbances still have to be disentangled. Here we demonstrate that the bioprocess performance and stability can be improved and reinforced in the face of disturbances, through a rationally predefined strategy of microbial resource management (MRM). This strategy was experimentally validated in replicated pilot-scale nitrifying gas-biofilters, for the two steps of nitrification. The associated biological mechanisms were unraveled through analysis of functions, abundances and community compositions for the major actors of nitrification in these biofilters, that is, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and Nitrobacter-like nitrite-oxidizers (NOB). Our MRM strategy, based on the application of successive, transient perturbations of increasing intensity, enabled to steer the nitrifier community in a favorable way through the selection of more resistant AOB and NOB sharing functional gene sequences close to those of, respectively, Nitrosomonas eutropha and Nitrobacter hamburgensis that are well adapted to high N load. The induced community shifts resulted in significant enhancement of nitrification resilience capacity following the intense perturbation.

  12. Feasibility study of complete nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater by consequent nitrification-denitrification using immobilized nitrifiers in gel beads

    SciTech Connect

    Libman, V.; Eliosov, B.; Argaman, Y.

    2000-02-01

    A two-stage process for complete removal of nitrogen from domestic wastewater is proposed in this paper. The two stages of this process are an aerobic stage using nitrifying microorganisms immobilized in gel beads and a conventional anoxic stage. The possible application of gel-entrapped biomass for high-rate, complete nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater was verified through theoretical and experimental work. Two assumption s were confirmed in the present work: (a) substances present in domestic wastewater do not inhibit nitrification, and (b) heterotrophic biomass that builds up on the surface of nitrifying beads is not expected to affect ammonium oxidation or remove a significant part of the biochemical oxygen demand required for denitrification. The effect of the attached heterotrophic layer on system performance was evaluated through theoretical prediction and short-term experiments. Calculations indicated that complete nitrogen removal could be achieved if the heterotrophic layer on 2-mm gel beads is less than 12 {micro}m thick. The heterotrophic biofilm observed in the experiments did not homogeneously spread over the entire bead surface. It was found that attached growth of heterotrophs is affected by mixing intensity and type of carrier material.

  13. Management of Microbial Communities through Transient Disturbances Enhances the Functional Resilience of Nitrifying Gas-Biofilters to Future Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Poly, Franck; Malhautier, Luc; Pommier, Thomas; Lerondelle, Catherine; Verstraete, Willy; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis; Le Roux, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities have a key role for the performance of engineered ecosystems such as waste gas biofilters. Maintaining constant performance despite fluctuating environmental conditions is of prime interest, but it is highly challenging because the mechanisms that drive the response of microbial communities to disturbances still have to be disentangled. Here we demonstrate that the bioprocess performance and stability can be improved and reinforced in the face of disturbances, through a rationally predefined strategy of microbial resource management (MRM). This strategy was experimentally validated in replicated pilot-scale nitrifying gas-biofilters, for the two steps of nitrification. The associated biological mechanisms were unraveled through analysis of functions, abundances and community compositions for the major actors of nitrification in these biofilters, that is, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and Nitrobacter-like nitrite-oxidizers (NOB). Our MRM strategy, based on the application of successive, transient perturbations of increasing intensity, enabled to steer the nitrifier community in a favorable way through the selection of more resistant AOB and NOB sharing functional gene sequences close to those of, respectively, Nitrosomonas eutropha and Nitrobacter hamburgensis that are well adapted to high N load. The induced community shifts resulted in significant enhancement of nitrification resilience capacity following the intense perturbation. PMID:26651080

  14. Sequence determinants of protein aggregation: tools to increase protein solubility

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most widely used hosts for the production of recombinant proteins. However, very often the target protein accumulates into insoluble aggregates in a misfolded and biologically inactive form. Bacterial inclusion bodies are major bottlenecks in protein production and are hampering the development of top priority research areas such structural genomics. Inclusion body formation was formerly considered to occur via non-specific association of hydrophobic surfaces in folding intermediates. Increasing evidence, however, indicates that protein aggregation in bacteria resembles to the well-studied process of amyloid fibril formation. Both processes appear to rely on the formation of specific, sequence-dependent, intermolecular interactions driving the formation of structured protein aggregates. This similarity in the mechanisms of aggregation will probably allow applying anti-aggregational strategies already tested in the amyloid context to the less explored area of protein aggregation inside bacteria. Specifically, new sequence-based approaches appear as promising tools to tune protein aggregation in biotechnological processes. PMID:15847694

  15. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  16. Using Amplicon Sequencing To Characterize and Monitor Bacterial Diversity in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jennifer L. A.; Weyrich, Laura S.; Sawade, Emma; Drikas, Mary; Cooper, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water assessments use a variety of microbial, physical, and chemical indicators to evaluate water treatment efficiency and product water quality. However, these indicators do not allow the complex biological communities, which can adversely impact the performance of drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs), to be characterized. Entire bacterial communities can be studied quickly and inexpensively using targeted metagenomic amplicon sequencing. Here, amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene region was performed alongside traditional water quality measures to assess the health, quality, and efficiency of two distinct, full-scale DWDSs: (i) a linear DWDS supplied with unfiltered water subjected to basic disinfection before distribution and (ii) a complex, branching DWDS treated by a four-stage water treatment plant (WTP) prior to disinfection and distribution. In both DWDSs bacterial communities differed significantly after disinfection, demonstrating the effectiveness of both treatment regimes. However, bacterial repopulation occurred further along in the DWDSs, and some end-user samples were more similar to the source water than to the postdisinfection water. Three sample locations appeared to be nitrified, displaying elevated nitrate levels and decreased ammonia levels, and nitrifying bacterial species, such as Nitrospira, were detected. Burkholderiales were abundant in samples containing large amounts of monochloramine, indicating resistance to disinfection. Genera known to contain pathogenic and fecal-associated species were also identified in several locations. From this study, we conclude that metagenomic amplicon sequencing is an informative method to support current compliance-based methods and can be used to reveal bacterial community interactions with the chemical and physical properties of DWDSs. PMID:26162884

  17. Using Amplicon Sequencing To Characterize and Monitor Bacterial Diversity in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jennifer L A; Monis, Paul; Weyrich, Laura S; Sawade, Emma; Drikas, Mary; Cooper, Alan J

    2015-09-01

    Drinking water assessments use a variety of microbial, physical, and chemical indicators to evaluate water treatment efficiency and product water quality. However, these indicators do not allow the complex biological communities, which can adversely impact the performance of drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs), to be characterized. Entire bacterial communities can be studied quickly and inexpensively using targeted metagenomic amplicon sequencing. Here, amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene region was performed alongside traditional water quality measures to assess the health, quality, and efficiency of two distinct, full-scale DWDSs: (i) a linear DWDS supplied with unfiltered water subjected to basic disinfection before distribution and (ii) a complex, branching DWDS treated by a four-stage water treatment plant (WTP) prior to disinfection and distribution. In both DWDSs bacterial communities differed significantly after disinfection, demonstrating the effectiveness of both treatment regimes. However, bacterial repopulation occurred further along in the DWDSs, and some end-user samples were more similar to the source water than to the postdisinfection water. Three sample locations appeared to be nitrified, displaying elevated nitrate levels and decreased ammonia levels, and nitrifying bacterial species, such as Nitrospira, were detected. Burkholderiales were abundant in samples containing large amounts of monochloramine, indicating resistance to disinfection. Genera known to contain pathogenic and fecal-associated species were also identified in several locations. From this study, we conclude that metagenomic amplicon sequencing is an informative method to support current compliance-based methods and can be used to reveal bacterial community interactions with the chemical and physical properties of DWDSs.

  18. Cold temperature decreases bacterial species richness in nitrogen-removing bioreactors treating inorganic mine waters.

    PubMed

    Karkman, A; Mattila, K; Tamminen, M; Virta, M

    2011-12-01

    Explosives used in mining, such as ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), can cause eutrophication of the surrounding environment by leakage of ammonium and nitrate from undetonated material that is not properly treated. Cold temperatures in mines affect nitrogen removal from water when such nutrients are treated with bioreactors in situ. In this study we identified bacteria in the bioreactors and studied the effect of temperature on the bacterial community. The bioreactors consisted of sequential nitrification and denitrification units running at either 5 or 10°C. One nitrification bioreactor running at 5°C was fed with salt spiked water. From the nitrification bioreactors, sequences from both ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were identified, but the species were distinct at different temperatures. The main nitrifiers in the lower temperature were closely related to the genera Nitrosospira and Candidatus Nitrotoga. 16S rRNA gene sequences closely related to halotolerant Nitrosomonas eutropha were found only from the salt spiked nitrification bioreactor. At 10°C the genera Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the abundant nitrifiers. The results showed that bacterial species richness estimates were low, <150 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), in all bioreactor clone libraries, when sequences were assigned to operational taxonomic units at an evolutionary distance of 0.03. The only exception was the nitrification bioreactor running at 10°C where species richness was higher, >300 OTUs. Species richness was lower in bioreactors running at 5°C compared to those operating at 10°C.

  19. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  20. AGGRESCAN: a server for the prediction and evaluation of "hot spots" of aggregation in polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Conchillo-Solé, Oscar; de Groot, Natalia S; Avilés, Francesc X; Vendrell, Josep; Daura, Xavier; Ventura, Salvador

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein aggregation correlates with the development of several debilitating human disorders of growing incidence, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. On the biotechnological side, protein production is often hampered by the accumulation of recombinant proteins into aggregates. Thus, the development of methods to anticipate the aggregation properties of polypeptides is receiving increasing attention. AGGRESCAN is a web-based software for the prediction of aggregation-prone segments in protein sequences, the analysis of the effect of mutations on protein aggregation propensities and the comparison of the aggregation properties of different proteins or protein sets. Results AGGRESCAN is based on an aggregation-propensity scale for natural amino acids derived from in vivo experiments and on the assumption that short and specific sequence stretches modulate protein aggregation. The algorithm is shown to identify a series of protein fragments involved in the aggregation of disease-related proteins and to predict the effect of genetic mutations on their deposition propensities. It also provides new insights into the differential aggregation properties displayed by globular proteins, natively unfolded polypeptides, amyloidogenic proteins and proteins found in bacterial inclusion bodies. Conclusion By identifying aggregation-prone segments in proteins, AGGRESCAN shall facilitate (i) the identification of possible therapeutic targets for anti-depositional strategies in conformational diseases and (ii) the anticipation of aggregation phenomena during storage or recombinant production of bioactive polypeptides or polypeptide sets. PMID:17324296

  1. Characterizing the Effect of Microhabitat on Bacterial Diversity in Sediments Along Topographic Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspar, L.; Bushaw-Newton, K.

    2005-05-01

    Ongoing riparian restoration including the conversion of agricultural fields back to forested areas is being conducted within the Monocacy Wildlife Management area providing the opportunity to analyze bacterial microhabitat characteristics of sediments under varying degrees of disturbance. The objective of this study is to develop greater understanding of the role of physical and chemical microhabitat differences on bacterial presence within sediments in different habitat types (i.e., upland, riparian, and in-stream) and under different degrees of disturbance. Physical and chemical microhabitat components determined were temperature, percent sediment organic matter, percent sediment moisture, concentrations of ammonia, pH, and total sediment carbon and nitrogen. Total bacterial populations of sediment were measured using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Polymerase chain reactions have been performed selecting for universal bacterial genes and specific nitrogen fixing, nitrifying, and denitrification genes. Bacterial diversity measurements using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis are ongoing. Remaining chemical and physical components of microhabitat have been completed and are being analyzed. Results indicate moisture inhibits bacterial abundance while nutrient presence in sediment is associated with larger bacterial biomass. These parameters of microhabitat do not have differing effects along elevations.

  2. Stimulative effect of the fungal biocontrol agent Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. Striga on abundance of nitrifying prokaryotes in a maize rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musyoki, Mary; Enowashu, Esther; Zimmermann, Judith; Muema, Esther; Wainright, Henry; Vanlauwe, Bernard; Cadisch, Georg; Rasche, Frank

    2014-05-01

    The integration of resistant crop varieties and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. strigae (Foxy-2) strains as biological control agent (BCA) has shown to be an effective control of the weed Striga hermonthica which is parasitic to several cereals (e.g., maize) cultivated in Sub-Saharan Africa. Most studies have examined the efficacy of the BCA and its interactions with host crops, while overlooking the interplay among key microorganisms in the soil nitrogen (N) cycle. Hence, we postulated that both Foxy-2 and Striga pose threats to the indigenous plant root-associated microbial communities involved in N cycling through direct or indirect competition for nutrients and that the application of high quality organic residues would compensate these effects. The primary objective of this study was thus to assess the potential impact of Foxy-2 on indigenous nitrifying prokaryotes in maize rhizosphere cultivated on two distinct soils (sandy Ferric Alisol versus clayey Humic Nitisol) obtained from Machanga and Embu, respectively, in central Kenya. These soils were treated with or without Foxy-2 and Striga; and in combination with high quality (i.e. CN ratio; 13, lignins, 8.9 % and polyphenols, 1.7 %) organic residues (i.e., Tithonia diversifolia) as N source. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we followed at three pre-defined sampling dates (14, 28 and 42 days after planting) the responses of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB), total bacteria and archaea in four treatments of a rhizobox experiment: (i) Foxy-2 plus Striga (F+S), (ii) Striga only (C+S), (iii) Foxy-2 plus Striga plus Tithonia diversifolia residues (F+S+T), and (iv) a non-treated control (C). Overall, the treatment effects on soil microbial populations were, in comparison to the clayey Embu soil, more pronounced in the sandy Machanga soil. Contrary to our expectations, we observed a distinct stimulative, but no resource competition effect of Foxy-2 on the abundance of AOA, as well as

  3. Dynamics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Fire ant aggregations are an inherently active system. Each ant harvests its own energy and can convert it into motion. The motion of individual ants contributes non-trivially to the bulk material properties of the aggregation. We have measured some of these properties using plate-plate rheology, where the response to an applied external force or deformation is measured. In this talk, we will present data pertaining to the aggregation behavior in the absence of any external force. We quantify the aggregation dynamics by monitoring the rotation of the top plate and by measuring the normal force. We then compare the results with visualizations of 2D aggregations.

  4. A robust nitrifying community in a bioreactor at 50 °C opens up the path for thermophilic nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Courtens, Emilie Np; Spieck, Eva; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Bodé, Samuel; Boeckx, Pascal; Schouten, Stefan; Jauregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico

    2016-09-01

    The increasing production of nitrogen-containing fertilizers is crucial to meet the global food demand, yet high losses of reactive nitrogen associated with the food production/consumption chain progressively deteriorate the natural environment. Currently, mesophilic nitrogen-removing microbes eliminate nitrogen from wastewaters. Although thermophilic nitrifiers have been separately enriched from natural environments, no bioreactors are described that couple these processes for the treatment of nitrogen in hot wastewaters. Samples from composting facilities were used as inoculum for the batch-wise enrichment of thermophilic nitrifiers (350 days). Subsequently, the enrichments were transferred to a bioreactor to obtain a stable, high-rate nitrifying process (560 days). The community contained up to 17% ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOAs) closely related to 'Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis', and 25% nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOBs) related to Nitrospira calida. Incorporation of (13)C-derived bicarbonate into the respective characteristic membrane lipids during nitrification supported their activity as autotrophs. Specific activities up to 198±10 and 894±81 mg N g(-1) VSS per day for AOAs and NOBs were measured, where NOBs were 33% more sensitive to free ammonia. The NOBs were extremely sensitive to free nitrous acid, whereas the AOAs could only be inhibited by high nitrite concentrations, independent of the free nitrous acid concentration. The observed difference in product/substrate inhibition could facilitate the development of NOB inhibition strategies to achieve more cost-effective processes such as deammonification. This study describes the enrichment of autotrophic thermophilic nitrifiers from a nutrient-rich environment and the successful operation of a thermophilic nitrifying bioreactor for the first time, facilitating opportunities for thermophilic nitrogen removal biotechnology. PMID:26894446

  5. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers. [Pseudomonas fluorescens; Serratia marcescens; Alcaligenes faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.C.; Levine, J.S.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigated the effect of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO/sub 2/) on the production of NO and N/sub 2/O by a wide variety of common soil nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The production of NO per cell was highest by autotrophic nitrifiers and was independent of pO/sub 2/ in the range tested (0.5 to 10%), whereas N/sub 2/O production was inversely proportional to pO/sub 2/. Nitrous oxide production was highest in the denitrifier Pseudomonas fluorescens, but only under anaerobic conditions. The molar ratio of NO/N/sub 2/O produced was usually greater than unity for nitrifiers and much less than unity for denitrifiers. Chemodenitrification was the major source of both the NO and N/sub 2/O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of NO and N/sub 2/O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of No and N/sub 2/O in nitrifier cultures but only when high concentrations of nitrite had accumulated or were added to the medium. Although most of the denitrifiers produced NO and N/sub 2/O only under anaerobic conditions, chemostat cultures of Alcaligenes faecalis continued to emit these gases even when the cultures were sprayed with air. Based upon these results, we predict that aerobic soils are primary sources of NO and that N/sub 2/O is produced only when there is sufficient soil moisture to provide the anaerobic microsites necessary for denitrification by either denitrifiers or nitrifiers.

  6. Kinetics of protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation into linear nanostructures, notably amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, is a common form of behaviour exhibited by a range of peptides and proteins. This process was initially discovered in the context of the aetiology of a range of neurodegenerative diseases, but has recently been recognised to of general significance and has been found at the origin of a number of beneficial functional roles in nature, including as catalytic scaffolds and functional components in biofilms. This talk discusses our ongoing efforts to study the kinetics of linear protein self-assembly by using master equation approaches combined with global analysis of experimental data.

  7. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  8. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  9. A shift in the archaeal nitrifier community in response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Newell, Silvia E; Eveillard, Damien; McCarthy, Mark J; Gardner, Wayne S; Liu, Zhanfei; Ward, Bess B

    2014-02-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is affected by hurricanes and suffers seasonal hypoxia. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted every trophic level in the coastal region. Despite their importance in bioremediation and biogeochemical cycles, it is difficult to predict the responses of microbial communities to physical and anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we quantify sediment ammonia-oxidizing archaeal (AOA) community diversity, resistance and resilience, and important geochemical factors after major hurricanes and the oil spill. Dominant AOA archetypes correlated with different geochemical factors, suggesting that different AOA are constrained by distinct parameters. Diversity was lowest after the hurricanes, showing weak resistance to physical disturbances. However, diversity was highest during the oil spill and coincided with a community shift, suggesting a new alternative stable state sustained for at least 1 year. The new AOA community was not significantly different from that at the spill site 1 year after the spill. This sustained shift in nitrifier community structure may be a result of oil exposure.

  10. A shift in the archaeal nitrifier community in response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Newell, Silvia E; Eveillard, Damien; McCarthy, Mark J; Gardner, Wayne S; Liu, Zhanfei; Ward, Bess B

    2014-02-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is affected by hurricanes and suffers seasonal hypoxia. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted every trophic level in the coastal region. Despite their importance in bioremediation and biogeochemical cycles, it is difficult to predict the responses of microbial communities to physical and anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we quantify sediment ammonia-oxidizing archaeal (AOA) community diversity, resistance and resilience, and important geochemical factors after major hurricanes and the oil spill. Dominant AOA archetypes correlated with different geochemical factors, suggesting that different AOA are constrained by distinct parameters. Diversity was lowest after the hurricanes, showing weak resistance to physical disturbances. However, diversity was highest during the oil spill and coincided with a community shift, suggesting a new alternative stable state sustained for at least 1 year. The new AOA community was not significantly different from that at the spill site 1 year after the spill. This sustained shift in nitrifier community structure may be a result of oil exposure. PMID:24596268

  11. Reducing N2O Emission from a Domestic-Strength Nitrifying Culture by Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew Elohim; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-07-19

    An increase of nitrite in the domestic-strength range is generally recognized to stimulate nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). It was found in this study, however, that N2O emission from a mainstream nitritation system (cyclic nitrite = 25-45 mg of N/L) that was established by free nitrous acid (FNA)-based sludge treatment was not higher but much lower than that from the initial nitrifying system with full conversion of NH4(+)-N to NO3(-)-N. Under dissolved oxygen (DO) levels of 2.5-3.0 mg/L, N2O emission from the nitritation stage was 76% lower than that from the initial stage. Even when the DO level was reduced to 0.3-0.8 mg/L, N2O emission from the nitritation stage was still 40% lower. An investigation of the mechanism showed that FNA treatment caused a shift of the stimulation threshold of nitrite on N2O emission. At the nitritation stage, the maximal N2O emission factor occurred at ∼16 mg of N/(L of nitrite). However, it increased with increasing nitrite in the range of 0-56 mg of N/L at the initial stage. FNA treatment decreased the biomass-specific N2O production rate, suggesting that the enzymes relevant to nitrifier denitrification were inhibited. Microbial analysis revealed that FNA treatment decreased the microbial community diversity but increased the abundances of AOB and denitrifiers. PMID:27294698

  12. Comparative study of microbial community structure in integrated vertical-flow constructed wetlands for treatment of domestic and nitrified wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Jun; Wu, Su-Qing; Liang, Kang; Wu, Zhenbin; Liang, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial processes play a vital important role in the removal of contaminants in constructed wetland (CW). However, the microbial physiology and community structure can be influenced by environmental conditions. In this study, four pilot-scale integrated vertical-flow constructed wetlands (IVCWs) were employed to treat domestic and nitrified wastewaters. The microbial properties, along with their response to wastewater quality characteristics and seasonal variation, were determined. The results showed higher Shannon-Weiner diversity (H) and evenness (E) index of fatty acids (FAs), and relative abundances of signature FAs in down-flow cells and in the systems fed with domestic wastewater (DW). The relative abundances of fungi and gram-negative and aerobic bacteria were greater in up-flow cells. The dominant anaerobic bacteria found in most cells might be accounted for the prevailing anaerobic environment within the wetland beds, which could mean that the system fed with nitrified wastewater (NW) should perform better in nitrogen removal. The redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that pollutant concentrations, especially organic matter, influence the FA compositions greatly, and the most significant difference of microbial community structures was detected in down-flow cells fed with DW and up-flow ones with NW. The branched FAs, which could be used to represent anaerobic bacteria, were observed in down-flow cells treating DW and had a significant positive correlation with chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration, probably suggesting the important role of anaerobic bacteria in organic matter degradation in the IVCWs. Seasonal variation, however, did not greatly influence the microbial community structure in the IVCWs.

  13. Bacterial oxidation of dibromomethane and methyl bromide in natural waters and enrichment cultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; Schaefer, J.K.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial oxidation of 14CH2Br2 and 14CH3Br was measured in freshwater, estuarine, seawater, and hypersaline-alkaline samples. In general, bacteria from the various sites oxidized similar amounts of 14CH2Br2 and comparatively less 14CH3Br. Bacterial oxidation of 14CH3Br was rapid in freshwater samples compared to bacterial oxidation of 14CH3Br in more saline waters. Freshwater was also the only site in which methyl fluoride-sensitive bacteria (e.g., methanotrophs or nitrifiers) governed brominated methane oxidation. Half-life calculations indicated that bacterial oxidation of CH2Br2 was potentially significant in all of the waters tested. In contrast, only in freshwater was bacterial oxidation of CH3Br as fast as chemical removal. The values calculated for more saline sites suggested that bacterial oxidation of CH3Br was relatively slow compared to chemical and physical loss mechanisms. However, enrichment cultures demonstrated that bacteria in seawater can rapidly oxidize brominated methanes. Two distinct cultures of nonmethanotrophic methylotrophs were recovered; one of these cultures was able to utilize CH2Br2 as a sole carbon source, and the other was able to utilize CH3Br as a sole carbon source.

  14. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  15. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    2001-07-01

    The septic arthritis literature of 2000 revisited several topics previously examined in some detail. These include septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatic manifestations of bacterial endocarditis, and infectious complications of prosthetic joints. The trend in antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent late infections in total joint replacement is to narrow the targeted hosts to those most at risk, to define the procedures associated with the greatest risk of bacteremia, and to simplify the antibiotic regimen. The diagnoses of septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joint and septic arthritis caused by direct inoculation of bacteria by a foreign object penetrating the joint are facilitated by noninvasive imaging technologies. Septic arthritis caused by uncommon microorganisms and septic arthritis in immunocompromised hosts are other noteworthy topics in this year's literature. PMID:11555734

  16. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  17. The structure of microbial community in aggregates of a typical chernozem aggregates under contrasting variants of its agricultural use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. A.; Kutovaya, O. V.; Tkhakakhova, A. K.; Chernov, T. I.; Pershina, E. V.; Markina, L. G.; Andronov, E. E.; Kogut, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The taxonomic structure of microbiomes in aggregates of different sizes from typical chernozems was investigated using sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The aggregate fractions of <0.25, 2-5, and >7 mm obtained by sieving of the soil samples at natural moisture were used for analysis. The highest prokaryote biomass (bacteria, archaea) was determined in the fractions <0.25 and aggregates 2-5 mm; the bacterial and archaeal biomass decreased in the following series: fallow > permanent black fallow > permanent winter wheat. The greatest number of fungi was recorded in the fraction <0.25 mm from the soils of the permanent black fallow and in all the studied aggregate fractions in the variant with permanent wheat. The system of agricultural use affected more significantly the structure of the prokaryote community in the chernozem than the size of aggregate fractions did. The most diverse microbial community was recorded in the soil samples of the fallow; the statistically significant maximums of the Shannon diversity indices and indices of phylogenetic diversity (PD) were recorded in the fractions <0.25 and 2-5 mm from the fallow soil. On the whole, the fine soil fractions (<0.25 mm) were characterized by higher diversity indices in comparison with those of the coarser aggregate fractions.

  18. DNA binding and aggregation by carbon nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    An, Hongjie; Liu, Qingdai; Ji, Qiaoli; Jin, Bo

    2010-03-19

    Significant environmental and health risks due to the increasing applications of engineered nanoparticles in medical and industrial activities have been concerned by many communities. The interactions between nanomaterials and genomes have been poorly studied so far. This study examined interactions of DNA with carbon nanoparticles (CNP) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We experimentally assessed how CNP affect DNA molecule and bacterial growth of Escherichia coli. We found that CNP were bound to the DNA molecules during the DNA replication in vivo. The results revealed that the interaction of DNA with CNP resulted in DNA molecule binding and aggregation both in vivo and in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, and consequently inhabiting the E. coli growth. While this was a preliminary study, our results showed that this nanoparticle may have a significant impact on genomic activities.

  19. FbsA-Driven Fibrinogen Polymerization: A Bacterial ``Deceiving Strategy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierno, Matteo; Maravigna, Laura; Piazza, Roberto; Visai, Livia; Speziale, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    We show that FbsA, a cell wall protein of the bacterium Streptococcus agalactiae, promotes large-scale aggregation of human plasma fibrinogen, leading to the formation of a semiflexible polymerlike network. This extensive aggregation process takes place not only in solution, but also on FbsA-functionalized colloidal particles, and leads to the formation of a thick layer on the bacterial cell wall itself, which becomes an efficient mask against phagocytosis.

  20. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  1. Peptide aggregation in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Regina M

    2002-01-01

    In the not-so-distant past, insoluble aggregated protein was considered as uninteresting and bothersome as yesterday's trash. More recently, protein aggregates have enjoyed considerable scientific interest, as it has become clear that these aggregates play key roles in many diseases. In this review, we focus attention on three polypeptides: beta-amyloid, prion, and huntingtin, which are linked to three feared neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer's, "mad cow," and Huntington's disease, respectively. These proteins lack any significant primary sequence homology, yet their aggregates possess very similar features, specifically, high beta-sheet content, fibrillar morphology, relative insolubility, and protease resistance. Because the aggregates are noncrystalline, secrets of their structure at nanometer resolution are only slowly yielding to X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR, and other techniques. Besides structure, the aggregates may possess similar pathways of assembly. Two alternative assembly pathways have been proposed: the nucleation-elongation and the template-assisted mode. These two modes may be complementary, not mutually exclusive. Strategies for interfering with aggregation, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches, are under development. The structural similarities between protein aggregates of dissimilar origin suggest that therapeutic strategies successful against one disease may have broad utility in others. PMID:12117755

  2. Topics in Probabilistic Judgment Aggregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanchun

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a compilation of several studies that are united by their relevance to probabilistic judgment aggregation. In the face of complex and uncertain events, panels of judges are frequently consulted to provide probabilistic forecasts, and aggregation of such estimates in groups often yield better results than could have been made…

  3. Mineral of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Natural aggregates, consisting of crushed stone, and sand and gravel, are a major contributor to economic health, and have an amazing variety of uses. Aggregates are among the most abundant mineral resources and are major basic raw materials used by construction, agriculture and other industries that employ complex chemical and metallurgical processes.

  4. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  5. Nanoparticle aggregation: principles and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The high surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles usually results in highly reactive and colloidal instability compared to their bulk counterparts. Aggregation as well as many other transformations (e.g., dissolution) in the environment may alter the physiochemical properties, reactivity, fate, transport, and biological interactions (e.g., bioavailability and uptake) of nanoparticles. The unique properties pertinent to nanoparticles, such as shape, size, surface characteristics, composition, and electronic structures, greatly challenge the ability of colloid science to understand nanoparticle aggregation and its environmental impacts. This review briefly introduces fundamentals about aggregation, fractal dimensions, classic and extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeak (DLVO) theories, aggregation kinetic modeling, experimental measurements, followed by detailed discussions on the major factors on aggregation and subsequent effects on nanomaterial transport and reactivity.

  6. Immunogenicity of Therapeutic Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Ehab M; Panchal, Jainik P; Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Blum, Janice S; Joubert, Marisa K; Narhi, Linda O; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic proteins have a propensity for aggregation during manufacturing, shipping, and storage. The presence of aggregates in protein drug products can induce adverse immune responses in patients that may affect safety and efficacy, and so it is of concern to both manufacturers and regulatory agencies. In this vein, there is a lack of understanding of the physicochemical determinants of immunological responses and a lack of standardized analytical methods to survey the molecular properties of aggregates associated with immune activation. In this review, we provide an overview of the basic immune mechanisms in the context of interactions with protein aggregates. We then critically examine the literature with emphasis on the underlying immune mechanisms as they relate to aggregate properties. Finally, we highlight the gaps in our current understanding of this issue and offer recommendations for future research. PMID:26869409

  7. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks.

  8. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations.

    PubMed

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks. PMID:26501413

  9. Adsorption-induced colloidal aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. M.; Petit, J.-M.; Beysens, D.

    1998-03-01

    Reversible colloidal aggregation in binary liquid mixtures has been studied for a number of years. As the phase separation temperature of the liquid mixture is approached the thickness of an adsorption layer around the colloidal particles increases. Beysens and coworkers have demonstrated experimentally that this adsorption layer is intimately connected with the aggregation of the colloidal particles, however, no definitive theory has been available which can explain all of the experimental observations. In this contribution we describe an extension of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theory of colloidal aggregation which takes into account the presence of the adsorption layer and which more realistically models the attractive dispersion interactions. This modified theory can quantitatively account for many of the observed experimental features such as the characteristics of the aggregated state, the general shape of the aggregation line, and the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient for a lutidine-water mixture containing a small volume fraction of silica colloidal particles.

  10. Effect of carbon source on acclimatization of nitrifying bacteria to achieve high-rate partial nitrification of wastewater with high ammonium concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Seyyed Alireza; Ibrahim, Shaliza; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine

    2014-08-01

    Experiments in two laboratory-scale sequential batch reactors were carried out to investigate the effect of heterotrophic bacteria on nitrifying bacteria using external carbon sources. Partial nitrification of ammonium-rich wastewater during short-term acclimatization enriched the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in both reactors. Heterotrophic bacteria exhibited a minor effect on nitrifying bacteria, and complete removal of ammonium occurred at a rate of 41 mg L-1 h-1 in both reactors. The main strategy of this research was to carry out partial nitrification using high-activity ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with a high concentration of free ammonia (70 mg L-1). The NO2 -/(NO3 - + NO2 -) ratio was greater than 0.9 in both reactors most of the time.

  11. Assessing carbon and nitrogen removal in a novel anoxic-aerobic cyanobacterial-bacterial photobioreactor configuration with enhanced biomass sedimentation.

    PubMed

    de Godos, I; Vargas, V A; Guzmán, H O; Soto, R; García, B; García, P A; Muñoz, R

    2014-09-15

    The carbon and nitrogen removal potential of an innovative anoxic-aerobic photobioreactor configuration operated with both internal and external recyclings was evaluated under different cyanobacterial-bacterial sludge residence times (9-31 days) during the treatment of wastewaters with low C/N ratios. Under optimal operating conditions, the two-stage photobioreactor was capable of providing organic carbon and nitrogen removals over 95% and 90%, respectively. The continuous biomass recycling from the settler resulted in the enrichment and predominance of rapidly-settling cyanobacterial-bacterial flocs and effluent suspended solid concentrations lower than 35 mg VSS L(-1). These flocs exhibited sedimentation rates of 0.28-0.42 m h(-1) but sludge volumetric indexes of 333-430 ml/g. The decoupling between the hydraulic retention time and sludge retention time mediated by the external recycling also avoided the washout of nitrifying bacteria and supported process operation at biomass concentrations of 1000-1500 mg VSS L(-1). The addition of additional NaHCO3 to the process overcame the CO2 limitation resulting from the intense competition for inorganic carbon between cyanobacteria and nitrifying bacteria in the photobioreactor, which supported the successful implementation of a nitrification-denitrification process. Unexpectedly, this nitrification-denitrification process occurred both simultaneously in the photobioreactor alone (as a result of the negligible dissolved oxygen concentrations) and sequentially in the two-stage anoxic-aerobic configuration with internal NO3(-)/NO2(-) recycling. PMID:24880959

  12. Bacterial concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Venkataswamy; Ramesh, K. P.; Bang, S. S.

    2001-04-01

    Cracks in concrete are inevitable and are one of the inherent weaknesses of concrete. Water and other salts seep through these cracks, corrosion initiates, and thus reduces the life of concrete. So there was a need to develop an inherent biomaterial, a self-repairing material which can remediate the cracks and fissures in concrete. Bacterial concrete is a material, which can successfully remediate cracks in concrete. This technique is highly desirable because the mineral precipitation induced as a result of microbial activities is pollution free and natural. As the cell wall of bacteria is anionic, metal accumulation (calcite) on the surface of the wall is substantial, thus the entire cell becomes crystalline and they eventually plug the pores and cracks in concrete. This paper discusses the plugging of artificially cracked cement mortar using Bacillus Pasteurii and Sporosarcina bacteria combined with sand as a filling material in artificially made cuts in cement mortar which was cured in urea and CaCl2 medium. The effect on the compressive strength and stiffness of the cement mortar cubes due to the mixing of bacteria is also discussed in this paper. It was found that use of bacteria improves the stiffness and compressive strength of concrete. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to document the role of bacteria in microbiologically induced mineral precipitation. Rod like impressions were found on the face of calcite crystals indicating the presence of bacteria in those places. Energy- dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectra of the microbial precipitation on the surface of the crack indicated the abundance of calcium and the precipitation was inferred to be calcite (CaCO3).

  13. Molecular phylogeny of heterotrophic nitrifiers and aerobic denitrifiers and their potential role in ammonium removal.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Meenakshi; Kaushik, Manish Singh; Singh, Anumeha; Singh, Deepti; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the physiology and taxonomic composition of the key players of nitrification and denitrification processes in paddy fields, culture dependent and independent studies have been carried out. A total of 28 bacterial strains have been screened in which six were capable of reducing nitrate and nitrite as well as having significant ammonium removal potential. 16S rRNA-PCR-DGGE-based molecular typing of enriched batch culture was done with time duration to explore and identify dominant and stable soil denitrifiers. Notably, three isolates namely PDN3, PDN19, PDN14 were found to be efficiently involved in the removal of 70.32, 71.46, and 81.50% of NH4 (+) and showed closest similarity (>98%) with Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, respectively. The bacterial strain PDN14 showed maximum growth with highest ammonium removal rate (2.78 gN/(m(3) ·h) has also been characterized based on nosZ gene which showed similarity to uncultured γ- Proteobacteria, P. aeruginosa sp. B3. Median joining (MJ) network and rRNA secondary structure have been analyzed for their detailed taxonomic diversity and derived haplotype-based co-occurrence. Results demonstrated that such strains can serve as good candidate for in situ nitrogen transformation in paddy soils and improvingly characterized by physiological and detailed phylogenetic approaches. PMID:27037833

  14. Effects of Suilysin on Streptococcus suis-Induced Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengwei; Wang, Junping; Chen, Shaolong; Yin, Jiye; Pan, Zhiyuan; Liu, Keke; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yuling; Yuan, Yuan; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Blood platelets play important roles during pathological thrombocytopenia in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). Streptococcus suis (S. suis) an emerging human pathogen, can cause STSS similarly to S. pyogenes. However, S. suis interactions with platelets are poorly understood. Here, we found that suilysin (SLY), different from other bacterial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), was the sole stimulus that induced platelet aggregation. Furthermore, the inside-out activation of GPIIb/IIIa of platelets mediated SLY-induced platelet aggregation. This process was triggered by Ca2+ influx that depend on the pore forming on platelets by SLY. Additionally, although SLY induced α-granule release occurred via the MLCK-dependent pathway, PLC-β-IP3/DAG-MLCK and Rho-ROCK-MLCK signaling were not involved in SLY-induced platelet aggregation. Interestingly, the pore dependent Ca2+ influx was also found to participate in the induction of platelet aggregation with pneumolysin (PLY) and streptolysin O (SLO), two other CDCs. It is possible that the CDC-mediated platelet aggregation we observed in S. suis is a similar response mechanism to that used by a wide range of bacteria. These findings might lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for S. suis-associated STSS. PMID:27800304

  15. Rates of microbial sulfate reduction control the sizes of biogenic iron sulfide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.

    2005-12-01

    Sulfide minerals occur widely in freshwater and marine sediments as byproducts of microbial sulfate reduction and as end products of heavy metal bioremediation. They form when metals in the environments combine with sulfide produced from the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria. We used chemostat bioreactors to study sizes and crystal structures of iron sulfide (FeS) minerals produced by Desulfovibrio vulgaris, D. desulfuricans strain G20, and subspecies desulfuricans. FeS nanoparticles and their aggregates are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). FeS nanoparticles produced by sulfate reducing bacteria are extremely small, usually less than around 10 nm in diameter. Nanoparticles do not occur as individual nanoparticles, but as aggregates. The sizes of FeS aggregates are affected by sulfate reduction rates, Fe(II) concentration, pH, ionic strength, organic matter concentration, bacterial species, etc. Aggregate size ranges from about 500 nm at very large sulfate reduction rates to about 1,500 nm at very small rates. Variations in Fe(II) concentration also lead to a difference up to 500 nm in FeS aggregate size. Different bacterial species produce nanoparticle aggregates of different sizes under similar growth conditions. For example, D. vulgaris produces FeS aggregates with sizes 500 nm smaller than those by strain G20. The inverse relationship between FeS aggregate sizes and sulfate reduction rates is important in evaluating metal bioremediation strategies. Previous approaches have focused on stimulating microbial activities in natural environments. However, our experimental results suggest that increasing metabolic rates may decrease the aggregate size, increasing the mobility of colloidal aggregates. Therefore, the balance between microbial activities and sizes of biogenic aggregates may be an important consideration in the design and

  16. Crude oil-degradation and plasmid profile of nitrifying bacteria isolated from oil-impacted mangrove sediment in the Niger Delta of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    John, R C; Okpokwasili, G C

    2012-06-01

    The crude oil degradability and plasmid profile of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria, Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter species, isolated from mangrove sediment in the Niger Delta of Nigeria were studied. The effects of temperature, pH and optical density on the utilization of different carbon sources by the bacteria were also investigated. Results showed that nitrifying bacteria could utilize kerosene, diesel oil, jet fuel and engine oil as carbon sources. None utilized hexane and xylene but moderate growth was observed in benzene, phenol and toluene. However, their ability to utilized crude oil varied both in rates of utilization and in growth profiles. Mixed culture of the isolates degrades 52 % of crude oil introduced into the medium followed by Nitrosomonas sp. with 40 % degradation. The least was Nitrobacter sp. with 20 % degradation. The ability of the autotrophs to degrade crude oil was found to be plasmid-mediated through curing experiment and electrophoresis. The size of the plasmid involved was estimated to be 23 kb. The high crude oil utilization of the mixed culture implies that nitrifying bacteria isolated from contaminated ecosystem are excellent crude oil degraders and can be harnessed for bioremediation purposes. PMID:22460804

  17. Influence of wastewater composition on nutrient removal behaviors in the new anaerobic–anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization process

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Lu, Xiwu; Yu, Ran; Gu, Qian; Zhou, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the new anaerobic–anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization (A2N–IC) system was compared with anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying (A2N) process to investigate nutrient removal performance under different influent COD and ammonia concentrations. Ammonia and COD removal rates were very stable in both processes, which were maintained at 84.9% and 86.6% when the influent ammonia varied from 30 mg L−1 to 45 mg L−1 and COD ranged from 250 mg L−1 to 300 mg L−1. The effluent phosphorus always maintained below 0.2 mg L−1 in A2N–IC, whereas in A2N the effluent phosphorus concentration was 0.4–1.7 mg L−1, demonstrating that A2N–IC is suitable to apply in a broader influent COD and ammonia concentration range. Under higher influent COD (300 mg L−1) or lower ammonia conditions (30 mg L−1), the main function of chemical induced crystallization was to coordinate better nutrient ratio for anoxic phosphorus uptake, whereas under high phosphorus concentration, it was to reduce phosphorus loading for biological system. Under the similar influent wastewater compositions, phosphorus release amounts were always lower in A2N–IC. To clarify the decrease procedure of phosphorus release in the A2N–IC, the equilibrium between chemical phosphorus removal and biological phosphorus removal in A2N–IC was analyzed by mass balance equations. During the long-term experiment, some undesirable phenomena were observed: the declining nitrification in post-aerobic tank and calcium phosphorus precipitation in the anaerobic tank. The reasons were analyzed; furthermore, the corresponding improvements were proposed. Nitrification effect could be enhanced in the post-aerobic tank, therefore ammonia removal rate could be increased; and biologically induced phosphorus precipitation could be inhibited by controlling pH at the anaerobic stage, so the phosphorus release and recovery could be improved. PMID:24596502

  18. Fractal aggregates in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Chassefiere, E.; Israel, G.

    1993-04-01

    The cluster structure of Titan's atmosphere was modeled by using an Eulerian microphysical model with the specific formulation of microphysical laws applying to fractal particles. The growth of aggregates in the settling phase was treated by introducing the fractal dimension as a parameter of the model. The model was used to obtain a vertical distribution of size and number density of the aggregates for different production altitudes. Results confirm previous estimates of the formation altitude of photochemical aerosols. The vertical profile of the effective radius of aggregates was calculated as a function of the visible optical depth.

  19. Particle Aggregation During Fe(III) Bioreduction in Nontronite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisi, D. P.; Dong, H.; Hi, Z.; Kim, J.

    2005-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the rate and mechanism of particle aggregation during bacterial Fe (III) reduction in different size fractions of nontronite and to investigate the role of different factors contributing to particle aggregation. To achieve this goal, microbial Fe(III) reduction experiments were performed with lactate as an electron donor, Fe(III) in nontronite as an electron acceptor, and AQDS as an electron shuttle in bicarbonate buffer using Shewanella putrefaceins CN32. These experiments were performed with and without Na- pyrophosphate as a dispersant in four size fractions of nontronite (0.12-0.22, 0.41-0.69, 0.73-0.96 and 1.42-1.8 mm). The rate of nontronite aggregation during the Fe(III) bioreduction was measured by analyzing particle size distribution using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and SEM images analysis. Similarly, the changes in particle morphology during particle aggregation were determined by analyses of SEM images. Changes in particle surface charge were measured with electrophoretic mobility analyzer. The protein and carbohydrate fraction of EPS produced by cells during Fe(III) bioreduction was measured using Bradford and phenol-sulfuric acid extraction method, respectively. In the presence of the dispersant, the extent of Fe(III) bioreduction was 11.5-12.2% within the first 56 hours of the experiment. There was no measurable particle aggregation in control experiments. The PCS measurements showed that the increase in the effective diameter (95% percentile) was by a factor of 3.1 and 1.9 for particle size of 0.12-0.22 mm and 1.42-1.80 mm, respectively. The SEM image analyses also gave the similar magnitude of increase in particle size. In the absence of the dispersant, the extent of Fe(III) bioreduction was 13.4-14.5% in 56 hours of the experiment. The rate of aggregation was higher than that in the presence of the dispersant. The increase in the effective diameter (95% percentile) was by a factor of 13.6 and 4.1 for

  20. Lake acidification and oxygen depletion may synergistically enhance nitrous oxide (N2O) production by nitrifier denitrification in a subalpine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, C. H.; Goepfert, T. J.; Rollog, M.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms are an important source of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). They produce N2O through two mechanisms: by the decomposition of an intermediate in the ammonia (NH3) oxidation reaction, and by nitrifier denitrification, which is the enzymatic reduction of nitrite (NO2-). We investigated the impact of water pH and oxygen (O2) concentrations on rates of N2O production by these two mechanisms in the water column of Lake Lugano, a subalpine lake between Switzerland and Italy. Acidification of natural waters is known to reduce the rate of ammonia oxidation by forcing the equilibrium NH4+ ←→ NH3 + H+ away from NH3, the form that is preferentially taken up by ammonia oxidizers. In turn, this reduces the rate of N2O production by decomposition of the reaction intermediate during ammonia oxidation. However, using 15NH4+ and 15NO2- tracer additions during lake water incubations, we showed that reducing the pH from in situ values of 7.5 to 8 down to 6 to 7 actually increased the rate of N2O production by nitrifier denitrification. Hypoxia is thought to enhance N2O production by nitrifier denitrification. We did not observe nitrifier denitrification in incubations that were fully oxic (partial pressure of O2 = 20.9%) or had reduced O2 (partial pressure = 12%). However, when the incubation pH was lowered and the O2 reduced to 12%, N2O production by nitrifier denitrification was much greater than it was in incubations where only the pH was reduced or only the O2 concentration was reduced. Water for these experiments was drawn from depths just below the epilimnion of the monomictic south basin of Lugano, an environment whose pH, O2, and nutrient concentrations fluctuate throughout the water column on a seasonal basis and change in the shallower depths on a daily basis. We discuss the implications of these changes for the flux of shallow N2O into the atmosphere and a possible mechanism that explains the synergistic influence of O2 and pH on

  1. Bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L; Agabian-Keshishian, N; Bendis, I

    1971-09-01

    technique can be used to select for mutants blocked in the various stages of morphogenesis. 3) Temperature-sensitive mutants of Caulobacter that are restricted in macromolecular synthesis and development at elevated temperatures have been isolated. 4) Genetic exchange in the Calflobacter genus has been demonstrated and is now being defined. Two questions related to control processes can now readily be approached experimentally. (i) Is the temporal progression of events occurring during bacterial differentiation controlled by regulator gene products? (ii) Is the differentiation cycle like a biosynthetic pathway where one event must follow another? The availability of temperature-sensitive mutants blocked at various stages of development permits access to both questions. An interesting feature of the differentiation cycle is that the polar organelle may represent a special segregated unit which is operative in the control of the differentiation process. Perhaps the sequential morphogenic changes exhibited by Caulobacter are dependent on the initial synthesis of this organelle. Because the ultimate expression of cell changes are dependent on selective protein synthesis, specific messenger RNA production-either from DNA present in an organelle or from the chromosome-may prove to be a controlling factor in cell differentiation. We have begun studies with RNA polymerase purified from Caulobacter crescentus to determine whether cell factors or alterations in the enzyme structure serve to change the specificity of transcription during the cell cycle. Control of sequential cell changes at the level of transcription has long been postulated and has recently been substantiated in the case of Bacillus sporulation (6). The Caulobacter bacteria now present another system in which direct analysis of these control mechanisms is feasible. PMID:5572165

  2. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates. PMID:19257067

  3. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates.

  4. The lantibiotic nisin induces lipid II aggregation, causing membrane instability and vesicle budding.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Katharina M; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-03-10

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane.

  5. Impact of Intensive Land-Based Fish Culture in Qingdao, China, on the Bacterial Communities in Surrounding Marine Waters and Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiufen; Zhang, Yan; Juck, David; Fortin, Nathalie; Greer, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of intensive land-based fish culture in Qingdao, China, on the bacterial communities in surrounding marine environment was analyzed. Culture-based studies showed that the highest counts of heterotrophic, ammonium-oxidizing, nitrifying, and nitrate-reducing bacteria were found in fish ponds and the effluent channel, with lower counts in the adjacent marine area and the lowest counts in the samples taken from 500 m off the effluent channel. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis was used to assess total bacterial diversity. Fewer bands were observed from the samples taken from near the effluent channel compared with more distant sediment samples, suggesting that excess nutrients from the aquaculture facility may be reducing the diversity of bacterial communities in nearby sediments. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequenced DGGE bands indicated that the bacteria community of fish-culture-associated environments was mainly composed of Flavobacteriaceae, gamma- and deltaproteobacteria, including genera Gelidibacter, Psychroserpen, Lacinutrix, and Croceimarina. PMID:21922024

  6. Impact of intensive land-based fish culture in qingdao, china, on the bacterial communities in surrounding marine waters and sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiufen; Zhang, Yan; Juck, David; Fortin, Nathalie; Greer, Charles W

    2011-01-01

    The impact of intensive land-based fish culture in Qingdao, China, on the bacterial communities in surrounding marine environment was analyzed. Culture-based studies showed that the highest counts of heterotrophic, ammonium-oxidizing, nitrifying, and nitrate-reducing bacteria were found in fish ponds and the effluent channel, with lower counts in the adjacent marine area and the lowest counts in the samples taken from 500 m off the effluent channel. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis was used to assess total bacterial diversity. Fewer bands were observed from the samples taken from near the effluent channel compared with more distant sediment samples, suggesting that excess nutrients from the aquaculture facility may be reducing the diversity of bacterial communities in nearby sediments. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequenced DGGE bands indicated that the bacteria community of fish-culture-associated environments was mainly composed of Flavobacteriaceae, gamma- and deltaproteobacteria, including genera Gelidibacter, Psychroserpen, Lacinutrix, and Croceimarina.

  7. Electromagnetic charges in aggregation phenomena.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Claude; Slobodrian, R. J.

    Introduction The mechanism of fine particles aggregation is of great importance in many areas of research, in particular environment sciences where the state of aggregation defines the removal speed of dust from the atmosphere. The study of this mechanism is also important to understand the first stage of planet formation from the solar nebula. The aggregates formed are generally fractals and, as mentioned in the literature [1], the fractal dimensions and the site growth probability measures of the resulting fractal structures strongly depend on the properties of the forces that cause the aggregation. Theory and experimental apparatus We began this study by the aggregation between two charged particles and we are now consid-ering the aggregation between two magnetized particles. The aggregations are produced in a gas at a pressure between 10 and 1000 mbar and by using the applicable simplifications; we find that the distance (r) between the particles as a function of time (t) is given by the following equations: r=Ce(tf -t)1/3 for the electrical attraction r=Cm(tf -t)1/5 for the magnetic dipoles aligned in an external magnetic field. The apparatus built for these measurements consists of an experimental cell from which two perpendicular views are combined via an optical system in one image recorded by a video camera. From the video, we can then measure the distance between the particles as a function of time and reconstruct the trajectories in 3-D. The horizontal and vertical resolutions are respectively 0.86 and 0.92 microns per pixel. With a depth of field of 250 microns, the usable volume for 3-D observation in then 250 microns x 250 microns x 443 microns. Results and discussion A first version of the apparatus was tested on an electrical force aggregation and the results [2] show that the corresponding equation is a good representation of the phenomenon. Preliminary results, from an experiment using iron particles, show that the magnetic force can be seen in

  8. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  9. Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube bio-templates for in situ monitoring of the metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Ho, Genevieve; Lynch, Jerome P.; Love, Nancy G.

    2009-03-01

    Despite the wide variety of effective disinfection and wastewater treatment techniques for removing organic and inorganic wastes, pollutants such as nitrogen remain in wastewater effluents. If left untreated, these nitrogenous wastes can adversely impact the environment by promoting the overgrowth of aquatic plants, depleting dissolved oxygen, and causing eutrophication. Although nitrification/denitrification processes are employed during advanced wastewater treatment, effective and efficient operation of these facilities require information of the pH, dissolved oxygen content, among many other parameters, of the wastewater effluent. In this preliminary study, a biocompatible CNT-based nanocomposite is proposed and validated for monitoring the biological metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria in wastewater effluent environments (i.e., to monitor the nitrification process). Using carbon nanotubes and a pH-sensitive conductive polymer (i.e., poly(aniline) emeraldine base), a layer-by-layer fabrication technique is employed to fabricate a novel thin film pH sensor that changes its electrical properties in response to variations in ambient pH environments. Laboratory studies are conducted to evaluate the proposed nanocomposite's biocompatibility with wastewater effluent environments and its pH sensing performance.

  10. Biodegradation of ibuprofen, diclofenac and carbamazepine in nitrifying activated sludge under 12 °C temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Kruglova, Antonina; Ahlgren, Pia; Korhonen, Nasti; Rantanen, Pirjo; Mikola, Anna; Vahala, Riku

    2014-11-15

    Pharmaceuticals constitute a well-known group of emerging contaminants with an increasing significance in water pollution. This study focuses on three pharmaceuticals extensively used in Finland and which can be found in environmental waters: ibuprofen, diclofenac and carbamazepine. Biodegradation experiments were conducted in a full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) and in laboratory-scale Sequencing Batch Reactors (SBRs). The SBRs were operated at 12 °C, with a sludge retention time (SRT) 10-12 d and organic loading rates (OLRs) of 0.17, 0.27 and 0.33 kg BOD7 m(-3) d(-1). Ibuprofen was found to biodegrade up to 99%. The biodegradation rate constants (k(biol)) for ibuprofen were calculated for full-scale and laboratory processes as well as under different laboratory conditions and found to differ from 0.9 up to 5.0 l g(SS)(-1) d(-1). Diclofenac demonstrated an unexpected immediate drop of concentration in three SBRs and partial recovery of the initial concentration in one of the reactors. High fluctuating in diclofenac concentration was presumably caused by removal of this compound under different concentrations of nitrites during development of nitrifying activated sludge. Carbamazepine showed no biodegradation in all the experiments.

  11. Shifts in Nitrification Kinetics and Microbial Community during Bioaugmentation of Activated Sludge with Nitrifiers Enriched on Sludge Reject Water

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifang; Peng, Dangcong; Pan, Ruiling

    2012-01-01

    This study used two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) to evaluate the shifts in nitrification kinetics and microbial communities of an activated sludge sewage treatment system (main stream) during bioaugmentation with nitrifiers cultivated on real sludge reject water (side stream). Although bioaugmentation exerted a strong influence on the microbial community and the nitrification kinetics in the main stream, there was 58% of maximum ammonia uptake rate (AUR) and 80% of maximum nitrite uptake rate (NUR) loss of the seed source after bioaugmentation. In addition, nitrite accumulation occurred during bioaugmentation due to the unequal and asynchronous increase of the AUR (from 2.88 to 13.36 mg N/L·h) and NUR (from 0.76 to 4.34 mg N/L·h). FISH results showed that ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was inclined to be washed out with effluent in contrast to nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and Nitrosococcus mobilis lineage was the dominant AOB, while the dominant NOB in the main stream gradually transferred from Nitrospira to Nitrobacter. Nitrospina and Nitrococcus which existed in the seed source could not be detected in the main stream. It can be inferred that nitrite accumulation occurred due to the mismatch of NOB structure but washed out with effluent. PMID:23091354

  12. Novel nitrifiers and comammox in a full-scale hybrid biofilm and activated sludge reactor revealed by metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yuanqing; Mao, Yanping; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are widely used in wastewater treatment for their particular enhancement of nitrogen removal and other significant advantages. In this study, the diversity and potential functions of nitrogen removal bacteria in suspended activated sludge (AS) and biofilm of a full-scale hybrid reactor were uncovered by metagenomes (∼34 Gb), coupled with PCR-based 454 reads (>33 K reads). The results indicated that the diversity and abundance of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in biofilm did not surpass that in AS, while more nitrification and denitrification genes were indeed found in biofilm than AS, suggesting that the increased nitrogen removal ability by applying biofilm might be attributed to the enhancement of removal efficiency, rather than the biomass accumulation of nitrogen removal bacteria. The gene annotation and phylogenetic analysis results revealed that AS and biofilm samples consisted of 6.0 % and 9.4 % of novel functional genes for nitrogen removal and 18 % and 30 % of new Nitrospira species for nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, respectively. Moreover, the identification of Nitrospira-like amoA genes provided metagenomic evidence for the presence of complete ammonia oxidizer (comammox) with the functional potential to perform the complete oxidation of ammonia to nitrate. These findings have significant implications in expanding our knowledge of the biological nitrogen transformations in wastewater treatment. PMID:27287850

  13. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/ reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated.

  14. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within <1 km of the vent. The deposits within the A418 pipe, Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (<62 μm). Secondly, the ash aggregates indicate the involvement of moisture coupled with the presence of dilute expanded eruption clouds. The structure and distribution of these deposits throughout the kimberlite conduit demand that aggregation and deposition operate entirely within the confines of the vent; this indicates that aggregation is a rapid process. Ash aggregates within glaciovolcanic sequences are also rarely documented. The

  15. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles strongly impact soil microbial function by affecting archaeal nitrifiers

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Marie; Richaume, Agnès; Guyonnet, Julien P.; Dubost, Audrey; Martins, Jean M. F.; Pommier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soils are facing new environmental stressors, such as titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs). While these emerging pollutants are increasingly released into most ecosystems, including agricultural fields, their potential impacts on soil and its function remain to be investigated. Here we report the response of the microbial community of an agricultural soil exposed over 90 days to TiO2-NPs (1 and 500 mg kg−1 dry soil). To assess their impact on soil function, we focused on the nitrogen cycle and measured nitrification and denitrification enzymatic activities and by quantifying specific representative genes (amoA for ammonia-oxidizers, nirK and nirS for denitrifiers). Additionally, diversity shifts were examined in bacteria, archaea, and the ammonia-oxidizing clades of each domain. With strong negative impacts on nitrification enzyme activities and the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing microorganism, TiO2-NPs triggered cascading negative effects on denitrification enzyme activity and a deep modification of the bacterial community structure after just 90 days of exposure to even the lowest, realistic concentration of NPs. These results appeal further research to assess how these emerging pollutants modify the soil health and broader ecosystem function. PMID:27659196

  16. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles strongly impact soil microbial function by affecting archaeal nitrifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, Marie; Richaume, Agnès; Guyonnet, Julien P.; Dubost, Audrey; Martins, Jean M. F.; Pommier, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Soils are facing new environmental stressors, such as titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs). While these emerging pollutants are increasingly released into most ecosystems, including agricultural fields, their potential impacts on soil and its function remain to be investigated. Here we report the response of the microbial community of an agricultural soil exposed over 90 days to TiO2-NPs (1 and 500 mg kg‑1 dry soil). To assess their impact on soil function, we focused on the nitrogen cycle and measured nitrification and denitrification enzymatic activities and by quantifying specific representative genes (amoA for ammonia-oxidizers, nirK and nirS for denitrifiers). Additionally, diversity shifts were examined in bacteria, archaea, and the ammonia-oxidizing clades of each domain. With strong negative impacts on nitrification enzyme activities and the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing microorganism, TiO2-NPs triggered cascading negative effects on denitrification enzyme activity and a deep modification of the bacterial community structure after just 90 days of exposure to even the lowest, realistic concentration of NPs. These results appeal further research to assess how these emerging pollutants modify the soil health and broader ecosystem function.

  17. Crystal aggregation in kidney stones; a polymer aggregation problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J.; Beshensky, A.; Viswanathan, P.; Zachowicz, W.; Kleinman, J.

    2008-03-01

    Kidney stones most frequently form as aggregates of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals with organic layers between them, and the organic layers contain principally proteins. The pathway leading to the formation of these crystal aggregates in affected people has not been identified, but stone forming patients are thought to have a defect in the structure or distribution of urinary proteins, which normally protect against stone formation. We have developed two polyelectrolyte models that will induce COM crystal aggregation in vitro, and both are consistent with possible urinary protein compositions. The first model was based on mixing polyanionic and polycationic proteins, in portions such that the combined protein charge is near zero. The second model was based on reducing the charge density on partially charged polyanionic proteins, specifically Tamm-Horsfall protein, the second most abundant protein in urine. Both models demonstrated polymer phase separation at solution conditions where COM crystal aggregation was observed. Correlation with data from other bulk crystallization measurements suggest that the anionic side chains form critical binding interactions with COM surfaces that are necessary along with the phase separation process to induce COM crystal aggregation.

  18. Characterization of the bacterial flora isolated from a pilot-scale lagoon processing swine manure.

    PubMed

    Chikh, G; Pourquié, J; Kaiser, P; Davila, A M

    1997-11-01

    The bacterial flora of an experimental plant that processes liquid swine manure by an aerated compartmented (multistage) lagoon system has been studied. The total flora is characterized by a larger number of oligotrophic bacteria than eutrophic ones. Each compartment displays a specific flora, different from the flora in the manure, and consisting of a complex assembly of Gram-negative and Gram-positive ubiquitous species, such as Aeromonas spp. and Pseudomonas spp., and specialized species, such as Sphingobacterium spp. and Corynebacterium spp. The fecal indicator microorganisms have been shown to disappear in the course of the processing. A significant population of nitrifying bacteria has been observed at levels up to 10(4) bacteria.mL-1.

  19. Isotope investigations of nitrification dynamics in the Elbe River and in pure cultures of nitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Juliane; Sanders, Tina; Dähnke, Kirstin

    2013-04-01

    Since the onset of industrialisation, the nutrient input to aquatic systems is significally enhanced. This leads to high nitrogen loads in rivers, which drain densely populated catchments, and an increased eutrophication pressure on coastal water bodies. Along the river - estuary - continuum, nitrogen processing in aquatic environments has the potential to alter river loads significantly. Especially nitrification, the stepwise oxidation of ammonium to nitrite and further to nitrate, is important, because it can create additional nitrate from freshly remineralized organic matter, but also represents the link to subsequent removal via denitrification. Stable isotopes are a valuable tool to track overlapping source and sink processes in natural environments: Changes in stable isotope ratios can be attributed to the corresponding turnover processes, if the corresponding isotope effects are carefully assessed. However, the data base on N and O isotope fractionation in natural environments and during specific turnover processes is scarce. Thus we aimed to better understand the isotope dynamics of nitrification, assigning specific fractionation factors to environmentally relevant bacterial species. Besides N and O isotope analyses of river nitrate over an annual cycle, we performed incubation experiments with pure cultures and river water. Biweekly water samples from the Elbe River (Northern Germany) were taken to analyse, among other parameters, the seasonal variations of δ15N and δ18O in nitrate, corresponding nitrification rates and isotope effects during nitrification. While changes in δ15N and δ18O suggest phytoplankton assimilation as the main turnover process, incubations of river water reveal the relevance of nutrient regeneration via nitrification, which increase 15-fold with the onset of spring. In these incubations, we analysed rates of ammonium and nitrite oxidation and the corresponding isotope fractionation factors. Additional experiments with newly

  20. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  1. The Physics of Amyloid Aggregation and Templating in Prions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The problem of self-assembled amyloid aggregation of proteins in structures with beta-strands perpendicular to a one dimensional grown axis is interesting at a fundamental level (is this the most generic end state of proteins?), from a biological level (if the self-assembly can be regulated it is of use in contexts like spider silk and bacterial colony formation), for human public health (aggregation unregulated induces diseases like mad cow and Alzheimer's), and for possible materials applications (e.g., in tissue scaffolding). In this presentation, I will review the work of my group in examining the possibility that the left-handed beta helix (LHBH) structure can be the building block of the aggregates of mammalian prion and yeast prion proteins. I will also discuss our efforts to assess the possibility of a novel pH driven structural switch between LHBH and alpha-helical forms in the ordered half of the mammalian prion protein, and now the possibly pH stabilized LHBH structure can template aggregate growth of the disordered half of the protein, identified in numerous experimental studies as most relevant to disease.

  2. Neisseria meningitidis Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Affects Aggregation, Adhesion, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Engman, Jakob; Negrea, Aurel; Sigurlásdóttir, Sara; Geörg, Miriam; Eriksson, Jens; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Kuwae, Asaomi; Sjölinder, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis autoaggregation is an important step during attachment to human cells. Aggregation is mediated by type IV pili and can be modulated by accessory pilus proteins, such as PilX, and posttranslational modifications of the major pilus subunit PilE. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of aggregation remain poorly characterized. Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is a 3′–5′ exonuclease that is involved in RNA turnover and the regulation of small RNAs. In this study, we biochemically confirm that NMC0710 is the N. meningitidis PNPase, and we characterize its role in N. meningitidis pathogenesis. We show that deletion of the gene encoding PNPase leads to hyperaggregation and increased adhesion to epithelial cells. The aggregation induced was found to be dependent on pili and to be mediated by excessive pilus bundling. PNPase expression was induced following bacterial attachment to human cells. Deletion of PNPase led to global transcriptional changes and the differential regulation of 469 genes. We also demonstrate that PNPase is required for full virulence in an in vivo model of N. meningitidis infection. The present study shows that PNPase negatively affects aggregation, adhesion, and virulence in N. meningitidis. PMID:26930706

  3. Coexistence of nitrifying, anammox and denitrifying bacteria in a sequencing batch reactor

    PubMed Central

    Langone, Michela; Yan, Jia; Haaijer, Suzanne C. M.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Andreottola, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen removal efficiencies from ammonium-rich wastewaters have been demonstrated by several applications, that combine nitritation and anammox processes. Denitrification will occur simultaneously when organic carbon is also present. In this study, the activity of aerobic ammonia oxidizing, anammox and denitrifying bacteria in a full scale sequencing batch reactor, treating digester supernatants, was studied by means of batch-assays. AOB and anammox activities were maximum at pH of 8.0 and 7.8–8.0, respectively. Short term effect of nitrite on anammox activity was studied, showing nitrite up to 42 mg/L did not result in inhibition. Both denitrification via nitrate and nitrite were measured. To reduce nitrite-oxidizing activity, high NH3-N (1.9–10 mg NH3-N/L) and low nitrite (3–8 mg TNN/L) are required conditions during the whole SBR cycle. Molecular analysis showed the nitritation-anammox sludge harbored a high microbial diversity, where each microorganism has a specific role. Using ammonia monooxygenase α–subunit (amoA) gene as a marker, our analyses suggested different macro- and micro-environments in the reactor strongly affect the AOB community, allowing the development of different AOB species, such as N. europaea/eutropha and N. oligotropha groups, which improve the stability of nitritation process. A specific PCR primer set, used to target the 16S rRNA gene of anammox bacteria, confirmed the presence of the “Ca. Brocadia fulgida” type, able to grow in presence of organic matter and to tolerate high nitrite concentrations. The diversity of denitrifiers was assessed by using dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nirS) gene-based analyses, who showed denitifiers were related to different betaproteobacterial genera, such as Thauera, Pseudomonas, Dechloromonas and Aromatoleum, able to assist in forming microbial aggregates. Concerning possible secondary processes, no n-damo bacteria were found while NOB from the genus Nitrobacter was detected

  4. Aggregated Recommendation through Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aggregated recommendation refers to the process of suggesting one kind of items to a group of users. Compared to user-oriented or item-oriented approaches, it is more general and, therefore, more appropriate for cold-start recommendation. In this paper, we propose a random forest approach to create aggregated recommender systems. The approach is used to predict the rating of a group of users to a kind of items. In the preprocessing stage, we merge user, item, and rating information to construct an aggregated decision table, where rating information serves as the decision attribute. We also model the data conversion process corresponding to the new user, new item, and both new problems. In the training stage, a forest is built for the aggregated training set, where each leaf is assigned a distribution of discrete rating. In the testing stage, we present four predicting approaches to compute evaluation values based on the distribution of each tree. Experiments results on the well-known MovieLens dataset show that the aggregated approach maintains an acceptable level of accuracy. PMID:25180204

  5. Novel insights into amylin aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Karen; Govender, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Amylin is a peptide that aggregates into species that are toxic to pancreatic beta cells, leading to type II diabetes. This study has for the first time quantified amylin association and dissociation kinetics (association constant (ka) = 28.7 ± 5.1 L mol−1 s−1 and dissociation constant (kd) = 2.8 ± 0.6 ×10−4 s−1) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Thus far, techniques used for the sizing of amylin aggregates do not cater for the real-time monitoring of unconstrained amylin in solution. In this regard we evaluated recently innovated nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). In addition, both SPR and NTA were used to study the effect of previously synthesized amylin derivatives on amylin aggregation and to evaluate their potential as a cell-free system for screening potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. Results obtained from NTA highlighted a predominance of 100–300 nm amylin aggregates and correlation to previously published cytotoxicity results suggests the toxic species of amylin to be 200–300 nm in size. The results seem to indicate that NTA has potential as a new technique to monitor the aggregation potential of amyloid peptides in solution and also to screen potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:26019498

  6. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... Most of the time, the small intestine does not have a high number ... in the small intestine may use up the nutrients needed by the ...

  7. The impact of cellulose nanocrystals on the aggregation and initial adhesion to a solid surface of Escherichia coli K12: Role of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Shao, Yanxi; Boluk, Yaman; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Aggregation of bacteria and their initial adhesion to silica surfaces are affected greatly by solution chemistry, particularly pH and ionic strength (IS). The effects of pH and IS on the aggregation and deposition of Escherichia coli K12 on silica surfaces were investigated in NaCl solutions at variable pH and IS, and in the absence and presence of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC). In the presence of CNC, bacterial aggregation was generally enhanced as the pH was increased from 3.5 to neutral at a given IS (10mM). At a given pH (7.2), bacterial aggregation was highest at 10mM as the IS was increased from 1mM to 50mM. The contribution of DLVO interaction and depletion interaction to bacterial aggregation in the bacteria and CNC system was compared. The results indicate that at pH ranging from 5.2 to 7.2 and IS ranging from 10mM to 50mM conditions, depletion attraction is the dominant mechanism for CNC induced bacterial aggregation. The lower bacterial deposition rates observed at 10mM IS and pH 7.2 compared with other conditions were mainly attributed to the aggregation of bacteria which could result in decreased convective-diffusive transport to the silica surface.

  8. The impact of cellulose nanocrystals on the aggregation and initial adhesion to a solid surface of Escherichia coli K12: Role of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Shao, Yanxi; Boluk, Yaman; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Aggregation of bacteria and their initial adhesion to silica surfaces are affected greatly by solution chemistry, particularly pH and ionic strength (IS). The effects of pH and IS on the aggregation and deposition of Escherichia coli K12 on silica surfaces were investigated in NaCl solutions at variable pH and IS, and in the absence and presence of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC). In the presence of CNC, bacterial aggregation was generally enhanced as the pH was increased from 3.5 to neutral at a given IS (10mM). At a given pH (7.2), bacterial aggregation was highest at 10mM as the IS was increased from 1mM to 50mM. The contribution of DLVO interaction and depletion interaction to bacterial aggregation in the bacteria and CNC system was compared. The results indicate that at pH ranging from 5.2 to 7.2 and IS ranging from 10mM to 50mM conditions, depletion attraction is the dominant mechanism for CNC induced bacterial aggregation. The lower bacterial deposition rates observed at 10mM IS and pH 7.2 compared with other conditions were mainly attributed to the aggregation of bacteria which could result in decreased convective-diffusive transport to the silica surface. PMID:26454547

  9. Bacterial Colonization of Particles: Growth and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, Kam; Ploug, Helle

    2003-01-01

    Marine particles in the ocean are exposed to diverse bacterial communities, and colonization and growth of attached bacteria are important processes in the degradation and transformation of the particles. In an earlier study, we showed that the initial colonization of model particles by individual bacterial strains isolated from marine aggregates was a function of attachment and detachment. In the present study, we have investigated how this colonization process was further affected by growth and interspecific interactions among the bacteria. Long-term incubation experiments showed that growth dominated over attachment and detachment after a few hours in controlling the bacterial population density on agar particles. In the absence of grazing mortality, this growth led to an equilibrium population density consistent with the theoretical limit due to oxygen diffusion. Interspecific interaction experiments showed that the presence of some bacterial strains (“residents”) on the agar particles either increased or decreased the colonization rate of other strains (“newcomers”). Comparison between an antibiotic-producing strain and its antibiotic-free mutant showed no inhibitory effect on the newcomers due to antibiotic production. On the contrary, hydrolytic activity of the antibiotic-producing strain appeared to benefit the newcomers and enhance their colonization rate. These results show that growth- and species-specific interactions have to be taken into account to adequately describe bacterial colonization of marine particles. Changes in colonization pattern due to such small-scale processes may have profound effects on the transformation and fluxes of particulate matter in the ocean. PMID:12788756

  10. Bacterial colonization of particles: growth and interactions.

    PubMed

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, Kam; Ploug, Helle

    2003-06-01

    Marine particles in the ocean are exposed to diverse bacterial communities, and colonization and growth of attached bacteria are important processes in the degradation and transformation of the particles. In an earlier study, we showed that the initial colonization of model particles by individual bacterial strains isolated from marine aggregates was a function of attachment and detachment. In the present study, we have investigated how this colonization process was further affected by growth and interspecific interactions among the bacteria. Long-term incubation experiments showed that growth dominated over attachment and detachment after a few hours in controlling the bacterial population density on agar particles. In the absence of grazing mortality, this growth led to an equilibrium population density consistent with the theoretical limit due to oxygen diffusion. Interspecific interaction experiments showed that the presence of some bacterial strains ("residents") on the agar particles either increased or decreased the colonization rate of other strains ("newcomers"). Comparison between an antibiotic-producing strain and its antibiotic-free mutant showed no inhibitory effect on the newcomers due to antibiotic production. On the contrary, hydrolytic activity of the antibiotic-producing strain appeared to benefit the newcomers and enhance their colonization rate. These results show that growth- and species-specific interactions have to be taken into account to adequately describe bacterial colonization of marine particles. Changes in colonization pattern due to such small-scale processes may have profound effects on the transformation and fluxes of particulate matter in the ocean.

  11. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  12. Phenotypes of Non-Attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa Aggregates Resemble Surface Attached Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Alhede, Morten; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Qvortrup, Klaus; Allesen-Holm, Marie; van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise D.; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Nielsen, Anne K.; Parsek, Matt; Wozniak, Dan; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse conditions. However, microscopic investigations of samples isolated from sites of chronic infections seem to suggest that some bacteria do not need to be attached to surfaces in order to establish chronic infections. In this study we employed scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently of age, both aggregates and flow-cell biofilm had the same slow growth rate as a stationary phase shaking cultures. Internal structures of the aggregates matrix components and their capacity to survive otherwise lethal treatments with antibiotics (referred to as tolerance) and resistance to phagocytes were also found to be strikingly similar to flow-cell biofilms. Our data indicate that the tolerance of both biofilms and non-attached aggregates towards antibiotics is reversible by physical disruption. We provide evidence that the antibiotic tolerance is likely to be dependent on both the physiological states of the aggregates and particular matrix components. Bacterial surface-attachment and subsequent biofilm formation are considered hallmarks of the capacity of microbes to cause persistent infections. We have observed non-attached aggregates in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients; otitis media; soft tissue fillers and non-healing wounds, and we propose that aggregated cells exhibit enhanced survival in the hostile host environment, compared with non-aggregated bacterial

  13. Customer Aggregation: An Opportunity for Green Power?

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2001-02-26

    We undertook research into the experience of aggregation groups to determine whether customer aggregation offers an opportunity to bring green power choices to more customers. The objectives of this report, therefore, are to (1) identify the different types of aggregation that are occurring today, (2) learn whether aggregation offers an opportunity to advance sales of green power, and (3) share these concepts and approaches with potential aggregators and green power advocates.

  14. Fractal aggregates in tennis ball systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, J.; Bandín, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-09-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the images of the cluster of balls, following Forrest and Witten's pioneering studies on the aggregation of smoke particles, to estimate their fractal dimension.

  15. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Jodi L.; Ritschdorff, Eric T.; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate via short-range physical and chemical signals, interactions known to mediate quorum sensing, sporulation, and other adaptive phenotypes. Although most in vitro studies examine bacterial properties averaged over large populations, the levels of key molecular determinants of bacterial fitness and pathogenicity (e.g., oxygen, quorum-sensing signals) may vary over micrometer scales within small, dense cellular aggregates believed to play key roles in disease transmission. A detailed understanding of how cell–cell interactions contribute to pathogenicity in natural, complex environments will require a new level of control in constructing more relevant cellular models for assessing bacterial phenotypes. Here, we describe a microscopic three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating colonies. In this laser-based lithographic technique, microscopic containers are formed around selected bacteria suspended in gelatin via focal cross-linking of polypeptide molecules. After excess reagent is removed, trapped bacteria are localized within sealed cavities formed by the cross-linked gelatin, a highly porous material that supports rapid growth of fully enclosed cellular populations and readily transmits numerous biologically active species, including polypeptides, antibiotics, and quorum-sensing signals. Using this approach, we show that a picoliter-volume aggregate of Staphylococcus aureus can display substantial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by enclosure within a shell composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24101503

  16. Investigation on effects of aggregate structure in water and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Chau, K W

    2004-01-01

    The fractal structure and particle size of flocs are generally recognized as the two most crucial physical properties having impact on the efficiency of operation of several unit processes in water and wastewater treatment. In this study, an experimental investigation is undertaken on the effect of aggregate structure in water and wastewater treatment in Hong Kong. The fractal dimension of the resulting aggregate is employed as a measure of the aggregate structure. Small angle light scattering technique is used here. Different amounts of polymers are mixed to bacterial suspensions and the resulting structures are examined. The addition of polymer may foster aggregate formation by neutralization of the bacterial surface charge and enhance inter-particle bridging. The aggregation behavior may affect the efficiency of certain water and wastewater treatment processes such as dewatering and coagulation. The impacts of aggregate structure on two representative processes, namely, ultra-filtration membrane fouling and pressure filter dewatering efficiency, are studied. It is found that the looser flocs yield a more porous cake and less tendency to foul whilst more porous filter cakes yield more ready biosolids dewatering.

  17. Environmentalism and natural aggregate mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Langer, W.H.; Sachs, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are seen as large negative environmental consequences. At the root of this disassociation is the philosophy of environmentalism, which flavors our perceptions of the excavation, processing, and distribution of natural aggregate. The two end-member ideas in this philosophy are ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. Ecocentrism takes the position that the natural world is a organism whose arteries are the rivers-their flow must not be altered. The soil is another vital organ and must not be covered with concrete and asphalt. The motto of the ecocentrist is "man must live more lightly on the land." The anthropocentrist wants clean water and air and an uncluttered landscape for human use. Mining is allowed and even encouraged, but dust and noise from quarry and pit operations must be minimized. The large volume of truck traffic is viewed as a real menace to human life and should be regulated and isolated. The environmental problems that the producers of natural aggregate (crushed stone and sand and gravel) face today are mostly difficult social and political concerns associated with the large holes dug in the ground and the large volume of heavy truck traffic associated with quarry and pit operations. These concerns have increased in recent years as society's demand for

  18. The effect of dissolved oxygen on N2O production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Erler, Dirk; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is commonly recognized as an important factor influencing nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, it has been difficult to separate the true effect of DO from that of nitrite, as DO variation often affects nitrite accumulation. The effect of DO on N2O production by an enriched nitrifying sludge, consisting of both AOB and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), was investigated in this study. Nitrite accumulation was minimised by augmenting nitrite oxidation through the addition of an enriched NOB sludge. It was demonstrated that the specific N2O production rate increased from 0 to 1.9 ± 0.09 (n = 3) mg N2O-N/hr/g VSS with an increase of DO concentration from 0 to 3.0 mg O2/L, whereas N2O emission factor (the ratio between N2O nitrogen emitted and the ammonium nitrogen converted) decreased from 10.6 ± 1.7% (n = 3) at DO = 0.2 mg O2/L to 2.4 ± 0.1% (n = 3) at DO = 3.0 mg O2/L. The site preference measurements indicated that both the AOB denitrification and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidation pathways contributed to N2O production, and DO had an important effect on the relative contributions of the two pathways. This finding is supported by analysis of the process data using an N2O model describing both pathways. As DO increased from 0.2 to 3.0 mg O2/L, the contribution of AOB denitrification decreased from 92% - 95%-66% - 73%, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the contribution by the NH2OH oxidation pathway. PMID:25179869

  19. Ammonium removal of drinking water at low temperature by activated carbon filter biologically enhanced with heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wen; Li, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Duo-Ying; Huang, Xiao-Fei; Song, Yang

    2016-03-01

    We sought to confirm whether use of Acinetobacter strains Y7 and Y16, both strains of heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria, was practical for removing ammonium (NH4 (+)-N) from drinking water at low temperatures. To test this, ammonium-containing drinking water was treated with strains Y7 and Y16 at 8 and 2 °C. Continuous ammonium treatment was conducted in order to evaluate the performance of three biologically enhanced activated carbon (BEAC) filters in removing ammonium. The three BEAC filters were inoculated with strain Y7, strain Y16, and a mixture of strains Y7 and Y16, respectively. A granular activated carbon (GAC) filter, without inoculation by any strains, was tested in parallel with the BEAC filters as control. The results indicated that NH4 (+)-N removal was significant when a BEAC filter was inoculated with the mixture of strains Y7 and Y16 (BEAC-III filter). Amounts of 0.44 ± 0.05 and 0.25 ± 0.05 mg L(-1) NH4 (+)-N were removed using the BEAC-III filter at 8 and 2 °C, respectively. These values were 2.8-4.0-fold higher than the values of ammonium removal acquired using the GAC filter. The synergistic effect of using strains Y7 and Y16 in concert was the cause of the high-ammonium removal efficiency achieved by using the BEAC-III filter at low temperatures. In addition, a high C/N ratio may promote NH4 (+)-N removal efficiency by improving biomass and microbial activity. This study provides new insight into the use of biofilters to achieve biological removal of ammonium at low temperature. PMID:26527340

  20. Effects of Grazing by Flagellates on Competition for Ammonium between Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Soil Columns

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Frank J. M.; Duyts, Hendrik; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1993-01-01

    The enhanced mineralization of immobilized nitrogen by bacteriophagous protozoa has been thought to favor the nitrification process in soils in which nitrifying bacteria must compete with heterotrophic bacteria for the available ammonium. To obtain more insight into this process, the influence of grazing by the flagellate Adriamonas peritocrescens on the competition for ammonium between the chemolithotrophic species Nitrosomonas europaea and the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis in the presence of Nitrobacter winogradskyi was studied in soil columns, which were continuously percolated with media containing 5 mM ammonium and different amounts of glucose at a dilution rate of 0.007 h-1 (liquid volumes). A. globiformis won the competition for ammonium. The grazing activities of the flagellates had two prominent effects on the competition between N. europaea and A. globiformis. First, the distribution of ammonium over the profile of the soil columns was more uniform in the presence of flagellates than in their absence. In the absence of flagellates, relatively high amounts of ammonium accumulated in the upper layer (0 to 3 cm), whereas in the underlying layers the ammonium concentrations were low. In the presence of flagellates, however, considerable amounts of ammonium were found in the lower layers, whereas less ammonium accumulated in the upper layer. Second, the potential ammonium-oxidizing activity of N. europaea was stimulated in the presence of flagellates. The numbers of N. europaea at different glucose concentrations in the presence of flagellates were comparable to those in the absence of protozoa. However, in the presence of flagellates, the potential ammonium-oxidizing activities were four to five times greater than those in the absence of protozoa. PMID:16348988

  1. Ammonium removal of drinking water at low temperature by activated carbon filter biologically enhanced with heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wen; Li, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Duo-Ying; Huang, Xiao-Fei; Song, Yang

    2016-03-01

    We sought to confirm whether use of Acinetobacter strains Y7 and Y16, both strains of heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria, was practical for removing ammonium (NH4 (+)-N) from drinking water at low temperatures. To test this, ammonium-containing drinking water was treated with strains Y7 and Y16 at 8 and 2 °C. Continuous ammonium treatment was conducted in order to evaluate the performance of three biologically enhanced activated carbon (BEAC) filters in removing ammonium. The three BEAC filters were inoculated with strain Y7, strain Y16, and a mixture of strains Y7 and Y16, respectively. A granular activated carbon (GAC) filter, without inoculation by any strains, was tested in parallel with the BEAC filters as control. The results indicated that NH4 (+)-N removal was significant when a BEAC filter was inoculated with the mixture of strains Y7 and Y16 (BEAC-III filter). Amounts of 0.44 ± 0.05 and 0.25 ± 0.05 mg L(-1) NH4 (+)-N were removed using the BEAC-III filter at 8 and 2 °C, respectively. These values were 2.8-4.0-fold higher than the values of ammonium removal acquired using the GAC filter. The synergistic effect of using strains Y7 and Y16 in concert was the cause of the high-ammonium removal efficiency achieved by using the BEAC-III filter at low temperatures. In addition, a high C/N ratio may promote NH4 (+)-N removal efficiency by improving biomass and microbial activity. This study provides new insight into the use of biofilters to achieve biological removal of ammonium at low temperature.

  2. Optimization of operation conditions for the mitigation of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from aerobic nitrifying granular sludge system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ting; Wang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Ming-Yu; Gao, Ming-Ming; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2016-05-01

    The optimization of operation parameters is a key consideration to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in biological nitrogen removal processes. So far, different parameters have only been investigated individually, making it difficult to compare their specific effects and combined influences. In this study, we applied the Plackett-Burman (PB) multifactorial experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) analysis to find the optimized condition for the mitigation of N2O release in a nitrifying granular sludge system. Seven parameters (temperature, pH, feeding strategy, C/N ratio, aeration rate, Cu(2+) concentration, and aeration mode) were tested in parallel. Five of them (other than chemical oxygen demand/nitrogen (C/N) ratio and Cu(2+) concentration) were selected as influential factors. Since the type of feeding strategies and aeration modes cannot be quantified, continuous feed strategy and anoxic/oxic aeration mode were applied for the following study. Influences of temperature, pH, and aeration rate on N2O emissions were tested with RSM analysis to further investigate the mutual interactions among the parameters and to identify the optimal values that would minimize N2O release. Results showed the minimum emission value could be obtained under the temperature of 22.3 °C, pH of 7.1 and aeration rate of 0.20 m(3)/h. Predicted results were then verified by subsequent validation experiments. The estimated N2O emission value of each design by RSM was also observed in good relationships with experimental result.

  3. Brevibacillus nitrificans sp. nov., a nitrifying bacterium isolated from a microbiological agent for enhancing microbial digestion in sewage treatment tanks.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Fumihiko; Hirota, Kikue; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Yumoto, Isao

    2012-09-01

    A heterotrophic nitrifying bacterium, designated strain DA2(T), was isolated from a microbiological agent for enhancing microbial digestion in sewage treatment tanks. Cells of strain DA2(T) were Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, sporulating rods that were motile by means of peritrichous flagella; they were able to grow at pH 5-8. The major isoprenoid quinone of strain DA2(T) was menaquinone-7 (MK-7) and its cellular fatty acid profile consisted mainly of iso-C(15 : 0) (18.6 %) and anteiso-C(15 : 0) (69.1 %). The DNA G+C content was 54.1 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny suggested that strain DA2(T) is a member of the genus Brevibacillus, with highest sequence similarities (in parentheses) to the type strains of Brevibacillus choshinensis (99.7 %), B. formosus (99.4 %), B. brevis (99.4 %), B. agri (99.0 %), B. reuszeri (98.8 %), B. parabrevis (98.7 %), B. centrosporus (98.6 %), B. limnophilus (97.4 %), B. panacihumi (97.3 %) and B. invocatus (97.3 %). DNA-DNA hybridization showed less than 60 % relatedness between strain DA2(T) and type strains of the most closely related species given above. Given the significant differences in phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, and phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA sequence and DNA-DNA relatedness data, the isolate merits classification as a novel species, for which the name Brevibacillus nitrificans is proposed; the type strain of this species is DA2(T) (= JCM 15774(T) = NCIMB 14531(T)).

  4. Influence of Biological Macromolecules and Aquatic Chemistries on the Inhibition of Nitrifying Bacteria by Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radniecki, T. S.; Anderson, J. W.; Schneider, M. C.; Stankus, D. P.; Nason, J. A.; Semprini, L.

    2010-12-01

    The use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) as a broad spectrum biocide in a wide range of consumer goods has grown exponentially since 2006 (1), which may result in an increased release of Ag-NP into wastewater streams and ultimately the receiving bodies of water. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play a critical role in the global nitrogen cycle through the oxidation of ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2-) and are widely considered to be the most sensitive microbial fauna in the environment being readily inhibited by contaminants, including Ag-NP (2). This research used physiological techniques in combination with physical/chemical assays to characterize the inhibition of Nitrosomonas europaea, the model AOB, by silver ions (Ag+), 3-5 nm Ag-NP, 20 nm Ag-NP and 80 nm Ag-NP under a variety of aqueous chemistries. In addition, the stability of Ag-NP suspensions was examined under a variety of aqueous chemistries including in the presences of divalent cations, chloride anions, natural organic matter (NOM), proteins (BSA) and lipopolysaccharides (alginate). Using the stable Ag-NP/test media suspensions, N. europaea was found to be extremely sensitive to Ag+, 3-5 nm Ag-NP, 20 nm Ag-NP and 80 nm Ag-NP with concentrations of 0.1, 0.12, 0.5 and 1.5 ppm, respectively, resulting in a 50% decrease in nitrification rates. The inhibition was correlated with the amount of Ag+ released into solution. It is suspected that the inhibition observed from Ag-NP exposure is caused by the liberated Ag+. The aquatic chemistry of the test media was found to have a profound influence on the stability of Ag-NP suspensions. The presence of Ag ligands (e.g. EDTA and Cl-) reduced toxicity of Ag-NP through the formation of Ag-ligand complexes with the liberated Ag+. The presence of divalent cations (e.g. Ca2+ or Mg2+) resulted in the rapid aggregation of Ag-NP leading to a decrease in Ag+ liberation and thus a decrease in N. europaea inhibition. The presence of 5 ppm NOM resulted in a highly stable Ag

  5. The synergistic effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on N2O production in biological domestic wastewater treatment under nitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengzhang; Wang, Shuying; Peng, Yongzhen; Liu, Yue; He, Janzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, which is produced during nitrifying and denitrifying processes. Some factors and mechanisms affecting N2O emission have been reported in previous literature, but wastewater biological nitrification is accompanied by a dynamic process of dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption and pH reduction, it is more meaningful to study the synergistic effects between DO and pH on N2O production. In this study, the synergistic effects between DO and pH on N2O production were investigated with real domestic wastewater. The results showed that high DO levels and a high pH could improve the oxidation ratio of NH4+-N and the production ratio of NO2--N, while effectively reducing the accumulation ratio of N2O. The NH4+-N was a prerequisite for nitrifier denitrification; when NH4+-N was oxidized completely, there would be no N2O production and an even higher concentration of NO2- The pH factor is shown to directly affect N2O emission, although free ammonia and free nitrous acid which changed with pH had no correlation with N2O emission. There were two reasons: (1) pH can influence the flow direction of electrons afforded by NH2OH oxidation; at high pH, electrons were mainly used for combining H+ and O2 (O2+4H++4e-=2H2O), the accumulation of NO2- cannot be a result of denitrification, and a higher DO can get more electrons to prefer NO2- and (2) NH4+ was the prerequisite for NH2OH oxidation, since NH2OH oxidation process was the way to provide electrons for nitrifier denitrification.

  6. Experimental evaluation of decrease in bacterial activity due to cell death and activity decay in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Xiangping; Cao, Yali; van Mark Loosdrecht, C M

    2009-08-01

    Decrease in bacterial activity (cell decay) in activated sludge can be attributed to cell death (reduction in the amount of active bacteria) and activity decay (reduction in the specific activity of active bacteria). The aim of this study was to experimentally differentiate between cell death and activity decay as a source of decrease in microbial activity. By means of measuring maximal oxygen uptake rates, verifying membrane integrity by live/dead staining and verifying presence of 16S rRNA with fluorescence in-situ hybridization, the decay rates and the death rates of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and ordinary heterotrophic organisms (OHOs) were determined respectively in a nitrifying sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and a heterotrophic SBR. The experiments revealed that in the nitrifying system activity decay contributed 47% and 82% to the decreased activities of AOB and NOB and that cell death was responsible for 53% and 18% of decreases in their respective activities. In the heterotrophic system, activity decay took a share of 78% in the decreased activity of OHOs, and cell death was only responsible for 22% of decrease in their activity. The difference between the importance of cell death on the decreased activities of AOB and OHOs might be caused by the mechanisms of substrate storage and/or cryptic growth/death-regeneration of OHOs. The different nutrient sources for AOB and NOB might be the reason for a relatively smaller fraction of cell death in NOB.

  7. Studies on recycled aggregates-based concrete.

    PubMed

    Rakshvir, Major; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2006-06-01

    Reduced extraction of raw materials, reduced transportation cost, improved profits, reduced environmental impact and fast-depleting reserves of conventional natural aggregates has necessitated the use of recycling, in order to be able to conserve conventional natural aggregate. In this study various physical and mechanical properties of recycled concrete aggregates were examined. Recycled concrete aggregates are different from natural aggregates and concrete made from them has specific properties. The percentages of recycled concrete aggregates were varied and it was observed that properties such as compressive strength showed a decrease of up to 10% as the percentage of recycled concrete aggregates increased. Water absorption of recycled aggregates was found to be greater than natural aggregates, and this needs to be compensated during mix design.

  8. RAGG - R EPISODIC AGGREGATION PACKAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The RAGG package is an R implementation of the CMAQ episodic model aggregation method developed by Constella Group and the Environmental Protection Agency. RAGG is a tool to provide climatological seasonal and annual deposition of sulphur and nitrogen for multimedia management. ...

  9. Cyclosporine A enhances platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Grace, A A; Barradas, M A; Mikhailidis, D P; Jeremy, J Y; Moorhead, J F; Sweny, P; Dandona, P

    1987-12-01

    In view of the reported increase in thromboembolic episodes following cyclosporine A (CyA) therapy, the effect of this drug on platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release was investigated. The addition of CyA, at therapeutic concentrations to platelet rich plasma from normal subjects in vitro was found to increase aggregation in response to adrenaline, collagen and ADP. Ingestion of CyA by healthy volunteers was also associated with enhanced platelet aggregation. The CyA-mediated enhancement of aggregation was further enhanced by the addition in vitro of therapeutic concentrations of heparin. Platelets from renal allograft recipients treated with CyA also showed hyperaggregability and increased thromboxane A2 release, which were most marked at "peak" plasma CyA concentration and less so at "trough" concentrations. Platelet hyperaggregability in renal allograft patients on long-term CyA therapy tended to revert towards normal following the replacement of CyA with azathioprine. Hypertensive patients with renal allografts on nifedipine therapy had normal platelet function and thromboxane release in spite of CyA therapy. These observations suggest that CyA-mediated platelet activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of the thromboembolic phenomena associated with the use of this drug. The increased release of thromboxane A2 (a vasoconstrictor) may also play a role in mediating CyA-related nephrotoxicity.

  10. Kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clément

    2007-10-01

    We derive general kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation that describe certain features of the morphogenesis of biological colonies (like bacteria, amoebae, endothelial cells or social insects). Starting from a stochastic model defined in terms of N coupled Langevin equations, we derive a nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equation governing the evolution of the distribution function of the system in phase space. By taking the successive moments of this kinetic equation and using a local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations involving a damping term. In the limit of small frictions, we obtain a hyperbolic model describing the formation of network patterns (filaments) and in the limit of strong frictions we obtain a parabolic model which is a generalization of the standard Keller-Segel model describing the formation of clusters (clumps). Our approach connects and generalizes several models introduced in the chemotactic literature. We discuss the analogy between bacterial colonies and self-gravitating systems and between the chemotactic collapse and the gravitational collapse (Jeans instability). We also show that the basic equations of chemotaxis are similar to nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equations so that a notion of effective generalized thermodynamics can be developed.

  11. Sequence-dependent Internalization of Aggregating Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Couceiro, José R.; Gallardo, Rodrigo; De Smet, Frederik; De Baets, Greet; Baatsen, Pieter; Annaert, Wim; Roose, Kenny; Saelens, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a number of aggregation disease polypeptides have been shown to spread from cell to cell, thereby displaying prionoid behavior. Studying aggregate internalization, however, is often hampered by the complex kinetics of the aggregation process, resulting in the concomitant uptake of aggregates of different sizes by competing mechanisms, which makes it difficult to isolate pathway-specific responses to aggregates. We designed synthetic aggregating peptides bearing different aggregation propensities with the aim of producing modes of uptake that are sufficiently distinct to differentially analyze the cellular response to internalization. We found that small acidic aggregates (≤500 nm in diameter) were taken up by nonspecific endocytosis as part of the fluid phase and traveled through the endosomal compartment to lysosomes. By contrast, bigger basic aggregates (>1 μm) were taken up through a mechanism dependent on cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane remodeling with the morphological hallmarks of phagocytosis. Importantly, the properties of these aggregates determined not only the mechanism of internalization but also the involvement of the proteostatic machinery (the assembly of interconnected networks that control the biogenesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation of proteins) in the process; whereas the internalization of small acidic aggregates is HSF1-independent, the uptake of larger basic aggregates was HSF1-dependent, requiring Hsp70. Our results show that the biophysical properties of aggregates determine both their mechanism of internalization and proteostatic response. It remains to be seen whether these differences in cellular response contribute to the particular role of specific aggregated proteins in disease. PMID:25391649

  12. An Aggregation Advisor for Ligand Discovery.

    PubMed

    Irwin, John J; Duan, Da; Torosyan, Hayarpi; Doak, Allison K; Ziebart, Kristin T; Sterling, Teague; Tumanian, Gurgen; Shoichet, Brian K

    2015-09-10

    Colloidal aggregation of organic molecules is the dominant mechanism for artifactual inhibition of proteins, and controls against it are widely deployed. Notwithstanding an increasingly detailed understanding of this phenomenon, a method to reliably predict aggregation has remained elusive. Correspondingly, active molecules that act via aggregation continue to be found in early discovery campaigns and remain common in the literature. Over the past decade, over 12 thousand aggregating organic molecules have been identified, potentially enabling a precedent-based approach to match known aggregators with new molecules that may be expected to aggregate and lead to artifacts. We investigate an approach that uses lipophilicity, affinity, and similarity to known aggregators to advise on the likelihood that a candidate compound is an aggregator. In prospective experimental testing, five of seven new molecules with Tanimoto coefficients (Tc's) between 0.95 and 0.99 to known aggregators aggregated at relevant concentrations. Ten of 19 with Tc's between 0.94 and 0.90 and three of seven with Tc's between 0.89 and 0.85 also aggregated. Another three of the predicted compounds aggregated at higher concentrations. This method finds that 61 827 or 5.1% of the ligands acting in the 0.1 to 10 μM range in the medicinal chemistry literature are at least 85% similar to a known aggregator with these physical properties and may aggregate at relevant concentrations. Intriguingly, only 0.73% of all drug-like commercially available compounds resemble the known aggregators, suggesting that colloidal aggregators are enriched in the literature. As a percentage of the literature, aggregator-like compounds have increased 9-fold since 1995, partly reflecting the advent of high-throughput and virtual screens against molecular targets. Emerging from this study is an aggregator advisor database and tool ( http://advisor.bkslab.org ), free to the community, that may help distinguish between

  13. The specific role of fungal community structure on soil aggregation and carbon sequestration: results from long-term field study in a paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Rajasekaran; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a crucial soil property that affects soil biota, biogeochemical processes and C sequestration. The relationship between soil aggregate stability and soil C cycling is well known but the influence of specific fungal community structure on this relationship is largely unknown in paddy soils. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term fertilisation (mineral fertiliser-MIN; farmyard manure-FYM; groundnut oil cake-GOC) effects on soil fungal community shifts associated with soil aggregates under rice-monoculture (RRR) and rice-legume-rice (RLR) systems. Fungal and bacterial communities were characterized using phospholipid fatty acids, and glucosamine and muramic acid were used as biomarkers for fungal and bacterial residues, respectively. Microbial biomass C and N, fungal biomass and residues were significantly higher in the organic fertiliser treatments than in the MIN treatment, for all aggregate sizes under both crop rotation systems. In general, fungal/bacterial biomass ratio and fungal residue C/bacterial residue C ratio were significantly higher in macroaggregate fractions (> 2000 and 250-2000 μm) than in microaggregate fractions (53-250 and <53 μm). In both crop rotation systems, the long-term application of FYM and GOC led to increased accumulation of saprotrophic fungi (SF) in aggregate fractions > 2000 μm. In contrast, we found that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was surprisingly higher in aggregate fractions > 2000 μm than in aggregate fraction 250-2000 μm under MIN treatment. The RLR system showed significantly higher AMF biomass and fungal residue C/ bacterial residue C ratio in both macroaggregate fractions compared to the RRR system. The strong relationships between SF, AMF and water stable aggregates shows the specific contribution of fungi community on soil aggregate stability. Our results highlight the fact that changes within fungal community structure play an important role in shaping the soil

  14. Nebular history of amoeboid olivine aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, N.; Petaev, M. I.; Kimura, M.; Miyazaki, A.; Hiyagon, H.

    2009-05-01

    Minor element (Ca, Cr, and Mn) concentrations in amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) from primitive chondrites were measured and compared with those predicted by equilibrium condensation in the solar nebula. CaO concentrations in forsterite are low, particularly in porous aggregates. A plausible explanation appears that an equilibrium Ca activity was not maintained during the olivine condensation. CaO and MnO in forsterite are negatively correlated, with CaO being higher in compact aggregates. This suggests that the compact aggregates formed either by a prolonged reheating of the porous aggregates or by condensation and aggregation of forsterite during a very slow cooling in the nebula.

  15. Bacterial colony counting by Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Alessandro; Lombardi, Stefano; Signoroni, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Counting bacterial colonies on microbiological culture plates is a time-consuming, error-prone, nevertheless fundamental task in microbiology. Computer vision based approaches can increase the efficiency and the reliability of the process, but accurate counting is challenging, due to the high degree of variability of agglomerated colonies. In this paper, we propose a solution which adopts Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) for counting the number of colonies contained in confluent agglomerates, that scored an overall accuracy of the 92.8% on a large challenging dataset. The proposed CNN-based technique for estimating the cardinality of colony aggregates outperforms traditional image processing approaches, becoming a promising approach to many related applications.

  16. Role of streams in myxobacteria aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiskowski, Maria A.; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark S.

    2004-10-01

    Cell contact, movement and directionality are important factors in biological development (morphogenesis), and myxobacteria are a model system for studying cell-cell interaction and cell organization preceding differentiation. When starved, thousands of myxobacteria cells align, stream and form aggregates which later develop into round, non-motile spores. Canonically, cell aggregation has been attributed to attractive chemotaxis, a long range interaction, but there is growing evidence that myxobacteria organization depends on contact-mediated cell-cell communication. We present a discrete stochastic model based on contact-mediated signaling that suggests an explanation for the initialization of early aggregates, aggregation dynamics and final aggregate distribution. Our model qualitatively reproduces the unique structures of myxobacteria aggregates and detailed stages which occur during myxobacteria aggregation: first, aggregates initialize in random positions and cells join aggregates by random walk; second, cells redistribute by moving within transient streams connecting aggregates. Streams play a critical role in final aggregate size distribution by redistributing cells among fewer, larger aggregates. The mechanism by which streams redistribute cells depends on aggregate sizes and is enhanced by noise. Our model predicts that with increased internal noise, more streams would form and streams would last longer. Simulation results suggest a series of new experiments.

  17. Influence of edaphic, climatic, and agronomic factors on the composition and abundance of nitrifying microorganisms in the rhizosphere of commercial olive crops.

    PubMed

    Caliz, Joan; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Triadó-Margarit, Xavier; Metsis, Madis; Landa, Blanca B; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2015-01-01

    The microbial ecology of the nitrogen cycle in agricultural soils is an issue of major interest. We hypothesized a major effect by farm management systems (mineral versus organic fertilizers) and a minor influence of soil texture and plant variety on the composition and abundance of microbial nitrifiers. We explored changes in composition (16S rRNA gene) of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and in abundance of AOA and AOB (qPCR of amoA genes) in the rhizosphere of 96 olive orchards differing in climatic conditions, agricultural practices, soil properties, and olive variety. Majority of archaea were 1.1b thaumarchaeota (soil crenarchaeotic group, SCG) closely related to the AOA genus Nitrososphaera. Most AOB (97%) were identical to Nitrosospira tenuis and most NOB (76%) were closely related to Nitrospira sp. Common factors shaping nitrifiers assemblage composition were pH, soil texture, and olive variety. AOB abundance was positively correlated with altitude, pH, and clay content, whereas AOA abundances showed significant relationships with organic nitrogen content and exchangeable K. The abundances of AOA differed significantly among soil textures and olive varieties, and those of AOB among soil management systems and olive varieties. Overall, we observed minor effects by orchard management system, soil cover crop practices, plantation age, or soil organic matter content, and major influence of soil texture, pH, and olive tree variety. PMID:25950678

  18. Influence of Edaphic, Climatic, and Agronomic Factors on the Composition and Abundance of Nitrifying Microorganisms in the Rhizosphere of Commercial Olive Crops

    PubMed Central

    Caliz, Joan; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Triadó-Margarit, Xavier; Metsis, Madis; Landa, Blanca B.; Casamayor, Emilio O.

    2015-01-01

    The microbial ecology of the nitrogen cycle in agricultural soils is an issue of major interest. We hypothesized a major effect by farm management systems (mineral versus organic fertilizers) and a minor influence of soil texture and plant variety on the composition and abundance of microbial nitrifiers. We explored changes in composition (16S rRNA gene) of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and in abundance of AOA and AOB (qPCR of amoA genes) in the rhizosphere of 96 olive orchards differing in climatic conditions, agricultural practices, soil properties, and olive variety. Majority of archaea were 1.1b thaumarchaeota (soil crenarchaeotic group, SCG) closely related to the AOA genus Nitrososphaera. Most AOB (97%) were identical to Nitrosospira tenuis and most NOB (76%) were closely related to Nitrospira sp. Common factors shaping nitrifiers assemblage composition were pH, soil texture, and olive variety. AOB abundance was positively correlated with altitude, pH, and clay content, whereas AOA abundances showed significant relationships with organic nitrogen content and exchangeable K. The abundances of AOA differed significantly among soil textures and olive varieties, and those of AOB among soil management systems and olive varieties. Overall, we observed minor effects by orchard management system, soil cover crop practices, plantation age, or soil organic matter content, and major influence of soil texture, pH, and olive tree variety. PMID:25950678

  19. Comparative evaluations of organic matters and nitrogen removal capacities of integrated vertical-flow constructed wetlands: Domestic and nitrified wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun J; Liang, Kang; Wu, Su Q; Zhang, Sheng H; Liang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Two groups of integrated vertical-flow constructed wetland (IVCW) microcosms were established for treating two types of representative wastewater: domestic and nitrified wastewater under two loading rates (LRs) over about two years. Their removal capacities of organic substance and nitrogen as well as the effects of loading rate (LR), outflow temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration were investigated and compared. Efficient chemical oxygen demand (COD) eliminations were achieved by the IVCWs, with the mass removal rates increasing linearly with the increasing LRs strongly, achieving average value of 56.07 g m(-2) d(-1) at the highest loading rate. Nevertheless, the effluent COD concentrations also increased, with the average value exceeding Class I A discharge standard (< 50 mg L(-1)) for municipal wastewater treatment plants in China at the highest loading rate. Greater total nitrogen (TN) mass removal rates but lower efficiencies were obtained at the high LR for both types of wastewater, and better removal was achieved for nitrified wastewater (NW) in comparison to domestic wastewater (DW), probably due to the prevailing anoxic conditions inside the IVCW beds restricted nitrification process of DW. The influences of LR, temperature and DO on COD removal were slight, but all remarkable on TN reduction. As compared to DO, temperature was more crucial for nitrogen removal, and the temperature dependence coefficient for TN removal of low LR of NW was significantly greater than others. PMID:25901854

  20. A crucial role for spatial distribution in bacterial quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meng; Zheng, Huizhen; Ren, Ying; Lou, Ruyun; Wu, Fan; Yu, Weiting; Liu, Xiudong; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process that enables bacteria to communicate using secreted signaling molecules, and then makes a population of bacteria to regulate gene expression collectively and control behavior on a community-wide scale. Theoretical studies of efficiency sensing have suggested that both mass-transfer performance in the local environment and the spatial distribution of cells are key factors affecting QS. Here, an experimental model based on hydrogel microcapsules with a three-dimensional structure was established to investigate the influence of the spatial distribution of cells on bacterial QS. Vibrio harveyi cells formed different spatial distributions in the microcapsules, i.e., they formed cell aggregates with different structures and sizes. The cell aggregates displayed stronger QS than did unaggregated cells even when equal numbers of cells were present. Large aggregates (LA) of cells, with a size of approximately 25 μm, restricted many more autoinducers (AIs) than did small aggregates (SA), with a size of approximately 10 μm, thus demonstrating that aggregate size significantly affects QS. These findings provide a powerful demonstration of the fact that the spatial distribution of cells plays a crucial role in bacterial QS. PMID:27698391

  1. Amyloid-linked cellular toxicity triggered by bacterial inclusion bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Montalban, Nuria; Villaverde, Antonio; Aris, Anna; E-mail: Anna.Aris@irta.es

    2007-04-13

    The aggregation of proteins in the form of amyloid fibrils and plaques is the characteristic feature of some pathological conditions ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to systemic amyloidoses. The mechanisms by which the aggregation processes result in cell damage are under intense investigation but recent data indicate that prefibrillar aggregates are the most proximate mediators of toxicity rather than mature fibrils. Since it has been shown that prefibrillar forms of the nondisease-related misfolded proteins are highly toxic to cultured mammalian cells we have studied the cytoxicity associated to bacterial inclusion bodies that have been recently described as protein deposits presenting amyloid-like structures. We have proved that bacterial inclusion bodies composed by a misfolding-prone {beta}-galactosidase fusion protein are clearly toxic for mammalian cells but the {beta}-galactosidase wild type enzyme forming more structured thermal aggregates does not impair cell viability, despite it also binds and enter into the cells. These results are in the line that the most cytotoxic aggregates are early prefibrilar assemblies but discard the hypothesis that the membrane destabilization is Key event to subsequent disruption of cellular processes, such as ion balance, oxidative state and the eventually cell death.

  2. Rapid Aggregation of Biofuel-Producing Algae by the Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s. PMID:23892750

  3. Rapid aggregation of biofuel-producing algae by the bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2013-10-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s.

  4. Aggregation of DNA by analogs of spermidine; enzymatic and structural studies.

    PubMed Central

    Srivenugopal, K S; Wemmer, D E; Morris, D R

    1987-01-01

    A homologous series of spermidine analogs, with defined abilities to replace the natural polyamine in supporting cell growth, was examined for its influence on the structure of supercoiled, aggregated DNA and on the ability of the DNA aggregates to act as substrates for various enzymes. The concentration of amine necessary to aggregate negatively supercoiled Col E1 DNA was progressively increased as the diaminobutane moiety of spermidine was extended beyond 5 methylene groups. 1H- and 31P-NMR spectroscopy suggested that less rigid DNA aggregates were formed by spermidine analogs than by spermidine itself. Spermidine and its analogs differentially modulated the activities of bacterial and mammalian type I topoisomerases and EcoRI restriction endonuclease on aggregated DNA in a manner reminiscent of the abilities of the amines to stimulate cell growth. When DNA was not aggregated, the influence of the various amines on these reactions was almost identical. These results are discussed in relation to the structures of the DNA aggregates in the presence of the various triamines. Images PMID:3031604

  5. Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1993-11-01

    Several bacterial species are able to catalyze ice formation at temperatures as warm as -2 degrees C. These microorganisms efficiently catalyze ice formation at temperatures much higher than most organic or inorganic substances. Because of their ubiquity on the surfaces of frost-sensitive plants, they are responsible for initiating ice formation, which results in frost injury. The high temperature of ice catalysis conferred by bacterial ice nuclei makes them useful in ice nucleation-limited processes such as artificial snow production, the freezing of some food products, and possibly in future whether modification schemes. The rarity of other ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperature, and the ease and sensitivity with which ice nuclei can be quantified, have made the use of a promoterless bacterial ice nucleation gene valuable as a reporter of transcription. Target genes to which this promoter is fused can be used in cells in natural habitats. Warm-temperature ice nucleation sites have also been extensively studied at a molecular level. Nucleation sites active at high temperatures (above -5 degrees C) are probably composed of bacterial ice nucleation protein molecules that form functionally aligned aggregates. Models of ice nucleation proteins predict that they form a planar array of hydrogen binding groups that closely complement that of an ice crystal face. Moreover, interdigitation of these molecules may produce a large contiguous template for ice formation.

  6. Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1993-11-01

    Several bacterial species are able to catalyze ice formation at temperatures as warm as -2 degrees C. These microorganisms efficiently catalyze ice formation at temperatures much higher than most organic or inorganic substances. Because of their ubiquity on the surfaces of frost-sensitive plants, they are responsible for initiating ice formation, which results in frost injury. The high temperature of ice catalysis conferred by bacterial ice nuclei makes them useful in ice nucleation-limited processes such as artificial snow production, the freezing of some food products, and possibly in future whether modification schemes. The rarity of other ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperature, and the ease and sensitivity with which ice nuclei can be quantified, have made the use of a promoterless bacterial ice nucleation gene valuable as a reporter of transcription. Target genes to which this promoter is fused can be used in cells in natural habitats. Warm-temperature ice nucleation sites have also been extensively studied at a molecular level. Nucleation sites active at high temperatures (above -5 degrees C) are probably composed of bacterial ice nucleation protein molecules that form functionally aligned aggregates. Models of ice nucleation proteins predict that they form a planar array of hydrogen binding groups that closely complement that of an ice crystal face. Moreover, interdigitation of these molecules may produce a large contiguous template for ice formation. PMID:8224607

  7. Artificial Intelligence for the Evaluation of Operational Parameters Influencing Nitrification and Nitrifiers in an Activated Sludge Process.

    PubMed

    Awolusi, Oluyemi Olatunji; Nasr, Mahmoud; Kumari, Sheena; Bux, Faizal

    2016-07-01

    Nitrification at a full-scale activated sludge plant treating municipal wastewater was monitored over a period of 237 days. A combination of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were used for identifying and quantifying the dominant nitrifiers in the plant. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), Pearson's correlation coefficient, and quadratic models were employed in evaluating the plant operational conditions that influence the nitrification performance. The ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) abundance was within the range of 1.55 × 10(8)-1.65 × 10(10) copies L(-1), while Nitrobacter spp. and Nitrospira spp. were 9.32 × 10(9)-1.40 × 10(11) copies L(-1) and 2.39 × 10(9)-3.76 × 10(10) copies L(-1), respectively. Specific nitrification rate (qN) was significantly affected by temperature (r 0.726, p 0.002), hydraulic retention time (HRT) (r -0.651, p 0.009), and ammonia loading rate (ALR) (r 0.571, p 0.026). Additionally, AOB was considerably influenced by HRT (r -0.741, p 0.002) and temperature (r 0.517, p 0.048), while HRT negatively impacted Nitrospira spp. (r -0.627, p 0.012). A quadratic combination of HRT and food-to-microorganism (F/M) ratio also impacted qN (r (2) 0.50), AOB (r (2) 0.61), and Nitrospira spp. (r (2) 0.72), while Nitrobacter spp. was considerably influenced by a polynomial function of F/M ratio and temperature (r (2) 0.49). The study demonstrated that ANFIS could be used as a tool to describe the factors influencing nitrification process at full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:26906468

  8. Impact of exogenous organic carbon on the removal of chemicals of concern in the high rate nitrifying trickling filters.

    PubMed

    Mai, Lei; van den Akker, Ben; Du, Jun; Kookana, Rai S; Fallowfield, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The application of fixed bed high rate nitrifying trickling filters (NTFs) for the removal of track organic chemicals of concern (CoC) is less well known than their application to nutrient removal in water treatment. Particularly, the effect of exogenous organic carbon substrate (sucrose) loading on the performance of NTFs is not well understood. A laboratory-scale NTF system was operated in recirculation mode, with the objective of removing ammonia and CoC simultaneously. The efficiency of a high rate NTF for removal both of low concentration of ammonia (5 mg NH4-N L(-1)) and different concentrations of CoC in the presence of an exogenous organic carbon substrate (30 mg total organic carbon (TOC) L(-1)) was investigated. In the presence of exogenous organic carbon, the results demonstrated that the high rate NTF was able to successfully remove most of the CoCs investigated, with the removal ranging from 20.2% to 87.54%. High removal efficiencies were observed for acetaminophen (87.54%), bisphenol A (86.60%), trimethoprim (86.24%) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (80.60%). It was followed by the medium removal efficiency for N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide (61.31%) and atrazine (56.90%). In contrast, the removal of caffeine (28.43%) and benzotriazole (20.20%) was poorer in the presence of exogenous organic carbon. The removal efficiency for CoC was also compared with the results obtained in our previous study in the absence of exogenous organic carbon. The results showed that the addition of exogenous organic carbon was able to improve the removal of some of the CoC. Significant TOC percentage removals (45.68%-84.43%) and ammonia removal rate (mean value of 0.44 mg NH4-N L(-1) h(-1)) were also achieved in this study. The findings from this study provide valuable information for optimising the efficiency of high rate NTF for the removal of ammonia, CoC and TOC.

  9. Impact of exogenous organic carbon on the removal of chemicals of concern in the high rate nitrifying trickling filters.

    PubMed

    Mai, Lei; van den Akker, Ben; Du, Jun; Kookana, Rai S; Fallowfield, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The application of fixed bed high rate nitrifying trickling filters (NTFs) for the removal of track organic chemicals of concern (CoC) is less well known than their application to nutrient removal in water treatment. Particularly, the effect of exogenous organic carbon substrate (sucrose) loading on the performance of NTFs is not well understood. A laboratory-scale NTF system was operated in recirculation mode, with the objective of removing ammonia and CoC simultaneously. The efficiency of a high rate NTF for removal both of low concentration of ammonia (5 mg NH4-N L(-1)) and different concentrations of CoC in the presence of an exogenous organic carbon substrate (30 mg total organic carbon (TOC) L(-1)) was investigated. In the presence of exogenous organic carbon, the results demonstrated that the high rate NTF was able to successfully remove most of the CoCs investigated, with the removal ranging from 20.2% to 87.54%. High removal efficiencies were observed for acetaminophen (87.54%), bisphenol A (86.60%), trimethoprim (86.24%) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (80.60%). It was followed by the medium removal efficiency for N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide (61.31%) and atrazine (56.90%). In contrast, the removal of caffeine (28.43%) and benzotriazole (20.20%) was poorer in the presence of exogenous organic carbon. The removal efficiency for CoC was also compared with the results obtained in our previous study in the absence of exogenous organic carbon. The results showed that the addition of exogenous organic carbon was able to improve the removal of some of the CoC. Significant TOC percentage removals (45.68%-84.43%) and ammonia removal rate (mean value of 0.44 mg NH4-N L(-1) h(-1)) were also achieved in this study. The findings from this study provide valuable information for optimising the efficiency of high rate NTF for the removal of ammonia, CoC and TOC. PMID:26989940

  10. Identification of inorganic and organic species of phosphorus and its bio-availability in nitrifying aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenli; Cai, Wei; Huang, He; Lei, Zhongfang; Zhang, Zhenya; Tay, Joo Hwa; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) recovery from sewage sludge is necessary for a sustainable development of the environment and thus the society due to gradual depletion of non-renewable P resources. Aerobic granular sludge is a promising biotechnology for wastewater treatment, which could achieve P-rich granules during simultaneous nitrification and denitrification processes. This study aimed to disclose the changes in inorganic and organic P species and their correlation with P mobility and bio-availability in aerobic granules. Two identical square reactors were used to cultivate aerobic granules, which were operated for 120 days with influent ammonia nitrogen (NH₄-N) of 100 mg/L before day 60 and then increased to 200 mg/L during the subsequent 60 days (chemical oxygen demand (COD) was kept constant at 600 mg/L). The aerobic granules exhibited excellent COD removal and nitrification efficiency. Results showed that inorganic P (IP) was about 61.4-67.7% of total P (TP) and non-apatite inorganic P (NAIP) occupied 61.9-70.2% of IP in the granules. The enrichment amount of NAIP and apatite P (AP) in the granules had strongly positive relationship with the contents of metal ions, i.e. Fe and Ca, respectively accumulated in the granules. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and solution index calculation demonstrated that hydroxyapatite (Ca₅(PO₄)₃(OH)) and iron phosphate (Fe₇(PO₄)₆) were the major P minerals in the granules. Organic P (OP) content maintained around 7.5 mg per gram of biomass in the aerobic granules during the 120 days' operation. Monoester phosphate (21.8% of TP in extract), diester phosphate (1.8%) and phosphonate (0.1%) were identified as OP species by Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (³¹P NMR). The proportion of NAIP + OP to TP was about 80% in the granules, implying high potentially mobile and bio-available P was stored in the nitrifying aerobic granules. The present results provide a new insight into the characteristics of P species in aerobic

  11. Artificial Intelligence for the Evaluation of Operational Parameters Influencing Nitrification and Nitrifiers in an Activated Sludge Process.

    PubMed

    Awolusi, Oluyemi Olatunji; Nasr, Mahmoud; Kumari, Sheena; Bux, Faizal

    2016-07-01

    Nitrification at a full-scale activated sludge plant treating municipal wastewater was monitored over a period of 237 days. A combination of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were used for identifying and quantifying the dominant nitrifiers in the plant. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), Pearson's correlation coefficient, and quadratic models were employed in evaluating the plant operational conditions that influence the nitrification performance. The ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) abundance was within the range of 1.55 × 10(8)-1.65 × 10(10) copies L(-1), while Nitrobacter spp. and Nitrospira spp. were 9.32 × 10(9)-1.40 × 10(11) copies L(-1) and 2.39 × 10(9)-3.76 × 10(10) copies L(-1), respectively. Specific nitrification rate (qN) was significantly affected by temperature (r 0.726, p 0.002), hydraulic retention time (HRT) (r -0.651, p 0.009), and ammonia loading rate (ALR) (r 0.571, p 0.026). Additionally, AOB was considerably influenced by HRT (r -0.741, p 0.002) and temperature (r 0.517, p 0.048), while HRT negatively impacted Nitrospira spp. (r -0.627, p 0.012). A quadratic combination of HRT and food-to-microorganism (F/M) ratio also impacted qN (r (2) 0.50), AOB (r (2) 0.61), and Nitrospira spp. (r (2) 0.72), while Nitrobacter spp. was considerably influenced by a polynomial function of F/M ratio and temperature (r (2) 0.49). The study demonstrated that ANFIS could be used as a tool to describe the factors influencing nitrification process at full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  12. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  13. Protein aggregation in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-05-26

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein-protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid-liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer-salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization.

  14. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  15. Morphomechanics of bacterial biofilms undergoing anisotropic differential growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Li, Bo; Huang, Xiao; Ni, Yong; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2016-10-01

    Growing bacterial biofilms exhibit a number of surface morphologies, e.g., concentric wrinkles, radial ridges, and labyrinthine networks, depending on their physiological status and nutrient access. We explore the mechanisms underlying the emergence of these greatly different morphologies. Ginzburg-Landau kinetic method and Fourier spectral method are integrated to simulate the morphological evolution of bacterial biofilms. It is shown that the morphological instability of biofilms is triggered by the stresses induced by anisotropic and heterogeneous bacterial expansion, and involves the competition between membrane energy and bending energy. Local interfacial delamination further enriches the morphologies of biofilms. Phase diagrams are established to reveal how the anisotropy and spatial heterogeneity of growth modulate the surface patterns. The mechanics of three-dimensional microbial morphogenesis may also underpin self-organization in other development systems and provide a potential strategy for engineering microscopic structures from bacterial aggregates.

  16. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  17. Tau Phosphorylation, Aggregation, and Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J.; Santa-María, I.; Pérez, M.; Hernández, F.; Moreno, F.

    2006-01-01

    Protein aggregation takes place in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, there is a controversy about the possible toxicity of these protein aggregates. In this review, this controversy is discussed, focussing on the tau aggregation that takes place in those disorders known as tauopathies. PMID:17047313

  18. Mineral resource of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willett, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Crushed stone and construction sand and gravel, the two major types of natural aggregates, are among the most abundant and accessible natural resources on the planet. The earliest civilizations used aggregates for various purposes, mainly construction. Today aggregates provide the basic raw materials for the foundation of modern society.

  19. Platelet leukocyte aggregates and markers of platelet aggregation, immune activation and disease progression in HIV infected treatment naive asymptomatic individuals.

    PubMed

    Nkambule, Bongani B; Davison, Glenda; Ipp, Hayley

    2015-11-01

    Platelet aggregates play a crucial role in the immune defence mechanism against viruses. Increased levels of lipopolysaccharide have been reported in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals. Platelets are capable of interacting with bacterial LPS and subsequently forming platelet leukocyte aggregates (PLAs). This study aimed at determining the levels of circulating PLAs in treatment naïve HIV infected individuals and correlating them, with markers of immune activation, disease progression and platelet aggregation. Thirty-two HIV negative and 35 HIV positive individuals were recruited from a clinic in the Western Cape. Platelet monocyte and platelet neutrophil aggregates were measured using flow cytometry at baseline and were correlated with markers of platelet activation (CD62P); aggregation (CD36); monocyte and neutrophil activation (CD69); monocyte tissue factor expression (CD142); immune activation (CD38 on T+ cells); D-dimers (a marker of active coagulation); CD4 count and viral load. Platelet monocyte aggregates were also measured post stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. PMA levels were higher in HIV 25.26 (16.16-32.28) versus control 14.12 (8.36-18.83), p = 0.0001. PMAs correlated with %CD38/8 expression (r = 0.54624, p = 0.0155); CD4 count (r = -0.6964, p = 0.0039) viral load (r = 0.633, p < 0.009) and monocyte %CD69 expression (r = 0.757, p = 0.030). In addition the %PMAs correlated with platelet %CD36 (r = 0.606, p = 0.017). The HIV group showed increased levels of %CD62P 5.44 (2.72-11.87) versus control 1.15 (0.19-3.59), p < 0.0001; %CD36 22.53 (10.59-55.15) versus 11.01 (3.69-26.98), p = 0.0312 and tissue factor (CD142) MFI 4.84 (4.01-8.17) versus 1.74 (1.07-9.3), p = 0.0240. We describe increased levels of circulating PMAs which directly correlates with markers of immune activation, disease progression and platelet aggregation in HIV treatment naïve individuals.

  20. Bacterial sorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, M D; Wolf, D C; Ferris, F G; Beveridge, T J; Flemming, C A; Bailey, G W

    1989-01-01

    Four bacteria, Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were examined for the ability to remove Ag+, Cd2+, Cu2+, and La3+ from solution by batch equilibration methods. Cd and Cu sorption over the concentration range 0.001 to 1 mM was described by Freundlich isotherms. At 1 mM concentrations of both Cd2+ and Cu2+, P. aeruginosa and B. cereus were the most and least efficient at metal removal, respectively. Freundlich K constants indicated that E. coli was most efficient at Cd2+ removal and B. subtilis removed the most Cu2+. Removal of Ag+ from solution by bacteria was very efficient; an average of 89% of the total Ag+ was removed from the 1 mM solution, while only 12, 29, and 27% of the total Cd2+, Cu2+, and La3+, respectively, were sorbed from 1 mM solutions. Electron microscopy indicated that La3+ accumulated at the cell surface as needlelike, crystalline precipitates. Silver precipitated as discrete colloidal aggregates at the cell surface and occasionally in the cytoplasm. Neither Cd2+ nor Cu2+ provided enough electron scattering to identify the location of sorption. The affinity series for bacterial removal of these metals decreased in the order Ag greater than La greater than Cu greater than Cd. The results indicate that bacterial cells are capable of binding large quantities of different metals. Adsorption equations may be useful for describing bacterium-metal interactions with metals such as Cd and Cu; however, this approach may not be adequate when precipitation of metals occurs. Images PMID:2515800

  1. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  2. Dynamics and functions of bacterial communities in bark, charcoal and sand filters treating greywater.

    PubMed

    Dalahmeh, Sahar S; Jönsson, Håkan; Hylander, Lars D; Hui, Nan; Yu, Dan; Pell, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    This study explored the effects of greywater application on the dynamics and functions of biofilms developed in bark, activated charcoal and sand filters used for removal of organic matter and nitrogen. Duplicate columns (20 cm diameter, 60 cm deep) were packed with bark, charcoal or sand with effective size 1.4 mm and uniformity coefficient 2.2, and dosed with 32 L m(-2) day(-1) of an artificial greywater (14 g BOD5 m(-2) day(-1)) for 116 days. Potential respiration rate (PRR), determined in filter samples after addition of excess glucose, and bacterial diversity and composition, analysed by 454-pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA, were measured at different times and depths in the filters. The bark and charcoal filters were more efficient in removing BOD5 than the sand (98, 97% and 75%, respectively). The highest PRR in the 0-2 cm layer of the columns on day 84 was found in the bark filters, followed by the charcoal and sand filters (632 ± 66, 222 ± 34 and 56 ± 2 mg O2 L(-1), respectively; n = 2). Bacterial community in the bark filters showed the highest richness. The charcoal and sand filters both developed more diverse and dynamic (changing over time and depth) bacterial communities than the bark. In addition to the greywater, the lignocelluosic composition of the bark and its lower pH probably selected for the bacterial community structure and the organic content provided additional substrate, as shown by its higher PRR and its different nitrifying bacterial genera. In the oligotrophic charcoal and sand, the composition of the greywater itself defined the bacterial community. Thus, the initially low bacterial biomass in the latter filters was enriched over time, allowing a diversified bacterial community to develop. The top layers of the bark and charcoal filters displayed a high dominance of Rhizobium, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter, which were less evident in the 60 cm layer, whereas in the sand filters these genera were

  3. Bacterial community analysis of an industrial wastewater treatment plant in Colombia with screening for lipid-degrading microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Silva-Bedoya, Lina Marcela; Sánchez-Pinzón, María Solange; Cadavid-Restrepo, Gloria Ester; Moreno-Herrera, Claudia Ximena

    2016-11-01

    The operation of wastewater treatment technologies depends on a combination of physical, chemical and biological factors. Microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plants play essential roles in the degradation and removal of organic waste and xenobiotic pollutants. Several microorganisms have been used in complementary treatments to process effluents rich in fats and oils. Microbial lipases have received significant industrial attention because of their stability, broad substrate specificity, high yields, and regular supply, as well as the fact that the microorganisms producing them grow rapidly on inexpensive media. In Colombia, bacterial community studies have focused on populations of cultivable nitrifying, heterotrophic and nitrogen-fixing bacteria present in constructed wetlands. In this study, culture-dependent methods, culture-independent methods (TTGE, RISA) and enzymatic methods were used to estimate bacterial diversity, to monitor temporal and spatial changes in bacterial communities, and to screen microorganisms that presented lipolytic activity. The dominant microorganisms in the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) examined in this study belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The enzymatic studies performed indicated that five bacterial isolates and three fungal isolates possessed the ability to degrade lipids; additionally, the Serratia, Kosakonia and Mucor genera presented lipase-mediated transesterification activity. The implications of these findings in regard to possible applications are discussed later in this paper. Our results indicate that there is a wide diversity of aerobic Gram-negative bacteria inhabiting the different sections of the WWTP, which could indicate its ecological condition, functioning and general efficiency.

  4. Bacterial community analysis of an industrial wastewater treatment plant in Colombia with screening for lipid-degrading microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Silva-Bedoya, Lina Marcela; Sánchez-Pinzón, María Solange; Cadavid-Restrepo, Gloria Ester; Moreno-Herrera, Claudia Ximena

    2016-11-01

    The operation of wastewater treatment technologies depends on a combination of physical, chemical and biological factors. Microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plants play essential roles in the degradation and removal of organic waste and xenobiotic pollutants. Several microorganisms have been used in complementary treatments to process effluents rich in fats and oils. Microbial lipases have received significant industrial attention because of their stability, broad substrate specificity, high yields, and regular supply, as well as the fact that the microorganisms producing them grow rapidly on inexpensive media. In Colombia, bacterial community studies have focused on populations of cultivable nitrifying, heterotrophic and nitrogen-fixing bacteria present in constructed wetlands. In this study, culture-dependent methods, culture-independent methods (TTGE, RISA) and enzymatic methods were used to estimate bacterial diversity, to monitor temporal and spatial changes in bacterial communities, and to screen microorganisms that presented lipolytic activity. The dominant microorganisms in the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) examined in this study belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The enzymatic studies performed indicated that five bacterial isolates and three fungal isolates possessed the ability to degrade lipids; additionally, the Serratia, Kosakonia and Mucor genera presented lipase-mediated transesterification activity. The implications of these findings in regard to possible applications are discussed later in this paper. Our results indicate that there is a wide diversity of aerobic Gram-negative bacteria inhabiting the different sections of the WWTP, which could indicate its ecological condition, functioning and general efficiency. PMID:27664750

  5. Microwave extinction characteristics of nanoparticle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. P.; Cheng, J. X.; Liu, X. X.; Wang, H. X.; Zhao, F. T.; Wen, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    Structure of nanoparticle aggregates plays an important role in microwave extinction capacity. The diffusion-limited aggregation model (DLA) for fractal growth is utilized to explore the possible structures of nanoparticle aggregates by computer simulation. Based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method, the microwave extinction performance by different nano-carborundum aggregates is numerically analyzed. The effects of the particle quantity, original diameter, fractal structure, as well as orientation on microwave extinction are investigated, and also the extinction characteristics of aggregates are compared with the spherical nanoparticle in the same volume. Numerical results give out that proper aggregation of nanoparticle is beneficial to microwave extinction capacity, and the microwave extinction cross section by aggregated granules is better than that of the spherical solid one in the same volume.

  6. What favors convective aggregation and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Caroline; Bony, Sandrine

    2015-07-01

    The organization of convection is ubiquitous, but its physical understanding remains limited. One particular type of organization is the spatial self-aggregation of convection, taking the form of cloud clusters, or tropical cyclones in the presence of rotation. We show that several physical processes can give rise to self-aggregation and highlight the key features responsible for it, using idealized simulations. Longwave radiative feedbacks yield a "radiative aggregation." In that case, sufficient spatial variability of radiative cooling rates yields a low-level circulation, which induces the upgradient energy transport and radiative-convective instability. Not only do vertically integrated radiative budgets matter but the vertical profile of cooling is also crucial. Convective aggregation is facilitated when downdrafts below clouds are weak ("moisture-memory aggregation"), and this is sufficient to trigger aggregation in the absence of longwave radiative feedbacks. These results shed some light on the sensitivity of self-aggregation to various parameters, including resolution or domain size.

  7. Simulation of J-aggregate microcavity photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michetti, Paolo; La Rocca, Giuseppe C.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed a model in order to account for the photoexcitation dynamics of J-aggregate films and strongly coupled J-aggregate microcavities. The J aggregates are described as a disordered Frenkel exciton system in which relaxation occurs due to the presence of a thermal bath of molecular vibrations. The correspondence between the photophysics in J-aggregate films and that in J-aggregate microcavities is obtained by introducing a model polariton wave function mixing cavity photon modes and J-aggregate super-radiant excitons. With the same description of the material properties, we have calculated both absorption and luminescence spectra for the J-aggregate film and the photoluminescence of strongly coupled organic microcavities. The model is able to account for the fast relaxation dynamics in organic microcavities following nonresonant pumping and explains the temperature dependence of the ratio between the upper polariton and the lower polariton luminescence.

  8. Changes in fractal dimension during aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Rajat K; Gardner, Kevin H; Atkinson, Joseph F; Van Benschoten, John E

    2003-02-01

    Experiments were performed to evaluate temporal changes in the fractal dimension of aggregates formed during flocculation of an initially monodisperse suspension of latex microspheres. Particle size distributions and aggregate geometrical information at different mixing times were obtained using a non-intrusive optical sampling and digital image analysis technique, under variable conditions of mixing speed, coagulant (alum) dose and particle concentration. Pixel resolution required to determine aggregate size and geometric measures including the fractal dimension is discussed and a quantitative measure of accuracy is developed. The two-dimensional fractal dimension was found to range from 1.94 to 1.48, corresponding to aggregates that are either relatively compact or loosely structured, respectively. Changes in fractal dimension are explained using a conceptual model, which describes changes in fractal dimension associated with aggregate growth and changes in aggregate structure. For aggregation of an initially monodisperse suspension, the fractal dimension was found to decrease over time in the initial stages of floc formation.

  9. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Lipid II Aggregation, Causing Membrane Instability and Vesicle Budding

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Katharina M.; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane. PMID:25762323

  10. The lantibiotic nisin induces lipid II aggregation, causing membrane instability and vesicle budding.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Katharina M; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-03-10

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane. PMID:25762323

  11. Symbiotic Cell Differentiation and Cooperative Growth in Multicellular Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Jumpei F; Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    As cells grow and divide under a given environment, they become crowded and resources are limited, as seen in bacterial biofilms and multicellular aggregates. These cells often show strong interactions through exchanging chemicals, as evident in quorum sensing, to achieve mutualism and division of labor. Here, to achieve stable division of labor, three characteristics are required. First, isogenous cells differentiate into several types. Second, this aggregate of distinct cell types shows better growth than that of isolated cells without interaction and differentiation, by achieving division of labor. Third, this cell aggregate is robust with respect to the number distribution of differentiated cell types. Indeed, theoretical studies have thus far considered how such cooperation is achieved when the ability of cell differentiation is presumed. Here, we address how cells acquire the ability of cell differentiation and division of labor simultaneously, which is also connected with the robustness of a cell society. For this purpose, we developed a dynamical-systems model of cells consisting of chemical components with intracellular catalytic reaction dynamics. The reactions convert external nutrients into internal components for cellular growth, and the divided cells interact through chemical diffusion. We found that cells sharing an identical catalytic network spontaneously differentiate via induction from cell-cell interactions, and then achieve division of labor, enabling a higher growth rate than that in the unicellular case. This symbiotic differentiation emerged for a class of reaction networks under the condition of nutrient limitation and strong cell-cell interactions. Then, robustness in the cell type distribution was achieved, while instability of collective growth could emerge even among the cooperative cells when the internal reserves of products were dominant. The present mechanism is simple and general as a natural consequence of interacting cells with

  12. Spatio-temporal Variation In Groundwater Bacterial Densities In A Riparian Wetland : Relationship Between Nitrogen and Organic Carbon Inputs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Pérez, J. M.; Garabetian, F.; Pavio, P.; Sauvage, S.; Rols, P.; Vervier, P.

    Total (DAPI) and nitrifying (MPN) bacteria were enumerated in groundwaters and sediments in a riparian zone. The studied site, 50 ha, is located within a meander of the river Garonne (France). The bacteria densities in groundwaters are strongly con- ditioned by the hydrological functioning of the zone, with highest densities (up to 3.3 106 cell mL-1) during the flood events. Total bacterial densities in groundwater proved to be related to surface waters bacterial numbers. As expected in sediment, total bacte- ria are mainly attached to fine particles (90 % in the fraction < 1000 mm). Irrespective of the hydrological conditions, the number of bacteria associated with the sediment (fraction < 2mm) remain constant. As concerns MPN counts of NH4 oxidising bac- teria, decreasing values (4 log) were observed from the alluvial to the river influenced groundwater. This result must be considered as preliminary given MPN precision and number of analysed samples. However the spatial extension of this low growth rate autotrophs might be explained by the higher residence time of alluvial groundwater allowing community growth while competition for oxygen with heterotrophs would reduce nitrifying bacteria densities. Further investigations The spatial variations of the total bacteria densities in the site are correlated with the exchanges between the groundwater and the river. From the upstream part of the meander to the downstream one, organic carbon and total bacteria concentrations are decreasing in the same way than the nitrate oneSs. These results suggest that in this kind of riparian wetland, ni- trates coming from alluvial groundwater influenced by agriculture may be consumed (denitrification ?) by organic carbon and bacteria originated from surface water of the river.

  13. Inhomogeneous diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinger, Robin Blumberg; Nittmann, Johann; Stanley, H. E.

    1989-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that inhomogeneous diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model can be used to simulate viscous fingering in a medium with inhomogeneous permeability and homogeneous porosity. The medium consists of a pipe-pore square-lattice network in which all pores have equal volume and the pipes have negligible volume. It is shown that fluctuations in a DLA-based growth process may be tuned by noise reduction, and that fluctuations in the velocity of the moving interface are multiplicative in form.

  14. Familial Aggregation of Absolute Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Baharloo, Siamak; Service, Susan K.; Risch, Neil; Gitschier, Jane; Freimer, Nelson B.

    2000-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is a behavioral trait that is defined as the ability to identify the pitch of tones in the absence of a reference pitch. AP is an ideal phenotype for investigation of gene and environment interactions in the development of complex human behaviors. Individuals who score exceptionally well on formalized auditory tests of pitch perception are designated as “AP-1.” As described in this report, auditory testing of siblings of AP-1 probands and of a control sample indicates that AP-1 aggregates in families. The implications of this finding for the mapping of loci for AP-1 predisposition are discussed. PMID:10924408

  15. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  16. Detergent-mediated protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Ghanei, Hamed; Holyoake, John; Bishop, Russell E; Privé, Gilbert G; Pomès, Régis

    2013-04-01

    Because detergents are commonly used to solvate membrane proteins for structural evaluation, much attention has been devoted to assessing the conformational bias imparted by detergent micelles in comparison to the native environment of the lipid bilayer. Here, we conduct six 500-ns simulations of a system with >600,000 atoms to investigate the spontaneous self assembly of dodecylphosphocholine detergent around multiple molecules of the integral membrane protein PagP. This detergent formed equatorial micelles in which acyl chains surround the protein's hydrophobic belt, confirming existing models of the detergent solvation of membrane proteins. In addition, unexpectedly, the extracellular and periplasmic apical surfaces of PagP interacted with the headgroups of detergents in other micelles 85 and 60% of the time, respectively, forming complexes that were stable for hundreds of nanoseconds. In some cases, an apical surface of one molecule of PagP interacted with an equatorial micelle surrounding another molecule of PagP. In other cases, the apical surfaces of two molecules of PagP simultaneously bound a neat detergent micelle. In these ways, detergents mediated the non-specific aggregation of folded PagP. These simulation results are consistent with dynamic light scattering experiments, which show that, at detergent concentrations ≥600 mM, PagP induces the formation of large scattering species that are likely to contain many copies of the PagP protein. Together, these simulation and experimental results point to a potentially generic mechanism of detergent-mediated protein aggregation.

  17. Attracted diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, S H Ebrahimnazhad; Saberi, A A

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) with a seed placed on an attractive plane as a simple model in connection with the electrical double layers. We compute the fractal dimension of the aggregated patterns as a function of the attraction strength α. For the patterns grown in both two and three dimensions, the fractal dimension shows a significant dependence on the attraction strength for small values of α and approaches that of the ordinary two-dimensional (2D) DLA in the limit of large α. For the nonattracting case with α = 1, our results in three dimensions reproduce the patterns of 3D ordinary DLA, while in two dimensions our model leads to the formation of a compact cluster with dimension 2. For intermediate α, the 3D clusters have a quasi-2D structure with a fractal dimension very close to that of the ordinary 2D DLA. This allows one to control the morphology of a growing cluster by tuning a single external parameter α. PMID:23005417

  18. Attracted diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbari, S. H. Ebrahimnazhad; Saberi, A. A.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) with a seed placed on an attractive plane as a simple model in connection with the electrical double layers. We compute the fractal dimension of the aggregated patterns as a function of the attraction strength α. For the patterns grown in both two and three dimensions, the fractal dimension shows a significant dependence on the attraction strength for small values of α and approaches that of the ordinary two-dimensional (2D) DLA in the limit of large α. For the nonattracting case with α=1, our results in three dimensions reproduce the patterns of 3D ordinary DLA, while in two dimensions our model leads to the formation of a compact cluster with dimension 2. For intermediate α, the 3D clusters have a quasi-2D structure with a fractal dimension very close to that of the ordinary 2D DLA. This allows one to control the morphology of a growing cluster by tuning a single external parameter α.

  19. Sectoral shifts and aggregate unemployment

    SciTech Connect

    Loungani, P.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent research has taken the view that sectoral or industry-specific shocks significantly affect aggregate unemployment by increasing the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required. The empirical evidence for this view rests on the finding that during the 1950s - and again during the 1970s - there was a positive correlation between aggregate unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth rates. This thesis demonstrates that this correlation arises largely because oil price shocks affect both unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth. Once the dispersion due to oil shocks is accounted for, the residual dispersion in employment has very low explanatory power for unemployment. Since the dispersion index does not measure pure sectoral shifts, an alternate measure of dispersion is developed that serves as a better proxy for the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required each period. Estimates using this measure suggest that, during the 1950s, temporary increases in the relative price of oil were responsible for generating the observed correlation. On the other hand, sectoral shifts were important during the 1970s; in particular, the 1973 oil price increase has had significant reallocative effects on the economy. This contention is subjected to further tests by looking at the time-series behavior of employment in durable-goods industries and also by following the inter-industry movements of workers over time through the use of panel data.

  20. A review of volcanic ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. J.; Bonadonna, C.; Durant, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Most volcanic ash particles with diameters <63 μm settle from eruption clouds as particle aggregates that cumulatively have larger sizes, lower densities, and higher terminal fall velocities than individual constituent particles. Particle aggregation reduces the atmospheric residence time of fine ash, which results in a proportional increase in fine ash fallout within 10-100 s km from the volcano and a reduction in airborne fine ash mass concentrations 1000 s km from the volcano. Aggregate characteristics vary with distance from the volcano: proximal aggregates are typically larger (up to cm size) with concentric structures, while distal aggregates are typically smaller (sub-millimetre size). Particles comprising ash aggregates are bound through hydro-bonds (liquid and ice water) and electrostatic forces, and the rate of particle aggregation correlates with cloud liquid water availability. Eruption source parameters (including initial particle size distribution, erupted mass, eruption column height, cloud water content and temperature) and the eruption plume temperature lapse rate, coupled with the environmental parameters, determines the type and spatiotemporal distribution of aggregates. Field studies, lab experiments and modelling investigations have already provided important insights on the process of particle aggregation. However, new integrated observations that combine remote sensing studies of ash clouds with field measurement and sampling, and lab experiments are required to fill current gaps in knowledge surrounding the theory of ash aggregate formation.

  1. Applications of aggregation theory to sustainability assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pollesch, N.; Dale, V. H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to aid in transition towards operations that promote sustainability goals, researchers and stakeholders use sustainability assessments. Although assessments take various forms, many utilize diverse sets of indicators that can number anywhere from two to over 2000. Indices, composite indicators, or aggregate values are used to simplify high dimensional and complex data sets and to clarify assessment results. Although the choice of aggregation function is a key component in the development of the assessment, there are few examples to be found in literature to guide appropriate aggregation function selection. This paper develops a connection between the mathematical study of aggregation functions and sustainability assessment in order to aid in providing criteria for aggregation function selection. Relevant mathematical properties of aggregation functions are presented and interpreted. Lastly, we provide cases of these properties and their relation to previous sustainability assessment research. Examples show that mathematical aggregation properties can be used to address the topics of compensatory behavior and weak versus strong sustainability, aggregation of data under varying units of measurements, multiple site multiple indicator aggregation, and the determination of error bounds in aggregate output for normalized and non-normalized indicator measures.

  2. Applications of aggregation theory to sustainability assessment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pollesch, N.; Dale, V. H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to aid in transition towards operations that promote sustainability goals, researchers and stakeholders use sustainability assessments. Although assessments take various forms, many utilize diverse sets of indicators that can number anywhere from two to over 2000. Indices, composite indicators, or aggregate values are used to simplify high dimensional and complex data sets and to clarify assessment results. Although the choice of aggregation function is a key component in the development of the assessment, there are few examples to be found in literature to guide appropriate aggregation function selection. This paper develops a connection between the mathematical study ofmore » aggregation functions and sustainability assessment in order to aid in providing criteria for aggregation function selection. Relevant mathematical properties of aggregation functions are presented and interpreted. Lastly, we provide cases of these properties and their relation to previous sustainability assessment research. Examples show that mathematical aggregation properties can be used to address the topics of compensatory behavior and weak versus strong sustainability, aggregation of data under varying units of measurements, multiple site multiple indicator aggregation, and the determination of error bounds in aggregate output for normalized and non-normalized indicator measures.« less

  3. Mechanisms of bacterial pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J; Schurr, M; LeBlanc, C; Ramamurthy, R; Buchanan, K; Nickerson, C

    2002-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilise a number of mechanisms to cause disease in human hosts. Bacterial pathogens express a wide range of molecules that bind host cell targets to facilitate a variety of different host responses. The molecular strategies used by bacteria to interact with the host can be unique to specific pathogens or conserved across several different species. A key to fighting bacterial disease is the identification and characterisation of all these different strategies. The availability of complete genome sequences for several bacterial pathogens coupled with bioinformatics will lead to significant advances toward this goal. PMID:11930024

  4. Bacterial challenges in food

    PubMed Central

    Collee, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of bacterial challenges that might be encountered in food are discussed with reference to recognized and relatively unrecognized hazards. Mechanisms of pathogenicity are reviewed and the populations at risk are noted. The bacterial content of food as it is served at table merits more study. The challenge of prevention by education is discussed. Indirect bacterial challenges in our food are considered. The real challenge of diagnosis depends upon an awareness of a complex range of conditions; the importance of effective communication with efficient laboratory and epidemiological services is stressed. There is an increasing need for care in the preparation and distribution of food. PMID:4467860

  5. Asphaltene Aggregation and Fouling Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshesh, Marzie

    This thesis explored the properties of asphaltene nano-aggregates in crude oil and toluene based solutions and fouling at process furnace temperatures, and the links between these two phenomena. The link between stability of asphaltenes at ambient conditions and fouling at the conditions of a delayed coker furnace, at over 450 °C, was examined by blending crude oil with an aliphatic diluent in different ratios. The stability of the blends were measured using a S-value analyzer, then fouling rates were measured on electrically heated stainless steel 316 wires in an autoclave reactor. The less stable the blend, the greater the rate and extent of fouling. The most severe fouling occurred with the unstable asphaltenes. SEM imaging of the foulant illustrates very different textures, with the structure becoming more porous with lower stability. Under cross-polarized light, the coke shows the presence of mesophase in the foulant layer. These data suggest a correlation between the fouling rate at high temperature furnace conditions and the stability index of the crude oil. Three organic polysulfides were introduced to the crude oil to examine their effect on fouling. The polysulfides are able to reduce coking and carbon monoxide generation in steam crackers. The fouling results demonstrated that polysulfide with more sulfur content increased the amount of corrosion-fouling of the wire. Various additives, solvents, ultrasound, and heat were employed to attempt to completely disaggregate the asphaltene nano-aggregates in solution at room temperature. The primary analytical technique used to monitor the nano-aggregation state of the asphaltenes in solution was the UV-visible spectroscopy. The results indicate that stronger solvents, such as pyridine and quinoline, combined with ionic liquids yield a slight reduction in the apparent absorbance at longer wavelengths, indicative of a decrease in the nano-aggregate size although the magnitude of the decrease is not significant

  6. Microbial characterization of nitrification in a shallow, nitrogen-contaminated aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts and detection of a novel cluster associated with nitrifying Betaproteobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Daniel N.; Smith, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater nitrification is a poorly characterized process affecting the speciation and transport of nitrogen. Cores from two sites in a plume of contamination were examined using culture-based and molecular techniques targeting nitrification processes. The first site, located beneath a sewage effluent infiltration bed, received treated effluent containing O 2 (> 300 µM) and NH 4+ (51-800 µM). The second site was 2.5 km down-gradient near the leading edge of the ammonium zone within the contaminant plume and featured vertical gradients of O 2, NH 4+, and NO 3- (0-300, 0-500, and 100-200 µM with depth, respectively). Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizers enumerated by the culture-based MPN method were low in abundance at both sites (1.8 to 350 g - 1 and 33 to 35,000 g - 1 , respectively). Potential nitrifying activity measured in core material in the laboratory was also very low, requiring several weeks for products to accumulate. Molecular analysis of aquifer DNA (nested PCR followed by cloning and 16S rDNA sequencing) detected primarily sequences associated with the Nitrosospira genus throughout the cores at the down-gradient site and a smaller proportion from the Nitrosomonas genus in the deeper anoxic, NH 4+ zone at the down-gradient site. Only a single Nitrosospira sequence was detected beneath the infiltration bed. Furthermore, the majority of Nitrosospira-associated sequences represent an unrecognized cluster. We conclude that an uncharacterized group associated with Nitrosospira dominate at the geochemically stable, down-gradient site, but found little evidence for Betaproteobacteria nitrifiers beneath the infiltration beds where geochemical conditions were more variable.

  7. Effect of recycle-to-influent ratio on activities of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in a combined UASB-activated sludge reactor system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ju-Sheng; Chou, Hsin-Hsien; Chen, Chih-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Mao

    2007-06-01

    A laboratory study using a combined upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB)-activated sludge (AS) reactor system was undertaken to explore the effect of recycle-to-influent ratio (R(e)=1, 2, and 3) on the activities of nitrifiers and denitrifiers. Suspended-solids pre-settled piggery wastewater was used as the substrate-feed wastewater. At the R(e) of 1-3, the combined reactor system achieved efficient removal of COD (96-97%), TKN (100%) and total nitrogen TN (54-77%). Methanogenesis occurred with nearly-complete denitrification in the UASB reactor, whereas complete nitrification took place in the AS reactor. A higher R(e) (i.e., accompanied with a shorter solids retention time) resulted in a larger amount of high-activity denitrifiers and thereby achieved a higher TN removal efficiency. Compact granules and a high biomass concentration in the UASB reactor were observed. At the R(e) of 1-3, the maximum specific reaction rate of nitrifiers (0.45-0.49 NH(4)(+)-NmgVSS(-1)d(-1)) and the specific nitrification rates of mixed culture (0.18-0.22mg NH(4)(+)-NmgVSS(-1)d(-1)) in the AS reactor varied slightly; whereas the maximum specific reaction rate of denitrifiers (0.18-0.27mg NO(x)(-)-NmgVSS(-1)d(-1)) and the specific denitrification and COD removal rates of mixed culture (0.025-0.050mg NO(x)(-)-NmgVSS(-1)d(-1); 0.24-0.31mgCODmgVSS(-1)d(-1)) in the UASB reactor increased with increasing R(e). The primary finding of the study is that the combined UASB-AS reactor system should be operated at a higher R(e) to maintain high-activity denitrifiers to remove organic materials and nitrogen from piggery wastewater.

  8. Microbial characterization of nitrification in a shallow, nitrogen-contaminated aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts and detection of a novel cluster associated with nitrifying Betaproteobacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.N.; Smith, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater nitrification is a poorly characterized process affecting the speciation and transport of nitrogen. Cores from two sites in a plume of contamination were examined using culture-based and molecular techniques targeting nitrification processes. The first site, located beneath a sewage effluent infiltration bed, received treated effluent containing O2 (> 300????M) and NH4+ (51-800????M). The second site was 2.5??km down-gradient near the leading edge of the ammonium zone within the contaminant plume and featured vertical gradients of O2, NH4+, and NO3- (0-300, 0-500, and 100-200????M with depth, respectively). Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizers enumerated by the culture-based MPN method were low in abundance at both sites (1.8 to 350??g- 1 and 33 to 35,000??g- 1, respectively). Potential nitrifying activity measured in core material in the laboratory was also very low, requiring several weeks for products to accumulate. Molecular analysis of aquifer DNA (nested PCR followed by cloning and 16S rDNA sequencing) detected primarily sequences associated with the Nitrosospira genus throughout the cores at the down-gradient site and a smaller proportion from the Nitrosomonas genus in the deeper anoxic, NH4+ zone at the down-gradient site. Only a single Nitrosospira sequence was detected beneath the infiltration bed. Furthermore, the majority of Nitrosospira-associated sequences represent an unrecognized cluster. We conclude that an uncharacterized group associated with Nitrosospira dominate at the geochemically stable, down-gradient site, but found little evidence for Betaproteobacteria nitrifiers beneath the infiltration beds where geochemical conditions were more variable.

  9. Microbial characterization of nitrification in a shallow, nitrogen-contaminated aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts and detection of a novel cluster associated with nitrifying Betaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel N; Smith, Richard L

    2009-01-26

    Groundwater nitrification is a poorly characterized process affecting the speciation and transport of nitrogen. Cores from two sites in a plume of contamination were examined using culture-based and molecular techniques targeting nitrification processes. The first site, located beneath a sewage effluent infiltration bed, received treated effluent containing O2 (>300 microM) and NH4+ (51-800 microM). The second site was 2.5 km down-gradient near the leading edge of the ammonium zone within the contaminant plume and featured vertical gradients of O2, NH4+, and NO3- (0-300, 0-500, and 100-200 microM with depth, respectively). Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizers enumerated by the culture-based MPN method were low in abundance at both sites (1.8 to 350 g(-1) and 33 to 35,000 g(-1), respectively). Potential nitrifying activity measured in core material in the laboratory was also very low, requiring several weeks for products to accumulate. Molecular analysis of aquifer DNA (nested PCR followed by cloning and 16S rDNA sequencing) detected primarily sequences associated with the Nitrosospira genus throughout the cores at the down-gradient site and a smaller proportion from the Nitrosomonas genus in the deeper anoxic, NH4+ zone at the down-gradient site. Only a single Nitrosospira sequence was detected beneath the infiltration bed. Furthermore, the majority of Nitrosospira-associated sequences represent an unrecognized cluster. We conclude that an uncharacterized group associated with Nitrosospira dominate at the geochemically stable, down-gradient site, but found little evidence for Betaproteobacteria nitrifiers beneath the infiltration beds where geochemical conditions were more variable.

  10. Natural aggregates of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.

    1988-01-01

    Crushed stone and sand and gravel are the two main sources of natural aggregates. These materials are commonly used construction materials and frequently can be interchanged with one another. They are widely used throughout the United States, with every State except two producing crushed stone. Together they amount to about half the mining volume in the United States. Approximately 96 percent of sand and gravel and 77 percent of the crushed stone produced in the United States are used in the construction industry. Natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States in a variety of geologic environments. Sand and gravel deposits commonly are the results of the weathering of bedrock and subsequent transportation and deposition of the material by water or ice (glaciers). As such, they commonly occur as river or stream deposits or in glaciated areas as glaciofluvial and other deposits. Crushed stone aggregates are derived from a wide variety of parent bedrock materials. Limestone and other carbonates account for approximately three quarters of the rocks used for crushed stone, with granite and other igneous rocks making up the bulk of the remainder. Limestone deposits are widespread throughout the Central and Eastern United States and are scattered in the West. Granites are widely distributed in the Eastern and Western United States, with few exposures in the Midwest. Igneous rocks (excluding granites) are largely concentrated in the Western United States and in a few isolated localities in the East. Even though natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States, they are not universally available for consumptive use. Some areas are devoid of sand and gravel, and potential sources of crushed stone may be covered with sufficient unconsolidated material to make surface mining impractical. In some areas many aggregates do not meet the physical property requirements for certain uses, or they may contain mineral constituents that react

  11. Platelet function in dogs with bacterial infections and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Abid, Monia; Kalbantner, Kerstin; Mischke, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of bacterial infections or leishmaniasis on primary haemostasis in dogs. Capillary bleeding time, automatic platelet function analysis (PFA-100), turbidimetric platelet aggregation, impedance aggregometry, platelet count and, in addition, the haematocrit were investigated in 25 dogs with bacterial infections or leishmaniasis . Results of these diseased dogs were compared to the control group and additionally classified into two subgroups based on criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (groups "SIRS" and "Non-SIRS"). Dogs with infections had a significantly prolonged closure time of the PFA-100 using both cartridges (e. g., collagen/ADP: 83 [55-301] vs. 65 [47-99 s; median [minimum-maximum]; p < 0.0001), a significant decrease in maximal aggregation of the turbidimetric aggregometry (e. g., ADP-induced: 45.2 ± 26.8 vs. 67.3 ± 21.8%; mean ± SD; P = 0.003), a significant increase of collagen-induced impedance aggregometry and a significant suppression of arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry. An enhanced collagen-induced impedance aggregation was the only significant difference between subgroups "SIRS"and "Non-SIRS". In conclusion, although individual tests indicate enhanced platelet aggregation, most of the in vitro tests revealed a normal to moderately reduced functionality. The reduced aggregabiity may partly indicate preactivation of platelets. PMID:26281441

  12. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  13. Bacterial surface adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  14. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in people who work in the health care industry. Chronic paronychia is most common in adult women and those who work in places where their hands are kept moist, such as food handlers. Signs and Symptoms Bacterial nail infection most ...

  15. Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Welch, Roy; Kaiser, Dale; Oster, George

    2004-03-01

    Under starvation conditions, a population of myxobacteria aggregates to build a fruiting body whose shape is species-specific and within which the cells sporulate. Early in this process, cells often pass through a "ripple phase" characterized by traveling linear, concentric, and spiral waves. These waves are different from the waves observed during slime mold aggregation that depend on diffusible morphogens, because myxobacteria communicate by direct contact. The difference is most dramatic when waves collide: rather than annihilating one another, myxobacterial waves appear to pass through one another unchanged. Under certain conditions, the spacing and location of the nascent fruiting bodies is determined by the wavelength and pattern of the waves. Later in fruiting body development, waves are replaced by streams of cells that circulate around small initial aggregates enlarging and rounding them. Still later, pairs of motile aggregates coalesce to form larger aggregates that develop into fruiting bodies. Here we present a mathematical model that quantitatively explains these wave and aggregation phenomena.

  16. Aggregation server for grid-integrated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Kempton, Willett

    2015-05-26

    Methods, systems, and apparatus for aggregating electric power flow between an electric grid and electric vehicles are disclosed. An apparatus for aggregating power flow may include a memory and a processor coupled to the memory to receive electric vehicle equipment (EVE) attributes from a plurality of EVEs, aggregate EVE attributes, predict total available capacity based on the EVE attributes, and dispatch at least a portion of the total available capacity to the grid. Power flow may be aggregated by receiving EVE operational parameters from each EVE, aggregating the received EVE operational parameters, predicting total available capacity based on the aggregated EVE operational parameters, and dispatching at least a portion of the total available capacity to the grid.

  17. Tubular aggregates: their association with myalgia.

    PubMed Central

    Niakan, E; Harati, Y; Danon, M J

    1985-01-01

    Three thousand consecutive muscle biopsies were reviewed for the presence of tubular aggregates and their association with clinical symptomatology. Tubular aggregates were detected in 19 patients (0.6%). Twelve of these nineteen patients had severe myalgia, and the most abundant tubular aggregates were found in biopsies of patients with myalgia. Seven patients had only myalgia as their clinical symptomatology with normal physical examination. An additional five patients with tubular aggregates and myalgia had concomitant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (2) or neuropathy (3). The high incidence of myalgia associated with tubular aggregates in our patients and the fact that tubular aggregates originate from sarcoplasmic reticulum suggest a role played by this structure in the pathogenesis of myalgia. Images PMID:2995591

  18. [Effects of long-term tillage measurements on soil aggregate characteristic and microbial diversity].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Hui-Jun; Wu, Xue-Ping; Cai, Dian-Xiong; Yao, Yu-Qing; Lü, Jun-Jie; Tian, Yun-Long

    2014-08-01

    Soil aggregate stability and microbial diversity play important roles in nutrient recycling in soil-crop systems. This study investigated the impacts of different soil tillage systems on soil aggregation and soil microbial diversity based on a 15-year long-term experiment on loess soil in Henan Province of China. Treatments included reduced tillage (RT), no-tillage (NT), sub-soiling with mulch (SM), wheat-peanut two crops (TC), and conventional tillage (CT). Soil aggregates were separated by wet sieving method, and soil microbial (bacterial, archaeal and fungal) diversity was examined by using the techniques of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis. The results showed that water-stable macroaggregates concent (R0.25) and the mean mass diameter (MWD) in the surface soil significantly increased under NT, SM and TC, R0.25 increased by 21.5%, 29.5% and 69.2%, and MWD increased by 18.0%, 12.2% and 50.4%, respectively, as compared with CT. Tillage practices caused changes in bacterial, archaeal and fungal community compositions. With NT, SM and TC, the bacterial, archaeal and fungal Shannon indices increased by 0.3%, 0.3%, and 0.6%, and 20.2%, 40.5%, and 49.1%, and 23.7%, 19.5%, and 25.8%, respectively, as compared with CT. Both bacterial and archaeal Shannon indices were significantly correlated with the indices of R0.25 and MWD, while the fungal Shannon index was not significantly correlated with these two indices. In conclusion, conservation tillage, including NT and SM, and crop rotation, including TC, improved soil aggregation and soil microbial diversity.

  19. Bistability and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Malka, Roy; Shochat, Eliezer; Rom-Kedar, Vered

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections occur when the natural host defenses are overwhelmed by invading bacteria. The main component of the host defense is impaired when neutrophil count or function is too low, putting the host at great risk of developing an acute infection. In people with intact immune systems, neutrophil count increases during bacterial infection. However, there are two important clinical cases in which they remain constant: a) in patients with neutropenic-associated conditions, such as those undergoing chemotherapy at the nadir (the minimum clinically observable neutrophil level); b) in ex vivo examination of the patient's neutrophil bactericidal activity. Here we study bacterial population dynamics under fixed neutrophil levels by mathematical modelling. We show that under reasonable biological assumptions, there are only two possible scenarios: 1) Bacterial behavior is monostable: it always converges to a stable equilibrium of bacterial concentration which only depends, in a gradual manner, on the neutrophil level (and not on the initial bacterial level). We call such a behavior type I dynamics. 2) The bacterial dynamics is bistable for some range of neutrophil levels. We call such a behavior type II dynamics. In the bistable case (type II), one equilibrium corresponds to a healthy state whereas the other corresponds to a fulminant bacterial infection. We demonstrate that published data of in vitro Staphylococcus epidermidis bactericidal experiments are inconsistent with both the type I dynamics and the commonly used linear model and are consistent with type II dynamics. We argue that type II dynamics is a plausible mechanism for the development of a fulminant infection. PMID:20463954

  20. Evaluation of bacterial communities by bacteriome analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes and quantitative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase gene in different types of compost.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Rika; Ishii, Kazuo; Maeda, Isamu; Kozaki, Toshinori; Iwabuchi, Kazunori; Saito, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration technology based on microbial degradation and assimilation is used for the removal of malodorous compounds, such as ammonia. Microbes that degrade malodorous and/or organic substances are involved in composting and are retained after composting; therefore, mature composts can serve as an ideal candidate for a biofilter medium. In this study, we focused on different types of raw compost materials, as these are important factors determining the bacterial community profile and the chemical component of the compost. Therefore, bacterial community profiles, the abundance of the bacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA), and the quantities of chemical components were analyzed in composts produced from either food waste or cattle manure. The community profiles with the lowest beta diversity were obtained from single type of cattle manure compost. However, cattle manure composts showed greater alpha diversity, contained higher amounts of various rRNA gene fragments than those of food waste composts and contained the amoA gene by relative quantification, and Proteobacteria were abundantly found and nitrifying bacteria were detected in it. Nitrifying bacteria are responsible for ammonia oxidation and mainly belong to the Proteobacteria or Nitrospira phyla. The quantities of chemical components, such as salt, phosphorus, and nitrogen, differed between the cattle manure and food waste composts, indicating that the raw materials provided different fermentation environments that were crucial for the formation of different community profiles. The results also suggest that cattle manure might be a more suitable raw material for the production of composts to be used in the biofiltration of ammonia.

  1. Evaluation of bacterial communities by bacteriome analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes and quantitative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase gene in different types of compost.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Rika; Ishii, Kazuo; Maeda, Isamu; Kozaki, Toshinori; Iwabuchi, Kazunori; Saito, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration technology based on microbial degradation and assimilation is used for the removal of malodorous compounds, such as ammonia. Microbes that degrade malodorous and/or organic substances are involved in composting and are retained after composting; therefore, mature composts can serve as an ideal candidate for a biofilter medium. In this study, we focused on different types of raw compost materials, as these are important factors determining the bacterial community profile and the chemical component of the compost. Therefore, bacterial community profiles, the abundance of the bacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA), and the quantities of chemical components were analyzed in composts produced from either food waste or cattle manure. The community profiles with the lowest beta diversity were obtained from single type of cattle manure compost. However, cattle manure composts showed greater alpha diversity, contained higher amounts of various rRNA gene fragments than those of food waste composts and contained the amoA gene by relative quantification, and Proteobacteria were abundantly found and nitrifying bacteria were detected in it. Nitrifying bacteria are responsible for ammonia oxidation and mainly belong to the Proteobacteria or Nitrospira phyla. The quantities of chemical components, such as salt, phosphorus, and nitrogen, differed between the cattle manure and food waste composts, indicating that the raw materials provided different fermentation environments that were crucial for the formation of different community profiles. The results also suggest that cattle manure might be a more suitable raw material for the production of composts to be used in the biofiltration of ammonia. PMID:26111599

  2. Diffusion Limited Aggregation: Algorithm optimization revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, F. L.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2011-08-01

    The Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA) model developed by Witten and Sander in 1978 is useful in modeling a large class of growth phenomena with local dependence. Besides its simplicity this aggregation model has a complex behavior that can be observed at the patterns generated. We propose on this work a brief review of some important proprieties of this model and present an algorithm to simulate a DLA aggregates that simpler and efficient compared to others found in the literature.

  3. Occurrence and enrichment of 'bacterial sherpas': climb to sustainability in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Arnaldos, M; Pagilla, K R

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents research on hemoglobin (Hb)-expressing bacteria in biological wastewater treatment systems. The outcome(s) will greatly reduce the aeration needs of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and provide insight into emerging biological nitrogen removal processes using low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions. In anthropogenic terms, the bacteria that express Hb could be considered as 'bacterial sherpas' that can function under low DO conditions. Hitherto, this functionality of bacteria has not been realized due to the initial response of the aerobic treatment stage: namely, morphology change by bacteria to filamentous forms to overcome oxygen mass transfer limitations causing bulking/foaming and nitrification inhibition. There is evidence, however, of the potential expression of Hb proteins by activated sludge (AS) bacteria. First, bacteria known to possess genes coding Hb proteins have been isolated from AS systems. Secondly, there is evidence that WWTPs are able to operate their biological processes at low DO without sludge bulking or incomplete nitrification. Our research has focused on nitrifying systems and has shown that this is due to prolonged operation at low DO conditions (0.1 mg O2/L), which allows sufficient time for bacterial acclimation. Additionally, it has been shown that enhanced Hb expression is linked to acclimation to low DO conditions. PMID:26524438

  4. Anionic Polyacrylamide (PAM) and Extracellular Polysaccharides (EPS) effects on flocculation and aggregate stability of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalasmeh, A. A.; Gharaibeh, M. A.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil structure influences many soil properties including aeration, water retention, drainage, bulk density, and resistance to erosion and indirectly influences most biological and chemical processes that occur in and around soil. A significant amount of literature showed that PAM plays an important role to control erosion. However, researchers are looking for more natural alternative for PAM. This study evaluated two anionic polymers including low and high molecular weight (MW), root exudates and bacterial exudates. We evaluated their influence on the rate and efficacy of colloid flocculation and the percent of water stable aggregates. We found that PAM was more effective than EPS in flocculating the colloids and all polymers increased the percent of stable soil aggregates although the PAM was more effective. These data suggest that the EPS would be less effective than PAM for reducing water erosion owing to its lesser flocculation and aggregate stabilizing potential.

  5. Crowding versus molecular seeding: NMR studies of protein aggregation in hen egg white

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfelice, D.; Adrover, M.; Martorell, G.; Pastore, A.; Temussi, P. A.

    2012-06-01

    In living systems, proteins are surrounded by many other macromolecules of different nature, at high total concentrations. In the last few years, there has been an increasing effort to study biological macromolecules directly in natural crowded environments, such as in intact bacterial cells or by mimicking natural crowding by adding proteins, polysaccharides or even synthetic polymers. We have recently proposed hen egg white (HEW) as a suitable, natural medium to study macromolecules in crowding conditions. Here, we show that HEW can increase dramatically the aggregation kinetics of proteins with an in-built tendency to associate. By dissecting the mechanism we demonstrate that only part of this effect is due to crowding, while another factor playing an important role is the interaction with proteins from the milieu. High molecular weight glycoproteins present in HEW act as efficient molecular seeds for aggregation. Our results bear important consequences for in-cell NMR studies and suggest a role of glycosylated proteins in aggregation.

  6. The effect of the flavonol morin on adhesion and aggregation of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Green, Angharad E; Rowlands, Richard S; Cooper, Rose A; Maddocks, Sarah E

    2012-08-01

    The effect of the flavonol morin on Streptococcus pyogenes biofilm growth was determined using a static biofilm model, in which reduced biofilm biomass was observed in the presence of morin, suggesting that morin inhibited biofilm development. Morin at concentrations exceeding 225 μM had the greatest impact on biofilm biomass causing reductions of up to 65%, which was found to be statistically significant. Morin was also shown to induce rapid bacterial aggregation. Approximately 55% of S. pyogenes in liquid suspension aggregated when incubated with morin at concentrations of 275 and 300 μM for 120 min, compared to the control group in which only 10% of the cells aggregated, this was also shown to be statistically significant.

  7. Neuronal aggregates: formation, clearance and spreading

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Junghyun; Yue, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proteostasis is maintained by multiple cellular pathways, including protein synthesis, quality control and degradation. An imbalance of neuronal proteostasis, associated with protein misfolding and aggregation, leads to proteinopathies or neurodegeneration. While genetic variations and protein modifications contribute to aggregate formation, components of the proteostasis network dictate the fate of protein aggregates. Here we provide an overview of proteostasis pathways and their interplay (particularly autophagy) with the metabolism of disease-related proteins. We review recent studies on neuronal activity-mediated regulation of proteostasis and transcellular propagation of protein aggregates in the nervous system. Targeting proteostasis pathways therapeutically remains an attractive but challenging task. PMID:25710535

  8. Immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins: influence of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ratanji, Kirsty D; Derrick, Jeremy P; Dearman, Rebecca J; Kimber, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The elicitation of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) against biotherapeutics can have detrimental effects on drug safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics. The immunogenicity of biotherapeutics is, therefore, an important issue. There is evidence that protein aggregation can result in enhanced immunogenicity; however, the precise immunological and biochemical mechanisms responsible are poorly defined. In the context of biotherapeutic drug development and safety assessment, understanding the mechanisms underlying aggregate immunogenicity is of considerable interest. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of protein aggregation, the production of unwanted aggregates during bioprocessing, and how the immune response to aggregated protein differs from that provoked by non-aggregated protein. Of particular interest is the nature of the interaction of aggregates with the immune system and how subsequent ADA responses are induced. Pathways considered here include 'classical' activation of the immune system involving antigen presenting cells and, alternatively, the breakdown of B-cell tolerance. Additionally, methods available to screen for aggregation and immunogenicity will be described. With an increased understanding of aggregation-enhanced immune responses, it may be possible to develop improved manufacturing and screening processes to avoid, or at least reduce, the problems associated with ADA.

  9. Bouncing behavior of microscopic dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizinger, A.; Kley, W.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Bouncing collisions of dust aggregates within the protoplanetary disk may have a significant impact on the growth process of planetesimals. Yet, the conditions that result in bouncing are not very well understood. Existing simulations studying the bouncing behavior used aggregates with an artificial, very regular internal structure. Aims: Here, we study the bouncing behavior of sub-mm dust aggregates that are constructed applying different sample preparation methods. We analyze how the internal structure of the aggregate alters the collisional outcome and we determine the influence of aggregate size, porosity, collision velocity, and impact parameter. Methods: We use molecular dynamics simulations where the individual aggregates are treated as spheres that are made up of several hundred thousand individual monomers. The simulations are run on graphic cards (GPUs). Results: Statistical bulk properties and thus bouncing behavior of sub-mm dust aggregates depend heavily on the preparation method. In particular, there is no unique relation between the average volume filling factor and the coordination number of the aggregate. Realistic aggregates bounce only if their volume filling factor exceeds 0.5 and collision velocities are below 0.1 ms-1. Conclusions: For dust particles in the protoplanetary nebula we suggest that the bouncing barrier may not be such a strong handicap in the growth phase of dust agglomerates, at least in the size range of ≈100 μm.

  10. Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface

    2006-02-23

    The purpose of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy (ARMCI) library is to provide a general- purpose, efficient, and Widely portable remote memory access (RMA) operations (one-sided communication) optimized for Contiguous and noncontiguous (strided, scatter/gather, I/O vector) data transfers. In addition, ARMCI includes a set of atomic and mutual exclusion operations. The development ARMCI is driven by the need to support the global-addres space communication model in context of distributed regular or irregular distributed data structures,more » communication libraries, and compilers. ARMCI is a standalone system that could be used to support user-level libraries and applications that use MPI or PVM.« less

  11. Swarms: Optimum aggregations of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Swarms are aggregations of spacecraft or elements of a space system which are cooperative in function, but physically isolated or only loosely connected. For some missions the swarm configuration may be optimum compared to a group of completely independent spacecraft or a complex rigidly integrated spacecraft or space platform. General features of swarms are induced by considering an ensemble of 26 swarms, examples ranging from Earth centered swarms for commercial application to swarms for exploring minor planets. A concept for a low altitude swarm as a substitute for a space platform is proposed and a preliminary design studied. The salient design feature is the web of tethers holding the 30 km swarm in a rigid two dimensional array in the orbital plane. A mathematical discussion and tutorial in tether technology and in some aspects of the distribution of services (mass, energy, and information to swarm elements) are included.

  12. Morphological classification of nanoceramic aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Kang, Bongwoo; Ospina, Carolina; Sung, Changmo

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum silicate nanoaggregates grown at near-room temperature on an organic template under a variety of experimental conditions have been imaged by transmission electron microscopy. Images have been automatically classified by an algorithm based on "spectrum enhancement", multivariate statistics and supervised optimization. Spectrum enhancement consists of subtracting, in the log scale, a known function of wavenumber from the angle averaged power spectral density of the image. Enhanced spectra of each image, after polynomial interpolation, have been regarded as morphological descriptors and as such submitted to principal components analysis nested with a multiobjective parameter optimization algorithm. The latter has maximized pairwise discrimination between classes of materials. The role of the organic template and of a reaction parameter on aggregate morphology has been assessed at two magnification scales. Classification results have also been related to crystal structure data derived from selected area electron diffraction patterns.

  13. Collisional Aggregation Due to Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Wilkinson, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars and to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favored by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modeling such processes. These advances lead to a semiquantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  14. Antimicrobial and anti-adhesive properties of biosurfactant produced by lactobacilli isolates, biofilm formation and aggregation ability.

    PubMed

    Zakaria Gomaa, Eman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and anti-adhesive properties of biosurfactant extracted from ten lactobacilli species isolated from Egyptian dairy products. The produced biosurfactants showed distinct antimicrobial and anti-adhesive activities against several pathogenic microorganisms. Furthermore, lactobacilli isolates were studied for biofilm formation and lactic acid production in different growth media. All lactobacilli isolates produced biofilm on polystyrene surface in all media tested to different degrees. L. acidophilus showed the highest biofilm formation in Rogosa medium. However, the highest lactic acid production was recorded by L. brevis (39.63 g/L), followed by L. reuteri (33.32 g/L) in MRS medium. Evaluation based on in vitro studies including auto-aggregation and co-aggregation with three pathogenic bacterial strains was further analyzed. All lactobacilli isolates tested were able to auto-aggregate (ranging from 51.12% to 78.17% assessed at 5 h of incubation). The lactobacilli isolates co-aggregate with the tested bacterial strains to different degrees; among them L. delbrueckii showed the highest scores of co-aggregation with Candida albicans ATC70014, reaching 59.37%. The aggregation ability exhibited by the isolated lactobacilli, together with the antimicrobial and anti-adhesive properties observed for their biosurfactants, opens future prospects for their use against microorganisms responsible for diseases and infections and as effective probiotic strains.

  15. Zooplankton and aggregates as refuge for aquatic bacteria: protection from UV, heat and ozone stresses used for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kam W; Dziallas, Claudia; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2011-02-01

    Aggregates and zooplankton may provide refuge for aquatic bacteria against external hazards. The ability of attached bacteria to survive and recover from stressors commonly used for water treatment was tested in the laboratory. Without zooplankton or aggregates, both UV and ozone significantly reduced abundance of free-living bacteria in both freshwater and marine medium. The presence of zooplankton carcasses and aggregates, however, allowed some of the attached bacteria to survive and recover quickly within 3 days. Heat exposure was the least effective as both free-living and attached bacteria were able to recover quickly. Selective survival of bacterial phylotypes led to large changes in bacterial community composition after stress exposures, and some of the bacteria that recovered belonged to groups with known pathogens. This study demonstrates that zooplankton and aggregates protected various aquatic bacteria from external stressors, and organic remains generated from zooplankton and aggregates after stress exposure even enabled the surviving bacteria to quickly regrow and subsequently be released into the surrounding water. Hence, water disinfection treatments that overlooked the potential persistence of bacteria associated with organisms and aggregates may not be effective in preventing the spread of undesirable bacteria.

  16. Emerin expression in tubular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Manta, Panagiota; Terzis, Gerasimos; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Kontou, Chrysanthi; Vassilopoulos, Demetris

    2004-06-01

    Emerin is an inner nuclear membrane protein that is mutated or not expressed in patients with X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (X-EDMD/EMD). Cytoplasmic localization of emerin in cultured cells or tissues has been reported, although this remains a controversial issue. Tubular aggregates (TAs) are pathological structures seen in the sarcoplasm of human skeletal muscle fibers in various disorders. The TAs derive from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and represent, probably, an adaptive response of the SR to various insults to the muscle fibers. In the present study, we present immunohistochemical evidence of emerin expression in TAs. Muscle biopsies with tubular aggregates from four male, unrelated patients were studied. The percentage of muscle fibers containing TAs varied between 5 and 20%. Routine histochemistry revealed intense reaction of TAs with NADH-TR, AMPDA, and NSE, but not with COX, SDH, myosin ATPase (pH 9.4, 4.3, 4.6), PAS, and Oil red O staining. Immunohistochemical study revealed strong immunostaining of TAs with antibodies against emerin and 7 SERCA2-ATPase. Immunostaining of TAs was also seen with antibodies against heat shock protein and dysferlin, but not with antibodies to lamin A, dystrophin, adhalin, beta, gamma, delta sarcoglycans, and merosin. These results suggest that emerin, an inner nuclear membrane protein, is present at the TAs. The interpretation and significance of this finding is discussed in relation to experimental data suggesting that normal emerin localization at the inner nuclear membrane depends on lamin A and mutations in the N-terminal domain of emerin cause mislocalization of the protein to the sarcoplasmic membranes.

  17. Detergent-mediated protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Chris; Ghanei, Hamed; Holyoake, John; Bishop, Russell E.; Privé, Gilbert G.; Pomès, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Because detergents are commonly used to solvate membrane proteins for structural evaluation, much attention has been devoted to assessing the conformational bias imparted by detergent micelles in comparison to the native environment of the lipid bilayer. Here, we conduct six 500-ns simulations of a system with >600,000 atoms to investigate the spontaneous self assembly of dodecylphosphocholine detergent around multiple molecules of the integral membrane protein PagP. This detergent formed equatorial micelles in which acyl chains surround the protein’s hydrophobic belt, confirming existing models of the detergent solvation of membrane proteins. In addition, unexpectedly, the extracellular and periplasmic apical surfaces of PagP interacted with the headgroups of detergents in other micelles 85 and 60% of the time, respectively, forming complexes that were stable for hundreds of nanoseconds. In some cases, an apical surface of one molecule of PagP interacted with an equatorial micelle surrounding another molecule of PagP. In other cases, the apical surfaces of two molecules of PagP simultaneously bound a neat detergent micelle. In these ways, detergents mediated the non-specific aggregation of folded PagP. These simulation results are consistent with dynamic light scattering experiments, which show that, at detergent concentrations ≥600 mM, PagP induces the formation of large scattering species that are likely to contain many copies of the PagP protein. Together, these simulation and experimental results point to a potentially generic mechanism of detergent-mediated protein aggregation. PMID:23466535

  18. Revealing Linear Aggregates of Light Harvesting Antenna Proteins in Photosynthetic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Zeng, Xiaohua; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Rajapaksha, Suneth; Kaplan, Samuel; Lu, H. Peter

    2010-01-01

    How light energy is harvested in a natural photosynthetic membrane through energy transfer is closely related to the stoichiometry and arrangement of light harvesting antenna proteins in the membrane. The specific photosynthetic architecture facilitates a rapid and efficient energy transfer among the light harvesting proteins (LH2 and LH1) and to the reaction center. Here we report the identification of linear aggregates of light harvesting proteins, LH2, in the photosynthetic membranes under ambient conditions by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and spectroscopic analysis. Our results suggest that the light harvesting protein, LH2, can exist as linear aggregates of 4±2 proteins in the photosynthetic membranes and that the protein distributions are highly heterogeneous. In the photosynthetic membranes examined in our measurements, the ratio of the aggregated to the non-aggregated LH2 proteins is about 3:1 to 5:1 depending on the intensity of the illumination used during sample incubation and on the bacterial species. AFM images further identify that the LH2 proteins in the linear aggregates are monotonically tilted at an angle 4°±2° from the plane of the photosynthetic membranes. The aggregates result in red-shifted absorption and emission spectra that are measured using various mutant membranes, including an LH2 knock-out, LH1 knock-out, and LH2 at different population densities. Measuring the fluorescence lifetimes of purified LH2 and LH2 in membranes, we have observed that the LH2 proteins in membranes exhibit biexponential lifetime decays whereas the purified LH2 proteins gave single exponential lifetime decays. We attribute that the two lifetime components originate from the existence of both aggregated and non-aggregated LH2 proteins in the photosynthetic membranes. PMID:19572507

  19. Diarrhea-associated biofilm formed by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and aggregative Citrobacter freundii: a consortium mediated by putative F pili

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are enteropathogenic strains identified by the aggregative adhesion (AA) pattern that share the capability to form biofilms. Citrobacter freundii is classically considered as an indigenous intestinal species that is sporadically associated with diarrhea. Results During an epidemiologic study focusing on infantile diarrhea, aggregative C. freundii (EACF) and EAEC strains were concomitantly recovered from a severe case of mucous diarrhea. Thereby, the occurrence of synergic events involving these strains was investigated. Coinfection of HeLa cells with EACF and EAEC strains showed an 8-fold increase in the overall bacterial adhesion compared with single infections (P < 0.001). The synergic effect was mediated by physical interactions among the bacteria and primed in the absence of chemical signaling and without the participation of host cells. Thus, significant increases (2.7-fold on average) in bacterial adhesion were also observed during the formation of mixed biofilms on abiotic surfaces. Bacterial settling assays showed that EAEC strains harboring F-pili genes (traA) were capable of forming bacterial aggregates only in the presence of EACF. Scanning electronic microscopy analyses revealed that bacterial aggregates as well as enhanced biofilms formed by EACF and traA-positive EAEC were mediated by non-bundle forming, flexible pili. Moreover, mixed biofilms formed by EACF and traA-positive EAEC strains were significantly reduced using nonlethal concentration of zinc, a specific inhibitor of F pili. In addition, EAEC strains isolated from diarrheic children frequently produced single biofilms sensitive to zinc. Conclusions Putative F pili expressed by EAEC strains boosted mixed biofilm formation when in the presence of aggregative C. freundii. PMID:20175929

  20. Simazine biodegradation in soil: analysis of bacterial community structure by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Anna Barra; Grenni, Paola; Ciccoli, Roberto; Di Landa, Giuseppe; Cremisini, Carlo

    2005-09-01

    Pesticide and nitrate contamination of soil and groundwater from agriculture is an environmental and public health concern worldwide. Simazine, 6-chloro-N2,N4-diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, is a triazine herbicide used in agriculture for selective weed control with several types of crops and it is frequently applied to soils receiving N-fertilizers. Degradation experiments were performed in the laboratory to assess whether the biodegradation of simazine in soil may be influenced by the presence of urea. Simazine degradation rates under different experimental conditions (presence/absence of urea, microbiologically active/sterilized soil) were assessed together with the formation, degradation and transformation of its main metabolites in soil. Simazine degradation was affected by the presence of urea, in terms both of a smaller half-life (t(1/2)) and of a higher amount of desethyl-simazine formed. The soil bacterial community was also studied. Microbial abundances were determined by epifluorescence direct counting. Moreover in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted fluorescent oligonucleotide probes was used to analyze the bacterial community structure. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detect specific groups of bacteria such as the alpha,beta,gamma-subdivisions of Proteobacteria, Gram-positive bacteria with a high G + C DNA content, Planctomycetes, Betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrifying bacteria. The presence of the herbicide and/or urea affected the bacterial community structure, showing that FISH is a valuable tool for determining the response of bacterial populations to different environmental conditions.

  1. Analysis of biofilm bacterial communities responsible for carbon removal through a reactor cascade treating wastewater.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Tibor; Táncsics, András; Szilágyi, Nikolett; Tóth, Imre; Farkas, Milán; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Krifaton, Csilla; Hartman, Mátyás; Kriszt, Balázs

    2014-03-01

    In this study molecular microbiological and multivariate statistical analyses were carried out to determine the structure and dynamics of bacterial communities through a biofilm based, pilot-scale wastewater treatment cascade system comprised of eight reactors. Results indicated a vertical as well as horizontal differentiation of biofilm bacterial communities within individual reactors and through the reactor series, respectively. The richness of biofilm samples taken from dissolved oxygen rich sections of reactors were relatively lower than of samples taken from less oxygenized sections (one-way ANOVA P = 0.07). The Euclidean distance based one-way ANOSIM pointed out that in bacteriological point of view: (1) no statistically significant difference could be observed among the first five reactors (P ≥ 0.1); (2) the first seven reactors differed significantly from the last reactor, (P ≤ 0.03); (3) reactors 1 and 2 differed significantly from reactors 6 and 7 (P ≈ 0.02) and (4) reactor 3 from reactor 7 (P ≈ 0.03). 16S rRNA gene cloning revealed that through the cascade system the initially dominant heterotrophic bacteria (Acinetobacter, Acidovorax, Parabacteroides, Thauera, Desulfobacterium and Desulfomicrobium) were gradually replaced or supplemented by autotrophic nitrifying bacteria (Nitrosomonas, 'Candidatus Nitrotoga' and Nitrospira). Our results indicate that the vertical alteration of bacterial community structure within a particular reactor was driven by the alteration of dissolved oxygen concentration, while the horizontal alteration of bacterial community structure through the cascade system was driven mainly by the gradually decreasing dissolved organic matter content and increasing dissolved oxygen concentration.

  2. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the “inter-aggregate” and “intra-aggregate” pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates

  3. Acetal phosphatidic acids: novel platelet aggregating agents.

    PubMed

    Brammer, J P; Maguire, M H; Walaszek, E J; Wiley, R A

    1983-05-01

    1 Palmitaldehyde, olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids induced rapid shape change and dose-dependent biphasic aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma; aggregation was reversible at low doses and irreversible at high doses of the acetal phosphatidic acids. The palmitaldehyde congener elicited monophasic dose-dependent aggregation of sheep platelets in platelet-rich plasma.2 The threshold concentration for palmitaldehyde acetal phosphatidic acid (PGAP)-induced platelet aggregation was 2.5-5 muM for human platelets and 0.25-0.5 muM for sheep platelets. PGAP was 4-5 times as potent versus human platelets as the olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids, which were equipotent.3 PGAP-induced irreversible aggregation of [(14)C]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([(14)C]-5-HT)-labelled human platelets in platelet-rich plasma was accompanied by release of 44.0+/-2.4% (s.e.) of the platelet [(14)C]-5-HT; reversible aggregation was not associated with release. In contrast, PGAP-induced release of [(14)C]-5-HT-labelled sheep platelets was dose-dependent.4 The adenosine diphosphate (ADP) antagonist, 2-methylthio-AMP, and the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, aspirin, abolished PGAP-induced second phase aggregation and release in human platelets but did not affect the first, reversible, phase of aggregation. Both the first and second phases of PGAP-induced aggregation were abolished by chlorpromazine, by the phospholipase A(2) inhibitor, mepacrine, and by nmolar concentrations of prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)); these agents abolished the second, but not the first phase of ADP-induced aggregation.5 The related phospholipids, lecithin, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid, at <100 muM, neither induced aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma, nor modified PGAP-induced aggregation; 1-palmityl lysophosphatidic acid elicited aggregation of human platelets at a threshold concentration of 100 muM.6 It is concluded that the acetal phosphatidic acids

  4. Preformed Seeds Modulate Native Insulin Aggregation Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Colina; Yang, Mu; Long, Fei; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-12-10

    Insulin aggregates under storage conditions via disulfide interchange reaction. It is also known to form aggregates at the site of repeated injections in diabetes patients, leading to injection amyloidosis. This has fueled research in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry as well as in academia to understand factors that modulate insulin stability and aggregation. The main aim of this study is to understand the factors that modulate aggregation propensity of insulin under conditions close to physiological and measure effect of "seeds" on aggregation kinetics. We explored the aggregation kinetics of insulin at pH 7.2 and 37 °C in the presence of disulfide-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT), using spectroscopy (UV-visible, fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and microscopy (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) techniques. We prepared insulin "seeds" by incubating disulfide-reduced insulin at pH 7.2 and 37 °C for varying lengths of time (10 min to 12 h). These seeds were added to the native protein and nucleation-dependent aggregation kinetics was measured. Aggregation kinetics was fastest in the presence of 10 min seeds suggesting they were nascent. Interestingly, intermediate seeds (30 min to 4 h incubation) resulted in formation of transient fibrils in 4 h that converted to amorphous aggregates upon longer incubation of 24 h. Overall, the results show that insulin under disulfide reducing conditions at pH and temperature close to physiological favors amorphous aggregate formation and seed "maturity" plays an important role in nucleation dependent aggregation kinetics.

  5. Exploiting the commons: cyclic diguanylate regulation of bacterial exopolysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sanjuán, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, there is increasing interest for bacterial polysaccharides in a wide variety of industrial sectors. This is due to their chemical and reological properties, and also the possibility to be obtained by fermentation processes. Biosynthesis of a growing number of exopolysaccharides (EPS) has been reported to be regulated by the ubiquitous second messenger c-di-GMP in a limited number of bacterial species. Since most bacteria are yet unexplored, it is likely that an unsuspected number and variety of EPS structures activated by c-di-GMP await to be uncovered. In the search of new EPS, manipulation of bacterial c-di-GMP metabolism can be combined with high throughput approaches for screening of large collections of bacteria. In addition, c-di-GMP activation of EPS production and promotion of cell aggregation may have direct applications in environmental industries related with biofuel production or wastewater treatments.

  6. Exploiting the commons: cyclic diguanylate regulation of bacterial exopolysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sanjuán, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, there is increasing interest for bacterial polysaccharides in a wide variety of industrial sectors. This is due to their chemical and reological properties, and also the possibility to be obtained by fermentation processes. Biosynthesis of a growing number of exopolysaccharides (EPS) has been reported to be regulated by the ubiquitous second messenger c-di-GMP in a limited number of bacterial species. Since most bacteria are yet unexplored, it is likely that an unsuspected number and variety of EPS structures activated by c-di-GMP await to be uncovered. In the search of new EPS, manipulation of bacterial c-di-GMP metabolism can be combined with high throughput approaches for screening of large collections of bacteria. In addition, c-di-GMP activation of EPS production and promotion of cell aggregation may have direct applications in environmental industries related with biofuel production or wastewater treatments. PMID:26773798

  7. Impact of Particle Aggregation on Nanoparticle Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, David

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of nanoparticles in the environment is expected to grow in the coming years due to their increasing pervasiveness in consumer and industrial applications. Once released into the environment, nanoparticles encounter conditions of pH, salinity, UV light, and other solution conditions that may alter their surface characteristics and lead to aggregation. The unique properties that make nanoparticles desirable are a direct consequence of their size and increased surface area. Therefore, it is critical to recognize how aggregation alters the reactive properties of nanomaterials, if we wish to understand how these properties are going to behave once released into the environment. The size and structure of nanoparticle aggregates depend on surrounding conditions, including hydrodynamic ones. Depending on these conditions, aggregates can be large or small, tightly packed or loosely bound. Characterizing and measuring these changes to aggregate morphology is important to understanding the impact of aggregation on nanoparticle reactive properties. Examples of decreased reactivity due to aggregation include the case where tightly packed aggregates have fewer available surface sites compared to loosely packed ones; also, photocatalytic particles embedded in the center of large aggregates will experience less light when compared to particles embedded in small aggregates. However, aggregation also results in an increase in solid-solid interfaces between nanoparticles. This can result in increased energy transfer between neighboring particles, surface passivation, and altered surface tension. These phenomena can lead to an increase in reactivity. The goal of this thesis is to examine the impacts of aggregation on the reactivity of a select group of nanomaterials. Additionally, we examined how aggregation impacts the removal efficiency of fullerene nanoparticles using membrane filtration. The materials we selected to study include ZnS---a metal chalcogenide

  8. Process Performance and Bacterial Community Structure Under Increasing Influent Disturbances in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hailong; Yan, Yingchun; Chen, Yuewen; Wu, Xiaolei; Li, Baoan

    2016-02-01

    The membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a promising municipal wastewater treatment process. In this study, two cross-flow MABRs were constructed to explore the carbon and nitrogen removal performance and bacterial succession, along with changes of influent loading shock comprising flow velocity, COD, and NH4-N concentrations. Redundancy analysis revealed that the function of high flow velocity was mainly embodied in facilitating contaminants diffusion and biosorption rather than the success of overall bacterial populations (p > 0.05). In contrast, the influent NH4-N concentration contributed most to the variance of reactor efficiency and community structure (p < 0.05). Pyrosequencing results showed that Anaerolineae, and Beta- and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in biofilms for COD and NH4-N removal. Among the identified genera, Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the main nitrifiers, and Hyphomicrobium, Hydrogenophaga, and Rhodobacter were the key denitrifiers. Meanwhile, principal component analysis indicated that bacterial shift in MABR was probably the combination of stochastic and deterministic processes. PMID:26528534

  9. Process Performance and Bacterial Community Structure Under Increasing Influent Disturbances in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hailong; Yan, Yingchun; Chen, Yuewen; Wu, Xiaolei; Li, Baoan

    2016-02-01

    The membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a promising municipal wastewater treatment process. In this study, two cross-flow MABRs were constructed to explore the carbon and nitrogen removal performance and bacterial succession, along with changes of influent loading shock comprising flow velocity, COD, and NH4-N concentrations. Redundancy analysis revealed that the function of high flow velocity was mainly embodied in facilitating contaminants diffusion and biosorption rather than the success of overall bacterial populations (p > 0.05). In contrast, the influent NH4-N concentration contributed most to the variance of reactor efficiency and community structure (p < 0.05). Pyrosequencing results showed that Anaerolineae, and Beta- and Alphaproteobacteria were the dominant groups in biofilms for COD and NH4-N removal. Among the identified genera, Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the main nitrifiers, and Hyphomicrobium, Hydrogenophaga, and Rhodobacter were the key denitrifiers. Meanwhile, principal component analysis indicated that bacterial shift in MABR was probably the combination of stochastic and deterministic processes.

  10. The bacterial lipocalins.

    PubMed

    Bishop, R E

    2000-10-18

    The lipocalins were once regarded as a eukaryotic protein family, but new members have been recently discovered in bacteria. The first bacterial lipocalin (Blc) was identified in Escherichia coli as an outer membrane lipoprotein expressed under conditions of environmental stress. Blc is distinguished from most lipocalins by the absence of intramolecular disulfide bonds, but the presence of a membrane anchor is shared with two of its closest homologues, apolipoprotein D and lazarillo. Several common features of the membrane-anchored lipocalins suggest that each may play an important role in membrane biogenesis and repair. Additionally, Blc proteins are implicated in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and in the activation of immunity. Recent genome sequencing efforts reveal the existence of at least 20 bacterial lipocalins. The lipocalins appear to have originated in Gram-negative bacteria and were probably transferred horizontally to eukaryotes from the endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of the mitochondrion. The genome sequences also reveal that some bacterial lipocalins exhibit disulfide bonds and alternative modes of subcellular localization, which include targeting to the periplasmic space, the cytoplasmic membrane, and the cytosol. The relationships between bacterial lipocalin structure and function further illuminate the common biochemistry of bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  11. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Connell, T.L.; Guidetti, J.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of [14C]methyl bromide ([14C]MeBr) to 14CO2 was measured in field experiments with soils collected from two strawberry plots fumigated with mixtures of MeBr and chloropicrin (CCI3NO2). Although these fumigants are considered potent biocides, we found that the highest rates of MeBr oxidation occurred 1 to 2 days after injection when the fields were tarped, rather than before or several days after injection. No oxidation of MeBr occurred in heat-killed soils, indicating that microbes were the causative agents of the oxidation. Degradation of MeBr by chemical and/or biological processes accounted for 20 to 50% of the loss of MeBr during fumigation, with evasion to the atmosphere inferred to comprise the remainder. In laboratory incubations, complete removal of [14C]MeBr occurred within a few days, with 47 to 67% of the added MeBr oxidized to 14CO2 and the remainder of counts associated with the solid phase. Chloropicrin inhibited the oxidation of MeBr, implying that use of this substance constrains the extent of microbial degradation of MeBr during fumigation. Oxidation was by direct bacterial attack of MeBr and not of methanol, a product of the chemical hydrolysis of MeBr. Neither nitrifying nor methane-oxidizing bacteria were sufficiently active in these soils to account for the observed oxidation of MeBr, nor could the microbial degradation of MeBr be linked to cooxidation with exogenously supplied electron donors. However, repeated addition of MeBr to live soils resulted in higher rates of its removal, suggesting that soil bacteria used MeBr as an electron donor for growth. To support this interpretation, we isolated a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium from these soils which grew with MeBr as a sole source of carbon and energy.

  12. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... other activities and actions. (See 40 CFR 1508.25(a)). (2) Consider reasonable alternative courses of... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification §...

  13. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... other activities and actions. (See 40 CFR 1508.25(a)). (2) Consider reasonable alternative courses of... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification §...

  14. 48 CFR 514.270 - Aggregate awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aggregate awards. 514.270 Section 514.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Solicitation of Bids 514.270 Aggregate awards....

  15. Streaming instability of aggregating slime mold amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Herbert; Reynolds, William

    1991-05-01

    We propose a new model of aggregation in the cellular slime mold D. Discoideum. Our approach couples the excitable signaling system to amoeba chemotaxis; the resultant system of equations is tractable to analytical and numerical approaches. Using our model, we derive the existence of a streaming instability for the concentric target aggregation pattern.

  16. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32... the total project must be listed and described by the responsible entity in the environmental review... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32...

  17. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32... the total project must be listed and described by the responsible entity in the environmental review... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32...

  18. Choosing Aggregation Rules for Composite Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munda, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    From a formal point of view, a composite indicator is an aggregate of all dimensions, objectives, individual indicators and variables used for its construction. This implies that what defines a composite indicator is the set of properties underlying its mathematical aggregation convention. In this article, I try to revise the theoretical debate on…

  19. Teaching Aggregate Demand and Supply Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Graeme

    2010-01-01

    The author analyzes the inflation-targeting model that underlies recent textbook expositions of the aggregate demand-aggregate supply approach used in introductory courses in macroeconomics. He shows how numerical simulations of a model with inflation inertia can be used as a tool to help students understand adjustments in response to demand and…

  20. 7 CFR 1.6 - Aggregating requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aggregating requests. 1.6 Section 1.6 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.6 Aggregating requests. When an agency reasonably believes that a requester, or a group of requesters acting in...

  1. 42 CFR 411.106 - Aggregation rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aggregation rules. 411.106 Section 411.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... Under Group Health Plans: General Provisions § 411.106 Aggregation rules. The following rules apply...

  2. 7 CFR 1.6 - Aggregating requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aggregating requests. 1.6 Section 1.6 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.6 Aggregating requests. When an agency reasonably believes that a requester, or a group of requesters acting in...

  3. Biomass round bales infield aggregation logistic scenarios

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass bales often need to be aggregated (collected into groups and transported) to a field-edge stack for temporary storage for feedlots or processing facilities. Aggregating the bales with the least total distance involved is a goal of producers and bale handlers. Several logistics scenarios for ...

  4. Aggregate size distribution of the soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka; Józsa, Sándor; Szalai, Zoltán; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    In agricultural areas the soil erosion and soil loss estimation is vital information in long-term planning. During the initial period of the erosion a part of the soil particles and aggregates get transportable and nutrients and organic matter could be transported due to the effect of water or wind. This preliminary phase was studied with laboratory-scale rainfall simulator. Developed surface crust and aggregate size composition of the runoff was examined in six different slope-roughness-moisture content combination of a Cambisol and a Regosol. The ratio of micro- and macro aggregates in the runoff indicate the stability of the aggregates and determine the transport capacity of the runoff. Both soil samples were taken from field where the water erosion is a potential hazard. During the experiment the whole amount of runoff and sediment was collected through sieve series to a bucket to separate the micro- and macro aggregates. In case of both samples the micro aggregates dominate in the runoff and the runoff rates are similar. Although the runoff of the Regosol - with dominant >1000μm macro aggregate content - contained almost nothing but <50μm sized micro aggregates. Meanwhile the runoff of the Cambisol - with more balanced micro and macro aggregate content - contained dominantly 50-250μm sized micro aggregates and in some case remarkable ratio 250-1000μm sized macro aggregates. This difference occurred because the samples are resistant against drop erosion differently. In case of both sample the selectivity of the erosion and substance matrix redistribution manifested in mineral crusts in the surface where the quartz deposited in place while the lighter organic matter transported with the sediment. The detachment of the aggregates and the redistribution of the particles highly effect on the aggregate composition of the runoff which is connected with the quality of the soil loss. So while the estimation of soil loss quantity is more or less is easy, measuring

  5. Therapeutic Protein Aggregation: Mechanisms, Design, and Control

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    While it is well known that proteins are only marginally stable in their folded states, it is often less well appreciated that most proteins are inherently aggregation-prone in their unfolded or partially unfolded states, and the resulting aggregates can be extremely stable and long-lived. For therapeutic proteins, aggregates are a significant risk factor for deleterious immune responses in patients, and can form via a variety of mechanisms. Controlling aggregation using a mechanistic approach may allow improved design of therapeutic protein stability, as a complement to existing design strategies that target desired protein structures and function. Recent results highlight the importance of balancing protein environment with the inherent aggregation propensities of polypeptide chains. PMID:24908382

  6. CHARGING OF AGGREGATE GRAINS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qianyu; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.; Land, Victor

    2013-02-15

    The charging of dust grains in astrophysical environments has been investigated with the assumption that these grains are homogeneous spheres. However, there is evidence which suggests that many grains in astrophysical environments are irregularly shaped aggregates. Recent studies have shown that aggregates acquire higher charge-to-mass ratios due to their complex structures, which in turn may alter their subsequent dynamics and evolution. In this paper, the charging of aggregates is examined including secondary electron emission and photoemission in addition to primary plasma currents. The results show that the equilibrium charge on aggregates can differ markedly from spherical grains with the same mass, but that the charge can be estimated for a given environment based on structural characteristics of the grain. The 'small particle effect' due to secondary electron emission is also important for de terming the charge of micron-sized aggregates consisting of nano-sized particles.

  7. Competitive aggregation dynamics using phase wave signals.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2014-10-21

    Coupled equations of the phase equation and the equation of cell concentration n are proposed for competitive aggregation dynamics of slime mold in two dimensions. Phase waves are used as tactic signals of aggregation in this model. Several aggregation clusters are formed initially, and target patterns appear around the localized aggregation clusters. Owing to the competition among target patterns, the number of the localized aggregation clusters decreases, and finally one dominant localized pattern survives. If the phase equation is replaced with the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, several spiral patterns appear, and n is localized near the center of the spiral patterns. After the competition among spiral patterns, one dominant spiral survives. PMID:24956327

  8. Formation of Tethers from Spreading Cellular Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Beaune, Grégory; Winnik, Françoise M; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    Membrane tubes are commonly extruded from cells and vesicles when a point-like force is applied on the membrane. We report here the unexpected formation of membrane tubes from lymph node cancer prostate (LNCaP) cell aggregates in the absence of external applied forces. The spreading of LNCaP aggregates deposited on adhesive glass substrates coated with fibronectin is very limited because cell-cell adhesion is stronger than cell-substrate adhesion. Some cells on the aggregate periphery are very motile and try to escape from the aggregate, leading to the formation of membrane tubes. Tethered networks and exchange of cargos between cells were observed as well. Growth of the tubes is followed by either tube retraction or tube rupture. Hence, even very cohesive cells are successful in escaping aggregates, which may lead to epithelial mesenchymal transition and tumor metastasis. We interpret the dynamics of formation and retraction of tubes in the framework of membrane mechanics. PMID:26509898

  9. Imbibition kinetics of spherical colloidal aggregates.

    PubMed

    Debacker, A; Makarchuk, S; Lootens, D; Hébraud, P

    2014-07-11

    The imbibition kinetics of a millimeter-sized aggregate of 300 nm diameter colloidal particles by a wetting pure solvent is studied. Three successive regimes are observed. First, the imbibition proceeds by compressing the air inside the aggregate. Next, the solvent stops when the pressure of the compressed air is equal to the excess of capillary pressure at the meniscus of the wetting solvent in the porous aggregate. The interface is pinned and the aggregate slowly degases up to the point where the pressure of the entrapped air stops decreasing and is controlled by the capillary pressure. Finally, the imbibition starts again at a constant excess of pressure, smaller than the capillary pressure but larger than the one of the atmosphere. This last stage leads to the complete infiltration of the aggregate. PMID:25062241

  10. Experimental Bacterial Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Durack, D. T.; Beeson, P. B.; Petersdorf, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A simple and reliable model for endocarditis in rabbits has been studied and standardized. Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis was produced on either side of the heart by the presence of a polyethylene catheter. One day later, this was converted into bacterial endocarditis by single intravenous injections of streptococci, staphylococci, Proteus and Candida. No infection resulted from injection of L-forms or virus. Reduction of inoculum size or withdrawal of the catheter reduced the incidence of bacterial endocarditis, but the presence of a catheter in the heart for only a few minutes predisposed to infection. Left-sided Streptococcus viridans infection was uniformly fatal, with average survival of about two weeks. Right-sided infection was not always fatal; approximately 25% of infected vegetations healed spontaneously. The advantages of a standardized model for endocarditis which allows exact timing of infection are discussed. ImagesFigs. 1-2 PMID:4700697

  11. Reconsidering the mechanism of polyglutamine peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christine C; Walters, Robert H; Murphy, Regina M

    2007-11-01

    There are at least nine neurodegenerative diseases associated with proteins that contain an unusually expanded polyglutamine domain, the best known of which is Huntington's disease. In all of these diseases, the mutant protein aggregates into neuronal inclusions; it is generally, although not universally, believed that protein aggregation is an underlying cause of the observed neuronal degeneration. In an effort to examine the role of polyglutamine in facilitating protein aggregation, investigators have used synthetic polyglutamine peptides as model systems. Analysis of kinetic data led to the conclusions that aggregation follows a simple nucleation-elongation mechanism characterized by a significant lag time, during which the peptide is monomeric, and that the nucleus is a monomer in a thermodynamically unfavorable conformation [Chen, S. M., et al. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 11884-11889]. We re-examined this hypothesis by measuring the aggregation kinetics of the polyglutamine peptide K2Q23K2, using sedimentation, static and dynamic light scattering, and size exclusion chromatography. Our data show that during the lag time in sedimentation kinetics, there is substantial organization of the peptide into soluble linear aggregates. These aggregates have no regular secondary structure as measured by circular dichroism but have particle dimensions and morphologies similar to those of mature insoluble aggregates. The soluble aggregates constitute approximately 30% of the total peptide mass, form rapidly, and continue to grow over a period of hours to days, eventually precipitating. Once insoluble aggregates form, loss of monomer from the solution phase continues. Our data support an assembly mechanism for polyglutamine peptide more complex than that previously proposed.

  12. Classification and Characterization of Therapeutic Antibody Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Marisa K.; Luo, Quanzhou; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Wypych, Jette; Narhi, Linda O.

    2011-01-01

    A host of diverse stress techniques was applied to a monoclonal antibody (IgG2) to yield protein particles with varying attributes and morphologies. Aggregated solutions were evaluated for percent aggregation, particle counts, size distribution, morphology, changes in secondary and tertiary structure, surface hydrophobicity, metal content, and reversibility. Chemical modifications were also identified in a separate report (Luo, Q., Joubert, M. K., Stevenson, R., Narhi, L. O., and Wypych, J. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25134–25144). Aggregates were categorized into seven discrete classes, based on the traits described. Several additional molecules (from the IgG1 and IgG2 subtypes as well as intravenous IgG) were stressed and found to be defined with the same classification system. The mechanism of protein aggregation and the type of aggregate formed depends on the nature of the stress applied. Different IgG molecules appear to aggregate by a similar mechanism under the same applied stress. Aggregates created by harsh mechanical stress showed the largest number of subvisible particles, and the class generated by thermal stress displayed the largest number of visible particles. Most classes showed a disruption of the higher order structure, with the degree of disorder depending on the stress process. Particles in all classes (except thermal stress) were at least partially reversible upon dilution in pH 5 buffer. High copper content was detected in isolated metal-catalyzed aggregates, a stress previously shown to produce immunogenic aggregates. In conclusion, protein aggregates can be a very heterogeneous population, whose qualities are the result of the type of stress that was experienced. PMID:21454532

  13. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context. PMID:24073569

  14. Sans study of asphaltene aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Overfield, R.E.; Sheu, E.Y.; Sinha, S.K.; Liang, K.S. )

    1988-06-01

    The colloidal properties of asphaltenes have long been recognized from peculiarities in their solubility and colligative properties. A layered micellar model or asphaltenes was proposed by others in which a highly condensed alkyl aromatic formed the central part, and molecules of decreasingly aromatic character (resins) clustered around them. Numerous studies, based on a variety of techniques such as ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy indicated a particulate nature for asphaltenes with size 20-40 A diameter. Others have proposed a refined model based on x-ray diffraction and small angle scattering. In this model, interactions between flat sheets of condensed aromatic rings form the central ''crystallite'' part of a spherical particle with the outer part being comprised of the aliphatic positions of the same molecules. These particles are bunched together with some degree of entanglement into ''micelles''. Concentration and solvent dependent radii of gyration, ranging from 30-50 A were reported. The aggregation creates a good deal of uncertainty as to the true molecular size or weight of asphaltenes. Neutron scattering offers novel contrast relative to light scattering (refractive index) and x-ray scattering (electron density). This is because the scattering length of proton is negative, whereas that from deuterium and other nuclei such as C, S, O, and N are positive. Thus by replacing hydrogen with deuterium in either the solvent or the scatterer the contrast can be varied, and different parts of the molecule can be highlighted.

  15. Anisotropic diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Popescu, M N; Hentschel, H G E; Family, F

    2004-06-01

    Using stochastic conformal mappings, we study the effects of anisotropic perturbations on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in two dimensions. The harmonic measure of the growth probability for DLA can be conformally mapped onto a constant measure on a unit circle. Here we map m preferred directions for growth to a distribution on the unit circle, which is a periodic function with m peaks in [-pi,pi) such that the angular width sigma of the peak defines the "strength" of anisotropy kappa= sigma(-1) along any of the m chosen directions. The two parameters (m,kappa) map out a parameter space of perturbations that allows a continuous transition from DLA (for small enough kappa ) to m needlelike fingers as kappa--> infinity. We show that at fixed m the effective fractal dimension of the clusters D(m,kappa) obtained from mass-radius scaling decreases with increasing kappa from D(DLA) approximately 1.71 to a value bounded from below by D(min) = 3 / 2. Scaling arguments suggest a specific form for the dependence of the fractal dimension D(m,kappa) on kappa for large kappa which compares favorably with numerical results. PMID:15244564

  16. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    PubMed

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  17. Bacterial transfer RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNA is an essential adapter molecule that is found across all three domains of life. The primary role of transfer RNA resides in its critical involvement in the accurate translation of messenger RNA codons during protein synthesis and, therefore, ultimately in the determination of cellular gene expression. This review aims to bring together the results of intensive investigations into the synthesis, maturation, modification, aminoacylation, editing and recycling of bacterial transfer RNAs. Codon recognition at the ribosome as well as the ever-increasing number of alternative roles for transfer RNA outside of translation will be discussed in the specific context of bacterial cells. PMID:25796611

  18. Bacterial ecologies in limonite.

    PubMed

    Vishniac, W

    1965-01-01

    Limonite (Fe2O3 . nH2O) may be a constituent of the Martian surface. We have prepared culture media with ferric hydroxide as an electron acceptor. One medium contained ethanol, another gaseous hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Bacterial growth without light and oxygen suggests that ferric iron serves as a terminal respiratory electron acceptor. The oxidation of ferrous hydroxide may be carried out by photosynthetic bacteria. A ferrous-ferric couple may thus support bacterial respiration and photosynthesis in the absence of oxygen. This cycle may account for the dark markings of Mars.

  19. Measuring Forces of Bacterial Biofilms on Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Benjamin; Gordon, Vernita

    2010-10-01

    Biofilms are multicellular aggregates of microorganisms with distinct gene expression and often complex spatial structure. Understanding the forces exerted by bacterial biofilms on their substrates could help in understanding damage they cause in industrial settings and to living tissue in biofilm infections. Here we propose a series of experiments to study the forces between biofilms and substrates using rheological and micro-rheological techniques. Polystyrene tracer beads embedded in agar gels can be mapped over the course of biofilm development, and these timelapse motions will show the strain in the substrate. Meanwhile, measurements of the Brownian motion of selected tracer beads can yield information about the microstructure of the agar. For instance, the extent of the Brownian motion will be increased if the agar is stretched apart or broken down. Additionally, tracers in the biofilms themselves would permit the study of the rheology of the biofilms throughout their development.

  20. Thermal Aggregation of Calcium-Fortified Skim Milk Enhances Probiotic Protection during Convective Droplet Drying.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Song; Fu, Nan; Jeantet, Romain; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2016-08-01

    Probiotic bacteria have been reported to confer benefits on hosts when delivered in an adequate dose. Spray-drying is expected to produce dried and microencapsulated probiotic products due to its low production cost and high energy efficiency. The bottleneck in probiotic application addresses the thermal and dehydration-related inactivation of bacteria during process. A protective drying matrix was designed by modifying skim milk with the principle of calcium-induced protein thermal aggregation. The well-defined single-droplet drying technique was used to monitor the droplet-particle conversion and the protective effect of this modified Ca-aggregated milk on Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The Ca-aggregated milk exhibited a higher drying efficiency and superior protection on L. rhamnosus GG during thermal convective drying. The mechanism was explained by the aggregation in milk, causing the lower binding of water in the serum phase and, conversely, local concentrated milk aggregates involved in bacteria entrapment in the course of drying. This work may open new avenues for the development of probiotic products with high bacterial viability and calcium enrichment. PMID:27420726

  1. Pathological-Condition-Driven Construction of Supramolecular Nanoassemblies for Bacterial Infection Detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Ma, Huai-Lei; Qi, Guo-Bin; Zhang, Di; Yu, Faquan; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-13

    A pyropheophorbide-α-based building block (Ppa-PLGVRG-Van) can be used to construct self-aggregated superstructures in vivo for highly specific and sensitive diagnosis of bacterial infection by noninvasive photoacoustic tomography. This in vivo supramolecular chemistry approach opens a new avenue for efficient, rapid, and early-stage disease diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26568542

  2. Can intra-aggregate pore structures affect the aggregate's effectiveness in protecting carbon?

    SciTech Connect

    Ananyeva, K; Wang, W; Smucker, A J.M.; Rivers, M L; Kravchenko, A N

    2012-11-15

    Aggregates are known to provide physical protection to soil organic matter shielding it from rapid decomposition. Spatial arrangement and size distribution of intra-aggregate pores play an important role in this process. This study examined relationships between intra-aggregate pores measured using X-ray computed micro-tomography images and concentrations of total C in 4–6 mm macro-aggregates from two contrasting land use and management practices, namely, conventionally tilled and managed row crop agricultural system (CT) and native succession vegetation converted from tilled agricultural land in 1989 (NS). Previous analyses of these aggregates indicated that small (<15 μm) and large (>100 μm) pores prevail in NS aggregates while medium (30–90 μm) pores are more abundant in CT aggregates (Kravchenko et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2012). We hypothesized that these differences in pore size distributions affect the ability of macro-aggregates to protect C. The results of this study supported this hypothesis. Consistent with greater heterogeneity of pore distributions within NS aggregates we observed higher total C and greater intra-aggregate C variability in NS as compared with CT aggregates. Total C concentrations and intra-aggregate C standard deviations were negatively correlated with fractions of medium sized pores, indicating that presence of such pores was associated with lower but more homogeneously distributed total C. While total C was positively correlated with presence of small and large pores. The results suggest that because of their pore structure NS macro-aggregates provide more effective physical protection to C than CT aggregates.

  3. A Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay For Monitoring α- Synclein Aggregation in a Caenorhabditis Elegans Model For Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Archana; Bodhicharla, Rakesh; Winter, Jody; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Morgan, Kevin; Searle, Mark; Nazir, Aamir; Adenle, Ademola; Fineberg, April; Brady, Declan; Vere, Kelly; Richens, Jo; O'Shea, Paul; Bell, David; de-Pomerai, David

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein (Syn or S) to form insoluble fibrils is important in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, but key risk factors remain ill-defined. We have developed Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based assays for α-synuclein aggregation, using Green Fluorescent Protein variants Cerulean (C) or Venus (V), fused to each other (CV, VC) or to human synuclein (SC, SV etc). Bacterially expressed proteins were purified to homogeneity, and C-terminal fusions SC and SV largely retained their ability to aggregate in vitro. FRET signals from mixtures of SC and SV were used to monitor aggregation. These fusion genes were linked to the C. elegans unc-54 myosin promoter to generate integrated transgenic strains. Increased FRET signals, indicative of S aggregation, were observed following treatment of unc-54::SC + unc-54::SV double transgenic worms with low concentrations of mercury or chlorpyrifos, or with RNAi against hsp-70 and hip-1. Opposite changes in Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP) fluorescence in an unc-54::SV strain (NL5901) are likely to reflect FRET from Yellow Fluorescent Protein to aggregates of Syn fusion protein. This could provide the basis for a high throughput screening assay, which could be used for studying the effects of toxic chemicals and environmental pollutants on the aggregation of proteins such as Syn in vivo. PMID:26295817

  4. The DUB-ious lack of ALIS in Salmonella infection: a Salmonella deubiquitinase regulates the autophagy of protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mair; Mesquita, Francisco S; Holden, David W

    2012-12-01

    Ubiquitinated aggregates are formed in eukaryotic cells in response to several external stimuli, including exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Although Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) LPS has been shown to induce aggresome-like induced structures (ALIS) in macrophages, these have not been described in S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. Given that LPS is present in infection, this suggests that S. Typhimurium might suppress the formation of ALIS. We found that S. Typhimurium induces the formation of ubiquitinated aggregates in epithelial cells and macrophages, but that their presence is masked by the deubiquitinase (DUB) activity of the S. Typhimurium virulence protein, SseL. SseL deubiquitinates SQSTM1/p62-bound proteins found in S. Typhimurium-induced aggregates and ALIS, and reduces the recruitment of autophagic components. While the functions of ALIS and other ubiquitinated aggregates remain unclear, they serve to sequester cytosolic proteins under a variety of stress conditions and are suggested to be involved in host immune defense. During infection, the deubiquitinase activity of SseL reduces autophagic flux in infected cells and favors bacterial replication. This is a new example of how a bacterial pathogen counteracts the autophagy pathway through the action of a translocated virulence protein.

  5. Collision simulation of sintered dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirono, Sin-iti; Ueno, Haruta

    Collisional evolution of dust aggregates is the initial process of the planet formation. Sticking velocity, below which collisional sticking of an aggregate happens, is a crucial quantity in the collisional evolution. In the standard model of protoplanetary nebula, the maximum collisional velocity is around 50m/s. Therefore, if a planetesimal is formed through direct collisional sticking, the sticking velocity should be higher than 50m/s. Even if a planetesimal is formed by other mechanism such as anticyclonic vortices, substantial growth of an aggregate is required because the motion of an aggregate should be decoupled from that of gas. Collisional simulation of icy dust aggregates (Wada et al. 2009, ApJ 702, 1490) showed that the sticking velocity was larger than 50m/s and planetesimal formation by collisional sticking was possible. However, sintering of ice proceeds in a wide area of a protoplanetary nebula (Sirono 2011, ApJ 765, 50). Sintering enlarges a neck, connection between adjacent dust grains, and changes the mechanical properties of a dust aggregate. Here we performed collisional simulations between sintered dust aggregates taking account of sintering. We found that the sticking velocity was decreased substantially down to 20m/s. This result suggests that a planetesimal is not formed by direct collisional sticking and that the planetesimal formation proceeded in particular regions in a protoplanetary nebula.

  6. Efficient clustering aggregation based on data fragments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ou; Hu, Weiming; Maybank, Stephen J; Zhu, Mingliang; Li, Bing

    2012-06-01

    Clustering aggregation, known as clustering ensembles, has emerged as a powerful technique for combining different clustering results to obtain a single better clustering. Existing clustering aggregation algorithms are applied directly to data points, in what is referred to as the point-based approach. The algorithms are inefficient if the number of data points is large. We define an efficient approach for clustering aggregation based on data fragments. In this fragment-based approach, a data fragment is any subset of the data that is not split by any of the clustering results. To establish the theoretical bases of the proposed approach, we prove that clustering aggregation can be performed directly on data fragments under two widely used goodness measures for clustering aggregation taken from the literature. Three new clustering aggregation algorithms are described. The experimental results obtained using several public data sets show that the new algorithms have lower computational complexity than three well-known existing point-based clustering aggregation algorithms (Agglomerative, Furthest, and LocalSearch); nevertheless, the new algorithms do not sacrifice the accuracy. PMID:22334025

  7. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  8. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  9. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  10. Staining bacterial flagella easily.

    PubMed Central

    Heimbrook, M E; Wang, W L; Campbell, G

    1989-01-01

    A wet-mount technique for staining bacterial flagella is highly successful when a stable stain and regular slides and cover slips are used. Although not producing a permanent mount, the technique is simple for routine use when the number and arrangement of flagella are critical in identifying species of motile bacteria. Images PMID:2478573

  11. Modeling intraocular bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Astley, Roger A; Coburn, Phillip S; Parkunan, Salai Madhumathi; Callegan, Michelle C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is an infection and inflammation of the posterior segment of the eye which can result in significant loss of visual acuity. Even with prompt antibiotic, anti-inflammatory and surgical intervention, vision and even the eye itself may be lost. For the past century, experimental animal models have been used to examine various aspects of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial endophthalmitis, to further the development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies, and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacies of antibiotics. Experimental models allow independent control of many parameters of infection and facilitate systematic examination of infection outcomes. While no single animal model perfectly reproduces the human pathology of bacterial endophthalmitis, investigators have successfully used these models to understand the infectious process and the host response, and have provided new information regarding therapeutic options for the treatment of bacterial endophthalmitis. This review highlights experimental animal models of endophthalmitis and correlates this information with the clinical setting. The goal is to identify knowledge gaps that may be addressed in future experimental and clinical studies focused on improvements in the therapeutic preservation of vision during and after this disease. PMID:27154427

  12. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  13. Seasonal variability of soil aggregate stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohoskova, M.; Kodesova, R.; Jirku, V.; Zigova, A.; Kozak, J.

    2009-04-01

    Seasonal variability of soil properties measured in surface horizons of three soil types (Haplic Luvisol, Greyic Phaeozem, Haplic Cambisol) was studied in years 2007 and 2008. Undisturbed and disturbed soil samples were taken every month to evaluate field water content, bulk density, porosity, ration of gravitational and capillary pores, pHKCl and pHH2O, organic matter content and its quality, aggregate stability using WSA