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Sample records for nitrile butadiene rubber

  1. Polybenzoxazole-filled nitrile butadiene rubber compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor); Guillot, David G. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) having an acrylonitrile content that ranges from approximately 26% by weight to approximately 35% by weight and polybenzoxazole (PBO) fibers. The NBR may be a copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene and may be present in the insulation composition in a range of from approximately 45% by weight to approximately 56% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. The PBO fibers may be present in a range of from approximately 3% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. A rocket motor including the insulation composition and a method of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  2. [Identification of migrants from nitrile-butadiene rubber gloves].

    PubMed

    Mutsuga, Motoh; Kawamura, Yoko; Wakui, Chiseko; Maitani, Tamio

    2003-04-01

    Polyvinyl chloride gloves containing di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate are restricted for food contact use. In their place, disposable gloves made from nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) are used in contact with foodstuffs. Some unknown substances were found to migrate into n-heptane from NBR gloves. By GC/MS, HR-MS and NMR, their chemical structures were confirmed to be 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (used as a plasticizer), 4,4'-butylidenedi(6-tert-butyl-m-cresol), a mixture of styrenated phenols consisting of 2-(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol, 4-(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol, 2,6-di(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol, 2,4-di(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol and 2,4,6-tri(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol (used as antioxidants), and 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, which seems to a degradation product of antioxidant. Migration levels of these compounds were 1.68 micrograms/cm2 of 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, 2.80 micrograms/cm2 of 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate, 46.08 micrograms/cm2 of styrenated phenols and 4.22 micrograms/cm2 of 4,4'-butylidenedi(6-tert-butyl-m-cresol) into n-heptane, respectively. The content of total styrenated phenols was 6,900 micrograms/g in NBR gloves.

  3. Molecular Simulation of Gas Solubility in Nitrile Butadiene Rubber.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, M; Sutton, A P; Mostofi, A A

    2017-01-12

    Molecular simulation is used to compute the solubility of small gases in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) with a Widom particle-insertion technique biased by local free volume. The convergence of the method is examined as a function of the number of snapshots upon which the insertions are performed and the number of insertions per snapshot and is compared to the convergence of the unbiased Widom insertion technique. The effect of varying the definition of local free volume is also investigated. The acrylonitrile content of the polymer is altered to examine its influence on the solubility of helium, CO2, and H2O, and the solubilities of polar gases are found to be enhanced relative to those of nonpolar gases, in qualitative agreement with experiment. To probe this phenomenon further, the solubilities are decomposed into contributions from the neighborhoods of different atoms, using a Voronoi cell construction, and a strong bias is found for CO2 and H2O in particular to be situated near nitrogen sites in the elastomer. Temperature is shown to suppress the solubility of CO2 and H2O but to increase that of helium. Increasing pressure is found to suppress the solubility of all gases but at different rates, according to a balance between their molecular sizes and electrostatic interactions with the polymer. These results are relevant to the use of NBR seals at elevated temperatures and pressures, such as in oil and gas wells.

  4. Carbon-nanotube/silver networks in nitrile butadiene rubber for highly conductive flexible adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rujun; Kwon, Seoyoung; Zheng, Qing; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Kim, Jae Il; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Baik, Seunghyun

    2012-07-03

    An adhesive with high conductivity, flexibility, cyclability, oxidation resistance, and good adhesion is developed using microscale silver flakes, multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with nanoscale silver particles, and nitrile butadiene rubber. Light-emitting-diode chips are attached to the conductive, flexible adhesive pattern on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate as a visual demonstration. The brightness is invariant during bending tests.

  5. Low percolation threshold carbon-black/ nitrile-butadiene-rubber composites and their electromagnetic shielding effects.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Min; Zhao, Dongliang; Yu, Ronghai; Feng, Meng; Yang, Bai; Liu, Xiaofang; Zhang, Yanghuan; Wang, Xinlin

    2013-02-01

    Nitrile-butadiene-rubber composites, filled with super conducting carbon black, are successfully prepared with low percolation threshold, high conductivity and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness. Percolation theory is used to represent the system's conductivity, and the corresponding result is close to the experimental value. The fitting curve also gives the weight fraction threshold and conductivity exponent of the conducting polymer. The percolation threshold of the composite is 9.2 phr, which is much smaller than previous homologous findings and lower than the value of short carbon fiber counterparts reported. The volume resistivity becomes 3.17 omega x cm for the 20 phr sample and decreases to 0.66 omega x cm for the 40 phr sample. At 1.8 GHz for 40 phr sample, the shielding effectiveness is -43 dB.

  6. The physical and degradation properties of starch-graft-acrylonitrile/carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber latex films.

    PubMed

    Misman, M A; Azura, A R; Hamid, Z A A

    2015-09-05

    Starch-graft-acrylonitrile (ANS) is compounded with carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The control XNBR and the ANS/XNBR latex films were prepared through a coagulant dipping process. The films were subjected to ageing and soil burial procedures. For the biodegradation experiment, the surface of the film was assessed after the 2nd, 4th and 8th week of soil burial. The ANS, XNBR, and ANS/XNBR colloidal stability were determined with a Malvern Zetasizer. For the dipped latex films, the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties were analyzed. The addition of ANS into the XNBR latex increased the stability of the colloidal dispersions, decreased the latex film tensile strength, but increased the elongation at break due to the bipolar interaction of the ANS and XNBR particles. The ANS/XNBR latex films aged faster than the control films while the morphological analysis showed the existence of a starch crystal region and the formation of microbial colonies on the surfaces of the films. Based on the TGA-DTA curves, a higher ΔT was observed for the ANS/XNBR latex films signifying high thermal energy needed for the film to thermally degrade.

  7. Predicting the solubility of gases in Nitrile Butadiene Rubber in extreme conditions using molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, Musab; Molinari, Nicola; Sutton, Adrian; Mostofi, Arash

    In the oil and gas industry, elastomer seals play an important role in protecting sensitive monitoring equipment from contamination by gases - a problem that is exacerbated by the high pressures and temperatures found down-hole. The ability to predict and prevent such permeative failure has proved elusive to-date. Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) is a common choice of elastomer for seals due to its resistance to heat and fuels. In the conditions found in the well it readily absorbs small molecular weight gases. How this behaviour changes quantitatively for different gases as a function of temperature and pressure is not well-understood. In this work a series of fully atomistic simulations are performed to understand the effect of extreme conditions on gas solubility in NBR. Widom particle insertion is used to compute solubilities. The importance of sampling and allowing structural relaxation upon compression are highlighted, and qualitatively reasonable trends reproduced. Finally, while at STP it has previously been shown that the solubility of CO2 is higher than that of He in NBR, we observe that under the right circumstances it is possible to reverse this trend.

  8. Isolation and identification of some unknown substances in disposable nitrile-butadiene rubber gloves used for food handling.

    PubMed

    Mutsuga, M; Wakui, C; Kawamura, Y; Maitani, T

    2002-11-01

    In Japan, disposable gloves made from nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) are frequently used in contact with foods. In a previous paper, we investigated substances migrating from various gloves made of polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene, natural rubber and NBR. Zinc di-n-butyldithiocarbamate (ZDBC), diethyldithiocarbamate (ZDEC) used as vulcanization accelerators, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) used as a plasticizer and many unknown compounds that migrated from NBR gloves into n-heptane were detected by GC/MS. In this paper, six unknown compounds were obtained from one kind of NBR glove by n-hexane extraction and each was isolated by silica gel chromatography. From the results of NMR and mass spectral analysis of the six unknown compounds, their structures are proposed as 1,4-dione-2,5-bis(1,1-dimethylpropyl)cyclohexadiene (1), 2-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-(1,1,3,3-tetra methylbutyl)phenol (2), 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol (3), 2,4-bis(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol (4), 2-(1,1-dimethylethyl)4,6-bis(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol (5) and 2,4,6-tris(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol (6). Compound 1 was observed in five of the seven kinds of NBR gloves, and compounds 2-4 and 6, which are not listed in Chemical Abstract (CA), were present in four kinds of gloves.

  9. Transport properties of carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR)-nanoclay composites; a promising material for protective gloves in occupational exposures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in response to one of the research needs of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), i.e. the application of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in the field of occupational safety and health. In order to fill this important knowledge gap, the equilibrium solubility and diffusion of carbon tetrachloride and ethyl acetate through carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR)-clay nanocomposite, as a promising new material for chemical protective gloves (or barrier against the transport of organic solvent contaminant), were examined by swelling procedure. Near Fickian diffusion was observed for XNBR based nanocomposites containing different amounts of nanoclay. Decontamination potential is a key factor in development of a new material for reusable chemical protective gloves applications, specifically for routine or highly toxic exposures. A thermal decontamination regime for nanocomposite was developed for the first time. Then, successive cycles of exposure/decontamination for nanocomposite were performed to the maximum 10 cycles for the first time. This result confirms that the two selected solvents cannot deteriorate the rubber-nanoclay interaction and, therefore, such gloves can be reusable after decontamination. PMID:24581248

  10. Wear resistance and friction reduction in acrylo nitrile butadiene rubber through hybrid combination of graphite flakes and nano tungsten disulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Neha; Pandey, Akanksha; Parihar, A. S.; Mishra, A. K.; Gandhi, M. N.; Bhattacharyya, A. R.; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Prasad, N. E.

    2016-05-01

    Friction and wear have considerable role in the life span of two interacting parts. Incorporation of nanofillers in polymers/elastomers matrix causes commendable changes in its tribologicalproperties. The main purpose of this work is to reduce the coefficient of friction and wear rate of Acrylo Nitrile Butadiene rubber (NBR). To achieve such objective traditionally well knownlubricants graphite(G), tungsten disulphide (WS2) and there hybrid combination was incorporated in NBR matrix. Effect of applied load (force) and concentration of fillers on tribological properties of NBR had been studied. The filler incorporation enhanced the hardnessby 8%, showed resistance to hydraulic oil and aging effect also got improved significantly. A particular optimized concentration of NBR with hybrid combination of 2% WS2 and 4% Graphite showed minimum coefficient of friction as well as wear rate. A hypothesis could be attributed that similar lamellar structure of WS2 and Graphite along with formation of a stable nanoscale disulfide tribofilmcould result in lowering of friction. These substantially improved properties of nanoreinforced rubber materials would definitely pave promising path for plethora of potential technological applications.

  11. Effect of magnetic and thermal properties of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Hun Tiar; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Boondamnoen, O.; Tai, Mun Foong

    2015-12-01

    Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves are one of the most important personal protective equipments but they are possible to tear off and contaminate food or pharmaceutical and healthcare products during manufacturing and packaging process. High tendency of torn glove remaining in food or products due to white or light flesh-coloured glove is not easy to be detected by naked eyes. In this paper, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) selected as additive for NBR to improve its detectability by mean of magnetic properties. IONs synthesized via precipitation method and compounded with NBR latex before casting on petri dish. The properties of IONs were investigated by X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Raman Spectroscopy and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Meanwhile NBR/IONs composites were studied by Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). It observed that, synthesized IONs shows of 25.28 nm crystallite with 25.86 nm semipherical (changed as) shape. Meanwhile, Magnetite and maghemite phase are found in range of 670 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 respectively, which it contributes magnetization saturation of 73.96 emu/g at 10,000 G by VSM. Thermal stability and magnetic properties were increased with incorporating IONs into NBR latex up to 20 phr. NBR/IONs 5 phr has the optimum thermal stability, lowest glass transition temperature (-14.83 °C) and acceptable range of magnetization saturation (3.83 emu/g at 10,000 G) to form NBR gloves with magnetic detectability.

  12. New dual-phase polymer electrolytes prepared from NBR/SBR lattices. [polyacryloNitrile-Butadiene Rubber/poly(Styrene-Butadiene) copolymer Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Morihiko; Ichino, Toshihiro; Rutt, J.S.; Nishi, Shiro . NTT Interdisciplinary Research Lab.)

    1993-10-01

    A new type of Li[sup +] ion conducting polymer electrolytes consisting of two phases, one of which is a highly polar region (impregnated with lithium salt solution), forming ion-conductive channels, while the other is a nonpolar region, forming supporting polymer matrices have been prepared from NBR/SBR lattices. TEM measurement and EDX analysis show evidence that dual-phase structure is constructed in the electrolyte. Ionic conductivity of the electrolyte increases with increase of lithium salt solution content. Maximum ionic conductivity of 2.2 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] S/cm is obtained at the lithium salt solution content of 60.5% (w/w). The electrolyte retains rubber-like film with good mechanical strength despite the presence of the solution.

  13. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques to Study the Cracking of a Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Insulator on the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Two different vendor rubber formulations have been used to produce the silica-filled NBR insulators for the BSM of each of the two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) on the Space Shuttle. Each cured insulator is bonded to the BSM aluminum aft closure with an epoxy adhesive, and some of the curved areas in the rubber may have significant residual stresses. A number of recently bonded NBR insulators have shown fine surface cracks, and stressed insulator areas may be aging at a faster rate than unstressed areas, thus hastening the surface cracking. Thermal analysis data on both vendor insulators by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) through a temperature/frequency sweep from 24 to 74 C have shown a higher flexural storage modulus and Arrhenius activation energy for the stressed area than for the unstressed area. Other thermal analysis techniques are being used to study the insulator surface vs. bulk interior for better understanding this anomaly.

  14. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques to Study the Cracking of an Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Insulator on the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Two different vendor rubber formulations have been used to produce the silica-filled NBR insulators for the BSM used on both of the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) of the Space Shuttle. A number of lots of the BSM insulator in 1998-99 exhibited surface cracks and/or crazing. Each insulator is bonded to the BSM aluminum aft closure with an epoxy adhesive. Induced insulator stresses from adhesive cure are likely greatest where the insulator/adhesive contour is the greatest, thus showing increased insulator surface cracking in this area. Thermal analysis testing by Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermomechanical Analysis (TMA) was performed on one each of the two vendor BSM insulators previously bonded that exhibited the surface cracking. The TMA data from the film/fiber technique yielded the most meaningful results, with thin insulator surface samples containing cracks having roughly the same modulus (stiffness) as thin insulator bulk samples just underneath.

  15. Styrene-butadiene rubber/halloysite nanotubes composites modified by epoxidized natural rubber.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhixin; Luo, Yuanfang; Yang, Shuyan; Du, Mingliang; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2011-12-01

    The reinforcement effects of halloysite nanotubes on styrene-butadiene rubber and the modification effect of epoxidized natural rubber on styrene-butadiene rubber/halloysite nanotubes composites were studied. The structure, morphology and properties of styrene-butadiene rubber/halloysite nanotubes composites before and after the incorporation of epoxidized natural rubber were investigated. The results indicated that epoxidized natural rubber can promote the dispersion and orientation of halloysite nanotubes in styrene-butadiene rubber matrix at nanoscale and strengthen interfacial combination between halloysite nanotubes and styrene-butadiene rubber by the formation of covalent bonds and hydrogen bonds between epoxidized natural rubber and halloysite nanotubes. Consequently epoxidized natural rubber can improve the mechanical properties of the vulcanizates of styrene-butadiene rubber/halloysite nanotubes composites. Besides epoxidized natural rubber can decrease the rolling resistance of the vulcanizates and increase the wet grip property of the vulcanizates.

  16. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-05

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption.

  17. Model fire tests on polyphosphazene rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/nitrile rubber foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widenor, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A video tape record of model room fire tests was shown, comparing polyphosphazene (P-N) rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/nitrile rubber closed-cell foams as interior finish thermal insulation under conditions directly translatable to an actual fire situation. Flashover did not occur with the P-N foam and only moderate amounts of low density smoke were formed, whereas with the PVC/nitrile foam, flashover occurred quickly and large volumes of high density smoke were emitted. The P-N foam was produced in a pilot plant under carefully controlled conditions. The PVC/nitrile foam was a commercial product. A major phase of the overall program involved fire tests on P-N open-cell foam cushioning.

  18. Radiation-induced vulcanisation of natural rubber latex in presence of styrene-butadiene rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, C. V.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Patil, N. D.; Dubey, K. A.; Kumar, Virendra; Sabharwal, S.

    2005-04-01

    Radiation vulcanisation of natural rubber latex in presence of styrene butadiene rubber latex (SBRL) has been investigated. The cast films were characterised for their swelling properties, tensile strength and thermal stability as a function of radiation dose as well as SBRL content. The gel content, tensile strength and thermal stability of the copolymer films were found to increase with increasing the SBRL content in the feed solution and radiation dose.

  19. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. 63.500 Section 63.500 Protection... limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. (a) Owners or operators of sources subject to this subpart producing styrene butadiene rubber using an emulsion process shall operate the...

  20. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. 63.500 Section 63.500 Protection... limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. (a) Owners or operators of sources subject to this subpart producing styrene butadiene rubber using an emulsion process shall operate the...

  1. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. 63.500 Section 63.500 Protection... limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. (a) Owners or operators of sources subject to this subpart producing styrene butadiene rubber using an emulsion process shall operate the...

  2. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. 63.500 Section 63.500 Protection... limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. (a) Owners or operators of sources subject to this subpart producing styrene butadiene rubber using an emulsion process shall operate the...

  3. Buffing dust as a filler of carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber and butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Chronska, K; Przepiorkowska, A

    2008-03-01

    Buffing dust from chrome tanned leather is one of the difficult tannery wastes to manage. It is also hazardous to both human health and the environment. The scientific literature rarely reports studies on dust management, especially on its utilization as a filler for elastomers. In this connection we have made an attempt to use this leather waste as a filler for rubbers such as XNBR and NBR. The addition of the buffing dust to rubber mixes brought improvement in mechanical properties, and increase in resistance to thermal ageing as well as in electric conductivity and crosslink density of vulcalizates.

  4. Nanocomposites of nitrile (NBR) rubber with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warasitthinon, Nuthathai

    Nanotechnology offers the promise of creating new materials with enhanced performance. There are different kinds of fillers used in rubber nanocomposites, such as carbon black, silica, carbon fibers, and organoclays. Carbon nanotube reinforced elastomers have potential for improved rubber properties in aggressive environments. The first chapter is an introduction to the literature. The second chapter investigated the incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into rubber matrix for potential use in high temperature applications. The vulcanization kinetics of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes was investigated. The vulcanized NBR rubber with different loading percentages of MWCNTs was also compared to NBR reinforced with carbon black N330. The optimum curing time at 170°C (T90) was found to decrease with increasing content of MWCNTs. Increased filler loading of both carbon black and MWCNTs gave higher modulus and strength. The MWCNTs filled materials gave better retention of modulus and tensile strength at high temperatures, but lower strength as compared to the carbon black filled samples. In the third chapter, carbon black (CB, 50phr) content in nitrile rubber (NBR) nanocomposites was partially replaced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). NBR/CB/CNTs nanocomposites with varying ratio of CB/CNTs (50/0 phr to 40/10 phr) were formulated via the melt-mixing method using an internal mixer. The reinforcing effect of single filler (CB) and mixture of fillers (CB and CNTs) on the properties of NBR nanocomposites was investigated. The cure kinetics and bound rubber content were analyzed using rheometry and solvent swelling method. In addition, mechanical behavior at both room temperature and high temperature (350°F/ 121°C) were examined. The scorch time and curing time values showed that there was no significant effect on the curing behavior of NBR nanocomposites after the partial replacement of CB with

  5. Determination of styrene-butadiene rubber composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. S.; Kiselev, S. A.; Kiseleva, E. A.; Budeeva, A. V.; Mashukov, V. I.

    2013-03-01

    A rapid method for determining the composition of styrene-butadiene rubber using attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was proposed. PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and infrared transmission spectroscopy were used as absolute techniques for determining the compositions of calibration samples. It was shown that the method was applicable to a wide range of styrene-butadiene rubbers, did not require additional sample preparation, and was easily reproducible.

  6. Ozone Ageing of Silicone Rubber and the Effects of Anti-Oxidants on the Ozone Ageing of Nitrile Rubber.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    APR 81 UNCLASSIFIED RAE-TM-MAT-369 DRIC-BR-87489 F/G 11/10 NL mEEns MEOMOEEhMImIIIIIIIIIIIEIIIIII 1.0 SIIIII . ’ + 1.8 11112 1.4 11111_L6 l~y k ~IT N i...graphs follow a characteristic curve of ozone attack on rubber. Table I is a representation of the retention of physical properties of the rubbers...TEST) ozone resistance. Silicone rubber. Nitrile rubber. 17. Abstract Work done by others suggested that a rapid lose of physical properties could occur

  7. [The airborne 1,3-butadiene concentrations in rubber and plastic processing plants].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiaki; Tainaka, Hidetsugu; Matsunaga, Ichiro; Goto, Sumio

    2002-03-01

    Environment pollution by 1,3-butadiene had considerably increased in Japan. The main cause of the pollution is the automotive exhaust gas, and leaks from factories, smoking, and burning of rubber and plastic products are considered to be minor sources. The object of this study was to determine the contamination levels of airborne 1,3-butadiene in factories processing rubber and plastics containing 1,3-butadiene. The concentrations of airborne 1,3-butadiene were measured in 21 plants (10 rubber processing plants and 11 plastics processing plants) in Osaka. 1,3-Butadiene in air was collected for 10 minutes with a charcoal tube and a portable small pump adjusted to a 250 ml/min flow rate. In each plant, indoor air samples at five points and an outdoor air sample at one point outside the plant were collected. The samples were subjected to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after thermal desorption from the charcoal. The concentrations of airborne 1,3-butadiene in the rubber processing plants and the plastics processing plants were 0.14-2.20 micrograms/m3 (geometric mean: 0.48 microgram/m3) and 0.23-4.51 micrograms/m3 (geometric mean: 0.80 microgram/m3), respectively. In all plants examined, indoor 1,3-butadiene concentrations were higher than the outdoor concentrations around the plants. Therefore, 1,3-butadiene was considered to arise from the processing of rubber or plastics, but the indoor 1,3-butadiene concentrations were much lower than the PEL-TWA (1 ppm = 2.21 mg/m3) of OSHA and the TLV-TWA (2 ppm) of ACGIH. The concentrations in the plants with closed room conditions without ventilation were higher than the concentrations in the other plants. It was suggested that ventilation affected the 1,3-butadiene concentration in the plants.

  8. Application of Lignin as Antioxidant in Styrene Butadiene Rubber Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shusheng; Cheng, Xiansu

    2010-11-01

    Lignin isolated from enzymatic hydrolyzed cornstalks (EHL) is a renewable natural polymer, and rubber is one of the most important polymer materials. The application of EHL in rubber industry is of great significance. The influence of EHL and antioxidant RD on the vulcanizing characteristics, thermal oxidative aging stability under free condition, and water extraction resistance of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) were investigated. The effect of EHL/antioxidant D composite antioxidant on the thermal oxidative ageing of SBR was also evaluated. Results showed that the protection of SBR from thermal oxidative aging by EHL/antioxidant D composite antioxidant was superior to that of antioxidant D. This is because EHL molecules have hindered phenol group and have excellent auxiliary antioxidant role with antioxidant D. Moreover, the influence of EHL on the vulcanizing characteristics of SBR compounds was better than that of antioxidant RD, and EHL can reduce the cure rate and increase the optimum cure time. It is because that the EHL molecules have hindered phenol group and methoxy group, which can form a special structure to capture free radical and terminate the chain reaction. The retained tensile strength of SBR compounds with EHL was similar to that of the samples with antioxidant RD, while the retained elongation at break of SBR compounds with EHL was higher than that of the samples with antioxidant RD. In addition, the SBR compounds with EHL have a good water extraction resistance property, which was similar to the samples with antioxidant RD. This is because EHL have large molecular weight, good stability and low solubility in water. In conclusion, due to the low price, abundant resources, non-toxic and pollution-free, etc., EHL will have broad application prospect.

  9. The swelling of nitrile rubber by selected species in a synthetic jet turbine fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John Lynn

    The swelling of nitrile O-ring seals in petroleum distillate fuels has long been attributed to the aromatic species in these fuels. This presents a problem for synthetic fuels as they typically do not contain these aromatic species and thus may cause O-ring seals to shrink and fail. The composition of petroleum distillate fuels is extremely complex and it is not clear whether the swelling property originates from the aromatics in general, or if certain aromatics contribute more swelling character than others. Consequently, developing a general description of an efficient swelling promoter for O-rings in liquid hydrocarbon fuels will allow an unambiguous selection of candidate swelling agents for synthetic fuels. To accomplish this, a study was undertaken of the swelling of nitrile rubber (the most widely used O-ring material) in JP-5 (the jet propulsion fuel used by the U.S. Navy) and its synthetic equivalent S-5. Briefly, examining the molecular structure of nitrile rubber showed the fuel resistance of this polymer resides in the polar character of the cyano group suggesting that polar species in general, and hydrogen-bonded species in particular, should serve as efficient swelling promoters. A thorough test program utilizing a unique optical dilatometry method to provide temporal volume swell data, a GC-MS method for measuring the polymer/fuel partitioning, and a spectroscopic examination of thin nitrile rubber films confirmed this hypothesis. This program also showed that swelling character increases with decreasing molar volume which is consistent with previous work and general theories of solubility. Overall, this study showed that the most efficient aromatic swelling promoters for nitrile rubber are naphthalenes and asymmetrically substituted alkyl benzenes. However, polar species such as ketones and alcohols can be more efficient than aromatics while phenols and aromatic alcohols represent the most efficient potential swelling promoters for nitrile rubber in

  10. Radiation crosslinking of styrene-butadiene rubber containing waste tire rubber and polyfunctional monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tariq; Khan, Sara; Shafiq, Muhammad; Gill, Rohama

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of polyfunctional monomers (PFMs) and absorbed dose on the final characteristics of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) mixed with waste tire rubber (WTR). A series of SBR/WTR blends were prepared by varying the ratios of WTR in the presence of PFMs, namely trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) and crosslinked using gamma rays. The physicochemical characteristics of the prepared blends were investigated. It was observed that tensile strength, hardness and gel content of the blends increased with absorbed dose while the blends containing TMPTA showed higher tensile strength, gel content and thermal stability as compared to the blends containing TMPTMA. Higher thermal stability was observed in the blends which were crosslinked by radiation as compared to the blends crosslinked by sulfur. These blends exhibited higher rate of swelling in organic solvents, whereas negligible swelling was observed in acidic and basic environment.

  11. Recycling of Chrome Tanned Leather Dust in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Salwa H.; Mohamed, Ola A.

    2010-06-01

    Concerns on environmental waste problem caused by chrome tanned leather wastes in huge amount have caused an increasing interest in developing this wastes in many composite formation. This leather dust was used as filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) before treatment and after treatment with ammonia solution and sod. formate. Different formulations of NBR/ leather dust (untreated-treated with ammonia solution—treated with sod. formate) composites are prepared. The formed composite exhibit a considerable improvement in some of their properties such as rheometric characteristics especially with composites loaded with treated leather dust. Tensile strength, modulus at 100% elongation, hardness and youngs modulus were improved then by further loading start to be steady or decrease. Cross linking density in toluene were increased by incorporation of leather dust treated or untreated resulting in decreases in equilibrium swelling. Distinct increase in the ageing coefficient of both treated and untreated leather with drop in NBR vulcanizates without leather dust. Addition of leather dust treated or untreated exhibit better thermal stability.

  12. Characterization and development of new hydrogenated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severe, Geralda

    Characteristics were determined for hydrogenated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (HNBR), which is a copolymer of butadiene and acrylonitrile made from hydrogenation of the diene segment in acrylonitrile rubber. There was close attention given to the glass transition behavior of HNBR and its tendency to crystallize in the quiescent and in stretching state. The glass transition behavior in HNBR was similar to that of other ethylene copolymers such as for example ethylene vinyl-acetate etc. The crystallinity in HNBR at high acrylonitrile content was due to alternating sequence of acrylonitrile and hydrogenated trans-1,4 butadiene rubber. Furthermore, the structure of HNBR does not have any effect on it rheological properties at the temperature investigated. HNBR exhibits a zero shear viscosity. It is common knowledge that most polymers are immiscible. However, over the years scientists have found numerous miscible polymers. On that basis we investigated miscibility between HNBR with ethylenic copolymers, chlorinated polymers, diene polymers, and hydrogenated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber. HNBR is miscible with high chlorine content chlorinated polymers like chlorinated polyethylene (42% Cl), chlorosulfonated polyethylene (43% Cl), PVC and CPVC. We have also developed dynamically vulcanized blends of HNBR with polychloroprene, epoxydized natural rubber, chlorobutyl, and carboxylated acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer. Most of the blends at 75/25 composition have promising properties.

  13. About the cure kinetics in natural rubber/styrene Butadiene rubber blends at 433 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansilla, M. A.; Marzocca, A. J.

    2012-08-01

    Vulcanized blends of elastomers are employed in several goods mainly to improve physical properties and reduce costs. One of the most used blends of this kind is that composed by natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). The cure kinetic of these blends depends mainly on the compound formulation and the cure temperature and time. The preparation method of the blends can influence the mechanical properties of the vulcanized compounds. In this work the cure kinetic at 433 K of NR/SBR blends vulcanized with the system sulfur/TBBS (N-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) is analyzed in samples prepared by mechanical mixing and solution blending. The two methods produce elastomer domains of NR and SBR, which present different microstructure due to the cure level attained during vulcanization. The cure kinetics is studied by means of rheometer tests and the model proposed by Kamal and Sourour. The analysis of the cure rate is presented and is related to the structure obtained during the vulcanization process.

  14. Permeability of nitrile rubber, latex, polyurethane, and neoprene gloves to 18 antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Connor, T H

    1999-12-01

    The permeability of four glove materials to various antineoplastic drugs was studied. Eighteen antineoplastic drugs posing potential health hazards to handlers were prepared at the highest concentrations normally encountered by hospital personnel. Four glove materials-nitrile rubber, latex, polyurethane, and neoprene-were exposed to the drugs for 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Glove thickness was measured with an electronic digital caliper. Random samples of material were selected from the glove fingertips, and triplicate samples were tested for each drug at each interval. For a majority of the drugs, a bacterial mutagenicity assay was used to measure the amount of drug (if any) that permeated the material. High-performance liquid chromatography was used for drugs not tested with the bacterial assay. The nitrile gloves were the thinnest (0.12 mm), and the latex gloves were the thickest (0.18 mm). The four materials were generally impermeable to each drug. One sample of the nitrile gloves appeared to have a defect, allowing >5% of the drug solution to pass through at 30 minutes. One sample each of the latex, polyurethane, and neoprene gloves demonstrated minimal permeability (< or =1%): One latex glove sample was permeated by carmustine, and paclitaxel permeated one sample each of the polyurethane and neoprene materials. Nitrile rubber, latex, polyurethane, and neoprene gloves were impermeable to 18 antineoplastic drugs in most, but not all, cases.

  15. Polybutadiene and Styrene-Butadiene rubbers for high-dose dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Lucas N.; Vieira, Silvio L.; Schimidt, Fernando; Antonio, Patricia L.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2015-07-01

    Polybutadiene and Styrene-Butadiene are synthetical rubbers used widely for pneumatic tires manufacturing. In this research, the dosimeter characteristics of those rubbers were studied for application in high-dose dosimetry. The rubber samples were irradiated with doses of 10 Gy up to 10 kGy, using a {sup 60}Co Gamma Cell-220 system (dose rate of 1.089 kGy/h) and their readings were taken on a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy-FTIR system (model Frontier/Perkin Elmer). The ratios of two absorbance peaks were taken for each kind of rubber spectrum, Polybutadiene (1306/1130 cm{sup -1}) and Styrene-Butadiene (1449/1306 cm{sup -1}). The ratio calculated was used as the response to the irradiation, and is not uniform across the sample. From the results, it can be concluded for both rubbers: a) the dose-response curves may be useful for high-dose dosimetry (greater than 250 Gy); b) their response for reproducibility presented standard deviations lower than 2.5%; c) the relative sensitivity was higher for Styrene-Butadiene (1.86 kGy{sup -1}) than for Polybutadiene (1.81 kGy{sup -1}), d) for doses of 10 kGy to 200 kGy, there was no variation in the dosimetric response. Both types of rubber samples showed usefulness as high-dose dosimeters. (authors)

  16. Birchwood biochar as partial carbon black replacement in styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birchwood feedstock was used to make slow pyrolysis biochar that contained 89% carbon and < 2% ash. This biochar was blended with carbon black as filler for styrene-butadiene rubber. Composites made from blended fillers of 25/75 biochar/carbon black were equivalent to or superior to their 100% carbo...

  17. Preparation and characterization of zinc sulphide nanocomposites based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Nihmath, A.; Francis, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Rubber composite based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) reinforced with nano zinc sulphide (ZnS) have been prepared via vulcanization process and characterized by several techniques. Processing characteristics such as scorch time, optimum cure time decreases with increase in concentration of nano filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Mechanical properties such as tensile and tear strength increases with increase in concentration of nano filler up to 7 phr of loading thereafter the value decreases, whereas hardness, and flame resistance increases with the dosage of fillers. These enhanced properties are due to the homogenous dispersion of nano fillers in NBR matrix, which is evidenced from the structure that evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  18. Temperature dependence on free volume in cured natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber blends.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, W; Somoza, A; Silva, L; Consolati, G; Quasso, F; Mansilla, M A; Marzocca, A J

    2011-05-01

    A systematic study on the evolution of free volume as a function of the temperature in vulcanized at 433 K natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) in 25-75, 50-50, 75-25 NR-SBR (percent content of pure NR and SBR, respectively) blends was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. All samples were prepared with sulfur and TBBS (n-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) as accelerator. The glass transition temperatures of the samples studied were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and from lifetime data. In general, a sigmoidal-like complex behavior of the long-lived lifetime component, linked to the nanohole free volume, as a function of the temperature was found. For SBR, the slope of the ortho-positronium lifetime against temperature curves could be well-fitted using a linear function. For blends and also for NR, two different linear functions were necessary. This last behavior is explained in terms of the supercooled process involving a reconfiguration of the elastomeric chains. In the case of blends, the state of cure of NR and SBR in each NR-SBR sample was also taken into account in the discussion of the results obtained. Besides, thermal expansion coefficients of the free volumes in the transition and glassy region of all compounds were estimated. The differences observed in the values of this parameter are discussed by taking into account the morphology and formulation of each blend, the crosslink densities, and the role of the interphases formed between both NR and SBR elastomers.

  19. Temperature dependence on free volume in cured natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgueiro, W.; Somoza, A.; Silva, L.; Consolati, G.; Quasso, F.; Mansilla, M. A.; Marzocca, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    A systematic study on the evolution of free volume as a function of the temperature in vulcanized at 433 K natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) in 25-75, 50-50, 75-25 NR-SBR (percent content of pure NR and SBR, respectively) blends was studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. All samples were prepared with sulfur and TBBS (n-t-butyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide) as accelerator. The glass transition temperatures of the samples studied were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and from lifetime data. In general, a sigmoidal-like complex behavior of the long-lived lifetime component, linked to the nanohole free volume, as a function of the temperature was found. For SBR, the slope of the ortho-positronium lifetime against temperature curves could be well-fitted using a linear function. For blends and also for NR, two different linear functions were necessary. This last behavior is explained in terms of the supercooled process involving a reconfiguration of the elastomeric chains. In the case of blends, the state of cure of NR and SBR in each NR-SBR sample was also taken into account in the discussion of the results obtained. Besides, thermal expansion coefficients of the free volumes in the transition and glassy region of all compounds were estimated. The differences observed in the values of this parameter are discussed by taking into account the morphology and formulation of each blend, the crosslink densities, and the role of the interphases formed between both NR and SBR elastomers.

  20. Innovative neutron shielding materials composed of natural rubber-styrene butadiene rubber blends, boron oxide and iron(III) oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumpee, C.; Wongsawaeng, D.

    2015-05-01

    Optimized flexible and lightweight neutron shielding materials were designed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. Thicknesses of 10 mm and 100 mm were tested for neutron shielding performances. Simulation results indicated that the 10 mm shielding material of natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) blend (1:1) with 60 part per hundred rubber (phr) boron oxide (B2O3) and 100 mm shielding material with four alternating layers of NR with 100 phr iron (III) oxide (Fe2O3) and of NR and SBR blend (1:1) with 10 phr B2O3 were most suitable for thermal neutron shielding and all-energy neutron shielding, respectively. Experimental results verified the shielding efficiency of these optimal designs and ease of fabrication.

  1. Correlation between free-volume parameters and physical properties of polyethylene-nitrile rubber blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, E.; Mostafa, N.; Mohsen, M.; Mohammed, M.

    2004-10-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to study the immiscibility of a polar nitrile rubber (NBR) that had been blended with pure and waste, low- and high-density polyethylene (PE). The effect of the weight percent of the rubber added to the PE was also investigated. It was found that a complicated variation (positive and negative) in both free-volume parameters (τ3 and I 3) from the values of the initial polymers forms an immiscible blend. These results are supported by a significant broadening in the free-volume hole size distributions. This has been interpreted in terms of interfacial spaces created between the boundaries of the two phases. Furthermore, a correlation was established between the free-volume parameters (τ3 and I 3) and the electrical and mechanical properties of the before mentioned polymer blends as a function of the weight percent of waste PE.

  2. Evaluating corn starch and corn stover biochar as renewable filler in carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn starch, corn flour, and corn stover biochar were evaluated as potential renewable substitutes for carbon black as filler in rubber composites using carboxylated styrene-butadiene as the rubber matrix. Previous work has shown that starch-based fillers have very good reinforcement properties at t...

  3. Experimental studies and performance analyses on polyurethane and nitrile rubber rod seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, M.; Temiz, V.; Kamburoǧlu, E.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the friction and leakage properties of rod seals made of polyethylene and nitrile rubber with different design geometries, under various pressure and lubricating oil viscosity conditions, in order to make assumptions about their general sealing characteristics and their pros and cons under certain working conditions that involve a range of fluid pressures. The test specimens consist of commercial rod seals of various designs and materials and were mounted on a hard chrome coated shaft subject to reciprocating motion. The test rig is capable of measuring friction force by means of strain measurements on a load cell transmitting the linear motion of a screw shaft to the test shaft. The test results of the reciprocating rod seal samples were evaluated according to leakage amount and friction resistance as a function of materials, design geometries and fluid pressures as well as the lubricating oil viscosity.

  4. Fracture morphologies of carbon-black-loaded SBR (styrene-butadiene rubber) subjected to low-cycle, high-stress fatigue. [Styrene-butadiene rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A.; Lesuer, D.R.; Patt, J.

    1988-02-01

    Experimental results, together with an analytical model, related to the loss in tensile strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) loaded with carbon black (CB) that had been subjected to low-cycle, high-stress fatigue tests were presented in a prior paper. The drop in tensile strength relative to that of a virgin sample was considered to be a measure of damage induced during the fatigue test. The present paper is a continuation of this study dealing with the morphological interpretations of the fractured surfaces, whereby the cyclic-tearing behavior, resulting in the damage, is related to the test and material parameters. It was found that failure is almost always initiated in the bulk of a sample at a material flaw. The size and definition of a flaw increase with an increase in carbon-black loading. Initiation flaw sites are enveloped by fan-shaped or penny-shaped regions which develop during cycling. The size and morphology of a fatigue-tear region appears to be independent of the fatigue load or the extent of the damage (strength loss). By contrast, either an increase in cycling load or an increase in damage at constant load increases the definition of the fatigue-region morphology for all formulations of carbon-black. On the finest scale, the morphology can be described in terms of tearing of individual groups of rubber strands, collapsing to form a cell-like structure. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Morphological and mechanical properties of styrene butadiene rubber/nano copper nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harandi, Maryam Hadizadeh; Alimoradi, Fakhrodin; Rowshan, Gholamhussein; Faghihi, Morteza; Keivani, Maryam; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    In this research, rubber based nanocomposites with presence of nanoparticle has been studied. Styrene butadiene rubber (SBR)/nanocopper (NC) composites were prepared using two-roll mill method. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed proper dispersion of NC in the SBR matrix without substantial agglomeration of nanoparticles. To evaluate the curing properties of nanocomposite samples, swelling and cure rheometric tests were conducted. Moreover, the rheological studies were carried out over a range of shear rates. The effect of NC particles was examined on the thermal behavior of the SBR using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Furthermore, tensile tests were employed to investigate the capability of nanoparticles to enhance mechanical behavior of the compounds. The results showed enhancement in tensile properties with incorporation of NC to SBR matrix. Moreover, addition of NC increased shear viscosity and curing time of SBR composites.

  6. Electrical and optical properties of nitrile rubber modified by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    S, Najidha; Predeep, P.

    2014-10-15

    Implantation of N{sup +} ion beams are performed on to a non-conjugated elastomer, acrylonirtle butadiene rubber (NBR) with energy 60 keV in the fluence range of 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. A decrease in the resistivity of the sample by about eight orders of magnitude is observed in the implanted samples along with color changes. The ion exposed specimens were characterized by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy which shows a shift in the absorption edge value for the as deposited polymer towards higher wavelengths. The band gap is evaluated from the absorption spectra and is found to decrease with increasing fluence. This study can possibly throw light on ion induced changes in the polymer surface.

  7. A polymeric flame retardant additive for rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.; Maiti, S.

    1993-12-31

    Synthesis of a polyphosphonate by the interfacial polymerization of bisphenol-A (BPA) and dichloro-phenyl phosphine oxide (DCPO) using cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TMAC) as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) was reported. The polyphosphonate was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, DSC and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The flame retardancy of the polymer was done by OI study. The polymer was used as a fire retardant additive to rubbers such as natural rubber (NR), styrene-butadiene rubber(SBR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR). The efficiency of the fire retardant property of this additive was determined by LOI measurements of the various rubber samples.

  8. Fast and robust method for the determination of microstructure and composition in butadiene, styrene-butadiene, and isoprene rubber by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vilmin, Franck; Dussap, Claude; Coste, Nathalie

    2006-06-01

    In the tire industry, synthetic styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), butadiene rubber (BR), and isoprene rubber (IR) elastomers are essential for conferring to the product its properties of grip and rolling resistance. Their physical properties depend on their chemical composition, i. e., their microstructure and styrene content, which must be accurately controlled. This paper describes a fast, robust, and highly reproducible near-infrared analytical method for the quantitative determination of the microstructure and styrene content. The quantitative models are calculated with the help of pure spectral profiles estimated from a partial least squares (PLS) regression, using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as the reference method. This versatile approach allows the models to be applied over a large range of compositions, from a single BR to an SBR-IR blend. The resulting quantitative predictions are independent of the sample path length. As a consequence, the sample preparation is solvent free and simplified with a very fast (five minutes) hot filming step of a bulk polymer piece. No precise thickness control is required. Thus, the operator effect becomes negligible and the method is easily transferable. The root mean square error of prediction, depending on the rubber composition, is between 0.7% and 1.3%. The reproducibility standard error is less than 0.2% in every case.

  9. Gloves against mineral oils and mechanical hazards: composites of carboxylated acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber latex

    PubMed Central

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Rzymski, Władysław M.; Malesa, Monika; Borkowska, Urszula; Oleksy, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to permeation of noxious chemical substances should be accompanied by resistance to mechanical factors because the glove material may be torn, cut or punctured in the workplace. This study reports on glove materials, protecting against mineral oils and mechanical hazards, made of carboxylated acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The obtained materials were characterized by a very high resistance of the produced materials to oil permeation (breakthrough time > 480 min). The mechanical properties, and especially tear resistance, of the studied materials were improved after the addition of modified bentonite (nanofiller) to the XNBR latex mixture. The nanocomposite meets the requirements in terms of parameters characterizing tear, abrasion, cut and puncture resistance. Therefore, the developed material may be used for the production of multifunctional protective gloves. PMID:26757889

  10. Experimental study on behaviors of dielectric elastomer based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kuangjun; Chuc, Nguyen Huu; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Phuc, Vuong Hong; Koo, Jachoon; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jaedo; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2010-04-01

    Previously, the dielectric elastomer based on Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR), called synthetic elastomer has been reported by our group. It has the advantages that its characteristics can be modified according to the requirements of performances, and thus, it is applicable to a wide variety of applications. In this paper, we address the effects of additives and vulcanization conditions on the overall performance of synthetic elastomer. In the present work, factors to have effects on the performances are extracted, e.g additives such as dioctyl phthalate (DOP), barium titanium dioxide (BaTiO3) and vulcanization conditions such as dicumyl peroxide (DCP), cross-linking times. Also, it is described how the performances can be optimized by using DOE (Design of Experiments) technique and experimental results are analyzed by ANOVA (Analysis of variance).

  11. Morphology and vulcanizate properties of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber/ styrene-butadiene rubber blends.

    PubMed

    Park, Gayoung; Kim, Yun Hee; Kim, Dong Soo; Ko, Young Chun

    2010-05-01

    Morphology and vulcanizate properties of EPDM/SBR blends were investigated. AAHR (a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon resins) was used as a compatibilizer and bis(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)tetrasulfide (TESPT) was used as a coupling agent. The vulcanizate properties and the morphological studies revealed that EPDM and SBR were incompatible, and the addition of AAHR was very effective to enhance the compatibility between EPDM and SBR. The weight percent of bound rubbers was increased with increasing SBR contents. The addition of an AAHR increased the amounts of bound rubbers, and hence the vulcanizate properties such as tear strength and fatigue resistance of the EPDM/SBR blends were improved. The dynamic mechanical analysis and the morphological studies revealed that the addition of TESPT increased the weight of bound rubbers and provided better dispersion of carbon black, resulting in good mechanical properties such as tear strength and fatigue resistance of the vulcanized EPDM/SBR blends. The smaller particle of zinc oxide (i.e., 50 nm > 100 nm > 1000 nm) yielded to the better blending properties of the polymer blend.

  12. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2015-11-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (M L) and maximum torque (M H) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties.

  13. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (ML) and maximum torque (MH) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties. PMID:26644917

  14. Styrene-butadiene rubber/halloysite nanotubes nanocomposites modified by sorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baochun; Chen, Feng; Lei, Yanda; Liu, Xiaoliang; Wan, Jingjing; Jia, Demin

    2009-05-01

    Sorbic acid (SA) was used to improve the performance of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) nanocomposites by direct blending. The detailed mechanisms for the largely improved performance were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), porosity analysis and crosslink density determination. The strong interfacial bonding between HNTs and rubber matrix is resulted through SA intermediated linkages. SA bonds SBR and HNTs through grafting copolymerization/hydrogen bonding mechanism. Significantly improved dispersion of HNTs in virtue of the interactions between HNTs and SA was achieved. Formation of zinc disorbate (ZDS) was revealed during the vulcanization of the composites. However, in the present systems, the contribution of ZDS to the reinforcement was limited. Effects of SA content on the vulcanization behavior, morphology and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Promising mechanical properties of SA modified SBR/HNTs nanocomposites were obtained. The changes in vulcanization behavior, mechanical properties and morphology were correlated with the interactions between HNTs and SA and the largely improved dispersion of HNTs.

  15. Preparation and properties of carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber/cellulose nanocrystals composites.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodong; Xu, Chuanhui; Liu, Yuhong; Chen, Yukun

    2013-01-30

    A series of carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber (XSBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) latex composites were successfully prepared. The vulcanization process, morphology, dynamic viscoelastic behavior, dynamic mechanical property, thermal and mechanical performance of the XSBR/CNs composites were investigated in detail. The results revealed that CNs were dispersed uniformly in the XSBR matrix and formed a strong filler-filler network. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of XSBR matrix was shifted from 48.45 to 50.64 °C with 3 phr CNs, but decreased from 50.64 to 46.28 °C when further increasing CNs content up to 15 phr. The composites exhibited a significant enhancement in tensile strength (from 16.9 to 24.1 MPa) and tear strength (from 43.5 to 65.2 MPa) with loading CNs from 0 to 15 phr. In addition, the thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the temperature at 5% weight loss of the XSBR/CNs composites decreased slightly with an increase of the CNs content.

  16. Performance of Styrene Butadiene Rubber as a Concrete Repair Material in tropical climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Prakash, V. Syam; Thampan, C. K.; Varma, Prasad

    2012-11-01

    Deterioration of Concrete due to variety of reasons like corrosion of steel, inferior quality of materials as well as workmanship and exposure to aggressive environment like thermal cycling affect the performance or damage a number of Reinforced cement concrete structures. In order to repair these structures for enhancing the service life, number of methods and materials are available. But the degree of success of any repair in concrete depends mainly on the correct choice and the method of application of repair materials. This paper discusses the details of an experimental investigation on the performance of Styrene ñ Butadiene Rubber (SBR) as a concrete repair material in tropical climatic conditions. Resistance to water penetration and tensile cracking are two important performance criteria for any repair material. Cement mortar cubes of mix proportion 1:3 with SBR added at the rate of 20% of the weight of cement, and control specimens without SBR were made. Compressive strength and sorptivity values of the cubes were determined. Shear Bond strength (by slant shear test) and splitting tensile strength of the repaired cylinder specimens of standard dimensions, in which SBR used as a bonding agent were determined. These values were compared with the values obtained for the similar specimens, in which the bonding agent applied was conventional cement slurry. The influence of thermal cycling on the properties of repaired concrete specimens were also studied. A comparison has also been made with the values required to meet the standard specifications of a repair material.

  17. The Synergy of Double Cross-linking Agents on the Properties of Styrene Butadiene Rubber Foams

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Liang; Ji, Zhan-You; Ma, Jian-Zhong; Xue, Chao-Hua; Ma, Zhong-Lei; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur (S) cross-linking styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) foams show high shrinkage due to the cure reversion, leading to reduced yield and increased processing cost. In this paper, double cross-linking system by S and dicumyl peroxide (DCP) was used to decrease the shrinkage of SBR foams. Most importantly, the synergy of double cross-linking agents was reported for the first time to our knowledge. The cell size and its distribution of SBR foams were investigated by FESEM images, which show the effect of DCP content on the cell structure of the SBR foams. The relationships between shrinkage and crystalline of SBR foams were analyzed by the synergy of double cross-linking agents, which were demonstrated by FTIR, Raman spectra, XRD, DSC and TGA. When the DCP content was 0.6 phr, the SBR foams exhibit excellent physical and mechanical properties such as low density (0.223 g/cm3), reduced shrinkage (2.25%) and compression set (10.96%), as well as elevated elongation at break (1.78 × 103%) and tear strength (54.63 N/mm). The results show that these properties are related to the double cross-linking system of SBR foams. Moreover, the double cross-linking SBR foams present high electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding properties compared with the S cross-linking SBR foams. PMID:27841307

  18. The Synergy of Double Cross-linking Agents on the Properties of Styrene Butadiene Rubber Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Liang; Ji, Zhan-You; Ma, Jian-Zhong; Xue, Chao-Hua; Ma, Zhong-Lei; Zhang, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Sulfur (S) cross-linking styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) foams show high shrinkage due to the cure reversion, leading to reduced yield and increased processing cost. In this paper, double cross-linking system by S and dicumyl peroxide (DCP) was used to decrease the shrinkage of SBR foams. Most importantly, the synergy of double cross-linking agents was reported for the first time to our knowledge. The cell size and its distribution of SBR foams were investigated by FESEM images, which show the effect of DCP content on the cell structure of the SBR foams. The relationships between shrinkage and crystalline of SBR foams were analyzed by the synergy of double cross-linking agents, which were demonstrated by FTIR, Raman spectra, XRD, DSC and TGA. When the DCP content was 0.6 phr, the SBR foams exhibit excellent physical and mechanical properties such as low density (0.223 g/cm3), reduced shrinkage (2.25%) and compression set (10.96%), as well as elevated elongation at break (1.78 × 103%) and tear strength (54.63 N/mm). The results show that these properties are related to the double cross-linking system of SBR foams. Moreover, the double cross-linking SBR foams present high electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding properties compared with the S cross-linking SBR foams.

  19. Adhesion of nitrile rubber to UV-assisted surface chemical modified PET fabric, part II: Interfacial characterization of MDI grafted PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud

    2016-08-01

    Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber industry. It is well known that surface treatment (i.e. physical, mechanical and chemical) is an effective method to improve interfacial bonding of fibers and/or fabrics to rubbers. UV irradiation is an effective method which has been used to increase fabric-rubber interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabrics was used to increase PET to nitrile rubber (NBR) adhesion. Nitrile rubber is a perfect selection as fuel and oil resistant rubber. However it has weak bonding to PET fabric. For this purpose PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was grafted on carboxylated PET. The chemical composition of the fabric before and after surface treatment was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sectional morphology of the experimental PET fibers and the interface between rubber compound and PET fabric was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The morphology and structure of the product were analyzed by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). FTIR-ATR and H NMR analysis were used to assess surface modifications on the PET irradiated fabrics.

  20. Glass Transition and Molecular Mobility in Styrene-Butadiene Rubber Modified Asphalt.

    PubMed

    Khabaz, Fardin; Khare, Rajesh

    2015-11-05

    Asphalt, a soft matter consisting of more than a thousand chemical species, is of vital importance for the transportation infrastructure, yet it poses significant challenges for microscopic theory and modeling approaches due to its multicomponent nature. Polymeric additives can potentially enhance the thermo-mechanical properties of asphalt, thus helping reduce the road repair costs; rational design of such systems requires knowledge of the molecular structure and dynamics of these systems. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the volumetric, structural, and dynamic properties of the neat asphalt as well as styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt systems. The volume-temperature behavior of the asphalt systems exhibited a glass transition phenomenon, akin to that observed in experiments. The glass transition temperature, room temperature density, and coefficient of volume thermal expansion of the neat asphalt systems so evaluated were in agreement with experimental data when the effect of the high cooling rate used in simulations was accounted for. While the volumetric properties of SBR modified asphalt were found to be insensitive to the presence of the SBR additive, the addition of SBR led to an increase in the aggregation of asphaltene molecules. Furthermore, addition of SBR caused a reduction in the mobility of the constituent molecules of asphalt, with the reduction being more significant for the larger constituent molecules. Similar to other glass forming liquids, the reciprocal of the diffusion coefficient of the selected molecules was observed to follow the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) behavior as a function of temperature. These results suggest the potential for using polymeric additives for enhancing the dynamic mechanical properties of asphalt without affecting its volumetric properties.

  1. Features of rubber swelling in transformer oil, according to NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavin, R. R.; Fursov, D. I.; Vasil'ev, S. G.; Tarasov, V. P.; Zabrodin, V. A.; Volkov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    NMR spectroscopy, NMR relaxation, and NMR with a pulsed magnetic field gradient methods are used to study the swelling of the elastomers based on ethylene-propylene rubber, butadiene-nitrile rubber, and fluororubber SKF-26 in transformer oil. Components corresponding to the fractions of oil and polymer network are identified. It is shown that the affinity of the polymers toward transformer oil displays an increase in the orderly sequence of ethylene-propylene rubber, fluororubber, and butadiene-nitrile rubber; the stability of the polymers towards carbon tetrachloride falls in the same sequence. Based on an analysis of the spin-spin relaxation time depending on the degree of swelling, it is found that fluororubber elastomers are characterized by the formation of a polymer network that prevents further sorption, In contrast, elastomer based on ethylene-propylene rubber gives no indication of the formation of a rigid polymer network.

  2. Effect of crosslinking density on biaxial relaxation of SBR by using reduced variables. [Styrene-Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenz, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The use of reduced variables to account for the effect of crosslinking density in a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) system is demonstrated for general biaxial stress states. Recently published results from stress relaxation tests on five SBR vulcanizates crosslinked to different degrees by tetramethylthiuram disulfide were superposed by using the crosslinking density as a reduction variable. The equilibrium shear modulus calculated from the master relaxation curve at long reduced times was in satisfactory agreement with other results for SBR. The time-axis shifts were related in a linear logarithmic manner to the crosslinking density but had a slope slightly less than values previously reported for elastomer systems.

  3. Effects of Fuels on the Physical Properties of Nitrile Rubber O-Rings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    les effets d’une exposition i divers carburants et milanges de carburants, de garnitures d’itanchfit en caoutchouc au nitrile. Les propriets (resistance...avait 6ti couramment plong6e. Des 6prouvettes de caoutchouc ont t6 expos~es i un carburant commercial (gas-oil pr~lev6 en cours de raffinage) riche en

  4. Multilayer graphene rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard; Frasca, Daniele; Schulze, Dietmar; Wachtendorf, Volker; Krafft, Bernd; Morys, Michael; Böhning, Martin; Rybak, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer Graphene (MLG), a nanoparticle with a specific surface of BET = 250 m2/g and thus made of only approximately 10 graphene sheets, is proposed as a nanofiller for rubbers. When homogenously dispersed, it works at low loadings enabling the replacement of carbon black (CB), increase in efficiency, or reduction in filler concentration. Actually the appropriate preparation yielded nanocomposites in which just 3 phr are sufficient to significantly improve the rheological, curing and mechanical properties of different rubbers, as shown for Chlorine-Isobutylene-Isoprene Rubber (CIIR), Nitrile-Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Natural Rubber (NR), and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR). A mere 3 phr of MLG tripled the Young's modulus of CIIR, an effect equivalent to 20 phr of carbon black. Similar equivalents are observed for MLG/CB mixtures. MLG reduces gas permeability, increases thermal and electrical conductivities, and retards fire behavior. The later shown by the reduction in heat release rate in the cone calorimeter. The higher the nanofiller concentration is (3 phr, 5 phr, and 10 phr was investigated), the greater the improvement in the properties of the nanocomposites. Moreover, the MLG nanocomposites improve stability of mechanical properties against weathering. An increase in UV-absorption as well as a pronounced radical scavenging are proposed and were proved experimentally. To sum up, MLG is interesting as a multifunctional nanofiller and seems to be quite ready for rubber development.

  5. Butadiene production process overview.

    PubMed

    White, Wm Claude

    2007-03-20

    Over 95% of butadiene is produced as a by-product of ethylene production from steam crackers. The crude C4 stream isolated from the steam cracking process is fed to butadiene extraction units, where butadiene is separated from the other C4s by extractive distillation. The amount of crude C4s produced in steam cracking is dependent on the composition of the feed to the cracking unit. Heavier feeds, such as naphtha, yield higher amounts of C4s and butadiene than do lighter feeds. Crackers using light feeds typically produce low quantities of C4s and do not have butadiene extraction units. Overall butadiene capacity is determined by ethylene cracker operating rates, the type of feed being cracked, and availability of butadiene extraction capacity. Global butadiene capacity is approximately 10.5 million metric tons, and global production is approximately 9 million metric tons [Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005 World Butadiene Analysis, Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005]. Crude C4s are traded globally, with the United States being the only significant net importer. Finished butadiene is also traded globally, with the largest exporters being Canada, Western Europe, Saudi Arabia and Korea. The largest net importers are Mexico, the United States and China. The global demand for butadiene is approximately 9 million metric tons [Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005 World Butadiene Analysis, Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005]. Production of styrene-butadiene rubber and polybutadiene rubber accounts for about 54% of global butadiene demand, with tire production being the single most important end use of butadiene synthetic rubbers. Other major butadiene derivatives are acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and styrene butadiene latex (about 24% of demand combined).

  6. Surface modification of halloysite nanotubes by vulcanization accelerator and properties of styrene-butadiene rubber nanocomposites with modified halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bangchao; Jia, Zhixin; Hu, Dechao; Luo, Yuanfang; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2016-03-01

    Vulcanization accelerant N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide (CZ) was used as a surface modifier and chemically grafted on the surface of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) to obtain CZ-functionalized HNTs (HNTs-s-CZ). It was found that HNTs-s-CZ could be homogeneously dispersed into styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The grafted CZ molecules, exactly located at the filler-rubber interface, reduced the activation energy of vulcanization of SBR/HNTs-s-CZ compounds. Besides, the density of chain segments introduced by the interfacial phase of SBR/HNTs-s-CZ nanocomposites was higher than the other nanocomposites with silane-modified HNTs (m-HNTs) or pristine HNTs, manifesting an indication of enhanced filler-rubber interfacial interaction in SBR/HNTs-s-CZ nanocomposites. Consequently, SBR/HNTs-s-CZ nanocomposites showed excellent mechanical properties. The tensile strength could be enhanced by as much as 38.6% and 102.5% compared to those of SBR/m-HNTs and SBR/HNTs nanocomposites, respectively, though containing equivalent accelerant component. The value of this work lies in the fact that apparent properties improvement of elastomer composites has been achieved by the incorporation of vulcanization accelerant-functionalized HNTs, which may be fruitful for the rational design of filler surface treatment and offer new scientific and technological opportunities for the preparation of high performance elastomer composites.

  7. Radiation preparation of nano-powdered styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and its toughening effect for polystyrene and high-impact polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daishuang; Xia, Haibing; Peng, Jing; Zhai, Maolin; Wei, Genshuan; Li, Jiuqiang; Qiao, Jinliang

    2007-11-01

    Nano-powdered styrene-butadiene rubber (NPSBR) was synthesized based on the styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) latex via gamma radiation crosslinking followed by spray drying. Two functional monomers, 2-ethyl hexyl acrylate (2-EHA) and trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) were used as crosslinking agents. It was found that both 2-EHA and TMPTA can improve the radiation crosslinking of SBR latex. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that the NPSBR has a particle size similar to that of SBR latex with a diameter of 100 nm due to the high degree of crosslinking of SBR. Mechanical testing results showed that NPSBR could toughen polystyrene (PS) and high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) effectively. In addition, NPSBR is more suitable to toughen HIPS than PS at low rubber content.

  8. A styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/carbon nanotube-based smart force sensor for automotive tire deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Min-Young; Kim, Ji-Sik; Lee, Ho-Geun; Choi, Seung-Bok; Kim, Gi-Woo

    2016-04-01

    This paper provides a preliminary study on the piezoresistive effect of a styrene-butadiene Rubber (SBR), one of the main ingredients of automotive tire, dispersed with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to explore its feasibility as a force sensor embedded in automotive tires. Typically, the application of CNTs has been successfully applied to the mechanical sensing technology such as a stress/strain and impact sensor. In this study, the potential of using the SBR/CNT as a force sensor for monitoring automotive tire deformation is evaluated for the first time. Experimental results show that the electrical resistance of the SBR/CNT composite changes in response to the sinusoidal loading, as well as static compressive load. These piezoresistive responses of the SBR/CNT composite will be used for sensing the tire deformation caused by the vehicle loading or cracks of tires.

  9. Effect of concentration of polyfunctional monomers on physical properties of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber under electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tariq; Ahmed, Shamshad; Ahmed, Munir; Yoshii, Fumio

    2005-06-01

    An investigation has been undertaken to find out the effect of concentration of different polyfunctional monomers (PFMs) on the physical properties of the acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) crosslinked by electron beam (EB). The PFMs used were diethylene glycol dimethacrylate, trimethylol propane trimethacrylate and trimethylol propane triacrylate. The physical properties of EB-irradiated NBR sheets were evaluated by measuring the tensile strength, elongation percent at break, hardness and gel fraction. The results showed a remarkable increase in tensile strength, hardness and gel fraction as the concentration of PFMs was increased from 1 part per hundred (phr) to 5 phr in the NBR samples whereas elongation percent decreased in a steady manner. The improvement in physical properties of radiation crosslinked NBR in the presence of PFMs may be attributed to its increased crosslinking density as observed by the corresponding increase in gel content.

  10. Improved ozone resistance of styrene-butadiene rubber cured by a combination of sulfur and ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basfar, A. A.; Silverman, Joseph

    1995-09-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) studies performed in this work indicate that high ozone resistance of Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) formulations cured by a combination of sulfur and ionizing radiation is associated with unusually high vinyl concentration. On the other hand, sulfur cured SBR formulations with low vinyl concentration have poor ozone resistance. Curing with peroxides which involves chemistry similar to that of radiation curing, also leads to high vinyl concentration (relative to sulfur curing) and high ozone resistance. Increasing the absorbed dose in sulfur-radiation cured samples decreased the high vinyl content to a point where the ozone resistance declined greatly. Carbon black was shown to reduce the absorption of both the transvinylene and the vinyl unsaturation groups, but not to the same extent in all formulations. Also, The carbon black seems to play a greater role in the absorption of the unsaturation as sulfur increases.

  11. Rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber filled with electron beam modified surface treated dual phase fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugharaj, A. M.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2004-01-01

    The rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) loaded with dual phase filler were measured using Monsanto Processability Tester (MPT) at three different temperatures (100°C, 110°C and 130°C) and four different shear rates (61.3, 306.3, 613, and 1004.5 s -1). The effect of electron beam modification of dual phase filler in absence and presence of trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) or triethoxysilylpropyltetrasulphide (Si-69) on melt flow properties of SBR was also studied. The viscosity of all the systems decreases with shear rate indicating their pseudoplastic or shear thinning nature. The higher shear viscosity for the SBR loaded with the electron beam modified filler is explained in terms of variation in structure of the filler upon electron beam irradiation. Die swell of the modified filler loaded SBR is slightly higher than that of the unmodified filler loaded rubber, which is explained by calculating normal stress difference for the systems. Activation energy of the modified filler loaded SBR systems is also slightly higher than that of the control filler loaded SBR system.

  12. PHA-rubber blends: synthesis, characterization and biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Rachana; Shah, Dishma; Patel, K C; Trivedi, Ujjval

    2008-07-01

    Medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA) and different rubbers; namely natural rubber, nitrile rubber and butadiene rubber were blended at room temperature using solution blending technique. Blends constituted 5%, 10% and 15% of mcl-PHA in different rubbers. Thermogravimetric analysis of mcl-PHA showed the melting temperature of the polymer around 50 degrees C. Thermal properties of the synthesized blend were studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry which confirmed effective blending between the polymers. Blending of mcl-PHA with natural rubber led to the synthesis of a different polymer having the melting point of 90 degrees C. Degradation studies of the blends were carried out using a soil isolate, Pseudomonas sp. 202 for 30 days. Extracellular protein concentration as well as OD660 due to the growth of Pseudomonas sp. 202 was studied. The degradation of blended plastic material, as evidenced by % weight loss after degradation and increase in the growth of organism correlated with the amount of mcl-PHA present in the sample. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. 202 resulted in 14.63%, 16.12% and 3.84% weight loss of PHA:rubber blends (natural, nitrile and butadiene rubber). Scanning electron microscopic studies after 30 days of incubation further confirmed biodegradation of the films.

  13. An approach towards tailoring interfacial structures and properties of multiphase renewable thermoplastics from lignin–nitrile rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Bova, Tony; Tran, Chau D.; Balakshin, Mikhail Y.; Chen, Jihua; Capanema, Ewellyn A.; Naskar, Amit K.

    2016-08-08

    Lignin-derived thermoplastics and elastomers with both versatile performance and commercialization potential have been an elusive pursuit for the past several decades. Lignin content has been limited to about 30 wt %, often requiring chemical modification, solvent fractionation of lignin, or prohibitively expensive additives. Each of these factors is a deterrent to industrial adoption of lignin-based polymers, limiting the potential of this renewable resource. Herein we describe high-performance multiphase thermoplastics made with a blend of 41 wt % unmodified industrial lignin and low-cost additives in a matrix of general-purpose acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR). Hardwood soda lignin (HSL) and softwood kraft lignin (SKL) were blended under high shear conditions with NBR, carbon black (CB), polyethylene oxide (PEO), boric acid (BA), and dicumyl peroxide (DCP). This combination with SKL lignin in the proper proportions resulted in a thermoplastic with a tensile strength and failure strain of 25.2 MPa and 9 %, respectively; it exhibited an unexpected tensile yield, similar to that of ABS, a commodity thermoplastic. The analogous HSL lignin compositions are tough materials with tensile strengths of 7.3 16.7 MPa and failure strain of 80 140 %. The contrasting ductility and yield stress behavior were analyzed based on the compositions morphology and interfacial structure arising from the nature of each lignin studied. Lastly, the roles of CB as a reinforcement in the rubbery phase, DCP and BA as cross-linkers to create multiphase networks, and PEO to promote the adhesion and compatibility of lignin in commercial-grade NBR are also discussed in detail.

  14. An approach towards tailoring interfacial structures and properties of multiphase renewable thermoplastics from lignin–nitrile rubber

    DOE PAGES

    Bova, Tony; Tran, Chau D.; Balakshin, Mikhail Y.; ...

    2016-08-08

    Lignin-derived thermoplastics and elastomers with both versatile performance and commercialization potential have been an elusive pursuit for the past several decades. Lignin content has been limited to about 30 wt %, often requiring chemical modification, solvent fractionation of lignin, or prohibitively expensive additives. Each of these factors is a deterrent to industrial adoption of lignin-based polymers, limiting the potential of this renewable resource. Herein we describe high-performance multiphase thermoplastics made with a blend of 41 wt % unmodified industrial lignin and low-cost additives in a matrix of general-purpose acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR). Hardwood soda lignin (HSL) and softwood kraft lignin (SKL)more » were blended under high shear conditions with NBR, carbon black (CB), polyethylene oxide (PEO), boric acid (BA), and dicumyl peroxide (DCP). This combination with SKL lignin in the proper proportions resulted in a thermoplastic with a tensile strength and failure strain of 25.2 MPa and 9 %, respectively; it exhibited an unexpected tensile yield, similar to that of ABS, a commodity thermoplastic. The analogous HSL lignin compositions are tough materials with tensile strengths of 7.3 16.7 MPa and failure strain of 80 140 %. The contrasting ductility and yield stress behavior were analyzed based on the compositions morphology and interfacial structure arising from the nature of each lignin studied. Lastly, the roles of CB as a reinforcement in the rubbery phase, DCP and BA as cross-linkers to create multiphase networks, and PEO to promote the adhesion and compatibility of lignin in commercial-grade NBR are also discussed in detail.« less

  15. Characterization on the phase separation behavior of styrene-butadiene rubber/polyisoprene/organoclay ternary blends under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianggui; Dong, Xia; Liu, Wei; Xing, Qian; Zou, Fasheng; Han, Charles C.; Wang, Dujin; Liang, Aimin; Li, Chuanqing; Xie, Ximing

    2015-09-01

    The present work investigated the influence of organoclay (organo-montmorillonite, OMMT) on the phase separation behavior and morphology evolution of solution polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber (SSBR)/low vinyl content polyisoprene (LPI) blends with rheological methodology. It was found that the incorporation of OMMT not only reduced the droplet size of the dispersion phase, slowed down the phase separation kinetics, also enlarged the processing miscibility window of the blends. The determination on the wetting parameters indicated that due to the oscillatory shear effect, the OMMT sheets might localize at the interface between the two phases and act as compatibilizer or rigid barrier to prevent domain coarsening, resulting in slow phase separation kinetics, small droplet size, and stable morphology. The analysis of rheological data by the Palierne model provided further confirmation that the addition of OMMT can decrease the interfacial tension and restrict the relaxation of melt droplets. Therefore, a vivid "sea-fish-net" model was proposed to describe the effect of OMMT on the phase separation behavior of SSBR/LPI blends, in which the OMMT sheets acted as the barrier (net) to slow down the domain coarsening/coalescence in phase separation process of SSBR/LPI blends.

  16. Coconut shell powder as cost effective filler in copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Keerthika, B; Umayavalli, M; Jeyalalitha, T; Krishnaveni, N

    2016-08-01

    Filler is one of the major additives in rubber compounds to enhance the physical properties. Even though numerous benefits obtained from agricultural by products like coconut shell, rice husk etc., still they constitute a large source of environmental pollution. In this investigation, one of the agricultural bye product coconut shell powder (CSP) is used as filler in the compounding KNB rubber. It shows the positive and satisfied result was achieved only by the use of filler Fast Extrusion Furnace (FEF) and coconut shell powder (CSP) which was used 50% in each. The effect of these fillers on the mechanical properties of a rubber material at various loading raging from 0 to 60PHP was studied. Mercaptodibanzothiazole disulphide (MBTS) was used as an accelerator. The result shows that presence of 25% and 50% of the composites has better mechanical properties like Hardness, Tensile strength, Elongation at break and Specific gravity when compared with other two combinations. Even though both 25% and 50% of composites shows good mechanical properties, 50% of CSP have more efficient than 25% of CSP.

  17. The influence of nano silica particles on gamma-irradiation ageing of elastomers based on chlorosulphonated polyethylene and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, G.; Marinović-Cincović, M.; Tanasić, Lj.; Jovanović, V.; Samaržija-Jovanović, S.; Vukić, N.; Budinski-Simendić, J.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work was to study gamma irradiation ageing of rubber blends based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and chlorosulphonated polyethylene rubber (CSM) reinforced by silica nano particles. The NBR/CSM compounds (50: 50, w/w) filled with different content of filler (0-100 phr) were crosslinked by sulfur. The vulcanization characteristics were assessed using the rheometer with an oscillating disk. The vulcanizates were prepared in a hydraulic press. The obtained materials were exposed to the different irradiation doses (100, 200, 300 and 400 kGy). The mechanical properties (hardness, modulus at 100% elongation, tensile strength and elongation at break) and swelling numbers were assessed before and after gamma irradiation ageing.

  18. The industrial production and use of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, N L

    1990-01-01

    This presentation provides a brief overview of the production and use of 1,3-butadiene in the United States. Starting as a coproduct of ethylene, the 1,3-butadiene monomer is extracted and purified, then transferred to consumers. Major uses of 1,3-butadiene include the manufacture of styrene-butadiene rubber, polybutadiene rubber, and adiponitrile. PMID:2205493

  19. Water-responsive mechanically adaptive nanocomposites based on styrene-butadiene rubber and cellulose nanocrystals--processing matters.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Pratheep K; Dagnon, Koffi L; Monemian, Seyedali; Foster, E Johan; Rowan, Stuart J; Weder, Christoph

    2014-01-22

    Biomimetic, stimuli-responsive polymer nanocomposites based on a hydrophobic styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) matrix and rigid, rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) isolated from cotton were prepared by three different approaches, and their properties were studied and related to the composition, processing history, and exposure to water as a stimulus. The first processing approach involved mixing an aqueous SBR latex with aqueous CNC dispersions, and films were subsequently formed by solution-casting. The second method utilized the first protocol, but films were additionally compression-molded. The third method involved the formation of a CNC organogel via a solvent exchange with acetone, followed by infusing this gel, in which the CNCs form a percolating network with solutions of SBR in tetrahydrofuran. The thermomechanical properties of the materials were established by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). In the dry state, all nanocomposites show much higher tensile storage moduli, E', than the neat SBR or the SBR latex. E' increases with the CNC content and depends strongly on the processing method, which appears to influence the morphology of the SBR nanocomposites produced. The highest E' values were observed for the solution cast samples involving an SBR latex, where E' increased from 3 MPa for the neat SBR to ca. 740 MPa for the nanocomposite containing 20% v/v CNCs. Upon submersion in deionized water, a dramatic reduction of E' was observed, for example from 740 to 5 MPa for the solution-cast nanocomposite containing 20% v/v CNCs. This change is interpreted as a disengagement of the percolating CNC network, on account of modest aqueous swelling and competitive hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the CNCs. It is shown that the method of preparation also influenced the swelling behavior and kinetics of modulus switching, consistent with different arrangements of the CNCs, which serve as channels for water absorption and transport within the

  20. Radiation-induced copolymerization of styrene/ n-butyl acrylate in the presence of ultra-fine powdered styrene-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haibo; Peng, Jing; Zhai, Maolin; Li, Jiuqiang; Wei, Genshuan; Qiao, Jinliang

    2007-11-01

    Styrene (St)/ n-butyl acrylate (BA) copolymers were prepared by two-stage polymerization: St/BA was pre-polymerized to a viscous state by bulk polymerization with initiation by benzoyl peroxide (BPO) followed by 60Co γ-ray radiation curing. The resultant copolymers had higher molecular weight and narrower molecular weight distribution than conventional methods. After incorporation of ultra-fine powdered styrene-butadiene rubber (UFSBR) with a particle size of 100 nm in the monomer, the glass transition temperature ( Tg) of St-BA copolymer increased at low rubber content. Both the St-BA copolymer and the St-BA copolymer/UFSBR composites had good transparency at BA content below 40%.

  1. FTIR spectra and mechanical strength analysis of some selected rubber derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekaran, S.; Natarajan, R. K.; Kala, A.

    2007-10-01

    Rubber materials have wide range of commercial applications such as, infant diapers, famine hygiene products, drug delivery devices and incontinency products such as rubber tubes, tyres, etc. In the present work, studies on mechanical properties of some selected rubber materials viz., natural rubber (NR), styrene butadiene rubber (SBR), nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) have been carried out in three states viz., raw, vulcanized and reinforced. To enhance the quality of rubber elastomers, an attempt is made to prepare new elastomers called polyblends. In the present study an attempt is made to blend NR with NBR and with EPDM. We here report, a novel approach for the evaluation of various physico-mechanical properties such as mechanical strength, tensile strength, elongation and hardness. The method is simple, direct and fast and involves infrared spectral measurements for the evaluation of these properties. With the applications of modern infrared spectroscopy, the mechanical strength of these rubber materials have been analyzed by calculating the internal standards among the methyl and methylene group vibrational frequencies obtained from FTIR spectroscopy. Also the tensile strength measurements carried out by universal testing machine. The results pertaining physico-mechanical properties of the rubber derivatives undertaken in the present study obtained by IR-based method are in good agreement with data resulted from the standard methods.

  2. FTIR spectra and mechanical strength analysis of some selected rubber derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, S; Natarajan, R K; Kala, A

    2007-10-01

    Rubber materials have wide range of commercial applications such as, infant diapers, famine hygiene products, drug delivery devices and incontinency products such as rubber tubes, tyres, etc. In the present work, studies on mechanical properties of some selected rubber materials viz., natural rubber (NR), styrene butadiene rubber (SBR), nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) have been carried out in three states viz., raw, vulcanized and reinforced. To enhance the quality of rubber elastomers, an attempt is made to prepare new elastomers called polyblends. In the present study an attempt is made to blend NR with NBR and with EPDM. We here report, a novel approach for the evaluation of various physico-mechanical properties such as mechanical strength, tensile strength, elongation and hardness. The method is simple, direct and fast and involves infrared spectral measurements for the evaluation of these properties. With the applications of modern infrared spectroscopy, the mechanical strength of these rubber materials have been analyzed by calculating the internal standards among the methyl and methylene group vibrational frequencies obtained from FTIR spectroscopy. Also the tensile strength measurements carried out by universal testing machine. The results pertaining physico-mechanical properties of the rubber derivatives undertaken in the present study obtained by IR-based method are in good agreement with data resulted from the standard methods.

  3. On the form of the strain energy function for a family of SBR materials. [Styrene-Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenz, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Styrene-butadiene materials with varying crosslink densities are analyzed through use of a strain energy function of the type introduced by Valanis and Landel (1967). A form of the strain energy function derived from strip biaxial tests proves to be accurate when checked against uniaxial and other biaxial test results.

  4. Mechanical properties of melt-processed polymer blend of amorphous corn flour composite filler and styrene-butadiene rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The corn flour composite fillers were prepared by blending corn flour with rubber latex, dried, and cryogenically ground into powders, which were then melt-blended with rubber polymers in an internal mixer to form composites with enhanced mechanical properties. The composites prepared with melt-blen...

  5. Prediction of Flexural Strength of Concretes Containing Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) with an Empirical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafieyzadeh, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the flexural test, the theoretical maximum tensile stress at the bottom fiber of a test beam is known as the modulus of rupture or flexural strength. This work deals with the effects of Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Latex (SBR) on flexural strength of concrete. An extensive experimentation was carried out to determine the effects of silica fume and SBR on flexural strength of concrete. Two water-binder ratios and several percentages of silica fume and SBR were considered. Abrams' Law, which was originally formulated for conventional concrete containing cement as the only cementations material, is used for prediction of flexural strength of these concretes. The aim of this work is to construct an empirical model to predict the flexural strength of silica fume-SBR concretes using concrete ingredients and time of curing in water. Also, the obtained results for flexural strength tests have been compared with predicted results.

  6. Effects of aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) on tensile properties and morphology of polypropylene (PP), recycle acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) and sugarcane bagasse (SCB) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiagoo, Ragunathan; Omar, Latifah; Zainal, Mustaffa; Ting, Sam Sung; Ismail, Hanafi

    2015-07-01

    The performance of sugarcane baggase (SCB) treated with γ-APS filled polypropylene (PP)/recycled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) biocomposites were investigated. The composites with different filler loading ranging from 5 to 30 wt % were prepared using heated two roll mill by melt mixing at temperature of 180 °C. Tensile properties of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites which is tensile strength, Young Modulus and elongation at break were investigated. Increasing of treated SCB filler loading in PP/NBRr/SCB composites have increased the Young modulus however decreased the tensile strength and elongation at break of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites. From the results, γ-APS treated SCB composites shown higher tensile strength and Young Modulus but lower elongation at break when compared to the untreated SCB composites. This is due to the stronger bonding between γ-APS treated SCB with PP/NBRr matrices. These findings was supported by micrograph pictures from morphological study. SCB filler treated with γ-APS has improved the adhesion as well as gave strong interfacial bonding between SCB filler and PP/NBRr matrices which results in good tensile strength of PP/NBRr/SCB composites.

  7. Heat shrinkable behavior, physico-mechanical and structure properties of electron beam cross-linked blends of high-density polyethylene with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholds, Ingars; Kalkis, Valdis; Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Grigalovica, Agnese

    2016-03-01

    In this study, heat-shrinkable composites of electron beam irradiated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated. HDPE/NBR blends at a ratio of components 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50 and 20/80 wt% were prepared using a two-roll mill. The compression molded films were irradiated high-energy (5 MeV) accelerated electrons up to irradiation absorbed doses of 100-300 kGy. The effect of electron beam induced cross-linking was evaluated by the changes of mechanical properties, gel content and by the differences of thermal properties, detected by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermo-shrinkage forces were determined as the kinetics of thermorelaxation and the residual shrinkage stresses of previously oriented (stretched up to 100% at above melting temperature of HDPE and followed by cooling to room temperature) specimens of irradiated HDPE/NBR blends under isometric heating-cooling mode. The compatibility between the both components was enhanced due to the formation of cross-linked sites at amorphous interphase. The results showed increase of mechanical stiffness of composites with increase of irradiation dose. The values of gel fraction compared to thermorelaxation stresses increased with the growth of irradiation dose level, as a result of formation cross-linked sites in amorphous PP/NBR interphase.

  8. Water soluble styrene butadiene rubber and sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose binder for ZnFe2O4 anode electrodes in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongyu; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Dong; Qiu, Hailong; Fu, Qiang; Na, Hui; Guo, Zhendong; Du, Fei; Chen, Gang; Wei, Yingjin

    2015-07-01

    ZnFe2O4 nano particles as an anode material for lithium ion batteries are prepared by the glycine-nitrate combustion method. The mixture of styrene butadiene rubber and sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose (SBR/CMC) with the weight ratio of 1:1 is used as the binder for ZnFe2O4 electrode. Compared with the conventional polyvinylidene-fluoride (PVDF) binder, the SBR/CMC binder is much cheaper and environment benign. More significantly, this water soluble binder significantly improves the rate capability and cycle stability of ZnFe2O4. A discharge capacity of 873.8 mAh g-1 is obtained after 100 cycles at the 0.1C rate, with a very little capacity fading rate of 0.06% per cycle. Studies show that the SBR/CMC binder enhances the adhesion of the electrode film to the current collector, and constructs an effective three-dimensional network for electrons transport. In addition, the SBR/CMC binder helps to form a uniform SEI film thus prohibiting the formation of lithium dendrite. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows that the SBR/CMC binder lowers the ohmic resistance of the electrode, depresses the formation of SEI film and facilitates the charge transfer reactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface. These advantages highlight the potential applications of SBR/CMC binder in lithium ion batteries.

  9. Characterization of free volume during vulcanization of styrene butadiene rubber by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical test.

    PubMed

    Marzocca, A J; Cerveny, S; Salgueiro, W; Somoza, A; Gonzalez, L

    2002-02-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect on the free volume of the advance of the cross-linking reaction in a copolymer of styrene butadiene rubber by sulfur vulcanization. The dynamic modulus and loss tangent were evaluated over samples cured for different times at 433 K by dynamic mechanical tests over a range of frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz at temperatures between 200 and 300 K. Using the William-Landel-Ferry relationship, master curves were obtained at a reference temperature of 298 K and the coefficients c(0)(1) and c(0)(2) were evaluated. From these parameters the dependence of the free volume on the cure time is obtained. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was also used to estimate the size and number density of free volume sites in the material. The spectra were analyzed in terms of continuous distributions of free volume size. The results suggest an increase of the lower free volume size when cross linking takes place. Both techniques give similar results for the dependence of free volume on the time of cure of the polymer.

  10. Utilizing carbon dioxide as a reaction medium to mitigate production of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the thermal decomposition of styrene butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Castaldi, Marco J

    2012-10-02

    The CO(2) cofeed impact on the pyrolysis of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to online gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The direct comparison of the chemical species evolved from the thermal degradation of SBR in N(2) and CO(2) led to a preliminary mechanistic understanding of the formation and relationship of light hydrocarbons (C(1-4)), aromatic derivatives, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), clarifying the role of CO(2) in the thermal degradation of SBR. The identification and quantification of over 50 major and minor chemical species from hydrogen and benzo[ghi]perylene were carried out experimentally in the temperature regime between 300 and 500 °C in N(2) and CO(2). The significant amounts of benzene derivatives from the direct bond dissociation of the backbone of SBR, induced by thermal degradation, provided favorable conditions for PAHs by the gas-phase addition reaction at a relatively low temperature compared to that with conventional fuels such as coal and petroleum-derived fuels. However, the formation of PAHs in a CO(2) atmosphere was decreased considerably (i.e., ∼50%) by the enhanced thermal cracking behavior, and the ultimate fates of these species were determined by different pathways in CO(2) and N(2) atmospheres. Consequently, this work has provided a new approach to mitigate PAHs by utilizing CO(2) as a reaction medium in thermochemical processes.

  11. Investigation of mechanisms of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) initiated from the thermal degradation of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) in N2 atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann; Castaldi, Marco J

    2008-03-15

    This study has been carried out to characterize the thermal decomposition of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to online GC/MS, and to investigate the formation and ultimate fate of chemical species produced during gasification of SBR. A preliminary mechanistic understanding has been developed to explain the formation and relationship of light hydrocarbons (C1-C4), substituted aromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during the decomposition of SBR in a N2 atmosphere. Identification and absolute concentrations of over 50 major and minor species (from hydrogen to benzo[ghi]perylene) have been established, and the measurements have been carried out between 300 and 500 at 10 degrees C/min heating rate in a N2 atmosphere. The concentration of styrene reached 120 PPMV and the concentration of other substituted aromatics, such as toluene and ethyl benzene reached 20 and 5 PPMV, respectively. These measurements indicate PAH formation at a relatively lower temperature as compared to conventional fuel, such as coal and diesel. The PAH sequence is not simply the constructing of larger PAHs from smaller ones to achieve the complex polymer structures. It is possible to generate large PAH molecules while circumventing the typical construction pathway.

  12. Effects of interfacial interaction on the properties of poly(vinyl chloride)/styrene-butadiene rubber blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuihan

    PVC/SBR blends---new thermoplastic elastomer material---were developed. They have potential applications due to low costs and low-temperature elasticity. A unique compatibilization method was employed to enhance the mechanical properties of the materials a compatibilizer miscible with one of the blend components can react chemically with the other component(s). Improvements in tensile and impact behavior were observed as a result of the compatibilization. A novel characterization technique to study the interface of PVC/SBR blends was developed. This technique involves the observation of the unstained sample under electron beam irradiation by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). An enrichment of rubber at the interface between PVC and SBR was detected in the compatiblized PVC/SBR blends. Magnetic relaxation measurements show that the rubber concentration in the proximity of PVC increases with the degree of covulcanization between NBR and SBR. The interface development and the rheological effect during processing were investigated. The interfacial concentration profile and the interfacial thickness were obtained by grayscale measurements on TEM micrographs, evaluation of SIMS images, and measurements of micromechanical properties.

  13. Development of Improved Rubber Compounds for Use in Weapon Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    product Paracril D. Compound formulations and physical properties are listed Jn Tab s 10 and 11. respectively. The Japanese nitrile rubber was »«T...Fluorosilicone ruDber inserts for use with machine gun springs exhibited better performance than the sllicone rubber now specified. Blends of...failure. Recently introduced Japanese nitrile rubber and two domestic nitriles did not exhibit any highly significant improvement over nitrile

  14. Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Krishen, A.

    1987-01-01

    This review covers methods for identification, characterization, and determination of rubber and materials in rubber. Techniques discussed include: nuclear magnetic resonance; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; UV spectroscopy; differential scanning calorimetry; thermogravimetric analysis; thermomechanical analysis; gel permeation chromatography; size exclusion chromatography; gas chromatography; mass spectrometry; pyrolysis; extraction; scanning selectron microscopy; polarization microscopy; x-ray fluorescence; x-ray scattering; angular light scattering; acoustic scattering; and vapor pressure osmometry.

  15. Industrial hygiene walk-through survey report of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Houston Chemical Plant, Houston, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fajen, J.M.; Ungers, L.J.

    1986-04-01

    A walk-through survey was conducted at Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Houston, Texas in November, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on production processes for styrene/butadiene rubber, styrene/butadiene latex and acrylonitrile/butadiene rubber, and to evaluate the potential for 1,3-butadiene exposure.

  16. Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, D. F.

    The word "rubber" immediately brings to mind materials that are highly flexible and will snap back to their original shape after being stretched. In this chapter a variety of materials are discussed that possess this odd characteristics. There will also be a discussion on the mechanism of this "elastic retractive force." Originally, rubber meant the gum collected from a tree growing in Brazil. The term "rubber" was coined for this material by the English chemist Joseph Priestley, who noted that it was effective for removing pencil marks from paper. Today, in addition to Priestley's natural product, many synthetic materials are made that possess these characteristics and many other properties. The common features of these materials are that they are made up of long-chain molecules that are amorphous (not crystalline), and the chains are above their glass transition temperature at room temperature.

  17. High damping properties of magnetic particles doped rubber composites at wide frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Liu, Yaqing; He, Minhong; Zhao, Guizhe; Sun, Youyi

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► A new kind of permanent magnetic rubber was prepared. ► The microstructure and magnetic properties were investigated. ► The mechanical and damping properties were discussed. ► The new material is expected to be an isolator material to a changed frequency. - Abstract: A new kind of rubber composite was prepared by doping SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles coated with silane coupling agents (Si-69) into nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) matrix, which was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed that the SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles were well dispersed in rubber matrix. Furthermore, the mechanical and magnetic properties of the rubber composites were investigated, in which the high tensile strength (15.8 MPa) and high saturation magnetization (22.9 emu/g) were observed. What is more, the high loss factor of the rubber composites was also obtained in a wide frequency range (0–100 Hz) at high loading (80 phr). The result is attributed to that the permanent magnetic field in rubber nanocomposites can absorb shock energy. These results indicate that the new kind of permanent magnetic rubber is expected to be a smart isolator material, in which the isolator will be able to adapt to a changed frequency.

  18. Wear Resistant Rubber Tank Track Pads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    of the control. Because of the oil shortage, the availability of synthetic rubbers (especially those based on styrene , butadiene , and chloroprene...catalyzed copolymers of butadiene / styrene and butadiene /lsoprene (HYTRANS) have exhibited a 50 percent or greater improvement in tread wear during service...copolymers of butadiene /isoprene and butadiene / styrene has pre- cluded the preparation of pilot lots of pads based on these elastomers. Correlation

  19. Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, they have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F{trademark}), polytetrafluoro-ethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to approximately 3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using Vapor Transport Rate measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. The authors have developed a chemical compatibility program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be incorporated in packaging for transporting mixed waste forms. From the data analyses performed to date, they have identified the thermoplastic, polychlorotrifluoroethylene, as having the greatest chemical compatibility after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of polytetrafluoroethylene under these conditions. In the evaluation of the two elastomeric materials they have concluded that while both materials exhibit remarkable resistance to these environmental conditions, EPDM has a greater resistance to this corrosive simulant mixed waste.

  20. A comparison between the effects of gamma radiation and sulfur cure system on the microstructure and crosslink network of (styrene butadiene rubber/ethylene propylene diene monomer) blends in presence of nanoclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari Zadeh Naseri, Aida; Jalali-Arani, Azam

    2015-10-01

    Rubber blends based on (styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)) with and without organoclay (OC) were prepared through a melt mixing process. The concentration ratio of the rubber phases (EPDM/SBR; 50/50 wt%) and the amount of the OC were kept constant. The samples were then vulcanized by means of gamma radiation using a Co-60 gamma source as well as sulfur cure system. The effect of absorbed dose on the formation of the crosslinks was confirmed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effects of absorbed dose, sulfur cure system and OC on the gel content, and crosslink density were evaluated by the chemical tests. Applying the Charlesby-Pinner equation to estimate the radiation chemical yield, revealed that the use of OC in the blend caused 20% reduction in the degradation/crosslinking ratio. Employing the swelling test data, some thermodynamic parameters were determined. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to investigate microstructure of the samples revealed a more homogeneous structure and also an increase in compatibility of the blend components in the sample cured by the irradiation in comparison to that cured by the sulfur curing system.

  1. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, Robert J.; Link, Dirk D.; Baltrus, John P.; Zandhuis, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber a-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile a-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fully synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fuel.

  2. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber o-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile o-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fuIly synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fueL

  3. Industrial-hygiene walk-through survey report of Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Fajen, J.M.; Ungers, L.J.

    1986-03-01

    A walk-through survey was conducted at the Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana in July, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on the 1,3-butadiene polymer manufacturing process and evaluate exposure potential. Bulk samples of vinylpyridine latex, styrene/butadiene rubber, and polybutadiene rubber were analyzed for residual 1,3-butadiene.

  4. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  5. HEALTH ASSESSMENT OF 1,3-BUTADIENE | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This assessment was conducted to review the new information that has become available since EPA's 1985 health assessment of 1,3-butadiene.1,3-Butadiene is a gas used commercially in the production of styrene-butadiene rubber, plastics, and thermoplastic resins. The major environmental source of 1,3-butadiene is the incomplete combustion of fuels from mobile sources (e.g., automobile exhaust). Tobacco smoke can be a significant source of 1,3-butadiene in indoor air.This assessment concludes that 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic to humans by inhalation, based on the total weight of evidence. The specific mechanisms of 1,3-butadiene-induced carcinogenesis are unknown; however, it is virtually certain that the carcinogenic effects are mediated by genotoxic metabolites of 1,3-butadiene.Animal data suggest that females may be more sensitive than males for cancer effects; nevertheless, there are insufficient data from which to draw any conclusions on potentially sensitive subpopulations.The human incremental lifetime unit cancer (incidence) risk estimate is based on extrapolation from leukemias observed in an occupational epidemiologic study. A twofold adjustment to the epidemiologic-based unit cancer risk is then applied to reflect evidence from the rodent bioassays suggesting that the epidemiologic-based estimate may underestimate total cancer risk from 1,3-butadiene exposure in the general population. 1,3-Butadiene also causes a variety of reproductive and develop

  6. Carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, R L; Shackelford, C C; Huff, J

    1993-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, a high-production volume chemical used largely in the manufacture of synthetic rubber, is a multiple organ carcinogen in rats and mice. In inhalation studies conducted in mice by the National Toxicology Program, high rates of early lethal lymphomas occurring at exposure levels of 625 ppm or higher reduced the development and expression of later developing tumors at other sites. Use of survival-adjusted tumor rates to account for competing risk factors provided a clearer indication of the dose responses for 1,3-butadiene-induced neoplasms. An increase in lung tumors in female mice was observed at exposure concentrations as low as 6.25 ppm, the lowest concentration ever used in a long-term carcinogenicity study of this gas. Human exposures to 1,3-butadiene by workers employed at facilities that produce this chemical and at facilities that produce styrene-butadiene rubber have been measured at levels higher than those that cause cancer in animals. Furthermore, epidemiology studies have consistently revealed associations between occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene and excess mortality due to lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers. In response to the carcinogenicity findings for 1,3-butadiene in animals and in humans, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has proposed lowering the occupational exposure standard for this chemical from 1000 ppm to 2 ppm. Future work is needed to understand the mechanisms of tumor induction by 1,3-butadiene; however, the pursuit of this research should not delay the reduction of human exposure to this chemical. PMID:8354171

  7. Trimerization of aromatic nitriles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Triazine compounds and cross-linked polymer compositions were made by heating aromatic nitriles to a temperature in the range of about 100 C to about 700 C, in the presence of a catalyst or mixture of catalysts. Aromatic nitrile-modified (terminated and/or appended) imide, benzimidazole, imidazopyrrolone, quinoxaline, and other condensation type prepolymers or their precopolymers were made which were trimerized with or without a filler by the aforementioned catalytic trimerization process.

  8. ODC-Free Solvent Implementation Issues for Vulcanized Rubber and Bond Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, James R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thiokol Propulsion has worked extensively to replace 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) with ozone depleting chemicals (ODC)-free solvents for use in the manufacture of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) for the Space Shuttle Program. As Thiokol has transitioned from sub-scale to full-scale testing and implementation of these new solvents, issues have been discovered which have required special attention. The original intent of Thiokol's solvent replacement strategy was to replace TCA with a single drop-in solvent for all equivalent applications. We have learned that a single candidate does not exist for replacing TCA. Solvent incompatibility with process materials has caused us to seek for niche solvents and/or processing changes that provide an ODC-free solution for special applications. This paper addresses some of the solvent incompatibilities, which have lead to processes changes and possible niche solvent usage. These incompatibilities were discovered during full-scale testing of ODC-free solvents and relate to vulcanized rubber and bond systems in the RSRM. Specifically, the following items are presented: (1) Cure effects of d-limonene based solvents on Silica Filled Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (SF-EPDM) rubber. During full-scale test operations, Thiokol discovered that d-limonene (terpene) based solvents inhibit the cure of EPDM rubber. Subsequent testing showed the same issue with Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR). Also discussed are efforts to minimize uncured rubber exposure to solvents; and (2) Cured bond system sensitivity to ODC-free solvents. During full scale testing it was discovered that a natural rubber to steel vulcanized bond could degrade after prolonged exposure to ODC-free solvents. Follow on testing showed that low vapor pressure and residence time seemed to be most likely cause for failure.

  9. QENS investigation of filled rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triolo, A.; Lo Celso, F.; Negroni, F.; Arrighi, V.; Qian, H.; Lechner, R. E.; Desmedt, A.; Pieper, J.; Frick, B.; Triolo, R.

    The polymer segmental dynamics is investigated in a series of silica-filled rubbers. The presence of inert fillers in polymers greatly affects the mechanical and physical performance of the final materials. For example, silica has been proposed as a reinforcing agent of elastomers in tire production. Results from quasielastic neutron scattering and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) measurements are presented on styrene-ran-butadiene rubber filled with silica. A clear indication is obtained of the existence of a bimodal dynamics, which can be rationalized in terms of the relaxation of bulk rubber and the much slower relaxation of the rubber adsorbed on the filler surface.

  10. Studies on Gel Electrolyte Based on Nitrile-Butadiene Copolymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    conductivity can be obtained in a dimensionally stable film. Apart from PEO, other polymers used as hosts are polyacrylonitrile (PAN)[ 5.’. 211, polyvinyl ...carbonate (PVCa), poly( vinyl pyrrolidone) (pVP)[171, and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVdF). Polystyrene, poly( vinyl chloride ) (PVC), and poly (vinyI... monomer has been widely used in gel electrolyte studies 1521.281. Although conductivities in the range of 10-3 to 10-4 S/cm at room temperature are

  11. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of 1,3-Butadiene (CAS No. 106-99-0) in B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).

    PubMed

    1984-08-01

    1,3-Butadiene is used as an intermediate in the production of elastomers, polymers, and other chemicals. Of the 1,3-butadiene used in 1978, 44% was used to manufacture styrene-butadiene rubber (a substitute for natural rubber, produced by copolymerization of 1,3-butadiene with styrene), and 19% was used to produce polybutane elastomer (a substance that increases resistance of tire products to wear, heat degradation, and blowouts). Chloroprene monomer, derived from 1,3-butadiene, is used exclusively to manufacture neoprene elastomers for non-tire and latex applications. Commercial nitrile rubber, used largely in rubber hoses, seals, and gaskets for automobiles, is a copolymer of 1,3-butadiene and acrylonitrile. Acrylonitrile- butadiene- styrene resins, usually containing 20%-30% 1,3-butadiene by weight, are used to make parts for automobiles and appliances. Other polymer uses include specialty polybutadiene polymers, thermoplastic elastomers, nitrile barrier resins, and K resins(R). 1,3-Butadiene is used as an intermediate in the production of a variety of industrial chemicals, including two fungicides, captan and captofol. It is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the production of adhesives used in articles for packaging, transporting, or holding food; in components of paper and paperboard that are in contact with dry food; and as a modifier in the production of semigrid and rigid vinyl chloride plastic food-contact articles. No information was located on the levels of monomer or on its elution rate from any of the commercially available polymers. It is not known if unreacted 1,3-butadiene migrated from packaging materials. Male and female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to air containing 1,3-butadiene (greater than 99% pure) at concentrations of 0-8,000 ppm in 15-day and 14-week inhalation studies. In the 15-day studies, survival was unaffected by dose, and no pathologic effects were observed; slight decreases in mean body weight occurred at the

  12. The Long-Term Effectiveness of Chemical vs. Polymeric Antiozonants in Rubber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-01

    this patent in the concentration range of 40-80 percent of the polymer blend . 1 Shaw, R.F., Ossefort, Z.T., and Touhey, W.J., Rubber World. 130, 636...resistance to nitrile and natural rubber vulcanizates during outdoor exposure. Some of the most promising of the diamine antiozonants were...described below: 1. They are staining and discoloring. ’ 13 Bergstrom, E.W., "Antiozonants for Nitrile and Natural Rubbers ," Rock Islaid Arsenal

  13. Predicting the glass transition temperature as function of crosslink density and polymer interactions in rubber compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Escamard, Gabriella; De Rosa, Claudio; Auriemma, Finizia

    2016-05-01

    Crosslink sulfur density in rubber compounds and interactions in polymer blends are two of the composition elements that affect the rubber compound properties and glass transition temperature (Tg), which is a marker of polymer properties related to its applications. Natural rubber (NR), butadiene rubber (BR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) compounds were investigated using calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results indicate that the Di Marzio's and Schneider's Models predict with accuracy the dependence of Tg on crosslink density and composition in miscible blends, respectively, and that the two model may represent the base to study the relevant "in service" properties of real rubber compounds.

  14. A novel application of ADC/K-foaming agent-loaded NBR rubber composites as pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, W. E.; El-Eraki, M. H. I.; El-Lawindy, A. M. Y.; Hassan, H. H.

    2006-02-01

    Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) structure foam of different apparent densities was obtained by using different concentrations of foaming agent, azodicarbonamide, ADC/K. The true stress-strain characteristics, in case of compression, of foamed samples were measured. It was found that the theoretical values predicted from the simple blending model are in more agreement with the experimental results than those from the square-relationship model. The effect of cyclic loading-unloading and dissipation energy of rubber foams was studied. The results also indicated that foams with low density exhibited a small hysteresis. The electrical properties were found dependent on the foaming agent concentration. This study was assisted by Mott and Gurney equation. The effect of compressive strain on the electrical conductivity of rubber foams was studied. The free current carrier mobility and the equilibrium concentration of charge carrier in the conduction band were produced as functions of compressive strain. The results also indicate that there is a linear variation between pressure and conductivity for all samples, which means that these samples can be used as a pressure sensor. At a certain concentration of foaming agent (5 phr) a change of electrical conductivity by more than three orders is observed at 20% compression strain.

  15. Assessment of 1,3-butadiene epidemiology studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, M G

    1990-01-01

    Positive carcinogenicity studies in mice and rats have led to concerns that 1,3-butadiene may be carcinogenic in humans under exposure conditions that have existed in occupational settings and perhaps exist today. The principal settings of interest are the styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) manufacturing industry, which uses large quantities of 1,3-butadiene, and the 1,3-butadiene monomer industry. The potential for 1,3-butadiene exposure is highest during monomer transfer operations and is lowest in finishing areas of polymerization plants where the polymer products are processed. Three large cohort mortality studies have been conducted in the SBR and monomer producing industries since 1980. These studies, which examined the mortality experience of over 17,000 men employed in one monomer and 10 SBR facilities, are the subject of this review. All but one of the facilities began operations during the early 1940s. The mortality experience observed within these employee cohorts is comparable to that seen in other long-term studies of men employed in the petroleum, chemical, and rubber industries for all causes of death, total malignant neoplasms, and for the specific cancers seen in excess in the toxicologic studies. This paper discusses discrepant findings observed in more detailed analyses within individual cohorts and among employment subgroups, as well as selected limitations of the particular studies. Additional efforts to refine 1,3-butadiene exposure categories are needed. Within the context of sample size limitations inherent in these studies, there is currently inadequate evidence to establish a relationship between cancer mortality outcomes and 1.3-butadiene exposure in humans. PMID:2205483

  16. Optical and Thermal Stability of Oligofluorene/Rubber Luminescent Blend.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Camila G; Faez, Roselena; Péres, Laura O

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes to obtain homogeneous and stable blends of oligo(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-co-phenylene (OF), a conjugated oligomer with strong tendency of formation of excimers in the solid state, and nitrile rubber (NBR). This rubber protection reduces the formation of polymer excimers in the films. The fluorene oligomer was synthesized via Suzuki reaction and incorporated in the nitrile rubber. The films were formed by spin coating and casting techniques on the proportions of 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 % (w/w) of OF in the nitrile rubber (NBR). The structural, optical and thermal properties of the films were evaluated with infrared, UV-Vis, fluorescence and thermogravimetry, respectively. The nitrile rubber proved to be essential for the preparation of homogeneous and stable films, since it was not possible to obtain films with only fluorene using the above-mentioned techniques. Furthermore, luminescent properties of OF are unchanged and the excimers formation in the solid state decrease suggesting the efficiency of nitrile rubber as the matrix for making films.

  17. Gender differences in the metabolism of 1,3-butadiene to butadiene diepoxide in Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Dahl, A.R.; Bechtold, W.E.

    1995-12-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a gaseous compound used in the production of rubber, is a potent carcinogen in mice and a weak carcinogen in rats. The mechanism of BD-induced carcinogenicity is thought to involve genotoxic effects of its reactive epoxide metabolites butadiene monoepoxide (BDO) and butadiene diepoxide (BDO{sub 2}). Studies in our laboratory have shown that levels of the epoxides, particularly BDO{sub 2}, are greater in mice-the more sensitive species-than rats. While both epoxides are genotoxic in a number of assays, BDO{sub 2} is mutagenic in TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells at concentrations approximately 100-fold lower than BDO. Species differences in carcinogenicity of BD have posed a dilemma to investigators deciding which animal model is most appropriate for BD risk assessment.

  18. 1,3-Butadiene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,3 - Butadiene ; CASRN 106 - 99 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  19. A brief survey of butadiene health effects: a role for metabolic differences.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, L S

    1993-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene is a major monomer in the rubber and plastics industry and is one of the highest-production industrial chemicals in the United States. Although not highly acutely toxic to rodents, inhalation of concentrations as low as 6.25 ppm causes tumors in mice. Butadiene is oncogenic in rats, but much higher exposure concentrations are required than in mice. Chronic toxicity targets the gonads and hematopoietic system. Butadiene is also a potent mutagen and clastogen. Differences in the absorption, distribution, and elimination of butadiene appear to be relatively minor between rats and mice, although mice do retain more butadiene and its metabolites after exposure to the same concentration and have a higher rate of metabolic elimination. Recent studies have demonstrated that major species differences appear to occur in the rate of detoxication of the primary metabolite, 3-epoxybutene (butadiene monoepoxide [BDMO]). Mice have the greatest rate of production of BDMO as compared to other species, but the rate of removal of BDMO appears to be less than in other species. Mice have low levels of epoxide hydrolase; rats have intermediate levels; monkeys and humans appear to have high levels of this detoxifying enzyme. Thus, while only low levels of butadiene exposure may result in an accumulation of BDMO in the mouse, much higher levels would be required to result in an elevation of circulating BDMO in other species. The level of this reactive metabolite may be correlated with the species differences in butadiene sensitivity. PMID:8020440

  20. Compatibilizer for crumb rubber modified asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Labib, M.E.; Memon, G.M.; Chollar, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    The United States of America discards more than 300 million tires each year, and out of that a large fraction of the tires is dumped into stock piles. This large quantity of tires creates an environmental problem. The use of scrap tires is limited. There is a usage potential in such fields as fuel for combustion and Crumb Rubber-Modified Asphalt binder (CRMA). The use of crumb rubber in modifying asphalt is not a new technique; it is been used since early 1960 by pavement engineers. Crumb rubber is a composite of different blends of natural and synthetic rubber (natural rubber, processing oils, polybutadiene, polystyrene butadiene, and filler). Prior research had concluded that the performance of crumb rubber modified asphalt is asphalt dependent. In some cases it improves the Theological properties and in some cases it degrades the properties of modified asphalt.

  1. Road asphalt modifiers based on oil-resistant rubbers and products of thermal transformations of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Sharypov, V.I.; Kiselev, V.P.; Beregovtsova, N.G.; Bugaenko, M.B.; Kuznetsov, B.N.

    2008-07-15

    The properties of asphalt binder modifiers prepared by dissolving butadiene-acrylonitrile rubbers and their production waste in liquid products of heat treatment of various brands of coal were studied.

  2. Tough Rubber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Sue

    1994-01-01

    Describes the benefits of using rubber floor coverings in a gym's free-weight and cardiovascular equipment areas. Tips on purchasing a rubber floor are highlighted as is an annotated list of suppliers and their rubber flooring products. (GR)

  3. Fabrication of T142 Tank Track Pads for Evaluation of a Rubber-Kevlar Composite Compound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    and has performed well. 1 A-54 compound, also known as "tri-blend", is based on a blend of natural rubber , butadiene - styrene rubber , and...TO RUBBER ADHESION Since the 1930’s, resorcinol-formaldehyde- latex (RFL) provide a solution to these problems. compositions have been used as primary...PERIOD COVERED Fabrication of T142 Tank Track Pads for Evaluation of a Rubber -Kevlar Composite FINAL Compound S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR

  4. Pressure sensitive conductive rubber blends

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, H.H. ); Abdel-Bary, E.M. ); El-Mansy, M.K.; Khodair, H.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR) was blended with polychloroprene (CR) according to standard techniques. The blend was mixed with different concentrations of ZnO. The vulcanized sample was subjected to electrical conductivity ({sigma}) measurements while different values of static pressure were applied on the sample. It was found that samples containing 7.5 phr ZnO showed a reasonable pressure sensitive increase of {sigma}. Furthermore, the {sigma} vs pressure relationship of rubber blend mixed with different concentrations of Fast Extrusion Furnace black (FEF) was investigated. It was found that rubber vulcanizate containing 40 phr FEF resulted in a negative value of the pressure coefficient of conductivity {approx equal} {minus} 4.5 KPa{sup {minus}1}.

  5. On hysteretic response and stationary phase fronts in rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczura, J.; Ravi-Chandar, K.

    2010-09-01

    We consider the dynamic response of natural, latex and synthetic, nitrile rubbers under non-monotonic dynamic loading conditions; in particular, we recreate an experiment first considered by Kolsky (Nature 224:1301, 1969) in which two segments of a long rubber specimen are initially maintained at different strain levels by external force and then allowed to evolve dynamically towards equilibrium. We show that as a result of the hysteretic behavior, a phase boundary that is stationary with respect to the material points can be established in both these materials. We also show that this phase boundary persists indefinitely in strain-crystallizing natural, latex rubber, but disappears quickly in the non-crystallizing nitrile rubber.

  6. Future directions in epidemiologic studies of 1,3-butadiene-exposed workers.

    PubMed Central

    Acquavella, J F

    1990-01-01

    To date, epidemiologic research on 1,3-butadiene has consisted of cohort mortality studies of workers in the styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and butadiene monomer industries. These studies have been extremely useful both in defining the focus on human health effects to the lymphopoietic cancers and in providing a perspective on which to evaluate the available animal models for human risk assessment. The next step for epidemiologic research will involve a lymphopoietic cancer case control approach to enable a more precise assessment of whether there is a relationship between 1,3-butadiene exposure and lymphopoietic cancer. In addition, periodic mortality updates of the 1,3-butadiene-exposed worker cohorts will be important to monitor trends in lymphopoietic cancer rates and to ensure that other cancers with long latency do not begin to show elevated rates. This paper describes an industry-sponsored program of case-control and cohort mortality update studies along with the critical elements in research design and analysis for each study. Epidemiological studies will play an important role in testing hypotheses developed from toxicological studies about potential biological mechanisms of 1,3-butadiene carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:2401253

  7. Future directions in epidemiologic studies of 1,3-butadiene-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Acquavella, J.F. )

    1990-06-01

    To date, epidemiologic research on 1,3-butadiene has consisted of cohort mortality studies of workers in the styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and butadiene monomer industries. These studies have been extremely useful both in defining the focus on human health effects to the lymphopoietic cancers and in providing a perspective on which to evaluate the available animal models for human risk assessment. The next step for epidemiologic research will involve a lymphopoietic cancer case control approach to enable a more precise assessment of whether there is a relationship between 1,3-butadiene exposure and lymphopoietic cancer. In addition, periodic mortality updates of the 1,3-butadiene-exposed worker cohorts will be important to monitor trends in lymphopoietic cancer rates and to ensure that other cancers with long latency do not begin to show elevated rates. This paper describes an industry-sponsored program of case-control and cohort mortality update studies along with the critical elements in research design and analysis for each study. Epidemiological studies will play an important role in testing hypotheses developed from toxicological studies about potential biological mechanisms of 1,3-butadiene carcinogenesis in humans.

  8. Data on synthesis and thermo-mechanical properties of stimuli-responsive rubber materials bearing pendant anthracene groups.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Jakob; Ayalur-Karunakaran, Santhosh; Radl, Simone; Oesterreicher, Andreas; Moser, Andreas; Ganser, Christian; Teichert, Christian; Pinter, Gerald; Kern, Wolfgang; Griesser, Thomas; Schlögl, Sandra

    2016-12-01

    The photo-reversible [4πs+4πs] cycloaddition reaction of pendant anthracene moieties represents a convenient strategy to impart wavelength dependent properties into hydrogenated carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (HXNBR) networks. The present article provides the (1)H NMR data on the reaction kinetics of the side chain functionalization of HXNBR. 2-(Anthracene-9-yl)oxirane with reactive epoxy groups is covalently attached to the polymer side chain of HXNBR via ring opening reaction between the epoxy and the carboxylic groups. Along with the identification, (1)H NMR data on the quantification of the attached functional groups are shown in dependence on reaction time and concentration of 2-(anthracene-9-yl)oxirane. Changes in the modification yield are reflected in the mechanical properties and DMA data of photo-responsive elastomers are illustrated in dependence on the number of attached anthracene groups. DMA curves over repeated cycles of UV induced crosslinking (λ>300 nm) and UV induced cleavage (λ=254 nm) are further depicted, demonstrating the photo-reversibility of the thermo-mechanical properties. Interpretation and discussion of the data are provided in "Design and application of photo-reversible elastomer networks by using the [4πs+4πs] cycloaddition reaction of pendant anthracene groups" (Manhart et al., 2016) [1].

  9. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg

    2010-02-01

    In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

  10. Rubber friction: comparison of theory with experiment.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J; Dieluweit, S; Tada, T

    2011-12-01

    We have measured the friction force acting on a rubber block slid on a concrete surface. We used both unfilled and filled (with carbon black) styrene butadiene (SB) rubber and have varied the temperature from -10 °C to 100 °C and the sliding velocity from 1 μm/s to 1000 μm/s. We find that the experimental data at different temperatures can be shifted into a smooth master-curve, using the temperature-frequency shifting factors obtained from measurements of the bulk viscoelastic modulus. The experimental data has been analyzed using a theory which takes into account the contributions to the friction from both the substrate asperity-induced viscoelastic deformations of the rubber, and from shearing the area of real contact. For filled SB rubber the frictional shear stress σ(f) in the area of real contact results mainly from the energy dissipation at the opening crack on the exit side of the rubber-asperity contact regions. For unfilled rubber we instead attribute σ(f) to shearing of a thin rubber smear film, which is deposited on the concrete surface during run in. We observe very different rubber wear processes for filled and unfilled SB rubber, which is consistent with the different frictional processes. Thus, the wear of filled SB rubber results in micrometer-sized rubber particles which accumulate as dry dust, which is easily removed by blowing air on the concrete surface. This wear process seams to occur at a steady rate. For unfilled rubber a smear film forms on the concrete surface, which cannot be removed even using a high-pressure air stream. In this case the wear rate appears to slow down after some run in time period.

  11. Hardness and compression resistance of natural rubber and synthetic rubber mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguello, J. M.; Santos, A.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to mechanically characterize through compression resistance and shore hardness tests, the mixture of hevea brasiliensis natural rubber with butadiene synthetic rubber (BR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer rubber (EPDM). For each of the studied mixtures were performed 10 tests, each of which increased by 10% the content of synthetic rubber in the mixture; each test consisted of carrying out five tests of compression resistance and five tests of shore hardness. The specimens were vulcanized on a temperature of 160°C, during an approximate time of 15 minutes, and the equipment used in the performance of the mechanical tests were a Shimadzu universal machine and a digital durometer. The results show that the A shore hardness increases directly proportional, with a linear trend, with the content of synthetic BR, SBR or EPDM rubber present in the mixture, being the EPDM the most influential. With respect to the compression resistance is observed that the content of BR or SBR increase this property directly proportional through a linear trend; while the EPDM content also increases but with a polynomial trend.

  12. Enantioselective biotransformations of nitriles in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Xiang

    2015-03-17

    The hydration and hydrolysis of nitriles are valuable synthetic methods used to prepare carboxamides and carboxylic acids. However, chemical hydration and hydrolysis of nitriles involve harsh reaction conditions, have low selectivity, and generate large amounts of waste. Therefore, researchers have confined the scope of these reactions to simple nitrile substrates. However, biological transformations of nitriles are highly efficient, chemoselective, and environmentally benign, which has led synthetic organic chemists and biotechologists to study these reactions in detail over the last two decades. In nature, biological systems degrade nitriles via two distinct pathways: nitrilases catalyze the direct hydrolysis of nitriles to afford carboxylic acids with release of ammonia, and nitrile hydratases catalyze the conversion of nitriles into carboxamides, which then furnish carboxylic acids via hydrolysis in the presence of amidases. Researchers have subsequently developed biocatalytic methods into useful industrial processes for the manufacture of commodity chemicals, including acrylamide. Since the late 1990s, research by my group and others has led to enormous progress in the understanding and application of enantioselective biotransformations of nitriles in organic synthesis. In this Account, I summarize the important advances in enantioselective biotransformations of nitriles and amides, with a primary focus on research from my laboratory. I describe microbial whole-cell-catalyzed kinetic resolution of various functionalized nitriles, amino- and hydroxynitriles, and nitriles that contain small rings and the desymmetrization of prochiral and meso dinitriles and diamides. I also demonstrate how we can apply the biocatalytic protocol to synthesize natural products and bioactive compounds. These nitrile biotransformations offer an attractive and unique protocol for the enantioselective synthesis of polyfunctionalized organic compounds that are not readily obtainable by

  13. Effect of strain rate on mechanical properties of melt-processed soy flour composite filler and styrene-butadiene blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymer composites were prepared by melt-mixing polymer and soy flour composite fillers in an internal mixer. Soy flour composite fillers were prepared by blending aqueous dispersion of soy flour with styrene-butadiene rubber latex, dried, and cryogenically ground into powders. Upon crosslinking, th...

  14. Air sampling and analysis in a rubber vulcanization area.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, S M; Fraser, D A

    1977-05-01

    Results of sampling and analysis of air in a rubber vulcanization area are described. Organic compounds were collected on activated charcoal, desorbed with carbon disulfide and analyzed by gas chromatography. Several previously identified substances were quantitated, including styrene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and several oligomers of 1,3-butadiene. Concentrations ranged from 0.007 to 1.1 ppm.

  15. Transition-Metal-Free Synthesis of 1,3-Butadiene-Containing π-Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuediao; Liu, Yating; Lu, Tian; Yang, Rui; Luo, Chuxin; Zhang, Qi; Chai, Yonghai

    2016-12-01

    This work describes the synthesis of π-conjugated polymers possessing arylene and 1,3-butadiene alternating units in the main chain by the reaction of α,β-unsaturated ester/nitrile containing γ-H with aromatic/heteroaromatic aldehyde compound. By using 4-(4-formylphenyl)-2-butylene acid ethyl ester as a model monomer, the different polymerization conditions, including catalyst, catalyst amount, and solvent, are optimized. The polymerization of 4-(4-formylphenyl)-2-butylene acid ethyl ester is carried out by refluxing in ethanol for 72 h with 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) as a catalyst to give a 1,3-butadiene-containing π-conjugated polymer, poly(phenylene-1,3-butadiene), in 84.3% yield with M¯n and M¯w/M¯n (PDI) estimated as 6172 and 1.65, respectively. Based on this new methodology, a series of π-conjugated polymers containing 1,3-butadiene units with different substituents are obtained in high yields. A possible mechanism is proposed for the polymerization through a six-membered ring transition state and then a 1,5-H shift intermediate.

  16. Mutagenicity of rubber vulcanization gases in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Hedenstedt, A; Ramel, C; Wachtmeister, C A

    1981-01-01

    Gases formed by rubber and rubber additives in the vulcanization process were collected with a laboratory-scale glass apparatus. Mutagenicity testing of the vulcanization gases by the Salmonella/microsome test was conducted with strains TA1535, TA1538, TA98, and TA100 in the absence and presence of a metabolizing system from rat liver homogenates. The mutagenicity of gases derived by heating chloroprene rubber and ethylene propylene rubber was established with both base substitution- and frameshift-sensitive strains and that of a styrene-butadiene rubber was established with the base substitution-sensitive stain TA100. Tests on pyrolysis gases from a butadiene acrylonitrile rubber revealed only toxic effects. Curing systems, additives, and filling materials from various sources were represented in the material. Gases were collected at temperature levels corresponding to both mixing and curing of these particular rubbers in the industrial operations. Attempts were made to correlate the mutagenicity of the gases to the presence of mutagenic components in the rubber mixtures.

  17. Nitrile versus Latex for Glove Juice Sampling.

    PubMed

    Landers, Timothy F; Dent, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the utility of nitrile gloves as a replacement for latex surgical gloves in recovering bacteria from the hands. Two types of nitrile gloves were compared to latex gloves using the parallel streak method. Streaks of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus were made on tryptic soy agar plates, and the zones of inhibition were measured around pieces of glove material placed on the plates. Latex gloves produced a mean zone of inhibition of 0.28 mm, compared to 0.002 mm for nitrile gloves (p<.001). While the parallel streak method is not intended as a quantitative estimate of antimicrobial properties, these results suggest that nitrile may be a viable alternative to latex in glove juice sampling methods, since nitrile avoids the risk of latex exposure.

  18. 40 CFR 63.494 - Back-end process provisions-residual organic HAP and emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... producing butyl rubber, epichlorohydrin elastomer, neoprene, and nitrile butadiene rubber shall not exceed... processes at affected sources producing butyl rubber, epichlorohydrin elastomer, neoprene, and nitrile... epichlorohydrin elastomer, the organic HAP emission limitation, in units of Mg organic HAP emissions per Mg...

  19. Biodegradation of Nitriles in Shale Oil

    PubMed Central

    Aislabie, Jackie; Atlas, Ronald M.

    1988-01-01

    Enrichment cultures were obtained, after prolonged incubation on a shale oil as the sole source of nitrogen, that selectively degraded nitriles. Capillary gas chromatographic analyses showed that the mixed microbial populations in the enrichments degraded the homologous series of aliphatic nitriles but not the aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, or heterocyclic-nitrogen compounds found in this oil. Time course studies showed that lighter nitriles were removed more rapidly than higher-molecular-weight nitriles. A Pseudomonas fluorescens strain isolated from an enrichment, which was able to completely utilize the individual nitriles undecyl cyanide and undecanenitrile as sole sources of carbon and nitrogen, was unable to attack stearonitrile when provided alone as the growth substrate. A P. aeruginosa strain, also isolated from one of the enrichments, used nitriles but not aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons when the oil was used as a sole nitrogen source. However, when the shale oil was used as the sole source of carbon, aliphatic hydrocarbons in addition to nitriles were degraded but aromatic hydrocarbons were still not attacked by this P. aeruginosa strain. PMID:16347731

  20. Quantitative analysis of styrene butadiene copolymers using S-SIMS and LA-FTICRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, D.; Boes, C.; Zimmer, R.; Muller, J. F.; Migeon, H.-N.

    2003-01-01

    Styrene butadiene copolymers (SBR) have been analyzed by static secondary ion mass spectrometry (S-SIMS) and laser ablation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LA-FTICRMS) to obtain quantitative information based on specific peaks knowing that the complication of this system is that there are no characteristic SIMS peaks unique to each styrene and butadiene monomer. So, to overcome this problem, a silver deposition has been applied into polystyrene (PS), butadiene rubber (BR) and SBR. By this way, new secondary ions are detected in particular silver cationized butadiene and styrene monomers at m/ z 161/163 and 211/213, respectively. The LA-FTICRMS experiments do not require pre-treatment. At high laser power density, UV photons (193, 266 and 355 nm) allow to detect directly the styrene and butadiene ions at m/ z 104 and 54, respectively. Using these SIMS and LA-FTICRMS peaks, it is possible to obtain quantitative results. However, the silver coating in the SIMS experiment seems to have a great influence on the obtention of quantitative information. For LA-FTICRMS experiments, the best results seem to be obtained at the 355 nm wavelength.

  1. Alteration of Acrylonitrile-Methylacrylate-Butadiene Terpolymer by Nocardia rhodochrous and Penicillium notatum†

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, A. D.; Dean, A. V.; Gilbert, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    [14C]Barex-210, a terpolymer of acrylonitrile, methylacrylate, and butadiene, was tested for bioconversion. Powdered samples of polymer, each specifically 14C labeled at different carbon atoms of the polymer, were incubated with either Nocardia rhodochrous or Penicillium notatum in an enriched growth medium for various periods of time. After 6 months of incubation, the 14C-labeled polymer was transformed from a high-molecular-weight material completely soluble in dimethyl formamide (DMF) into both a lower-molecular-weight form still soluble in DMF and a second form that was no longer soluble in DMF. The amount of 14C-labeled carbon atoms converted into DMF-insoluble material was 8% of the backbone carbon-carbon atoms and 12% of the side-chain nitrile and acrylate atoms from the acrylonitrile-methylacrylate copolymer and 60% of the elastomer (acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer) atoms. Metabolism of the polymer was not established from measurements of metabolic 14CO2. Evolution of 14CO2 amounted to only 0.3, 0.6, 1.8, and 3.3% of these four fractions, respectively. Although the transformation of high-molecular-weight polymer into DMF-insoluble material was rapid in the early stages of microbial growth, the accompanying CO2 evolution was much slower. Further evidence of polymer alteration was indicated by the infrared spectrum of the insoluble material, which showed a disappearance of the nitrile and methylacrylate peaks. PMID:16345541

  2. Investigation of free volume and the interfacial, and toughening behavior for epoxy resin/rubber composites by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minfeng, Zeng; Xudong, Sun; Huiquan, Xiao; Genzhong, Ji; Xuewen, Jiang; Baoyi, Wang; Chenze, Qi

    2008-03-01

    An epoxy resin (EP) matrix has been modified with carboxyl-randomized butadiene-acrylonitrile (CRBN) rubber and hydroxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (HTBN). When the rubber content was low (⩽5%), the free volume size varied slowly, meanwhile, the free volume size of EP/HTBN system was smaller than EP/CRBN system. With further addition of rubber component (⩾7%), the free volume size of the composite increased quickly. In this case, the free volume size of EP/HTBN system was larger than EP/CRBN system. The intermediate positron lifetime component ( I2) was affected by the structure of the interface layer between rubber particles and EP matrix. The different free volume properties could be attributed to the compatibility between rubber and EP.

  3. Rubber Reclamation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2007-01-01

    The safety and health hazards related to recycling of used rubber, due to the scarcity and high price of virgin rubber are reported. Various threats like stagnant water pools trapped in tires leading to diseases and ignited tires, which become very difficult to extinguish and generating smoke that is extremely detrimental to the environment, have…

  4. Stereoselective construction of nitrile-substituted cyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Denton, Justin R; Cheng, Kevin; Davies, Huw M L

    2008-03-14

    Nitrile-substituted cyclopropanes are readily synthesized in a stereocontrolled fashion from the intermolecular cyclopropanation between 2-diazo-2-phenylacetonitrile and electron-rich olefins, catalyzed by the chiral dirhodium complex, Rh(2)(S-PTAD)(4).

  5. The Effect of Uncertainty in Exposure Estimation on the Exposure-Response Relation between 1,3-Butadiene and Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Graff, John J.; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Macaluso, Maurizio; Maldonado, George; Matthews, Robert; Delzell, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    In a follow-up study of mortality among North American synthetic rubber industry workers, cumulative exposure to 1,3-butadiene was positively associated with leukemia. Problems with historical exposure estimation, however, may have distorted the association. To evaluate the impact of potential inaccuracies in exposure estimation, we conducted uncertainty analyses of the relation between cumulative exposure to butadiene and leukemia. We created the 1,000 sets of butadiene estimates using job-exposure matrices consisting of exposure values that corresponded to randomly selected percentiles of the approximate probability distribution of plant-, work area/job group-, and year specific butadiene ppm. We then analyzed the relation between cumulative exposure to butadiene and leukemia for each of the 1,000 sets of butadiene estimates. In the uncertainty analysis, the point estimate of the RR for the first non zero exposure category (>0–<37.5 ppm-years) was most likely to be about 1.5. The rate ratio for the second exposure category (37.5–<184.7 ppm-years) was most likely to range from 1.5 to 1.8. The RR for category 3 of exposure (184.7–<425.0 ppm-years) was most likely between 2.1 and 3.0. The RR for the highest exposure category (425.0+ ppm-years) was likely to be between 2.9 and 3.7. This range off RR point estimates can best be interpreted as a probability distribution that describes our uncertainty in RR point estimates due to uncertainty in exposure estimation. After considering the complete probability distributions of butadiene exposure estimates, the exposure-response association of butadiene and leukemia was maintained. This exercise was a unique example of how uncertainty analyses can be used to investigate and support an observed measure of effect when occupational exposure estimates are employed in the absence of direct exposure measurements. PMID:19826555

  6. Reactive processing of recycled polycarbonate/acrylonitrile butadiene styrene.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Hyuk; Choi, Yeon-Sil; Moon, Jung-Min; Tortorrela, Nathan; Beatty, Charles L; Lee, Jang-Oo

    2009-04-01

    Cellular phone housings were ground to make original particulates using a knife mill. Foams and adhesives with a lighter density than water were removed from ground mixtures using a sink-float process in water; ground metals, button rubbers, and wires were separated from desired materials by using a sink float process in salt All housing materials, consisting of seven thermoplastics included in cellular phone housings, showed better tensile properties than pure housing materials made of polycarbonate/acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, but they only had about half of the impact strength. In contrast, the low impact strength for all housing materials was improved by adding 25 wt % polyethylene elastomer and/or 2.4 wt % ground epoxy circuit boards for batch mixing. Impact strengths, tensile strengths, and the energy absorption ability of all housing materials were improved by adding 5.4wt% glycidyl methacrylate for twin screw extrusion.

  7. Experimental thermal transport evolution of silane activated nano-clay reinforced styrene butadiene elastomeric nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, S. S.; Iqbal, N.; Jamil, T.; Bashir, A.; Shahid, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, silane activated nanoclay was reinforced in styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) to enhance the thermal resistance/stability and mechanical properties of SBR. silane activated nanoclay with variant concentrations was impregnated in the rubber matrix to fabricate polymer nanocomposites under control processing conditions. Experimental thermal transport, thermal oxidation, phase transition study, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite specimens were carried out. Thermal insulation, thermal stability, and heat flow response were remarkably enhanced with the addition of nanokaolinite in the polymer matrix. Phase transition temperatures, their corresponding enthalpies, tensile strength, elastic modulus, elongation at break and hardness of the rubber composites were positively influenced with the filler incorporation into the host matrix. The Even dispersion of nanoreinforcements, morphological and compositional analyses of the thermal transport tested specimens were performed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively.

  8. Species differences in metabolism of 1,3-butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.F.

    1995-02-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a 4-carbon gaseous compound with two double bonds. Used in high tonnage to make styrene-butadiene polymers in the rubber industry. Because of large amounts in use, BD was tested for toxicity in 2-year inhalation exposures of both Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice. The results of the two-species studies were dramatically different. In the initial study in mice, BD was shown to be a potent multiple-site carcinogen at exposure levels of 625 and 1250 ppM. There were increased incidences of neoplasia in the heart, lung, mammary gland, and ovary; malignant lymphomas resulted in early deaths of the mice so that the planned 2-year study was stopped after only 61 weeks of exposure. The second study in mice was conducted at much lower exposure concentrations (6.25, 20, 62.5, 200, and 625 ppM) and lasted 104 weeks. Increased incidences of hemangiosarcomas of the heart and lung neoplasia were observed in males exposed to 62.5 ppM BD, while females had increased lung neoplasia even at the 6.25 ppM exposure level. Early deaths from lymphomas were again observed at the high exposure concentration (625 ppm). A noncancer toxicity observed in mice was a macrocytic, megaloblastic anemia.

  9. High performance graphene oxide based rubber composites.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications.

  10. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications.

  11. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications. PMID:23974435

  12. Structural Characteristics and Swelling Mechanism of Two Commercial Nitrile-Butadiene Elastomers in Various Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-06

    small rectangular disks were cut by means of a sharp edged knife. The thickness, length and width of the disks were measured using a vernier caliper...The dimensions of the sample were measured using the vernier caliper and the results were recorded. After measuring the weight and the dimensions, the

  13. Enzyme-substrate binding landscapes in the process of nitrile biodegradation mediated by nitrile hydratase and amidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zeng, Zhuotong; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Xuanming; Chen, Ming; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Zhifeng; Xie, Gengxin

    2013-08-01

    The continuing discharge of nitriles in various industrial processes has caused serious environmental consequences of nitrile pollution. Microorganisms possess several nitrile-degrading pathways by direct interactions of nitriles with nitrile-degrading enzymes. However, these interactions are largely unknown and difficult to experimentally determine but important for interpretation of nitrile metabolisms and design of nitrile-degrading enzymes with better nitrile-converting activity. Here, we undertook a molecular modeling study of enzyme-substrate binding modes in the bi-enzyme pathway for degradation of nitrile to acid. Docking results showed that the top substrates having favorable interactions with nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus erythropolis AJ270 (ReNHase), nitrile hydratase from Pseudonocardia thermophila JCM 3095 (PtNHase), and amidase from Rhodococcus sp. N-771 (RhAmidase) were benzonitrile, 3-cyanopyridine, and L-methioninamide, respectively. We further analyzed the interactional profiles of these top poses with corresponding enzymes, showing that specific residues within the enzyme's binding pockets formed diverse contacts with substrates. This information on binding landscapes and interactional profiles is of great importance for the design of nitrile-degrading enzyme mutants with better oxidation activity toward nitriles or amides in the process of pollutant treatments.

  14. Chemoselective Alkylations with N- and C-Metalated Nitriles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Nath, Dinesh; Fleming, Fraser F

    2015-10-02

    Metalated nitriles exhibit complementary chemoselectivities in electrophilic alkylations. N-Lithiated or C-magnesiated nitriles can be prepared from the same nitrile precursor and selectively reacted with a 1:1 mixture of methyl cyanoformate and benzyl bromide or bifunctional electrophiles through chemoselective attack onto either an alkyl halide or a carbonyl electrophile. A mechanistic explanation for the chemoselectivity preferences is provided that rests on the structural and complexation differences between N- and C-metalated nitriles.

  15. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates—I. Simple waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczura, J.; Ravi-Chandar, K.

    2011-02-01

    In this series of papers, we examine the propagation of waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis; in the present paper, Part I, attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional waves in strips of natural, latex and synthetic, nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves indicated a need for an appropriate constitutive model for rubber; by quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions, an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers was obtained. This matching process suggested that a simple power-law constitutive model was capable of representing the high strain-rate response for both rubbers used.

  16. Styrene-Butadiene Co-Polymer Based Highly Conducting and Flexible Polymer Composite Film with Low Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Anisha Mary; Neena, P.

    2011-10-01

    Conducting polymer composites are finding novel applications in various fields especially in device technology. In this work an effort has been made to synthesize polyaniline-synthetic rubber (Styrene-butadiene rubber) composite via ex-situ technique and its electrochemical properties are investigated. Highly conducting emeraldine form of polyaniline (20 S/cm) is prepared by the oxidative polymerization of aniline in aqueous acidic (CSA) media using ammonium peroxydisulfate as oxidizing agent. These composite films are characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy to investigate their optical properties. The dc conductivity studies indicate that these composite films show extremely low percolation threshold.

  17. A moving robotic hand system for whole-glove permeation and penetration: captan and nitrile gloves.

    PubMed

    Phalen, Robert; Hee, Shane Que

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a robotic hand to test the influence of hand movement on the permeation/penetration of captan through disposable nitrile rubber gloves. An available robotic hand was modified to within one standard deviation of the anthropometric 50th percentile male hand. Permeation tests used a nylon inspection glove interposed between medium-size outer and inner nitrile gloves, the latter protected the hand. Permeation of an aqueous emulsion (217 mg/mL) of captan was conducted at 35 degrees C +/- 0.7 degrees C. A new surface wipe technique facilitated collection of captan from the inner surface of the exposed nitrile gloves, a technique favored above rinse methods that extracted captan from within the glove. With hand movement, the permeated mass of captan collected after 8 hr ranged from 1.6 to 970 microg (Brand A) and 8.6 +/- 1.2 microg (Brand B). Without hand movement, the corresponding masses ranged from 1.4 to 8.4 microg (Brand A) and 11 +/- 3 mg (Brand B). These results were not significantly different at p < or = 0.05 using parametric and nonparametric statistical tests but indicated that hand movement could influence the precision of permeation (F-test p < or = 0.05). One glove exhibited failure after 2 hr with movement, in comparison with 0.5 to 9.9 microg captan with no movement. Hand movement did not appear to significantly affect the permeation of captan through nitrile gloves. However, hand movement did influence physical and/or chemical degradation, resulting in glove failures. The robotic hand simulated normal hand motions, was reliable, and could be used to assess the influence of hand movement on the permeation of nonvolatile components through gloves. Future research should continue to investigate the influence of hand movement and additional work factors on the permeation, penetration, and physical integrity of protective gloves.

  18. A numerical investigation on mechanical property improvement of styrene butadine rubber by static straight blade indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiyana, B.; Ismail, R.; Jamari, J.; Schipper, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical property improvement of rubber is widely carried out by adding carbon black or silica as a filler in rubber. In general, this improvement aims on the increase of stiffness and abrasion resistance. By means of the static straight blade indentation technique, this paper studies the mechanical properties of Unfilled Styrene Butadiene Rubber (SBR-0) and Filled Styrene Butadiene Rubber that is compounded with carbon black (SBR-25). The numerical method applied was Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in which the rubber was modeled as a hyper-elastic material and indented by a blade indenter with various wedge angles i.e. 30, 45 and 60 degrees. At the same depth of indentation, the results showed that there was an increase in both rubber stiffness and maximum stress if the rubber was compounded. However, it is found that the rubber stiffness showed a regular slight increase, while the maximum stress experienced an irregularly significant increase. Especially for the 30 degree wedge angle, the maximum stress extremely increased at a certain depth of indentation.

  19. An update of nitrile photochemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.

    1987-01-01

    Comparisons are undertaken between laboratory kinetics experiments and Voyager observations in order to shed light on possible chemical reaction pathways to the generation of cyanogen and dicyanoacetylene in Titan's upper atmosphere. The predicted concentrations of the simple nitrile compounds are found to be of a magnitude realistically corresponding to the Voyager observations.

  20. Inhalation toxicology and carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in B6C3F1 mice following 65 weeks of exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, R L; Huff, J E; Roycroft, J H; Chou, B J; Miller, R A

    1990-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, a large-production volume chemical used mainly in the manufacture of synthetic rubber, was found to induce multiple-organ carcinogenicity in male and female B6C3F1 mice at exposure concentrations (625 and 1250 ppm) equivalent to and below the OSHA standard of 1000 ppm. Since this study was terminated after 60 weeks of exposure because of reduced survival due to fatal tumors, and because dose-response relationships for 1,3-butadiene-induced neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions were not clearly established, a second long-term inhalation study of 1,3-butadiene in B6C3F1 mice was conducted at lower exposure concentrations, ranging from 6.25 to 625 ppm. Both the histopathological findings from animals dying through week 65 and the results of evaluations of animals exposed for 40 and 65 weeks are presented in this report. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene caused a regenerative anemia at concentrations of 62.5 ppm and higher. Testicular atrophy was induced at 625 ppm, and ovarian atrophy was observed at 20 ppm and higher. During the first 50 weeks of the study, lymphocytic lymphoma was the major cause of death of mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene. Neoplasms of the heart, forestomach, lung, Harderian gland, mammary gland, ovary, and liver were frequently observed in 1,3-butadiene-exposed mice that died between week 40 and week 65 of the study. Studies in which exposure to 1,3-butadiene was stopped after limited periods were also included to assess the relationship between exposure levels and duration of exposures on the outcome of 1,3-butadiene-induced carcinogenicity. In these studies, lymphocytic lymphomas were induced in male mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene for only 13 weeks. The incidence of lymphocytic lymphoma in male mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene for 26 weeks was two times that in mice exposed to 625 ppm for 13 weeks. However, when the exposure concentration was reduced by half to 312 ppm and the exposure duration extended to 52 weeks, the

  1. [Biological monitoring in the molding of plastics and rubbers].

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Cirla, A M; Cirla, P E; Cutugno, V; Lionetti, C; Martinotti, I; Mossini, E; Foà, V

    2007-01-01

    This survey was carried out in the molding of plastics and rubbers, in the "Professional Cancer Prevention Project" sponsored by the Lombardy region with the objective of developing and implementing protocols for evaluating exposure to carcinogens through the biological monitoring. The realities of molding the thermoplastic polymer ABS, rubber, and thermosetting plastics containing formaldehyde were examined. The carcinogenic substances identified in these processes were: 1,3-butadiene, acrylonitrile and styrene in molding ABS, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in molding rubber, and formaldehyde in molding the thermosetting plastics. Only for some of these substances biological indicators are available. The limited exposure to airborne chemicals in molding ABS and the intrinsic characteristics of biological indicators available for 1-3 butadiene have determined the non applicability of biological monitoring to this situation. The absence of a biological indicator of exposure to formaldehyde has made this situation not investigable. Exposure in the rubber molding was studied in 19 subjects applying the determination not metabolized PAH in urine. The levels of these indicators were similar to those measured in other groups of subjects without occupational exposure to PAH, confirming a low airborne contamination in this workplace.

  2. Nitrile Polymerisation and Heterocyclic Synthesis Using Iminyls.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-31

    give ring—opened products. No reaction occurred with hydroxylamine , sodium cyanide , acetic anhydride or ~—toluenesu1phony1 chloride, and with...reduced with sodium amalgam to the diol (11) (cf. ref. 5) but subsequent oxidation with manganese dioxide again gave the ring tautomer (b a...simpler to alkylate the keto—nitrile (20) from isobutyrophenone and methacrybonitrile. Treatment of (20) with sodium hydride ~fo1lowed by methyl iodide

  3. Biomonitoring of 1,3-butadiene and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Osterman-Golkar, S; Bond, J A

    1996-01-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments list several volatile organic chemicals as hazardous air pollutants, including ethylene oxide, butadiene, styrene, and acrylonitrile. The toxicology of many of these compounds shares several common elements such as carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, genotoxicity of the epoxide intermediates, involvement of cytochrome P450 for metabolic activation (except ethylene oxide), and involvement of at least two enzymes for detoxication of the epoxides (e.g., hydrolysis or conjugation with glutathione). These similarities facilitate research strategies for identifying and developing biomarkers of exposure. This article reviews the current knowledge about biomarkers of butadiene. Butadiene is carcinogenic in mice and rats, which raises concern for potential carcinogenicity in humans. Butadiene is metabolized to DNA-reactive metabolites, including 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and diepoxybutane. These epoxides are thought to play a critical role in butadiene carcinogenicity. Butadiene and some of its metabolites (e.g., epoxybutene) are volatile. Exhalation of unchanged butadiene and excretion of butadiene metabolites in urine represent major routes of elimination. Therefore, biomonitoring of butadiene exposure could be based on chemical analysis of butadiene in exhaled breath, blood levels of butadiene epoxides, excretion of butadiene metabolites in urine, or adducts of butadiene epoxides with DNA or blood proteins. Mutation induction in specific genes (e.g., HPRT) following butadiene exposure can be potentially used as a biomarker. Excretion of 1,2-dihydroxy-4-(N-acetylcysteinyl-S)butane or the product of epoxybutene with N-7 in guanine in urine, epoxybutene-hemoglobin adducts, and HPRT mutation have been used as biomarkers in recent studies of occupational exposure to butadiene. Data in laboratory animals suggest that diepoxybutane may be a more important genotoxic metabolite than epoxybutene. Biomonitoring methods need to be developed for

  4. Biomonitoring of 1,3-butadiene and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Osterman-Golkar, S; Bond, J A

    1996-10-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments list several volatile organic chemicals as hazardous air pollutants, including ethylene oxide, butadiene, styrene, and acrylonitrile. The toxicology of many of these compounds shares several common elements such as carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, genotoxicity of the epoxide intermediates, involvement of cytochrome P450 for metabolic activation (except ethylene oxide), and involvement of at least two enzymes for detoxication of the epoxides (e.g., hydrolysis or conjugation with glutathione). These similarities facilitate research strategies for identifying and developing biomarkers of exposure. This article reviews the current knowledge about biomarkers of butadiene. Butadiene is carcinogenic in mice and rats, which raises concern for potential carcinogenicity in humans. Butadiene is metabolized to DNA-reactive metabolites, including 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and diepoxybutane. These epoxides are thought to play a critical role in butadiene carcinogenicity. Butadiene and some of its metabolites (e.g., epoxybutene) are volatile. Exhalation of unchanged butadiene and excretion of butadiene metabolites in urine represent major routes of elimination. Therefore, biomonitoring of butadiene exposure could be based on chemical analysis of butadiene in exhaled breath, blood levels of butadiene epoxides, excretion of butadiene metabolites in urine, or adducts of butadiene epoxides with DNA or blood proteins. Mutation induction in specific genes (e.g., HPRT) following butadiene exposure can be potentially used as a biomarker. Excretion of 1,2-dihydroxy-4-(N-acetylcysteinyl-S)butane or the product of epoxybutene with N-7 in guanine in urine, epoxybutene-hemoglobin adducts, and HPRT mutation have been used as biomarkers in recent studies of occupational exposure to butadiene. Data in laboratory animals suggest that diepoxybutane may be a more important genotoxic metabolite than epoxybutene. Biomonitoring methods need to be developed for

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of 4-(2-hydroxyphenoxy) phthalic nitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, Yudong; LAN, Zhili; SHENG, Liping; XING, Suli; WU, Binrui

    2017-01-01

    4-(2-hydroxyphenoxy) phthalic nitrile was prepared by the nucleophilic substitution reaction of catechol and 4-nitro phthalic nitrile in DMF with the existence of N2 and K2CO3. The optimal reaction conditions were obtained as follows: the mole ratio of catechol, K2CO3 and 4-nitro phthalic nitrile is 2:1:1, with the quality of the solute concentration of 0.222g/mL and reaction temperature 80°C. Consequently, the yield of final product reached 87.64%, and the structure of the 4-(2-hydroxyphenoxy) phthalic nitrile was characterized by IR, 1H NMR and DSC.

  6. Mortality study of workers in 1,3-butadiene production units identified from a chemical workers cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, E M; Fajen, J M; Ruder, A M; Rinsky, R A; Halperin, W E; Fessler-Flesch, C A

    1995-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has given the designations of "sufficient evidence" of carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in experimental animals and "limited evidence" of carcinogenicity in humans. To investigate the carcinogenic effect in humans, we conducted a cohort mortality study among 364 men who were assigned to any of three 1,3-butadiene production units located within several chemical plants in the Kanawha Valley of West Virginia, including 277 men employed in a U.S. Rubber Reserve Plant which operated during World War II. The butadiene production units included in this study were selected from an index developed by the Union Carbide Corporation, which listed for each chemical production unit within their South Charleston, West Virginia and Institute, West Virginia, plants all products, by-products, and reactants. Departments included in the study were those where butadiene was a primary product and neither benzene nor ethylene oxide was present. A total of 185 deaths were observed; the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes of death was 91, reflecting lower mortality among the study population than the U.S. population. The study found a significantly elevated standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma based on four observed cases (SMR = 577; 95% CI = 157-1480), which persisted in an analysis using county referent rates. An excess of lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma among all workers and among workers with routine exposure to 1,3-butadiene was also observed in the only other cohort of 1,3-butadiene production workers previously studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7556014

  7. A cobalt-containing eukaryotic nitrile hydratase.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Yang, Xinhang; Bennett, Brian; Holz, Richard C

    2017-01-01

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase), an industrially important enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of nitriles to their corresponding amides, has only been characterized from prokaryotic microbes. The putative NHase from the eukaryotic unicellular choanoflagellate organism Monosiga brevicollis (MbNHase) was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting enzyme expressed as a single polypeptide with fused α- and β-subunits linked by a seventeen-histidine region. Size-exclusion chromatography indicated that MbNHase exists primarily as an (αβ)2 homodimer in solution, analogous to the α2β2 homotetramer architecture observed for prokaryotic NHases. The NHase enzyme contained its full complement of Co(III) and was fully functional without the co-expression of an activator protein or E. coli GroES/EL molecular chaperones. The homology model of MbNHase was developed identifying Cys400, Cys403, and Cys405 as active site ligands. The results presented here provide the first experimental data for a mature and active eukaryotic NHase with fused subunits. Since this new member of the NHase family is expressed from a single gene without the requirement of an activator protein, it represents an alternative biocatalyst for industrial syntheses of important amide compounds.

  8. Structural Basis of Biological Nitrile Reduction*

    PubMed Central

    Chikwana, Vimbai M.; Stec, Boguslaw; Lee, Bobby W. K.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Swairjo, Manal A.

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme QueF catalyzes the reduction of the nitrile group of 7-cyano-7-deazaguanine (preQ0) to 7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1), the only nitrile reduction reaction known in biology. We describe here two crystal structures of Bacillus subtilis QueF, one of the wild-type enzyme in complex with the substrate preQ0, trapped as a covalent thioimide, a putative intermediate in the reaction, and the second of the C55A mutant in complex with the substrate preQ0 bound noncovalently. The QueF enzyme forms an asymmetric tunnel-fold homodecamer of two head-to-head facing pentameric subunits, harboring 10 active sites at the intersubunit interfaces. In both structures, a preQ0 molecule is bound at eight sites, and in the wild-type enzyme, it forms a thioimide covalent linkage to the catalytic residue Cys-55. Both structural and transient kinetic data show that preQ0 binding, not thioimide formation, induces a large conformational change in and closure of the active site. Based on these data, we propose a mechanism for the activation of the Cys-55 nucleophile and subsequent hydride transfer. PMID:22787148

  9. Mortality from cancer and other causes of death among synthetic rubber workers

    PubMed Central

    Sathiakumar, N.; Delzell, E.; Hovinga, M.; Macaluso, M.; Julian, J. A.; Larson, R.; Cole, P.; Muir, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the mortality experience of workers from the styrene-butadiene rubber industry. Concerns about a possible association of 1,3-butadiene and styrene with lymphohaematopoietic, gastrointestinal, and lung cancers prompted the investigation. METHODS: A retrospective follow up study was conducted of 15,649 men employed for at least one year at any of eight North American styrene-butadiene rubber plants. Analyses used standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) to compare styrene-butadiene rubber workers' cause specific mortalities (1943-91) with those of the United States and Ontario general populations. RESULTS: On average, there were 25 years of follow up per subject. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 87 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 85 to 90) for all causes of death combined and was 93 (95% CI 87 to 99) for all cancers. There was an excess of leukaemia (SMR 131, 95% CI 97 to 174), restricted to hourly workers (SMR 143, 95% CI 104 to 191). For causes of death other than leukaemia, SMRs were close to or below the null value of 100. Results by work area (process group) were unremarkable for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and stomach cancer. Maintenance workers had a slight increase in deaths from lung cancer, and certain subgroups of workers had more than expected deaths from cancer of the large intestine and the larynx. CONCLUSION: This study found an excess of leukaemia that is likely to be due to exposure to butadiene or to butadiene plus other chemicals. Deaths from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and stomach cancer did not seem to be related to occupational exposure. The excess deaths from lung cancer among maintenance workers may be due in part to confounding by smoking, which was not controlled for, and in part to an unidentified occupational exposure other than butadiene or styrene. Increases in cancer of the large intestine and larynx were based on small numbers, did not seem to be due to exposure to

  10. Effect of Applied Potential on the Electrochemical Deposition of Styrene-Butadiene Co-Polymer Based Conducting Polymer Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Anisha Mary; Neena, P.

    2011-10-01

    Homogeneous conducting polymer composite films with improved electrical properties are synthesized via electrochemical polymerization of polyaniline on Styrene butadiene rubber coated steel electrode. The electrochemical polymerization is carried out by potentiostatic method using an aqueous solution of 0.2 M aniline and 1.5 M sulphuric acid as electrolyte in a single compartment electrochemical cell. The optical studies show successful incorporation of polyaniline into the matrix polymer film. The effect of applied potential on the electrodeposition of composite is studied by cyclic voltammetry and by impedance spectroscopic measurements.

  11. Structure of the interfacial layer in blends of elastomers with different polarities and ozone resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livanova, N. M.; Popov, A. A.; Shershnev, V. A.; Zaikov, G. E.

    2014-05-01

    The effects of isomers of butadiene units, the ratio of comonomers in ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymers, and the degree of isotacticity of propylene units on the intensity of interfacial interaction in blends and ozone resistence of covulcanisates with butadiene-nitrile rubbers have been analyzed.

  12. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  13. Alkyl amides and nitriles as novel tracers for biomass burning.

    PubMed

    Rushdi, A I; bin Abas, M R; Didyk, B M

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of n-alkanoic acids, amides, and nitriles in samples of aerosol particulate matter from Kuala Lumpur and Santiago suggests that emissions from cooking and biomass burning are the primary sources of these organic markers in the atmosphere. It is proposed that fatty acids react with ammonia during biomass burning or combustion to produce amides and nitriles, which can be applied as useful biomarker tracers. To test this hypothesis, nonadecanoic acid and hexadecanamide were used as reactants in hydrous pyrolysis experiments. These experiments produced amides and nitriles and indicated that ammonia is an essential agent in their formation. Thus amides and nitriles are of utility as indicators for input from combustion and biomass burning in the ambient atmosphere.

  14. Mild palladium-catalyzed selective monoarylation of nitriles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingyun; Hartwig, John F

    2005-11-16

    Two new palladium-catalyzed procedures for the arylation of nitriles under less basic conditions than previously reported have been developed. The selective monoarylation of acetonitrile and primary nitriles has been achieved using alpha-silyl nitriles in the presence of ZnF2. This procedure is compatible with a variety of functional groups, including cyano, keto, nitro, and ester groups, on the aryl bromide. The arylation of secondary nitriles occurred in high yield by conducting reactions with zinc cyanoalkyl reagents. These reaction conditions tolerated base-sensitive functional groups, such as ketones and esters. The combination of these two methods, one with alpha-silyl nitriles and one with zinc cyanoalkyl reagents, provides a catalytic route to a variety of benzylic nitriles, which have not only biological significance but utility as synthetic intermediates. The utility of these new coupling reactions has been demonstrated by a synthesis of verapamil, a clinically used drug for the treatment of heart disease, by a three-step route from commercial materials that allows convenient variation of the aryl group.

  15. Mechanochemical modification of natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylov, I. A.; Sukhareva, K. V.; Andriasyan, Yu. O.; Popov, A. A.; Vorontsov, N. V.

    2016-11-01

    Thermomechanochemical changes of SVR 3L natural rubber after the treatment in the internal rubber mixer in the self-heating mode were studied. The effect of the molecular mass and content of the gel fraction of natural rubber is shown. Properties of rubber compounds and vulcanized rubber are presented. Taking into account modern requirements, a new alternative technology of obtaining halogenated elastomers based on the solid-phase (mechanochemical) halide modification is created. New halogen-containing natural rubber produced by this technology proves themselves in the conditions of rubber production. New fluorinated natural rubber produced by this technology proves themselves in the conditions of rubber production.

  16. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  17. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-12-07

    A process and resulting product are provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  18. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    DOE PAGES

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; ...

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrationsmore » respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport capability

  19. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport

  20. Rubberized asphalt emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, E.

    1986-09-02

    A method is described of making a rubberized asphalt composition which comprises the steps of: (a) combining asphalt with a hydrocarbon oil having a flash point of 300/sup 0/F. or more to provide a homogenous asphalt-oil mixture or solution, (b) then combining the asphalt-oil mixture with a particulate rubber at a temperature sufficient to provide a homogenous asphalt-rubber-oil gel, and (c) emulsifying the asphalt-rubber-oil gel by passing the gel, water, and an emulsifying agent through a colloid mill to provide an emulsion.

  1. Thermodynamics of Rubber Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicer, J.; Manzanares, J. A.; Zúñiga, J.; Utrillas, P.; Fernández, J.

    2001-02-01

    A thermodynamic study of an isotropic rubber band under uniaxial stress is presented on the basis of its equation of state. The behavior of the rubber band is compared with both that of an ideal elastomer and that of an ideal gas, considering the generalized Joule's law as the ideality criterion. First, the thermal expansion of rubber at constant stress and the change in the stress with temperature at constant length are described. Thermoelastic inversion is then considered, and the experimental observations are easily rationalized. Finally, the temperature changes observed in the adiabatic stretching of a rubber band are evaluated from the decrease of entropy with length.

  2. Rubber friction directional asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, A.; Dorogin, L.; Steenwyk, B.; Warhadpande, A.; Motamedi, M.; Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-12-01

    In rubber friction studies it is usually assumed that the friction force does not depend on the sliding direction, unless the substrate has anisotropic properties, like a steel surface grinded in one direction. Here we will present experimental results for rubber friction, where we observe a strong asymmetry between forward and backward sliding, where forward and backward refer to the run-in direction of the rubber block. The observed effect could be very important in tire applications, where directional properties of the rubber friction could be induced during braking.

  3. 29 CFR 1910.1051 - 1,3-Butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...,3-Butadiene. (a) Scope and application. (1) This section applies to all occupational exposures to 1... enter a regulated area. 1,3-Butadiene means an organic compound with chemical formula CH2=CH-CH=CH2 that... equipped with approved BD or organic vapor cartridges or canisters. Cartridges or canisters shall...

  4. Immediate reactions to rubber products.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, T; Wahl, R

    1992-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of contact urticaria (CU) and systemic reactions to rubber products. Thirty-one patients are presented: most were atopic (20/31) and women (26/31); 71% worked in the medical field; 32.2% (10/31) showed signs of hand dermatitis. In 28 patients (90.3%), rub and/or prick tests with liquid latex in different dilutions and with latex gloves led to an immediate type of positive reaction. The allergen(s) appear in part to be water soluble: 20 of 28 patients (71.4%) revealed positive test reactions to an aqueous glove extract. In two patients, urticarial test reactions to tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD), mercapto mix, and p-phenylenediamine (PPD mix) were considered as possible contributing factors of CU. Cornstarch was negative in all patients (scratch). Sixteen of 27 sera (59.2%) showed radioallergosorbent (RAST) class 0 using latex allergen disks. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacoyl-amide (SDS-PAGE) determined protein bands of less than or equal to 14 kD (not allergen specific) and approx 28 kD. The Western blot detected the 28 kD protein as allergen in the sera of three patients. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) proved no protein bands. Immunoprinting performed with sera of five patients presented allergen bands in a pH range between 3.8 and 4.55. This shows the radio staining (immunoprint) is more sensitive than is the Coomassie blue staining. Although three sera showed RAST class 0, immunoblotting detected allergen bands. In this case the immunoblot appears to be more sensitive than the RAST. A cross reactivity between latex and banana could not be established. Alternative gloves are Neolon (neoprene) or Elastyren (styrene-butadiene polymer).

  5. Nitrile Bonds as Infrared Probes of Electrostatics in Ribonuclease S

    PubMed Central

    Fafarman, Aaron; Boxer, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Three different nitrile-containing amino acids, para-cyanophenylalanine, meta-cyanophenylalanine and S-cyano homocysteine, have been introduced near the active site of the semi-synthetic enzyme Ribonuclease S (RNase S) to serve as probes of electrostatic fields. Vibrational Stark spectra, measured directly on the probe-modified proteins, confirm the predominance of the linear Stark tuning rate in describing the sensitivity of the nitrile stretch to external electric fields, a necessary property for interpreting observed frequency shifts as a quantitative measure of local electric fields that can be compared with simulations. The X-ray structures of these nitrile-modified RNase variants and enzymatic assays demonstrate minimal perturbation to the structure and function, respectively, by the probes and provide a context for understanding the influence of the environment on the nitrile stretching frequency. We examine the ability of simulation techniques to recapitulate the spectroscopic properties of these nitriles as a means to directly test a computational electrostatic model for proteins, specifically that in the ubiquitous Amber ′99 force field. Although qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is observed for the largest shifts, substantial discrepancies are observed in some cases, highlighting the ongoing need for experimental metrics to inform the development of theoretical models of electrostatic fields in proteins. PMID:20883003

  6. Gas Phase Raman Spectra of Butadiene and BUTADIENE-d_{6} and the Internal Rotation Potential Energy Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar; Laane, Jaan; Craig, Norman C.

    2009-06-01

    The Raman spectrum of butadiene has been previously reported by Carreira and by Engeln and co-workers. Both studies reported a series of bands corresponding to double quantum jumps of ν_{13}, the internal rotation vibration, of the trans rotamer. Both studies also reported weaker bands assigned to the higher energy conformer. Carriera assigned these to the cis form while Engeln assigned them to the gauche form. Recent high level calculations by Feller and Craig also assign the higher energy form as gauche. In the present study we report the gas phase Raman spectrum of butadiene and its d_{6} isotopomer at both 25^°C and 260^°C. Several new spectral features in the 330 to 210 cm^{-1} region were observed and the effect of heating on the band intensities was studied. In addition, combination bands were observed in the 630 to 690 cm^{-1} (ν_{12} + ν_{13}) and 1130 to 1180 cm^{-1} (ν_{10} + ν_{13}) regions. A periodic potential energy function with V_{1}, V_{2}, V_{3}, V_{4}, and V_{6} terms was utilized to fit the data. This function was compared to the results from previous work and to the theoretical calculation. L. Carreira, J. Phys. Chem. 62, 3851 (1975). R. Engeln, D. Consalvo, and J. Reuss, J. Chem. Phys. 160, 427 (1992). D. Feller and N. C. Craig, J. Phys. Chem. 113, 1601 (2009).

  7. Polybutadiene (Jumping Rubber)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    This laboratory procedure starts with a violet suspension of an 'alfin' catalyst being added to a bottle containing a solution of 1,3-butadiene in pentane. The bottle is corked and shaken for several seconds. The mixture sets to a gel, and within 2 minutes the contents erupt from the bottle.

  8. Rubber Band Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowens, John

    2005-01-01

    Not only are rubber bands great for binding objects together, but they can be used in a simple science experiment that involves predicting, problem solving, measuring, graphing, and experimenting. In this article, the author describes how rubber bands can be used to teach the force of mass.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopic Study on Structural Change and Interfacial Interaction in Rubber Composites Filled with Silica-Kaolin Hybrid Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Guan, J.; Hu, H.; Gao, H.; Zhang, L.

    2016-07-01

    A series of natural rubber/styrene butadiene rubber/polybutadiene rubber composites was prepared with nanometer silica and micron kaolin by a dry modification process, mechanical compounding, and mold vulcanization. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the structural changes and interfacial interactions in composites. The results showed that the "seesaw" structure was formed particularly with the incorporation of silica particles in the preparation process, which would be beneficial to the dispersibility of fillers in the rubber matrix. The kaolinite platelets were generally arranged in directional alignment. Kaolinite with smaller particle size and low-defect structure was more stable in preparation, but kaolinite with larger particle size and high defect structure tended to change the crystal structure. The composite prepared in this research exhibited excellent mechanical and thermal properties.

  10. Natural rubber biosynthesis in plants: rubber transferase.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Katrina; Xie, Wenshuang

    2012-01-01

    Rubber biosynthesis in plants is a fascinating biochemical system, which evolved at the dawn of the dicotyledoneae and is present in at least four of the dictolydonous superorders. Rubber biosynthesis is catalyzed by a membrane complex in a monolayer membrane envelope, requires two distinct substrates and a divalent cation cofactor, and produces a high-molecular-weight isoprenoid polymer. A solid understanding of this system underpins valuable papers in the literature. However, the published literature is rife with unreliable reports in which the investigators have fallen into traps created by the current incomplete understanding of the biochemistry of rubber synthesis. In this chapter, we attempt to guide both new and more established researchers around these pitfalls.

  11. Exposure of a Nitrile Rubber to Fuels of Varying Aromatics Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    degraded tensile properties to a greater extent than did exposure to either fuel alone for the same total period of time.. RESUME Un caoutchouc ...pros les mimes effets sur les caractiristiques 6lastiques que les aromatiques monocycliques. Le fait de placer le caoutchouc alternativement dans deux

  12. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric... acetonitrile at 25 °C is not less than 0.29 deciliter per gram as determined by ASTM method D1243-79, “Standard Test Method for Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated...

  17. Equipment for shredding rubber scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhkov, V.F.; Golikov, V.N.; Kurglov, V.I.; Cherepkova, R.V.

    1987-07-01

    The authors describe a range of machines developed for shredding rubber scrap and discarded rubber articles into crumbs. Technical characteristics of the machine for shredding vulcanized pressed-rubber parts, used rubber articles and scrap from the shoe industry are presented. A machine for shredding rubber scrap from plants making rubber products and from the shoe industry is shown, as is one for producing rubber crumbs from the scrap during the roughing of tires. Another machine is examined which cuts tires with metallic cords.

  18. Ericameria Nauseosa (rubber rabbitbrush): a complementary rubber feedstock to augment the guayule rubber production stream

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ericameria nauseosa (rubber rabbitbrush) is a highly prolific desert shrub that produces high quality natural rubber. Over the past several years we have investigated rabbitbrush’s potential as a commercial rubber feedstock. Like guayule, rabbitbrush produces natural rubber within its bark tissues a...

  19. Fluorescent nitrile-based inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Frizler, Maxim; Mertens, Matthias D; Gütschow, Michael

    2012-12-15

    Cysteine cathepsins play an important role in many (patho)physiological conditions. Among them, cathepsins L, S, K and B are subjects of several drug discovery programs. Besides their role as drug targets, cysteine cathepsins are additionally considered to be possible biomarkers for inflammation and cancer. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, biological evaluation and spectral properties of fluorescently labeled dipeptide- and azadipeptide nitriles.

  20. Stereoselective Synthesis of Spirooxindole Amides through Nitrile Hydrozirconation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chunliang; Xiao, Qing; Floreancig, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Spirooxindole amides can be prepared by the intramolecular addition of functionalized indoles into acyliminium ions that are accessed from nitriles by hydrozirconation and acylation. The stereochemical outcome at the quaternary center was controlled by the steric bulk of the substituent at the 2-position of the indole unit. The products are well-suited for diversification to prepare libraries. PMID:20961073

  1. 40 CFR 721.5350 - Substituted nitrile (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5350 Substituted nitrile (generic name). Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34638, June 18, 2014. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The...

  2. Identification of novel plasmin inhibitors possessing nitrile moiety as warhead.

    PubMed

    Teno, Naoki; Gohda, Keigo; Wanaka, Keiko; Sueda, Takuya; Tsuda, Yuko

    2011-11-01

    Lysine-nitrile derivatives having a trisubstituted benzene, which belongs to a new chemical class, were prepared and tested for inhibitory activities against plasmin and the highly homologous plasma kallikrein and urokinase. The use of the novel chemotype in the development of plasmin inhibitors has been demonstrated by derivatives of compound 9.

  3. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the properties of natural rubber (NR)/styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manshaie, R.; Nouri Khorasani, S.; Jahanbani Veshare, S.; Rezaei Abadchi, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, physico-mechanical properties of NR/SBR blends cured by electron beam irradiation and sulfur were compared. The NR/SBR blends were prepared using a two-roll mill. Electron beam irradiations of 100-400 kGy were applied to cure the blends and changes in physico-mechanical properties were studied as a function of irradiation. Also, oil resistance and the effect of thermal ageing on mechanical properties of the blends were investigated. The results show that the irradiated blends have better mechanical properties than those cured by sulfur system. The irradiation cured samples also exhibited better heat stability than the sulfur cured samples. The blend cured by the highest dose shows the lowest swelling and high oil resistance compared with the other samples cured by irradiation.

  4. Rubberized, Brominated Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W.; Kourtides, D.; Parker, J.; Nir, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composite materials made with resins containing bromine and rubber additives. New composites tougher and more resistant to fire. Flame resistance increased by introducing bromine via commercial brominated flame-retartant polymeric additives.

  5. Runaway Rubber Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    16, No. 1, Jan 1944, pp. 53-68. 4. Moore, D.F., The Friction of Pneumatic Tyres , Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Amsterdam, The Netherlands...timing of rubber removal are addressed. i’ ’ - " " - . 1.3 The Method of Research. A literature review first investigates the history , mechanics...mechanics of tire-pavement friction are fundamental to any study of the runway rubber process. In this section the history and two main components of

  6. Microwave treatment of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Schulz, Rebecca L.; Clark, David E.; Folz, Diane C.

    2002-07-16

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a vulcanized solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has select chemical bonds broken by microwave radiation. The direct application of microwaves in combination with uniform heating of the crumb rubber renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger particle sizes and/or loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures to produce recycled composite products with good properties.

  7. Evaluation of genotoxicity of nitrile fragrance ingredients using in vitro and in vivo assays.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S P; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-09-01

    Genotoxicity studies were conducted on a group of 8 fragrance ingredients that belong to the nitrile family. These nitriles are widely used in consumer products however there is very limited data in the literature regarding the genotoxicity of these nitriles. The 8 nitriles were assessed for genotoxicity using an Ames test, in vitro chromosome aberration test or in vitro micronucleus test. The positive results observed in the in vitro tests were further investigated using an in vivo micronucleus test. The results from these different tests were compared and these 8 nitriles are not considered to be genotoxic. Dodecanitrile and 2,2,3-trimethylcyclopent-3-enylacetonitrile were negative in the in vitro chromosome aberration test and in vitro micronucleus test, respectively. While citronellyl nitrile, 3-methyl-5-phenylpentanenitrile, cinnamyl nitrile, and 3-methyl-5-phenylpent-2-enenitrile revealed positive results in the in vitro tests, but confirmatory in vivo tests determined these nitriles to be negative in the in vivo micronucleus assay. The remaining two nitriles (benzonitrile and α-cyclohexylidene benzeneacetonitrile) were negative in the in vivo micronucleus test. This study aims to evaluate the genotoxicity potential of these nitriles as well as enrich the literature with genotoxicity data on fragrance ingredients.

  8. Nitrile/Buna N Material Failure Assessment for an O-Ring used on the Gaseous Hydrogen Flow Control Valve (FCV) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Doug

    2006-01-01

    After the rollout of Space Shuttle Discovery in April 2005 in preparation for return-to-flight, there was a failure of the Orbiter (OV-103) helium signature leak test in the gaseous hydrogen (GH2) system. Leakage was attributed to the Flow Control Valve (FCV) in Main Engine 3. The FCV determined to be the source of the leak for OV-103 is designated as LV-58. The nitrile/Buna N rubber O-ring seal was removed from LV-58, and failure analysis indicated radial cracks providing leak paths in one quadrant. Cracks were eventually found in 6 of 9 FCV O-rings among the three Shuttle Orbiters, though none were as severe as those for LV-58, OV-103. Testing by EM10 at MSFC on all 9 FCV O- rings included: laser dimensional, Shore A hardness and properties from a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and an Instron tensile machine. The following test data was obtained on the cracked quadrant of the LV-58, OV-103 O-ring: (1) the estimated compression set was only 9.5%, compared to none for the rest of the O-ring; (2) Shore A hardness for the O.D. was higher by almost 4 durometer points than for the rest of the O-ring; and (3) DMA data showed that the storage/elastic modulus E was almost 25% lower than for the rest of the O-ring. Of the 8 FCV O-rings tested on an Instron, 4 yielded tensile strengths that were below the MIL spec requirement of 1350 psi-a likely influence of rubber cracking. Comparisons were made between values of modulus determined by DNA (elastic) and Instron (Young s). Each nitrile/Buna N O-ring used in the FCV conforms to the MIL-P-25732C specification. A number of such O-rings taken from shelf storage at MSFC and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) were used to generate a reference curve of DMA glass transition temperature (Tg) vs. shelf storage time ranging from 8 to 26 years. A similar reference curve of TGA onset temperature (of rubber weight loss) vs. shelf storage time was also generated. The DMA and TGA data for the used FCV O-rings were compared to the reference

  9. Reactivity of sulfide-containing silane toward boehmite and in situ modified rubber/boehmite composites by the silane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tengfei; Zhu, Lixin; Chen, Weiwei; Wu, Siwu; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2013-09-01

    The silanization reaction between boehmite (BM) nanoplatelets and bis-[3-(triethoxysilyl)-propyl]-tetrasulfide (TESPT) was characterized in detail. Via such modification process, the grafted sulfide moieties on the BM endow reactivity toward rubber and substantially improved hydrophobicity for BM. Accordingly, TESPT was employed as in situ modifier for the nitrile rubber (NBR)/BM compounds to improve the mechanical properties of the reinforced vulcanizates. The effects of BM content and in situ modification on the mechanical properties, curing characteristics and morphology were investigated. BM was found to be effective in improving the mechanical performance of NBR vulcanizates. The NBR/BM composites could be further strengthened by the incorporation of TESPT. The interfacial adhesion of NBR/BM composites was obviously improved by the addition of TESPT. The substantially improved mechanical performance was correlated to the interfacial reaction and the improved dispersion of BM in rubber matrix.

  10. Nitrile functionalized halloysite nanotubes/poly(arylene ether nitrile) nanocomposites: Interface control, characterization, and improved properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xinyi; Zhan, Yingqing; Zeng, Guangyong; He, Yi

    2017-01-01

    To develop high-performance halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based nanocomposites, the two key issues need to be considered: precise interface control and the dispersal of HNTs. This study presents an efficient way to functionalize halloysite nanotubes with 3-aminophenoxy-phthalonitrile, followed by compounding with poly(arylene ether nitrile) (PEN), to prepare functional nanocomposite films. The surface functionalization of HNTs was characterized and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared with neat PEN, the tensile strength and modulus of the resulting PEN nanocomposites with 3 wt% functionalized HNTs were found to increase by 25.7% and 20.7%, respectively. The good dispersion and high capacitance of the dielectric layer resulted in PEN/HNTs nancomposites with enhanced dielectric permittivity and relatively low dielectric loss. Moreover, the addition of functional HNTs greatly improved the thermal stability of PEN, which could be further enhanced through the chemical cross-linking reaction between the functional HNTs and the PEN matrix. This work provides a new path toward obtaining advanced polymer-based nanocomposites with functional properties.

  11. Occupational exposure of workers to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Fajen, J M; Roberts, D R; Ungers, L J; Krishnan, E R

    1990-01-01

    Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an extent-of-exposure study of the 1,3-butadiene monomer, polymer, and end-user industries to determine the size of the exposed workforce, evaluate control technologies and personal protective equipment programs, and assess occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene. A new analytical method was developed for 1,3-butadiene that increased the sensitivity and selectivity of the previous NIOSH method. The new method is sensitive to 0.2 microgram per 1,3-butadiene sample. Walk-through surveys were conducted in 11 monomer, 17 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. In-depth industrial hygiene surveys were conducted at 4 monomer, 5 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. Airborne exposure concentrations of 1,3-butadiene were determined using personal sampling for each job category. A total of 692 full shift and short-term personnel and 259 area air samples were examined for the presence of 1,3-butadiene. Sample results indicated that all worker exposures were well below the current OSHA PEL of 1000 ppm. Exposures ranged from less than 0.006 ppm to 374 ppm. The average exposure for all samples was less than 2 ppm. The present American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value for 1,3-butadiene is 10 ppm. To reduce the potential for occupational exposure, it is recommended that quality control sampling be conducted using a closed loop system. Also all process pumps should be retrofitted with dual mechanical seals, magnetic gauges should be used in loading and unloading rail cars, and engineering controls should be designed for safely voiding quality control cylinders. PMID:2401251

  12. Occupational exposure of workers to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Fajen, J M; Roberts, D R; Ungers, L J; Krishnan, E R

    1990-06-01

    Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an extent-of-exposure study of the 1,3-butadiene monomer, polymer, and end-user industries to determine the size of the exposed workforce, evaluate control technologies and personal protective equipment programs, and assess occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene. A new analytical method was developed for 1,3-butadiene that increased the sensitivity and selectivity of the previous NIOSH method. The new method is sensitive to 0.2 microgram per 1,3-butadiene sample. Walk-through surveys were conducted in 11 monomer, 17 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. In-depth industrial hygiene surveys were conducted at 4 monomer, 5 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. Airborne exposure concentrations of 1,3-butadiene were determined using personal sampling for each job category. A total of 692 full shift and short-term personnel and 259 area air samples were examined for the presence of 1,3-butadiene. Sample results indicated that all worker exposures were well below the current OSHA PEL of 1000 ppm. Exposures ranged from less than 0.006 ppm to 374 ppm. The average exposure for all samples was less than 2 ppm. The present American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value for 1,3-butadiene is 10 ppm. To reduce the potential for occupational exposure, it is recommended that quality control sampling be conducted using a closed loop system. Also all process pumps should be retrofitted with dual mechanical seals, magnetic gauges should be used in loading and unloading rail cars, and engineering controls should be designed for safely voiding quality control cylinders.

  13. Dermatitis in rubber manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    White, I.R.

    1988-01-01

    This review describes the history of rubber technology and the manufacturing techniques used in rubber manufacturing industries. The important aspects of the acquisition of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis within the industry are presented for the reader.

  14. Performance evaluation of CFRP-rubber shock absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lamanna, Giuseppe Sepe, Raffaele

    2014-05-15

    In the present work a numerical investigation on the energy absorbing capability of dedicated structural components made of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer and an emulsion polymerised styrene butadiene rubber is reported. The shock absorbers are devices designed to absorb large amounts of energy by sacrificing their own structural integrity. Their aim is to cushion the effects of an impact phenomenon with the intent to preserve other structures from global failure or local damaging. Another important role of shock absorbers is reducing the peak of the acceleration showed during an impact phenomenon. This effect is of considerable interest in the case of vehicles to preserve passengers’ safety. Static and dynamic numerical results are compared with experimental ones in terms of mean crushing forces, energy and peak crushing. The global performance of the absorbers has been evaluated by referencing to a proposed quality index.

  15. Performance evaluation of CFRP-rubber shock absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Sepe, Raffaele

    2014-05-01

    In the present work a numerical investigation on the energy absorbing capability of dedicated structural components made of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer and an emulsion polymerised styrene butadiene rubber is reported. The shock absorbers are devices designed to absorb large amounts of energy by sacrificing their own structural integrity. Their aim is to cushion the effects of an impact phenomenon with the intent to preserve other structures from global failure or local damaging. Another important role of shock absorbers is reducing the peak of the acceleration showed during an impact phenomenon. This effect is of considerable interest in the case of vehicles to preserve passengers' safety. Static and dynamic numerical results are compared with experimental ones in terms of mean crushing forces, energy and peak crushing. The global performance of the absorbers has been evaluated by referencing to a proposed quality index.

  16. Extrudate characteristics and morphology of styrene butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasree, T. K.; Manuvel, Jayan

    2013-06-01

    When HDPE is added to SBR, the melt elasticity of the system gets reduced. The morphology of the extrudates of the blends has been found to be dependent on the shear rate. Dynamic crosslinking with DCP has been improved the processability of SBR/HDPE blends by reducing the melt elasticity of the system considerably.

  17. Ultrasonic studies on polystyrene/styrene butadiene rubber polymer blends filled with glass fiber and talc.

    PubMed

    Higazy, A A; Afifi, H; Khafagy, A H; El-Shahawy, M A; Mansour, A M

    2006-12-22

    The compatibility of solid blends: PS/SBR, PS/SBR filled with glass fiber and PS/SBR filled with talc were studied using ultrasonic pulse echo technique. Measurements were carried out at room temperature (298 K) and a frequency of 3 MHz. The ultrasonic velocity for the compressional wave and that for shear wave have been measured to obtain the elastic moduli data by knowing of density. The variation of ultrasonic wave velocities and elastic moduli with weight percent of the blend was found to be linear in PS/SBR blend, indicating some degree of compatibility but the drawback of elastic moduli indicate incompatibility of the system blend, while it deviates from linearity in blends of PS/SBR filled with glass fiber and talc but the increase in elastic moduli indicates that there is an increase in degree of compatibility between PS and SBR due to adding of glass fiber or talc. The ultrasonic absorptions for longitudinal wave in the temperature range from 298 to 423 K in the studied system were measured using ultrasonic pulse echo technique. Typical results showing the temperature dependence of the ultrasonic absorption at frequencies of 1, 2, 3 and 5 MHz are illustrated for all samples of the different compositions. The study of compositional and temperature dependence of the ultrasonic absorption in the present studied blends reveals the same behavior of the compatibility degree of the blends. Density data of the blends confirmed the ultrasonic results. Also the correlation between hardness and elastic moduli for the present blend systems has been studied.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Vulcanized Rubbers and Thermoplastic Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Toki,S.; Hsiao, B.; Kohjiya, S.; Tosaka, M.; Tosaka, A.; Tsou, A.; Datta, S.

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique has revealed strain-induced crystallization and molecular orientation in vulcanized rubbers and thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) during deformation in real time. The stress-strain curves and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns in vulcanized rubbers and TPE were measured simultaneously. In-situ WAXD patterns were taken not only at different strains during uniaxial deformation but also at different temperatures at a constant strain. Results lead to several new insights. (i) Strain-induced crystallization is a common phenomenon in vulcanized rubbers, except SBR (styrene-butadiene rubber), and in TPE (with crystalline hard segments). (ii) Strain-induced crystallization decreases the stress and increases the elongation in the strained rubber. (iii) The hybrid structure of chemical networks and strain-induced crystallites is responsible to the tensile strength and elongation at break for both systems. (iiii) Some original crystal fraction (hard segment domain) in TPE is destroyed. During deformation, strain-induced crystallization increases with strain. Upon retraction even to stress zero, the majority of oriented strain-induced crystallites remains in tack with preferred orientation.

  19. Impact properties of rubber-modified epoxy resin-graphite-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Nir, Z.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the impact resistance of graphite-fiber composites, a commercial and an experimental epoxy resin were modified with liquid reactive rubber and a brominated epoxy resin. The commercial epoxy was a tetrafunctional resin, and the experimental epoxy was a trifunctional resin. The reactive rubber was a carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer. The rubber content was varied from 0 to 25 percent (wt). The brominated epoxy resin was used at Br levels of 4, 19, and 35 percent of the resin. Composites were prepared with woven graphite cloth reinforcement. The composites were evaluated by using flexural strength in the dry state and an elevated temperature after saturation with water. The impact properties were determined by measuring shear strength after falling-ball impact and instrumented impact. The rubber-modified, trifunctional resin exhibited better properties, when tested in hot-wet conditions in a heated oven at 366 K (after boiling the material for 2 h in demineralized water), than the tetrafunctional resin. Improved impact resistance was observed with the addition of the reactive rubber to the epoxy resin. Further improvement was observed with the addition of the brominated epoxy resin.

  20. Heterogeneity in styrene-butadiene latex films.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliane P; Corpart, Pascale; Wong, Kenneth; Galembeck, Fernando

    2004-11-23

    Low-Tg styrene-butadiene (SB) latex films were investigated by noncontact atomic force microscopy and scanning electric potential microscopy, revealing a number of different morphologies and electric potential patterns across films cast from the same SB latex dispersions under the same conditions. Surface leveling and charge dispersion throughout the films are, thus, restrained even at temperatures above Tg and the minimum film-formation temperature. An unprecedented electric pattern is observed, in which the particle cores are more positive than the contacting particle outer layers. Different packing patterns, including cubic and hexagonal arrays, coexist in neighboring areas. Zonal centrifugation of the SB latex in sucrose density gradient shows that particles cover a broad range of densities. Thus, film surface heterogeneity is at least partly due to particle heterogeneity. Fractal dimensions of topographic profiles are lower than those of the electric potential profiles, showing that charge mobility is much more restrained than polymer chain motion at the film surface and that it imposes a limit to the charged chain-ends motion.

  1. Laboratory Evaluation of Nitrile Fuel Tank Materials (Phase 2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    control number . PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) September 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES...COVERED (From - To) October 2011–March 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laboratory Evaluation of Nitrile Fuel Tank Materials (Phase II) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ...5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) James M. Sloan, David Flanagan, Daniel DeSchepper, Paul Touchet,* and Henry Feuer† 5d

  2. Dipeptide-derived nitriles containing additional electrophilic sites: potentially irreversible inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Löser, Reik; Gütschow, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Heterocyclic and open-chain dipeptide-derived nitriles have been synthesized, containing an additional electrophilic center enabling the subsequent covalent modification of the thioimidate nitrogen formed in situ at the active site of the enzyme. The inhibitory potential of these nitriles against the cysteine proteases papain and cathepsins L, S, and K was determined. The open-chain dipeptide nitriles 8 and 10 acted as moderate reversible inhibitors, but no evidence for an irreversible inhibition of these enzymes was discernable.

  3. Biodesulfurization of rubber materials

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E. ); Raghavan, D. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in municipal waste treatment is the recycling of polymeric waste materials. The present study has demonstrated the applicability of biotechnological principles in the desulfurization of rubber using shake flask and Warburg respirometric techniques. In terms of oxygen uptake and specific rate of oxygen uptake, it was found that the mixed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans was more efficient in this process than the individual pure cultures of these bacteria. Furthermore, the mixed cultures resulted in ten times higher sulfur removals from rubber relative to those of sterile controls. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of biodesulfurization of rubber. It is expected that the development of this process may provide a solution to recycling of car tire materials. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Health Assessment Document for 1,3-Butadiene (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This risk assessment of 1,3-butadiene, a gas used commercially in the production of various resins and plastics, concludes that 1,3-butadiene is a known human carcinogen, based on three types of evidence: 1) excess leukemias in workers occupationally exposed to 1,3-butadiene (by ...

  5. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  6. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  10. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Measurement methods for benzene and 1... Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene. (a) Sampling for benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be... 86.109. (b) Benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be analyzed by gas chromatography. Expected values...

  11. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Measurement methods for benzene and 1... Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene. (a) Sampling for benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be... 86.109. (b) Benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be analyzed by gas chromatography. Expected values...

  12. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Measurement methods for benzene and 1... Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene. (a) Sampling for benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be... 86.109. (b) Benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be analyzed by gas chromatography. Expected values...

  13. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Measurement methods for benzene and 1... Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene. (a) Sampling for benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be... 86.109. (b) Benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be analyzed by gas chromatography. Expected values...

  14. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement methods for benzene and 1... Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene. (a) Sampling for benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be... 86.109. (b) Benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be analyzed by gas chromatography. Expected values...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  19. Recycling rubber products sensibly

    SciTech Connect

    Fesus, E.M.; Eggleton, R.W.

    1991-03-01

    This article examines processes for surface treating ground rubber from tires and other sources to enhance its ability to chemically bond with an uncured elastomer matrix during vulcanization. The topics discussed are environmental effects, processing and physical and chemical properties, mesh size, compounding, loading study, mineral fillers, and applications.

  20. Reinforcement of SBR/waste rubber powder vulcanizate with in situ generated zinc dimethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. P.; Cheng, B. K.; Zhang, X.; Jia, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    Methyl acrylic acid/zinc oxide (MAA/ZnO) was introduced to modify styrene- butadiene rubber/waste rubber powder (SBR/WRP) composites by blending. The enhanced mechanical properties and processing ability were presumably originated from improved compatibility and interfacial interaction between WRP and the SBR matrix by the in situ polymerization of zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA). A refined interface of the modified SBR/WRP composite was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The formation of ZDMA significantly increased the ionic bond content in the vulcanizate, resulting in exceptional mechanical performance. The comprehensive mechanical properties including tensile strength, tear strength and dynamic heat-building performance reached optimum values with 16 phr MAA.

  1. Biological monitoring to determine worker dose in a butadiene processing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Hayes, R.B.

    1995-12-01

    Butadiene (BD) is a reactive gas used extensively in the rubber industry and is also found in combustion products. Although BD is genotoxic and acts as an animal carcinogen, the evidence for carcinogenicity in humans is limited. Extrapolation from animal studies on BD carcinogenicity to risk in humans has been controversial because of uncertainties regarding relative biologic exposure and related effects in humans vs. experimental animals. To reduce this uncertainty, a study was designed to characterize exposure to BD at a polymer production facility and to relate this exposure to mutational and cytogenetic effects. Biological monitoring was used to better assess the internal dose of BD received by the workers. Measurement of 1,2-dihydroxy-4-(N-acetylcysteinyl) butane (M1) in urine served as the biomarker in this study. M1 has been shown to correlate with area monitoring in previous studies. Most studies that relate exposure to a toxic chemical with its biological effects rely on exposure concentration as the dose metric; however, exposure concentration may or may not reflect the actual internal dose of the chemical.

  2. Comparison of the biotransformation of 1,3-butadiene and its metabolite, butadiene monoepoxide, by hepatic and pulmonary tissues from humans, rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Csanády, G A; Guengerich, F P; Bond, J A

    1992-07-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a widely used monomer in the production of synthetic rubber and other resins, is one of the 189 hazardous air pollutants identified in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. BD induces tumors at multiple organ sites in B6C3F1 mice and Sprague-Dawley rats; mice are much more susceptible to the carcinogenic action of BD than are rats. Previous in vivo studies have indicated higher circulating blood levels of butadiene monoepoxide (BMO), a potential carcinogenic metabolite of BD, in mice compared to rats, suggesting that species differences in the metabolism of BD may be responsible for the observed differences in carcinogenic susceptibility. The metabolic fate of BD in humans is unknown. The objective of these studies was to quantitate in vitro species differences in the oxidation of BD and BMO by cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases and the inactivation of BMO by epoxide hydrolases and glutathione S-transferases using microsomal and cytosolic preparations of livers and lungs obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats, B6C3F1 mice and humans. Maximum rates for BD oxidation (Vmax) were highest for mouse liver microsomes (2.6 nmol/mg protein/min) compared to humans (1.2) and rats (0.6). The Vmax for BD oxidation by mouse lung microsomes was similar to that of mouse liver but greater than 10-fold higher than the Vmax for the reaction in human or rat lung microsomes. Correlation analysis revealed that P450 2E1 is the major P450 enzyme responsible for oxidation of BD to BMO. Only mouse liver microsomes displayed quantifiable rates for metabolism of BMO to butadiene diepoxide (Vmax = 0.2 nmol/mg protein/min), a known rodent carcinogen. Human liver microsomes displayed the highest rate of BMO hydrolysis by epoxide hydrolases. The Vmax in human liver microsomes ranged from 9 to 58 nmol/mg protein/min and was at least 2-fold higher than the Vmax observed in mouse and rat liver microsomes. The Vmax for glutathione S-transferase-catalyzed conjugation of BMO with

  3. Ruthenium on chitosan: A recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium has been immobilized over chitosan by simply stirring an aqueous suspension of chitosan in water with ruthenium chloride and has been utilized for the oxidation of nitriles to amides; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity, which procee...

  4. Selective Hydrogenation of Nitriles to Primary Amines by using a Cobalt Phosphine Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Adam, Rosa; Bheeter, Charles Beromeo; Cabrero-Antonino, Jose R; Junge, Kathrin; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2017-01-09

    A general procedure for the catalytic hydrogenation of nitriles to primary amines by using a non-noble metal-based system is presented. Co(acac)3 in combination with tris[2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]phosphine efficiently catalyzes the selective hydrogenation of a wide range of (hetero)aromatic and aliphatic nitriles to give the corresponding amines.

  5. Nitrile Hydratase and Amidase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous Hydrolyze Acrylic Fibers and Granular Polyacrylonitriles

    PubMed Central

    Tauber, M. M.; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Robra, K.-H.; Gübitz, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 11216 produced nitrile hydratase (320 nkat mg of protein−1) and amidase activity (38.4 nkat mg of protein−1) when grown on a medium containing propionitrile. These enzymes were able to hydrolyze nitrile groups of both granular polyacrylonitriles (PAN) and acrylic fibers. Nitrile groups of PAN40 (molecular mass, 40 kDa) and PAN190 (molecular mass, 190 kDa) were converted into the corresponding carbonic acids to 1.8 and 1.0%, respectively. In contrast, surfacial nitrile groups of acrylic fibers were only converted to the corresponding amides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 16% of the surfacial nitrile groups were hydrolyzed by the R. rhodochrous enzymes. Due to the enzymatic modification, the acrylic fibers became more hydrophilic and thus, adsorption of dyes was enhanced. This was indicated by a 15% increase in the staining level (K/S value) for C.I. Basic Blue 9. PMID:10742253

  6. Nitrile-converting enzymes: an eco-friendly tool for industrial biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, Pramod W; Maurice, Navodita G; Joseph, Babu; Wadher, Bharat J

    2013-01-01

    Nitriles are organic compounds bearing a − C ≡ N group; they are frequently known to occur naturally in both fauna and flora and are also synthesized chemically. They have wide applicability in the fields of medicine, industry, and environmental monitoring. However, the majority of nitrile compounds are considered to be lethal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic in nature and are known to cause potential health problems such as nausea, bronchial irritation, respiratory distress, convulsions, coma, and skeletal deformities in humans. Nitrile-converting enzymes, which are extracted from microorganisms, are commonly termed nitrilases and have drawn the attention of researchers all over the world to combat the toxicity of nitrile compounds. The present review focuses on the utility of nitrile-converting enzymes, sources, classification, structure, properties, and applications, as well as the future perspective on nitrilases.

  7. Nitrile glucosides and serotobenine from Campylospermum glaucum and Ouratea turnarea.

    PubMed

    Abouem à Zintchem, Auguste; Bikobo, Dominique Ngono; de Théodore Atchadé, Alex; Mbing, Joséphine Ngo; Gangoue-Pieboji, Joseph; Tih, Raphael Ghogomu; Blond, Alain; Pegnyemb, Dieudonné Emmanuel; Bodo, Bernard

    2008-08-01

    Two nitrile glucosides (1S,3S,4S,5R)-4-benzoyloxy-2-cyanomethylene-3,5-dihydroxycyclohexyl-1-O-beta-glucopyranoside (campyloside A) and (1S,3S,4S,5R)-5-benzoyloxy-2-cyanomethylene-3-hydroxy-4-(2-pyrrolcarboxyloxy)cyclohexyl-1-O-beta-glucopyranoside (campyloside B) were isolated from the stem roots of Campylospermum glaucum, whereas serotobenine was isolated from Ouratea turnarea. The structure elucidations were based on spectroscopic evidence. The biological assays of compounds and crude extract of plant species showed good antimicrobial activity of crude extracts against Gram-positive cocci.

  8. Nitrile crosslinked polyphenyl-quinoxaline/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were performed to reduce the 600 F thermoplasticity of polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) matrix resins by introducing crosslinking by the reaction of terminal nitrile groups. Seven solvents and solvent mixtures were studied as the crosslinking catalysts and used to fabricate crosslinked PPQ/HMS graphite fiber composites. The room temperature and 600 F composite mechanical properties after short time and prolonged 600 F air exposure and the 600 F composite weight loss were determined and compared to those properties of high molecular weight, linear PPQ/HMS graphite fiber composites.

  9. Cancer risk assessment of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Cote, I L; Bayard, S P

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) risk assessment of 1,3-butadiene. The assessment focuses on estimation of increased cancer risk to populations living near industrial sources of 1,3-butadiene emissions rather than occupationally exposed populations. Incremental cancer risk estimates based on extrapolation from laboratory animal data are presented. Pharmacokinetic data published since the EPA's 1985 assessment are incorporated, which somewhat alters the earlier assessment of cancer risk. Characterization of emission sources, estimates of ambient air concentrations, and population exposure are also discussed. The estimate presented in this paper of excess cancer cases resulting from point source exposure to 1,3-butadiene is decreased to approximately 40% of the estimate published in 1985 from 6.4 in 10 to 2.5 chances in 10 for a lifetime exposure to 1 ppm. The current estimate is no more than eight additional cancer incidences in the general population. Increased risk to the most exposed individuals is not anticipated to be greater than 1 in 10. This reduction in the risk estimate is due to a change in the estimate of 1,3-butadiene potency (i.e., incremental unit risk estimate) based on incorporation of new pharmacokinetic data. PMID:2205485

  10. Recycling tires? Reversible crosslinking of poly(butadiene).

    PubMed

    Trovatti, Eliane; Lacerda, Talita M; Carvalho, Antonio J F; Gandini, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Furan-modified poly(butadiene) prepared by the thiol-ene click reaction is crosslinked with bismaleimides through the Diels-Alder reaction, giving rise to a novel recyclable elastomer. This is possible because of the thermal reversibility of the adducts responsible for the formation of the network. The use of this strategy provides the possibility to produce recyclable tires.

  11. Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. 69 FR 61403 - Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-10-18

    ... COMMISSION Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... on polychloroprene rubber from Japan. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will...)) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping finding on polychloroprene rubber from Japan...

  15. Elastic instabilities in rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gent, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Materials that undergo large elastic deformations can exhibit novel instabilities. Several examples are described: development of an aneurysm on inflating a rubber tube; non-uniform stretching on inflating a spherical balloon; formation of internal cracks in rubber blocks at a critical level of triaxial tension or when supersaturated with a dissolved gas; surface wrinkling of a block at a critical amount of compression; debonding or fracture of constrained films on swelling, and formation of ``knots'' on twisting stretched cylindrical rods. These various deformations are analyzed in terms of a simple strain energy function, using Rivlin's theory of large elastic deformations, and the results are compared with experimental measurements of the onset of unstable states. Such comparisons provide new tests of Rivlin's theory and, at least in principle, critical tests of proposed strain energy functions for rubber. Moreover the onset of highly non-uniform deformations has serious implications for the fatigue life and fracture resistance of rubber components. [4pt] References: [0pt] R. S. Rivlin, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. Ser. A241 (1948) 379--397. [0pt] A. Mallock, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. 49 (1890--1891) 458--463. [0pt] M. A. Biot, ``Mechanics of Incremental Deformations'', Wiley, New York, 1965. [0pt] A. N. Gent and P. B. Lindley, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 249 (1958) 195--205. [0pt] A. N. Gent, W. J. Hung and M. F. Tse, Rubb. Chem. Technol. 74 (2001) 89--99. [0pt] A. N. Gent, Internatl. J. Non-Linear Mech. 40 (2005) 165--175.

  16. [Applications of nitrile converting enzymes in the production of fine chemicals].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuguo; Xue, Yaping; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Renchao; Shen, Yinchu

    2009-12-01

    Nitriles are an important type of synthetic intermediates in the production of fine chemicals because of their easy preparations and versatile transformations. The traditional chemical conversion of nitriles to carboxylic acids and amides is feasible but it requires relatively harsh conditions of heat, acid or alkali. Nitrile converting enzymes (nitrilase, nitrile hydratase and amidase) which are used as biocatalyst for the production of fine chemicals have attracted substantial interest because of their ability to convert readily available nitriles into the corresponding higher value amides or acids under mild conditions with excellent chemo-, regio- and stereo-selectivities. Many nitrile converting enzymes have been explored and widely used for the production of fine chemicals. In this paper, various examples of biocatalytic synthesis of pharmaceuticals and their intermediates, agrochemicals and their intermediates, food and feed additives, and other fine chemicals are presented. In the near future, an increasing number of novel nitrile converting enzymes will be screened and their potential in the production of useful fine chemicals will be further exploited.

  17. Cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of food-borne nitriles in a liver in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Kupke, Franziska; Herz, Corinna; Hanschen, Franziska S.; Platz, Stefanie; Odongo, Grace A.; Helmig, Simone; Bartolomé Rodríguez, María M.; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Lamy, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are the most intensively studied breakdown products of glucosinolates from Brassica plants and well recognized for their pleiotropic effects against cancer but also for their genotoxic potential. However, knowledge about the bioactivity of glucosinolate-borne nitriles in foods is very poor. As determined by GC-MS, broccoli glucosinolates mainly degrade to nitriles as breakdown products. The cytotoxicity of nitriles in human HepG2 cells and primary murine hepatocytes was marginal as compared to isothiocyanates. Toxicity of nitriles was not enhanced in CYP2E1-overexpressing HepG2 cells. In contrast, the genotoxic potential of nitriles was found to be comparable to isothiocyanates. DNA damage was persistent over a certain time period and CYP2E1-overexpression further increased the genotoxic potential of the nitriles. Based on actual in vitro data, no indications are given that food-borne nitriles could be relevant for cancer prevention, but could pose a certain genotoxic risk under conditions relevant for food consumption. PMID:27883018

  18. Friction characteristics of 20 x 4.4, type 7, aircraft tires constructed with different tread rubber compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.; Yager, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    A test program was conducted at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility to evaluate the friction characteristics of 20 x 4.4, type, aircraft tires constructed with experimental cut-resistant, tread rubber compounds. These compounds consisted of different blends of natural rubber (NR) and an alfin catalyzed styrene-butadiene copolymer rubber (SBR). One tire having a blend of 30 SBR and 70 NR and another having a blend of 60 SBR and 40 NR in the tread were tested together with a standard production tire with no SBR content in the tread rubber. The results of this investigation indicated that the test tires constructed with the special cut-resistant tread rubber compositions did not suffer any significant degradation in tire friction capability when compared with the standard tire. In general, tire friction capability decreased with increasing speed and surface wetness condition. As yaw angle increased, tire braking capability decreased while tire cornering capability increased. Tread-wear data based on number of brake cycles, however, suggested that the tires with alfin SBR blends experienced significantly greater wear than the standard production tire.

  19. Guayule rubber for South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-17

    It is reported that Agtec together with South Africa's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, is investigating the possibility of large-scale production of guayule. The rubber-yielding shrub grows in semi-arid climates and may be the source of a $35-million natural rubber industry in South Africa.

  20. Rubber composition compatible with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repar, J.

    1973-01-01

    Formulation improves compatibility of butyl rubbers with hydrazine while reducing permeation to low levels necessary for prolonged storage in space. This is accomplished by replacing carbon-black filler with inert materials such as hydrated silica or clay. Pressure increases suggest that hydrazine is decomposed only slightly by new type of rubber.

  1. An anomalous hydration/dehydration sequence for the mild generation of a nitrile oxide.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Nagatoshi; Kobiro, Kazuya; Kiyoto, Hideyuki; Hirao, Shotaro; Sawayama, Jun; Saigo, Kazuhiko; Okajima, Yoshikazu; Uehara, Toshiharu; Maki, Asaka; Ariga, Masahiro

    2011-04-21

    A nitrile oxide containing a carbamoyl group is readily generated upon the treatment of 2-methyl-4-nitro-3-isoxazolin-5(2H)-one with water under mild reaction conditions, even in the absence of special reagents. The obtained nitrile oxide undergoes cycloaddition with dipolarophiles, alkynes and alkenes, to afford the corresponding isoxazol(in)es, which are useful intermediates in the synthesis of polyfunctionalized compounds. A plausible mechanism underlying the formation of the nitrile oxide is proposed, which involves an anomalous hydration/dehydration sequence. DFT calculations were also performed to support this mechanism.

  2. Integrity of disposable nitrile exam gloves exposed to simulated movement.

    PubMed

    Phalen, Robert N; Wong, Weng Kee

    2011-05-01

    Every year, millions of health care, first responder, and industry workers are exposed to chemical and biological hazards. Disposable nitrile gloves are a common choice as both a chemical and physical barrier to these hazards, especially as an alternative to natural latex gloves. However, glove selection is complicated by the availability of several types or formulations of nitrile gloves, such as low-modulus, medical grade, low filler, and cleanroom products. This study evaluated the influence of simulated movement on the physical integrity (i.e., holes) of different nitrile exam glove brands and types. Thirty glove products were evaluated out-of-box and after exposure to simulated whole-glove movement for 2 hr. In lieu of the traditional 1 L water-leak test, a modified water-leak test, standardized to detect a 0.15 ± 0.05 mm hole in different regions of the glove, was developed. A specialized air inflation method simulated bidirectional stretching and whole-glove movement. A worst-case scenario with maximum stretching was evaluated. On average, movement did not have a significant effect on glove integrity (chi-square; p=0.068). The average effect was less than 1% between no movement (1.5%) and movement (2.1%) exposures. However, there was significant variability in glove integrity between different glove types (p≤0.05). Cleanroom gloves, on average, had the highest percentage of leaks, and 50% failed the water-leak test. Low-modulus and medical grade gloves had the lowest percentages of leaks, and no products failed the water-leak test. Variability in polymer formulation was suspected to account for the observed discrepancies, as well as the inability of the traditional 1 L water-leak test to detect holes in finger/thumb regions. Unexpectedly, greater than 80% of the glove defects were observed in the finger and thumb regions. It is recommended that existing water-leak tests be re-evaluated and standardized to account for product variability.

  3. Down-Regulation of Small Rubber Particle Protein Expression Affects Integrity of Rubber Particles and Rubber Content in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Andrea; Post, Janina J.; Wurbs, David; Wahler, Daniela; Lenders, Malte; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Prüfer, Dirk; Gronover, Christian Schulze

    2012-01-01

    The biosynthesis of rubber is thought to take place on the surface of rubber particles in laticifers, highly specialized cells that are present in more than 40 plant families. The small rubber particle protein (SRPP) has been supposed to be involved in rubber biosynthesis, and recently five SRPPs (TbSRPP1–5) were identified in the rubber-producing dandelion species Taraxacum brevicorniculatum. Here, we demonstrate by immunogold labeling that TbSRPPs are localized to rubber particles, and that rubber particles mainly consist of TbSRPP3, 4 and 5 as shown by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis. We also carried out an RNA-interference approach in transgenic plants to address the function of TbSRPPs in rubber biosynthesis as well as rubber particle morphology and stability. TbSRPP-RNAi transgenic T. brevicorniculatum plants showed a 40–50% reduction in the dry rubber content, but neither the rubber weight average molecular mass nor the polydispersity of the rubber were affected. Although no phenotypical differences to wild-type particles could be observed in vivo, rubber particles from the TbSRPP-RNAi transgenic lines were less stable and tend to rapidly aggregate in expelling latex after wounding of laticifers. Our results prove that TbSRPPs are very crucial for rubber production in T. brevicorniculatum, probably by contributing to a most favourable and stable rubber particle architecture for efficient rubber biosynthesis and eventually storage. PMID:22911861

  4. Down-regulation of small rubber particle protein expression affects integrity of rubber particles and rubber content in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Andrea; Post, Janina J; Wurbs, David; Wahler, Daniela; Lenders, Malte; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Prüfer, Dirk; Gronover, Christian Schulze

    2012-01-01

    The biosynthesis of rubber is thought to take place on the surface of rubber particles in laticifers, highly specialized cells that are present in more than 40 plant families. The small rubber particle protein (SRPP) has been supposed to be involved in rubber biosynthesis, and recently five SRPPs (TbSRPP1-5) were identified in the rubber-producing dandelion species Taraxacum brevicorniculatum. Here, we demonstrate by immunogold labeling that TbSRPPs are localized to rubber particles, and that rubber particles mainly consist of TbSRPP3, 4 and 5 as shown by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis. We also carried out an RNA-interference approach in transgenic plants to address the function of TbSRPPs in rubber biosynthesis as well as rubber particle morphology and stability. TbSRPP-RNAi transgenic T. brevicorniculatum plants showed a 40-50% reduction in the dry rubber content, but neither the rubber weight average molecular mass nor the polydispersity of the rubber were affected. Although no phenotypical differences to wild-type particles could be observed in vivo, rubber particles from the TbSRPP-RNAi transgenic lines were less stable and tend to rapidly aggregate in expelling latex after wounding of laticifers. Our results prove that TbSRPPs are very crucial for rubber production in T. brevicorniculatum, probably by contributing to a most favourable and stable rubber particle architecture for efficient rubber biosynthesis and eventually storage.

  5. Robotically enhanced rubber hand illusion.

    PubMed

    Arata, Jumpei; Hattori, Masashi; Ichikawa, Shohei; Sakaguchi, Masamichi

    2014-01-01

    The rubber hand illusion is a well-known multisensory illusion. In brief, watching a rubber hand being stroked by a paintbrush while one's own unseen hand is synchronously stroked causes the rubber hand to be attributed to one's own body and to "feel like it's my hand." The rubber hand illusion is thought to be triggered by the synchronized tactile stimulation of both the subject's hand and the fake hand. To extend the conventional rubber hand illusion, we introduce robotic technology in the form of a master-slave telemanipulator. The developed one degree-of-freedom master-slave system consists of an exoskeleton master equipped with an optical encoder that is worn on the subject's index finger and a motor-actuated index finger on the rubber hand, which allows the subject to perform unilateral telemanipulation. The moving rubber hand illusion has been studied by several researchers in the past with mechanically connected rigs between the subject's body and the fake limb. The robotic instruments let us investigate the moving rubber hand illusion with less constraints, thus behaving closer to the classic rubber hand illusion. In addition, the temporal delay between the body and the fake limb can be precisely manipulated. The experimental results revealed that the robotic instruments significantly enhance the rubber hand illusion. The time delay is significantly correlated with the effect of the multisensory illusion, and the effect significantly decreased at time delays over 100 ms. These findings can potentially contribute to the investigations of neural mechanisms in the field of neuroscience and of master-slave systems in the field of robotics.

  6. An updated study of mortality among North American synthetic rubber industry workers

    PubMed Central

    Sathiakumar, N; Graff, J; Macaluso, M; Maldonado, G; Matthews, R; Delzell, E

    2005-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the mortality experience of workers from the styrene-butadiene industry. Methods: The authors added seven years of follow up to a previous investigation of mortality among 17 924 men employed in the North American synthetic rubber industry. Analyses used the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) to compare styrene-butadiene rubber workers' cause specific mortality (1943–98) with those of the United States and the Ontario general populations. Results: Overall, the observed/expected numbers of deaths were 6237/7242 for all causes (SMR = 86, 95% CI 84 to 88) and 1608/1741 for all cancers combined (SMR = 92, 95% CI 88 to 97), 71/61 for leukaemia, 53/53 for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 26/27 for multiple myeloma. The 16% leukaemia increase was concentrated in hourly paid subjects with 20–29 years since hire and 10 or more years of employment in the industry (19/7.4, SMR = 258, 95% CI 156 to 403) and in subjects employed in polymerisation (18/8.8, SMR = 204, 95% CI 121 to 322), maintenance labour (15/7.4, SMR = 326, 95% CI 178 to 456), and laboratory operations (14/4.3, SMR = 326, 95% CI 178–546). Conclusion: The study found that some subgroups of synthetic rubber workers had an excess of mortality from leukaemia that was not limited to a particular form of leukaemia. Uncertainty remains about the specific agent(s) that might be responsible for the observed excesses and about the role of unidentified confounding factors. The study did not find any clear relation between employment in the industry and other forms of lymphohaematopoietic cancer. Some subgroups of subjects had more than expected deaths from colorectal and prostate cancers. These increases did not appear to be related to occupational exposure in the industry. PMID:16299089

  7. Nitrilases in nitrile biocatalysis: recent progress and forthcoming research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades, nitrilases have drawn considerable attention because of their application in nitrile degradation as prominent biocatalysts. Nitrilases are derived from bacteria, filamentous fungi, yeasts, and plants. In-depth investigations on their natural sources function mechanisms, enzyme structure, screening pathways, and biocatalytic properties have been conducted. Moreover, the immobilization, purification, gene cloning and modifications of nitrilase have been dwelt upon. Some nitrilases are used commercially as biofactories for carboxylic acids production, waste treatment, and surface modification. This critical review summarizes the current status of nitrilase research, and discusses a number of challenges and significant attempts in its further development. Nitrilase is a significant and promising biocatalyst for catalytic applications. PMID:23106943

  8. Chlorinolysis reclaims rubber of waste tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, E. R.; Tervet, J. H.; Hull, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    Process reclaims rubber and reduces sulfur content by using chlorine gas to oxidize sulfur bonds in preference to other bonds. Rubber does not have poor hysteresis and abrasion resistance like conventionally reclaimed rubber and is suitable for premium radial tires. Chlorinated rubber is less susceptible to swelling by oils and may be used as paint ingredient.

  9. Recycling, production and use of reprocessed rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Klingensmith, B. )

    1991-03-01

    This article examines the various methods used to produce recycled rubber and to compare their characteristics and application. The topics discussed include reclaiming by chemical digestion, devulcanization by the severing of sulfur bonds, ambient temperature and cryogenically ground rubber, processing and mixing of ground rubber, and properties of reclaimed rubbers by reclamation method.

  10. Copolymerization of carbon dioxide and butadiene via a lactone intermediate.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Ito, Shingo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2014-04-01

    Although carbon dioxide has attracted broad interest as a renewable carbon feedstock, its use as a monomer in copolymerization with olefins has long been an elusive endeavour. A major obstacle for this process is that the propagation step involving carbon dioxide is endothermic; typically, attempted reactions between carbon dioxide and an olefin preferentially yield olefin homopolymerization. Here we report a strategy to circumvent the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers for copolymerizations of carbon dioxide and olefins by using a metastable lactone intermediate, 3-ethylidene-6-vinyltetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-one, which is formed by the palladium-catalysed condensation of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene. Subsequent free-radical polymerization of the lactone intermediate afforded polymers of high molecular weight with a carbon dioxide content of 33 mol% (29 wt%). Furthermore, the protocol was applied successfully to a one-pot copolymerization of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene, and one-pot terpolymerizations of carbon dioxide, butadiene and another 1,3-diene. This copolymerization technique provides access to a new class of polymeric materials made from carbon dioxide.

  11. Copolymerization of carbon dioxide and butadiene via a lactone intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Ryo; Ito, Shingo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2014-04-01

    Although carbon dioxide has attracted broad interest as a renewable carbon feedstock, its use as a monomer in copolymerization with olefins has long been an elusive endeavour. A major obstacle for this process is that the propagation step involving carbon dioxide is endothermic; typically, attempted reactions between carbon dioxide and an olefin preferentially yield olefin homopolymerization. Here we report a strategy to circumvent the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers for copolymerizations of carbon dioxide and olefins by using a metastable lactone intermediate, 3-ethylidene-6-vinyltetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-one, which is formed by the palladium-catalysed condensation of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene. Subsequent free-radical polymerization of the lactone intermediate afforded polymers of high molecular weight with a carbon dioxide content of 33 mol% (29 wt%). Furthermore, the protocol was applied successfully to a one-pot copolymerization of carbon dioxide and 1,3-butadiene, and one-pot terpolymerizations of carbon dioxide, butadiene and another 1,3-diene. This copolymerization technique provides access to a new class of polymeric materials made from carbon dioxide.

  12. Conversion of 2,3-butanediol to butadiene

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; Frye, Jr, John G.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Albrecht, Karl O.

    2016-09-06

    A composition comprising 2,3-butanediol is dehydrated to methyl vinyl carbinol and/or 1,3-butadiene by exposure to a catalyst comprising (a) M.sub.xO.sub.y wherein M is a rare earth metal, a group IIIA metal, Zr, or a combination thereof, and x and y are based upon an oxidation state of M, or (b) M.sup.3.sub.a(PO.sub.4).sub.b where M.sup.3 is a group IA, a group IIA metal, a group IIIA metal, or a combination thereof, and a and b are based upon the oxidation state of M.sup.3. Embodiments of the catalyst comprising M.sub.xO.sub.y may further include M.sup.2, wherein M.sup.2 is a rare earth metal, a group IIA metal, Zr, Al, or a combination thereof. In some embodiments, 2,3-butanediol is dehydrated to methyl vinyl carbinol and/or 1,3-butadiene by a catalyst comprising M.sub.xO.sub.y, and the methyl vinyl carbinol is subsequently dehydrated to 1,3-butadiene by exposure to a solid acid catalyst.

  13. A high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes based on ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Ma, Cui-Luan; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Li

    2011-02-01

    Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes (nitrilase or nitrile hydratase/amidase) have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and it is important to build a method for screening for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes. In this paper, a simple, rapid, and high-throughput screening method based on the ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry has been proposed. To validate the accuracy of this screening strategy, the nitrilases from Rhodococcus erythropolis CGMCC 1.2362 and Alcaligenes sp. ECU0401 were used for evaluating the method. As a result, the accuracy for assaying aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was as high as the HPLC-based method. Therefore, the method may be potentially used in the selection of microorganisms or engineered proteins with nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes.

  14. Green synthesis of nitriles using non-noble metal oxides-based nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, Rajenahally V; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2014-07-09

    (Hetero)aromatic and aliphatic nitriles constitute major building blocks for organic synthesis and represent a versatile motif found in numerous medicinally and biologically important compounds. In general, these nitriles are synthesized by traditional cyanation procedures using toxic cyanides. With respect to green chemistry, the development of more sustainable and cost-efficient processes for the synthesis of advanced nitriles is highly desired. Here we report an environmentally benign synthesis of all kinds of structurally diverse aryl, heterocyclic, allylic and aliphatic nitriles from easily available alcohols applying aqueous ammonia and molecular oxygen. Key to success for this synthesis is the use of nitrogen-doped graphene-layered non-noble metal oxides as stable and durable nanocatalysts. As an example a renewable synthesis of adiponitrile, an industrially important bulk chemical is presented.

  15. Human physiologic factors in respiratory uptake of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y S; Smith, T J; Kelsey, K T; Wypij, D

    2001-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a suspected human carcinogen, is used as the raw material in industries to make synthetic butyl rubber and plastics. Simulation models using experimental animal data have shown that physiologic factors play an important role in the kinetic behavior of BD. However, human data are limited. The aim of this inhalation study was to identify influential human physiologic factors in the respiratory uptake of BD. We recruited 133 healthy volunteers in Boston, Massachusetts, into this study and tested them under an approved human subjects protocol. Each subject was exposed to 2 ppm (4.42 mg/m3) BD for 20 min, followed by purified air for another 40 min. Five exhaled breath samples collected during exposure were used to determine the respiratory uptake of BD, which was defined as absorbed BD (micrograms) per kilogram of body weight during exposure. Although subjects were given identical administered doses (40 ppm x min), there was a wide range of uptake, 0.6-4.9 microg/kg. Of the studied physiologic factors, the blood:air partition coefficient and alveolar ventilation were most significant in determining the respiratory uptake (p < 0.001 for each). In addition, in the multiple regression analysis, females had significantly higher respiratory uptake of BD than males on a weight basis. For all subjects, increasing age and cigarette smoking led to significantly decreased respiratory uptake of BD. The results of this human study are consistent with previous kinetic simulations and animal studies. The findings also suggest that interindividual variation in human physiologic factors that affect the exposure-internal dose relationship should be considered while also exploring exposure-disease associations in future epidemiologic research. PMID:11673121

  16. Copper-catalyzed intermolecular carboetherification of unactivated alkenes by alkyl nitriles and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Chatalova-Sazepin, Claire; Wang, Qian; Sammis, Glenn M; Zhu, Jieping

    2015-04-27

    A three-component carboetherification of unactivated alkenes has been developed allowing the rapid building of complexity from simple starting materials. A wide range of α-substituted styrenes underwent smooth reactions with unactivated alkyl nitriles and alcohols to afford γ-alkoxy alkyl nitriles with concomitant generation of a quaternary carbon center. A radical clock experiment provided clear-cut evidence that the reaction proceeds through a tertiary alkyl radical intermediate.

  17. Transition-Metal-Free Decarboxylative Photoredox Coupling of Carboxylic Acids and Alcohols with Aromatic Nitriles.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Benjamin; Nauth, Alexander M; Opatz, Till

    2016-08-05

    A transition-metal-free protocol for the redox-neutral light-induced decarboxylative coupling of carboxylic acids with (hetero)aromatic nitriles at ambient temperature is presented. A broad scope of acids and nitriles is accepted, and alcohols can be coupled in a similar fashion through their oxalate half esters. Various inexpensive sources of UV light and even sunlight can be used to achieve this C-C bond formation proceeding through a free radical mechanism.

  18. Changes in chemical permeation of disposable latex, nitrile, and vinyl gloves exposed to simulated movement.

    PubMed

    Phalen, Robert N; Le, Thi; Wong, Weng Kee

    2014-01-01

    Glove movement can affect chemical permeation of organic compounds through polymer glove products. However, conflicting reports make it difficult to compare the effects of movement on chemical permeation through commonly available glove types. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of movement on chemical permeation of an organic solvent through disposable latex, nitrile, and vinyl gloves. Simulated whole-glove permeation testing was conducted using ethyl alcohol and a previously designed permeation test system. With exposure to movement, a significant decrease (p ≤ 0.001) in breakthrough time (BT) was observed for the latex (-23%) and nitrile gloves (-31%). With exposure to movement, only the nitrile glove exhibited a significant increase (p ≤ 0.001) in steady-state permeation rate (+47%) and cumulative permeation at 30 min (+111%). Even though the nitrile glove provided optimum chemical resistance against ethyl alcohol, it was most affected by movement. With exposure to movement, the latex glove was an equivalent option for overall worker protection, because it was less affected by movement and the permeation rate was lower than that of the nitrile glove. In contrast, the vinyl glove was the least affected by movement, but did not provide adequate chemical resistance to ethyl alcohol in comparison with the nitrile and latex gloves. Glove selection should take movement and polymer type into account. Some glove polymer types are less affected by movement, most notably the latex glove in this test. With nitrile gloves, at least a factor of three should be used when attempting to assign a protection factor when repetitive hand motions are anticipated. Ultimately, the latex gloves outperformed nitrile and vinyl in these tests, which evaluated the effect of movement on chemical permeation. Future research should aim to resolve some of the observed discrepancies in test results with latex and vinyl gloves.

  19. Microstructure of Purified Rubber Particles.

    PubMed

    Wood; Cornish

    2000-05-01

    Purified rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis (Brazilian rubber tree), Parthenium argentatum (guayule), Ficus elastica (Indian rubber tree), and Euphorbia lactiflua were examined and compared using conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field-emission SEM, cryo-SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rubber particles of all four species were spherical; they varied in size and had a uniform homogeneous material, the rubber core, surrounded by a contiguous monolayer (half-unit) membrane. Frozen-hydrated and/or untreated particles from H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum deformed and fused readily, whereas those from F. elastica and E. lactiflua retained their spherical shapes. These results indicate that the surface components of the H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum particles are more fluid than those of F. elastica or E. lactiflua. When fixed in aldehyde, F. elastica particles retained their spherical exterior shapes but had hollow centers, whereas H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum particles completely collapsed. In aldehyde-osmium tetroxide-fixed material, the rubber core of F. elastica was poorly preserved in some particles in which only a small amount of the rubber core remained adhering to the monolayer membrane, leaving a hollow center. Euphorbia lactiflua particles were well preserved in terms of retaining the rubber core; however, the membrane was not as easily discernible as it was in the other three species. Both H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum were well preserved following fixation; their cores remained filled with rubber, and their monolayer membranes were defined. The addition of potassium permanganate to the fixation-staining regime resulted in higher-contrast micrographs and more well defined monolayer membranes.

  20. Final report on the peri-/postnatal evaluation of hexachloro-1,3-butadiene (HCBD) toxicity in Cd rats. Report for 27 February 1988-3 April 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.A.; Sleet, R.B.; Price, C.J.; Marr, M.C.; Myers, C.B.

    1990-05-23

    Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene (HCBD) is an agricultural and industrial chemical and by-product which has been identified as a neprhotoxin in both humans and laboratory animals. It is used industrially to recover chlorine-containing gas, as a fluid for gyroscopes and in the production of lubricants and rubber. HCBD is also a by-product of chlorinated hydrocarbon production. Agriculturally, it is used as a fumigant on grapes. HCBD contamination has been detected in air, water and soil surrounding chemical manufacturing plants and toxic waste landfills and in food and beverages. The current study was undertaken to examine peri-/postnatal development of the rat during maternal exposure to HCBD in the diet during late gestation and lactation with particular attention to structural and functional renal endpoints.

  1. Quantitative risk assessment of exposures to butadiene in EU occupational settings based on the University of Alabama at Birmingham epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2013-03-01

    The excess risks due to 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation in EU occupational settings are quantified for leukemia, AML, CLL, CML, lymphoid neoplasms, and myeloid neoplasms. The most recent data from the University of Alabama at Birmingham epidemiological study of North American workers in the styrene-butadiene rubber industry are modeled. The number of high-intensity tasks (HITs) and other exposure covariates may be more important predictors than cumulative BD ppm-years alone. For example, all of the 71 leukemia decedents in the UAB study who were exposed to BD had some BD HITs. None of the 1192 exposed workers without BD HITs had leukemia mortalities. The authors' best estimate (consolidated over all endpoints) of the average occupational BD exposure concentration for 45 years of exposure starting at age 20 corresponding to an added risk of 1/10,000 by age 70 is 7.2 ppm. Cumulative BD ppm-years is not statistically significantly associated with CML, AML, or myeloid neoplasms or (after any one of eight exposure covariates is included in the modeling) leukemia. The statistical significance of the slopes for leukemia, CLL, and lymphoid neoplasms unadjusted for covariate effects disappears when modeling is restricted to person years with less than 200 cumulative BD ppm-years.

  2. Rubber linings answer to many problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mehra, L.

    1998-12-31

    The uses of rubber linings in different fields industries are discussed.The physical properties of rubber both natural and synthetic rubber are listed and their importance is evaluated. The aging of rubber is discussed in detail, including effects of temperature on aging of rubber. By virtue of its inherent elasticity and chemical resistance, rubber linings have found many uses in the protection of mining equipment, water treatment tanks and vessels, flue gas desulfurization equipment in power plants and varied process and storage vessels in chemical industries. Rubber has found extensive use in civil engineering field as expansion joints and bladders in dams. Electrical resistance of rubber is useful for its application as an insulating material. Rubber is chemically resistant to acids, alkalies and many salt solutions. Rubber linings are therefore used for protection of steel against these acids, alkalies or salt solutions. The extreme elasticity of rubber has been found useful in its application as a lining material in areas subject to high abrasion. Frequently rubber linings are the linings of choice when a combination of abrasion and chemical attack are to be protected against. Constantly, new formulations of rubber lining compounds are being developed just as new chemical processes are being made. The flexibility of compounding and the relative ease of putting layers of different rubber formulations together in multilayered formulations of rubber lining compounds is leading to new uses of this lining material.

  3. 1,3-butadiene in urban and industrial areas and its role in photochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czader, Beata; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    1,3-butadiene is an important pollutant in terms of public health and important driver for photochemical processes influencing ozone formation in the area of Houston. Ambient levels of 1,3-butadiene were simulated with the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) including the SAPRC99-extended mechanism and the results were compared to spatially and temporally resolved observations of 1,3-butadiene for an episodic period during Summer 2006. Relative contributions of different type of emissions and chemical reactions to 1,3-butadiene concentrations were examined, the highest contribution was found to be from industrial emission sources. 1,3-butadiene mixing ratios in the urban area were found to be lower than in the industrial area. Although emissions of 1,3-butadiene peak during daytime its mixing ratios are lower during daytimes as compared to nighttime. 1,3-butadiene is removed from the surface through vertical upward transport (~90%) and chemical reactions (~10%). During daytime 1,3-butadiene reacts mainly with the OH radical (90%), during nighttime this reaction pathway is still significant in the industrial area (57% of all reaction pathways). Reaction with NO3 during nighttime contributes 33% in industrial and 56% in urban areas, where high NOx emissions occur. Reaction with ozone contributes 10% and 13% in industrial and urban areas, respectively. Analysis of measured data revealed that episodically very high emissions spikes of 1,3-butadiene occur. CMAQ often underpredicts 1,3-butadiene mixing ratios when sites are exposed to sporadic releases from industrial facilities. These releases are not accounted for in the emission inventory. It also appears that emissions of 1,3-butadiene from point sources have much more variability than those listed in the emission inventory.

  4. Modeling of 1,3-butadiene in urban and industrial areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czader, Beata H.; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    1,3-butadiene is an important pollutant in terms of public health and important driver for photochemical processes influencing ozone formation in the area of Houston. Ambient levels of 1,3-butadiene were simulated with the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) including the SAPRC99-extended mechanism and the results were compared to spatially and temporally resolved observations of 1,3-butadiene for an episodic period during Summer 2006. Relative contributions of different type of emissions and chemical reactions to 1,3-butadiene concentrations were examined, the highest contribution was found to be from industrial emission sources. 1,3-butadiene mixing ratios in the urban area were found to be lower than in the industrial area. Although emissions of 1,3-butadiene peak during daytime its mixing ratios are lower during daytimes as compared to nighttime. 1,3-butadiene is removed from the surface through vertical upward transport (∼90%) and chemical reactions (∼10%). During daytime 1,3-butadiene reacts mainly with the OH radical (90%), during nighttime this reaction pathway is still significant in the industrial area (57% of all reaction pathways). Reaction with NO3 during nighttime contributes 33% in industrial and 56% in urban areas, where high NOx emissions occur. Reaction with ozone contributes 10% and 13% in industrial and urban areas, respectively. Analysis of measured data revealed that episodically very high emissions spikes of 1,3-butadiene occur. CMAQ often underpredicts 1,3-butadiene mixing ratios when sites are exposed to sporadic releases from industrial facilities. These releases are not accounted for in the emission inventory. It also appears that emissions of 1,3-butadiene from point sources have much more variability than those listed in the emission inventory.

  5. Identification of a Taraxacum brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor protein that is localized on rubber particles and promotes rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Laibach, Natalie; Hillebrand, Andrea; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Two protein families required for rubber biosynthesis in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum have recently been characterized, namely the cis-prenyltransferases (TbCPTs) and the small rubber particle proteins (TbSRPPs). The latter were shown to be the most abundant proteins on rubber particles, where rubber biosynthesis takes place. Here we identified a protein designated T. brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor (TbREF) by using mass spectrometry to analyze rubber particle proteins. TbREF is homologous to the TbSRPPs but has a molecular mass that is atypical for the family. The promoter was shown to be active in laticifers, and the protein itself was localized on the rubber particle surface. In TbREF-silenced plants generated by RNA interference, the rubber content was significantly reduced, correlating with lower TbCPT protein levels and less TbCPT activity in the latex. However, the molecular mass of the rubber was not affected by TbREF silencing. The colloidal stability of rubber particles isolated from TbREF-silenced plants was also unchanged. This was not surprising because TbREF depletion did not affect the abundance of TbSRPPs, which are required for rubber particle stability. Our findings suggest that TbREF is an important component of the rubber biosynthesis machinery in T. brevicorniculatum, and may play a role in rubber particle biogenesis and influence rubber production.

  6. Rubber stopper remover

    DOEpatents

    Stitt, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    A device for removing a rubber stopper from a test tube is mountable to an upright wall, has a generally horizontal splash guard, and a lower plate spaced parallel to and below the splash guard. A slot in the lower plate has spaced-apart opposing edges that converge towards each other from the plate outer edge to a narrowed portion, the opposing edges shaped to make engagement between the bottom of the stopper flange and the top edge of the test tube to wedge therebetween and to grasp the stopper in the slot narrowed portion to hold the stopper as the test tube is manipulated downwardly and pulled from the stopper. The opposing edges extend inwardly to adjoin an opening having a diameter significantly larger than that of the stopper flange.

  7. Silicone-Rubber Stitching Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    Fabric products protected from raveling by coating threads and filling stitching holes with silicone rubber. Uncored silicone rubber applied to stitching lines with air-pressurized sealant gun. Next, plastic release film placed on coated side, and blanket flipped over so release film lies underneath. Blanket then bagged and adhesive cured under partial vacuum of about 3.5 psi or under pressure. Applications include balloons, parachutes, ultralight aircraft, sails, rescue harnesses, tents, or other fabric products highly stressed in use.

  8. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  9. Tautomer-selective derivatives of enolate, ketone and enaminone by addition reaction of picolyl-type anions with nitriles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jianliang; Wang, Peng; Cao, Wei; Chen, Xia

    2017-01-01

    We describe an efficient for the synthesis of compounds of tautomeric β-pyridyl/quinolyl-enol, -ketone, -enaminone, which were finally characterized by standard methods like NMR, IR or SCXRD. The addition reaction of lithiated intermediates of picoline, 2-ethylpyridine and 2-methylquinoline, respectively, with nitriles followed by acid hydrolysis afforded the corresponding tautomeric compounds of enol, ketone and emaminone. Interestingly, treatment of 2-methylpyridine or 2-ethylpyridine with nitriles, respectively, yielded mostly β-pyridyl ketone and enol tautomers without enaminones, while 2-methylquinoline with nitriles gave β-quinolyl ketone and enaminone tautomers without enols. The reaction of 2-benzylpyridine with nitriles was not available under the same conditions.

  10. SOME INSIGHTS INTO THE MODE OF ACTION OF BUTADIENE BY EXAMINING THE GENOTOXICITY OF ITS METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,3-Butadiene (BTD) is an important commodity chemical and air pollutant that has been shown to be a potent carcinogen in mice, and to a lesser extent, a carcinogen in rats. To better assess butadiene's carcinogenic risk to humans, it is important to understand its mode of action...

  11. In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity of 1,3-butadiene and metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Arce, G T; Vincent, D R; Cunningham, M J; Choy, W N; Sarrif, A M

    1990-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene and two major genotoxic metabolites 3,4-epoxybutene (EB) and 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB) were used as model compounds to determine if genetic toxicity findings in animal and human cells can aid in extrapolating animal toxicity data to man. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus induction results indicated 1,3-butadiene was genotoxic in the bone marrow of the mouse but not the rat. This paralleled the chronic bioassays which showed mice to be more susceptible than rats to 1,3-butadiene carcinogenicity. However, 1,3-butadiene did not induce unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in the rat or mouse hepatocytes following in vivo exposure. Likewise, UDS in rat and mouse hepatocytes in vitro was not induced by EB or DEB. Salmonella typhimurium gene mutation (Ames) tests of 1,3-butadiene using strains TA1535, TA97, TA98, and TA100 and employing rat, mouse, and human liver S9 metabolic systems were barely 2-fold above background only in strain TA1535 at 30% 1,3-butadiene in air with induced and uninduced rat S9 and mouse S9 (uninduced). 1,3-Butadiene was negative in in vitro SCE studies in human whole blood lymphocytes cultures treated in the presence of rat, mouse, or human liver S9 metabolic activation. In general, 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in vivo but is a weak in vitro genotoxin. PMID:2205494

  12. 75 FR 31713 - 2-Propenoic acid polymer, with 1,3-butadiene and ethenylbenzene; Tolerance Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 2-Propenoic acid polymer, with 1,3-butadiene and ethenylbenzene; Tolerance... establishes an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of 2-propenoic acid polymer, with 1... a maximum permissible level for residues of 2-propenoic acid polymer, with 1,3-butadiene...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10280 - Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10280 Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated. (a... benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated (PMN P-10-476; CAS No. 1195978-93-8)) is...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1020 Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer....

  15. 40 CFR 721.10280 - Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10280 Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated. (a... benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated (PMN P-10-476; CAS No. 1195978-93-8)) is...

  16. Pipeline system insulation: thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. December 1985-February 1988 (citations from the rubber and plastics research association data base). Report for December 1985-February 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulating of pipeline systems used to transfer liquids and gases. Thermal aging of polyurethane foam for insulating heating pipes, extrusion-film pipeline-insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile-rubber pipeline insulation with class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass-reinforced polyester insulated-pipeline systems are among the topics discussed. Applications in solar-heating systems, underground water, oil, and gas, interior hot water and cold water lines under seawater, and chemical-plant pipeline-system insulation are included. (This updated bibliography contains 139 citations, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  17. Differing mechanisms of simple nitrile formation on glucosinolate degradation in Lepidium sativum and Nasturtium officinale seeds.

    PubMed

    Williams, David J; Critchley, Christa; Pun, Sharon; Chaliha, Mridusmita; O'Hare, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Glucosinolates are sulphur-containing glycosides found in brassicaceous plants that can be hydrolysed enzymatically by plant myrosinase or non-enzymatically to form primarily isothiocyanates and/or simple nitriles. From a human health perspective, isothiocyanates are quite important because they are major inducers of carcinogen-detoxifying enzymes. Two of the most potent inducers are benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) present in garden cress (Lepidium sativum), and phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) present in watercress (Nasturtium officinale). Previous studies on these salad crops have indicated that significant amounts of simple nitriles are produced at the expense of the isothiocyanates. These studies also suggested that nitrile formation may occur by different pathways: (1) under the control of specifier protein in garden cress and (2) by an unspecified, non-enzymatic path in watercress. In an effort to understand more about the mechanisms involved in simple nitrile formation in these species, we analysed their seeds for specifier protein and myrosinase activities, endogenous iron content and glucosinolate degradation products after addition of different iron species, specific chelators and various heat treatments. We confirmed that simple nitrile formation was predominantly under specifier protein control (thiocyanate-forming protein) in garden cress seeds. Limited thermal degradation of the major glucosinolate, glucotropaeolin (benzyl glucosinolate), occurred when seed material was heated to >120 degrees C. In the watercress seeds, however, we show for the first time that gluconasturtiin (phenylethyl glucosinolate) undergoes a non-enzymatic, iron-dependent degradation to a simple nitrile. On heating the seeds to 120 degrees C or greater, thermal degradation of this heat-labile glucosinolate increased simple nitrile levels many fold.

  18. The genetic basis of constitutive and herbivore-induced ESP-independent nitrile formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Burow, Meike; Losansky, Anja; Müller, René; Plock, Antje; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Wittstock, Ute

    2009-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a group of thioglucosides that are components of an activated chemical defense found in the Brassicales. Plant tissue damage results in hydrolysis of glucosinolates by endogenous thioglucosidases known as myrosinases. Spontaneous rearrangement of the aglucone yields reactive isothiocyanates that are toxic to many organisms. In the presence of specifier proteins, alternative products, namely epithionitriles, simple nitriles, and thiocyanates with different biological activities, are formed at the expense of isothiocyanates. Recently, simple nitriles were recognized to serve distinct functions in plant-insect interactions. Here, we show that simple nitrile formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotype Columbia-0 rosette leaves increases in response to herbivory and that this increase is independent of the known epithiospecifier protein (ESP). We combined phylogenetic analysis, a screen of Arabidopsis mutants, recombinant protein characterization, and expression quantitative trait locus mapping to identify a gene encoding a nitrile-specifier protein (NSP) responsible for constitutive and herbivore-induced simple nitrile formation in Columbia-0 rosette leaves. AtNSP1 is one of five Arabidopsis ESP homologues that promote simple nitrile, but not epithionitrile or thiocyanate, formation. Four of these homologues possess one or two lectin-like jacalin domains, which share a common ancestry with the jacalin domains of the putative Arabidopsis myrosinase-binding proteins MBP1 and MBP2. A sixth ESP homologue lacked specifier activity and likely represents the ancestor of the gene family with a different biochemical function. By illuminating the genetic and biochemical bases of simple nitrile formation, our study provides new insights into the evolution of metabolic diversity in a complex plant defense system.

  19. Electron tomography provides a direct link between the Payne effect and the inter-particle spacing of rubber composites

    PubMed Central

    Staniewicz, Lech; Vaudey, Thomas; Degrandcourt, Christophe; Couty, Marc; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Midgley, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Rubber-filler composites are a key component in the manufacture of tyres. The filler provides mechanical reinforcement and additional wear resistance to the rubber, but it in turn introduces non-linear mechanical behaviour to the material which most likely arises from interactions between the filler particles, mediated by the rubber matrix. While various studies have been made on the bulk mechanical properties and of the filler network structure (both imaging and by simulations), there presently does not exist any work directly linking filler particle spacing and mechanical properties. Here we show that using STEM tomography, aided by a machine learning image analysis procedure, to measure silica particle spacings provides a direct link between the inter-particle spacing and the reduction in shear modulus as a function of strain (the Payne effect), measured using dynamic mechanical analysis. Simulations of filler network formation using attractive, repulsive and non-interacting potentials were processed using the same method and compared with the experimental data, with the net result being that an attractive inter-particle potential is the most accurate way of modelling styrene-butadiene rubber-silica composite formation. PMID:25487130

  20. Butadiene-Isoprene Block Copolymers and Their Hydrogenated Derivatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    polymerization reactivities butadienes dienes i soprene benzene compounds * anions chemorheo logy AB1STRACT (000010 an 0ee 06 It nese.m ill fdef’ 6F...Foclur, A. G. Kitchen, C. C. Baird , Am. Chem. Soc. Div. Og Coat. Plast. Chem. Pap., 34(1), 130, (1974). 11. O.L. Marrs, F. E. Naylor, and L.O. Edmonds , J...York (1977). 2. A. V. Tobolsky, "Properties and Structure of Polymers," Chap. V, John Wiley & Sons, NY (1960). 3. K. Arai and Y. Naito, J. Soc. Rheol

  1. Telomerization of butadiene with starch under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Mesnager, Julien; Quettier, Claude; Lambin, Anne; Rataboul, Franck; Pinel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The design of industrial products based on bioresources is a challenging issue. Modification of starch, by hydrophobic chemical substituents, results in an innovative hydrophobic material. Herein, the hydrophobic part of the derivative, comprised of octadienyl chains, is introduced through catalytic butadiene telomerization. The process is efficiently conducted on starch in its granular form in an aqueous medium using hydrosoluble palladium complexes. After optimization, a turnover number (TON) of up to 550 was achieved in the presence of [(pi-allyl)PdCl](2) catalyst and, unusually, by using dimethylisosorbide as a cosolvent.

  2. Nitrile-synthesizing enzyme: Screening, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Takuto; Suzuki, Takahisa; Shimizu, Sakayu; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-09-12

    Cyanide is known as a toxic compound for almost all living organisms. We have searched for cyanide-resistant bacteria from the soil and stock culture collection of our laboratory, and have found the existence of a lot of microorganisms grown on culture media containing 10 mM potassium cyanide. Almost all of these cyanide-resistant bacteria were found to show β-cyano-L-alanine (β-CNAla) synthetic activity. β-CNAla synthase is known to catalyze nitrile synthesis: the formation of β-CNAla from potassium cyanide and O-acetyl-L-serine or L-cysteine. We found that some microorganisms were able to detoxify cyanide using O-methyl-DL-serine, O-phospho-L-serine and β-chloro-DL-alanine. In addition, we purified β-CNAla synthase from Pseudomonas ovalis No. 111 in nine steps, and characterized the purified enzyme. This enzyme has a molecular mass of 60,000 and appears to consist of two identical subunits. The purified enzyme exhibits a maximum activity at pH 8.5-9.0 at an optimal temperature of 40-50°C. The enzyme is specific for O-acetyl-L-serine and β-chloro-DL-alanine. The Km value for O-acetyl-L-serine is 10.0 mM and Vmax value is 3.57 μmol/min/mg.

  3. Natural rubber latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Deval, Ravi; Ramesh, V; Prasad, G B K S; Jain, Arun Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL) is a ubiquitous allergen as it is a component of > 40,000 products in everyday life. Latex allergy might be attributed to skin contact or inhalation of latex particles. Latex allergy is an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to NRL, presenting a wide range of clinical symptoms such as angioedema, swelling, cough, asthma, and anaphylactic reactions. Until 1979, latex allergy appeared only as type IV delayed hypersensitivity; subsequently, the proportion of different allergy types drifted towards type IV contact allergy reactions. Several risk factors for sensitization to NRL are already known and well documented. Some authors have established a positive correlation between a history of multiple surgical interventions, atopy, spina bifida malformation, and latex allergy incidence. We suspect an increase in latex allergy incidence in association with increased atopy and sensitivity to environmental allergens in the industrial population. It is often postulated in literature that the groups of workers at risk for this allergy are essentially workers in the latex industry and healthcare professionals. In this population, direct internal and mucosal contact with NRL medical devices may be the route of sensitization as factors such as the number of procedures and use of NRL materials (catheters and tubes) were associated with increased risk of latex sensitization and allergy.

  4. Rolling tires into rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-06-01

    For Envirotire (Lillington, North Carolina), producing quality crumb rubber this summer is all in a night`s work. The tire recycling facility has operated in Lillington, which is about an hour south of Raleigh, North Carolina, for about a year and a half, since October 1995. In the summer, the plant runs at night to save money in electricity costs by operating during off-peak hours; in the winter, daytime hours also can be off-peak. In contrast to the cryogenic systems used elsewhere to recycle tires, Envirotire`s system works on mechanical principles. Before the tires are even shredded, a worker cuts the white-walls out of the tires manually, so the white does not contaminate the black end-product. A worker places the tires manually on a conveyor, which feed them up to an initial shredder that sections them quickly into pieces. While the tires are on the conveyor, dividing strips on the conveyor mark off a place for each tire. The system takes nine new tires per minute.

  5. Active Site Mapping of Human Cathepsin F with Dipeptide Nitrile Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Janina; Furtmann, Norbert; Ponert, Moritz; Frizler, Maxim; Löser, Reik; Bartz, Ulrike; Bajorath, Jürgen; Gütschow, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Cleavage of the invariant chain is the key event in the trafficking pathway of major histocompatibility complex class II. Cathepsin S is the major processing enzyme of the invariant chain, but cathepsin F acts in macrophages as its functional synergist which is as potent as cathepsin S in invariant chain cleavage. Dedicated low-molecular-weight inhibitors for cathepsin F have not yet been developed. An active site mapping with 52 dipeptide nitriles, reacting as covalent-reversible inhibitors, was performed to draw structure-activity relationships for the non-primed binding region of human cathepsin F. In a stepwise process, new compounds with optimized fragment combinations were designed and synthesized. These dipeptide nitriles were evaluated on human cysteine cathepsins F, B, L, K and S. Compounds 10 (N-(4-phenylbenzoyl)-leucylglycine nitrile) and 12 (N-(4-phenylbenzoyl)leucylmethionine nitrile) were found to be potent inhibitors of human cathepsin F, with Ki values <10 nM. With all dipeptide nitriles from our study, a 3D activity landscape was generated to visualize structure-activity relationships for this series of cathepsin F inhibitors.

  6. Electrospinning of PVC with natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Muhammad Hariz; Mohamed, Mahathir; Abdullah, Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was mixed with natural rubbers which are liquid natural rubber (LNR), liquid epoxidised natural rubber (LENR) and liquid epoxidised natural rubber acrylate (LENRA) for a preparation of a fine non-woven fiber's mat. PVC and each natural rubbers(PVC:LENR, PVC:LNR and PVC:LENRA) were mixed based on ratio of 70:30. Electrospinning method was used to prepare the fiber. The results show that the spinnable concentration of PVC/ natural rubber/THF solution is 16 wt%. The morphology, diameter, structure and degradation temperature of electrospun fibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). SEM photos showed that the morphology and diameter of the fibers were mainly affected by the addition of natural rubber. TGA results suggested that PVC electrospun fiber has higher degradation temperature than those electrospun fibers that contain natural rubber.

  7. 75 FR 57980 - Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... whether revocation of the antidumping duty finding on polychloroprene rubber from Japan would be likely...

  8. Electrospinning of PVC with natural rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, Muhammad Hariz; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Mohamed, Mahathir

    2013-11-27

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was mixed with natural rubbers which are liquid natural rubber (LNR), liquid epoxidised natural rubber (LENR) and liquid epoxidised natural rubber acrylate (LENRA) for a preparation of a fine non-woven fiber’s mat. PVC and each natural rubbers(PVC:LENR, PVC:LNR and PVC:LENRA) were mixed based on ratio of 70:30. Electrospinning method was used to prepare the fiber. The results show that the spinnable concentration of PVC/ natural rubber/THF solution is 16 wt%. The morphology, diameter, structure and degradation temperature of electrospun fibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). SEM photos showed that the morphology and diameter of the fibers were mainly affected by the addition of natural rubber. TGA results suggested that PVC electrospun fiber has higher degradation temperature than those electrospun fibers that contain natural rubber.

  9. Advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhixin; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2014-02-01

    The research advances in rubber/halloysite nanotubes (rubber/HNTs) nanocomposites are reviewed. HNTs are environmentally-friendly natural nanomaterials, which could be used to prepare the rubber-based nanocomposites with high performance and low cost. Unmodified HNTs could be adopted to prepare the rubber/HNTs composites with improved mechanical properties, however, the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites with fine morphology and excellent properties were chiefly prepared with various modifiers by in situ mixing method. A series of rubber/HNTs nanocomposites containing several rubbers (SBR, NR, xSBR, NBR, PU) and different modifiers (ENR, RH, Si69, SA, MAA, ILs) have been investigated. The results showed that all the rubber/HNTs nanocomposites achieved strong interfacial interaction via interfacial covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds or multiple interactions, realized significantly improved dispersion of HNTs at nanoscale and exhibited excellent mechanical performances and other properties.

  10. Enhanced breakdown strength of poly(vinylidene fluoride) utilizing rubber nanoparticles for energy storage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ming-Sheng; Zha, Jun-Wei; Yang, Yu; Han, Peng; Hu, Chao-He; Dang, Zhi-Min

    2016-08-01

    A kind of rubber nanoparticles, methyl methacrylate-butadiene-styrene (MBS), was applied into poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) matrix to fabricate MBS/PVDF composite films. Uniform dispersion and good compatibility of MBS in the matrix were observed. We found that the entanglement state between MBS nanoparticles and random chains of PVDF could diminish gaps in the matrix, which is helpful for high breakdown strength. The composite film with 12 vol. % MBS showed the maximum breakdown strength of 535 MV/m and the high energy density of 9.85 J/cm3, which were 1.7 times and about 2.2 times higher than pure PVDF film, respectively.

  11. Guayule - natural rubber from the desert

    SciTech Connect

    Bucks, D.A.

    1984-11-01

    Guayule is the most likely source of home grown natural rubber in the United States and research is currently underway on methods of increasing rubber content, seed germination and survival, climate and soil requirements and rubber content determination by solvent extraction.

  12. World synthetic rubber consumption is growing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-04

    Worldwide consumption of new rubber, both synthetic and natural, has increased. This report includes a prediction of even more growth in the rubber market which was made by the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers (IISRP), based in Houston. Figures are given for worldwide consumption.

  13. 75 FR 38119 - Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSION Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty finding on polychloroprene rubber from Japan... antidumping duty finding on polychloroprene rubber from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation...

  14. 63 FR 41284 - Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-08-03

    ... COMMISSION Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on polychloroprene rubber from Japan... antidumping duty order on polychloroprene rubber from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation...

  15. Rubber friction and tire dynamics.

    PubMed

    Persson, B N J

    2011-01-12

    We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, for example, in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (Persson 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 7789). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to accurately calculate μ-slip curves (and the self-aligning torque) for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g. braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of anti-blocking system (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms.

  16. Tensile Properties and Swelling Behavior of Sealing Rubber Materials Exposed to High-Pressure Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamabe, Junichiro; Nishimura, Shin

    Rubber O-rings exposed to high-pressure hydrogen gas swell, and the volume increase induced by swelling influences tensile properties of the O-rings. Samples of nonfilled (NF), carbon black-filled (CB), and silica-filled (SC) sulfur-vulcanized acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber were exposed to hydrogen at 30 °C and pressures of up to 100 MPa, and the effect of hydrogen exposure on the volume increase, hydrogen content, and tensile properties was investigated. The residual hydrogen content, measured 35 minutes after decompression, increased with increasing hydrogen pressure in the range 0.7-100 MPa for all three samples. In contrast, the volumes of NF, CB, and SC barely changed at pressures below 10 MPa, whereas they increased at pressures above 10 MPa. This nonlinear volume increase is probably related to the free volume of the rubber structure. The volume increase of the CB and SC samples was smaller than that of the NF samples, possibly because of the superior tensile properties of CB and SC. As the volumes of the NF, CB, and SC samples increased, their tensile elastic moduli decreased as a result of a decrease in crosslink density and elongation by volume increase. Although the true fracture stress of NF was barely dependent on the volume of the specimen, those of CB and SC clearly decreased as the volume increased. The decrease in the true fracture stress of CB and SC was related to the volume increase by swelling, showing that the boundary structure between the filler and the rubber matrix was changed by the volume increase.

  17. Real-time PCR detection of aldoxime dehydratase genes in nitrile-degrading microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Dooley-Cullinane, Tríona Marie; O'Reilly, Catherine; Coffey, Lee

    2017-02-01

    Aldoxime dehydratase catalyses the conversion of aldoximes to their corresponding nitriles. Utilization of the aldoxime-nitrile metabolising enzyme pathway can facilitate the move towards a greener chemistry. In this work, a real-time PCR assay was developed for the detection of aldoxime dehydratase genes in aldoxime/nitrile metabolising microorganisms which have been purified from environmental sources. A conventional PCR assay was also designed allowing gene confirmation via sequencing. Aldoxime dehydratase genes were identified in 30 microorganisms across 11 genera including some not previously shown to harbour the gene. The assay displayed a limit of detection of 1 pg/μL DNA or 7 CFU/reaction. This real-time PCR assay should prove valuable in the high-throughput screening of micro-organisms for novel aldoxime dehydratase genes towards pharmaceutical and industrial applications.

  18. Gas Phase Computational Studies on the Competition Between Nitrile and Water Ligands in Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2010-08-26

    The formation of uranyl dicationic complexes containing water and nitrile (acetonitrile, propionitrile, and benzonitrile) ligands, [UO2(H2O)n(RCN)m]2+, has been studied using density functional theory (DFT) with a relativistic effective core potential (RECP) to account for scalar relativistic effects on uranium. It is shown that nitrile addition is favored over the addition of water ligands. Decomposition of these complexes to [UO2OH(H2O)n(RCN)m]+ by the loss of either H3O+ or (RCN+H)+ is also examined. It is found that this reaction occurs when the coordination sphere of uranyl is unsaturated. Additionally, this reaction is influenced by the size of the nitrile ligand with reactions involving acetonitrile being the most prevalent.

  19. Enzymatic degradation of nitriles by a Candida guilliermondii UFMG-Y65.

    PubMed

    Dias, J C; Rezende, R P; Rosa, C A; Lachance, M A; Linardi, V R

    2000-06-01

    Candida guilliermondii UFMG-Y65, isolated from a gold mine, was able to utilize different nitriles and the corresponding amides as sole source of nitrogen, at concentrations up to 2 M. Resting cells cultivated on YCB-acetonitrile medium showed nitrile hydrolyzing enzyme activities against acrylonitrile and benzonitrile. These enzymes were inducible and intracellular; the optimum pH was 7.0-8.0, and the optimum temperature 25 degrees C-30 degrees C. Liquid chromatographic analysis indicated that C. guilliermondii UFMG-Y65 metabolized 12 mM benzonitrile to 11 mM benzoic acid and 10 mM acrylonitrile to 7.9 mM acrylic acid. The results suggest that C. guilliermondii UFMG-Y65 may be useful for the bioproduction of amides and acids, and for the bioremediation of environments contaminated with nitriles.

  20. Conversion of unsaturated alcohols into functionalized tetrahydrofurans and tetrahydropyrans via nitrile oxide dipolar cycloadditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hassner, A.; Murthy, K.S.K. ); Padwa, A.; Dean, D.C.; Schoffstall, A.M. ); Chiacchio, U. )

    1989-10-27

    The intramolecular nitrile oxide cycloaddition (INOC) of a series of unsaturated oximino ethers has been investigated. The synthesis of the olefinic nitrile oxides involves treating an unsaturated alcohol with a {alpha}-bromoalkanal O-(trimethylsilyl)oxime in the presence of fluoride ion followed by subsequent sodium hypochlorite oxidation. The nitrile oxides were not isolated but spontaneously underwent intramolecular cycloaddition to give fused five- and six-membered ring ethers. The preferred stereoisomer in the formation of the five-membered ring ethers is trans, whereas in the six-membered ring ethers the cis isomer predominates. MM2 calculations help rationalize the observed stereoselectivity. The ratio of diastereomeric products from the INOC reaction appears to correlate with product stabilities. Simple heating of some of the oximino ethers led to intramolecular cycloaddition. The ring closure apparently proceeds subsequent to a tautomeric equilibration of the oxime with a transient nitrone which is trapped by the neighboring {pi}-bond.

  1. Chemistry of nitrile anions in the interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Carles, S.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Biennier, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2015-12-31

    Despite the extreme conditions of temperature (down to 10K) and density (down to 100 molecules/cm{sup 3}), the giant molecular clouds and the circumstellar envelopes present a rich and complex chemistry. To date, more than 180 molecules have been detected in the InterStellar Medium (ISM) with a large abundance of nitriles (RC≡N). In addition, several anions have been recently observed in this medium: C{sub 4}H{sup ¯}, C{sub 6}H{sup ¯}, C{sub 8}H{sup ¯}, CN{sup ¯}, C{sub 3}N{sup ¯} and C{sub 5}N{sup ¯}. These last species should play a key role in the molecular growth towards complexity. To explore this hypothesis, their reactivity must be studied in the laboratory. The FALP-MS and the CRESU experimental apparatuses of the Rennes University are able to measure absolute rate coefficient of various chemical reactions, including the ion – molecule reactions, in gas phase at low temperature (from 300K for the FALP-MS down to 15K for the CRESU). Therefore, these experimental tools are particularly adapted to the kinetic studies of reactions potentially involved in the Interstellar Medium. One of the difficulties encountered in experiments with anions is their generation. We describe here the formation of the CN{sup ¯} and C{sub 3}N{sup ¯} anions by dissociative electron attachment on the molecular precursors BrCN and BrC{sub 3}N.

  2. Glutathione transferases and glutathionylated hemoglobin in workers exposed to low doses of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Primavera, Alessandra; Fustinoni, Silvia; Biroccio, Antonino; Ballerini, Sabrina; Urbani, Andrea; Bernardini, Sergio; Federici, Giorgio; Capucci, Enrico; Manno, Maurizio; Lo Bello, Mario

    2008-11-01

    We evaluated glutathione transferase (GST) activities and the levels of glutathionylated hemoglobin in the RBC of 42 workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene in a petrochemical plant, using 43 workers not exposed to 1,3-butadiene and 82 foresters as internal and external controls, respectively. Median 1,3-butadiene exposure levels were 1.5, 0.4, and 0.1 microg/m3 in 1,3-butadiene-exposed workers, in workers not directly exposed to 1,3-butadiene, and in foresters, respectively. In addition, we determined in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of the same individuals the presence of GST polymorphic genes GSTT1 and GSTM1 and the distribution of GSTP1 allelic variants. Comparing the mean values observed in petrochemical workers with those of control foresters, we found a marked decrease of GST enzymatic activity and a significant increase of glutathionylated hemoglobin in the petrochemical workers. A weak but significant negative correlation was found between levels of 1,3-butadiene exposure and GST activity, whereas a positive correlation was found between 1,3-butadiene exposure and glutathionylated hemoglobin. A negative correlation was also observed between GST activity and glutathionylated hemoglobin. No influence of confounders was observed. Using a multiple linear regression model, up to 50.6% and 41.9% of the variability observed in glutathionylated hemoglobin and GST activity, respectively, were explained by 1,3-butadiene exposure, working setting, and GSTT1 genotype. These results indicate that occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene induces an oxidative stress that impairs the GST balance in RBC, and suggest that GST activity and glutathionylated hemoglobin could be recommended as promising biomarkers of effect in petrochemical workers.

  3. Improved rubber nanofillers

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T. J.

    2012-03-01

    During this task, Silane functionalized TiO2 and HK3Ti4O4(SiO4)3 were sent to Goodyear (GY) for testing. These materials were characterized based on their interaction with the model elastomer, squalene. The Van der Waals interactions and Hamaker Constants for ZnO particles in squalene and rubber materials were characterized and it was determined that a 10-20 nm spacing was necessary between primary filler particles to maintain a stable nanocomposite. Contact angle measurements on the ZnO and ZnO-silane materials indicated that the solvent should wet the particles, and solvophobic attractions should not be present. These studies showed that the surface modification with sulfosilane coupling agents was successful, and high levels of dispersion of the particles remained possible. Further, a novel surface charging phenomenon where negative surface charging is developed in the squalene environment was observed and corroborated by measurements of particle size and of the surface modified materials in squalene. This impacts the dispersion of the particles according to the traditional colloidal interpretation of electrostatic repulsive forces between particles. Additionally, thin nanocomposite fibers were developed using electrospinning. The size and shape of the oxides did not change during the electrospinning process, although the shape of the fiber and the distribution of the particles, particularly for ZnO, was not ideal. There was an obvious increase in elastic modulus and hardness from the addition of the oxides, but differentiating the oxides, and particularly the surfactants, was difficult. The A-1289 lead to the greatest dispersion of the filler particles, while the A-1589 and the NXT produced clustered particle aggregates. This agrees with previous study of these materials in low molecular weight squalene solvent studies reported earlier. The behavior of the nanoparticle ZnO and the microparticle silica is different as well, with the ZnO being contained within

  4. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  5. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Scharff, Robert P.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  6. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1995-01-17

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

  7. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.; Bagheri, Reza

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  8. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    McInnis, Edwin L.; Bauman, Bernard D.; Williams, Mark A.

    1996-04-09

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

  9. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

    1997-12-02

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

  10. Durability of styrene-butadiene latex modified concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Shaker, F.A.; El-Dieb, A.S.; Reda, M.M.

    1997-05-01

    The durability of reinforced concrete structures represents a major concern to many investigators. The use of latex modified concrete (LMC) in construction has urged researchers to review and investigate its different properties. This study is part of a comprehensive investigation carried on the use of polymers in concrete. The main objective of this study to investigate and evaluate the main durability aspects of Styrene-Butadiene latex modified concrete (LMC) compared to those of conventional concrete. Also, the main microstructural characteristics of LMC were studied using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The SEM investigation of the LMC showed major differences in its microstructure compared to that of the conventional concrete. The LMC proved to be superior in its durability compared to the durability of conventional concrete especially its water tightness (measured by water penetration, absorption, and sorptivity tests), abrasion, corrosion, and sulphate resistance.

  11. Sprayed Coating Renews Butyl Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Damaged butyl rubber products are renewed by spray technique originally developed for protective suits worn by NASA workers. A commercial two-part adhesive is mixed with Freon-113 (or equivalent) trichlorotrifluoroethane to obtain optimum viscosity for spraying. Mix is applied with an external-air-mix spray gun.

  12. Effects of Soy Protein Nanoparticle Aggregate Size on the Viscoelastic Properties of Styrene-Butadiene Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein nanoparticle aggregates were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of soy protein isolate (SPI). Light scattering measurements indicated a narrow size distribution of SPI aggregates. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed SPI (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB...

  13. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accepted chemical engineering principles, measurable process parameters, or physical or chemical laws or... engineering assessment, as described in paragraph (c)(2) of this section. (1) The owner or operator may choose... run. (2) The owner or operator may use engineering assessment to demonstrate compliance with...

  14. Acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR)/manganous tungstate (MnWO4) nanocomposites: Characterization, mechanical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Abdu Raheem V., P.; Jayakrishnan, P.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2014-10-01

    Nanocomposites of NBR with manganous-tungstate nanoparticles were prepared through vulcanization process. The extent of interaction of nanoparticles with the polymer was studied by FTIR, SEM, XRD, TGA and AC conductivity. FTIR and XRD ascertain the interaction of NBR with MnWO4 nanoparticles. SEM analysis established that the nanopartilces were well dispersed in the macromolecular chain of NBR. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were studied as a function of filler loading. The nanocomposites exhibited enhanced thermal stability as seen in TGA. Conductivity and dielectric properties of nanocomposites increase with increase in concentration of MnWO4 nanoparticles (7phr) and thereafter the value decreases.

  15. Latex Clearing Protein—an Oxygenase Cleaving Poly(cis-1,4-Isoprene) Rubber at the cis Double Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Hiessl, Sebastian; Böse, Dietrich; Oetermann, Sylvia; Eggers, Jessica; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2, a potent rubber-degrading actinomycete, harbors two latex clearing proteins (Lcps), which are known to be essential for the microbial degradation of rubber. However, biochemical information on the exact role of this protein in the degradation of polyisoprene was lacking. In this study, the gene encoding Lcp1VH2 was heterologously expressed in strains of Escherichia coli, the corresponding protein was purified, and its role in rubber degradation was examined by measurement of oxygen consumption as well as by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. It turned out that active Lcp1VH2 is a monomer and is responsible for the oxidative cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) in synthetic as well as in natural rubber by the addition of oxygen (O2) to the cis double bonds. The resulting oligomers possess repetitive isoprene units with aldehyde (CHO-CH2—) and ketone (—CH2-CO-CH3) functional groups at the termini. Two fractions with average isoprene contents of 18 and 10, respectively, were isolated, thus indicating an endocleavage mechanism. The activity of Lcp1VH2 was determined by applying a polarographic assay. Alkenes, acyclic terpenes, or other rubber-like polymers, such as poly(cis-1,4-butadiene) or poly(trans-1,4-isoprene), are not oxidatively cleaved by Lcp1VH2. The pH and temperature optima of the enzyme are at pH 7 and 30°C, respectively. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that active Lcp1VH2 is a Cu(II)-containing oxygenase that exhibits a conserved domain of unknown function which cannot be detected in any other hitherto-characterized enzyme. The results presented here indicate that this domain might represent a new protein family of oxygenases. PMID:24928880

  16. Latex clearing protein-an oxygenase cleaving poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) rubber at the cis double bonds.

    PubMed

    Hiessl, Sebastian; Böse, Dietrich; Oetermann, Sylvia; Eggers, Jessica; Pietruszka, Jörg; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2, a potent rubber-degrading actinomycete, harbors two latex clearing proteins (Lcps), which are known to be essential for the microbial degradation of rubber. However, biochemical information on the exact role of this protein in the degradation of polyisoprene was lacking. In this study, the gene encoding Lcp1VH2 was heterologously expressed in strains of Escherichia coli, the corresponding protein was purified, and its role in rubber degradation was examined by measurement of oxygen consumption as well as by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. It turned out that active Lcp1VH2 is a monomer and is responsible for the oxidative cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) in synthetic as well as in natural rubber by the addition of oxygen (O2) to the cis double bonds. The resulting oligomers possess repetitive isoprene units with aldehyde (CHO-CH2-) and ketone (-CH2-CO-CH3) functional groups at the termini. Two fractions with average isoprene contents of 18 and 10, respectively, were isolated, thus indicating an endocleavage mechanism. The activity of Lcp1VH2 was determined by applying a polarographic assay. Alkenes, acyclic terpenes, or other rubber-like polymers, such as poly(cis-1,4-butadiene) or poly(trans-1,4-isoprene), are not oxidatively cleaved by Lcp1VH2. The pH and temperature optima of the enzyme are at pH 7 and 30°C, respectively. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that active Lcp1VH2 is a Cu(II)-containing oxygenase that exhibits a conserved domain of unknown function which cannot be detected in any other hitherto-characterized enzyme. The results presented here indicate that this domain might represent a new protein family of oxygenases.

  17. (η(4)-Butadiene)Sn(0) Complexes: A New Approach for Zero-Valent p-Block Elements Utilizing a Butadiene as a 4π-Electron Donor.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Takuya; Nakada, Marisa; Hamada, Jumpei; Guo, Jing Dong; Nagase, Shigeru; Saito, Masaichi

    2016-09-07

    Research on zero-valent p-block elements is a recent hot topic in synthetic and theoretical chemistry because of their novel electronic states having two lone pairs in both the s- and p-orbitals. It is considered that σ-donating ligands bearing large substituents are essential to stabilize these species. Herein, we propose a new approach using butadiene as a 4π-electron donor to stabilize zero-valent group 14 elements. During our study to explore the coordination chemistry of stannacyclopentadienyl ligands, unexpected products, in which the tin atom is coordinated by a butadiene in a η(4)-fashion, were obtained. Because butadiene is a neutral 4π-electron donating ligand, the formal oxidation number of the tin atoms of the products should be zero, which is supported by X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. A mechanism for the formation of the products is also described.

  18. hprt mutant lymphocyte frequencies in workers at a 1,3-butadiene production plant.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J B; Ammenheuser, M M; Bechtold, W E; Whorton, E B; Legator, M S

    1994-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene is a major industrial chemical that has been shown to be a carcinogen at multiple sites in mice and rats at concentrations as low as 6.25 ppm. Occupational exposures have been reduced in response to these findings, but it may not be possible to determine by using traditional epidemiological methods, whether current exposure levels are adequate for protection of worker health. However, it is possible to evaluate the biological significance of exposure to genotoxic chemicals at the time of exposure by measuring levels of genetic damage in exposed populations. We have conducted a pilot study to evaluate the effects of butadiene exposure on the frequencies of lymphocytes containing mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in workers in a butadiene production plant. At the same time, urine specimens from the same individuals were collected and evaluated for the presence of butadiene-specific metabolites. Eight workers from areas of the plant where the highest exposures to butadiene occur were compared to five workers from plant areas where butadiene exposures were low. In addition, six subjects with no occupational exposure to butadiene were also studied as outside controls. All of the subjects were nonsmokers. An air sampling survey conducted for 6 months, and ending about 3 months before the study, indicated that average butadiene levels in the air of the high-exposure areas were about 3.5 +/- 7.5 ppm. They were 0.03 +/- 0.03 ppm in the low-exposure areas. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from the subjects were assayed using an autoradiographic test for hprt mutations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7698091

  19. Detection of electron tunneling across plasmonic nanoparticle-film junctions using nitrile vibrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Yao, Kun; Parkhill, John A; Schultz, Zachary D

    2017-02-22

    The significant electric field enhancements that occur in plasmonic nanogap junctions are instrumental in boosting the performance of spectroscopy, optoelectronics and catalysis. Electron tunneling, associated with quantum effects in small junctions, is reported to limit the electric field enhancement. However, observing and quantitatively determining how tunneling alters the electric fields within small gaps is challenging due to the nanoscale dimensions and heterogeneity present experimentally. Here, we report the use of a nitrile probe placed in the nanoparticle-film gap junctions to demonstrate that the change in the nitrile stretching band associated with the vibrational Stark effect can be directly correlated with the local electric field environment modulated by gap size variations. The emergence of Stark shifts correlates with plasmon resonance shifts associated with electron tunneling across the gap junction. Time dependent changes in the nitrile band with extended illumination further support a build up of charge associated with optical rectification in the coupled plasmon system. Computational models agree with our experimental observations that the frequency shifts arise from a vibrational Stark effect. Large local electric fields associated with the smallest gap junctions give rise to significant Stark shifts. These results indicate that nitrile Stark probes can measure the local field strengths in plasmonic junctions and monitor the subtle changes in the local electric fields resulting from electron tunneling.

  20. Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative synthesis of aryl nitriles from benzylic alcohols and aqueous ammonia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chuanzhou; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Youmin; Liu, Weiwei; Cao, Zhiling

    2013-05-28

    Copper-catalyzed direct conversion of benzylic alcohols to aryl nitriles was realized using NH3(aq.) as the nitrogen source, O2 as the oxidant and TEMPO as the co-catalyst. Furthermore, copper-catalyzed one-pot synthesis of primary aryl amides from alcohols was also achieved.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a nitrile hydrolysing acidotolerant black yeast-Exophiala oligosperma R1.

    PubMed

    Rustler, Sven; Stolz, Andreas

    2007-06-01

    Different nitriles were used as sole sources of nitrogen in a series of enrichments under acidic conditions to isolate acidotolerant nitriles hydrolysing microorganisms. From an enrichment in Na-citrate-phosphate buffer at pH 4 with glucose as carbon source and phenylacetonitrile as sole source of nitrogen, a black yeast (strain R1) was obtained which was identified by subsequent 18S rRNA gene sequencing as Exophiala oligosperma. The growth conditions of the organism were optimized for the production of cell material and the induction of the nitrile converting activity. Resting cell experiments demonstrated that phenylacetonitrile was converted via phenylacetic acid and 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. The organism could grow at pH 4 with phenylacetonitrile as sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The nitriles hydrolysing activity was also detected in cell-free extracts and indications for a nitrilase activity were found. The cell-free extracts converted, in addition to phenylacetonitrile, also different substituted phenylacetonitriles. Whole cells of E. oligosperma R1 converted phenylacetonitrile with almost the same reaction rates in the pH range from pH 1.5-pH 9.

  2. Synthesis of quinolones by nickel-catalyzed cycloaddition via elimination of nitrile.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kenichiro; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2013-02-15

    Substituted quinolones were efficiently synthesized via the nickel-catalyzed cycloaddition of o-cyanophenylbenzamide derivatives with alkynes. The reaction involves elimination of a nitrile group by cleavage of the two independent aryl-cyano and aryl-carbonyl C-C bonds of the amides.

  3. Imidazole-nitrile or imidazole-isonitrile C-C coupling on rhenium tricarbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Viguri, Maialen Espinal; Huertos, Miguel A; Pérez, Julio; Riera, Lucía

    2013-09-23

    Ligand activation: Deprotonation of the nitrile or isonitrile complexes [Re(CO)3(N-RIm)2(L)](+) (N-RIm = N-alkylimidazole; L = N≡CtBu, C≡NtBu) selectively afforded alkylidenamido or iminoacyl derivatives, respectively, in which C-C coupling has occurred. Protonation of the latter complex leads to aminocarbene products.

  4. Capture of an elusive nitrile ylide as an intermediate in isoxazole-oxazole photoisomerization.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Cláudio M; Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui

    2013-11-01

    The unimolecular photochemistry of 3,5-dimethylisoxazole (1) induced by a narrow-band tunable UV laser was studied using low-temperature matrix isolation coupled with infrared spectroscopy. Monomers of 1 were isolated in argon matrices at 15 K and characterized spectroscopically. Irradiation of matrix-isolated 1 at λ = 222 nm (near its absorption maximum) led to the corresponding 2H-azirine 3 and ketenimine 6 as primary photoproducts and also to nitrile ylide 4 and 2,5-dimethyloxazole (5). The photoproducts were identified (i) by comparison with infrared spectra of authentic matrix-isolated samples of 3 and 5 and (ii) using additional irradiations at longer wavelengths (where 1 does not react) which induce selective photoisomerizations of 4 and 6. In particular, irradiation with λ = 340 nm led to the unequivocal identification of the nitrile ylide anti-4, which was transformed into oxazole 5. The details of the 1,5-electrocyclization of the carbonyl nitrile ylide 4 and its structural nature (propargyl-like versus allene-like geometry) were also characterized using theoretical calculations. Thus, the elusive carbonyl nitrile ylide 4 was captured and characterized for the first time as an intermediate in the isoxazole-oxazole photoisomerization.

  5. Ruthenium hydroxide supported on magnetic nanoparticles: a benign aqueous protocol for hydration of nitriles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amides are an important class of compounds in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry1,2. Conventionally, amides have been synthesized by the hydration of nitriles, catalyzed by strong acids3 and bases4. Many by-products such as carboxylic acids are produced due to hydrolysis of...

  6. Synthesis of highly substituted oxazoles through iodine(III)-mediated reactions of ketones with nitriles.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akio; Hyodo, Nao; Hanzawa, Yuji

    2012-09-13

    In the presence of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TfOH) or bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide (Tf₂NH), iodosobenzene (PhI=O) efficiently promoted the reactions of dicarbonyl compounds as well as monocarbonyl compounds with nitriles to give 2,4-disubstituted and 2,4,5-trisubstituted oxazole in a single step under the mild conditions.

  7. Construction of a Spirooxindole Amide Library through Nitrile Hydrozirconation-Acylation-Cyclization Cascade

    PubMed Central

    LaPorte, Matthew G.; Tsegay, Sammi; Hong, Ki Bum; Lu, Chunliang; Fang, Cheng; Wang, Lirong; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Floreancig, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    A library of spirooxindoles containing varied elements of structural and stereochemical diversity has been constructed via a three step, one pot nitrile hydrozirconation-acylation-cyclization reaction sequence from common acyclic indole intermediates. The resulting library was evaluated for novelty through comparison with MLSMR and Maybridge compound collections. PMID:23731121

  8. General, stereoselective synthesis of (Z)-beta,gamma-unsaturated nitriles promoted by samarium diiodide.

    PubMed

    Concellón, José M; Rodríguez-Solla, Humberto; Simal, Carmen; Santos, David; Paz, Nieves R

    2008-10-16

    A method to obtain (Z)-beta,gamma-unsaturated nitriles in high or good yields and with moderate or high stereoselectivity is described. The products were achieved through the photoinduced metalation of 3-acetoxy-4-chloronitriles with SmI2. The starting compounds were readily prepared, and a mechanism is proposed to explain this stereoselective beta-elimination reaction.

  9. Rubber lining for FGD scrubbers for waste incinerator plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rullmann, H.E.

    1999-11-01

    Flue gas desulfurization scrubbers for waste incineration plants can be lined with soft rubber or hard rubber for corrosion protection. Hard rubber is cured under high temperature and pressure in an autoclave. The advantage of hard rubber is the excellent temperature and chemical resistance. The authors have experience with hard rubber lined scrubbers that are in service without failures for over 20 years.

  10. In-depth proteome analysis of the rubber particle of Hevea brasiliensis (para rubber tree).

    PubMed

    Dai, Longjun; Kang, Guijuan; Li, Yu; Nie, Zhiyi; Duan, Cuifang; Zeng, Rizhong

    2013-05-01

    The rubber particle is a special organelle in which natural rubber is synthesised and stored in the laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis. To better understand the biological functions of rubber particles and to identify the candidate rubber biosynthesis-related proteins, a comprehensive proteome analysis was performed on H. brasiliensis rubber particles using shotgun tandem mass spectrometry profiling approaches-resulting in a thorough report on the rubber particle proteins. A total of 186 rubber particle proteins were identified, with a range in relative molecular mass of 3.9-194.2 kDa and in isoelectric point values of 4.0-11.2. The rubber particle proteins were analysed for gene ontology and could be categorised into eight major groups according to their functions: including rubber biosynthesis, stress- or defence-related responses, protein processing and folding, signal transduction and cellular transport. In addition to well-known rubber biosynthesis-related proteins such as rubber elongation factor (REF), small rubber particle protein (SRPP) and cis-prenyl transferase (CPT), many proteins were firstly identified to be on the rubber particles, including cyclophilin, phospholipase D, cytochrome P450, small GTP-binding protein, clathrin, eukaryotic translation initiation factor, annexin, ABC transporter, translationally controlled tumour protein, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, and several homologues of REF, SRPP and CPT. A procedure of multiple reaction monitoring was established for further protein validation. This comprehensive proteome data of rubber particles would facilitate investigation into molecular mechanisms of biogenesis, self-homeostasis and rubber biosynthesis of the rubber particle, and might serve as valuable biomarkers in molecular breeding studies of H. brasiliensis and other alternative rubber-producing species.

  11. The enzymatic synthesis of rubber polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachalam, K.V.; Wooten, L.; Benedict, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Washed rubber particles (WRP) isolated from stem homogenates of Parthenium argentatum by ultracentrifugation and gel filtration on columns of LKB Ultrogel AcA34 contain a tightly bound rubber transferase which catalyzes the polymerization of IPP into rubber polymer. The polymerization reaction requires Mg{sup 2+}, IPP and an allylic-PP. The Km values for Mg{sup 2+}, IPP and DMAPP are 5.2{times}10{sup {minus}4}M, 8.3{times}10{sup {minus}5} M and 9.6{times}10{sup {minus}5}M respectively. Gel permeation chromatography of the enzymatic polymer product on 3 linear columns of 1{times}10{sup 6} to 500 {angstrom} Ultrastyragel shows that the in vitro formed polymer has a similar mol wt to natural rubber. Over 90% of the in vitro formation of the rubber polymer was a de novo polymerization reaction from DMAPP initiator and IPP monomers. The bound rubber polymerase substantially differs from cytosolic rubber transferase which catalyzes only chain lengthening reactions. Treatment of the WRP with Chaps solubilized the bound rubber transferase which was further purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The purified preparation primarily consists of a 52 kD polypeptide which binds to a photolabile substrate analog. The soluble rubber transferase catalyzes the synthesis of a 1{times}10{sup 5} mol wt rubber polymer from Mg{sup 2+}, DMAPP, IPP and detergent.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of crumb rubber and SBR on rutting resistance of asphalt concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Chuang-Tsair; Tia, Mang; Ruth, B.E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study to evaluate the effects of addition of crumb rubber (CR) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) on the rutting resistance of asphalt concrete. These two additives were blended with an AC-20 and an AC-30 grade asphalt cements at different levels of concentrations. These modified and unmodified asphalt blends were tested at intermediate and high temperatures to evaluate their rutting resistance characteristics. They were also used to make Florida type S-I structural surface mixtures. These mixtures were made into Marshall-size specimens by using Gyratory Testing Machine (GTM) equipped with air-roller to compact and density to three compaction levels which simulate three different conditions in the pavement. The FDOT`s (Florida Department of Transportation) Loaded Wheel Tester was also used to evaluate the rutting resistance of these asphalt mixtures. The test results indicate that the modified asphalt mixtures show relatively better rutting resistance and shear resistance as compared with the unmodified asphalt mixtures.

  13. Sorption study of toluene and xylene in aqueous solutions by recycled tires crumb rubber.

    PubMed

    Alamo-Nole, Luis A; Perales-Perez, Oscar; Roman-Velazquez, Felix R

    2011-01-15

    Sorption of toluene and xylene by tire crumb rubber (TCR) and its main components: carbon black (CB) and styrene-butadiene polymer (SBP) were evaluated. The 12 starting concentrations of adsorbates in aqueous solutions ranged from 0.05 mg/L to 100.0mg/L. The amounts of CB and SBP used in the sorption tests were determined considering their typical contents in tire crumb rubber (30% and 60% w/w, respectively). Freundlich's isotherms and Scatchard plot parameters suggested a two-step sorption process when TCR was used as the sorbent; whereas a single-step route was apparent when the sorption experiments were carried out with CB or SBP. Freundlich's n parameter was estimated at 0.65 for CB and 1.0 for both TCR and SBP. A removal of 60% of toluene and 81% of xylene from starting 50 ppm solutions was attained in the first 30 minutes of contact using 5 g/L of TCR.

  14. Electron beam crosslinked gels—Preparation, characterization and their effect on the mechanical, dynamic mechanical and rheological properties of rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Suman; Chattopadhyay, Santanu; Sabharwal, Sunil; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2010-03-01

    Electron beam (EB) crosslinked natural rubber (NR) gels were prepared by curing NR latex with EB irradiation over a range of doses from 2.5 to 20 kGy using butyl acrylate as sensitizer. The NR gels were systematically characterized by solvent swelling, dynamic light scattering, mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties. These gels were introduced in virgin NR and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) matrices at 2, 4, 8 and 16 phr concentration. Addition of the gels improved the mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties of NR and SBR considerably. For example, 16 phr of 20 kGy EB-irradiated gel-filled NR showed a tensile strength of 3.53 MPa compared to 1.85 MPa of virgin NR. Introduction of gels in NR shifted the glass transition temperature to a higher temperature. A similar effect was observed in the case of NR gel-filled SBR systems. Morphology of the gel-filled systems was studied with atomic force microscopy. The NR gels also improved the processability of the virgin rubbers greatly. Both the shear viscosity and the die swell values of EB-irradiated gel-filled NR and SBR were lower than their virgin counterparts as investigated by capillary rheometer.

  15. The Arabidopsis Epithiospecifier Protein Promotes the Hydrolysis of Glucosinolates to Nitriles and Influences Trichoplusia ni Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Lambrix, Virginia; Reichelt, Michael; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Glucosinolates are anionic thioglucosides that have become one of the most frequently studied groups of defensive metabolites in plants. When tissue damage occurs, the thioglucoside linkage is hydrolyzed by enzymes known as myrosinases, resulting in the formation of a variety of products that are active against herbivores and pathogens. In an effort to learn more about the molecular genetic and biochemical regulation of glucosinolate hydrolysis product formation, we analyzed leaf samples of 122 Arabidopsis ecotypes. A distinct polymorphism was observed with all ecotypes producing primarily isothiocyanates or primarily nitriles. The ecotypes Columbia (Col) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) differed in their hydrolysis products; therefore, the Col × Ler recombinant inbred lines were used for mapping the genes controlling this polymorphism. The major quantitative trait locus (QTL) affecting nitrile versus isothiocyanate formation was found very close to a gene encoding a homolog of a Brassica napus epithiospecifier protein (ESP), which causes the formation of epithionitriles instead of isothiocyanates during glucosinolate hydrolysis in the seeds of certain Brassicaceae. The heterologously expressed Arabidopsis ESP was able to convert glucosinolates both to epithionitriles and to simple nitriles in the presence of myrosinase, and thus it was more versatile than previously described ESPs. The role of ESP in plant defense is uncertain, because the generalist herbivore Trichoplusia ni (the cabbage looper) was found to feed more readily on nitrile-producing than on isothiocyanate-producing Arabidopsis. However, isothiocyanates are frequently used as recognition cues by specialist herbivores, and so the formation of nitriles instead of isothiocyanates may allow Arabidopsis to be less apparent to specialists. PMID:11752388

  16. High throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS methodology for mercapturic acid metabolites of 1,3-butadiene: Biomarkers of exposure and bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Esades, Amanda; Matter, Brock; Le, Chap; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2015-11-05

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is an important industrial and environmental carcinogen present in cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and urban air. The major urinary metabolites of BD in humans are 2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxybut-3-ene (MHBMA), 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA), and 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (THBMA), which are formed from the electrophilic metabolites of BD, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethyl vinyl ketone (HMVK), and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-diol (EBD), respectively. In the present work, a sensitive high-throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous quantification of MHBMA and DHBMA in small volumes of human urine (200 μl). The method employs a 96 well Oasis HLB SPE enrichment step, followed by isotope dilution HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS analysis on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The validated method was used to quantify MHBMA and DHBMA in urine of workers from a BD monomer and styrene-butadiene rubber production facility (40 controls and 32 occupationally exposed to BD). Urinary THBMA concentrations were also determined in the same samples. The concentrations of all three BD-mercapturic acids and the metabolic ratio (MHBMA/(MHBMA+DHBMA+THBMA)) were significantly higher in the occupationally exposed group as compared to controls and correlated with BD exposure, with each other, and with BD-hemoglobin biomarkers. This improved high throughput methodology for MHBMA and DHBMA will be useful for future epidemiological studies in smokers and occupationally exposed workers.

  17. Hydrogenation of nitriles on a well-characterized nickel surface: From surface science studies to liquid phase catalytic activity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gardin, Denis Emmanuel

    1993-12-01

    Nitrile hydrogenation is the most commonly used method for preparing diverse amines. This thesis is aimed at the mechanism and factors affecting the performance of Ni-based catalysts in nitrile hydrogenations. Surface science techniques are used to study bonding of nitriles and amines to a Ni(111) surface and to identify surface intermediates. Liquid-phase hydrogenations of cyclohexene and 1-hexene on a Pt foil were carried out successfully. Finally, knowledge about the surface structure, surface chemical bond, dynamics of surface atoms (diffusion, growth), and reactivity of metal surfaces from solid-gas interface studies, is discussed.

  18. In situ quantitative and kinetic study by Fourier transform raman spectroscopy of reaction between nitriles and hydroperoxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacque, V.; Dupuy, N.; Sombret, B.; Huvenne, J. P.; Legrand, P.

    1997-06-01

    The reaction of nitrile with alkaline hydrogen peroxide has been studied kinetically by means of iodometry several times. We proposed to set up an in situ analytical method to follow the consumption of nitrile. We applied FT-Raman spectroscopy coupled with a partial least-squares quantitative method to the study the reactions of hydrogen peroxide or tert-butyl hydroperoxide on benzonitrile and acetonitrile. The results obtained led us to conclusions on the reactivity of the hydroperoxides and on the rate of consumption of nitrile. Our study made also clear that FT-Raman spectroscopy was a convenient tool for controlling industrial processes.

  19. Pipeline-system insulation: thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. January 1976-November 1985 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1976-November 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulating of pipeline systems used to transfer liquids and gases. Thermal aging of polyurethane foam for insulating heating pipes, extrusion-film pipeline-insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile-rubber pipeline insulation with class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass-reinforced polyester insulated-pipeline systems are among the topics discussed. Applications in solar-heating systems, underground water, oil, and gas, interior hot-water and cold-water lines under seawater, and chemical-plant pipeline-system insulation are included. (This updated bibliography contains 266 citations, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  20. Pipeline-system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. December 1985-September 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for December 1985-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulating of pipeline systems utilized to transfer liquids and gases. Thermal aging of polyurethane foam for insulating heating pipes, extrusion-film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile-rubber pipeline insulation with class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass-reinforced polyester-insulated pipeline systems are among the topics discussed. Applications in solar heating systems, underground water, oil, and gas, interior hot water and cold water lines under seawater, and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (This updated bibliography contains 231 citations, 92 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  1. Modeling the temperature dependence of N-methylpyrrolidone permeation through butyl- and natural-rubber gloves.

    PubMed

    Zellers, E T; Sulewski, R

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes the temperature dependence of N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) permeation through gloves used in microelectronics fabrication facilities. One type of butyl-rubber glove (North B161), two types of natural-rubber gloves (Edmont Puretek and Ansell Pacific White), and a natural rubber/nitrile/neoprene-blend glove (Pioneer Trionic) were tested at four temperatures from 25-50 degrees C using the ASTM F739-85 permeation test method. The butyl-rubber glove showed no breakthrough after four hours of exposure at any temperature. The variations with temperature of measured breakthrough times (BT) and steady-state permeation rates (SSPR) for the other gloves were described well by Arrhenius relationships, with BT values decreasing by factors of 7-10 and SSPR values increasing by factors of 4-6 over the temperature range studied. Extrapolation to 70 and 93 degrees C, the temperatures at which degreasing is often performed, yielded BT values of < 2 min and < 0.5 min, respectively, in all cases. With the exception of the butyl-rubber glove, following an initial exposure at 25 degrees C and air drying overnight, low levels of NMP vapor were detected off-gassing from the inner surfaces of the gloves. Experimental results were then compared to those expected from several permeation models. Estimates of the equilibrium solvent solubility, S, were calculated using a model based on three-dimensional solubility parameters. Estimates of the solvent diffusion coefficient, D, were obtained from correlations with either the solvent kinematic viscosity or the product of the Flory interaction parameter, chi, and the solvent molar volume. Combining these values of D and S in Fickian diffusion equations gave modeled BT estimates that were within 23% of experimental values over the temperature range examined. Modeled SSPR values were within 50% (typically within 25%) of experimental values. Another model based on a generalized Arrhenius relationship also provided useful but

  2. Adding crumb rubber into exterior wall materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Han; Thong-On, Norasit; Zhang, Xiong

    2002-10-01

    In Arizona US, most houses are built with walls covered by stuccos/coatings/mortars. This paper presents an explorative investigation of adding crumb rubber into stuccos/coatings/mortars. A series of experiments are conducted to examine the thermal and mechanical performance of the crumb rubber mixes. The results show that, the mixes with crumb rubber do exhibit more desirable performances like being high in crack-resistance and thermal insulation, and low in thermal expansion/contraction. The drawback for the crumb rubber mixes is the reduction in compressive strength, but which can be compensated by other means. As a site experiment, an area of 100 square-feet of crumb rubber coatings for two mix designs is sprayed on a tire-adobe wall. After being sprayed more than 14 months, the coatings apparently are in good condition. Significance of this study is that this practice, if accepted, will yield improved products that consume large quantities of crumb rubber.

  3. Prehistoric polymers: rubber processing in ancient mesoamerica

    PubMed

    Hosler; Burkett; Tarkanian

    1999-06-18

    Ancient Mesoamerican peoples harvested latex from Castilla elastica, processed it using liquid extracted from Ipomoea alba (a species of morning glory vine), and fashioned rubber balls, hollow rubber figurines, and other rubber artifacts from the resulting material. Chemical and mechanical analyses of the latex and of the processed rubber indicate that the enhanced elastic behavior of the rubber relative to the unprocessed latex is due to purification of the polymer component and to an increase in the strength and number of interchain interactions that are induced by organic compounds present in I. alba. These ancient peoples' control over the properties of latex and processed rubber gave rise to the Mesoamerican ball game, a central ritual element in all ancient Mesoamerican societies.

  4. Identification of natural rubber and characterization of rubber biosynthetic activity in fig tree.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Kang, M Y; Han, K H

    2000-07-01

    Natural rubber was extracted from the fig tree (Ficus carica) cultivated in Korea as part of a survey of rubber producing plants. Fourier transform infrared and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of samples prepared by successive extraction with acetone and benzene confirmed that the benzene-soluble residues are natural rubber, cis-1,4-polyisoprene. The rubber content in the latex of fig tree was about 4%, whereas the rubber content in the bark, leaf, and fruit was 0.3%, 0.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. Gel-permeation chromatography revealed that the molecular size of the natural rubber from fig tree is about 190 kD. Similar to rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) and guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray), rubber biosynthesis in fig tree is tightly associated with rubber particles. The rubber transferase in rubber particles exhibited a higher affinity for farnesyl pyrophosphate than for isopentenyl pyrophosphate, with apparent K(m) values of 2.8 and 228 microM, respectively. Examination of latex serum from fig tree by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed major proteins of 25 and 48 kD in size, and several proteins with molecular mass below 20 and above 100 kD. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequencing and immunochemical analyses revealed that the 25- and 48-kD proteins were novel and not related to any other suggested rubber transferases. The effect of EDTA and Mg(2+) ion on in vitro rubber biosynthesis in fig tree and rubber tree suggested that divalent metal ion present in the latex serum is an important factor in determining the different rubber biosynthetic activities in fig tree and rubber tree.

  5. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-09-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  6. Influence of filler type on wet skid resistance of SSBR/BR composites: Effects from roughness and micro-hardness of rubber surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-Xia; Wu, You-Ping; Li, Wen-Ji; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-01-01

    The wet skid resistance (WSR) of SSBR/BR(solution styrene-butadiene rubber/butadiene rubber) composites filled with carbon black, silica, and nano-diamond partly replacing carbon black or silica, respectively, was measured with a portable British Pendulum Skid Tester (BPST). A dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer was used to obtain the viscoelasticity of the composites. A 3D scanning white-light interfering profilometer was used and the scratch test performed to characterize surface roughness and micro-roughness, respectively, of the composites. WSR of the silica-filled composite was better than that of the carbon black-filled one, and further enhancement of WSR was obtained by replacing silica with nano-diamond. Tan δ of the composites at 0 °C, 10 Hz, and tensile strain of 2% did not show good correlation with WSR. The surface roughness of the composites had effects on WSR. The scratch test indicated that the higher the hardness of the filler in the composite, the higher the micro-hardness and the better the WSR. Therefore, the surface micro-hardness of the composites is an important factor affecting WSR, besides viscoelasticity and surface roughness.

  7. Blow molding of melt processible rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, W.R.; Stuart, R.E.; Myrick, R.E.

    1991-07-01

    This article discusses the advantages of making hollow rubber parts by blow molding thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) versus conventional rubber processing. It describes the various types of blow molding processes and it provides some insight into the rheological properties of melt processible rubber (MPR) and how MPR should be molded by each of these processes. A number of blow molded applications for MPR are also discussed.

  8. Chemistry of rubber processing and disposal.

    PubMed

    Bebb, R L

    1976-10-01

    The major chemical changes during the processing of rubber occur with the breakdown in mastication and during vulcanization of the molded tire. There is little chemical change during the compounding, calendering, extrusion, and molding steps. Reclaiming is the process of converting scrap rubber into an unsaturated, processible product that can be vulcanized with sulfur. Pyrolysis of scrap rubber yields a complex mixture of liquids, gas, and residue in varying ratios dependent on the nature of the scrap and the conditions of pyrolysis.

  9. Method for the addition of vulcanized waste rubber to virgin rubber products

    DOEpatents

    Romine, Robert A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a method of using enzymes from thiophyllic microbes for selectively breaking the sulfur rubber cross-link bonds in vulcanized rubber. The process is halted at the sulfoxide or sulfone step so that a devulcanized layer is reactive with virgin rubber.

  10. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the rubber and plastics research association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Method for the addition of vulcanized waste rubber to virgin rubber products

    DOEpatents

    Romine, R.A.; Snowden-Swan, L.J.

    1997-01-28

    The invention is a method of using enzymes from thiophyllic microbes for selectively breaking the sulfur rubber cross-link bonds in vulcanized rubber. The process is halted at the sulfoxide or sulfone step so that a devulcanized layer is reactive with virgin rubber. 8 figs.

  13. The functional analyses of the cis-prenyltransferase and the rubber elongation factor in rubber biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) is an essential plant derived commodity required for the manufacture of numerous industrial, medical and household items. Rubber is synthesized and sequestered on cytsolic vesicles known as rubber particles. When provided with farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and is...

  14. Chemical modifications of liquid natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, Nur Hanis Adila; Rasid, Hamizah Md; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2016-11-01

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) was synthesized via photosentisized degradation of natural rubber (NR). LNR was modified into epoxidized liquid natural rubber (LENR) and hydroxylated liquid natural rubber (LNR-OH) using Na2WO4/CH3COOH/H2O2 catalytic system. Chemical structures of LNR and modified LNRs were characterized using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Integration of 1H NMR was used to calculate the epoxy content (%) of LENR. 1H NMR detected the formation of LNR-OH after prolonged heating and increased of catalyst in oxidation reaction.

  15. Malaria-associated rubber plantations in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Bhumiratana, Adisak; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Kaewwaen, Wuthichai; Maneekan, Pannamas; Pimnon, Suntorn

    2013-01-01

    Rubber forestry is intentionally used as a land management strategy. The propagation of rubber plantations in tropic and subtropic regions appears to influence the economical, sociological and ecological aspects of sustainable development as well as human well-being and health. Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries are the world's largest producers of natural rubber products; interestingly, agricultural workers on rubber plantations are at risk for malaria and other vector-borne diseases. The idea of malaria-associated rubber plantations (MRPs) encompasses the complex epidemiological settings that result from interactions among human movements and activities, land cover/land use changes, agri-environmental and climatic conditions and vector population dynamics. This paper discusses apparent issues pertaining to the connections between rubber plantations and the populations at high risk for malaria. The following questions are addressed: (i) What are the current and future consequences of rubber plantations in Thailand and Southeast Asia relative to malaria epidemics or outbreaks of other vector-borne diseases? (ii) To what extent is malaria transmission in Thailand related to the forest versus rubber plantations? and (iii) What are the vulnerabilities of rubber agricultural workers to malaria, and how contagious is malaria in these areas?

  16. Rubber Elasticity in Highly Crosslinked Polyesters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Esters, *Polymers, *Elastic properties, Rubber, Propylene glycol , Maleic acid, Anhydrides, Phthalic acids, Mechanical properties, Molecular structure, Crosslinking(Chemistry), Polymerization, Styrenes, Temperature, Transition temperature, Molecular weight

  17. Dangerous and cancer-causing properties of products and chemicals in the oil refining and petrochemical industry--Part II: Carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and developmental toxicity of 1,3-butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlman, M.A.; Legator, M.S. )

    1991-05-01

    1,3-butadiene (BD) is present in synthetic rubber and motor fuels (gasoline). BD is shown to cause lymphocytic lymphomas, heart hemangiosarcomas, lung alveolar bronchiolar cancers, forestomach-squamous cell cancers, harderian gland neoplasms, preputial gland adenoma or carcinoma, liver-hepatocellular cancers, mammary gland acinar cell carcinomas, ovary-glanulosa cell carcinoma, brain cancers, pancreas adenoma and carcinoma, testis-Leydig cell tumors, thyroid follicular adenoma and carcinoma, and zymbal gland carcinoma in rodents and to date no exposure level has been established at which this chemical does not cause cancers. In humans BD causes increase in lymphomas, leukemias, and other cancers of hematopoietic systems and organs. BD is also a potent alkylating agent, directly toxic to developing embryos and damages progeny after parental exposure.29 references.

  18. Quantum chemical study of relative reactivities of a series of amines and nitriles - Relevance to prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loew, G. H.; Berkowitz, D.; Chang, S.

    1975-01-01

    Using the Iterative Extended Huckel Theory (IEHT) calculations of the electron distribution and orbital energies of a series of thirteen amines, nitriles and amino-nitriles relevant to prebiotic and cosmo-chemistry have been carried out. Ground state properties such as the energy and nature of the highest occupied (HOMO) and lowest empty (LEMO) molecular orbitals, net atomic charges and number of nonbonding electrons have been identified as criteria for correlating the relative nucleophilicity of amine and nitrile nitrogens and the electrophilicity of nitrile and other unsaturated carbon atoms. The results of such correlations can be partially verified by known chemical behavior of these compounds and are used to predict and understand their role in prebiotic organic synthesis.

  19. Nitrile-converting enzymes as a tool to improve biocatalysis in organic synthesis: recent insights and promises.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jin-Song; Shi, Jin-Song; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Li, Heng; Zhou, Zhe-Min; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Nitrile-converting enzymes, including nitrilase and nitrile hydratase (NHase), have received increasing attention from researchers of industrial biocatalysis because of their critical role as a tool in organic synthesis of carboxylic acids and amides from nitriles. To date, these bioconversion approaches are considered as one of the most potential industrial processes using resting cells or purified enzymes as catalysts for production of food additives, pharmaceutical, and agrochemical precursors. This review focuses on the distribution and catalytic mechanism research of nitrile-converting enzymes in recent years. Molecular biology aspects to improve the biocatalytic performance of microbial nitrilase and NHase are demonstrated. The process developments of microbial nitrilase and NHase for organic synthesis are also discussed.

  20. Composite molding of SPECTRA{reg_sign} extended chain polyethylene fibers in a flexible rubber matrix

    SciTech Connect

    McKeehan, K.

    1997-08-01

    THETA Technologies, Inc. is a multidisciplinary research and development firm involved in the design and development of affordable, lightweight, high ballistic protection modular body armor ensemble for future military, law enforcement, and specialized commercial market applications. In the course of their research, THETA Technologies, Inc. identified that current state-of-the-art in ballistic protection and overall composite reinforcement is a high density extended chain polyethylene (HDECPE) fiber known as SPECTRA{reg_sign}, a product of AlliedSignal Fibers, Petersburg, VA. SPECTRA{reg_sign} is ten times stronger than steel of equal weight. As a non-aramid polyethylene, it offers highly desirable properties in areas of resistance to chemical degradation, virtual neutral buoyancy (0.97), and increased capacity for composite bonding over competing nylon-based fibers, such as KEVLAR{reg_sign}. SPECTRA Shield{trademark}, a woven ballistic-resistant fabric using the SPECTRA{reg_sign} fiber, is presently the most effective ballistic-resistant component for both flexible and hard plate composite armors. THETA Technologies, Inc. identified a market need for a boot sole design that would measurably increase protection to the wearer without significantly degrading performance in other areas, such as flexibility and overall weight. THETA Technologies, Inc. proposed a nitrile rubber and SPECTRA{reg_sign} fiber matrix to produce an optimal boot sole. The objective of this CRADA effort was to develop and test a process for combining the SPECTRA{reg_sign} fiber, in both chopped fiber and SPECTRA Shield{trademark} form, within a semiflexible nitrile composite having desirable and marketable properties in areas of resistance to penetration and mechanical stress.

  1. Photochemical isomerization in solution. Photophysics of diphenyl butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velsko, Stephan P.; Fleming, Graham R.

    1982-04-01

    We have examined the radiative and nonradiative decay rates of diphenyl butadiene in hydrocarbon and polar solvents as a function of temperature and pressure. We demonstrate that the radiative rate constant has a small dependence on solvent polarizability, in contrast to what is observed for diphenylhexatriene. We make an explicit separation of the internal molecular barrier to isomerization and the barrier due to frictional forces in the solvent. The energy of the internal barrier to isomerization is less than the activation energy observed in solution, and depends on the polarizability and polarity of the solvent. In contrast to diphenylhexatriene, it decreases, in more polar solvents. We compare the viscosity dependence of the barrier crossing process with Kramers' theory, the recent kinetic theory result of Skinner and Wolynes [J. Chem. Phys. 69, 2143 (1978)], and the free volume theory of Gegiou, Muzkat, and Fischer, [J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 90, 12 (1968)]. Our data clearly show that the isomerization process is in the intermediate friction limit and we obtain experimental values for the parameters of the three theories. Over the viscosity region studied, Kramers' and Skinner and Wolynes' equations coincide exactly and do not reproduce the functional dependence of the radiationless rate pre-exponential factor as well as the free volume theory. We speculate that it may be necessary to consider the frequency dependence of medium viscosity.

  2. a Look at Nitrile Chemistry in SGR B2(N) Using the Combined Power of the GBT and the VLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steber, Amanda; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Seifert, Nathan A.; Neill, Justin; Muckle, Matt; Pate, Brooks; Corby, Joanna F.; Remijan, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    Nitriles form the most prolific family of molecules known in the ISM, and laboratory work shows that radical-driven chemistry can account for the formation of a diverse set of nitrile and imine molecules. Broadband reaction screening of nitrile chemistry in a pulsed discharge nozzle coupled to a chirped-pulse Fourier transform rotational spectrometer has enabled detections of several new interstellar species including E- and Z-ethanimine and E-cyanomethanimine. The detections were made by direct comparisons of laboratory broadband rotational spectra with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) PRebiotic Interstellar MOlecule Survery (PRIMOS) survey towards Sgr B2(N), the most chemically complex interstellar region known. In order to probe nitrile chemistry in Sgr B2, we targeted low energy rotational transitions in the 18-21 GHz range of several nitriles with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at ˜1 arcsecond resolution. The data indicate that most nitriles and nitrile derivatives are co-spatial with shell shaped continuum features thought to be expanding ionization fronts. The CH2CN radical and imine species in particular are NOT associated with the hot core known as the "Large Molecule Heimat", where most large organic molecules are thought to reside. This result suggests radical driven nitrile chemistry may be promoted by near-UV radiation in moderate density regions of molecular clouds, and the data will be useful for evaluating possible formation mechanisms. R.A. Loomis et al. Ap. J. L., 765, (L9), 2013. D.P. Zaleski et al. Ap. J. L., 765, (L10), 2013.

  3. Product-catalyzed addition of alkyl nitriles to unactivated imines promoted by sodium aryloxide/ethyl(trimethylsilyl)acetate (ETSA) combination.

    PubMed

    Poisson, Thomas; Gembus, Vincent; Oudeyer, Sylvain; Marsais, Francis; Levacher, Vincent

    2009-05-01

    The first transition-metal-free addition of alkyl nitriles to unactivated imines was developed using a catalytic combination of 4-MeOC(6)H(4)ONa and TMSCH(2)CO(2)Et to promote the reaction. The corresponding beta-amino nitriles are obtained in good to almost quantitative isolated yields under mild conditions. A mechanism involving an autocatalytic pathway is proposed on the basis of experimental observations.

  4. Electron scattering from 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, C5H8 , molecules: Role of methylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmytkowski, Czesław; Stefanowska, Sylwia; Zawadzki, Mateusz; Ptasińska-Denga, ElŻbieta; MoŻejko, Paweł

    2016-10-01

    We report cross-section results from experimental and theoretical investigations into electron collisions with the 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene [C5H8] molecule. The current results are compared with our previous results for the 1,3-butadiene [C4H6] molecule, a structural homologue of 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, to investigate how the methylation (the substitution of hydrogen atom by a methyl group) affects the shape and/or magnitude of the total cross sections (TCSs). Both experimental TCS energy dependencies have certain features in common: the Ramsauer-Townsend-like minimum located within 1.4-1.6 eV; the resonant maximum centered at 3.4 eV for the 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene molecule and at 3.2 eV for 1,3-butadiene; a weak shoulder in the vicinity of 7 eV; and the pronounced broad enhancement peaking around 8.5 eV for 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene and near 9.5 eV for 1,3-butadiene. The magnitude of the TCS for 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene appears to be higher than that for 1,3-butadiene over the whole investigated energy range. Closer analysis of data shows that the TCS for 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene can be reasonably reproduced by the sum of TCSs for 1,3-butadiene and half of the TCS for the ethane [C2H6] molecule—that stays for the TCS of the methyl unit [CH3] . That result can be extended to homologous series of methyl-substituted allenes, ethylenes, and acetylenes.

  5. Assessment of the potential risk to workers from exposure to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, D; Rodricks, J V; Brett, S M

    1990-01-01

    The available epidemiologic data provide equivocal evidence that 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic in humans; some available studies suggest that the lymphopoietic system is a target, but there are inconsistencies among studies in the types of tumors associated with 1,3-butadiene exposure, and there is no evidence of a relationship between length of exposure and cancer risk, as one might expect if there was a true causal relationship between 1,3-butadiene exposure and cancer risk. The available chronic animal studies, however, show an increase in tumor incidence associated with exposure to high concentrations of 1,3-butadiene. In addition to the general uncertainty of the relevance of animal data to humans, there are several additional reasons why the National Toxicology Program's mouse study may not be appropriate for assessing possible human risks. These include: a) the possible involvement of a species-specific tumor virus (MuLV) in the response in mice; b) apparent differences between mice and humans in the rate of metabolism of 1,3-butadiene to reactive epoxides that may be proximate carcinogens; c) use of high dose levels that caused excess early mortality; and d) exposure of animals to 1,3-butadiene for only about half their lifetime. While recognizing the uncertainty in using the available animal data for risk assessment, we have performed low-dose extrapolation of the data to examine the implications of the data if humans were as sensitive as rats or mice to 1,3-butadiene, and to examine how the predictions of the animal data compare to that observed in the epidemiologic studies. With the mouse data, because the study was of less than lifetime duration, we have used the Hartley-Sielken time-to-tumor model to permit estimation of lifetime risk from the less than lifetime exposure of the study. With the rat data, we have used three plausible models for assessing low-dose risk: the multistage model, the Weibull model, and the Mantel-Bryan probit model. With both

  6. Molecular Design, Synthesis and Trypanocidal Activity of Dipeptidyl Nitriles as Cruzain Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Avelar, Leandro A. A.; Camilo, Cristian D.; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Fernandes, William B.; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W.; Leitão, Andrei; McKerrow, James H.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Orozco, Erika V. Meñaca; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Rosini, Fabiana; Saidel, Marta E.

    2015-01-01

    A series of compounds based on the dipeptidyl nitrile scaffold were synthesized and assayed for their inhibitory activity against the T. cruzi cysteine protease cruzain. Structure activity relationships (SARs) were established using three, eleven and twelve variations respectively at the P1, P2 and P3 positions. A Ki value of 16 nM was observed for the most potent of these inhibitors which reflects a degree of non-additivity in the SAR. An X-ray crystal structure was determined for the ligand-protein complex for the structural prototype for the series. Twenty three inhibitors were also evaluated for their anti-trypanosomal effects and an EC50 value of 28 μM was observed for the most potent of these. Although there remains scope for further optimization, the knowledge gained from this study is also transferable to the design of cruzain inhibitors based on warheads other than nitrile as well as alternative scaffolds. PMID:26173110

  7. Molecular Design, Synthesis and Trypanocidal Activity of Dipeptidyl Nitriles as Cruzain Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Leandro A A; Camilo, Cristian D; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Fernandes, William B; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W; Leitão, Andrei; McKerrow, James H; Montanari, Carlos A; Orozco, Erika V Meñaca; Ribeiro, Jean F R; Rocha, Josmar R; Rosini, Fabiana; Saidel, Marta E

    2015-01-01

    A series of compounds based on the dipeptidyl nitrile scaffold were synthesized and assayed for their inhibitory activity against the T. cruzi cysteine protease cruzain. Structure activity relationships (SARs) were established using three, eleven and twelve variations respectively at the P1, P2 and P3 positions. A Ki value of 16 nM was observed for the most potent of these inhibitors which reflects a degree of non-additivity in the SAR. An X-ray crystal structure was determined for the ligand-protein complex for the structural prototype for the series. Twenty three inhibitors were also evaluated for their anti-trypanosomal effects and an EC50 value of 28 μM was observed for the most potent of these. Although there remains scope for further optimization, the knowledge gained from this study is also transferable to the design of cruzain inhibitors based on warheads other than nitrile as well as alternative scaffolds.

  8. Molecular tectonics: on the formation of 1-D silver coordination networks by thiacalixarenes bearing nitrile groups.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Marina N; Ferlay, Sylvie; Solovieva, Svetlana E; Antipin, Igor S; Konovalov, Alexander I; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2007-11-28

    Two new p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arene derivatives 2 and 3 decorated at the lower rim with four nitrile groups have been prepared and structurally characterised in the crystalline phase. The two ligands, differing by the length of the spacer between the calix moiety and the nitrile group, adopt the 1,3-alternate conformation in the solid state. The ligand 3 bearing four (CH(2))(3)CN fragments behaves as a tecton in the presence of silver salts (AgX, X = BF(4), PF(6) or SbF(6)) and leads to the formation of analogous 1-D linear coordination networks. The tecton 3 acts as a bischelate unit and bridges consecutive silver cations adopting a tetrahedral coordination geometry. Anions and solvent molecules occupy the free space between networks and exhibit no specific interactions with the cationic architecture.

  9. In vitro synthesis of high molecular weight rubber by Hevea small rubber particles.

    PubMed

    Rojruthai, Porntip; Sakdapipanich, Jitladda Tangpakdee; Takahashi, Seiji; Hyegin, Lee; Noike, Motoyoshi; Koyama, Tanetoshi; Tanaka, Yasuyuki

    2010-02-01

    Hevea brasiliensis is one of few higher plants producing the commercial natural rubber used in many significant applications. The biosynthesis of high molecular weight rubber molecules by the higher plants has not been clarified yet. Here, the in vitro rubber biosynthesis was performed by using enzymatically active small rubber particles (SRP) from Hevea. The mechanism of the in vitro rubber synthesis was investigated by the molecular weight distribution (MWD). The highly purified SRP prepared by gel filtration and centrifugation in the presence of Triton((R)) X-100 showed the low isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) incorporation for the chain extension mechanism of pre-existing rubber. The MWD of in vitro rubber elongated from the pre-existing rubber chains in SRP was analyzed for the first time in the case of H. brasiliensis by incubating without the addition of any initiator. The rubber transferase activity of 70% incorporation of the added IPP (w/w) was obtained when farnesyl diphosphate was present as the allylic diphosphate initiator. The in vitro synthesized rubber showed a typical bimodal MWD of high and low molecular weight fractions in GPC analysis, which was similar to that of the in vivo rubber with peaks at around 10(6) and 10(5) Da or lower. The reaction time independence and dependence of molecular weight of high and low molecular weight fractions, respectively, indicated that the high molecular weight rubber was synthesized from the chain extension of pre-existing rubber molecules whereas the lower one was from the chain elongation of rubber molecules newly synthesized from the added allylic substrates.

  10. Cotton-Fiber-Filled Rubber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Floyd A.

    1987-01-01

    Carbonization of fibers at high temperatures improves strength and erosion resistance. Cotton linters tested as replacement for asbestos filler currently used in rubber insulation in solid rocket motors. Cotton-filled rubber insulation has industrial uses; in some kinds of chemical- or metal-processing equipment, hoses, and protective clothing.

  11. Rubber transferase in guayule plants. [Parthenium argentatum

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, C.L.; Foster, M.A.; Benedict, C.R.

    1986-04-01

    Rubber transferase catalyzes the transfer of cis-1,4-polyprenyl-PP to isopentenyl-PP (IPP) with the elimination of PP/sub i/. Rubber transferase activity in guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) stems was localized in the lipid fraction of the homogenate following centrifugation in buffer and 0.4M Mannitol. Washed rubber particles were obtained by the chromatography of the lipid fraction on Ultrogel columns with an exclusion limit of 750,000 daltons by the procedure of B.G. Audley (private communication). The rubber particles catalyzed the incorporation of /sup 14/C-IPP into cis-polyisoprene. The radioactive cis-polyisoprene was identified by ozonolysis and chromatography of the resulting /sup 14/C-levulinic acid. The synthesis of cis-polyisoprene in the rubber particles required Mg/sup 2 +/ and IPP and was stimulated 2-fold with the addition of DMAPP. Rubber synthesis in guayule plants growing in the Permian Basin of West Texas does not occur during summer months but is induced by the cold night temperatures of the fall and winter. From August to December individual plants (which were transplanted in May) accumulated from 66mg to 11,800mg or rubber. During this period there was a 4-fold increase in rubber transferase activity in stem homogenates induced by the low temperatures.

  12. Amino acid modifiers in guayule rubber compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tire producers are increasingly interested in biobased materials, including rubber but also as compounding chemicals. An alternative natural rubber for tire use is produced by guayule, a woody desert shrub native to North America. Alternative compounding chemicals include naturally-occurring amino a...

  13. Unraveling the Mystery of Natural Rubber Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber (NR) is primarily obtained from Hevea brasiliensis, commonly known as the Brazilian rubber tree. As this species contains little genetic variation, it is susceptible to pathogen-based eradication. Consequently, it is imperative that a biomimetic pathway for NR production be developed....

  14. RADIATION INDUCED VULCANIZATION OF RUBBER LATEX

    DOEpatents

    Mesrobian, R.B.; Ballantine, D.S.; Metz, D.J.

    1964-04-28

    A method of vulcanizing rubber latex by exposing a mixture containing rubber latex and from about 15 to about 21.3 wt% of 2,5-dichlorostyrene to about 1.1 megarads of gamma radiation while maintaining the temperature of the mixture at a temperature ranging between from about 56 to about 59 deg C is described. (AEC)

  15. Zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily P; Ren, Zhiyong; Mays, David C

    2012-12-04

    Because tires contain approximately 1-2% zinc by weight, zinc leaching is an environmental concern associated with civil engineering applications of tire crumb rubber. An assessment of zinc leaching data from 14 studies in the published literature indicates that increasing zinc leaching is associated with lower pH and longer leaching times, but the data display a wide range of zinc concentrations, and do not address the effect of crumb rubber size or the dynamics of zinc leaching during flow through porous crumb rubber. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of crumb rubber size using the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), the effect of exposure time using quiescent batch leaching tests, and the dynamics of zinc leaching using column tests. Results indicate that zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber increases with smaller crumb rubber and longer exposure time. Results from SPLP and quiescent batch leaching tests are interpreted with a single-parameter leaching model that predicts a constant rate of zinc leaching up to 96 h. Breakthrough curves from column tests displayed an initial pulse of elevated zinc concentration (~3 mg/L) before settling down to a steady-state value (~0.2 mg/L), and were modeled with the software package HYDRUS-1D. Washing crumb rubber reduces this initial pulse but does not change the steady-state value. No leaching experiment significantly reduced the reservoir of zinc in the crumb rubber.

  16. Roughness Perception during the Rubber Hand Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutz-Bosbach, Simone; Tausche, Peggy; Weiss, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Watching a rubber hand being stroked by a paintbrush while feeling identical stroking of one's own occluded hand can create a compelling illusion that the seen hand becomes part of one's own body. It has been suggested that this so-called rubber hand illusion (RHI) does not simply reflect a bottom-up multisensory integration process but that the…

  17. Guayule: Culture, breeding and rubber production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pressure on worldwide Hevea rubber supplies and other factors are renewing interest in guayule rubber. The objective of this chapter is to review recent and past research dealing with guayule production, breeding, and product development. Production research continues to show that although guayule i...

  18. 69 FR 78474 - Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-12-30

    ... COMMISSION Polychloroprene Rubber From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... Japan. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice of the scheduling of a full review pursuant to... revocation of the antidumping duty order on polychloroprene rubber from Japan would be likely to lead...

  19. Crystal structure of 2-(4-methyl­benzyl­idene)malono­nitrile

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Ouafa; Rakib, El Mostapha; Hannioui, Abdellah; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2014-01-01

    The mol­ecule of the title compound, C11H8N2, is approximately planar (r.m.s.deviation for all non-H atoms = 0.023 Å). The malono­nitrile C—C—C angle is 113.54 (13)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules stack head-to-tail along [010]. There are no significant inter­molecular inter­actions present. PMID:25553034

  20. Permeation of Military Fuels Through Nitrile-Coated Fabrics Used for Collapsible Fuel Storage Containers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    five of the candidate fabrics: the Bell Avon, Dunlop, Eng Fabrics, AmFuel, and Reeves fabrics. However, the Zodiac and Pronal nitrile-coated fabrics...Fife, U.K.), Engineering Fabrics (Rockmart, GA), Zodiac Fabrics Co. (London, Canada), Pronal Elastomer Engineering (Leers, France), Reeves Brothers...permeation rates measured. The three remaining coated fabric materials—BLSS, Zodiac , and Pronal—exhibited significantly lower permeation rates ranging from

  1. Hydrogen-bonding interactions between a nitrile-based functional ionic liquid and DMSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yu; Deng, Geng; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2016-11-01

    Task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) have been introduced by incorporating additional functional groups in the cation or anion to impart specific properties or reactivates. In this work, the hydrogen-bonding interactions between a nitrile-functional TSIL 1-propylnitrile-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([PCNMIM][BF4]) and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) were investigated in detail by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), combined with hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and density functional theory calculations (DFT). It was found that, first, introducing a nitrile group into the alkyl chain does not change the main interaction site in the cation. It is still the C2 hydrogen. So the v(C2-H) is more sensitive to the environmental change and can be used as an indicator of the environments change of IL. Second, the wavenumber shift changes of v(C2-H) have two turning points (xDMSO ≈ 0.6 and 0.9), dividing the dilution process into three stages. Combined with the calculation results, the dilution process is identified as: From larger ion clusters to smaller ion clusters (xDMSO < 0.6), then to ion pairs (0.6 0.9). Introducing a nitrile group into the alkyl chain does not influence the dilution process of IL dissolving in DMSO. Third, the Ctbnd N in [PCNMIM][BF4] can work as an electron donor in forming hydrogen-bonds with the methyl group of [PCNMIM]+ and DMSO, but its strength is weaker than that formed by the imidazolium ring C-Hs. The dual roles of the cation to work as both electron acceptor and donor expand the wide applications of this nitrile-functional ionic liquid.

  2. Cycloaddition of C{sub 60} fullerene and stable nitrile oxide, 2-(benzenesulfonyl)benzonitrile oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Drozd, V.N.; Sokolov, V.I.; Stoyanovich, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    The general features of the reactivity of fullerenes as polyolefins have been well studied over a wide range of cycloadditions. In this study, the stable 2-(benzenesulfonyl)benzonitrile oxide is used to look at the interaction between fullerene and aryl nitrile oxides. Employed were {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy to determine the electronic and molecular structure of the reaction`s monoadduct.

  3. Multicomponent Approach to the Synthesis of Oxidized Amides through Nitrile Hydrozirconation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Shuangyi; Green, Michael E.; Park, Jung-Hyun; Floreancig, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    “Oxidized” amides, as represented by acyl aminals and acyl hemiaminals, are integral subunits of several natural products that exhibit useful biological activity. In this manuscript a multicomponent approach to these groups from acylimine intermediates is demonstrated. The acylimines are accessed through a sequence of nitrile hydrozirconation and acylation, making this highly versatile amide synthesis useful for a range of range of applications in target- and diversity-oriented synthesis. PMID:18020344

  4. PRODUCTS OF THE GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF 1,3-BUTADIENE WITH OH AND NO3 RADICALS. (R825252)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,3-Butadiene is emitted into the atmosphere from a number of sources
    including combustion sources and is listed in the United States as a hazardous
    air pollutant. In the atmosphere, 1,3-butadiene reacts with OH radicals,
    NO3 radicals, and O3 ...

  5. Temperature field in rubber vibration isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhadi, M. Issa

    1985-02-01

    The temperature field inside a vibrating rubber solid cylinder is investigated. The rubber cylinder, a specimen of a vibration isolator rubber (Neoprene GR), is subjected to a repeatedly cyclic compressive force by means of an electrodynamic shaker. In the experimental investigation the temperatures at 16 different locations inside the cylinder have been measured by means of copper-constantan thermocouples. After the estimation of the heat generated per unit volume per unit time with the help of the estimated damping and stiffness coefficients of rubber, one can attempt the solution of the heat conduction equation describing the temperature field inside the rubber specimen. The values of the temperature found from the analytical investigation compare fairly well with the experimental measurements.

  6. Rubber elasticity: From topology to filled elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, G.; Vilgis, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    Various new aspects in the elasticity of rubbers and statistics of unfilled and filled elastomers, together with various consequences for practical application are discussed. It is shown that the role of network topology is crucial in the statistics of rubbers. This is seen mostly on the influence of heterogeneities of crosslink density which determine the elastic modulus, ultimate properties as well as the dynamical behavior. The filler effects, entanglements in filled rubbers, and the filler/bound rubber/mobile rubber problem are discussed from a novel point of view. A localization model is adopted, where it can be shown that on a rough (filler) surface more polymer can be adsorbed compared to a flat surface with similar energetic properties. The role of carbon black networking and fractal properties of the filler are discussed in relation to the dynamic-mechanical properties of the elastomer.

  7. Rubber rolling over a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koiller, J.; Ehlers, K.

    2007-04-01

    “Rubber” coated bodies rolling over a surface satisfy a no-twist condition in addition to the no slip condition satisfied by “marble” coated bodies [1]. Rubber rolling has an interesting differential geometric appeal because the geodesic curvatures of the curves on the surfaces at corresponding points are equal. The associated distribution in the 5 dimensional configuration space has 2 3 5 growth (these distributions were first studied by Cartan; he showed that the maximal symmetries occurs for rubber rolling of spheres with 3:1 diameters ratio and materialize the exceptional group G 2). The 2 3 5 nonholonomic geometries are classified in a companion paper [2] via Cartan’s equivalence method [3]. Rubber rolling of a convex body over a sphere defines a generalized Chaplygin system [4 8] with SO(3) symmetry group, total space Q = SO(3) × S 2 and base S 2, that can be reduced to an almost Hamiltonian system in T* S 2 with a non-closed 2-form ωNH. In this paper we present some basic results on the sphere-sphere problem: a dynamically asymmetric but balanced sphere of radius b (unequal moments of inertia I j but with center of gravity at the geometric center), rubber rolling over another sphere of radius a. In this example ωNH is conformally symplectic [9]: the reduced system becomes Hamiltonian after a coordinate dependent change of time. In particular there is an invariant measure, whose density is the determinant of the reduced Legendre transform, to the power p = 1/2( b/a - 1). Using sphero-conical coordinates we verify the result by Borisov and Mamaev [10] that the system is integrable for p = -1/2 (ball over a plane). They have found another integrable case [11] corresponding to p = -3/2 (rolling ball with twice the radius of a fixed internal ball). Strikingly, a different set of sphero-conical coordinates separates the Hamiltonian in this case. No other integrable cases with different I j are known.

  8. The active site sulfenic acid ligand in nitrile hydratases can function as a nucleophile.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard

    2014-01-29

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) catalyzes the hydration of nitriles to their corresponding commercially valuable amides at ambient temperatures and physiological pH. Several reaction mechanisms have been proposed for NHase enzymes; however, the source of the nucleophile remains a mystery. Boronic acids have been shown to be potent inhibitors of numerous hydrolytic enzymes due to the open shell of boron, which allows it to expand from a trigonal planar (sp(2)) form to a tetrahedral form (sp(3)). Therefore, we examined the inhibition of the Co-type NHase from Pseudonocardia thermophila JCM 3095 (PtNHase) by boronic acids via kinetics and X-ray crystallography. Both 1-butaneboronic acid (BuBA) and phenylboronic acid (PBA) function as potent competitive inhibitors of PtNHase. X-ray crystal structures for BuBA and PBA complexed to PtNHase were solved and refined at 1.5, 1.6, and 1.2 Å resolution. The resulting PtNHase-boronic acid complexes represent a "snapshot" of reaction intermediates and implicate the cysteine-sulfenic acid ligand as the catalytic nucleophile, a heretofore unknown role for the αCys(113)-OH sulfenic acid ligand. Based on these data, a new mechanism of action for the hydration of nitriles by NHase is presented.

  9. A first principle study of graphene functionalized with hydroxyl, nitrile, or methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoumi, M.; Rocca, D.; Said, M.; Lebègue, S.

    2017-01-01

    By means of ab initio calculations, we study the functionalization of graphene by different chemical groups such as hydroxyl, nitrile, or methyl. Two extreme cases of functionalization are considered: a single group on a supercell of graphene and a sheet of graphene fully functionalized. Once the equilibrium geometry is obtained by density functional theory, we found that the systems are metallic when a single group is attached to the sheet of graphene. With the exception of the nitrile functionalized boat configuration, a large bandgap is obtained at full coverage. Specifically, by using the GW approximation, our calculated bandgaps are direct and range between 5.0 and 5.5 eV for different configurations of hydroxyl functionalized graphene. An indirect GW bandgap of 6.50 eV was found in nitrile functionalized graphene while the methyl group functionalization leads to a direct bandgap with a value of 4.50 eV. Since in the two limiting cases of minimal and full coverage, the electronic structure changes drastically from a metal to a wide bandgap semiconductor, a series of intermediate states might be expected by tuning the amount of functionalization with these different groups.

  10. Interaction of papain-like cysteine proteases with dipeptide-derived nitriles.

    PubMed

    Löser, Reik; Schilling, Klaus; Dimmig, Elke; Gütschow, Michael

    2005-12-01

    A series of 44 dipeptide nitriles with various amino acids at the P2 position and glycine nitrile at position P1 were prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. With respect to the important contribution of the P2-S2 interaction to the formation of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, it was focused to introduce structural diversity into the P2 side chain. Nonproteinogenic amino acids were introduced, and systematic fluorine, bromine, and phenyl scans for phenylalanine in the P2 position were performed. Moreover, the N-terminal protection was varied. Kinetic investigations were carried out with cathepsin L, S, and K as well as papain. Changes in the backbone structure of the parent N-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-phenylalanyl-glycine-nitrile (16), such as the introduction of an R-configured amino acid or an azaamino acid into P2 as well as methylation of the P1 nitrogen, resulted in a drastic loss of affinity. Exemplarily, the cyano group of 16 was replaced by an aldehyde or methyl ketone function. Structure-activity relationships were discussed with respect to the substrate specificity of the target enzymes.

  11. Nitrile-functionalized ruthenium nanoparticles: charge delocalization through Ru - N ≡ C interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengqi; Huang, Lin; Zou, Jiasui; Yan, Jinwu; Zhu, Jiaying; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2017-03-01

    Ruthenium nanoparticles (2.06 ± 0.46 nm in diameter) were stabilized by the self-assembly of nitrile molecules onto the ruthenium colloid surface by virtue of the formation of Ru-N≡C interfacial bonding linkages. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that there were about 63 nitrile ligands per nanoparticle, corresponding to an average molecular footprint of 22.4 Å2. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies suggested an end-on configuration of the nitrile moiety on the metal core surface. Meanwhile, infrared measurements showed that the C≡N stretch red-shifted from 2246 to 1944 cm-1 upon adsorption on the nanoparticle surfaces, as confirmed by 15N isotopic labeling. This apparent red-shift suggests extensive intraparticle charge delocalization, which was further manifested by photoluminescence measurements of 1-cyanopyrene-functionalized ruthenium nanoparticles that exhibited a red shift of 40 nm of the emission maximum, in comparison to that of free monomers. The results further highlight the significance of metal-organic contacts in the manipulation of the dynamics of intraparticle charge transfer and the nanoparticle optical and electronic properties.

  12. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Nitrile Ices Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie; Ferrante, Robert F.; Moore, W. James; Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla H.

    2011-01-01

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan?s atmosphere have been determined from 2.0 to 333.3 microns (approx.5000 to 30/cm). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan?s winter pole. Ices studied were: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C2N2, cyanogen; CH3CN, acetonitrile; C2H5CN, propionitrile; and HC3N, cyanoacetylene. Optical constants were calculated, using Kramers-Kronig analysis, for each nitrile ice?s spectrum measured at a variety of temperatures, in both the amorphous- and crystalline phases. Spectra were also measured for many of the nitriles after quenching at the annealing temperature and compared with those of annealed ices. For each of these molecules we also measured the real component, n, of the refractive index for amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. Several examples of the information contained in these new data sets and their usefulness in modeling Titan?s observed features will be presented (e.g., the broad emission feature at 160/cm; Anderson and Samuelson, 2011).

  13. Significance of 1,3-butadiene to the US air toxics regulatory effort.

    PubMed

    Morrow, N L

    2001-06-01

    Because of its prevalence, particularly as a combustion by-product, 1,3-butadiene is a particularly important air toxic. It plays a significant role in all air toxics regulatory efforts in the US. The various requirements of the Federal Clean Air Act (CAA) dealing with air toxics are reviewed and the significance of 1,3-butadiene in each area is discussed in light of what is known about its emissions and health effects. The impacts of the changes in the understanding of 1,3-butadiene cancer potency over the past 15 years demonstrates the possible impact of such benchmarks and the importance of using the best science in understanding public health risks.

  14. 1,3-Butadiene: linking metabolism, dosimetry, and mutation induction.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J A; Csanady, G A; Gargas, M L; Guengerich, F P; Leavens, T; Medinsky, M A; Recio, L

    1994-01-01

    There is increasing concern for the potential adverse health effects of human exposures to chemical mixtures. To better understand the complex interactions of chemicals within a mixture, it is essential to develop a research strategy which provides the basis for extrapolating data from single chemicals to their behavior within the chemical mixture. 1,3-Butadiene (BD) represents an interesting case study in which new data are emerging that are critical for understanding interspecies differences in carcinogenic/genotoxic response to BD. Knowledge regarding mechanisms of BD-induced carcinogenicity provides the basis for assessing the potential effects of mixtures containing BD. BD is a multisite carcinogen in B6C3F1 mice and Sprague-Dawley rats. Mice exhibit high sensitivity relative to the rat to BD-induced tumorigenesis. Since it is likely that BD requires metabolic activation to mutagenic reactive epoxides that ultimately play a role in carcinogenicity of the chemical, a quantitative understanding of the balance of activation and inactivation is essential for improving our understanding and assessment of human risk following exposure to BD and chemical mixtures containing BD. Transgenic mice exposed to 625 ppm BD for 6 hr/day for 5 days exhibited significant mutagenicity in the lung, a target organ for the carcinogenic effect of BD in mice. In vitro studies designed to assess interspecies differences in the activation of BD and inactivation of BD epoxides reveal that significant differences exist among mice, rats, and humans. In general, the overall activation/detoxication ratio for BD metabolism was approximately 10-fold higher in mice compared to rats or humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7698092

  15. Evaporative emissions of 1,3-butadiene from petrol-fuelled motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y.; Galbally, I. E.; Weeks, I. A.; Duffy, B. L.; Nelson, P. F.

    This study reports the identification and quantification of 1,3-butadiene in petrol and in the evaporative emissions from Australian light-duty passenger vehicles. The mass fraction of 1,3-butadiene in each of the different grades of any brand of Australian petrol was found to be relatively constant for a given marketing area. However, the mass fractions vary significantly between the different brands (or refineries) from 0.004±0.001% to 0.047±0.008%. The measurements of the evaporative emissions of 1,3-butadiene from in-service motor vehicles were performed using standard Australian Design Rule 37/00 (ADR 37/00) Sealed Housing Evaporative Determination (SHED) tests. For post-1985 catalyst equipped vehicles fuelled with unleaded petrol, average evaporative emissions of 1,3-butadiene were 9.4 (0.7-22) and 5.0 (0.1-23) mg per test for diurnal and hot soak SHED tests, respectively. The corresponding average evaporative emissions for the older, pre-1986 non-catalyst equipped vehicles fuelled with leaded petrol were 26.5 (11.7-45.4) and 9.2 (4.3-13.1) mg per test, respectively, about double the observed emissions from newer vehicles. For the complete vehicle set (all ages), the average mass fraction of 1,3-butadiene in the total hydrocarbon (sum of C 1-C 10 hydrocarbons) emission was 0.21±0.14% from the diurnal phase and was 0.11±0.06% from the hot-soak phase. Evaporative emissions were estimated to contribute about 4% (ranging from 1-15%) of the total (exhaust and evaporative) emissions of 1,3-butadiene from Australian motor vehicles.

  16. Extraction and characterization of latex and natural rubber from rubber-bearing plants.

    PubMed

    Buranov, Anvar U; Elmuradov, Burkhon J

    2010-01-27

    Consecutive extraction of latex and natural rubber from the roots of rubber-bearing plants such as Taraxacum kok-saghyz (TKS), Scorzonera tau-saghyz (STS), and Scorzonera Uzbekistanica (SU) were carried out. Latex extraction was carried via two methods: Blender method and Flow method. The results of latex extraction were compared. Cultivated rubber-bearing plants contained slightly higher latex contents compared to those from wild fields. Several creaming agents for latex extraction were compared. About 50% of total natural rubber was extracted as latex. The results of the comparative studies indicated that optimum latex extraction can be achieved with Flow method. The purity of latex extracted by Blender method ( approximately 75%) was significantly lower than that extracted by Flow method (99.5%). When the latex particles were stabilized with casein, the latex was concentrated significantly. Through concentrating latex by flotation, the latex concentration of 35% was obtained. Bagasse contained mostly solid natural rubber. The remaining natural rubber in the bagasse (left after the latex extraction) was extracted using sequential solvent extraction first with acetone and then with several nonpolar solvents. Solid natural rubber was analyzed for gel content and characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) for molecular weight determinations. SEC of solid natural rubber has shown that the molecular weight is about 1.8E6 and they contain less gel compared to TSR20 (Grade 20 Technically Specified Rubber), a commercial natural rubber from Hevea brasiliensis.

  17. Validation of a radial diffusive sampler for measuring occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Mariella; Bartolucci, Giovanni B; Paci, Enrico; Sacco, Paolo; Pigini, Daniela; Zaratin, Laura; Cottica, Danilo; Scapellato, Maria L; Tranfo, Giovanna

    2014-08-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a major industrial chemical used in the manufacture of rubbers and latexes; it is also a ubiquitous environmental pollutant whose major source is traffic. Occupational exposure to (BD) can occur both during its production and during its use as a raw material. The objective of the study was the laboratory and field validation of a new diffusive sampler for BD. The nominal sampling rate of the Radiello diffusive sampler filled with Carbopack X is 30.5 cm(3)/min, at 0.177 mg/m(3), 20 °C and 50% relative humidity (RH), for an 8-h exposure time. A model can be used for calculating the sampling rate as a function of temperature, time and RH. The concentration does not affect the sampling rate above 30 μg/m(3). The measurement uncertainty (k=2), calculated both by laboratory data and by field comparison according to International Standard Organization (ISO) 13752, satisfies the EN 482:2006 requirement for measurements between 0.1 and 0.5 times the threshold limit value-time weighted average (TLV-TWA) (uncertainty<50%). For field validation study, 38 workers exposed to BD and 20 administrative employees, as the control group, underwent environmental and biological monitoring. Personal exposure to BD was measured by diffusive samplers (Radiello) in comparison with active samplers. The BD exposure levels detected for the exposed subjects were low (mean 0.059, range <0.010-1.340 mg/m(3)) but higher than the controls levels, all below 0.010 mg/m(3). The comparison between diffusive and active (pumped) air sampling showed a good correlation, with no systematic deviation from the ideal values of the intercept and slope of the optimized regression line. The concentrations of two biomarkers were also determined on urine samples, collected at the end of the work-shift: unchanged BD, by GC-MS, and the metabolite dihydroxybutylmercapturic acid (DHBMA), by HPLC-MS/MS. The urinary excretion of the biomarkers was on average higher in the exposed group (urinary BD

  18. Deceptive similarities in the reactions of Fe/sup +/ and Co/sup +/ with linear nitriles in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrilla, C.B.; Drewello, T.; Schwarz, H.

    1987-09-16

    The gas-phase reactions of the transition-metal ions Fe/sup +/ and Co/sup +/ with linear C(4)-C(12) nitriles are reported. In spite of an overall similar reactivity pattern, a more detailed analysis, based on the study of labeled nitriles, reveals distinct differences with regard to the mechanisms of elimination of alkenes and alkanes. For both metal ions, hydrogen and alkenes are generated from linear C(4)-C(12) nitriles, and the intermediates are formed via oxidative addition to terminal and internal C-H bonds. For the RCN/Fe/sup +/ system insertion in an internal C-H bond commences at position C(8) of the nitrile; for the analogous RCN/Co/sup +/ system, the oxidative addition to an internal C-H bond starts at position C(7) of the nitrile. Similarly, alkane formation is different for the two transition-metal ions. For RCN/Fe/sup +/ the generation of alkanes is observed for nitriles having at least eight carbon atoms; in contrast, the elimination of alkanes from RCN/Co/sup +/ is already observed for C(6) nitriles. Alkane elimination seems to follow the conventional mechanism (i.e., oxidative addition to a C-C bond, ..beta..-hydrogen transfer, and reductive elimination) for the RCN/Co/sup +/ system, whereas for the RCN/Fe/sup +/ complex there is an additional mechanism. This mechanism corresponds to the loss of H/sub 2/ from an internal position of the alkyl chain followed by the elimination of an alkene. Some possible origins of the different behavior of Fe/sup +/ vs. Co/sup +/ are discussed.

  19. Exposure to rubber fume and rubber process dust in the general rubber goods, tyre manufacturing and retread industries.

    PubMed

    Dost, A A; Redman, D; Cox, G

    2000-08-01

    This study assesses the current patterns and levels of exposure to rubber fume and rubber process dust in the British rubber industry and compares and contrasts the data obtained from the general rubber goods (GRG), retread tire (RT) and new tire (NT) sectors. A total of 179 rubber companies were visited and data were obtained from 52 general rubber goods, 29 retread tire and 7 new tire manufacturers. The survey was conducted using a questionnaire and included a walk-through inspection of the workplace to assess the extent of use of control measures and the nature of work practices being employed. The most recent (predominantly 1995-97) exposure monitoring data for rubber fume and rubber process dust were obtained from these companies; no additional sampling was conducted for the purpose of this study. In addition to the assessment of exposure data, evaluation of occupational hygiene reports for the quality of information and advice was also carried out.A comparison of the median exposures for processes showed that the order of exposure to rubber fume (E, in mg m(-3)) is: E(moulding) (0.40) approximately E(extrusion) (0.33)>E(milling) (0.18) for GRG; E(press) (0. 32)>E(extrusion) (0.19)>E(autoclave) (0.10) for RT; and E(press) (0. 22) approximately E(all other) (0.22) for NT. The order of exposure to rubber fume between sectors was E(GRG) (0.40)>E(RT) (0.32)>E(NT) (0.22). Median exposures to rubber process dust in the GRG was E(weighing) (4.2)>E(mixing) (1.2) approximately E(milling) (0.8) approximately E(extrusion) (0.8) and no significant difference (P=0. 31) between GRG and NT sectors. The findings compare well with the study carried out in the Netherlands [Kromhout et al. (1994), Annals of Occupational Hygiene 38(1), 3-22], and it is suggested that the factors governing the significant differences noted between the three sectors relate principally to the production and task functions and also to the extent of controls employed. Evaluation of occupational

  20. History of Rubber and Its Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ingo; Strehlow, Peter

    Despite its spectacular properties rubber was not much good for anything before the latter part of the 19th century. To be sure the Aztecs had used it to make balls for their ceremonial ball games - or so we are told. But those games died along with the Aztec culture in the 16th century and there is no record of other useful applications until the late 18th century. But then, after that, rubber took off in a small way. After the American inventor Samuel Peal had obtained a patent in 1791 for the production of rubber-coated watertight textiles, the Scottish chemist Charles Macintosh (1766-1843) used such textiles for making rain-coats, and Thomas Hancock (1786-1865) produced rubber boots. At that time it was not really appropriate to speak of a rubber industry. What little material the evil-smelling workshops in New York and London needed, could be satisfied with the import of 30 tons of Caoutchouc1 annually - extracted from the sap of the tree Hevea brasiliensis - and most of that went for making erasers. Indeed, it had been reported by the English minister and scientist Joseph Priestley (1733-1804) that pieces of rubber are well-suited to rub out (sic!) pencil marks. Even today there is nothing better for the purpose and rubber became the English word for Caoutchouc.

  1. Zinc Leaching from Tire Crumb Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. P.; Ren, J.; Mays, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent estimates indicate that more than 2 billion scrap tires are currently stockpiled in the United States and approximately 280 million more tires are added annually. Various engineering applications utilize recycled tires in the form of shredded tire crumb rubber. However, the use of tire crumb rubber may have negative environmental impacts, especially when the rubber comes into contact with water. A review of the literature indicates that leaching of zinc from tire crumb rubber is the most significant water quality concern associated with using this material. Zinc is generally used in tire manufacturing, representing approximately 1.3% of the final product by mass. This study will report results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure, batch leaching tests, and column leaching tests performed to quantify the process by which zinc leaches from tire crumb rubber into water. Results are interpreted with a first-order kinetic attachment/detachment model, implemented with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service software HYDRUS-1D, in order to determine the circumstances when zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber would be expected to comply with the applicable discharge limits. One potential application for recycled tires is replacing sand with tire crumb rubber in granular media filters used for stormwater pollution control. For this to be a viable application, the total zinc in the stormwater discharge must be below the EPA’s benchmark value of 0.117 mg/L.

  2. Structural characterization of rubber from jackfruit and euphorbia as a model of natural rubber.

    PubMed

    Mekkriengkrai, Dararat; Ute, Koiichi; Swiezewska, Ewa; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Sakdapipanich, Jitladda T

    2004-01-01

    A structural study of low molecular weight rubbers from Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) and Painted spurge (Euphorbia heterophylla) was carried out as model compounds of natural rubber from Hevea brasiliensis. The rubber content of latex from Jackfruit was 0.4-0.7%, which is very low compared with that of 30-35% in the latex from Hevea tree. The rubber from Jackfruit latex was low molecular weight with narrow unimodal molecular weight distribution (MWD), whereas that obtained from E. heterophylla showed very broad MWD. The 1H and 13C NMR analyses showed that Jackfruit rubber consists of a dimethylallyl group and two trans-isoprene units connected to a long sequence of cis-isoprene units. The alpha-terminal group of Jackfruit rubber was presumed to be composed of a phosphate group based on the presence of 1H NMR signal at 4.08 ppm corresponding to the terminal =CH-CH2OP group.

  3. Thermal properties of hydrogenated liquid natural rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-25

    Natural rubber (NR) was modified to form liquid natural rubber (LNR) via photooxidative degradation. Hydrogenated liquid natural rubber (HLNR) was synthesized by using diimide as source of hydrogen which the diimide is produced by thermolysis of p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide (TSH). The structure of HLNR was characterized by determining the changes of main peaks in Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra after hydrogenation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the HLNR had higher decomposition temperature compared to LNR and the decomposition temperature is directly proportional to the percentage of conversion.

  4. Fatigue life of automotive rubber jounce bumper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, R. S.; Ali, Aidy

    2010-05-01

    It is evident that most rubber components in the automotive industry are subjected to repetitive loading. Vigorous research is needed towards improving the safety and reliability of the components. The study was done on an automotive rubber jounce bumper with a rubber hardness of 60 IRHD. The test was conducted in displacement-controlled environment under compressive load. The existing models by Kim, Harbour, Woo and Li were adopted to predict the fatigue life. The experimental results show strong similarities with the predicted models.

  5. Thermal properties of hydrogenated liquid natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-01

    Natural rubber (NR) was modified to form liquid natural rubber (LNR) via photooxidative degradation. Hydrogenated liquid natural rubber (HLNR) was synthesized by using diimide as source of hydrogen which the diimide is produced by thermolysis of p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide (TSH). The structure of HLNR was characterized by determining the changes of main peaks in Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra after hydrogenation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the HLNR had higher decomposition temperature compared to LNR and the decomposition temperature is directly proportional to the percentage of conversion.

  6. Chemistry of rubber processing and disposal.

    PubMed Central

    Bebb, R L

    1976-01-01

    The major chemical changes during the processing of rubber occur with the breakdown in mastication and during vulcanization of the molded tire. There is little chemical change during the compounding, calendering, extrusion, and molding steps. Reclaiming is the process of converting scrap rubber into an unsaturated, processible product that can be vulcanized with sulfur. Pyrolysis of scrap rubber yields a complex mixture of liquids, gas, and residue in varying ratios dependent on the nature of the scrap and the conditions of pyrolysis. PMID:799964

  7. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  8. Alkyltransferase-mediated Toxicity of 1,3-Butadiene Diepoxide

    PubMed Central

    Kalapila, Aley G.; Loktionova, Natalia A.; Pegg, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    Human O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (hAGT) expression increases mutations and cytotoxicity following exposure to 1,3-butadiene diepoxide (BDO) and hAGT-DNA cross-links are formed in the presence of BDO. We have used hAGT mutants to investigate the mechanism of cross-link formation and genotoxicity. Formation of a hAGT-DNA conjugate in vitro was observed with C145S and C145A mutant proteins but was considerably diminished with the C145A/C150S double mutant confirming that cross-linking primarily involves either of these two cysteine residues, which are located in the active site pocket of the protein. Cross-link formation by BDO occurred both via (a) an initial reaction of BDO with hAGT followed by attack of the reactive hAGT complex on DNA, and (b) the initial reaction of BDO with DNA followed by a reaction between hAGT and the DNA adduct. These results differ from those with 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) where Cys145 is the only site of attachment and pathway (b) does not occur. The complex formed between hAGT at Cys145 and BDO was very unstable in aqueous solution. However, the BDO-hAGT complex at Cys150 exhibited stability for more than 1 h. The effect of hAGT and mutants on BDO-induced genotoxicity was studied in E. coli using the forward assay to rifampicin resistance. Both mutations and cell killing were greatly increased by wild type hAGT and there was a smaller but significant effect with the C145A mutant. The R128A mutant and R128A/C145A and C145A/C150S double mutants were ineffective supporting the hypothesis that the formation of hAGT-DNA cross-links is responsible for the enhanced genotoxicity detected in this biological system. In the absence of hAGT, there were equal proportions of G:C to A:T transitions, G:C to T:A transversions and A:T to T:A transversions. Wild type hAGT expression yielded significantly greater G:C to A:T and A:T to G:C transitions, whereas C145A mutant expression resulted in more transitions and transversions at A:T base

  9. Quantitation of DNA Adducts Induced by 1,3-Butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangaraju, Dewakar; Villalta, Peter W.; Wickramaratne, Susith; Swenberg, James; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Human exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) present in automobile exhaust, cigarette smoke, and forest fires is of great concern because of its potent carcinogenicity. The adverse health effects of BD are mediated by its epoxide metabolites such as 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), which covalently modify genomic DNA to form promutagenic nucleobase adducts. Because of their direct role in cancer, BD-DNA adducts can be used as mechanism-based biomarkers of BD exposure. In the present work, a mass spectrometry-based methodology was developed for accurate, sensitive, and precise quantification of EB-induced N-7-(1-hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl) guanine (EB-GII) DNA adducts in vivo. In our approach, EB-GII adducts are selectively released from DNA backbone by neutral thermal hydrolysis, followed by ultrafiltration, offline HPLC purification, and isotope dilution nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 analysis on an Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. Following method validation, EB-GII lesions were quantified in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells treated with micromolar concentrations of EB and in liver tissues of rats exposed to sub-ppm concentrations of BD (0.5-1.5 ppm). EB-GII concentrations increased linearly from 1.15 ± 0.23 to 10.11 ± 0.45 adducts per 106 nucleotides in HT1080 cells treated with 0.5-10 μM DEB. EB-GII concentrations in DNA of laboratory rats exposed to 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ppm BD were 0.17 ± 0.05, 0.33 ± 0.08, and 0.50 ± 0.04 adducts per 106 nucleotides, respectively. We also used the new method to determine the in vivo half-life of EB-GII adducts in rat liver DNA (2.20 ± 0.12 d) and to detect EB-GII in human blood DNA. To our knowledge, this is the first application of nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 Orbitrap methodology to quantitative analysis of DNA adducts in vivo.

  10. The Lifetimes of Nitriles (-C*N) and Acids (-COOH) during Ultraviolet Photolysis and Their Survival in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Ashbourn, Samantha; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Nitriles are one of the most common classes of molecules observed in the gas phase in space, with over a dozen having been positively identified in interstellar and circumstellar environments through the detection of their rotational transitions. Acids, in contrast, are much less common. In this paper we present laboratory data comparing the stability of two structurally related acid-nitrile pairs to ultraviolet (UV) photolytic destruction: acetic acid vs. acetonitrile (CH3-COOH vs. CH3-CN) and glycine vs. aminoacetonitrile (H2N-CH2-COOH vs. H2N-CH2-CN). We find that the nitriles are destroyed ten and five times more slowly (respectively) by UV photolysis than are the corresponding acids. This suggests that whatever their relative formation rates, acids may be less abundant than nitriles in interstellar environments in part because they are more rapidly destroyed by photolysis. The results of this infrared (IR) spectral matrix isolation study indicate that during the lifetime of a typical interstellar cloud, even in its darkest regions, a population of acids in the gas phase will likely be diminished by at least half. Since aminoacetonitrile is a precursor to the amino acid glycine, and far more stable, presolar aminoacetonitrile may be a contributor to the deuterium enriched glycine detected in meteorites. It would clearly be informative to search for aminoacetonitrile (the nitrile corresponding to glycine) in the regions where the amino acid glycine has been reported.

  11. Characterization of rubber particles and rubber chain elongation in Taraxacum koksaghyz

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural rubber is a biopolymer with exceptional qualities that cannot be completely replaced using synthetic alternatives. Although several key enzymes in the rubber biosynthetic pathway have been isolated, mainly from plants such as Hevea brasiliensis, Ficus spec. and the desert shrub Parthenium argentatum, there have been no in planta functional studies, e.g. by RNA interference, due to the absence of efficient and reproducible protocols for genetic engineering. In contrast, the Russian dandelion Taraxacum koksaghyz, which has long been considered as a potential alternative source of low-cost natural rubber, has a rapid life cycle and can be genetically transformed using a simple and reliable procedure. However, there is very little molecular data available for either the rubber polymer itself or its biosynthesis in T. koksaghyz. Results We established a method for the purification of rubber particles - the active sites of rubber biosynthesis - from T. koksaghyz latex. Photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed an average particle size of 320 nm, and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed that isolated rubber particles contain poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) with a purity >95%. Size exclusion chromatography indicated that the weight average molecular mass (w) of T. koksaghyz natural rubber is 4,000-5,000 kDa. Rubber particles showed rubber transferase activity of 0.2 pmol min-1 mg-1. Ex vivo rubber biosynthesis experiments resulted in a skewed unimodal distribution of [1-14C]isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) incorporation at a w of 2,500 kDa. Characterization of recently isolated cis-prenyltransferases (CPTs) from T. koksaghyz revealed that these enzymes are associated with rubber particles and are able to produce long-chain polyprenols in yeast. Conclusions T. koksaghyz rubber particles are similar to those described for H. brasiliensis. They contain very pure, high molecular mass poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) and

  12. Identification and subcellular localization analysis of two rubber elongation factor isoforms on Hevea brasiliensis rubber particles.

    PubMed

    Dai, Longjun; Nie, Zhiyi; Kang, Guijuan; Li, Yu; Zeng, Rizhong

    2017-02-01

    Rubber elongation factor (REF) is the most abundant protein found on the rubber particles or latex from Hevea brasiliensis (the Para rubber tree) and is considered to play important roles in natural rubber (cis-polyisoprene) biosynthesis. 16 BAC (benzyldimethyl-n-hexadecylammonium chloride)/SDS-PAGE separations and mass spectrometric identification had revealed that two REF isoforms shared similar amino acid sequences and common C-terminal sequences. In this study, the gene sequences encoding these two REF isoforms (one is 23.6 kDa in size with 222 amino acid residues and the other is 27.3 kDa in size with 258 amino acid residues) were obtained. Their proteins were relatively enriched by sequential extraction of the rubber particle proteins and separated by 16 BAC/SDS-PAGE. The localization of these isoforms on the surfaces of rubber particles was further verified by western blotting and immunogold electron microscopy, which demonstrated that these two REF isoforms are mainly located on the surfaces of larger rubber particles and that they bind more tightly to rubber particles than the most abundant REF and SRPP (small rubber particle protein).

  13. Micromorphological characterization and label-free quantitation of small rubber particle protein in natural rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sai; Liu, Jiahui; Wu, Yanxia; You, Yawen; He, Jingyi; Zhang, Jichuan; Zhang, Liqun; Dong, Yiyang

    2016-04-15

    Commercial natural rubber is traditionally supplied by Hevea brasiliensis, but now there is a big energy problem because of the limited resource and increasing demand. Intensive study of key rubber-related substances is urgently needed for further research of in vitro biosynthesis of natural rubber. Natural rubber is biosynthesized on the surface of rubber particles. A membrane protein called small rubber particle protein (SRPP) is a key protein associated closely with rubber biosynthesis; however, SRPP in different plants has been only qualitatively studied, and there are no quantitative reports so far. In this work, H. brasiliensis was chosen as a model plant. The microscopic distribution of SRPP on the rubber particles during the washing process was investigated by transmission electron microscopy-immunogold labeling. A label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor was developed to quantify SRPP in H. brasiliensis for the first time. The immunosensor was then used to rapidly detect and analyze SRPP in dandelions and prickly lettuce latex samples. The label-free SPR immunosensor can be a desirable tool for rapid quantitation of the membrane protein SRPP, with excellent assay efficiency, high sensitivity, and high specificity. The method lays the foundation for further study of the functional relationship between SRPP and natural rubber content.

  14. Risk assessment of butadiene in ambient air; the approach used in the UK.

    PubMed

    Fielder, R J

    1996-10-28

    The UK Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment (COC) and the related Committee on Mutagenicity provided advice on 1,3-butadiene in 1992. This followed detailed consideration of the available mutagenicity, animal carcinogenicity and epidemiology data plus information on toxicokinetics. They concluded that 1,3-butadiene was an in vivo mutagen, a potent genotoxic animal carcinogen and should be regarded as a probable human carcinogen. The Department of Health is not aware of more recent data warranting reconsideration of these conclusions. General advice on setting air quality standards for carcinogenic air pollutants was given by the COC. Although the prudent assumption of the absence of any safe level for genotoxic carcinogens was preferred, a pragmatic approach based essentially on assessment of the exposure at which no increased risk would be detected, plus a safety factor, was considered reasonable for compounds like butadiene where exposure cannot be totally avoided. This approach, plus recognition that it is unadvisable to allow ambient levels of genotoxic carcinogens to rise, is used in the UK. The procedure by which the Department of Environment's Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards recommended a value of 1 ppb for butadiene based on these principles is described.

  15. THE OZONE REACTION WITH BUTADIENE: FORMATION OF TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product ...

  16. HYDROXYL RADICAL AND OZONE INITIATED PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS OF 1,3-BUTADIENE. (R826247)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,3-Butadiene, classified as hazardous in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, is an important ambient air pollutant. Understanding its atmospheric transformation is useful for its own sake, and is also helpful for eliciting isoprene's fate in the atmosphere (isoprene dominates ...

  17. Industrial-hygiene survey report of Dow Chemical USA SB (styrene butadiene) Latex Facility, Freeport, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fajen, J.M.; Krishnan, E.R.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on the SB latex production process and assess the potential for occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene at the SB latex facility. The information will be used in determining the suitability of including the plant in an in-depth survey.

  18. EFFECTS OF 1,3-BUTADIENE, ISOPRENE, AND THEIR PHOTOCHEMICAL DEGRADATION PRODUCTS ON HUMAN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of potential exposure both in the workplace and from ambient air, the known carcinogen 1,3-butadiene (BD) is considered a priority hazardous air pollutant. BD and its 2-methyl analog, isoprene (ISO), are chemically similar but have very different toxicities, with ISO show...

  19. Polymer composites prepared from heat-treated starch and styrene-butadiene latex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermoplastic starch/latex polymer composites were prepared using styrene–butadiene (SB) latex and heat-treated cornstarch. The composites were prepared in a compression mold at 130 °C, with starch content 20%. An amylose-free cornstarch, waxy maize, was used for this research and the heat treatment...

  20. Exposure and risk assessment of 1,3-butadiene in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Haruyuki; Mita, Kazuaki; Yoshikado, Hiroshi; Iwata, Mitsuo; Nakanishi, Junko

    2007-03-20

    1,3-Butadiene is on the list of Substances Requiring Priority Action published by the Central Environmental Council of Japan in 1996. Emission of 1,3-butadiene has been controlled by a voluntary reduction program since 1997. Although the industrial emission of 1,3-butadiene in Japan has decreased in recent years, primarily due to a voluntary industrial emissions reduction program, the risks of exposure to it remain largely unknown. We assessed the risks and consequences of exposure to 1,3-butadiene on human health. A remarkable advantage of our risk assessment approach is the detailed assessment of exposure. Previously, we developed two different models that can be applied for the assessment of exposure: the first, the AIST-ADMER model estimates regional concentration distributions, whereas the second, the METI-LIS model estimates concentration distributions in the vicinity of factories. Both models were used for the assessment of exposure to 1,3-butadiene. Using exposure concentration and carcinogenic potency determined and reported by Environment Canada and Health Canada, we evaluated the excess lifetime cancer risk for persons exposed to 1,3-butadiene over the course of a lifetime. The results suggested that the majority of the population in Japan has an excess lifetime cancer risk of less than 10(-5), whereas a small number of people living close to industrial sources had a risk of greater than 10(-5). The results of the present assessment also showed that 1,3-butadiene in the general environment originates primarily from automobile emissions, such that a countermeasure of reducing emissions from cars is expected to be effective at reducing the total cancer risk among Japanese. On the other hand, individual risks among a population living in the vicinity of certain industrial sources were found to be significantly higher than those of the population living elsewhere, such that a reduction in emissions from a small number of specific industrial sources should be

  1. Emission of 1,3-butadiene from petrol-driven motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y.; Galbally, I. E.; Weeks, I. A.

    This study reports the measurement of 1,3-butadiene emissions from 30 petrol-driven vehicles from the Australian car fleet using the Australian Design Rule 37/00 vehicle test procedure. Six of the cars tested were not equipped with catalytic converters and used leaded petrol as fuel. The remaining 24 cars were fitted with catalytic converters and used unleaded petrol. 1,3-Butadiene in exhaust samples was found to degrade rapidly in SUMMA treated stainless steel canisters and the degradation followed first-order kinetics. The rate coefficient of the decay can be represented by a linear dependence on the concentration of nitrogen oxides in the exhaust ( r2 = 0.79, n = 43), and the gas-phase reaction of NO 2 and 1,3-butadiene may have a major role in this loss. The 1,3-butadiene concentrations used to estimate vehicle emissions were corrected for this loss using the decay rate constant either observed from replicate analyses or from the NO x concentrations in the samples. The measurements showed that 1,3-butadiene was emitted at a rate of 20.7 ± 9.2 mg km -1 from 6 non-catalyst vehicles. There was considerable scatter in the observations from catalyst equipped vehicles and we infer that this was due to the malfunction of the emission control devices on some vehicles. The 19 vehicles that appeared to have functioning catalyst emission control devices had an average emission rate of 2.1 ± 1.5 mg km -1. These emission rates are consistent with atmospheric observations and are much higher than those reported previously. We calculate that more than 90% of the 1,3-butadiene in engine exhaust comes from the common alkane and aromatic constituents of the fuel. A comparison of emissions in the different phases of the drive cycle indicates that current emission controls remove more than 90% of the 1,3-butadiene from the initial exhaust mixture.

  2. [Total analysis of organic rubber additives].

    PubMed

    He, Wen-Xuan; Robert, Shanks; You, Ye-Ming

    2010-03-01

    In the present paper, after middle pressure chromatograph separation using both positive phase and reversed-phase conditions, the organic additives in ethylene-propylene rubber were identified by infrared spectrometer. At the same time, by using solid phase extraction column to maintain the main component-fuel oil in organic additves to avoid its interfering with minor compounds, other organic additves were separated and analysed by GC/Ms. In addition, the remaining active compound such as benzoyl peroxide was identified by CC/Ms, through analyzing acetone extract directly. Using the above mentioned techniques, soften agents (fuel oil, plant oil and phthalte), curing agent (benzoylperoxide), vulcanizing accelerators (2-mercaptobenzothiazole, ethyl thiuram and butyl thiuram), and antiagers (2, 6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methyl phenol and styrenated phenol) in ethylene-propylene rubber were identified. Although the technique was established in ethylene-propylene rubber system, it can be used in other rubber system.

  3. Oils and rubber from arid land plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. D.; Hinman, C. W.

    1980-05-01

    In this article the economic development potentials of Cucurbita species (buffalo gourd and others), Simmondsia chinensis (jojoba), Euphorbia lathyris (gopher plant), and Parthenium argentatum (guayule) are discussed. All of these plants may become important sources of oils or rubber.

  4. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz.

  5. Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing (NAICS 326)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find environmental regulatory and compliance information for plastics and rubber products manufacturing (which includes the manufacture of cellulose and other fibers) including information about NESHAPs and effluent guidelines for wastewater discharges

  6. Visual evoked potentials in rubber factory workers.

    PubMed

    Tandon, O P; Kumar, V

    1997-01-01

    Pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (pVEP) were studied in 39 male rubber factory workers in the age range of 18-55 years and 20 control subjects (aged 18-46 years) not exposed to the rubber factory environment. Results revealed that 20 (51%) rubber factory workers had abnormal latencies of wave P1 (dominant component of pVEP) as per accepted criteria of 99% tolerance limit set for the control group (i.e. any value above mean +3 SD of control was considered abnormal). The section-wise per cent distribution of abnormalities was vulcanization (83%), tubing (75%), calendering (60%), loading (38%) and mixing (14%). This study provides electrophysiological evidence that rubber factory environments affect the conduction processes in optical pathways from their origin in the retina to striate cortex. However, this study has its limitations in not identifying the specific chemical(s) causing these changes in VEP.

  7. Constructing covalent interface in rubber/clay nanocomposite by combining structural modification and interlamellar silylation of montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Zha, Chao; Wang, Wencai; Lu, Yonglai; Zhang, Liqun

    2014-11-12

    Strong interfacial interaction and nanodispersion are necessary for polymer nanocomposites with expectations on mechanical performance. In this work, montmorillonite (MMT) was first structurally modified by acid treatment to produce more silanol groups on the layer surface. This was followed by chemical modification of γ-methacryloxy propyl trimethoxysilane molecule (KH570) through covalent grafting with the silanol groups. (29)Si and (27)Al magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR results revealed the microstructural changes of MMT after acid treatment and confirmed the increase of silanol groups on acid-treated MMT surfaces. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated an increase in the grafted amount of organosilane on the MMT surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the functionalization process changed the highly ordered stacking structure of the MMT mineral into a highly disordered structure, indicating successful grafting of organosilane to the interlayer surface of the crystalline sheets. The styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/MMT nanocomposites were further prepared by co-coagulating with SBR latex and grafted-MMT aqueous suspension. During vulcanization, a covalent interface between modified MMT and rubber was established through peroxide-radical-initiated reactions, and layer aggregation was effectively prevented. The SBR/MMT nanocomposites had highly and uniformly dispersed MMT layers, and the covalent interfacial interaction was finally achieved and exhibited high performance.

  8. Improved Synthesis of 5-Substituted 1H-Tetrazoles via the [3+2] Cycloaddition of Nitriles and Sodium Azide Catalyzed by Silica Sulfuric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhenting; Si, Changmei; Li, Youqiang; Wang, Yin; Lu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    A silica supported sulfuric acid catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition of nitriles and sodium azide to form 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles is described. The protocol can provide a series of 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles using silica sulfuric acid from nitriles and sodium azide in DMF in 72%–95% yield. PMID:22606004

  9. Improved synthesis of 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles via the [3+2] cycloaddition of nitriles and sodium azide catalyzed by silica sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhenting; Si, Changmei; Li, Youqiang; Wang, Yin; Lu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    A silica supported sulfuric acid catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition of nitriles and sodium azide to form 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles is described. The protocol can provide a series of 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles using silica sulfuric acid from nitriles and sodium azide in DMF in 72%-95% yield.

  10. [Detection of pentachlorophenol in natural rubber latex].

    PubMed

    Jaworska, E

    1976-01-01

    The method of detection of pentachlorophenol in natural rubber latex is proposed. Pentachlorophenol is isolated from other nonrubber-like substances by thin-layer chromatography and identified by spectroscopic method in UV-light. Isolation of pentachlorophenol is carried out from water extracts obtained from the dry caoutchouc films, so the same method can be used for examination of the rubber articles designed for the medicinetoo.

  11. Adaptive Process Control in Rubber Industry.

    PubMed

    Brause, Rüdiger W; Pietruschka, Ulf

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the problems and an adaptive solution for process control in rubber industry. We show that the human and economical benefits of an adaptive solution for the approximation of process parameters are very attractive. The modeling of the industrial problem is done by the means of artificial neural networks. For the example of the extrusion of a rubber profile in tire production our method shows good resuits even using only a few training samples.

  12. Fatigue, Fracture and Wear Properties of Rubber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-19

    gregates and rubber molecules: Wc-[ -ACPcr (filled)/ ACpa m (filled)]*(1-v), (6) where v is the fraction of bound rubber which could be determined by20 v - 1...ACPcr / ACPa m ) *(l-0) (A Tic /AH TIC , o ) +( AHSIC /AHsI C 1 4 )( in which AH TIC oo- 64.1 J/gm (15.3 cal/gm)2 ., AHTIC (Figure 4b), AHSI C (Figure 5

  13. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Catallo, W J; Kennedy, C H; Henk, W; Barker, S A; Grace, S C; Penn, A

    2001-09-01

    Adverse health effects of airborne toxicants, especially small respirable particles and their associated adsorbed chemicals, are of growing concern to health professionals, governmental agencies, and the general public. Areas rich in petrochemical processing facilities (e.g., eastern Texas and southern California) chronically have poor air quality. Atmospheric releases of products of incomplete combustion (e.g., soot) from these facilities are not subject to rigorous regulatory enforcement. Although soot can include respirable particles and carcinogens, the toxicologic and epidemiologic consequences of exposure to environmentally relevant complex soots have not been well investigated. Here we continue our physico-chemical analysis of butadiene soot and report effects of exposure to this soot on putative targets, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. We examined organic extracts of butadiene soot by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), probe distillation MS, and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS-MS. Hundreds of aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with molecular mass as high as 1,000 atomic mass units were detected, including known and suspected human carcinogens (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene). Butadiene soot particles also had strong, solid-state free-radical character in electron spin resonance analysis. Spin-trapping studies indicated that fresh butadiene soot in a buffered aqueous solution containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) oxidized the DMSO, leading to CH(3)* radical formation. Butadiene soot DMSO extract (BSDE)-exposed NHBE cells displayed extranuclear fluorescence within 4 hr of exposure. BSDE was cytotoxic to > 20% of the cells at 72 hr. Morphologic alterations, including cell swelling and membrane blebbing, were apparent within 24 hr of exposure. These alterations are characteristic of oncosis, an ischemia-induced form of cell death. BSDE treatment also produced significant genotoxicity, as indicated by binucleated cell

  14. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Catallo, W J; Kennedy, C H; Henk, W; Barker, S A; Grace, S C; Penn, A

    2001-01-01

    Adverse health effects of airborne toxicants, especially small respirable particles and their associated adsorbed chemicals, are of growing concern to health professionals, governmental agencies, and the general public. Areas rich in petrochemical processing facilities (e.g., eastern Texas and southern California) chronically have poor air quality. Atmospheric releases of products of incomplete combustion (e.g., soot) from these facilities are not subject to rigorous regulatory enforcement. Although soot can include respirable particles and carcinogens, the toxicologic and epidemiologic consequences of exposure to environmentally relevant complex soots have not been well investigated. Here we continue our physico-chemical analysis of butadiene soot and report effects of exposure to this soot on putative targets, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. We examined organic extracts of butadiene soot by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), probe distillation MS, and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS-MS. Hundreds of aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with molecular mass as high as 1,000 atomic mass units were detected, including known and suspected human carcinogens (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene). Butadiene soot particles also had strong, solid-state free-radical character in electron spin resonance analysis. Spin-trapping studies indicated that fresh butadiene soot in a buffered aqueous solution containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) oxidized the DMSO, leading to CH(3)* radical formation. Butadiene soot DMSO extract (BSDE)-exposed NHBE cells displayed extranuclear fluorescence within 4 hr of exposure. BSDE was cytotoxic to > 20% of the cells at 72 hr. Morphologic alterations, including cell swelling and membrane blebbing, were apparent within 24 hr of exposure. These alterations are characteristic of oncosis, an ischemia-induced form of cell death. BSDE treatment also produced significant genotoxicity, as indicated by binucleated cell

  15. Establishment of new crops for the production of natural rubber.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Jan B; Poirier, Yves

    2007-11-01

    Natural rubber is a unique biopolymer of strategic importance that, in many of its most significant applications, cannot be replaced by synthetic alternatives. The rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis is the almost exclusive commercial source of natural rubber currently and alternative crops should be developed for several reasons, including: a disease risk to the rubber tree that could potentially decimate current production, a predicted shortage of natural rubber supply, increasing allergic reactions to rubber obtained from the Brazilian rubber tree and a general shift towards renewables. This review summarizes our knowledge of plants that can serve as alternative sources of natural rubber, of rubber biosynthesis and the scientific gaps that must be filled to bring the alternative crops into production.

  16. Nitriles as directionally tolerant hydrogen bond acceptors: IR-UV ion depletion spectroscopy of benzenepropanenitrile and its hydrate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Patrick A.; Lobo, Isabella A.; Wilson, David J. D.; Robertson, Evan G.

    2016-09-01

    Benzenepropanenitrile (BPN) and its hydrate clusters are studied by R2PI and IR-UV ion-depletion spectroscopy in the CH/OH stretch regions, aided by theoretical calculations. A single water molecule binds to the terminal nitrile 'lone-pair' of the anti-BPN host, but there is also evidence for a side-type structure with OH donating to the nitrile π-electrons. In the gauche-BPN cluster, water is located at an intermediate angle that facilitates O⋯HC(ortho) interaction. A wide range of attachment angles is possible, as the intrinsic preference for linear hydrogen bonding is mediated by additional CH⋯O interactions that depend on molecular geometry near the nitrile group.

  17. Review of organic nitrile incineration at the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) operates the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly called the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, where uranium was enriched under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Currently, ETTP missions include environmental management, waste management (WM), and the development of new technologies. As part of its WM mission, ETTP operates the TSCA (Toxic Substances Control Act) Incinerator (TSCAI) for treatment of hazardous waste and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contaminated with low-level radioactivity. Beginning in the autumn of 1995, employees from diverse ETTP buildings and departments reported experiencing headaches, fatigue, depression, muscle aches, sleeplessness, and muscle tremors. These symptoms were judged by a physician in the ETTP Health Services Department to be consistent with chronic exposures to hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was called in to perform a health hazard evaluation to ascertain whether the employees` illnesses were in fact caused by occupational exposure to HCN. The NIOSH evaluation found no patterns for employees` reported symptoms with respect to work location or department. NIOSH also conducted a comprehensive air sampling study, which did not detect airborne cyanides at the ETTP. Employees, however, expressed concerns that the burning of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have produced HCN as a combustion product. Therefore, LMES and DOE established a multidisciplinary team (TSCAI Technical Review Team) to make a more detailed review of the possibility that combustion of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have either released nitriles or created HCN as a product of incomplete combustion (PIC).

  18. Nitrile versus isonitrile adsorption at interstellar grains surfaces. I. Hydroxylated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, M.; Doronin, M.; Fillion, J.-H.; Michaut, X.; Philippe, L.; Lattelais, M.; Markovits, A.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Almost 20% of the 200 different species detected in the interstellar and circumstellar media present a carbon atom linked to nitrogen by a triple bond. Among these 37 molecules, 30 are nitrile R-CN compounds, the remaining seven belonging to the isonitrile R-NC family. How these species behave in presence of the grain surfaces is still an open question. Aims: In this contribution we investigate whether the difference between nitrile and isonitrile functional groups may induce differences in the adsorption energies of the related isomers at the surfaces of interstellar grains of different nature and morphologies. Methods: The question was addressed by means of a concerted experimental and theoretical study of the adsorption energies of CH3CN and CH3NC on the surface water ice and silica. The experimental determination of the molecule - surface interaction energies was carried out using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) under an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) between 70 and 160 K. Theoretically, the question was addressed using first principle periodic density functional theory (DFT) to represent the organized solid support. Results: The most stable isomer (CH3CN) interacts more efficiently with the solid support than the higher energy isomer (CH3NC) for water ice and silica. Comparing with the HCN and HNC pair of isomers, the simulations show an opposite behaviour, in which isonitrile HNC are more strongly adsorbed than nitrile HCN provided that hydrogen bonds are compatible with the nature of the model surface. Conclusions: The present study confirms that the strength of the molecule surface interaction between isomers is not related to their intrinsic stability but instead to their respective ability to generate different types of hydrogen bonds. Coupling TPD to first principle simulations is a powerful method for investigating the possible role of interstellar surfaces in the release of organic species from grains, depending on the environment.

  19. Rubber linings -- Overview and new technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mehra, L.; Polaski, E.L.; Lewis, R.K.; Mauri, A.

    1995-12-01

    The authors have covered at some length the basic steps involved in rubber lining. They have talked about the progress made in adhesives for lining. The new system in use now is far superior to previous systems. The new systems and the developments going on towards water-based adhesives are discussed. The authors briefly brought up the various types of rubber materials and new developments in terms of chlorobutyl-faced three-ply rubbers as well as development of EPDM-based compounds in Europe. The methods of vulcanization used have been discussed, including hot air vulcanizing which is prevalent in Europe. The development of self-vulcanizing rubber and the advantages in use of pre-cured rubber have been described. The development of new methods, techniques and products for rubber lining has been slow but sure. As can be expected, new product development costs are huge, requiring expert attention and participation. The possibilities are limitless and effort is forthcoming from various sources. There is a need for an interchange of ideas, and the involvement of NACE International and other professional bodies is acknowledged and appreciated.

  20. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of tautomerization in gas phase by mass spectrometry and DFT calculations: Keto-enol versus nitrile-ketenimine equilibria.

    PubMed

    Giussi, Juan M; Gastaca, Belen; Albesa, Alberto; Cortizo, M Susana; Allegretti, Patricia E

    2011-02-01

    The study of tautomerics equilibria is really important because the reactivity of each compound with tautomeric capacity can be determined from the proportion of each tautomer. In the present work the tautomeric equilibria in some γ,δ-unsaturated β-hydroxynitriles and γ,δ-unsaturated β-ketonitriles were studied. The first family of compounds presents two possible theoretical tautomers, nitrile and ketenimine, while the second one presents four possible theoretical tautomers, keto-nitrile, enol (E and Z)-nitrile and keto-ketenimine. The equilibrium in gas phase was studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Tautomerization enthalpies were calculated by this methodology, and results were compared with those obtained by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, observing a good agreement between them. Nitrile tautomers were favored within the first family of compounds, while keto-nitrile tautomers were favored in the second family.

  1. Rh(III)-Catalyzed meta-C-H Olefination Directed by a Nitrile Template.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Jin; Lu, Yi; Farmer, Marcus E; Wang, Huai-Wei; Zhao, Dan; Kang, Yan-Shang; Sun, Wei-Yin; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2017-02-15

    A range of Rh(III)-catalyzed ortho-C-H functionalizations have been developed; however, extension of this reactivity to remote C-H functionalizations through large-ring rhodacyclic intermediates has yet to be demonstrated. Herein we report the first example of the use of a U-shaped nitrile template to direct Rh(III)-catalyzed remote meta-C-H activation via a postulated 12-membered macrocyclic intermediate. Because the ligands used for Rh(III) catalysts are significantly different from those of Pd(II) catalysts, this offers new opportunities for future development of ligand-promoted meta-C-H activation reactions.

  2. Nitrile Oxide-Norbornene Cycloaddition as a Bioorthogonal Crosslinking Reaction for the Preparation of Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Truong, Vinh X; Zhou, Kun; Simon, George P; Forsythe, John S

    2015-10-01

    This communication describes the first application of cycloaddition between an in situ generated nitrile oxide with norbornene leading to a polymer crosslinking reaction for the preparation of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels under physiological conditions. Hydrogels with high water content and robust physical strength are readily formed within 2-5 min by a simple two-solution mixing method which allows 3D encapsulation of neuronal cells. This bioorthogonal crosslinking reaction provides a simple yet highly effective method for preparation of hydrogels to be used in bioengineering.

  3. The infrared spectra of nitriles and related compounds frozen in Ar and H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    We present the 2320-2050 cm-1 (4.31-4.88 micrometers) infrared spectra of 16 solid-state nitriles, isonitriles, and related compounds in order to facilitate the assignment of absorption features in a spectral region now becoming accessible to astronomers for the first time through the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). This frequency range spans the positions of the strong C triple bond N stretching vibration of these compounds and is inaccessible from the ground due to absorption by CO2 in the terrestrial atmosphere. Band positions, profiles, and intrinsic strengths (A values) were measured for compounds frozen in Ar and H2O matrices at 12 K. The molecular species examined included acetonitrile, benzonitrile (phenylcyanide), 9-anthracenecarbonitrile, dimethylcyanamide, isopropylnitrile (isobutyronitrile), methylacrylonitrile, crotononitrile, acrylonitrile (vinyl cyanide), 3-aminocrotononitrile, pyruvonitrile, dicyandiamide, cyanamide, n-butylisocyanide, methylisocyanoacetate, diisopropylcarbodiimide, and hydrogen cyanide. The C triple bond N stretching bands of the majority of nitriles fall in the 2300-2200 cm-1 (4.35-4.55 micrometers) range and have similar positions in both Ar and H2O matrices, although the bands are generally considerably broader in the H2O matrices. In contrast, the isonitriles and a few exceptional nitriles and related species produce bands at lower frequencies spanning the 2200-2080 cm-1 (4.55-4.81 micrometers) range. These features also have similar positions in both Ar and H2O matrices, and the bands are broader in the H2O matrices. Three of the compounds (pyruvonitrile, dicyandiamide, and cyanamide) show unusually large shifts of their C triple bond N stretching frequencies when changing from Ar to H2O matrices. We attribute these shifts to the formation of H2O:nitrile complexes with these compounds. The implications of these results for the identification of the 2165 cm-1 (4.62 micrometers) "XCN" interstellar feature and the 4550 cm-1 (2

  4. Cathepsin B Inhibitors: Combining Dipeptide Nitriles with an Occluding Loop Recognition Element by Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An active site mapping of human cathepsin B with dipeptide nitrile inhibitors was performed for a combinatorial approach by introducing several points of diversity and stepwise optimizing the inhibitor structure. To address the occluding loop of cathepsin B by a carboxylate moiety, click chemistry to generate linker-connected molecules was applied. Inhibitor 17 exhibited Ki values of 41.3 nM, 27.3 nM, or 19.2 nM, depending on the substrate and pH of the assay. Kinetic data were discussed with respect to the conformational selection and induced fit models. PMID:26985300

  5. Tetra-aceto-nitrile-lithium tetra-iso-thio-cyanato-borate.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Jens Michael; Wietelmann, Ulrich; Lerner, Hans-Wolfram; Bolte, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, [Li(CH3CN)4][B(NCS)4], is composed of discrete cations and anions. Both the Li and B atoms show a tetra-hedral coordination by four equal ligands. The aceto-nitrile and iso-thio-cyanate ligands are linear. The bond angles at the B atom are close to the ideal tetra-hedral value [108.92 (18)-109.94 (16)°], but the bond angles at the Li atom show larger deviations [106.15 (17)-113.70 (17)°].

  6. The Infrared Spectra of Nitriles and Related Compounds Frozen in Ar and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1997-02-01

    We present the 2320-2050 cm-1 (4.31-4.88 μm) infrared spectra of 16 solid-state nitriles, isonitriles, and related compounds in order to facilitate the assignment of absorption features in a spectral region now becoming accessible to astronomers for the first time through the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). This frequency range spans the positions of the strong C≡N stretching vibration of these compounds and is inaccessible from the ground due to absorption by CO2 in the terrestrial atmosphere. Band positions, profiles, and intrinsic strengths (A values) were measured for compounds frozen in Ar and H2O matrices at 12 K. The molecular species examined included acetonitrile, benzonitrile (phenylcyanide), 9-anthracenecarbonitrile, dimethylcyanamide, isopropylnitrile (isobutyronitrile), methylacrylonitrile, crotononitrile, acrylonitrile (vinyl cyanide), 3-aminocrotononitrile, pyruvonitrile, dicyandiamide, cyanamide, n-butylisocyanide, methylisocyanoacetate, diisopropylcarbodiimide, and hydrogen cyanide. The C≡N stretching bands of the majority of nitriles fall in the 2300-2200 cm-1 (4.35-4.55 μm) range and have similar positions in both Ar and H2O matrices, although the bands are generally considerably broader in the H2O matrices. In contrast, the isonitriles and a few exceptional nitriles and related species produce bands at lower frequencies spanning the 2200-2080 cm-1 (4.55-4.81 μm) range. These features also have similar positions in both Ar and H2O matrices, and the bands are broader in the H2O matrices. Three of the compounds (pyruvonitrile, dicyandiamide, and cyanamide) show unusually large shifts of their C≡N stretching frequencies when changing from Ar to H2O matrices. We attribute these shifts to the formation of H2O:nitrile complexes with these compounds. The implications of these results for the identification of the 2165 cm-1 (4.62 μm) ``XCN'' interstellar feature and the 4550 cm-1 (2.2 μm) feature of various objects in the solar system are

  7. Hydroformylation of olefinic compounds in the presence of a cobalt catalyst and an organic nitrile promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Virnig, M.J.

    1986-09-16

    A process for preparing a formylated olefinic fatty compound is described comprising reacting an olefinic fatty compound having at least 9 carbon atoms with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a catalytic amount of a soluble cobalt salt catalyst and a promoter comprised of an organic nitrile selected from the group consisting of cyano-substituted alkanes having from 2 to 44 carbon atoms and cyano-substituted alkanes having from 4 to 22 carbon atoms containing no substituent other than cyano.

  8. Use of waste rubber as concrete additive.

    PubMed

    Chou, Liang Hsing; Lu, Chun-Ku; Chang, Jen-Ray; Lee, Maw Tien

    2007-02-01

    For resource reutilization, scrap tyres have long been investigated as an additive to concrete to form 'Rubcrete' for various applications and have shown promising results. However, the addition of rubber particles leads to the degradation of physical properties, particularly, the compressive strength of the concrete. In this study, a theoretical model was proposed to shed light on the mechanisms of decrease in compressive strength due to the addition of rubber particles as well as improvement in compressive strength through modification of particle surfaces. The literature suggests that the compressive strength can be improved by soaking the rubber particles in alkaline solution first to increase the inter-phase bonding between the rubber particles and cement. Instead, we discovered that the loss in compressive strength was due to local imperfections in the hydration of cement, induced by the addition of heterogeneous and hydrophobic rubber particles. Microscopic studies showed that the rubber particles disturbed the water transfer to create channels, which were prone to cracking and led to a loss in the compressive strength. Unexpectedly, no cracking was found along the surfaces of the rubber particles, indicating that the bonding strength between the rubber particles and cement phases was not the critical factor in determining the compressive strength. Therefore, a theoretical model was proposed to describe the water transfer in the Rubcrete specimens to explain the experimental data. In the model, the local water available for hydration (Q) is: Q = -A(slv)/6piv, where Q, A(slv), and v are mass flow rate (kg s(-1)), Hamaker constant (J), and dynamic viscosity (m2 s(-1)), respectively. By maximizing the quantity Q and, in turn, the Hamaker constant A(slv), the compressive strength could be improved. The Hamaker constant A(slv) for water film on rubber particle surfaces was smaller than that for the hydrated cement particles; the water transfer rate was lower in

  9. A calculation method for torsional vibration of a crankshafting system with a conventional rubber damper by considering rubber form

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Tomoaki; Honda, Yasuhiro; Wakabayashi, Katsuhiko; Iwamoto, Shoichi

    1996-09-01

    The cheap and compact rubber dampers of shear-type have been widely employed as the torsional vibration control of the crankshaft system of high-speed, automobile diesel engines. The conventional rubber dampers have various rubber forms owing to the thorough investigation of optimum dampers in the design stage. Their rubber forms can be generally grouped into three classes such as the disk type, the bush type and the composite type. The disk type and the bush type rubber dampers are called the basic-pattern rubber dampers hereafter. The composite type rubber part is supposed to consist of the disk type and the bush type parts, regarded respectively as the basic patterns of the rubber part, at large. The dynamic characteristics of the vibration isolator rubber depend generally on temperature, frequency, strain amplitude, shape and size effect,s so it is difficult to estimate accurately their characteristics. With the present technical level, it is also difficult to determine the suitable rubber geometry which optimizes the vibration control effect. The study refers to the calculation method of the torsional vibration of a crankshaft system with a shear-type rubber damper having various rubber forms in order to offer the useful method for optimum design. In this method, the rheological formula of the three-element Maxwell model, from which the torsional stiffness and the damping coefficient of the damper rubber part in the equivalent vibration system are obtained, are adopted in order to decide the dynamic characteristics of the damper rubber part.

  10. Direct approaches to nitriles via highly efficient nitrogenation strategy through C-H or C-C bond cleavage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Teng; Jiao, Ning

    2014-04-15

    Because of the importance of nitrogen-containing compounds in chemistry and biology, organic chemists have long focused on the development of novel methodologies for their synthesis. For example, nitrogen-containing compounds show up within functional materials, as top-selling drugs, and as bioactive molecules. To synthesize these compounds in a green and sustainable way, researchers have focused on the direct functionalization of hydrocarbons via C-H or C-C bond cleavage. Although researchers have made significant progress in the direct functionalization of simple hydrocarbons, direct C-N bond formation via C-H or C-C bond cleavage remains challenging, in part because of the unstable character of some N-nucleophiles under oxidative conditions. The nitriles are versatile building blocks and precursors in organic synthesis. Recently, chemists have achieved the direct C-H cyanation with toxic cyanide salts in the presence of stoichiometric metal oxidants. In this Account, we describe recent progress made by our group in nitrile synthesis. C-H or C-C bond cleavage is a key process in our strategy, and azides or DMF serve as the nitrogen source. In these reactions, we successfully realized direct nitrile synthesis using a variety of hydrocarbon groups as nitrile precursors, including methyl, alkenyl, and alkynyl groups. We could carry out C(sp(3))-H functionalization on benzylic, allylic, and propargylic C-H bonds to produce diverse valuable synthetic nitriles. Mild oxidation of C═C double-bonds and C≡C triple-bonds also produced nitriles. The incorporation of nitrogen within the carbon skeleton typically involved the participation of azide reagents. Although some mechanistic details remain unclear, studies of these nitrogenation reactions implicate the involvement of a cation or radical intermediate, and an oxidative rearrangement of azide intermediate produced the nitrile. We also explored environmentally friendly oxidants, such as molecular oxygen, to make our

  11. Reactions of carbonyl compounds with α,β-unsaturated nitriles as a convenient pathway to carbo- and heterocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharanin, Yu A.; Goncharenko, M. P.; Litvinov, Victor P.

    1998-05-01

    Published data on the methods for synthesis of carbo- and heterocyclic compounds based on reactions of α,β-unsaturated nitriles with carbonyl compounds and activated phenols are surveyed. It is demonstrated that all these reactions occur via nucleophilic addition of the carbanion generated from a carbonyl compound to the double bond of an unsaturated nitrile (the Michael reaction). The main routes of transformation of the adducts into carbo- and heterocyclic compounds are considered. The methods for regioselective preparation of fused 4H-pyrans or 1,4-dihydropyridines by varying conditions of cyclisation of Michael adducts are discussed. The bibliography includes 249 references.

  12. Effect of reactive compatibilization on the morphology and physical properties of bisphenol-A-polycarbonate/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Gregg Stephen

    1998-11-01

    An amine functional styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN-amine) polymer is proposed as a reactive compatibilizer for bisphenol-A-polycarbonate/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (PC/ABS) blends. This polymer is miscible with the styrene/acrylonitrile (SAN) copolymer matrix of ABS materials, and the pendant secondary amine groups react with PC at the carbonate linkage to form a SAN-g-PC copolymer. The graft copolymer molecules reside at the PC/ABS interface and provide improved morphological stability at elevated temperatures by suppressing phase coalescence. The synthesis of this reactive compatibilizer and its reaction with carbonate moieties is described. Characterization of this reaction was done by NMR and GPC using model secondary amine and carbonate containing compounds. A technique was developed for the quantitative measurement of the kinetics of dispersed phase particle coalescence in these blends; the morphology was examined using TEM. While uncompatibilized PC/SAN blends showed an increase in particle size from approximately 1 mum to 2 mum (depending on PC viscosity) in less than five minutes at 270sp°C; compatibilized blends containing as little as 1% SAN-amine exhibited no change in morphology after 20 minutes. The effects of dispersed phase concentration, viscosity ratio and interfacial compatibilization using the SAN-amine compatibilizer on the process induced morphology of PC/SAN blends were also examined. Dispersed phase particle size increased significantly with SAN concentration and, although the morphology of uncompatibilized PC/SAN blends mixed in a Brabender mixer, single and twin screw extruders were quite similar, the twin screw extruder produced significantly finer morphologies in blends containing SAN-amine. The average particle size for blends compatibilized with the SAN-amine polymer was approximately half that of uncompatibilized blends and was relatively independent of viscosity ratio and dispersed phase composition. The fracture of thin (3.18 mm

  13. Combination biological and microwave treatments of used rubber products

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.; Wicks, George G.

    2002-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a vulcanized solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has select chemical bonds altered by biotreatment with thermophillic microorganisms selected from natural isolates from hot sulfur springs. Following the biotreatment, microwave radiation is used to further treat the surface and to treat the bulk interior of the crumb rubber. The resulting combined treatments render the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels and sizes of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures and good properties obtained from the new recycled products.

  14. Euphorbia characias latex: micromorphology of rubber particles and rubber transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Spanò, Delia; Pintus, Francesca; Esposito, Francesca; Loche, Danilo; Floris, Giovanni; Medda, Rosaria

    2015-02-01

    We have recently characterized a natural rubber in the latex of Euphorbia characias. Following that study, we here investigated the rubber particles and rubber transferase in that Mediterranean shrub. Rubber particles, observed by scanning electron microscopy, are spherical in shape with diameter ranging from 0.02 to 1.2 μm. Washed rubber particles exhibit rubber transferase activity with a rate of radiolabeled [(14)C]IPP incorporation of 4.5 pmol min(-1)mg(-1). Denaturing electrophoresis profile of washed rubber particles reveals a single protein band of 37 kDa that is recognized in western blot analysis by antibodies raised against the synthetic peptide whose sequence, DVVIRTSGETRLSNF, is included in one of the five regions conserved among cis-prenyl chain elongation enzymes. The cDNA nucleotide sequence of E. characias rubber transferase (GenBank JX564541) and the deduced amino acid sequence appear to be highly homologous to the sequence of several plant cis-prenyltransferases.

  15. Effect of non-rubber constituents on guayule and Hevea rubber intrinsic properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To meet the increasing demand for natural rubber (NR), and address price volatility and steadily increasing labor costs, alternate rubber-producing species are in commercial development. One of these, guayule (Parthenium argentatum), has emerged on the market as a sustainable commercial source of h...

  16. 21 CFR 801.437 - User labeling for devices that contain natural rubber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... User labeling for devices that contain natural rubber. (a) Data in the Medical Device Reporting System..., natural rubber that contacts humans. The term “natural rubber” includes natural rubber latex, dry natural rubber, and synthetic latex or synthetic rubber that contains natural rubber in its......

  17. Conversion of ethanol to 1,3-butadiene over Na doped ZnxZryOz mixed metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Baylon, Rebecca A.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous studies on different oxide catalysts for the ethanol to 1,3-butadiene reaction, few have identified active sites (i.e., type of acidity) correlated to the catalytic performances. In this work, the type of acidity needed for ethanol to 1,3-butadiene conversion has been studied over Zn/Zr mixed oxide catalysts. Specifically, synthesis method, Zn/Zr ratio, and Na doping have been used to control the surface acid-base properties, as confirmed by characterizations such as NH3-TPD and IR-Py techniques. The 2000 ppm Na doped Zn1Zr10Oz-H with balanced base and weak Bronsted acid sites was found to give not only high selectivity to 1,3-butadiene (47%) at near complete ethanol conversion (97%), but also exhibited a much higher 1,3-butadiene productivity than other mixed oxides studied.

  18. Crosslinked polyarylene ether nitrile film as flexible dielectric materials with ultrahigh thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruiqi; Wei, Renbo; Li, Kui; Tong, Lifen; Jia, Kun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2016-11-09

    Dielectric film with ultrahigh thermal stability based on crosslinked polyarylene ether nitrile is prepared and characterized. The film is obtained by solution-casting of polyarylene ether nitrile terminated phthalonitrile (PEN-Ph) combined with post self-crosslinking at high temperature. The film shows a 5% decomposition temperature over 520 °C and a glass transition temperature (Tg) around 386 °C. Stable dielectric constant and low dielectric loss are observed for this film in the frequency range of 100-200 kHz and in the temperature range of 25-300 °C. The temperature coefficient of dielectric constant is less than 0.001 °C(-1) even at 400 °C. By cycling heating and cooling up to ten times or heating at 300 °C for 12 h, the film shows good reversibility and robustness of the dielectric properties. This crosslinked PEN film will be a potential candidate as high performance film capacitor electronic devices materials used at high temperature.

  19. Crosslinked polyarylene ether nitrile film as flexible dielectric materials with ultrahigh thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruiqi; Wei, Renbo; Li, Kui; Tong, Lifen; Jia, Kun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2016-11-01

    Dielectric film with ultrahigh thermal stability based on crosslinked polyarylene ether nitrile is prepared and characterized. The film is obtained by solution-casting of polyarylene ether nitrile terminated phthalonitrile (PEN-Ph) combined with post self-crosslinking at high temperature. The film shows a 5% decomposition temperature over 520 °C and a glass transition temperature (Tg) around 386 °C. Stable dielectric constant and low dielectric loss are observed for this film in the frequency range of 100–200 kHz and in the temperature range of 25–300 °C. The temperature coefficient of dielectric constant is less than 0.001 °C‑1 even at 400 °C. By cycling heating and cooling up to ten times or heating at 300 °C for 12 h, the film shows good reversibility and robustness of the dielectric properties. This crosslinked PEN film will be a potential candidate as high performance film capacitor electronic devices materials used at high temperature.

  20. Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzyme from Meyerozyma guilliermondii and its potential in biosynthesis of 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Jin-Song; Dong, Ting-Ting; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Heng; Dou, Wen-Fang; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-03-11

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is an important platform chemical in organic synthesis. Traditionally, 3-HP was produced by chemical methods and fermentation process. In this work, a novel enzymatic method was developed for green synthesis of 3-HP. A yeast strain harboring nitrile-hydrolyzing enzyme was newly isolated from environmental samples using 3-hydroxypropionitrile (3-HPN) as the sole nitrogen source. It was identified to be Meyerozyma guilliermondii CGMCC12935 by sequencing of the 18S ribosomal DNA and internal transcribed spacer, together with analysis of the morphology characteristics. The catalytic properties of M. guilliermondii CGMCC12935 resting cells were determined, and the optimum activity was achieved at 55 °C and pH 7.5. The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity towards nitriles, especially 3-HPN, aminoacetonitrile and 3-cyanopyridine. The presence of Ag(+), Pb(2+) and excess substrate inhibited the enzyme activity, whereas 5% (v/v) ethyl acetate had a positive effect on the enzyme activity. M. guilliermondii CGMCC12935 resting cells by addition of 3% glucose could thoroughly hydrolyze 500 mM 3-HPN into 3-HP within 100 h and the maximal accumulative production of 3-HP reached 216.33 mM, which was over twofolds than the control group with no additional glucose. And this work would lay the foundation for biological production of 3-HP in industry.

  1. Crosslinked polyarylene ether nitrile film as flexible dielectric materials with ultrahigh thermal stability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruiqi; Wei, Renbo; Li, Kui; Tong, Lifen; Jia, Kun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric film with ultrahigh thermal stability based on crosslinked polyarylene ether nitrile is prepared and characterized. The film is obtained by solution-casting of polyarylene ether nitrile terminated phthalonitrile (PEN-Ph) combined with post self-crosslinking at high temperature. The film shows a 5% decomposition temperature over 520 °C and a glass transition temperature (Tg) around 386 °C. Stable dielectric constant and low dielectric loss are observed for this film in the frequency range of 100–200 kHz and in the temperature range of 25–300 °C. The temperature coefficient of dielectric constant is less than 0.001 °C−1 even at 400 °C. By cycling heating and cooling up to ten times or heating at 300 °C for 12 h, the film shows good reversibility and robustness of the dielectric properties. This crosslinked PEN film will be a potential candidate as high performance film capacitor electronic devices materials used at high temperature. PMID:27827436

  2. INFRARED SPECTRA AND OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NITRILE ICES RELEVANT TO TITAN's ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie; Ferrante, Robert F.; James Moore, W.

    2010-11-15

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan's atmosphere are presented from 2.0 to 333.3 {mu}m ({approx}5000-30 cm{sup -1}). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan's winter pole. Ices studied are: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, cyanogen; CH{sub 3}CN, acetonitrile; C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN, propionitrile; and HC{sub 3}N, cyanoacetylene. For each of these molecules, we also report new cryogenic measurements of the real refractive index, n, determined in both the amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. These new values have been incorporated into our optical constant calculations. Spectra were measured and optical constants were calculated for each nitrile at a variety of temperatures, including, but not limited to, 20, 35, 50, 75, 95, and 110 K, in both the amorphous phase and the crystalline phase. This laboratory effort used a dedicated FTIR spectrometer to record transmission spectra of thin-film ice samples. Laser interference was used to measure film thickness during condensation onto a transparent cold window attached to the tail section of a closed-cycle helium cryostat. Optical constants, real (n) and imaginary (k) refractive indices, were determined using Kramers-Kronig analysis. Our calculation reproduces the complete spectrum, including all interference effects.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of tripeptidic plasmin inhibitors with nitrile as warhead.

    PubMed

    Teno, Naoki; Otsubo, Tadamune; Gohda, Keigo; Wanaka, Keiko; Sueda, Takuya; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Hijikata-Okunomiya, Akiko; Tsuda, Yuko

    2012-10-01

    Plasmin is best known as the key molecule in the fibrinolytic system, which is critical for clot lysis and can initiate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation cascade. Along with MMP, plasmin is suggested to be involved in physiological processes that are linked to the risk of carcinoma formation. Plasmin inhibitors could be perceived as a promising new principle in the treatment of diseases triggered by plasmin. On the basis of the peptidic sequence derived from the synthetic plasmin substrate, a series of peptidic plasmin inhibitors possessing nitrile as warhead were prepared and evaluated for their inhibitory activities against plasmin and other serine proteases, plasma kallikrein and urokinase. The most potent peptidic inhibitors with the nitrile warhead exhibit the potency toward plasmin (IC(50)  = 7.7-11 μM) and are characterized by their selectivity profile against plasma kallikrein and urokinase. The results and molecular modeling of the peptidic inhibitor complexed with plasmin reveal that the P2 residue makes favorable contacts with the open binding pocket comprising the S2 and S3 subsites of plasmin.

  4. Production of hydrocarbons and nitriles by electrical processes in Titan's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R; Ramirez, S I; de la Rosa, J G; Coll, P; Raulin, F

    2001-01-01

    Although lightning has not been observed in Titan's atmosphere, the presence of methane rain in the troposphere suggests the possibility of electrical activity in the form of corona and/or lightning discharges. Here we examine the chemical effects of these electrical processes on a Titan simulated atmosphere composed of CH4 in N2 at various mixing ratios. Corona discharges were simulated in two different experimental arrays. For the detection of reactive intermediates we used a mass spectrometer to study the main positive ions arising by bombarding low-energy electrons from a hot filament into low-pressure methane. The final stable products, generated by applying a high voltage in a coaxial reactor with either positive or negative polarity, were separated and detected by gas chromatography-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-FTIR-MS). Lightning discharges were simulated by a hot and dense plasma generated by a Nd-YAG laser and the final products were separated and detected by GC-FTIR-MS. Corona discharges produce linear and branched hydrocarbons as well as nitriles whereas lightning discharges generate mainly unsaturated hydrocarbons and nitriles. Lightning discharges are about 2 orders of magnitude more efficient in product formation than corona discharges.

  5. Ceria/POLYMER hybrid nanoparticles as efficient catalysts for the hydration of nitriles to amides.

    PubMed

    Mari, Margherita; Müller, Beate; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael

    2015-05-27

    We report the synthesis of ceria/polymer hybrid nanoparticles and their use as effective supported catalysts for the hydration of nitriles to amide, exemplified with the conversion of 2-cyanopiridine to 2-picolinamide. The polymeric cores, made of either polystyrene (PS) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), are prepared by miniemulsion copolymerization in the presence of different functional comonomers that provide carboxylic or phosphate groups: acrylic acid, maleic acid, and ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate. The functional groups of the comonomers generate a corona around the main polymer particle and serve as nucleating agents for the in situ crystallization of cerium(IV) oxide. The obtained hybrid nanoparticles can be easily redispersed in water or ethanol. The conversion of amides to nitriles was quantitative for most of the catalytic samples, with yields close to 100%. According to our experimental observations by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), no work up is needed to separate the product from unreacted substrate. The substrate remains absorbed on the catalyst surface, whereas the product can be easily separated. The catalysts are shown to be recyclable and can be reused for a large number of cycles without loss in efficiency.

  6. On Optimizing an Archibald Rubber-Band Heat Engine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, J. G.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the criteria and procedure for optimizing the performance of Archibald rubber-band heat engines by using the appropriate choice of dimensions, minimizing frictional torque, maximizing torque and balancing the rubber band system. (GA)

  7. New rubber qualification for the igniter adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humpherys, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Kirkhill Rubber Company (KRC) has informed Thiokol Corporation that two raw materials used in the asbestos and silica filled acrylonitrile butadience rubber (NBR) formulation per STW 2621 are no longer available from their vendors. Agerite White (Di-beta-naphthyl-paraphenylene diamine), manufactured by B. F. Goodrich, is an antioxidant used in NBR. This raw material makes up roughly 1-2 percent of the finished product. KRC proposed that this raw material be replaced by Agerite Stalite S (mixture of octylated diphenylamines) distributed by R. T. Vanderbilt Co. Protox-166 zinc oxide, manufactured by Zinc Corporation of America, is an activator currently used in NBR. This material also makes up about 1-2 percent of the finished material. Protox-166 is an American process grade zinc oxide. It is proposed by KRC to replace Protox-166 with Kadox-930C, a French process grade zinc oxide. American process grades have an ASTM minimum purity of 99.0 percent; the French process grades have a minimum purity of 99.5 percent. Previous testing per WTP-0270 has demonstrated that the mechanical and thermal properties of the rubber with the new ingredients are comparable to the 'old' rubber. The test results are reported in TWR-61790. One igniter adapter, Part no. 7U77562-02 serial no. 2 was insulated per ETP-1206 using the new rubber formulation and a modified lay up and cure method to demonstrate that there is no impact on this process. The results of this demonstration are reported.

  8. Investigation of natural latex rubber gloves

    SciTech Connect

    Vessel, E.M.

    1993-03-19

    Seventy five percent of natural latex rubber gloves used in laboratories at the Savannah River Site are not reused. A cost analysis performed by the SRS Procurement Department determined that a net savings of $1,092,210 could be achieved annually by recycling latex rubber gloves. The Materials Technology Section, at the request of the Procurement Department, examined some mechanical and chemical properties of latex rubber gloves manufactured by Ansell Edmont, which had been purchased by the site specifications for protective clothing. It also examined mechanical properties of re-cycled gloves purchased by specifications and of {open_quotes}off the shelf{close_quotes} gloves manufactured by North Brothers Company. Finally, water vapor transmission studies, simulating tritium permeation, were performed on gloves from both manufacturers. These studies were performed to determine whether latex rubber gloves can be recycled or whether using only new, unwashed gloves is required in areas where tritium exposure is a possibility. The results of these studies indicate that the acceptable glove characteristics, required in the WSRC Manual 5Q1.11, Protective Clothing Specifications, are not adversely affected after washing and drying the gloves manufactured by Ansell Edmont for seven cycles. Results also indicate that natural latex rubber gloves manufactured by North Brothers comply with most of the acceptable glove characteristics specified in the WSRC Manual 5Q1.11. Statistical analysis of the water vapor permeation data show that there is no correlation between permeation rates and the manufacturer.

  9. Radiation degradation of spent butyl rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, A. V.; Zavyalov, N. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Sitnikov, N. P.; Smetanin, M. L.; Tarantasov, V. P.; Shadrin, D. N.; Shorikov, I. V.; Liakumovich, A. L.; Miryasova, F. K.

    2002-03-01

    Radiation methods of materials modification applied in technological chains can have significant economical and ecological advantages as compared to the established chemical, thermal and mechanical methods. Each year the problems of nature resources economy through the use of production and consumption wastes acquire a more significant value, as it allows to solve also ecological issues along with economical ones. This is mostly acute in relation to polymeric systems based on saturated rubbers, for example butyl rubber (BR) used in the tyre industry, as due to their high resistance to the action of oxygen, ozone, solar radiation and bacteria, they contaminate the environment for rather a long period. At VNIIEF and KSPU experiments were carried out on application of electron beams with energy from 6 to 10 MeV for radiation destruction of spent rubber based on BR. The radiation-degraded material was tested for re-use in the formulation of initial diaphragm mixture, rubber mixture for producing rubberized fabric and roofing.

  10. Estimating the Degree of Cross-Linking in Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Degree of cross-linking or network chain concentration of rubber estimated with aid of new method. Quantity is needed in studies of mechanical behavior of rubber. New method is based on finding rubber follows different stress/ strain relationships in extension and retraction. When rubber specimen is stretched to given extension ration and released. Stress-vs-strain curve follows two paths: one for extension and other for retraction.

  11. Use of scrap rubber in asphalt pavement surfaces. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.A.; Roberts, R.J.; Blackburn, R.R.

    1991-12-01

    Scrap tire rubber was mixed into an asphalt concrete wearing course to study the effect of ice disbonding from the pavement surface under traffic. Rubber contents of 0, 3, 6, and 12% by weight were studied. Initial laboratory ice disbonding test results led to the development of a new paving material, Chunk Rubber Asphalt Concrete (CRAC), that uses larger pieces of rubber in a much denser asphalt concrete mix. Strength values doubled and ice disbonding performance was enhanced.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects of Repeated Exposure to Cruciferous Allyl Nitrile in Sensitizer-Induced Ear Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanii, Hideji; Sugitani, Kayo; Saijoh, Kiyofumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Skin sensitizers induce allergic reactions through the induction of reactive oxygen species. Allyl nitrile from cruciferous vegetables has been reported to induce antioxidants and phase II detoxification enzymes in various tissues. We assessed the effects of repeated exposure to allyl nitrile on sensitizer-induced allergic reactions. Material/Methods Mice were dosed with allyl nitrile (0–200 μmol/kg), and then received a dermal application of 1 of 3 sensitizers on the left ear or 1 of 2 vehicles on the right ear. Quantitative assessment of edema was carried out by measuring the difference in weight between the portions taken from the right and left ears. We tested enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in ears. Results Repeated exposure to allyl nitrile reduced edemas induced by glutaraldehyde and by 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), but not by formaldehyde. The repeated exposure decreased levels of TBARS, a marker of oxidative stress, induced by glutaraldehyde and by DNCB, but not by formaldehyde. Allyl nitrile elevated SOD levels for the 3 sensitizers, and CAT levels for formaldehyde and DNCB. Allyl nitrile also increased GPx levels for formaldehyde and DNCB, but not for glutaraldehyde. The reduced edemas were associated with changes in oxidative stress levels and antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions Repeated exposure to allyl nitrile reduced allergic reactions induced by glutaraldehyde and by DNCB, but not by formaldehyde. This reduction was associated with changes in ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:26932717

  13. A facile one-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica: Aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium hydroxide immobilization; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity using this...

  14. Anaerobic desulfurization of ground rubber with the thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus--a new method for rubber recycling.

    PubMed

    Bredberg, K; Persson, J; Christiansson, M; Stenberg, B; Holst, O

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic sulfur-reducing archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated regarding its capacity to desulfurize rubber material. The microorganism's sensitivity towards common rubber elastomers and additives was tested and several were shown to be toxic to P. furiosus. The microorganism was shown to utilize sulfur in vulcanized natural rubber and an increase in cell density was obtained when cultivated in the presence of spent tire rubber. Ethanol-leached cryo-ground tire rubber treated with P. furiosus for 10 days was vulcanized together with virgin rubber material (15% w/w) and the mechanical properties of the resulting material were determined. The increase in the stress at break value and the decrease in swell ratio and stress relaxation rate obtained for material containing microbially treated rubber (compared to untreated material) show the positive effects of microbial desulfurization on rubber.

  15. Development of crops to produce industrially useful natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber, cis-1,4-polyisoprene, is an essential industrial commodity that most developed countries have to import. Hevea brasiliensis (Hevea), grown in tropical and subtropical areas is the primary source of natural rubber. The high quality and quantity of the rubber cause us to focus on und...

  16. 30 CFR 77.606-1 - Rubber gloves; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. 77.606-1... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606-1 Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. (a) Rubber gloves (lineman's... be used and tested in accordance with the provisions of §§ 77.704-6 through 77.704-8. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 872.6300 - Rubber dam and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubber dam and accessories. 872.6300 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6300 Rubber dam and accessories. (a) Identification. A rubber dam and accessories is a device composed of a thin sheet of latex with a hole in...

  18. 21 CFR 872.6300 - Rubber dam and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubber dam and accessories. 872.6300 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6300 Rubber dam and accessories. (a) Identification. A rubber dam and accessories is a device composed of a thin sheet of latex with a hole in...

  19. 30 CFR 77.606-1 - Rubber gloves; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. 77.606-1... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606-1 Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. (a) Rubber gloves (lineman's... be used and tested in accordance with the provisions of §§ 77.704-6 through 77.704-8. (b)...

  20. Bonding soft rubber or plasticized elastomers to metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, J. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III; White, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Approach using bond-cover coat of unplasticized rubber between soft rubber and adhesive eliminates diffusion problem. Approach is useful in making improved seals in automobile engines, industrial and public plumbing, and in other areas using soft-rubber-to-metal bonds. Seals and gaskets made this way would not have to be replaced very often, reducing cost of maintenance.