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Sample records for nitrite reductase activities

  1. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  2. Modulating hemoglobin nitrite reductase activity through allostery: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Alayash, Abdu I; Wilson, Michael T; Cooper, Chris E

    2013-11-30

    The production of nitric oxide by hemoglobin (Hb) has been proposed to play a major role in the control of blood flow. Because of the allosteric nature of hemoglobin, the nitrite reductase activity is a complex function of oxygen partial pressure PO2. We have previous developed a model to obtain the micro rate constants for nitrite reduction by R state (kR) and T state (kT) hemoglobin in terms of the experimental maximal macro rate constant kNmax and the corresponding oxygen concentration PO2max. However, because of the intrinsic difficulty in obtaining accurate macro rate constant kN, from available experiments, we have developed an alternative method to determine the micro reaction rate constants (kR and kT) by fitting the simulated macro reaction rate curve (kN versus PO2) to the experimental data. We then use our model to analyze the effect of pH (Bohr Effect) and blood ageing on the nitrite reductase activity, showing that the fall of bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) during red cell storage leads to increase NO production. Our model can have useful predictive and explanatory power. For example, the previously described enhanced nitrite reductase activity of ovine fetal Hb, in comparison to the adult protein, may be understood in terms of a weaker interaction with BPG and an increase in the value of kT from 0.0087M(-1)s(-1) to 0.083M(-1)s(-1).

  3. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  4. A genetic screen reveals a periplasmic copper chaperone required for nitrite reductase activity in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Jen, Freda E-C; Djoko, Karrera Y; Bent, Stephen J; Day, Christopher J; McEwan, Alastair G; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    Under conditions of low oxygen availability, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are able to respire via a partial denitrification pathway in which nitrite is converted to nitrous oxide. In this process, nitrite reductase (AniA), a copper (Cu)-containing protein converts nitrite to NO, and this product is converted to nitrous oxide by nitric oxide reductase (NorB). NorB also confers protection against toxic NO, and so we devised a conditional lethal screen, using a norB mutant, to identify mutants that were resistant to nitrite-dependent killing. After random-deletion mutagenesis of N. meningitidis, this genetic screen identified a gene encoding a Cu chaperone that is essential for AniA function, AccA. Purified AccA binds one Cu (I) ion and also possesses a second binding site for Cu (II). This novel periplasmic Cu chaperone (AccA) appears to be essential for provision of Cu ions to AniA of pathogenic Neisseria to generate an active nitrite reductase. Apart from the Neisseria genus, AccA is distributed across a wide range of environmental Proteobacteria species.

  5. Salivary nitrate, nitrite and nitrate reductase activity in relation to risk of oral cancer in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Badawi, A F; Hosny, G; el-Hadary, M; Mostafa, M H

    1998-10-01

    It has been suggested that nitrate and nitrite may play a role in the etiology of human oral cancer. We investigated whether salivary nitrate and nitrite and the activity of nitrate reductase (NRase) may affect the risk of oral cancer in Egypt, an area with high levels of environmental nitrosating agents. Levels of salivary nitrite (8.3 +/- 1.0 micrograms/ml) and nitrate (44 +/- 3.7 micrograms/ml) and activity of NRase (74 +/- 10 nmol/ml/min) were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in oral cancer patients (n = 42) compared to control Egyptian healthy individuals (n = 40, nitrite = 5.3 +/- 0.3 micrograms/ml, nitrate = 27 +/- 1.2 micrograms/ml, and NRase activity = 46 +/- 4 nmol/ml/min). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (C.I.) for risk of oral cancer, categorized by the levels of salivary nitrate and nitrite and NRase activity, showed a higher cancer risk associated with nitrite > 7.5 micrograms/ml (OR: 3.0, C.I.: 1.0-9.3), nitrite > 40 micrograms/ml (OR: 4.3, C.I.: 1.4-13.3) and NRase activity > 50 nmol/ml/min (OR: 2.9, C.I.: 1.1-7.4). Our findings suggest that increased consumption of dietary nitrate and nitrite is associated with elevated levels of salivary nitrite. Together with the increased activity of salivary NRase, these observations may explain, at least in part, the role of nitrate and nitrite in the development of oral cancer in individuals from an area with a high burden of N-nitroso precursors.

  6. Nitric Oxide (NO) Generation from Heme/Copper Assembly Mediated Nitrite Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hematian, Shabnam; Siegler, Maxime A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a cellular signaling molecule and vasodilator regulates a range of physiological and pathological processes. Nitrite (NO2−) is recycled in vivo to generate nitric oxide, particularly in physiologic hypoxia and ischemia. The cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) binuclear hemea3/CuB active site is one entity known to be responsible for cellular nitrite conversion to nitric oxide. We recently reported that a partially reduced heme/Cu assembly reduces nitrite ion, producing NO; the heme serves as the reductant and cupric ion provides a Lewis Acid interaction with nitrite, facilitating nitrite (N−O) bond cleavage (Hematian et al., J Am Chem Soc 134:18912–18915, 2012). To further investigate this nitrite reductase (NIR) chemistry, copper(II)-nitrito complexes with tri-and tetra-dentate ligands were used in this study, where either O,O'-bidentate or O-unidentate modes of nitrite binding to the cupric center are present. To study the role of the reducing ability of the ferrous heme center, two different tetraarylporphyrinate-iron(II) complexes, one with electron donating para-methoxy peripheral substituents, (TMPP)FeII, and the other with electron withdrawing 2,6-difluorophenyl substituents, (F8)FeII, were employed. The results show that differing nitrite coordination modes to copper(II) ion leads to varying kinetic behavior. Here, also, the ferrous heme is in all cases the source of the reducing equivalent required to take nitrite to nitric oxide, but the reduction ability of the heme center does not play a key role in the observed overall reaction rate. Based on our observations, reaction mechanisms are proposed and discussed in terms of heme/Cu heterobinuclear structures. PMID:24430198

  7. Residues in the Distal Heme Pocket of Arabidopsis Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins: Implication for Nitrite Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Astegno, Alessandra; Chen, Jian; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that plant hemoglobins (Hbs) are involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism via NO dioxygenase and/or nitrite reductase activity. The ferrous-deoxy Arabidopsis Hb1 and Hb2 (AHb1 and AHb2) have been shown to reduce nitrite to NO under hypoxia. Here, to test the hypothesis that a six- to five-coordinate heme iron transition might mediate the control of the nitrite reduction rate, we examined distal pocket mutants of AHb1 and AHb2 for nitrite reductase activity, NO production and spectroscopic features. Absorption spectra of AHbs distal histidine mutants showed that AHb1 mutant (H69L) is a stable pentacoordinate high-spin species in both ferrous and ferric states, whereas heme iron in AHb2 mutant (H66L) is hexacoordinated low-spin with Lys69 as the sixth ligand. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO were 13.3 ± 0.40, 7.3 ± 0.5, 10.6 ± 0.8 and 171.90 ± 9.00 M−1·s−1 for AHb1, AHb2, AHb1 H69L and AHb2 H66L, respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. Consistent with the reductase activity, the amount of NO detected by chemiluminescence was significantly higher in the AHb2 H66L mutant. Our data indicate that nitrite reductase activity is determined not only by heme coordination, but also by a unique distal heme pocket in each AHb. PMID:27136534

  8. Nitrite-Reductase and Peroxynitrite Isomerization Activities of Methanosarcina acetivorans Protoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Leboffe, Loris; Pesce, Alessandra; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sbardella, Diego; Bolognesi, Martino; Coletta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Within the globin superfamily, protoglobins (Pgb) belong phylogenetically to the same cluster of two-domain globin-coupled sensors and single-domain sensor globins. Multiple functional roles have been postulated for Methanosarcina acetivorans Pgb (Ma-Pgb), since the detoxification of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species might co-exist with enzymatic activity(ies) to facilitate the conversion of CO to methane. Here, the nitrite-reductase and peroxynitrite isomerization activities of the CysE20Ser mutant of Ma-Pgb (Ma-Pgb*) are reported and analyzed in parallel with those of related heme-proteins. Kinetics of nitrite-reductase activity of ferrous Ma-Pgb* (Ma-Pgb*-Fe(II)) is biphasic and values of the second-order rate constant for the reduction of NO2– to NO and the concomitant formation of nitrosylated Ma-Pgb*-Fe(II) (Ma-Pgb*-Fe(II)-NO) are kapp1 = 9.6±0.2 M–1 s–1 and kapp2 = 1.2±0.1 M–1 s–1 (at pH 7.4 and 20°C). The kapp1 and kapp2 values increase by about one order of magnitude for each pH unit decrease, between pH 8.3 and 6.2, indicating that the reaction requires one proton. On the other hand, kinetics of peroxynitrite isomerization catalyzed by ferric Ma-Pgb* (Ma-Pgb*-Fe(III)) is monophasic and values of the second order rate constant for peroxynitrite isomerization by Ma-Pgb*-Fe(III) and of the first order rate constant for the spontaneous conversion of peroxynitrite to nitrate are happ = 3.8×104 M–1 s–1 and h0 = 2.8×10–1 s–1 (at pH 7.4 and 20°C). The pH-dependence of hon and h0 values reflects the acid-base equilibrium of peroxynitrite (pKa = 6.7 and 6.9, respectively; at 20°C), indicating that HOONO is the species that reacts preferentially with the heme-Fe(III) atom. These results highlight the potential role of Pgbs in the biosynthesis and scavenging of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. PMID:24827820

  9. The nitrite reductase activity of horse heart carboxymethylated-cytochrome c is modulated by cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Sbardella, Diego; Sinibaldi, Federica; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Horse heart carboxymethylated cytc (CM-cytc) displays myoglobin-like properties. Here, the effect of cardiolipin (CL) liposomes on the nitrite reductase activity of ferrous CM-cytc [CM-cytc-Fe(II)], in the presence of sodium dithionite, is reported between pH 5.5 and 7.6, at 20.0 °C. Cytc-Fe(II) displays a very low value of the apparent second-order rate constant for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of cytc-Fe(II) to cytc-Fe(II)-NO [k on = (7.3 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4], whereas the value of k on for NO2 (-) reduction by CM-cytc-Fe(II) is 1.1 ± 0.2 M(-1) s(-1) (at pH 7.4). CL facilitates the NO2 (-)-mediated nitrosylation of CM-cytc-Fe(II) in a dose-dependent manner, the value of k on for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-CM-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-CM-cytc-Fe(II)-NO (5.6 ± 0.6 M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4) being slightly higher than that for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-cytc-Fe(II)-NO (2.6 ± 0.3 M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4). The apparent affinity of CL for CM-cytc-Fe(II) is essentially pH independent, the average value of B being (1.3 ± 0.3) × 10(-6) M. In the absence and presence of CL liposomes, the nitrite reductase activity of CM-cytc-Fe(II) increases linearly on lowering pH and the values of the slope of the linear fittings of Log k on versus pH are -1.05 ± 0.07 and -1.03 ± 0.03, respectively, reflecting the involvement of one proton for the formation of the transient ferric form, NO, and OH(-). These results indicate that Met80 carboxymethylation and CL binding cooperate in the stabilization of the highly reactive heme-Fe atom of CL-CM-cytc. PMID:27010463

  10. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  11. Cardiolipin modulates allosterically the nitrite reductase activity of horse heart cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria; Polticelli, Fabio; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2014-10-01

    Upon cardiolipin (CL) liposomes binding, horse heart cytochrome c (cytc) changes its tertiary structure disrupting the heme-Fe-Met80 distal bond, reduces drastically the midpoint potential, binds CO and NO with high affinity, displays peroxidase activity, and facilitates peroxynitrite isomerization. Here, the effect of CL liposomes on the nitrite reductase activity of ferrous cytc (cytc-Fe(II)) is reported. In the absence of CL liposomes, hexa-coordinated cytc-Fe(II) displays a very low value of the apparent second-order rate constant for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of cytc-Fe(II) to cytc-Fe(II)-NO (k on = (7.3 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4 and 20.0 °C). However, CL liposomes facilitate the NO2 (-)-mediated nitrosylation of cytc-Fe(II) in a dose-dependent manner inducing the penta-coordination of the heme-Fe(II) atom. The value of k on for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-cytc-Fe(II)-NO is 2.6 ± 0.3 M(-1) s(-1) (at pH 7.4 and 20.0 °C). Values of the apparent dissociation equilibrium constant for CL liposomes binding to cytc-Fe(II) are (2.2 ± 0.2) × 10(-6) M, (1.8 ± 0.2) × 10(-6) M, and (1.4 ± 0.2) × 10(-6) M at pH 6.5, 7.4, and 8.1, respectively, and 20.0 °C. These results suggest that the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-cytc-Fe(II)-NO could play anti-apoptotic effects impairing lipid peroxidation and therefore the initiation of the cell death program by the release of pro-apoptotic factors (including cytc) in the cytoplasm. PMID:24969400

  12. Expression of Nitrate and Nitrite Reductase Activities under Various Forms of Nitrogen Nutrition in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Timpo, E E; Neyra, C A

    1983-05-01

    The main objectives of this work were to study the effect of different N sources on plant growth, N accumulation, and on the expression of nitrate reductase activity in Phaseolus vulgaris L. leaves. Plants were grown under greenhouse conditions (15 to 25 kilolux; 16/8 hour day/night cycles) in plastic pots filled with perlite: vermiculite (1:1) and watered daily with a minus N solution (N(2) plants) or supplemented with either KNO(3), (NH(4))(2)SO(4), or urea as combined N sources.Significant levels of nitrate reductase activity in trifoliolate leaves of N(2)-, NH(4) (+)-, urea-, or NO(3) (-)-dependent plants was demonstrated throughout this work. Leaves from the urea- or NH(4) (+)-grown plants accumulated NO(2) (-) in the dark but not in the light when NO(2) (-) was supplied by vacuum infiltration. These results indicated that the potential for reduction of NO(3) (-) or NO(2) (-) was not impaired by growing the plants on NH(4) (+) or urea and, in addition, provided evidence for the occurrence of a non-nitrate-inducible nitrite reductase. The nitrate reductase activities associated with N(2)-, NH(4) (+)-, or urea-dependent plants are tentatively regarded as ;constitutive' to differentiate from the widely occurring NO(3) (-)-inducible nitrate reductase activity.Plants grown on NO(3) (-) or urea accumulated significantly larger amounts of reduced N and dry matter as compared to NH(4) (+)- and N(2)-dependent plants. Regardless of N treatment, or size of plants, about 50% of the N accumulated by the plant was allocated to the leaves. PMID:16662985

  13. Designing a functional type 2 copper center that has nitrite reductase activity within α-helical coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Tegoni, Matteo; Yu, Fangting; Bersellini, Manuela; Penner-Hahn, James E; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2012-12-26

    One of the ultimate objectives of de novo protein design is to realize systems capable of catalyzing redox reactions on substrates. This goal is challenging as redox-active proteins require design considerations for both the reduced and oxidized states of the protein. In this paper, we describe the spectroscopic characterization and catalytic activity of a de novo designed metallopeptide Cu(I/II)(TRIL23H)(3)(+/2+), where Cu(I/II) is embeded in α-helical coiled coils, as a model for the Cu(T2) center of copper nitrite reductase. In Cu(I/II)(TRIL23H)(3)(+/2+), Cu(I) is coordinated to three histidines, as indicated by X-ray absorption data, and Cu(II) to three histidines and one or two water molecules. Both ions are bound in the interior of the three-stranded coiled coils with affinities that range from nano- to micromolar [Cu(II)], and picomolar [Cu(I)]. The Cu(His)(3) active site is characterized in both oxidation states, revealing similarities to the Cu(T2) site in the natural enzyme. The species Cu(II)(TRIL23H)(3)(2+) in aqueous solution can be reduced to Cu(I)(TRIL23H)(3)(+) using ascorbate, and reoxidized by nitrite with production of nitric oxide. At pH 5.8, with an excess of both the reductant (ascorbate) and the substrate (nitrite), the copper peptide Cu(II)(TRIL23H)(3)(2+) acts as a catalyst for the reduction of nitrite with at least five turnovers and no loss of catalytic efficiency after 3.7 h. The catalytic activity, which is first order in the concentration of the peptide, also shows a pH dependence that is described and discussed. PMID:23236170

  14. Designing a functional type 2 copper center that has nitrite reductase activity within α-helical coiled coils

    PubMed Central

    Tegoni, Matteo; Yu, Fangting; Bersellini, Manuela; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2012-01-01

    One of the ultimate objectives of de novo protein design is to realize systems capable of catalyzing redox reactions on substrates. This goal is challenging as redox-active proteins require design considerations for both the reduced and oxidized states of the protein. In this paper, we describe the spectroscopic characterization and catalytic activity of a de novo designed metallopeptide Cu(I/II)(TRIL23H)3+/2+, where Cu(I/II) is embeded in α-helical coiled coils, as a model for the CuT2 center of copper nitrite reductase. In Cu(I/II)(TRIL23H)3+/2+, Cu(I) is coordinated to three histidines, as indicated by X-ray absorption data, and Cu(II) to three histidines and one or two water molecules. Both ions are bound in the interior of the three-stranded coiled coils with affinities that range from nano- to micromolar [Cu(II)], and picomolar [Cu(I)]. The Cu(His)3 active site is characterized in both oxidation states, revealing similarities to the CuT2 site in the natural enzyme. The species Cu(II)(TRIL23H)32+ in aqueous solution can be reduced to Cu(I)(TRIL23H)3+ using ascorbate, and reoxidized by nitrite with production of nitric oxide. At pH 5.8, with an excess of both the reductant (ascorbate) and the substrate (nitrite), the copper peptide Cu(II)(TRIL23H)32+ acts as a catalyst for the reduction of nitrite with at least five turnovers and no loss of catalytic efficiency after 3.7 h. The catalytic activity, which is first order in the concentration of the peptide, also shows a pH dependence that is described and discussed. PMID:23236170

  15. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Tian, Guoting; Feng, Shanshan; Wong, Jack Ho; Zhao, Yongchang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was 45 °C and 6.8, respectively. B. edulis NiR was capable of prolonging the lifespan of nitrite-intoxicated mice, indicating that it had the action of an antidote. The enzyme could also eliminate nitrite from blood after intragastric administration of sodium nitrite, and after packaging into capsule, this nitrite-eliminating activity could persist for at least 120 minutes thus avoiding immediate gastric degradation. B. edulis NiR represents the first nitrite reductase purified from mushrooms and may facilitate subsequent applications. PMID:26446494

  16. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Tian, Guoting; Feng, Shanshan; Wong, Jack Ho; Zhao, Yongchang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-10-08

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was 45 °C and 6.8, respectively. B. edulis NiR was capable of prolonging the lifespan of nitrite-intoxicated mice, indicating that it had the action of an antidote. The enzyme could also eliminate nitrite from blood after intragastric administration of sodium nitrite, and after packaging into capsule, this nitrite-eliminating activity could persist for at least 120 minutes thus avoiding immediate gastric degradation. B. edulis NiR represents the first nitrite reductase purified from mushrooms and may facilitate subsequent applications.

  17. De novo-designed metallopeptides with type 2 copper centers: modulation of reduction potentials and nitrite reductase activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangting; Penner-Hahn, James E; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2013-12-01

    Enzymatic reactions involving redox processes are highly sensitive to the local electrostatic environment. Despite considerable effort, the complex interactions among different influential factors in native proteins impede progress toward complete understanding of the structure-function relationship. Of particular interest is the type 2 copper center Cu(His)3, which may act as an electron transfer center in peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) or a catalytic center in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR). A de novo design strategy is used to probe the effect of modifying charged amino acid residues around, but not directly bound to, a Cu(His)3 center embedded in three-stranded coiled coils (TRI-H)3 [TRI-H = Ac-G WKALEEK LKALEEK LKALEEK HKALEEK G-NH2]. Specifically, the peptide TRI-EH (=TRI-HK22E) alters an important lysine to glutamate just above the copper binding center. With a series of TRI-EH peptides mutated below the metal center, we use a variety of spectroscopies (EPR, UV-vis, XAS) to show a direct impact on the protonation equilibria, copper binding affinities, reduction potentials, and nitrite reductase activities of these copper-peptide complexes. The potentials at a specific pH vary by 100 mV, and the nitrite reductase activities range over a factor of 4 in rates. We also observe that the affinities, potentials, and catalytic activities are strongly influenced by the pH conditions (pH 5.8-7.4). In general, Cu(II) affinities for the peptides are diminished at low pH values. The interplay among these factors can lead to a 200 mV shift in reduction potential across these peptides, which is determined by the pH-dependent affinities of copper in both oxidation states. This study illustrates the strength of de novo protein design in elucidating the influence of ionizable residues on a particular redox system, an important step toward understanding the factors that govern the properties of this metalloenzyme with a goal of eventually improving the

  18. De novo designed metallopeptides with type 2 copper centers: modulation of reduction potentials and nitrite reductase activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fangting; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic reactions involving redox processes are highly sensitive to the local electrostatic environment. Despite considerable effort, the complex interactions between different influential factors in native proteins impede progress towards complete understanding of the structure-function relationship. Of particular interest is the type 2 copper center Cu(His)3, which may act as an electron transfer center in peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) or a catalytic center in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR). A de novo design strategy is used to probe the effect of modifying charged amino acid residues around, but not directly bound to, a Cu(His)3 center embedded in three-stranded coiled coils (TRI-H)3 [TRI-H = Ac-G WKALEEK LKALEEK LKALEEK HKALEEK G-NH2]. Specifically, the peptide TRI-EH [TRI-EH = TRI-HK22E] alters an important lysine to glutamate just above the copper binding center. With a series of TRI-EH peptides mutated below the metal center, we use a variety of spectroscopies (EPR, UV-Vis, XAS) to show a direct impact on the protonation equilibria, copper binding affinities, reduction potentials and nitrite reductase activities of these copper-peptide complexes. The potentials at a specific pH vary by 100 mV and nitrite reductase activity ranges over a factor of four in rates. We also observe that affinities, potentials and catalytic activities are strongly influenced by pH conditions (pH 5.8 ~ 7.4). In general, Cu(II) affinities for the peptides are diminished at low pH values. The interplay between these factors can lead to a 200 mV shift in reduction potentials across these peptides, which is determined by the pH-dependent affinities of copper in both oxidation states. This study illustrates the strength of de novo protein design in elucidating the influence of ionizable residues on a particular redox system, an important step towards understanding the factors that govern the properties of this metalloenzyme with a goal of eventually improving

  19. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective.

  20. Effects of Nitrite, Chlorate, and Chlorite on Nitrate Uptake and Nitrate Reductase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, M. Yaeesh; King, Bryan J.; Glass, Anthony D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of NO2−, ClO3−, and ClO2− on the induction of nitrate transport and nitrate reductase activity (NRA) as well as their effects on NO3− influx into roots of intact barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Klondike) seedlings were investigated. A 24-h pretreatment with 0.1 mol m−3 NO2− fully induced NO3− transport but failed to induce NRA. Similar pretreatments with ClO3− and ClO2− induced neither NO3− transport nor NRA. Net ClO3− uptake was induced by NO3− but not by ClO3− itself, indicating that NO3− and ClO3− transport occur via the NO3− carrier. At the uptake step, NO2− and ClO2− strongly inhibited NO3− influx; the former exhibited classical competitive kinetics, whereas the latter exhibited complex mixed-type kinetics. ClO3− proved to be a weak inhibitor of NO3− influx (Ki = 16 mol m−3) in a noncompetitive manner. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the suitability of these NO3− analogs as screening agents for the isolation of mutants defective in NO3− transport. PMID:16653041

  1. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  2. Nitrite Reductase and Nitric-oxide Synthase Activity of the Mitochondrial Molybdopterin Enzymes mARC1 and mARC2*

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E.; Tejero, Jesús; Sun, Bin; Gauthier, Marc C.; Thomas, John; Ragireddy, Venkata; Merchant, Bonnie A.; Wang, Jun; Azarov, Ivan; Basu, Partha; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC) proteins are molybdopterin-containing enzymes of unclear physiological function. Both human isoforms mARC-1 and mARC-2 are able to catalyze the reduction of nitrite when they are in the reduced form. Moreover, our results indicate that mARC can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite when forming an electron transfer chain with NADH, cytochrome b5, and NADH-dependent cytochrome b5 reductase. The rate of NO formation increases almost 3-fold when pH was lowered from 7.5 to 6.5. To determine if nitrite reduction is catalyzed by molybdenum in the active site of mARC-1, we mutated the putative active site cysteine residue (Cys-273), known to coordinate molybdenum binding. NO formation was abolished by the C273A mutation in mARC-1. Supplementation of transformed Escherichia coli with tungsten facilitated the replacement of molybdenum in recombinant mARC-1 and abolished NO formation. Therefore, we conclude that human mARC-1 and mARC-2 are capable of catalyzing reduction of nitrite to NO through reaction with its molybdenum cofactor. Finally, expression of mARC-1 in HEK cells using a lentivirus vector was used to confirm cellular nitrite reduction to NO. A comparison of NO formation profiles between mARC and xanthine oxidase reveals similar Kcat and Vmax values but more sustained NO formation from mARC, possibly because it is not vulnerable to autoinhibition via molybdenum desulfuration. The reduction of nitrite by mARC in the mitochondria may represent a new signaling pathway for NADH-dependent hypoxic NO production. PMID:24500710

  3. Cardiac contractility in Antarctic teleost is modulated by nitrite through xanthine oxidase and cytochrome p-450 nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Filippo; Amelio, Daniela; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Pellegrino, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    In mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates, nitrite anion, the largest pool of intravascular and tissue nitric oxide storage, represents a key player of many biological processes, including cardiac modulation. As shown by our studies on Antarctic teleosts, nitrite-dependent cardiac regulation is of great relevance also in cold-blooded vertebrates. This study analysed the influence elicited by nitrite on the performance of the perfused beating heart of two Antarctic stenotherm teleosts, the haemoglobinless Chionodraco hamatus (icefish) and the red-blooded Trematomus bernacchii. Since haemoglobin is crucial in nitric oxide homeostasis, the icefish, a naturally occurring genetic knockout for this protein, provides exclusive opportunities to investigate nitric oxide/nitrite signaling. In vivo, nitrite conversion to nitric oxide requires the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450, thus the involvement of these enzymes was also evaluated. We showed that, in C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite influenced cardiac performance by inducing a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which was unaffected by nitric oxide scavenging by PTIO in C. hamatus, while it was abolished in T. bernacchii. Specific inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450 revealed, in the two teleosts, that the nitrite-dependent inotropism required the nitrite reductase activity of both enzymes. We also found that xanthine oxidase is more expressed in C. hamatus than in T. bernacchii, while the opposite was observed concerning cytochrome P-450. Results suggested that in the heart of C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite is an integral physiological source of nitric oxide with important signaling properties, which require the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450. PMID:26045289

  4. Cardiac contractility in Antarctic teleost is modulated by nitrite through xanthine oxidase and cytochrome p-450 nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Filippo; Amelio, Daniela; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Pellegrino, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    In mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates, nitrite anion, the largest pool of intravascular and tissue nitric oxide storage, represents a key player of many biological processes, including cardiac modulation. As shown by our studies on Antarctic teleosts, nitrite-dependent cardiac regulation is of great relevance also in cold-blooded vertebrates. This study analysed the influence elicited by nitrite on the performance of the perfused beating heart of two Antarctic stenotherm teleosts, the haemoglobinless Chionodraco hamatus (icefish) and the red-blooded Trematomus bernacchii. Since haemoglobin is crucial in nitric oxide homeostasis, the icefish, a naturally occurring genetic knockout for this protein, provides exclusive opportunities to investigate nitric oxide/nitrite signaling. In vivo, nitrite conversion to nitric oxide requires the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450, thus the involvement of these enzymes was also evaluated. We showed that, in C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite influenced cardiac performance by inducing a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which was unaffected by nitric oxide scavenging by PTIO in C. hamatus, while it was abolished in T. bernacchii. Specific inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450 revealed, in the two teleosts, that the nitrite-dependent inotropism required the nitrite reductase activity of both enzymes. We also found that xanthine oxidase is more expressed in C. hamatus than in T. bernacchii, while the opposite was observed concerning cytochrome P-450. Results suggested that in the heart of C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite is an integral physiological source of nitric oxide with important signaling properties, which require the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450.

  5. Nitrite controls the release of nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd{sub 1} nitrite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo, Serena; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzola, Francesca

    2007-11-23

    Nitrite reductase (cd{sub 1}NIR) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which catalyses the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), contains a c-heme as the electron acceptor and a d{sub 1}-heme where catalysis occurs. Reduction involves binding of nitrite to the reduced d{sub 1}-heme, followed by dehydration to yield NO; release of NO and re-reduction of the enzyme close the cycle. Since NO is a powerful inhibitor of ferrous hemeproteins, enzymatic turnover demands the release of NO. We recently discovered that NO dissociation from the ferrous d{sub 1}-heme is fast, showing that cd{sub 1}NIR behaves differently from other hemeproteins. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the physiological substrate nitrite displaces NO from the ferrous enzyme, which enters a new catalytic cycle; this reaction depends on the conserved His369 whose role in substrate stabilization is crucial for catalysis. Thus we suggest that also in vivo the activity of cd{sub 1}NIR is controlled by nitrite.

  6. Spinach nitrite reductase. Purification and properties of a siroheme-containing iron-sulfur enzyme.

    PubMed

    Vega, J M; Kamin, H

    1977-02-10

    Ferredoxin-nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1.) from spinach has been purified to homogeneity with a specific activity of 110 units/mg of protein. The enzyme, Mr = 61,000 has 3 iron atoms (of which one is in siroheme) and 2 labile sulfides, i.e. 1 (Fe2-S2) per molecule, with absorption maxima at 276, 386 (Soret), 573 (alpha), and 690 nm, with an E386 of 3.97 X 10(4) M-1-cm-1, and A276/A386 absorptivity ratio of 1.8. Anaerobic addition of dithionite results in the loss of the 690 nm peak and the splitting of the 573 nm absorption band into two broad peaks at 545 and 585 nm. Reduction by dithionite is enhanced by cyanide (Fig. 7) and requires about 3 electron eq per mol of enzyme. With nitrite or hydroxylamine (substrates of the enzyme), cyanide (a competitive inhibitor with respect to nitrite), or sulfite, the 690 nm absorption band of substrate-free enzyme disappears and the absorbance in the Soret and alpha region are altered. The high spin EPR signals disappear (J. M. Vega, H. Kamin, N. R. Orme-Johnson, and W. H. Orme-Johnson, unpublished observations). Titration permits calculation of 1 mol of nitrite bound/mol of enzyme with a Kdiss of 3.2 X 10(-6) M. Dithionite-reduced enzyme also forms complexes with added nitrite, hydroxylamine, or cyanide, characterized by marked alterations in the 573 (alpha) absorption band. THus, substrates or competitive inhibitors can be bound to the oxidized or reduced enzyme forms. CO inhibits nitrite reductase and forms a complex with reduced enzyme (epsilonmax at 395, 543, and 585 nm). Formation or dissociation of the spectrophotometrically detectable CO complex correlates with inhibition or inhibition-reversal of nitrite reduction catalysis. During steady state turnover with dithionite and nitrite, the enzyme forms a complex with added nitrite with absorption difference maxima at 445, 538, and 580 nm with respect to reduced enzyme. When nearly all substrate is depleted the spectrum of a new species appears, indicating that nitrite

  7. DFT Study on Nitrite Reduction Mechanism in Copper-Containing Nitrite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Lintuluoto, Masami; Lintuluoto, Juha M

    2016-01-12

    Dissimilatory reduction of nitrite by copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR) is an important step in the geobiochemical nitrogen cycle. The proposed mechanisms for the reduction of nitrite by CuNiRs include intramolecular electron and proton transfers, and these two events are understood to couple. Proton-coupled electron transfer is one of the key processes in enzyme reactions. We investigated the geometric structure of bound nitrite and the mechanism of nitrite reduction on CuNiR using density functional theory calculations. Also, the proton transfer pathway, the key residues, and their roles in the reaction mechanism were clarified in this study. In our results, the reduction of T2 Cu site promotes the proton transfer, and the hydrogen bond network around the binding site has an important role not only to stabilize the nitrite binding but also to promote the proton transfer to nitrite.

  8. Direct electrochemistry of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase: evidence of interactions across the dimeric interface.

    PubMed

    Judd, Evan T; Youngblut, Matthew; Pacheco, A Andrew; Elliott, Sean J

    2012-12-21

    Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (soNrfA), a dimeric enzyme that houses five c-type hemes per protomer, conducts the six-electron reduction of nitrite and the two-electron reduction of hydroxylamine. Protein film voltammetry (PFV) has been used to study the cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Escherichia coli (ecNrfA) previously, revealing catalytic reduction of both nitrite and hydroxylamine substrates by ecNrfA adsorbed to a graphite electrode that is characterized by "boosts" and attenuations in activity depending on the applied potential. Here, we use PFV to investigate the catalytic properties of soNrfA during both nitrite and hydroxylamine turnover and compare those properties to the properties of ecNrfA. Distinct differences in both the electrochemical and kinetic characteristics of soNrfA are observed; e.g., all detected electron transfer steps are one-electron in nature, contrary to what has been observed in ecNrfA [Angove, H. C., Cole, J. A., Richardson, D. J., and Butt, J. N. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 23374-23381]. Additionally, we find evidence of substrate inhibition during nitrite turnover and negative cooperativity during hydroxylamine turnover, neither of which has previously been observed in any cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Collectively, these data provide evidence that during catalysis, potential pathways of communication exist between the individual soNrfA monomers comprising the native homodimer.

  9. Direct electrochemistry of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase: evidence for interactions across the dimeric interface

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Evan T.; Youngblut, Matthew; Pacheco, A. Andrew; Elliott, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (soNrfA), a dimeric enzyme that houses five c-type hemes per protomer, carries out the six-electron reduction of nitrite and the two-electron reduction of hydroxylamine. Protein film voltammetry (PFV) has been used to study the cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Escherichia coli (ecNrfA) previously, revealing catalytic reduction of both nitrite and hydroxylamine substrates by ecNrfA adsorbed to a graphite electrode that is characterized by ‘boosts’ and attenuations in activity depending on the applied potential. Here, we use PFV to investigate the catalytic properties of soNrfA during both nitrite and hydroxylamine turnover and compare those properties to ecNrfA. Distinct differences in both the electrochemical and kinetic characteristics of soNrfA are observed, e.g., all detected electron transfer steps are one-electron in nature, contrary to what has been observed in ecNrfA (Angove, H. C., Cole, J. A., Richardson, D. J., and Butt, J. N. (2002) Protein film voltammetry reveals distinctive fingerprints of nitrite and hydroxylamine reduction by a cytochrome C nitrite reductase, J Biol Chem 277, 23374-23381). Additionally, we find evidence of substrate inhibition during nitrite turnover and negative cooperativity during hydroxylamine turnover, neither of which have previously been observed in any cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Collectively these data provide evidence that during catalysis, potential pathways of communication exist between the individual soNrfA monomers comprising the native homodimer. PMID:23210513

  10. Reductive activation of the heme iron-nitrosyl intermediate in the reaction mechanism of cytochrome c nitrite reductase: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Bykov, Dmytro; Neese, Frank

    2012-06-01

    Cytochrome c nitrite reductase catalyzes the six-electron, seven-proton reduction of nitrite to ammonia without release of any detectable reaction intermediate. This implies a unique flexibility of the active site combined with a finely tuned proton and electron delivery system. In the present work, we employed density functional theory to study the recharging of the active site with protons and electrons through the series of reaction intermediates based on nitrogen monoxide [Fe(II)-NO(+), Fe(II)-NO·, Fe(II)-NO(-), and Fe(II)-HNO]. The activation barriers for the various proton and electron transfer steps were estimated in the framework of Marcus theory. Using the barriers obtained, we simulated the kinetics of the reduction process. We found that the complex recharging process can be accomplished in two possible ways: either through two consecutive proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) or in the form of three consecutive elementary steps involving reduction, PCET, and protonation. Kinetic simulations revealed the recharging through two PCETs to be a means of overcoming the predicted deep energetic minimum that is calculated to occur at the stage of the Fe(II)-NO· intermediate. The radical transfer role for the active-site Tyr(218), as proposed in the literature, cannot be confirmed on the basis of our calculations. The role of the highly conserved calcium located in the direct proximity of the active site in proton delivery has also been studied. It was found to play an important role in the substrate conversion through the facilitation of the proton transfer steps.

  11. Expression and purification of spinach nitrite reductase in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Bellissimo, D.; Privalle, L. )

    1991-03-11

    The study of structure-function relationships in nitrite reductase (NiR) by site-directed mutagenesis requires an expression system from which suitable quantities of active enzyme can be purified. Spinach NiR cDNA was cloned into pUC18 and expressed in E.coli JM109 as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein. The IPTG-induced fusion protein contains five additional amino acids at the N-terminus. The expressed NiR in aerobic cultures was mostly insoluble and inactive indicating the presence of inclusion bodies. By altering growth conditions, active NiR could represent 0.5-1.0% of the total E.coli protein, Effects of the addition of delta-aminolevulinic acid, a heme precursor, and anaerobic growth were also examined. Spinach NiR was purified approximately 200 fold to homogeneity. When subjected to electrophoresis on SDS polyacrylamide gels, the NiR migrated as a single band with similar mobility to pure spinach enzyme. The expressed enzyme also reacted with rabbit anti-spinach NiR antibody as visualized by Western blot analysis. The absorption spectrum of the E.coli-expressed enzyme was identical to spinach enzyme with a Soret and alpha band a 386 and 573 nm, respectively, and an A{sub 278}/A{sub 386} = 1.9. The addition of nitrite produced the characteristic shifts in the spectrum. The E. coli-expressed NiR catalyzed the methylviologen-dependent reduction of nitrite. The specific activity was 100 U/mg. The K{sub m} determined for nitrite was 0.3 mM which is in agreement with values reported for the enzyme. These results indicate that the E.coli-expressed NiR is fully comparable to spinach NiR in purity, catalytic activity and physical state. Site-directed mutants have been made using PCR to examine structure-function relationships in this enzyme.

  12. Quantum mechanical interpretation of nitrite reduction by cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase from Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    PubMed

    Ranghino, G; Scorza, E; Sjögren, T; Williams, P A; Ricci, M; Hajdu, J

    2000-09-12

    The reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in respiratory denitrification is catalyzed by a cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase in Paracoccus pantotrophus (formerly known as Thiosphaera pantotropha LMD 92.63). High-resolution structures are available for the fully oxidized [Fülöp, V., Moir, J. W., Ferguson, S. J., and Hajdu, J. (1995) Cell 81, 369-377; Baker, S. C., Saunders, N. F., Willis, A. C., Ferguson, S. J., Hajdu, J., and Fülöp, V. (1997) J. Mol. Biol. 269, 440-455] and fully reduced forms of this enzyme, as well as for various intermediates in its catalytic cycle [Williams, P. A., Fülöp, V., Garman, E. F., Saunders, N. F., Ferguson, S. J., and Hajdu, J. (1997) Nature 389, 406-412]. On the basis of these structures, quantum mechanical techniques (QM), including density functional methods (DFT), were combined with simulated annealing (SA) and molecular mechanics techniques (MM) to calculate the electronic distribution of molecular orbitals in the active site during catalysis. The results show likely trajectories for electrons, protons, substrates, and products in the process of nitrite reduction, and offer an interpretation of the reaction mechanism. The calculations indicate that the redox state of the d(1) heme and charges on two histidines in the active site orchestrate catalysis locally. Binding of nitrite to the reduced iron is followed by proton transfer from His345 and His388 to one of the oxygens of nitrite, creating a water molecule and an [Fe(II)-NO(+)] complex. Valence isomerization within this complex gives [Fe(III)-NO]. The release of NO from the ferric iron is influenced by the protonation state of His345 and His388, and by the orientation of NO on the d(1) heme. Return of Tyr25 to a hydrogen-bonding position between His345 and His388 facilitates product release, but a rebinding of Tyr25 to the oxidized iron may be bypassed in steady-state catalysis.

  13. The purification and properties of a cd-cytochrome nitrite reductase from Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Cronin, S.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans, grown anaerobically in the presence of nitrite, contained membrane and cytoplasmic nitrite reductases. When assayed in the presence of phenazine methosulfate and ascorbate, the membrane-bound enzyme produced nitrous oxide whereas the cytoplasmic enzyme produced nitric oxide. When both enzymes were assayed in the presence of methyl viologen and dithionite, the cytoplasmic enzyme produced ammonia. Following solubilization, the membrane-bound enzyme behaved like the cytoplasmic enzyme, producing nitric oxide in the presence of phenazine methosulfate and ascorbate, and ammonia when assayed in the presence of methyl viologen and dithionite. The cytoplasmic and membrane-bound enzymes were purified to essentially the same specific activity. Only a single nitrite-reductase activity was detected on electrophoretic gels and the electrophoretic behavior of both enzymes suggested they were identical. The spectral properties of both enzymes suggested they were cd-type cytochromes. These data suggest that the products of nitrite reduction by the cd-cytochrome nitrite reductase are determined by the location of the enzyme and the redox potential of the electron donor.

  14. Structural study of the X-ray-induced enzymatic reaction of octahaem cytochrome C nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, A A; Polyakov, K M; Lazarenko, V A; Popov, A N; Tikhonova, T V; Tikhonov, A V; Popov, V O

    2015-05-01

    Octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from the bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium and of sulfite to sulfide. The reducing properties of X-ray radiation and the high quality of the enzyme crystals allow study of the catalytic reaction of cytochrome c nitrite reductase directly in a crystal of the enzyme, with the reaction being induced by X-rays. Series of diffraction data sets with increasing absorbed dose were collected from crystals of the free form of the enzyme and its complexes with nitrite and sulfite. The corresponding structures revealed gradual changes associated with the reduction of the catalytic haems by X-rays. In the case of the nitrite complex the conversion of the nitrite ions bound in the active sites to NO species was observed, which is the beginning of the catalytic reaction. For the free form, an increase in the distance between the oxygen ligand bound to the catalytic haem and the iron ion of the haem took place. In the case of the sulfite complex no enzymatic reaction was detected, but there were changes in the arrangement of the active-site water molecules that were presumably associated with a change in the protonation state of the sulfite ions.

  15. Correlations between the Electronic Properties of Shewanella oneidensis Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase (ccNiR) and Its Structure: Effects of Heme Oxidation State and Active Site Ligation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Natalia; Love, Daniel; Judd, Evan T; Elliott, Sean J; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2015-06-23

    The electrochemical properties of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR), a homodimer that contains five hemes per protomer, were investigated by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectropotentiometries. Global analysis of the UV-vis spectropotentiometric results yielded highly reproducible values for the heme midpoint potentials. These midpoint potential values were then assigned to specific hemes in each protomer (as defined in previous X-ray diffraction studies) by comparing the EPR and UV-vis spectropotentiometric results, taking advantage of the high sensitivity of EPR spectra to the structural microenvironment of paramagnetic centers. Addition of the strong-field ligand cyanide led to a 70 mV positive shift of the active site's midpoint potential, as the cyanide bound to the initially five-coordinate high-spin heme and triggered a high-spin to low-spin transition. With cyanide present, three of the remaining hemes gave rise to distinctive and readily assignable EPR spectral changes upon reduction, while a fourth was EPR-silent. At high applied potentials, interpretation of the EPR spectra in the absence of cyanide was complicated by a magnetic interaction that appears to involve three of five hemes in each protomer. At lower applied potentials, the spectra recorded in the presence and absence of cyanide were similar, which aided global assignment of the signals. The midpoint potential of the EPR-silent heme could be assigned by default, but the assignment was also confirmed by UV-vis spectropotentiometric analysis of the H268M mutant of ccNiR, in which one of the EPR-silent heme's histidine axial ligands was replaced with a methionine.

  16. A novel nitrite biosensor based on conductometric electrode modified with cytochrome c nitrite reductase composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Leonard, Didier; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Zhang, Jiao; Bessueille, François; Goepfert, Yves; Wang, Xuejiang; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Jianfu; Almeida, M Gabriela; Silveira, Célia M

    2009-02-15

    A conductometric biosensor for nitrite detection was developed using cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) extracted from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 cells immobilized on a planar interdigitated electrode by cross-linking with saturated glutaraldehyde (GA) vapour in the presence of bovine serum albumin, methyl viologen (MV), Nafion, and glycerol. The configuration parameters for this biosensor, including the enzyme concentration, ccNiR/BSA ratio, MV concentration, and Nafion concentration, were optimized. Various experimental parameters, such as sodium dithionite added, working buffer solution, and temperature, were investigated with regard to their effect on the conductance response of the biosensor to nitrite. Under the optimum conditions at room temperature (about 25 degrees C), the conductometric biosensor showed a fast response to nitrite (about 10s) with a linear range of 0.2-120 microM, a sensitivity of 0.194 microS/microM [NO(2)(-)], and a detection limit of 0.05 microM. The biosensor also showed satisfactory reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 6%, n=5). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M,app)) was 338 microM. When stored in potassium phosphate buffer (100mM, pH 7.6) at 4 degrees C, the biosensor showed good stability over 1 month. No obvious interference from other ionic species familiar in natural waters was detected. The application experiments show that the biosensor is suitable for use in real water samples. PMID:18804367

  17. Role of nitrate and nitrite in the induction of nitrite reductase in leaves of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The role of NO3- and NO2- in the induction of nitrite reductase (NiR) activity in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was investigated. Barley leaves contained 6 to 8 micromoles NO2-/gram fresh weight x hour of endogenous NiR activity when grown in N-free solutions. Supply of both NO2- and NO3- induced the enzyme activity above the endogenous levels (5 and 10 times, respectively at 10 millimolar NO2- and NO3- over a 24 hour period). In NO3(-)-supplied leaves, NiR induction occurred at an ambient NO3- concentration of as low as 0.05 millimolar; however, no NiR induction was found in leaves supplied with NO2- until the ambient NO2- concentration was 0.5 millimolar. Nitrate accumulated in NO2(-)-fed leaves. The amount of NO3- accumulating in NO2(-)-fed leaves induced similar levels of NiR as did equivalent amounts of NO3- accumulating in NO3(-)-fed leaves. Induction of NiR in NO2(-)-fed leaves was not seen until NO3- was detectable (30 nanomoles/gram fresh weight) in the leaves. The internal concentrations of NO3-, irrespective of N source, were highly correlated with the levels of NiR induced. When the reduction of NO3- to NO2- was inhibited by WO4(2-), the induction of NiR was inhibited only partially. The results indicate that in barley leaves in NiR is induced by NO3- directly, i.e. without being reduced to NO2-, and that absorbed NO2- induces the enzyme activity indirectly after being oxidized to NO3- within the leaf.

  18. Characterization of the gene encoding nitrite reductase and the physiological consequences of its expression in the nondenitrifying Rhizobium {open_quotes}hedysari{close_quotes} strain HCNT1

    SciTech Connect

    Toffanin, A.; Shapleigh, J.P.; Maskus, M.

    1996-11-01

    Rhizobium {open_quotes}hedysari{close_quotes} HCNT1 is an unclassified rhizobium which contains a nitric oxide-producing nitrite reductase but is apparently incapable of coupling the reduction of nitrite to energy conservation. The gene encoding the nitrite reductase, nirK, has been cloned and sequenced and was found to encode a protein closely related to the copper-containing family of nitrite reductases. Unlike other members of this family, nirK expression in HCNT1 is not dependent on the presence of nitrogen oxides, being dependent only on oxygen concentration. Oxygen respiration of microaerobically grown Nir-deficient cells is not affected by concentrations of nitrite that completely inhibit oxygen respiration in wild-type cells. This loss of sensitivity suggests that the product of nitrite reductase, nitric oxide, is responsible for inhibition of oxygen respiration. By using a newly developed chemically modified electrode to detect nitric oxide, it was found that nitrite reduction by HCNT1 produces significantly higher nitric oxide concentrations than are observed in true denitrifiers. This indicates that nitrite reductase is the only nitrogen oxide reductase active in HCNT1. The capacity to generate such large concentrations of freely diffusible nitric oxide as a consequence of nitrite respiration makes HCNT1 unique among bacteria. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Measurement of nitrite reductase in leaf tissue of Vigna mungo : A new method.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R C; Bose, B; Mukerji, D; Mathur, S N; Srivastava, H S

    1979-12-01

    The enzyme nitrite reductase (EC 1.6.6.4) is generally assayed in terms of disappearance of nitrite from the assay medium. We describe a technique which allowed estimation of the enzyme level in leaf tissues of Vigna mungo (L). Hepper in terms of the release of the product (NH3) of the enzyme reaction. The technique is offered as an alternative, possibly more convenient method for assay of nitrite reductase in plant tissue in vivo.

  20. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  1. Nitrate reductase and nitrite as additional components of defense system in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) against Helicoverpa armigera herbivory.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rimaljeet; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Taggar, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Amylase inhibitors serve as attractive candidates of defense mechanisms against insect attack. Therefore, the impediment of Helicoverpa armigera digestion can be the effective way of controlling this pest population. Nitrite was found to be a potent mixed non-competitive competitive inhibitor of partially purified α-amylase of H. armigera gut. This observation impelled us to determine the response of nitrite and nitrate reductase (NR) towards H. armigera infestation in nine pigeonpea genotypes (four moderately resistant, three intermediate and two moderately susceptible). The significant upregulation of NR in moderately resistant genotypes after pod borer infestation suggested NR as one of the factors that determine their resistance status against insect attack. The pod borer attack caused greater reduction of nitrate and significant accumulation of nitrite in moderately resistant genotypes. The activity of nitrite reductase (NiR) was also enhanced more in moderately resistant genotypes than moderately susceptible genotypes on account of H. armigera herbivory. Expression of resistance to H. armigera was further revealed when significant negative association between NR, NiR, nitrite and percent pod damage was observed. This is the first report that suggests nitrite to be a potent inhibitor of H. armigera α-amylase and also the involvement of nitrite and NR in providing resistance against H. armigera herbivory. PMID:25307464

  2. Reactions of spinach nitrite reductase with its substrate, nitrite, and a putative intermediate, hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Sofya; Knaff, David B; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Sétif, Pierre; Mattioli, Tony A

    2004-08-24

    Plant nitrite reductase (NiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite (NO(2)(-)) to ammonia, using reduced ferredoxin as the electron donor. NiR contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster and an Fe-siroheme, which is the nitrite binding site. In the enzyme's as-isolated form ([4Fe-4S](2+)/Fe(3+)), resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that the siroheme is in the high-spin ferric hexacoordinated state with a weak sixth axial ligand. Kinetic and spectroscopic experiments showed that the reaction of NiR with NO(2)(-) results in an unexpectedly EPR-silent complex formed in a single step with a rate constant of 0.45 +/- 0.01 s(-)(1). This binding rate is slow compared to that expected from the NiR turnover rates reported in the literature, suggesting that binding of NO(2)(-) to the as-isolated form of NiR is not the predominant type of substrate binding during enzyme turnover. Resonance Raman spectroscopic characterization of this complex indicated that (i) the siroheme iron is low-spin hexacoordinated ferric, (ii) the ligand coordination is unusually heterogeneous, and (iii) the ligand is not nitric oxide, most likely NO(2)(-). The reaction of oxidized NiR with hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH), a putative intermediate, results in a ferrous siroheme-NO complex that is spectroscopically identical to the one observed during NiR turnover. Resonance Raman and absorption spectroscopy data show that the reaction of oxidized NiR ([4Fe-4S](2+)/Fe(3+)) with hydroxylamine is binding-limited, while the NH(2)OH conversion to nitric oxide is much faster.

  3. Theoretical study on reaction mechanisms of nitrite reduction by copper nitrite complexes: toward understanding and controlling possible mechanisms of copper nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shintaro; Matsui, Toru; Hirao, Kimihiko; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2015-04-30

    Using density functional theory, we studied denitrification reaction mechanisms of copper adducts of tris(pyrazolyl)methane and hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate models of a copper nitrite reductase (Cu-NiR), and herein propose several possible reaction pathways, including some parts that have never been examined previously. Because electron and proton transfer reactions participate in the enzymatic cycles of Cu-NiR, the Gibbs energy of a proton in solution, G(H(+)), and the redox potential, Eredox, of the model Cu-NiR are also evaluated. Although the pathway where a nitrite is provided as HNO2 is energetically preferable, a well-known reaction pathway passing through the resting state with an active site occupied by a water molecule where nitrite is provided as NO2(-) is the main recognized pathway under normal conditions. These features do not change whether the electron transfer occurs before production of NO or not. However, our results suggest that the pathway involving HNO2 might become dominant under low pH conditions in conjunction with experimental results.

  4. Theoretical study on reaction mechanisms of nitrite reduction by copper nitrite complexes: toward understanding and controlling possible mechanisms of copper nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shintaro; Matsui, Toru; Hirao, Kimihiko; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2015-04-30

    Using density functional theory, we studied denitrification reaction mechanisms of copper adducts of tris(pyrazolyl)methane and hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate models of a copper nitrite reductase (Cu-NiR), and herein propose several possible reaction pathways, including some parts that have never been examined previously. Because electron and proton transfer reactions participate in the enzymatic cycles of Cu-NiR, the Gibbs energy of a proton in solution, G(H(+)), and the redox potential, Eredox, of the model Cu-NiR are also evaluated. Although the pathway where a nitrite is provided as HNO2 is energetically preferable, a well-known reaction pathway passing through the resting state with an active site occupied by a water molecule where nitrite is provided as NO2(-) is the main recognized pathway under normal conditions. These features do not change whether the electron transfer occurs before production of NO or not. However, our results suggest that the pathway involving HNO2 might become dominant under low pH conditions in conjunction with experimental results. PMID:25845517

  5. Stable Copper-Nitrosyl Formation By Nitrite Reductase in Either Oxidation State

    SciTech Connect

    Tocheva, E.I.; Rosell, F.I.; Mauk, A.G.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-04

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) is an enzyme that uses type 1 and type 2 copper sites to reduce nitrite to nitric oxide during bacterial denitrification. A copper-nitrosyl intermediate is a proposed, yet poorly characterized feature of the NiR catalytic cycle. This intermediate is formally described as Cu(I)-NO{sup +} and is proposed to be formed at the type 2 copper site after nitrite binding and electron transfer from the type 1 copper site. In this study, copper-nitrosyl complexes were formed by prolonged exposure of exogenous NO to crystals of wild-type and two variant forms of NiR from Alcaligenes faecalis (AfNiR), and the structures were determined to 1.8 {angstrom} or better resolution. Exposing oxidized wild-type crystals to NO results in the reverse reaction and formation of nitrite that remains bound at the active site. In a type 1 copper site mutant (H145A) that is incapable of electron transfer to the type 2 site, the reverse reaction is not observed. Instead, in both oxidized and reduced H145A crystals, NO is observed bound in a side-on manner to the type 2 copper. In AfNiR, Asp98 forms hydrogen bonds to both substrate and product bound to the type 2 Cu. In the D98N variant, NO is bound side-on but is more disordered when observed for the wild-type enzyme. The solution EPR spectra of the crystallographically characterized NiR-NO complexes indicate the presence of an oxidized type 2 copper site and thus are interpreted as resulting from stable copper-nitrosyls and formally assigned as Cu(II)-NO{sup -}. A reaction scheme in which a second NO molecule is oxidized to nitrite can account for the formation of a CuD-NO{sup -} species after exposure of the oxidized H145A variant to NO gas.

  6. Structure of octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens in a complex with phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Trofimov, A. A.; Polyakov, K. M.; Boiko, K. M.; Filimonenkov, A. A.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Popov, V. O.; Koval'chuk, M. V.

    2010-01-15

    Octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia. The structures of the free enzyme and of the enzyme in complexes with the substrate (nitrite ion) and the inhibitor (azide ion) have been solved previously. In this study we report the structures of the oxidized complex of TvNiR with phosphate and of this complex reduced by europium(II) chloride (1.8- and 2.0-A resolution, the R factors are 15.9 and 16.7%, respectively) and the structure of the enzyme in the complex with cyanide (1.76-A resolution, the R factor is 16.5%), which was prepared by soaking a crystal of the oxidized phosphate complex of TvNiR. In the active site of the enzyme, the phosphate ion binds to the iron ion of the catalytic heme and to the side chains of the catalytic residues Arg131, Tyr303, and His361. The cyanide ion is coordinated to the heme-iron ion and is hydrogen bonded to the residue His361. In the structure of reduced TvNiR, the phosphate ion is bound in the same manner as in the structure of oxidized TvNiR, and the nine{sub c}oordinated europium ion is located on the surface of one of the crystallographically independent monomers of the enzyme.

  7. The anoxic plant mitochondrion as a nitrite: NO reductase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2011-07-01

    Under the conditions of oxygen deprivation, accumulating nitrite can be reduced in the mitochondrial electron transport chain forming free radical nitric oxide (NO). By reducing nitrite to NO, plant mitochondria preserve the capacity to oxidize external NADH and NADPH and retain a limited power for ATP synthesis complementing glycolytic ATP production. NO participates in O(2) balance in mitochondria by competitively inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase which can oxidize it to nitrite when oxygen concentration increases. Some of the NO escapes to the cytosol, where the efficient scavenging system involving non-symbiotic hemoglobin oxygenates NO to nitrate and supports continuous anaerobic turnover of nitrogen species.

  8. Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) does not disproportionate hydroxylamine to ammonia and nitrite, despite a strongly favorable driving force.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew; Pauly, Daniel J; Stein, Natalia; Walters, Daniel; Conrad, John A; Moran, Graham R; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) from Shewanella oneidensis, which catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia in vivo, was shown to oxidize hydroxylamine in the presence of large quantities of this substrate, yielding nitrite as the sole free nitrogenous product. UV-visible stopped-flow and rapid-freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance data, along with product analysis, showed that the equilibrium between hydroxylamine and nitrite is fairly rapidly established in the presence of high initial concentrations of hydroxylamine, despite said equilibrium lying far to the left. By contrast, reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia did not occur, even though disproportionation of hydroxylamine to yield both nitrite and ammonia is strongly thermodynamically favored. This suggests a kinetic barrier to the ccNiR-catalyzed reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia. A mechanism for hydroxylamine reduction is proposed in which the hydroxide group is first protonated and released as water, leaving what is formally an NH2(+) moiety bound at the heme active site. This species could be a metastable intermediate or a transition state but in either case would exist only if it were stabilized by the donation of electrons from the ccNiR heme pool into the empty nitrogen p orbital. In this scenario, ccNiR does not catalyze disproportionation because the electron-donating hydroxylamine does not poise the enzyme at a sufficiently low potential to stabilize the putative dehydrated hydroxylamine; presumably, a stronger reductant is required for this.

  9. Nitrite reductase function of deoxymyoglobin: oxygen sensor and regulator of cardiac energetics and function.

    PubMed

    Rassaf, Tienush; Flögel, Ulrich; Drexhage, Christine; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike; Kelm, Malte; Schrader, Jürgen

    2007-06-22

    Although the primary function of myoglobin (Mb) has been considered to be cellular oxygen storage and supply, recent studies have suggested to classify Mb as a multifunctional allosteric enzyme. In the heart, Mb acts as a potent scavenger of nitric oxide (NO) and contributes to the attenuation of oxidative damage. Here we report that a dynamic cycle exists in which a decrease in tissue oxygen tension drives the conversion of Mb from being an NO scavenger in normoxia to an NO producer in hypoxia. The NO generated by reaction of deoxygenated Mb with nitrite is functionally relevant and leads to a downregulation of cardiac energy status, which was not observed in mice lacking Mb. As a consequence, myocardial oxygen consumption is reduced and cardiac contractility is dampened in wild-type mice. We propose that this pathway represents a novel homeostatic mechanism by which a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand in muscle is translated into the fractional increase of deoxygenated Mb exhibiting enhanced nitrite reductase activity. Thus, Mb may act as an oxygen sensor which through NO can adjust muscle energetics to limited oxygen supply. PMID:17495223

  10. Nitrite reductase function of deoxymyoglobin: oxygen sensor and regulator of cardiac energetics and function.

    PubMed

    Rassaf, Tienush; Flögel, Ulrich; Drexhage, Christine; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike; Kelm, Malte; Schrader, Jürgen

    2007-06-22

    Although the primary function of myoglobin (Mb) has been considered to be cellular oxygen storage and supply, recent studies have suggested to classify Mb as a multifunctional allosteric enzyme. In the heart, Mb acts as a potent scavenger of nitric oxide (NO) and contributes to the attenuation of oxidative damage. Here we report that a dynamic cycle exists in which a decrease in tissue oxygen tension drives the conversion of Mb from being an NO scavenger in normoxia to an NO producer in hypoxia. The NO generated by reaction of deoxygenated Mb with nitrite is functionally relevant and leads to a downregulation of cardiac energy status, which was not observed in mice lacking Mb. As a consequence, myocardial oxygen consumption is reduced and cardiac contractility is dampened in wild-type mice. We propose that this pathway represents a novel homeostatic mechanism by which a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand in muscle is translated into the fractional increase of deoxygenated Mb exhibiting enhanced nitrite reductase activity. Thus, Mb may act as an oxygen sensor which through NO can adjust muscle energetics to limited oxygen supply.

  11. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal

    PubMed Central

    Horrell, Sam; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Eady, Robert R.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Hough, Michael A.; Strange, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX) to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07–1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a ‘catalytic reaction movie’ highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines. PMID:27437114

  12. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal.

    PubMed

    Horrell, Sam; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar; Hough, Michael A; Strange, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX) to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07-1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a 'catalytic reaction movie' highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines. PMID:27437114

  13. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal.

    PubMed

    Horrell, Sam; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar; Hough, Michael A; Strange, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX) to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07-1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a 'catalytic reaction movie' highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines.

  14. A nitrite biosensor based on co-immobilization of nitrite reductase and viologen-modified chitosan on a glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Quan, De; Shin, Woonsup

    2010-01-01

    An electrochemical nitrite biosensor based on co-immobilization of copper-containing nitrite reductase (Cu-NiR, from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides forma sp. denitrificans) and viologen-modified chitosan (CHIT-V) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is presented. Electron transfer (ET) between a conventional GCE and immobilized Cu-NiR was mediated by the co-immobilized CHIT-V. Redox-active viologen was covalently linked to a chitosan backbone, and the thus produced CHIT-V was co-immobilized with Cu-NiR on the GCE surface by drop-coating of hydrophilic polyurethane (HPU). The electrode responded to nitrite with a limit of detection (LOD) of 40 nM (S/N = 3). The sensitivity, linear response range, and response time (t(90%)) were 14.9 nA/μM, 0.04-11 μM (r(2) = 0.999) and 15 s, respectively. The corresponding Lineweaver-Burk plot showed that the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M) (app)) was 65 μM. Storage stability of the biosensor (retaining 80% of initial activity) was 65 days under ambient air and room temperature storage conditions. Reproducibility of the sensor showed a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.8% (n = 5) for detection of 1 μM of nitrite. An interference study showed that anions commonly found in water samples such as chlorate, chloride, sulfate and sulfite did not interfere with the nitrite detection. However, nitrate interfered with a relative sensitivity of 64% and this interference effect was due to the intrinsic character of the NiR employed in this study. PMID:22219710

  15. Impact of residues remote from the catalytic centre on enzyme catalysis of copper nitrite reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leferink, Nicole G. H.; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Houwman, Joseline A.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Eady, Robert R.; Hasnain, S. Samar

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme mechanisms are often probed by structure-informed point mutations and measurement of their effects on enzymatic properties to test mechanistic hypotheses. In many cases, the challenge is to report on complex, often inter-linked elements of catalysis. Evidence for long-range effects on enzyme mechanism resulting from mutations remains sparse, limiting the design/redesign of synthetic catalysts in a predictable way. Here we show that improving the accessibility of the active site pocket of copper nitrite reductase by mutation of a surface-exposed phenylalanine residue (Phe306), located 12 Å away from the catalytic site type-2 Cu (T2Cu), profoundly affects intra-molecular electron transfer, substrate-binding and catalytic activity. Structures and kinetic studies provide an explanation for the lower affinity for the substrate and the alteration of the rate-limiting step in the reaction. Our results demonstrate that distant residues remote from the active site can have marked effects on enzyme catalysis, by driving mechanistic change through relatively minor structural perturbations. PMID:25022223

  16. Impact of residues remote from the catalytic centre on enzyme catalysis of copper nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Leferink, Nicole G H; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Houwman, Joseline A; Scrutton, Nigel S; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar

    2014-07-15

    Enzyme mechanisms are often probed by structure-informed point mutations and measurement of their effects on enzymatic properties to test mechanistic hypotheses. In many cases, the challenge is to report on complex, often inter-linked elements of catalysis. Evidence for long-range effects on enzyme mechanism resulting from mutations remains sparse, limiting the design/redesign of synthetic catalysts in a predictable way. Here we show that improving the accessibility of the active site pocket of copper nitrite reductase by mutation of a surface-exposed phenylalanine residue (Phe306), located 12 Å away from the catalytic site type-2 Cu (T2Cu), profoundly affects intra-molecular electron transfer, substrate-binding and catalytic activity. Structures and kinetic studies provide an explanation for the lower affinity for the substrate and the alteration of the rate-limiting step in the reaction. Our results demonstrate that distant residues remote from the active site can have marked effects on enzyme catalysis, by driving mechanistic change through relatively minor structural perturbations.

  17. DFT Study on Enzyme Turnover Including Proton and Electron Transfers of Copper-Containing Nitrite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Lintuluoto, Masami; Lintuluoto, Juha M

    2016-08-23

    The reaction mechanism of copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR) has been proposed to include two important events, an intramolecular electron transfer and a proton transfer. The two events have been suggested to be coupled, but the order of these events is currently under debate. We investigated the entire enzyme reaction mechanism of nitrite reduction at the T2 Cu site in thermophilic Geobacillus CuNiR from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2 (GtNiR) using density functional theory calculations. We found significant conformational changes of His ligands coordinated to the T2 Cu site upon nitrite binding during the catalytic reaction. The reduction potentials and pKa values calculated for the relevant protonation and reduction states show two possible routes, A and B. Reduction of the T2 Cu site in the resting state is followed by endothermic nitrite binding in route A, while exothermic nitrite binding occurs prior to reduction of the T2 Cu site in route B. We concluded that our results support the random-sequential mechanism rather than the ordered mechanism. PMID:27455866

  18. Induction of the Nitrate Assimilation nirA Operon and Protein-Protein Interactions in the Maturation of Nitrate and Nitrite Reductases in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frías, José E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate is widely used as a nitrogen source by cyanobacteria, in which the nitrate assimilation structural genes frequently constitute the so-called nirA operon. This operon contains the genes encoding nitrite reductase (nirA), a nitrate/nitrite transporter (frequently an ABC-type transporter; nrtABCD), and nitrate reductase (narB). In the model filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which can fix N2 in specialized cells termed heterocysts, the nirA operon is expressed at high levels only in media containing nitrate or nitrite and lacking ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source. Here we examined the genes downstream of the nirA operon in Anabaena and found that a small open reading frame of unknown function, alr0613, can be cotranscribed with the operon. The next gene in the genome, alr0614 (narM), showed an expression pattern similar to that of the nirA operon, implying correlated expression of narM and the operon. A mutant of narM with an insertion mutation failed to produce nitrate reductase activity, consistent with the idea that NarM is required for the maturation of NarB. Both narM and narB mutants were impaired in the nitrate-dependent induction of the nirA operon, suggesting that nitrite is an inducer of the operon in Anabaena. It has previously been shown that the nitrite reductase protein NirA requires NirB, a protein likely involved in protein-protein interactions, to attain maximum activity. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis confirmed possible NirA-NirB and NarB-NarM interactions, suggesting that the development of both nitrite reductase and nitrate reductase activities in cyanobacteria involves physical interaction of the corresponding enzymes with their cognate partners, NirB and NarM, respectively. IMPORTANCE Nitrate is an important source of nitrogen for many microorganisms that is utilized through the nitrate assimilation system, which includes nitrate/nitrite membrane transporters and the nitrate and nitrite reductases. Many

  19. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme–substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes. PMID:26929369

  20. Redox-coupled structural changes in nitrite reductase revealed by serial femtosecond and microfocus crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yohta; Suzuki, Mamoru; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) has enabled the damage-free structural determination of metalloenzymes and filled the gaps of our knowledge between crystallographic and spectroscopic data. Crystallographers, however, scarcely know whether the rising technique provides truly new structural insights into mechanisms of metalloenzymes partly because of limited resolutions. Copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), which converts nitrite to nitric oxide in denitrification, has been extensively studied by synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX). Although catalytic Cu (Type 2 copper (T2Cu)) of CuNiR had been suspected to tolerate X-ray photoreduction, we here showed that T2Cu in the form free of nitrite is reduced and changes its coordination structure in SRX. Moreover, we determined the completely oxidized CuNiR structure at 1.43 Å resolution with SFX. Comparison between the high-resolution SFX and SRX data revealed the subtle structural change of a catalytic His residue by X-ray photoreduction. This finding, which SRX has failed to uncover, provides new insight into the reaction mechanism of CuNiR. PMID:26769972

  1. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E P; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-03-15

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme-substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes.

  2. The energy-conserving nitric-oxide-reductase system in Paracoccus denitrificans. Distinction from the nitrite reductase that catalyses synthesis of nitric oxide and evidence from trapping experiments for nitric oxide as a free intermediate during denitrification.

    PubMed

    Carr, G J; Page, M D; Ferguson, S J

    1989-02-15

    1. A Clark-type electrode that responds to nitric oxide has been used to show that cytoplasmic membrane vesicles of Paracoccus denitrificans have a nitric-oxide reductase activity. Nitrous oxide is the reaction product. NADH, succinate or isoascorbate plus 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylene diamine can act as reductants. The NADH-dependent activity is resistant to freezing of the vesicles and thus the NADH:nitric-oxide oxidoreductase activity of stored frozen vesicles provides a method for calibrating the electrode by titration of dissolved nitric oxide with NADH. The periplasmic nitrite reductase and nitrous-oxide reductase enzymes are absent from the vesicles which indicates that nitric-oxide reductase is a discrete enzyme associated with the denitrification process. This conclusion was supported by the finding that nitric-oxide reductase activity was absent from both membranes prepared from aerobically grown P. denitrificans and bovine heart submitochondrial particles. 2. The NADH: nitric-oxide oxidoreductase activity was inhibited by concentrations of antimycin or myxothiazol that were just sufficient to inhibit the cytochrome bc1 complex of the ubiquinol--cytochrome-c oxidoreductase. The activity was deduced to be proton translocating by the observations of: (a) up to 3.5-fold stimulation upon addition of an uncoupler; and (b) ATP synthesis with a P:2e ratio of 0.75. 3. Nitrite reductase of cytochrome cd1 type was highly purified from P. denitrificans in a new, high-yield, rapid two- or three-step procedure. This enzyme catalysed stoichiometric synthesis of nitric oxide. This observation, taken together with the finding that the maximum rate of NADH:nitric-oxide oxidoreductase activity catalysed by the vesicles was comparable with that of NADH:nitrate-oxidoreductase, is consistent with a role for nitric-oxide reductase in the physiological conversion of nitrate or nitrite to dinitrogen gas. 4. Intact cells of P. denitrificans also reduced nitric oxide in an

  3. Laue crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase from a high-yield expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew

    2012-09-11

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, are reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein 'small tetraheme c' replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated approximately 20 mg crude ccNiR per liter of culture, compared with 0.5-1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for Escherichia coli ccNiR, and is stable for over 2 weeks in pH 7 solution at 4 C. UV/vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified five independent one-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the five reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed among the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good-quality crystals, with which the 2.59-{angstrom}-resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein).

  4. Laue Crystal Structure of Shewanella oneidensis Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase from a High-yield Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR), and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, is reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein “Small Tetra-heme c” replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated ~20 mg crude ccNiR/L culture, compared with 0.5–1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for E. coli ccNiR, and is stable for over two weeks in pH 7 solution at 4° C. UV/Vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified 5 independent 1-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the 5 reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed amongst the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good quality crystals, with which the 2.59 Å resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein). PMID:22382353

  5. In Situ Association of Calvin Cycle Enzymes, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase, Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase, and Nitrite Reductase with Thylakoid and Pyrenoid Membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts as Revealed by Immunoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Suss, K. H.; Prokhorenko, I.; Adler, K.

    1995-01-01

    The in situ localization of the chloroplast enzymes ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), Rubisco activase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase was studied by immunoelectron microscopy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Immunogold labeling revealed that, despite Rubisco in the pyrenoid matrix, Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco activase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase are associated predominantly with chloroplast thylakoid membranes and the inner surface of the pyrenoid membrane. This is in accord with previous enzyme localization studies in higher plants (K.H. Suss, C. Arkona, R. Manteuffel, K. Adler [1993] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518). Pyrenoid tubules do not contain these enzymes. The pyrenoid matrix consists of Rubisco but is devoid of the other photosynthetic enzymes investigated. Evidence for the occurrence of two Rubisco forms differing in their spatial localization has also been obtained: Rubisco form I appears to be membrane associated like other Calvin cycle components, whereas Rubisco form II is confined to the pyrenoid matrix. It is proposed that enzyme form I represents an active Rubisco when assembled into Calvin cycle enzyme complexes, whereas Rubisco form II may be part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism. Pyrenoidal Calvin cycle complexes are thought to be highly active in CO2 fixation and important for the synthesis of starch around the pyrenoid. PMID:12228443

  6. In Situ Association of Calvin Cycle Enzymes, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase, Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase, and Nitrite Reductase with Thylakoid and Pyrenoid Membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts as Revealed by Immunoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suss, K. H.; Prokhorenko, I.; Adler, K.

    1995-04-01

    The in situ localization of the chloroplast enzymes ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), Rubisco activase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase was studied by immunoelectron microscopy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Immunogold labeling revealed that, despite Rubisco in the pyrenoid matrix, Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco activase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase are associated predominantly with chloroplast thylakoid membranes and the inner surface of the pyrenoid membrane. This is in accord with previous enzyme localization studies in higher plants (K.H. Suss, C. Arkona, R. Manteuffel, K. Adler [1993] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518). Pyrenoid tubules do not contain these enzymes. The pyrenoid matrix consists of Rubisco but is devoid of the other photosynthetic enzymes investigated. Evidence for the occurrence of two Rubisco forms differing in their spatial localization has also been obtained: Rubisco form I appears to be membrane associated like other Calvin cycle components, whereas Rubisco form II is confined to the pyrenoid matrix. It is proposed that enzyme form I represents an active Rubisco when assembled into Calvin cycle enzyme complexes, whereas Rubisco form II may be part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism. Pyrenoidal Calvin cycle complexes are thought to be highly active in CO2 fixation and important for the synthesis of starch around the pyrenoid.

  7. Nitrosylation of c heme in cd(1)-nitrite reductase is enhanced during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2014-08-29

    The reduction of nitrite into nitric oxide (NO) in denitrifying bacteria is catalyzed by nitrite reductase. In several species, this enzyme is a heme-containing protein with one c heme and one d1 heme per monomer (cd1NiR), encoded by the nirS gene. For many years, the evidence of a link between NO and this hemeprotein represented a paradox, given that NO was known to tightly bind and, possibly, inhibit hemeproteins, including cd1NiRs. It is now established that, during catalysis, cd1NiRs diverge from "canonical" hemeproteins, since the product NO rapidly dissociates from the ferrous d1 heme, which, in turn, displays a peculiar "low" affinity for NO (KD=0.11 μM at pH 7.0). It has been also previously shown that the c heme reacts with NO at acidic pH but c heme nitrosylation was not extensively investigated, given that in cd1NiR it was considered a side reaction, rather than a genuine process controlling catalysis. The spectroscopic study of the reaction of cd1NiR and its semi-apo derivative (containing the sole c heme) with NO reported here shows that c heme nitrosylation is enhanced during catalysis; this evidence has been discussed in order to assess the potential of c heme nitrosylation as a regulatory process, as observed for cytochrome c nitrosylation in mammalian mitochondria.

  8. Electron transfer and docking between cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase and different redox partners - A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Humberto A; Silveira, Célia M; Almeida, Rui M; Almeida, Ana; Besson, Stéphane; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; Almeida, M Gabriela

    2016-09-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductases (cd1NiRs) catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in denitrifying bacteria, such as Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Previous work demonstrated that the enzymatic activity depends on a structural pre-activation triggered by the entry of electrons through the electron transfer (ET) domain, which houses a heme c center. The catalytic activity of M. hydrocarbonoclasticus cd1NiR (Mhcd1NiR) was tested by mediated electrochemistry, using small ET proteins and chemical redox mediators. The rate of enzymatic reaction depends on the nature of the redox partner, with cytochrome (cyt) c552 providing the highest value. In situations where cyt c552 is replaced by either a biological (cyt c from horse heart) or a chemical mediator the catalytic response was only observed at very low scan rates, suggesting that the intermolecular ET rate is much slower. Molecular docking simulations with the 3D model structure of Mhcd1NiR and cyt c552 or cyt c showed that hydrophobic interactions favor the formation of complexes where the heme c domain of the enzyme is the principal docking site. However, only in the case of cyt c552 the preferential areas of contact and Fe-Fe distances between heme c groups of the redox partners allow establishing competent ET pathways. The coupling of the enzyme with chemical redox mediators was also found not to be energetically favorable. These results indicate that although low activity functional complexes can be formed between Mhcd1NiR and different types of redox mediators, efficient ET is only observed with the putative physiological electron donor cyt c552. PMID:27133504

  9. Electron transfer and docking between cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase and different redox partners - A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Humberto A; Silveira, Célia M; Almeida, Rui M; Almeida, Ana; Besson, Stéphane; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; Almeida, M Gabriela

    2016-09-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductases (cd1NiRs) catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in denitrifying bacteria, such as Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Previous work demonstrated that the enzymatic activity depends on a structural pre-activation triggered by the entry of electrons through the electron transfer (ET) domain, which houses a heme c center. The catalytic activity of M. hydrocarbonoclasticus cd1NiR (Mhcd1NiR) was tested by mediated electrochemistry, using small ET proteins and chemical redox mediators. The rate of enzymatic reaction depends on the nature of the redox partner, with cytochrome (cyt) c552 providing the highest value. In situations where cyt c552 is replaced by either a biological (cyt c from horse heart) or a chemical mediator the catalytic response was only observed at very low scan rates, suggesting that the intermolecular ET rate is much slower. Molecular docking simulations with the 3D model structure of Mhcd1NiR and cyt c552 or cyt c showed that hydrophobic interactions favor the formation of complexes where the heme c domain of the enzyme is the principal docking site. However, only in the case of cyt c552 the preferential areas of contact and Fe-Fe distances between heme c groups of the redox partners allow establishing competent ET pathways. The coupling of the enzyme with chemical redox mediators was also found not to be energetically favorable. These results indicate that although low activity functional complexes can be formed between Mhcd1NiR and different types of redox mediators, efficient ET is only observed with the putative physiological electron donor cyt c552.

  10. Structure and function of a hexameric copper-containing nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Masaki; Xie, Yong; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Takahiko; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Kataoka, Kunishige; Deligeer; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Kai, Yasushi; Suzuki, Shinnichiro

    2007-03-13

    Dissimilatory nitrite reductase (NIR) is a key enzyme in denitrification, catalyzing the first step that leads to gaseous products (NO, N(2)O, and N(2)). We have determined the crystal structure of a Cu-containing NIR from a methylotrophic denitrifying bacterium, Hyphomicrobium denitrificans, at 2.2-A resolution. The overall structure of this H. denitrificans NIR reveals a trigonal prism-shaped molecule in which a monomer consisting of 447 residues and three Cu atoms is organized into a unique hexamer (i.e., a tightly associated dimer of trimers). Each monomer is composed of an N-terminal region containing a Greek key beta-barrel folding domain, cupredoxin domain I, and a C-terminal region containing cupredoxin domains II and III. Both cupredoxin domains I and II bind one type 1 Cu and are combined with a long loop comprising 31 amino acid residues. The type 2 Cu is ligated at the interface between domain II of one monomer and domain III of an adjacent monomer. Between the two trimeric C-terminal regions are three interfaces formed by an interaction between the domains I, and the type 1 Cu in the domain is required for dimerization of the trimer. The type 1 Cu in domain II functions as an electron acceptor from an electron donor protein and then transfers an electron to the type 2 Cu, binding the substrate to reduce nitrite to NO. The discussion of the intermolecular electron transfer process from cytochrome c(550) to the H. denitrificans NIR is based on x-ray crystallographic and kinetic results. PMID:17360521

  11. Hydrotris(triazolyl)borate complexes as functional models for Cu nitrite reductase: the electronic influence of distal nitrogens.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dixon, Natalie A; Merkle, Anna C; Zeller, Matthias; Lehnert, Nicolai; Papish, Elizabeth T

    2012-07-01

    Hydrotris(triazolyl)borate (Ttz) ligands form CuNO(x) (x = 2, 3) complexes for structural and functional models of copper nitrite reductase. These complexes have distinct properties relative to complexes of hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate (Tp) and neutral tridentate N-donor ligands. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of five-coordinate copper complexes show rare nitrogen superhyperfine couplings with the Ttz ligand, indicating strong σ donation. The copper(I) nitrite complex [PPN](+)[(Ttz(tBu,Me))Cu(I)NO(2)](-) has been synthesized and characterized and allows for the stoichiometric reduction of NO(2)(-) to NO with H(+) addition. Anionic Cu(I) nitrite complexes are unusual and are stabilized here for the first time because Ttz is a good π acceptor. PMID:22671968

  12. Nitrite

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrite ; CASRN 14797 - 65 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  13. 15N Tracing Studies on In Vitro Reactions of Ferredoxin-Dependent Nitrite Reductase and Glutamate Synthase Using Reconstituted Electron Donation Systems.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Fujimori, Tamaki; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Hase, Toshiharu; Suzuki, Akira

    2015-06-01

    It is known that plants contain ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent nitrite reductase (NiR) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). The Fd-NiR reaction produces ammonia from nitrite, and the activity is usually measured by nitrite disappearance. The Fd-GOGAT reaction forms two glutamates of different origin, from glutamine and 2-oxoglutarate, and the activity is measured by the oxidation of reductant (NADPH) or by formation of total glutamate. Here, a quantitative probe of the products and efficiency of the process was conducted using (15)N tracing techniques on these reactions in vitro. We quantified the reduction of (15)N-labeled [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] and the formation of [(15)N]glutamate and [(14)N]glutamate from [5-(15)N-amide]glutamine plus 2-oxoglutarate by NiR and GOGAT, respectively, with the reductant-Fd-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR)-Fd system as the sequential electron donors. The supply of dithionite or NADPH to recombinant cyanobacterial NiR led to electron donation system-dependent formation of [(15)N]ammonium from [(15)N]nitrite. Addition of 20 mM NaCl and 20 mM Na-ascorbate accelerated nitrite reduction under high concentrations of NADPH. A sufficient supply of NADPH to recombinant Zea mays Fd-GOGAT generated complete GOGAT activity (transferring the [5-(15)N]amide of glutamine to 2-oxoglutarate to form [(15)N]glutamate), whereas a shortage of NADPH resulted in glutaminase activity only, which removed the amide from glutamine and released ammonia and [(14)N]glutamate. We conclude that although the recombinant Fd-GOGAT enzyme has two forms of glutamate synthesis, the first by glutaminase (ammonia release by glutamine amidotransferase) and the second by glutamate synthase (coupling of the ammonia and exogenously applied 2-oxoglutarate), the first works without NADPH, while the second is strictly dependent on NADPH availability.

  14. Molecular interactions between multihaem cytochromes: probing the protein-protein interactions between pentahaem cytochromes of a nitrite reductase complex.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Colin; Butt, Julea N; Clarke, Thomas A; Richardson, David J

    2011-01-01

    The cytochrome c nitrite reductase NrfA is a 53 kDa pentahaem enzyme that crystallizes as a decahaem homodimer. NrfA catalyses the reduction of NO2- to NH4+ through a six electron reduction pathway that is of major physiological significance to the anaerobic metabolism of enteric and sulfate reducing bacteria. NrfA receives electrons from the 21 kDa pentahaem NrfB donor protein. This requires that redox complexes form between the NrfA and NrfB pentahaem cytochromes. The formation of these complexes can be monitored using a range of methodologies for studying protein-protein interactions, including dynamic light scattering, gel filtration, analytical ultracentrifugation and visible spectroscopy. These methods have been used to show that oxidized NrfA exists in dynamic monomer-dimer equilibrium with a Kd (dissociation constant) of 4 μM. Significantly, the monomeric and dimeric forms of NrfA are equally active for either the six electron reduction of NO2- or HSO3-. When mixed together, NrfA and NrfB exist in equilibrium with NrfAB, which is described by a Kd of 50 nM. Thus, since NrfA and NrfB are present in micromolar concentrations in the periplasmic compartment, it is likely that NrfB remains tightly associated with its NrfA redox partner under physiological conditions.

  15. SERR Spectroelectrochemical Study of Cytochrome cd1 Nitrite Reductase Co-Immobilized with Physiological Redox Partner Cytochrome c552 on Biocompatible Metal Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Célia M; Quintas, Pedro O; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; Hildebrandt, Peter; Almeida, M Gabriela; Todorovic, Smilja

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductases (cd1NiRs) catalyze the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Due to their catalytic reaction, cd1NiRs are regarded as promising components for biosensing, bioremediation and biotechnological applications. Motivated by earlier findings that catalytic activity of cd1NiR from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus (Mhcd1) depends on the presence of its physiological redox partner, cytochrome c552 (cyt c552), we show here a detailed surface enhanced resonance Raman characterization of Mhcd1 and cyt c552 attached to biocompatible electrodes in conditions which allow direct electron transfer between the conducting support and immobilized proteins. Mhcd1 and cyt c552 are co-immobilized on silver electrodes coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and the electrocatalytic activity of Ag // SAM // Mhcd1 // cyt c552 and Ag // SAM // cyt c552 // Mhcd1 constructs is tested in the presence of nitrite. Simultaneous evaluation of structural and thermodynamic properties of the immobilized proteins reveals that cyt c552 retains its native properties, while the redox potential of apparently intact Mhcd1 undergoes a ~150 mV negative shift upon adsorption. Neither of the immobilization strategies results in an active Mhcd1, reinforcing the idea that subtle and very specific interactions between Mhcd1 and cyt c552 govern efficient intermolecular electron transfer and catalytic activity of Mhcd1.

  16. Inhibition of denitrification activity but not of mRNA induction in Paracoccus denitrificans by nitrite at a suboptimal pH.

    PubMed

    Baumann, B; van der Meer, J R; Snozzi, M; Zehnder, A J

    1997-10-01

    The influence of pH on the denitrification activity of a continuous culture of Paracoccus denitrificans was studied in relation to the presence of nitrite. After a transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions at the suboptimal pH of 6.8, P. denitrificans was not able to build up a functional denitrification pathway. Nitrite accumulated in the medium as the predominant denitrification product. Although the nitrite reductase gene was induced properly, the enzyme could not be detected at sufficient amounts in the culture. These observations was somehow inhibited, or once synthesized nitrite reductase was inactivated, possibly by the high concentrations of nitrous acid (HNO2). Interestingly, when a P. denitrificans culture which was grown to steady-state under anaerobic conditions was then exposed to suboptimal pHs, cells exhibited a reduced overall denitrification activity, but neither nitrite nor any other denitrification intermediate accumulated. PMID:9403103

  17. Role of. pi. -cation radicals in the enzymatic cycles of peroxidases, catalases, and nitrite and sulfite reductases

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, L K; Chang, C K; Davis, M S; Fajer, J

    1980-01-01

    Charge iterative extended Hueckel calculations, and magnetic and optical results on porphyrins, chlorins, and isobacteriochlorins (1) suggest that the catalytic cycles of the enzymes horseradish peroxidase, catalase, Neurospora crassa catalase, and nitrite and sulfite reductases proceed via ..pi..-cation radicals of their prosthetic groups; (2) offer distinguishing features for the optical and magnetic spectra of these radicals, pertinent to their detection as enzymatic intermediates; (3) reconcile the seemingly contradictory optical and NMR data on Compounds I of horseradish peroxidase; and (4) predict that the axial ligation of the heme differs for horseradish peroxidase and catalase.

  18. Genomic analysis reveals widespread occurrence of new classes of copper nitrite reductases.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Mark J; Grossmann, J Günter; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar

    2007-11-01

    Recently, the structure of a Cu-containing nitrite reductase (NiR) from Hyphomicrobium denitrificans (HdNiR) has been reported, establishing the existence of a new family of Cu-NiR where an additional type 1 Cu (T1Cu) containing cupredoxin domain is located at the N-terminus (Nojiri et al. in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104:4315-4320, 2007). HdNiR retains the well-characterised coupled T1Cu-type 2 Cu (T2Cu) core, where the T2Cu catalytic site is also built utilising ligands from neighbouring monomers. We have undertaken a genome analysis and found the wide occurrence of these NiRs, with members clustering in two groups, one showing an amino acid sequence similarity of around 80% with HdNiR, and a second group, including the NiR from the extremophile Acidothermus cellulolyticus, clustering around 50% similarity to HdNiR. This is reminiscent of the difference observed between the blue (Alcaligenes xylosoxidans) and green (Achromobacter cycloclastes and Alcaligenes faecalis) NiRs which have been extensively studied and may indicate that these also form two distinct subclasses of the new family. Genome analysis also showed the presence of Cu-NiRs with a C-terminal extension of 160-190 residues containing a class I cytochrome c domain with a characteristic beta-sheet extension. Currently no structural information exists for any member of this family. Genome analysis suggests the widespread occurrence of these novel NiRs with representatives in the alpha, beta and gamma subclasses of the Proteobacteria and in two species of the fungus Aspergillus. We selected the enzyme from Ralstonia pickettii for comparative modelling and produced a plausible structure highlighting an electron transfer mode in which the cytochrome c haem at the C-terminus can come within 16-A reach of the T1Cu centre of the T1Cu-T2Cu core. PMID:17712582

  19. Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase and nitrate reductase coimmobilized bienzymatic biosensor for the simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Madasamy, Thangamuthu; Pandiaraj, Manickam; Balamurugan, Murugesan; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Karunakaran, Chandran

    2014-02-15

    This work presents a novel bienzymatic biosensor for the simultaneous determination of nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)) ions using copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and nitrate reductase (NaR) coimmobilized on carbon nanotubes (CNT)-polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposite modified platinum electrode. Morphological changes of the PPy and CNT modified electrodes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behavior of the bienzymatic electrode (NaR-SOD1-CNT-PPy-Pt) was characterized by cyclic voltammetry exhibiting quasi-reversible redox peak at +0.06 V and reversible redox peaks at -0.76 and -0.62V vs. Ag/AgCl, for the immobilized SOD1 and NaR respectively. The electrocatalytic activity of SOD1 towards NO2(-) oxidation observed at +0.8 V was linear from 100 nM to 1mM with a detection limit of 50 nM and sensitivity of 98.5 ± 1.7 nA µM(-1)cm(-2). Similarly, the coimmobilized NaR showed its electrocatalytic activity towards NO3(-) reduction at -0.76 V exhibiting linear response from 500 nM to 10mM NO3(-) with a detection limit of 200 nM and sensitivity of 84.5 ± 1.56 nA µM(-1)cm(-2). Further, the present bienzymatic biosensor coated with cellulose acetate membrane for the removal of non-specific proteins was used for the sensitive and selective determinations of NO2(-) and NO3(-) present in human plasma, whole blood and saliva samples.

  20. Cooperative use of cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase and its redox partner cytochrome c552 to improve the selectivity of nitrite biosensing.

    PubMed

    Serra, A S; Jorge, S R; Silveira, C M; Moura, J J G; Jubete, E; Ochoteco, E; Cabañero, G; Grande, H; Almeida, M G

    2011-05-01

    In this work, a novel enzymatic biosensor for determination of nitrites constructed on an electrochemical transducing platform is proposed. The sensor is based on cytochrome-cd(1) (cyt-cd(1)) nitrite reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus strain 617 as biological recognition element, and its putative physiological redox partner cytochrome-c(552) (cyt-c(552)), as electron mediator. The proteins were co-immobilized using a photopolymerizable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) derivative, onto carbon paste screen printed electrodes (CPSPEs); the optimal modification conditions were 100 μM cyt-cd(1)/100 μM cyt-c(552) and 50% PVA, after a 48 h polymerization time. Electrochemical characterization of the mediator was carried out by cyclic voltammetry. The one-electron exchange between cyt-c(552) and the working electrode is a quasi-reversible process, without mass transport limitations. The formal potential of the mediator is 254±2 mV vs NHE and the intermolecular electron transfer rate constant between cytochromes c(552) and cd(1) is 9.9×10(3)M(-1)s(-1). The analytical parameters of the biosensor response to nitrite as assessed by amperometric measurements were: linear range from 10 to 200 μM; detection and quantification limits of 7 and 24 μM, respectively; sensitivity of 2.49±0.08 Amol(-1)cm(2) μM(-1). Catalytic profiles in the presence of possible interfering species were also investigated. The interference from competitive enzymatic reduction of dissolved oxygen could be overcome by tuning the cyclic voltammograms for faster sweep rates.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary structure determination of the membrane-bound complex cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M. L.; Oliveira, T.; Matias, P. M.; Martins, I. C.; Valente, F. M. A.; Pereira, I. A. C.; Archer, M.

    2006-06-01

    The cytochrome c nitrite reductase complex from D. vulgaris Hildenborough has been crystallized. The preliminary crystallographic structure reveals a 2:1 NrfA:NrfH complex stoichiometry. The cytochrome c nitrite reductase (cNiR) isolated from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a membrane-bound complex formed of NrfA and NrfH subunits. The catalytic subunit NrfA is a soluble pentahaem cytochrome c that forms a physiological dimer of about 120 kDa. The electron-donor subunit NrfH is a membrane-anchored tetrahaem cytochrome c of about 18 kDa molecular weight and belongs to the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases, for which no structures are known. Crystals of the native cNiR membrane complex, solubilized with dodecylmaltoside detergent (DDM), were obtained using PEG 4K as precipitant. Anomalous diffraction data were measured at the Swiss Light Source to 2.3 Å resolution. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.5, b = 256.7, c = 578.2 Å. Molecular-replacement and MAD methods were combined to solve the structure. The data presented reveal that D. vulgaris cNiR contains one NrfH subunit per NrfA dimer.

  2. Nitrite reduction in Veillonella alcalescens.

    PubMed Central

    Yordy, D M; Delwiche, E A

    1979-01-01

    Nitrite reduction was examined in Veillonella alcalescens C-1, and obligate anaerobe with an ATP-yielding nitrate-reducing system. Hydrogen donors for nitrite reduction included hydrosulfite, hydrogen gas, and pyruvate, but not pyridine nucleotides, in the presnece or absence of flavins. Pyruvate-linked nitrite reduction was not inhibited by 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-thienyl) 1,3-butanedione, dicoumarol, or 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline-N-oxide. The noninvolvement of membrane-bound factors was supported by the fact that 100% of pyruvate-linked activity remained in the soluble fraction after fractionation of crude extracts by ultracentrifugation. Using DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, however, the participation of ferredoxin in nitrite reduction was demonstrated. The product of nitrite reduction appeared to be ammonia, as determined from H2-to-NO2- ratios. Nitrite reductase was induced by nitrate or nitrite and was repressed by increased levels of reduced nitrogenous compounds. PMID:422515

  3. The napF and narG Nitrate Reductase Operons in Escherichia coli Are Differentially Expressed in Response to Submicromolar Concentrations of Nitrate but Not Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henian; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Gunsalus, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli synthesizes two biochemically distinct nitrate reductase enzymes, a membrane-bound enzyme encoded by the narGHJI operon and a periplasmic cytochrome c-linked nitrate reductase encoded by the napFDAGHBC operon. To address why the cell makes these two enzymes, continuous cell culture techniques were used to examine napF and narG gene expression in response to different concentrations of nitrate and/or nitrite. Expression of the napF-lacZ and narG-lacZ reporter fusions in strains grown at different steady-state levels of nitrate revealed that the two nitrate reductase operons are differentially expressed in a complementary pattern. The napF operon apparently encodes a “low-substrate-induced” reductase that is maximally expressed only at low levels of nitrate. Expression is suppressed under high-nitrate conditions. In contrast, the narGHJI operon is only weakly expressed at low nitrate levels but is maximally expressed when nitrate is elevated. The narGHJI operon is therefore a “high-substrate-induced” operon that somehow provides a second and distinct role in nitrate metabolism by the cell. Interestingly, nitrite, the end product of each enzyme, had only a minor effect on the expression of either operon. Finally, nitrate, but not nitrite, was essential for repression of napF gene expression. These studies reveal that nitrate rather than nitrite is the primary signal that controls the expression of these two nitrate reductase operons in a differential and complementary fashion. In light of these findings, prior models for the roles of nitrate and nitrite in control of narG and napF expression must be reconsidered. PMID:10464201

  4. Comparative induction of nitrate reductase by nitrate and nitrite in barley leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Rosichan, J. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    The comparative induction of nitrate reductase (NR) by ambient NO3- and NO2- as a function of influx, reduction (as NR was induced) and accumulation in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was determined. The dynamic interaction of NO3- influx, reduction and accumulation on NR induction was shown. The activity of NR, as it was induced, influenced its further induction by affecting the internal concentration of NO3-. As the ambient concentration of NO3- increased, the relative influences imposed by influx and reduction on NO3- accumulation changed with influx becoming a more predominant regulant. Significant levels of NO3- accumulated in NO2(-)-fed leaves. When the leaves were supplied cycloheximide or tungstate along with NO2-, about 60% more NO3- accumulated in the leaves than in the absence of the inhibitors. In NO3(-)-supplied leaves NR induction was observed at an ambient concentration of as low as 0.02 mM. No NR induction occurred in leaves supplied with NO2- until the ambient NO2- concentration was 0.5 mM. In fact, NR induction from NO2- solutions was not seen until NO3- was detected in the leaves. The amount of NO3- accumulating in NO2(-)-fed leaves induced similar levels of NR as did equivalent amounts of NO3- accumulating from NO3(-)-fed leaves. In all cases the internal concentration of NO3-, but not NO2-, was highly correlated with the amount of NR induced. The evidence indicated that NO3- was a more likely inducer of NR than was NO2-.

  5. Diversity, abundance, and distribution of NO-forming nitrite reductase-encoding genes in deep-sea subsurface sediments of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Hong, Y; Cao, H; Klotz, M G; Gu, J-D

    2013-03-01

    In marine ecosystems, both nitrite-reducing bacteria and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, containing different types of NO-forming nitrite reductase-encoding genes, contribute to the nitrogen cycle. The objectives of study were to reveal the diversity, abundance, and distribution of NO-forming nitrite reductase-encoding genes in deep-sea subsurface environments. Results showed that higher diversity and abundance of nirS gene than nirK and Scalindua-nirS genes were evident in the sediments of the South China Sea (SCS), indicating bacteria containing nirS gene dominated the NO-forming nitrite-reducing microbial community in this ecosystem. Similar diversity and abundance distribution patterns of both nirS and Scalindua-nirS genes were detected in this study sites, but different from nirK gene. Further statistical analyses also showed both nirS and Scalindua-nirS genes respond similarly to environmental factors, but differed from nirK gene. These results suggest that bacteria containing nirS and Scalindua-nirS genes share similar niche in deep-sea subsurface sediments of the SCS, but differed from those containing nirK gene, indicating that community structures of nitrite-reducing bacteria are segregated by the functional modules (NirS vs. NirK) rather than the competing processes (anammox vs. classical denitrification). PMID:23398962

  6. Diversity, abundance, and distribution of NO-forming nitrite reductase-encoding genes in deep-sea subsurface sediments of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Hong, Y; Cao, H; Klotz, M G; Gu, J-D

    2013-03-01

    In marine ecosystems, both nitrite-reducing bacteria and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, containing different types of NO-forming nitrite reductase-encoding genes, contribute to the nitrogen cycle. The objectives of study were to reveal the diversity, abundance, and distribution of NO-forming nitrite reductase-encoding genes in deep-sea subsurface environments. Results showed that higher diversity and abundance of nirS gene than nirK and Scalindua-nirS genes were evident in the sediments of the South China Sea (SCS), indicating bacteria containing nirS gene dominated the NO-forming nitrite-reducing microbial community in this ecosystem. Similar diversity and abundance distribution patterns of both nirS and Scalindua-nirS genes were detected in this study sites, but different from nirK gene. Further statistical analyses also showed both nirS and Scalindua-nirS genes respond similarly to environmental factors, but differed from nirK gene. These results suggest that bacteria containing nirS and Scalindua-nirS genes share similar niche in deep-sea subsurface sediments of the SCS, but differed from those containing nirK gene, indicating that community structures of nitrite-reducing bacteria are segregated by the functional modules (NirS vs. NirK) rather than the competing processes (anammox vs. classical denitrification).

  7. TPR domain of NrfG mediates complex formation between heme lyase and formate-dependent nitrite reductase in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Han, Dohyun; Kim, Kyunggon; Oh, Jongkil; Park, Jungeun; Kim, Youngsoo

    2008-02-15

    Escherichia coli synthesize C-type cytochromes only during anaerobic growth in media supplemented with nitrate and nitrite. The reduction of nitrate to ammonium in the periplasm of Escherichia coli involves two separate periplasmic enzymes, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. The nitrite reductase involved, NrfA, contains cytochrome C and is synthesized coordinately with a membrane-associated cytochrome C, NrfB, during growth in the presence of nitrite or in limiting nitrate concentrations. The genes NrfE, NrfF, and NrfG are required for the formate-dependent nitrite reduction pathway, which involves at least two C-type cytochrome proteins, NrfA and NrfB. The NrfE, NrfF, and NrfG genes (heme lyase complex) are involved in the maturation of a special C-type cytochrome, apocytochrome C (apoNrfA), to cytochrome C (NrfA) by transferring a heme to the unusual heme binding motif of the Cys-Trp-Ser-Cys-Lys sequence in apoNrfA protein. Thus, in order to further investigate the roles of NrfG in the formation of heme lyase complex (NrfEFG) and in the interaction between heme lyase complex and formate-dependent nitrite reductase (NrfA), we determined the crystal structure of NrfG at 2.05 A. The structure of NrfG showed that the contact between heme lyase complex (NrfEFG) and NrfA is accomplished via a TPR domain in NrfG which serves as a binding site for the C-terminal motif of NrfA. The portion of NrfA that binds to TPR domain of NrfG has a unique secondary motif, a helix followed by about a six-residue C-terminal loop (the so called "hook conformation"). This study allows us to better understand the mechanism of special C-type cytochrome assembly during the maturation of formate-dependent nitrite reductase, and also adds a new TPR binding conformation to the list of TPR-mediated protein-protein interactions.

  8. Nitrite-Specific Active Transport System of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin-ichi; Okamura, Masato; Kobayashi, Masaki; Omata, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    Studies on the nitrite uptake capability of a mutant of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 lacking the ATP-binding cassette-type nitrate-nitrite-bispecific transporter revealed the occurrence of a nitrite-specific active transport system with an apparent Km (NO2−) of about 20 μM. Similar to the nitrate-nitrite-bispecific transporter, the nitrite-specific transporter was reversibly inhibited by ammonium in the medium. PMID:9852027

  9. Effect of self-alkalization on nitrite accumulation in a high-rate denitrification system: Performance, microflora and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Shan, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhi-Yao; Lin, Xiao-Yu; Li, Chen-Xu; Cai, Chao-Yang; Abbas, Ghulam; Zhang, Meng; Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, He-Ping; Zheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The self-alkalization of denitrifying automatic circulation (DAC) reactor resulted in a large increase of pH up to 9.20 and caused a tremendous accumulation of nitrite up to 451.1 ± 49.0 mgN L(-1) at nitrate loading rate (NLR) from 35 kgN m(-3) d(-1) to 55 kgN m(-3) d(-1). The nitrite accumulation was greatly relieved even at the same NLR once the pH was maintained at 7.6 ± 0.2 in the system. Enzymatic assays indicated that the long-term bacterial exposure to high pH significantly inhibited the activity of copper type nitrite reductase (NirK) rather than the cytochrome cd1 type nitrite reductase (NirS). The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed that the dominant denitrifying bacteria shifted from the NirS-containing Thauear sp. 27 to the NirK-containing Hyphomicrobium nitrativorans strain NL23 during the self-alkalization. The significant nitrite accumulation in the high-rate denitrification system could be therefore, due to the inhibition of Cu-containing NirK by high pH from the self-alkalization. The results suggest that the NirK-containing H. nitrativorans strain NL23 could be an ideal functional bacterium for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite, i.e. denitritation, which could be combined with anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) to develop a new process for nitrogen removal from wastewater. PMID:26595097

  10. Effect of self-alkalization on nitrite accumulation in a high-rate denitrification system: Performance, microflora and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Shan, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhi-Yao; Lin, Xiao-Yu; Li, Chen-Xu; Cai, Chao-Yang; Abbas, Ghulam; Zhang, Meng; Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, He-Ping; Zheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The self-alkalization of denitrifying automatic circulation (DAC) reactor resulted in a large increase of pH up to 9.20 and caused a tremendous accumulation of nitrite up to 451.1 ± 49.0 mgN L(-1) at nitrate loading rate (NLR) from 35 kgN m(-3) d(-1) to 55 kgN m(-3) d(-1). The nitrite accumulation was greatly relieved even at the same NLR once the pH was maintained at 7.6 ± 0.2 in the system. Enzymatic assays indicated that the long-term bacterial exposure to high pH significantly inhibited the activity of copper type nitrite reductase (NirK) rather than the cytochrome cd1 type nitrite reductase (NirS). The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed that the dominant denitrifying bacteria shifted from the NirS-containing Thauear sp. 27 to the NirK-containing Hyphomicrobium nitrativorans strain NL23 during the self-alkalization. The significant nitrite accumulation in the high-rate denitrification system could be therefore, due to the inhibition of Cu-containing NirK by high pH from the self-alkalization. The results suggest that the NirK-containing H. nitrativorans strain NL23 could be an ideal functional bacterium for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite, i.e. denitritation, which could be combined with anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) to develop a new process for nitrogen removal from wastewater.

  11. Detection and diversity of copper containing nitrite reductase genes (nirK) in prokaryotic and fungal communities of agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew; Song, Bongkeun; Fridey, Kelly; Silva, Amy

    2015-02-01

    Microorganisms are capable of producing N2 and N2O gases as the end products of denitrification. Copper-containing nitrite reductase (NirK), a key enzyme in the microbial N-cycle, has been found in bacteria, archaea and fungi. This study seeks to assess the diversity of nirK genes in the prokaryotic and fungal communities of agricultural soils in the United States. New primers targeting the nirK genes in fungi were developed, while nirK genes in archaea and bacteria were detected using previously published methods. The new primers were able to detect fungal nirK genes as well as bacterial nirK genes from a group that could not be observed with previously published primers. Based on the sequence analyses from three different primer sets, five clades of nirK genes were identified, which were associated with soil archaea, ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and fungi. The diversity of nirK genes in the two denitrifying bacteria clades was higher than the diversity found in other clades. Using a newly designed primer set, this study showed the detection of fungal nirK genes from environmental samples. The newly designed PCR primers in this study enhance the ability to detect the diversity of nirK-encoding microorganisms in soils.

  12. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-mediated denitration reaction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene to yield nitrite in mammals.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Nishihara, Yuya; Amamiya, Masahiro; Wakayama, Toshihiko; Li, Song; Kikuchi, Tomohiro; Nakai, Yumi; Shimojo, Nobuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    While the biodegradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) via the release of nitrite is well established, mechanistic details of the reaction in mammals are unknown. To address this issue, we attempted to identify the enzyme from rat liver responsible for the production of nitrite from TNT. A NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (P450R) was isolated and identified from rat liver microsomes as the enzyme responsible for not only the release of nitrite from TNT but also formation of superoxide and 4-hydroxyamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-HADNT) under aerobic conditions. In this context, reactive oxygen species generated during P450R-catalyzed TNT reduction were found to be, at least in part, a mediator for the production of 4-HADNT from TNT via formation of 4-nitroso-2,6-dinitrotoluene. P450R did not catalyze the formation of the hydride-Meisenheimer complex (H(-)-TNT) that is thought to be an intermediate for nitrite release from TNT. Furthermore, in a time-course experiment, 4-HADNT formation reached a plateau level and then declined during the reaction between TNT and P450R with NADPH, while the release of nitrite was subjected to a lag period. Notably, the produced 4-HADNT can react with the parent compound TNT to produce nitrite and dimerized products via formation of a Janovsky complex. Our results demonstrate for the first time that P450R-mediated release of nitrite from TNT results from the process of chemical interaction of TNT and its 4-electron reduction metabolite 4-HADNT.

  13. HY5 regulates nitrite reductase 1 (NIR1) and ammonium transporter1;2 (AMT1;2) in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lifen; Zhang, Hongcheng; Zhang, Huiyong; Deng, Xing Wang; Wei, Ning

    2015-09-01

    HY5 (Long Hypocotyles 5) is a key transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana that has a pivotal role in seedling development. Soil nitrogen is an essential macronutrient, and its uptake, assimilation and metabolism are influenced by nutrient availability and by lights. To understand the role of HY5 in nitrogen assimilation pathways, we examined the phenotype as well as the expression of selected nitrogen assimilation-related genes in hy5 mutant grown under various nitrogen limiting and nitrogen sufficient conditions, or different light conditions. We report that HY5 positively regulates nitrite reductase gene NIR1 and negatively regulates the ammonium transporter gene AMT1;2 under all nitrogen and light conditions tested, while it affects several other genes in a nitrogen supply-dependent manner. HY5 is not required for light induction of NIR1, AMT1;2 and NIA genes, but it is necessary for high level expression of NIR1 and NIA under optimal nutrient and light conditions. In addition, nitrogen deficiency exacerbates the abnormal root system of hy5. Together, our results suggest that HY5 exhibits the growth-promoting activity only when sufficient nutrients, including lights, are provided, and that HY5 has a complex involvement in nitrogen acquisition and metabolism in Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:26259199

  14. Vertical distribution of nitrite reductase genes (nir S) in continental margin sediments of the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tiquia, Sonia M; Masson, Steven A; Devol, Allan

    2006-12-01

    Marine sediments account for up to 66% of the loss of nitrogen load to coastal areas. Sedimentary denitrification is the main sink for fixed nitrogen in the global nitrogen budget, and thus it is important to understand the structure and composition of denitrifying communities. To understand the structure and composition of denitrifying communities, the diversity of nitrite reductase (nirS) genes from sediments along the Gulf of Mexico was examined using a PCR-based cloning approach. Sediments were collected at three different depths (0-0.5, 4-5 and 19-21 cm). Geochemical analysis revealed decreasing nitrate and oxygen concentrations with increasing sediment depth. This trend coincided with the decrease in diversity of denitrifying bacteria. LIBSHUFF analysis indicated that the clone library in the shallowest sediment (depth, 0-0.5 cm) was significantly different from that in the deepest sediment (depth, 19-21 cm), and that the deeper sediments (depths of 4-5 and 19-21 cm) were significantly similar. Community structural shifts were evident between the shallowest (oxic zone) and deepest (anoxic zone) sediments. Community changes within the deepest sediments were more subtle, with the presence of different nirS clone sequences gradually becoming dominant or, alternatively, decreasing with depth. The changes in community structure at this depth are possibly driven by nutrient availability, with lower quality sources of carbon and energy leading to the disappearance of nirS sequences common in the top layer. The majority of recovered nirS sequences were phylogenetically divergent relative to known denitrifying bacteria in the database.

  15. Relationship between Nitrite Reduction and Active Phosphate Uptake in the Phosphate-Accumulating Denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. Strain JR 12

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Yoram; van Rijn, Jaap

    2000-01-01

    Phosphate uptake by the phosphate-accumulating denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. JR12 was examined with different combinations of electron and carbon donors and electron acceptors. Phosphate uptake in acetate-supplemented cells took place with either oxygen or nitrate but did not take place when nitrite served as the final electron acceptor. Furthermore, nitrite reduction rates by this denitrifier were shown to be significantly reduced in the presence of phosphate. Phosphate uptake assays in the presence of the H+-ATPase inhibitor N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), in the presence of the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), or with osmotic shock-treated cells indicated that phosphate transport over the cytoplasmic membrane of this bacterium was mediated by primary and secondary transport systems. By examining the redox transitions of whole cells at 553 nm we found that phosphate addition caused a significant oxidation of a c-type cytochrome. Based on these findings, we propose that this c-type cytochrome serves as an intermediate in the electron transfer to both nitrite reductase and the site responsible for active phosphate transport. In previous studies with this bacterium we found that the oxidation state of this c-type cytochrome was significantly higher in acetate-supplemented, nitrite-respiring cells (incapable of phosphate uptake) than in phosphate-accumulating cells incubated with different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. Based on the latter finding and results obtained in the present study it is suggested that phosphate uptake in this bacterium is subjected to a redox control of the active phosphate transport site. By means of this mechanism an explanation is provided for the observed absence of phosphate uptake in the presence of nitrite and inhibition of nitrite reduction by phosphate in this organism. The implications of these findings regarding denitrifying, phosphate removal wastewater plants is discussed. PMID

  16. Conserved Active Site Residues Limit Inhibition of a Copper-Containing Nitrite By Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tocheva, E.I.; Eltis, L.D.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-05-26

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  17. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27033597

  18. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Regulation of nap Gene Expression and Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase Activity in the Phototrophic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158

    PubMed Central

    Gavira, Mónica; Roldán, M. Dolores; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial periplasmic nitrate reductases (Nap) can play different physiological roles and are expressed under different conditions depending on the organism. Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM158 has a Nap system, encoded by the napKEFDABC gene cluster, but nitrite formed is not further reduced because this strain lacks nitrite reductase. Nap activity increases in the presence of nitrate and oxygen but is unaffected by ammonium. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blots demonstrated that the napKEFDABC genes constitute an operon transcribed as a single 5.5-kb product. Northern blots and nap-lacZ fusions revealed that nap expression is threefold higher under aerobic conditions but is regulated by neither nitrate nor ammonium, although it is weakly induced by nitrite. On the other hand, nitrate but not nitrite causes a rapid enzyme activation, explaining the higher Nap activity found in nitrate-grown cells. Translational nap′-′lacZ fusions reveal that the napK and napD genes are not efficiently translated, probably due to mRNA secondary structures occluding the translation initiation sites of these genes. Neither butyrate nor caproate increases nap expression, although cells growing phototrophically on these reduced substrates show a very high Nap activity in vivo (nitrite accumulation is sevenfold higher than in medium with malate). Phototrophic growth on butyrate or caproate medium is severely reduced in the NapA− mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that nitrate reduction in R. sphaeroides is mainly regulated at the level of enzyme activity by both nitrate and electron supply and confirm that the Nap system is involved in redox balancing using nitrate as an ancillary oxidant to dissipate excess reductant. PMID:11872721

  20. Diversity and Abundance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Nitrite Reductase (nirK) Genes in Estuarine Sediments of San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reji, L.; Lee, J. A.; Damashek, J.; Francis, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification, the microbially-mediated aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an integral component of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation, is carried out by two distinct microbial groups: ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Molecular ecological studies targeting the amoA gene have revealed the abundance and ubiquity of AOA in terrestrial as well as aquatic environments. In addition to the ammonia oxidation machinery that includes the amoA gene, AOA also encode a gene for copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK). The distribution patterns and functional role of nirK in AOA remain mostly unknown; proposed functions include the indirect involvement in ammonia oxidation through the production of nitric oxide during nitrite reduction, and (2) nitrite detoxification. In the present study, the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing approaches. In sediment samples collected from the San Francisco Bay estuary, two archaeal nirK variants (AnirKa and AnirKb) were amplified using specific primer sets. Overall, AnirKa was observed to be significantly more abundant than AnirKb in the sediment samples, with variation in relative abundance spanning two to three orders of magnitude between sampling sites. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a number of unique archaeal nirK sequence types, as well as many that clustered with sequences from previous estuarine studies and cultured AOA isolates, such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus. This study yielded new insights into the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments, and highlights the importance of further investigating the physiological role of this gene in AOA, as well as its suitability as a marker gene for studying AOA in the environment.

  1. [Response of N transformation related soil enzyme activities to inhibitor applications].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijun; Wu, Zhijie; Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Likai

    2002-09-01

    With an aerobic incubation test, this paper studied the response of soil urease, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and hydroxylamine reductase to urease inhibitor hydroquinone (HQ) applied in combination with nitrification inhibitor encapsulated calcium carbide (HQ + ECC) or dicyandiamide (HQ + DCD). The results showed that HQ + DCD could inhibit urease activity and increase activities of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and hydroxylamine reductase significantly in comparison with CK, HQ and HQ + ECC. Under the condition of our test, there existed a significant relationship between soil urease, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and hydroxylamine reductase activities and soil NH4+ and NO3- contents, NH3 volatilization and N2O emission rate, and regression analysis indicated that there were significantly positive relationships between soil urease, nitrite reductase and hydroxylamine reductase activities.

  2. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  3. Nitrite-dependent nitric oxide production pathway: implications for involvement of active nitrogen species in photoinhibition in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, H

    2000-10-29

    Air pollution studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous free radical, is a potent photosynthetic inhibitor that reduces CO2 uptake activity in leaves. It is now recognized that NO is not only an air pollutant but also an endogenously produced metabolite, which may play a role in regulating plant cell functions. Although many studies have suggested the presence of mammalian-type NO synthase (NOS) in plants, the source of NO is still not clear. There has been a number of studies indicating that plant cells possess a nitrite-dependent NO production pathway which can be distinguished from the NOS-mediated reaction. Nitrate reductase (NR) has been recently found to be capable of producing NO through one-electron reduction of nitrite using NAD(P)H as an electron donor. This review focuses on current understanding of the mechanism for the nitrite-dependent NO production in plants. Impacts of NO produced by NR on photosynthesis are discussed in association with photo-oxidative stress in leaves.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a complex between the electron-transfer partners hexameric Cu-containing nitrite reductase and pseudoazurin.

    PubMed

    Hira, Daisuke; Nojiri, Masaki; Suzuki, Shinnichiro

    2009-02-01

    The complex between Cu-containing nitrite reductase (HdNIR) and its electron-donor protein pseudoazurin (HdPAz) from Hyphomicrobium denitrificans has been crystallized. The crystals were obtained from a mixture of the two proteins using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) as precipitants. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that the crystals contained both proteins. The X-ray diffraction experiment was carried out at SPring-8 and diffraction data were collected to 3.3 A resolution. The crystals were tetragonal (space group P4(1)2(1)2), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 130.39, c = 505.55 A. Preliminary analysis indicated that there was one HdNIR and at least two HdPAz molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystal. PMID:19193999

  5. Nitrite Transport Activity of the ABC-Type Cyanate Transporter of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus▿

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin-ichi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type nitrate/nitrite-bispecific transporter, which has a high affinity for both substrates (Km, ∼1 μM), Synechococcus elongatus has an active nitrite transport system with an apparent Km (NO2−) value of 20 μM. We found that this activity depends on the cynABD genes, which encode a putative cyanate (NCO−) ABC-type transporter. Accordingly, nitrite transport by CynABD was competitively inhibited by NCO− with a Ki value of 0.025 μM. The transporter was induced under conditions of nitrogen deficiency, and the induced cells showed a Vmax value of 11 to 13 μmol/mg of chlorophyll per h for cyanate or nitrite, which could supply ∼30% of the amount of nitrogen required for optimum growth. Its relative specificity for the substrates and regulation at transcriptional and posttranslational levels suggested that the physiological role of the bispecific cyanate/nitrite transporter in S. elongatus is to allow nitrogen-deficient cells to assimilate low concentrations of cyanate in the medium. Its contribution to nitrite assimilation was significant in a mutant lacking the ABC-type nitrate/nitrite transporter, suggesting a possible role for CynABD in nitrite assimilation by cyanobacterial species that lack another high-affinity mechanism(s) for nitrite transport. PMID:19286804

  6. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    PubMed

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies. PMID:27466384

  7. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    PubMed

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies.

  8. 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-11-01

    We measured the 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of (/sup 3/H) dihydrotestosterone from (/sup 3/H) testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10/sup -8/ M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity in each tissue studied.

  9. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  10. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N2O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N2O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N2O reductase activity was inhibited by O2, C2H2, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 μM) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 μM) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N2O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater (Km = 2.17 μM), estuarine (Km = 14.5 μM), and alkaline-saline (Km = 501 μM) environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N2O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N2O per m2 per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N2O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N2O per m2 per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  11. Structural and functional characterization of the Geobacillus copper nitrite reductase: involvement of the unique N-terminal region in the interprotein electron transfer with its redox partner.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yohta; Koteishi, Hiroyasu; Yoneda, Ryohei; Tamada, Taro; Takami, Hideto; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Nojiri, Masaki

    2014-03-01

    The crystal structures of copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR) from the thermophilic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 and the amino (N)-terminal 68 residue-deleted mutant were determined at resolutions of 1.3Å and 1.8Å, respectively. Both structures show a striking resemblance with the overall structure of the well-known CuNiRs composed of two Greek key β-barrel domains; however, a remarkable structural difference was found in the N-terminal region. The unique region has one β-strand and one α-helix extended to the northern surface of the type-1 copper site. The superposition of the Geobacillus CuNiR model on the electron-transfer complex structure of CuNiR with the redox partner cytochrome c551 in other denitrifier system led us to infer that this region contributes to the transient binding with the partner protein during the interprotein electron transfer reaction in the Geobacillus system. Furthermore, electron-transfer kinetics experiments using N-terminal residue-deleted mutant and the redox partner, Geobacillus cytochrome c551, were carried out. These structural and kinetics studies demonstrate that the region is directly involved in the specific partner recognition.

  12. Indirect determination of nitric oxide production by reduction of nitrate with a freeze-thawing-resistant nitrate reductase from Escherichia coli MC1061.

    PubMed

    Arias-Negrete, Sergio; Jiménez-Romero, Luis A; Solís-Martínez, Martha O; Ramírez-Emiliano, Joel; Avila, Eva E; Cuéllar-Mata, Patricia

    2004-05-01

    Preparation of a nitrate reductase lysate of Escherichia coli MC1061 to measure nitrate and nitrite in biologic fluids is described. To obtain the crude bacterial lysate containing nitrate reductase activity, E. coli MC1061 was subjected to 16-20 freeze-thawing cycles, from -70 to 60 degrees C, until nitrite reductase activity was < or = 25%. Nitrate reductase activity was detected mainly in the crude preparation. To validate the nitrate reduction procedure, standard nitrate solutions (1.6-100 microM) were incubated with the nitrate reductase preparation for 3 h at 37 degrees C, and nitrite was estimated by the Griess reaction in a microassay. Nitrate solutions were reduced to nitrite in a range of 60-70%. Importantly, no cofactors were necessary to perform nitrate reduction. The biological samples were first reduced with the nitrate reductase preparation. After centrifugation, samples were deproteinized with either methanol/ether or zinc sulfate and nitrite was quantified. The utility of the nitrate reductase preparation was assessed by nitrate+nitrite determination in serum of animals infected with the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica or the bacteria E. coli and in the supernatant of cultured lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. Our results indicate that the nitrate reductase-containing lysate provides a convenient tool for the reduction of nitrate to determine nitrate+nitrite in biological fluids by spectrophotometric methods.

  13. Regulation of Nitrite Stress Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a Model Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Chen, Amy; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Luning, Eric G.; Zane, Grant M.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are sensitive to low concentrations of nitrite, and nitrite has been used to control SRB-related biofouling in oil fields. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model SRB, carries a cytochrome c-type nitrite reductase (nrfHA) that confers resistance to low concentrations of nitrite. The regulation of this nitrite reductase has not been directly examined to date. In this study, we show that DVU0621 (NrfR), a sigma54-dependent two-component system response regulator, is the positive regulator for this operon. NrfR activates the expression of the nrfHA operon in response to nitrite stress. We also show that nrfR is needed for fitness at low cell densities in the presence of nitrite because inactivation of nrfR affects the rate of nitrite reduction. We also predict and validate the binding sites for NrfR upstream of the nrfHA operon using purified NrfR in gel shift assays. We discuss possible roles for NrfR in regulating nitrate reductase genes in nitrate-utilizing Desulfovibrio spp. IMPORTANCE The NrfA nitrite reductase is prevalent across several bacterial phyla and required for dissimilatory nitrite reduction. However, regulation of the nrfA gene has been studied in only a few nitrate-utilizing bacteria. Here, we show that in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not respire nitrate, the expression of nrfHA is induced by NrfR upon nitrite stress. This is the first report of regulation of nrfA by a sigma54-dependent two-component system. Our study increases our knowledge of nitrite stress responses and possibly of the regulation of nitrate reduction in SRB. PMID:26283774

  14. [Electrical activity and circulatory effects of nitrite in the rat cerebrum].

    PubMed

    Shumilova, T E; Smirnov, A G; Shereshkov, V I; Fedorova, M A; Nozdrachev, A D

    2015-01-01

    An association between the cerebrum electrical activity (CEA) in rats, blood supply of its cortex microregions (linear blood flow), and general cerebrum blood flow under acute nitrite hypoxia was studied. The phase character of the change in hemodynamic indices and the total capacity of electroencephalography (EEG) spectrum for 75 min after sodium nitrite introduction (30 mg/kg of body weight) was detected. The first phase (30 min) was associated with cerebrum adaptation to hypotension caused by nitrite and was completed by EEG normalization. The second phase was characterized by pathological EEG changes (in spite of restoration of hemodynamics in the cerebrum) caused by the growth of oxygen debt in the nervous tissue as a result of a decrease in the blood oxygen capacity by 60-75 min of the effect of nitrite.

  15. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  16. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  17. Molecular Components of Nitrate and Nitrite Efflux in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Elisa; González-Montelongo, Rafaela; Giraldez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Diego Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Some eukaryotes, such as plant and fungi, are capable of utilizing nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Once transported into the cell, nitrate is reduced to ammonium by the consecutive action of nitrate and nitrite reductase. How nitrate assimilation is balanced with nitrate and nitrite efflux is unknown, as are the proteins involved. The nitrate assimilatory yeast Hansenula polymorpha was used as a model to dissect these efflux systems. We identified the sulfite transporters Ssu1 and Ssu2 as effective nitrate exporters, Ssu2 being quantitatively more important, and we characterize the Nar1 protein as a nitrate/nitrite exporter. The use of strains lacking either SSU2 or NAR1 along with the nitrate reductase gene YNR1 showed that nitrate reductase activity is not required for net nitrate uptake. Growth test experiments indicated that Ssu2 and Nar1 exporters allow yeast to cope with nitrite toxicity. We also have shown that the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae sulfite efflux permease Ssu1 is also able to excrete nitrite and nitrate. These results characterize for the first time essential components of the nitrate/nitrite efflux system and their impact on net nitrate uptake and its regulation. PMID:24363367

  18. Sequence homology requirements for transcriptional silencing of 35S transgenes and post-transcriptional silencing of nitrite reductase (trans)genes by the tobacco 271 locus.

    PubMed

    Thierry, D; Vaucheret, H

    1996-12-01

    The transgene locus of the tobacco plant 271 (271 locus) is located on a telomere and consists of multiple copies of a plasmid carrying an NptII marker gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 19S promoter and the leaf-specific nitrite reductase Nii1 cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Previous analysis of gene expression in leaves has shown that this locus triggers both post-transcriptional silencing of the host leaf-specific Nii genes and transcriptional silencing of transgenes driven by the 19S or 35S promoter irrespective of their coding sequence and of their location in the genome. In this paper we show that silencing of transgenes carrying Nii1 sequences occurs irrespective of the promoter driving their expression and of their location within the genome. This phenomenon occurs in roots as well as in leaves although root Nii genes share only 84% identity with leaf-specific Nii1 sequences carried by the 271 locus. Conversely, transgenes carrying the bean Nii gene (which shares 76% identity with the tobacco Nii1 gene) escape silencing by the 271 locus. We also show that transgenes driven by the figwort mosaic virus 34S promoter (which shares 63% identity with the 35S promoter) also escape silencing by the 271 locus. Taken together, these results indicate that a high degree of sequence similarity is required between the sequences of the silencing locus and of the target (trans)genes for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing.

  19. Aldose reductase inhibitory activity of compounds from Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1-7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8-12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC(50), 4.78 μ M). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  20. Oral Nitrate Reductase Activity Is Not Associated with Development of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH): A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Barzin, Gilda; Merat, Shahin; Nokhbeh-Zaeem, Habibeh; Saniee, Parastoo; Pedramnia, Shahrzad; Mostashfi Habibabadi, Ali; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND NAFLD/NASH is a manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is associated with obesity/overweight. Not all obese/overweight individuals develop NASH. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is considered a gastrointestinal manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and is associated with obesity/overweight. Again not all obese/overweight individuals develop GERD. Recent data show association of dietary nitrate content and oral nitrate reductase activity (NRA) with GERD. Nitrates need to be converted to nitrite (done in human beings by nitrate reductase of oral bacteria exclusively) to be active in metabolic pathways. OBJECTIVE To assess the relation between NASH/NAFLD and oral NRA. METHODS Oral NRA was measured in individuals with NASH (compatible abdominal ultrasound and two elevated ALT/AST levels over six months) and was compared with that of those without NASH. Oral NRA was measured according to a previously reported protocol. RESULTS Eleven NASH patients and twelve controls were enrolled. Mean oral NRA activity were 2.82 vs. 3.51 μg nitrite-N formed per person per minute for cases and controls respectively (p=0.46). CONCLUSION According to our data, oral nitrite production is not different between individual swith and without NASH. PMID:24829701

  1. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  2. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated. PMID:26656409

  3. Ultrasonic Treatment Enhanced Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial (AOB) Activity for Nitritation Process.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Liu, Yan-Chen; Xin, Jia; Zuo, Hao; Wang, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-19

    Oxidation of ammonia to nitrite rather than nitrate is critical for nitritation process for wastewater treatment. We proposed a promising approach by using controlled ultrasonic treatment to enhance the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and suppress that of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Batch activity assays indicated that when ultrasound was applied, AOB activity reached a peak level and then declined but NOB activity deteriorated continuously as the power intensity of ultrasound increased. Kinetic analysis of relative microbial activity versus ultrasonic energy density was performed to investigate the effect of operational factors (power, sludge concentration, and aeration) on AOB and NOB activities and the test parameters were selected for reactor tests. Laboratory sequential batch reactor (SBR) was further used to test the ultrasonic stimulus with 8 h per day operational cycle and synthetic waste urine as influent. With specific ultrasonic energy density of 0.09 kJ/mg VSS and continuously fed influent containing above 200 mg NH3-N/L, high AOB reproductive activity was achieved and nearly complete conversion of ammonia-N to nitrite was maintained. Microbial structure analysis confirmed that the treatment changed community of AOB, NOB, and heterotrophs. Known AOB Nitrosomonas genus remained at similar level in the biomass while typical NOB Nitrospira genus disappeared in the SBR under ultrasonic treatment and after the treatment was off for 30 days.

  4. Ultrasonic Treatment Enhanced Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial (AOB) Activity for Nitritation Process.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Liu, Yan-Chen; Xin, Jia; Zuo, Hao; Wang, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-19

    Oxidation of ammonia to nitrite rather than nitrate is critical for nitritation process for wastewater treatment. We proposed a promising approach by using controlled ultrasonic treatment to enhance the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and suppress that of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Batch activity assays indicated that when ultrasound was applied, AOB activity reached a peak level and then declined but NOB activity deteriorated continuously as the power intensity of ultrasound increased. Kinetic analysis of relative microbial activity versus ultrasonic energy density was performed to investigate the effect of operational factors (power, sludge concentration, and aeration) on AOB and NOB activities and the test parameters were selected for reactor tests. Laboratory sequential batch reactor (SBR) was further used to test the ultrasonic stimulus with 8 h per day operational cycle and synthetic waste urine as influent. With specific ultrasonic energy density of 0.09 kJ/mg VSS and continuously fed influent containing above 200 mg NH3-N/L, high AOB reproductive activity was achieved and nearly complete conversion of ammonia-N to nitrite was maintained. Microbial structure analysis confirmed that the treatment changed community of AOB, NOB, and heterotrophs. Known AOB Nitrosomonas genus remained at similar level in the biomass while typical NOB Nitrospira genus disappeared in the SBR under ultrasonic treatment and after the treatment was off for 30 days. PMID:26678011

  5. Selenate reductase activity in Escherichia coli requires Isc iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nathan; Choi, Jessica; Porter, Abigail W; Carey, Sean; Rauschenbach, Ines; Harel, Arye

    2014-12-01

    The selenate reductase in Escherichia coli is a multi-subunit enzyme predicted to bind Fe-S clusters. In this study, we examined the iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis genes that are required for selenate reductase activity. Mutants devoid of either the iscU or hscB gene in the Isc iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis pathway lost the ability to reduce selenate. Genetic complementation by the wild-type sequences restored selenate reductase activity. The results indicate the Isc biosynthetic system plays a key role in selenate reductase Fe-S cofactor assembly and is essential for enzyme activity.

  6. A calibration curve for immobilized dihydrofolate reductase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Morris, Holly; Tivanski, Alexei V; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-09-01

    An assay was developed for measuring the active-site concentration, activity, and thereby the catalytic turnover rate (k cat) of an immobilized dihydrofolate reductase model system (Singh et al., (2015), Anal. Biochem). This data article contains a calibration plot for the developed assay. In the calibration plot rate is plotted as a function of DHFR concentration and shows linear relationship. The concentration of immobilized enzyme was varied by using 5 different size mica chips. The dsDNA concentration was the same for all chips, assuming that the surface area of the mica chip dictates the resulting amount of bound enzyme (i.e. larger sized chip would have more bound DHFR). The activity and concentration of each chip was measured.

  7. ATP activation and properties of the methyl coenzyme M reductase system in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Gunsalus, R P; Wolfe, R S

    1978-01-01

    The requirement of ATP for the methyl coenzyme M methylreductase in extracts of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was found to be catalytic; for each mol of ATP added, 15 mol of methane was produced from methyl coenzyme M [2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid]. Other nucleotide triphosphates partially replaced ATP in activation of the reductase. All components of the reaction were found in the supernatant fraction of cell extracts after centrifugation at 100,000 X g for 1 h; optimal reaction rates occurred at 65 degrees C, at a pH range of 5.6 to 6.0, and at concentrations of ATP and MgCl2 of 1 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Chloral hydrate, chloroform, nitrite, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and viologen dyes (compounds known to inhibit methanogenesis from a variety of substrates) were found to inhibit the conversion of methyl coenzyme M to methane. Methyl coenzyme M methylreductase was shown to be present in a variety of methanogens. PMID:29032

  8. Community Structure of Denitrifiers, Bacteria, and Archaea along Redox Gradients in Pacific Northwest Marine Sediments by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Amplified Nitrite Reductase (nirS) and 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Braker, Gesche; Ayala-del-Río, Héctor L.; Devol, Allan H.; Fesefeldt, Andreas; Tiedje, James M.

    2001-01-01

    Steep vertical gradients of oxidants (O2 and NO3−) in Puget Sound and Washington continental margin sediments indicate that aerobic respiration and denitrification occur within the top few millimeters to centimeters. To systematically explore the underlying communities of denitrifiers, Bacteria, and Archaea along redox gradients at distant geographic locations, nitrite reductase (nirS) genes and bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes (rDNAs) were PCR amplified and analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. The suitablility of T-RFLP analysis for investigating communities of nirS-containing denitrifiers was established by the correspondence of dominant terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) of nirS to computer-simulated T-RFs of nirS clones. These clones belonged to clusters II, III, and IV from the same cores and were analyzed in a previous study (G. Braker, J. Zhou, L. Wu, A. H. Devol, and J. M. Tiedje, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:2096–2104, 2000). T-RFLP analysis of nirS and bacterial rDNA revealed a high level of functional and phylogenetic diversity, whereas the level of diversity of Archaea was lower. A comparison of T-RFLPs based on the presence or absence of T-RFs and correspondence analysis based on the frequencies and heights of T-RFs allowed us to group sediment samples according to the sampling location and thus clearly distinguish Puget Sound and the Washington margin populations. However, changes in community structure within sediment core sections during the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions were minor. Thus, within the top layers of marine sediments, redox gradients seem to result from the differential metabolic activities of populations of similar communities, probably through mixing by marine invertebrates rather than from the development of distinct communities. PMID:11282647

  9. Periplasmic nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase: similar molecular architectures with very different enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Gonzalez, Pablo J; Fernandes, Pedro A; Moura, José J G; Ramos, Maria João

    2015-11-17

    It is remarkable how nature has been able to construct enzymes that, despite sharing many similarities, have simple but key differences that tune them for completely different functions in living cells. Periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) from the DMSOr family are representative examples of this. Both enzymes share almost identical three-dimensional protein foldings and active sites, in terms of coordination number, geometry and nature of the ligands. The substrates of both enzymes (nitrate and formate) are polyatomic anions that also share similar charge and stereochemistry. In terms of the catalytic mechanism, both enzymes have a common activation mechanism (the sulfur-shift mechanism) that ensures a constant coordination number around the metal ion during the catalytic cycle. In spite of these similarities, they catalyze very different reactions: Nap abstracts an oxygen atom from nitrate releasing nitrite, whereas FdH catalyzes a hydrogen atom transfer from formate and releases carbon dioxide. In this Account, a critical analysis of structure, function, and catalytic mechanism of the molybdenum enzymes periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) is presented. We conclude that the main structural driving force that dictates the type of reaction, catalyzed by each enzyme, is a key difference on one active site residue that is located in the top region of the active sites of both enzymes. In both enzymes, the active site is centered on the metal ion of the cofactor (Mo in Nap and Mo or W in Fdh) that is coordinated by four sulfur atoms from two pyranopterin guanosine dinucleotide (PGD) molecules and by a sulfido. However, while in Nap there is a Cys directly coordinated to the Mo ion, in FdH there is a SeCys instead. In Fdh there is also an important His that interacts very closely with the SeCys, whereas in Nap the same position is occupied by a Met. The role of Cys in Nap and SeCys in FdH is similar in both

  10. Binding of nitrite and its reductive activation to nitric oxide at biomimetic copper centers.

    PubMed

    Monzani, E; Anthony, G J; Koolhaas, A; Spandre, A; Leggieri, E; Casella, L; Gullotti, M; Nardin, G; Randaccio, L; Fontani, M; Zanello, P; Reedijk, J

    2000-04-01

    analyzed. The mechanism of reductive activation of nitrite to nitric oxide by the Cu(I) complexes of 1-bb, 2-bb, and ddah has been studied. The reaction requires two protons per molecule of nitrite and Cu(I). Kinetic experiments show that the reaction is first order in [Cu(I)] and [H+] and exhibits saturation behavior with respect to nitrite concentration. The kinetic data show that [Cu(2-bb)]+ is more efficient than [Cu(1-bb)]+ and [Cu(ddah)]+ in reducing nitrite. PMID:10819470

  11. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  12. Inorganic nitrite attenuates NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide generation in activated macrophages via a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Peleli, Maria; Zollbrecht, Christa; Giulietti, Alessia; Terrando, Niccolo; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Carlström, Mattias

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of many disorders, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Immune cells are major sources of superoxide (O2(∙-)) as part of the innate host defense system, but exaggerated and sustained O2(∙-) generation may lead to progressive inflammation and organ injuries. Previous studies have proven organ-protective effects of inorganic nitrite, a precursor of nitric oxide (NO), in conditions manifested by oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the mechanisms are still not clear. This study aimed at investigating the potential role of nitrite in modulating NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity in immune cells. Mice peritoneal macrophages or human monocytes were activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with or without coincubation with nitrite. O2(∙-) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation were detected by lucigenin-based chemiluminescence and fluorescence techniques, respectively. The intracellular NO production was measured by DAF-FM DA fluorescence. NOX isoforms and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression were detected by qPCR. LPS increased both O2(∙-) and ONOO(-) production in macrophages, which was significantly reduced by nitrite (10µmol/L). Mechanistically, the effects of nitrite are (1) linked to increased NO generation, (2) similar to that observed with the NO donor DETA-NONOate, and (3) can be abolished by the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO or by the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor febuxostat. Nox2 expression was increased in activated macrophages, but was not influenced by nitrite. However, nitrite attenuated LPS-induced upregulation of iNOS expression. Similar to that observed in mice macrophages, nitrite also reduced O2(∙-) generation in LPS-activated human monocytes. In conclusion, XO-mediated reduction of nitrite attenuates NOX activity in activated macrophages, which may modulate the inflammatory response. PMID:25724690

  13. Isobutyraldehyde production from Escherichia coli by removing aldehyde reductase activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasing global demand and reliance on petroleum-derived chemicals will necessitate alternative sources for chemical feedstocks. Currently, 99% of chemical feedstocks are derived from petroleum and natural gas. Renewable methods for producing important chemical feedstocks largely remain unaddressed. Synthetic biology enables the renewable production of various chemicals from microorganisms by constructing unique metabolic pathways. Here, we engineer Escherichia coli for the production of isobutyraldehyde, which can be readily converted to various hydrocarbons currently derived from petroleum such as isobutyric acid, acetal, oxime and imine using existing chemical catalysis. Isobutyraldehyde can be readily stripped from cultures during production, which reduces toxic effects of isobutyraldehyde. Results We adopted the isobutanol pathway previously constructed in E. coli, neglecting the last step in the pathway where isobutyraldehyde is converted to isobutanol. However, this strain still overwhelmingly produced isobutanol (1.5 g/L/OD600 (isobutanol) vs 0.14 g/L/OD600 (isobutyraldehyde)). Next, we deleted yqhD which encodes a broad-substrate range aldehyde reductase known to be active toward isobutyraldehyde. This strain produced isobutanol and isobutyraldehyde at a near 1:1 ratio, indicating further native isobutyraldehyde reductase (IBR) activity in E. coli. To further eliminate isobutanol formation, we set out to identify and remove the remaining IBRs from the E. coli genome. We identified 7 annotated genes coding for IBRs that could be active toward isobutyraldehyde: adhP, eutG, yiaY, yjgB, betA, fucO, eutE. Individual deletions of the genes yielded only marginal improvements. Therefore, we sequentially deleted all seven of the genes and assessed production. The combined deletions greatly increased isobutyraldehyde production (1.5 g/L/OD600) and decreased isobutanol production (0.4 g/L/OD600). By assessing production by overexpression of each

  14. Structural Basis for Activation of Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-12-03

    The class Ib ribonucleotide reductase of Escherichia coli can initiate reduction of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides with either a Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-tyrosyl radical (Y{sm_bullet}) or a Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor in the NrdF subunit. Whereas Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} can self-assemble from Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and O{sub 2}, activation of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF requires a reduced flavoprotein, NrdI, proposed to form the oxidant for cofactor assembly by reduction of O{sub 2}. The crystal structures reported here of E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF reveal different coordination environments, suggesting distinct initial binding sites for the oxidants during cofactor activation. In the structures of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF in complex with reduced and oxidized NrdI, a continuous channel connects the NrdI flavin cofactor to the NrdF Mn{sub 2}{sup II} active site. Crystallographic detection of a putative peroxide in this channel supports the proposed mechanism of Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly.

  15. Effect of changing the nanoscale environment on activity and stability of nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Veena; Hooda, Vinita

    2016-07-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) is employed for fabrication of nitrate sensing devices in which the enzyme in immobilized form is used to catalyze the conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the presence of a suitable cofactor. So far, instability of immobilized NR due to the use of inappropriate immobilization matrices has limited the practical applications of these devices. Present study is an attempt to improve the kinetic properties and stability of NR using nanoscale iron oxide (nFe3O4) and zinc oxide (nZnO) particles. The desired nanoparticles were synthesized, surface functionalized, characterized and affixed onto the epoxy resin to yield two nanocomposite supports (epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO) for immobilizing NR. Epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO support could load as much as 35.8±0.01 and 33.20±0.01μg/cm(2) of NR with retention of about 93.72±0.50 and 84.81±0.80% of its initial activity respectively. Changes in surface morphology and chemical bonding structure of both the nanocomposite supports after addition of NR were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Optimum working conditions of pH, temperature and substrate concentration were ascertained for free as well as immobilized NR preparations. Further, storage stability at 4°C and thermal stability between 25-50°C were determined for all the NR preparations. Analytical applications of immobilized NR for determination of soil and water nitrates along with reusability data has been included to make sure the usefulness of the procedure. PMID:27233127

  16. Antitumor effect of synergistic contribution of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Mizuno, Masaaki; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas (NEAPP) have been attracted attention in the noble application of cancer therapy. Although good effects of the Plasma-Activated-Medium (PAM) such as the selective antitumor effect and killing effect for the anticancer agent resistant cells were reported, a mechanism of this effect has not been still clarified yet. In this study, we have investigated a contribution of the reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) generated in PAM such as hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. Those species generated in the PAM quantitatively measured by light absorbance of commercial regent. Moreover, viable cell count after cell culture with those RNOS intentionally added medium or PAM were also measured by MTS assay. Our NEAPP source generated hydrogen peroxide and nitrite with the generation ratio of 0.35 μM/s and 9.8 μM/s. In those RNOS, hydrogen peroxide has respective antitumor effect. On the other hands, nitrite has no antitumor effect singly. But, synergistically enhance the antitumor effect of hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, this effect of those RNOS also contribute for the selectively cancer killing effect of PAM.

  17. Separation of NADH-fumarate reductase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Christmas, P B; Turrens, J F

    2000-02-15

    A recent review suggested that the activity of NADH-fumarate reductase from trypanosomatids could be catalyzed by succinate dehydrogenase working in reverse (Tielens and van Hellemond, Parasitol. Today 14, 265-271, 1999). The results reported in this study demonstrate that the two activities can easily be separated without any loss in either activity, suggesting that fumarate reductase and succinate dehydrogenase are separate enzymes.

  18. Chromate reductase activity in Streptomyces sp. MC1.

    PubMed

    Polti, Marta A; Amoroso, María J; Abate, Carlos M

    2010-02-01

    Biological transformation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by enzymatic reduction may provide a less costly and more environmentally friendly approach to remediation. In a previous report a Cr(VI) resistant actinomycete strain, Streptomyces sp. MC1, was able to reduce Cr(VI) present in a synthetic medium, soil extract and soil samples. This is the first time optimal conditions such as pH, temperature, growth phase and electron donor have been elucidated in vitro for Cr(VI) reduction by a streptomycete. Chromate reductase of Streptomyces sp. MC1 is a constitutive enzyme which was mainly associated with biomass and required NAD(P)H as an electron donor. It was active over a broad temperature (19-39 degrees C) and pH (5-8) range, and optimum conditions were 30 degrees C and pH 7. The enzyme was present in supernatant, pellet and cell free extract. Bioremediation with the enzyme was observed in non-compatible cell reproduction systems, conditions frequently found in contaminated environments. PMID:20339215

  19. The 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory components from heartwood of Artocarpus incisus: structure-activity investigations.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Fukuda, M; Kondo, R; Sakai, K

    2000-02-01

    The methanol extract of heartwood of Artocarpus incisus showed potent 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory activity. We investigated the 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory effects of nine compounds isolated from A. incisus. Chlorophorin (IC50 = 37 microM) and artocarpin (IC50 = 85 microM) showed more potent inhibitory effects than did alpha-linolenic acid, which is known as a naturally occurring potent inhibitor. Structure-activity investigations suggested that the presence of an isoprene substituent (prenyl and geranyl) would enhance 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory effects.

  20. A Periplasmic Complex of the Nitrite Reductase NirS, the Chaperone DnaK, and the Flagellum Protein FliC Is Essential for Flagellum Assembly and Motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Borrero-de Acuña, José Manuel; Molinari, Gabriella; Rohde, Manfred; Dammeyer, Thorben; Wissing, Josef; Jänsch, Lothar; Arias, Sagrario; Jahn, Martina; Schobert, Max; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitously occurring environmental bacterium and opportunistic pathogen responsible for various acute and chronic infections. Obviously, anaerobic energy generation via denitrification contributes to its ecological success. To investigate the structural basis for the interconnection of the denitrification machinery to other essential cellular processes, we have sought to identify the protein interaction partners of the denitrification enzyme nitrite reductase NirS in the periplasm. We employed NirS as an affinity-purifiable bait to identify interacting proteins in vivo. Results obtained revealed that both the flagellar structural protein FliC and the protein chaperone DnaK form a complex with NirS in the periplasm. The interacting domains of NirS and FliC were tentatively identified. The NirS-interacting stretch of amino acids lies within its cytochrome c domain. Motility assays and ultrastructure analyses revealed that a nirS mutant was defective in the formation of flagella and correspondingly in swimming motility. In contrast, the fliC mutant revealed an intact denitrification pathway. However, deletion of the nirF gene, coding for a heme d1 biosynthetic enzyme, which leads to catalytically inactive NirS, did not abolish swimming ability. This pointed to a structural function for the NirS protein. FliC and NirS were found colocalized with DnaK at the cell surface of P. aeruginosa. A function of the detected periplasmic NirS-DnaK-FliC complex in flagellum formation and motility was concluded and discussed. IMPORTANCE Physiological functions in Gram-negative bacteria are connected with the cellular compartment of the periplasm and its membranes. Central enzymatic steps of anaerobic energy generation and the motility mediated by flagellar activity use these cellular structures in addition to multiple other processes. Almost nothing is known about the protein network functionally connecting these processes in the periplasm

  1. A Novel Nitrate/Nitrite Permease in the Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Toshio; Inoue-Sakamoto, Kaori; Bryant, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    The nrtP and narB genes, encoding nitrate/nitrite permease and nitrate reductase, respectively, were isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 and characterized. NrtP is a member of the major facilitator superfamily and is unrelated to the ATP-binding cassette-type nitrate transporters that previously have been described for freshwater strains of cyanobacteria. However, NrtP is similar to the NRT2-type nitrate transporters found in diverse organisms. An nrtP mutant strain consumes nitrate at a 4.5-fold-lower rate than the wild type, and this mutant grew exponentially on a medium containing 12 mM nitrate at a rate approximately 2-fold lower than that of the wild type. The nrtP mutant cells could not consume nitrite as rapidly as the wild type at pH 10, suggesting that NrtP also functions in nitrite uptake. A narB mutant was unable to grow on a medium containing nitrate as a nitrogen source, although this mutant could grow on media containing urea or nitrite with rates similar to those of the wild type. Exogenously added nitrite enhanced the in vivo activity of nitrite reductase in the narB mutant; this suggests that nitrite acts as a positive effector of nitrite reductase. Transcripts of the nrtP and narB genes were detected in cells grown on nitrate but were not detected in cells grown on urea or ammonia. Transcription of the nrtP and narB genes is probably controlled by the NtcA transcription factor for global nitrogen control. The discovery of a nitrate/nitrite permease in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 suggests that significant differences in nutrient transporters may occur in marine and freshwater cyanobacteria. PMID:10572142

  2. Glyphosate inhibition of ferric reductase activity in iron deficient sunflower roots.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Levent; Yazici, Atilla; Eker, Selim; Gokmen, Ozgur; Römheld, Volker; Cakmak, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is increasingly being observed in cropping systems with frequent glyphosate applications. A likely reason for this is that glyphosate interferes with root uptake of Fe by inhibiting ferric reductase in roots required for Fe acquisition by dicot and nongrass species. This study investigated the role of drift rates of glyphosate (0.32, 0.95 or 1.89 mm glyphosate corresponding to 1, 3 and 6% of the recommended herbicidal dose, respectively) on ferric reductase activity of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) roots grown under Fe deficiency conditions. Application of 1.89 mm glyphosate resulted in almost 50% inhibition of ferric reductase within 6 h and complete inhibition 24 h after the treatment. Even at lower rates of glyphosate (e.g. 0.32 mm and 0.95 mm), ferric reductase was inhibited. Soluble sugar concentration and the NAD(P)H oxidizing capacity of apical roots were not decreased by the glyphosate applications. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the effects of glyphosate on ferric reductase activity. The nature of the inhibitory effect of glyphosate on ferric reductase could not be identified. Impaired ferric reductase could be a major reason for the increasingly observed Fe deficiency in cropping systems associated with widespread glyphosate usage.

  3. Peach MYB7 activates transcription of the proanthocyanidin pathway gene encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase, but not anthocyanidin reductase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Liao, Liao; Gu, Chao; Lu, Ziqi; Allan, Andrew C.; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are a group of natural phenolic compounds that have a great effect on both flavor and nutritious value of fruit. It has been shown that PA synthesis is regulated by R2R3-MYB transcription factors (TFs) via activation of PA-specific pathway genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a MYB gene designated PpMYB7 in peach. The peach PpMYB7 represents a new group of R2R3-MYB genes regulating PA synthesis in plants. It is able to activate transcription of PpLAR1 but not PpANR, and has a broader selection of potential bHLH partners compared with PpMYBPA1. Transcription of PpMYB7 can be activated by the peach basic leucine-zipper 5 TF (PpbZIP5) via response to ABA. Our study suggests a transcriptional network regulating PA synthesis in peach, with the results aiding the understanding of the functional divergence between R2R3-MYB TFs in plants. PMID:26579158

  4. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  5. The activation state of nitrate reductase is not always correlated with total nitrate reductase activity in leaves

    PubMed

    Man; Abd-El Baki GK; Stegmann; Weiner; Kaiser

    1999-10-01

    The relation between nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) activity, activation state and NR protein in leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was investigated. Maximum NR activity (NRA(max)) and NR protein content (Western blotting) were modified by growing plants hydroponically at low (0.3 mM) or high (10 mM) nitrate supply. In addition, plants were kept under short-day (8 h light/16 h dark) or long-day (16 h light/8 h dark) conditions in order to manipulate the concentration of nitrate stored in the leaves during the dark phase, and the concentrations of sugars and amino acids accumulated during the light phase, which are potential signalling compounds. Plants were also grown under phosphate deficiency in order to modify their glucose-6-phosphate content. In high-nitrate/long-day conditions, NRA(max) and NR protein were almost constant during the whole light period. Low-nitrate/long-day plants had only about 30% of the NRA(max) and NR protein of high-nitrate plants. In low-nitrate/long-day plants, NRA(max) and NR protein decreased strongly during the second half of the light phase. The decrease was preceded by a strong decrease in the leaf nitrate content. Short daylength generally led to higher nitrate concentrations in leaves. Under short-day/low-nitrate conditions, NRA(max) was slightly higher than under long-day conditions and remained almost constant during the day. This correlated with maintenance of higher nitrate concentrations during the short light period. The NR activation state in the light was very similar in high-nitrate and low-nitrate plants, but dark inactivation was twice as high in the high-nitrate plants. Thus, the low NRA(max) in low-nitrate/long-day plants was slightly compensated by a higher activation state of NR. Such a partial compensation of a low NR(max) by a higher dark activation state was not observed with phosphate-depleted plants. Total leaf concentrations of sugars, of glutamine and glutamate and of glucose-6-phosphate did

  6. Contribution of reductase activity to quinone toxicity in three kinds of hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Kaori; Ishii, Satomi; Kashiwagi, Kyoko; Shimamoto, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain quinone cytotoxicity: oxidative stress via the redox cycle, and the arylation of intracellular nucleophiles. The redox cycle is catalyzed by intracellular reductases, and therefore the toxicity of redox cycling quinone is considered to be closely associated with the reductase activity. This study examined the relationship between quinone toxicity and the intracellular reductase activity using 3 kinds of hepatic cells; rat primary hepatocytes, HepG2 and H4IIE. The intracellular reductase activity was; primary hepatocyte >HepG2>H4IIE. The three kinds of cells showed almost the same vulnerability to an arylating quinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ). However, the susceptibility to a redox cycling quinone, 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ) was; primary hepatocyte>HepG2>H4IIE. In addition, the cytotoxicity elicited by DMNQ was significantly attenuated in HepG2 cells and almost completely suppressed in primary hepatocytes by diphenyleneiodonium chloride, a reductase inhibitor. These data suggest that cells with a high reductase activity are susceptible to redox cycling quinones. This study provides essential evidence to assess the toxicity of quinone-based drugs during their developmental processes.

  7. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase: a possible link between metabolic activity and vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank B; Simonsen, Ulf; Roepstorff, Andreas; Fago, Angela

    2009-12-01

    In catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a crucial role in CO2 transport, in acid-base balance, and in linking local acidosis to O2 unloading from hemoglobin. Considering the structural similarity between bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced in the reaction induces vasodilation in aortic rings. This reaction occurs under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and in various tissues at physiological levels of CA and nitrite. Furthermore, two specific inhibitors of the CO2 hydration, dorzolamide and acetazolamide, increase the CA-catalyzed production of vasoactive NO from nitrite. This enhancing effect may explain the known vasodilating effects of these drugs and indicates that CO2 and nitrite bind differently to the enzyme active site. Kinetic analyses show a higher reaction rate at high pH, suggesting that anionic nitrite participates more effectively in catalysis. Taken together, our results reveal a novel nitrous anhydrase enzymatic activity of CA that would function to link the in vivo main end products of energy metabolism (CO2/H+) to the generation of vasoactive NO. The CA-mediated NO production may be important to the correlation between blood flow and metabolic activity in tissues, as occurring for instance in active areas of the brain. PMID:19820197

  8. Rat, mouse and human neutrophils stimulated by a variety of activating agents produce much less nitrite than rodent macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, E L; Pruett, S B

    1995-01-01

    The role of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) in the antimicrobial activities of neutrophils from various mammalian species is unclear. However, it has been reported that rodent neutrophils possess the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase and that inflammatory neutrophils from rats produce potentially antimicrobial levels of RNI. In the present study, neutrophils from humans, rats and mice were evaluated for production of nitrite, a stable end-product of RNI. Human neutrophil preparations (> 95% neutrophils) isolated from peripheral blood were stimulated for 2-24 hr with agents known to trigger the Ca(2+)-dependent constitutive nitric oxide synthase, or to stimulate synthesis of the inducible nitric oxide synthase. Superoxide dismutase was added to some cultures to decrease the levels of superoxide, a compound reported to react with RNI and yield products other than nitrite. Even though the cells were viable and responsive to stimuli, they did not produce nitrite concentrations indicative of antimicrobial potential. Preparations of inflammatory (casein-elicited) mouse neutrophils also failed to produce high concentrations of nitrite. Inflammatory rat neutrophils (2.5 x 10(6)/ml) produced nitrite concentrations of approximately 40 microM in 24-hr cultures, but plots of nitrite production versus cell number for neutrophil and macrophage preparations indicated that contaminating macrophages could account for all the nitrite production in the neutrophil preparations. Thus, neutrophils from rats, mice and humans seem comparable in their inability to produce high levels of nitrite in response to a variety of stimuli. This suggests that in most circumstances the constitutive nitric oxide synthase known to be present in these cells is limited to the production of low levels of nitric oxide for intercellular signalling. In addition, this raises questions about the presence or functional status of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rodent neutrophils. PMID:7534260

  9. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  10. Role of the denitrifying Haloarchaea in the treatment of nitrite-brines.

    PubMed

    Nájera-Fernández, Cindy; Zafrilla, Basilio; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2012-09-01

    Haloferax mediterranei is a denitrifying halophilic archaeon able to reduce nitrate and nitrite under oxic and anoxic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite are used as nitrogen sources for growth. Under oxygen scarcity, this haloarchaeon uses both ions as electron acceptors via a denitrification pathway. In the present work, the maximal nitrite concentration tolerated by this organism was determined by studying the growth of H. mediterranei in minimal medium containing 30, 40 and 50 mM nitrite as sole nitrogen source and under initial oxic conditions at 42 degrees C. The results showed the ability of H. mediterranei to withstand nitrite concentrations up to 50 mM. At the beginning of the incubation, nitrate was detected in the medium, probably due to the spontaneous oxidation of nitrite under the initial oxic conditions. The complete removal of nitrite and nitrate was accomplished in most of the tested conditions, except in culture medium containing 50 mM nitrite, suggesting that this concentration compromised the denitrification capacity of the cells. Nitrite and nitrate reductases activities were analyzed at different growth stages of H. mediterranei. In all cases, the activities of the respiratory enzymes were higher than their assimilative counterparts; this was especially the case for NirK. The denitrifying and possibly detoxifying role of this enzyme might explain the high nitrite tolerance of H. mediterranei. This archaeon was also able to remove 60% of the nitrate and 75% of the nitrite initially present in brine samples collected from a wastewater treatment facility. These results suggest that H. mediterranei, and probably other halophilic denitrifying Archaea, are suitable candidates for the bioremediation of brines with high nitrite and nitrate concentrations.

  11. Nitrate reductase activity in heme-deficient mutants of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, K A; Lascelles, J

    1976-01-01

    Mutants H-14 and H-18 of Staphylococcus aureus require hemin for growth on glycerol and other nonfermentable substrates. H-14 also responds to delta-aminolevulinate. Heme-deficient cells grown in the presence of nitrate do not have lactate-nitrate reductase activity but gain this activity when incubated with hemin in buffer and glucose. Lactate-nitrate reductase activity is also restored to the membrane fraction from such cells by incubation with hemin and dithiothreitol; addition of adenosine 5'-triphosphate has no effect upon the restoration. Cells grown with nitrate in the absence of hemin have two to five times more reduced benzyl viologen-nitrate reductase activity than do those grown with hemin. The activity increases throughout the growth period in the absence of hemin, but with hemin present enzyme formation ceases before the end of growth. There was no evidence of enzyme destruction. The distribution of nitrate reductase activity between membrane and cytoplasm was similar in cells grown with and without hemin; 70 to 90% was in the cytoplasm. It is concluded that heme-deficient staphylococci form apo-cytochrome b, which readily combines in vitro with its prosthetic group to restore normal function. The avaliability of the heme prosthetic group influences the formation of nitrate reductase. PMID:1262303

  12. Kinetic and product distribution analysis of NO* reductase activity in Nitrosomonas europaea hydroxylamine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kostera, Joshua; Youngblut, Matthew D; Slosarczyk, Jeffrey M; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2008-09-01

    Hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea normally catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite, which is the second step in ammonia-dependent respiration. Here we show that, in the presence of methyl viologen monocation radical (MV(red)), HAO can catalyze the reduction of nitric oxide to ammonia. The process is analogous to that catalyzed by cytochrome c nitrite reductase, an enzyme found in some bacteria that use nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic respiration. The availability of a reduction pathway to ammonia is an important factor to consider when designing in vitro studies of HAO, and may also have some physiological relevance. The reduction of nitric oxide to ammonia proceeds in two kinetically distinct steps: nitric oxide is first reduced to hydroxylamine, and then hydroxylamine is reduced to ammonia at a tenfold slower rate. The second step was investigated independently in solutions initially containing hydroxylamine, MV(red), and HAO. Both steps show first-order dependence on nitric oxide and HAO concentrations, and zero-order dependence on MV(red) concentration. The rate constants governing each reduction step were found to have values of (4.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(5) and (2.06 +/- 0.04) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. A second reduction pathway, with second-order dependence on nitric oxide, may become available as the concentration of nitric oxide is increased. Such a pathway might lead to production of nitrous oxide. We estimate a maximum value of (1.5 +/- 0.05) x 10(10) M(-2) s(-1) for the rate constant of the alternative pathway, which is small and suggests that the pathway is not physiologically important.

  13. Aggregate Size and Architecture Determine Microbial Activity Balance for One-Stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox ▿

    PubMed Central

    Vlaeminck, Siegfried E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.; De Clippeleir, Haydée; Schaubroeck, Thomas; Bolca, Selin; Demeestere, Lien; Mast, Jan; Boon, Nico; Carballa, Marta; Verstraete, Willy

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) and anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) cooperate in partial nitritation/anammox systems to remove ammonium from wastewater. In this process, large granular microbial aggregates enhance the performance, but little is known about granulation so far. In this study, three suspended-growth oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification (OLAND) reactors with different inoculation and operation (mixing and aeration) conditions, designated reactors A, B, and C, were used. The test objectives were (i) to quantify the AerAOB and AnAOB abundance and the activity balance for the different aggregate sizes and (ii) to relate aggregate morphology, size distribution, and architecture putatively to the inoculation and operation of the three reactors. A nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR) was defined as the net aerobic nitrite production rate divided by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate. The smallest reactor A, B, and C aggregates were nitrite sources (NARR, >1.7). Large reactor A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the autotrophic space in these granules consisted of AerAOB- and AnAOB-specific extracellular polymeric substances. Large reactor B aggregates were thin film-like nitrite sinks (NARR, <0.5) in which AnAOB were not shielded by an AerAOB layer. Voids and channels occupied 13 to 17% of the anoxic zone of AnAOB-rich aggregates (reactors B and C). The hypothesized granulation pathways include granule replication by division and budding and are driven by growth and/or decay based on species-specific physiology and by hydrodynamic shear and mixing. PMID:19948857

  14. The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Aeromonas caviae ST exhibits NADH-dependent tellurite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel E; Molina, Roberto; Díaz, Waldo; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2008-10-10

    Potassium tellurite (K(2)TeO(3)) is extremely toxic for most forms of life and only a limited number of organisms are naturally resistant to the toxic effects of this compound. Crude extracts prepared from the environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST catalize the in vitro reduction of TeO32- in a NADH-dependent reaction. Upon fractionation by ionic exchange column chromatography three major polypeptides identified as the E1, E2, and E3 components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were identified in fractions exhibiting tellurite-reducing activity. Tellurite reductase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities co-eluted from a Sephadex gel filtration column. To determine which component(s) of the PDH complex has tellurite reductase activity, the A. caviae ST structural genes encoding for E1 (aceE), E2 (aceF), and E3 (lpdA) were independently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and their gene products purified. Results indicated that tellurite reductase activity lies almost exclusively in the E3 component, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The E3 component of the PDH complex from E. coli, Zymomonas mobilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus also showed NADH-dependent tellurite reductase in vitro suggesting that this enzymatic activity is widely distributed among microorganisms. PMID:18675788

  15. Formation of an activated N-nitroso compound in nitrite-treated fava beans (Vicia faba).

    PubMed

    Piacek-Llanes, B G; Tannenbaum, S R

    1982-01-01

    Fava beans are prominent in the diet of the Colombian population at high gastric cancer risk. Upon nitrite treatment under simulated gastric conditions, a potent mutagen was formed as detected by a forward mutation assay using Salmonella typhimurium TM677 without microsomal activation. The promutagen was partially purified by preparative t.l.c. and normal phase h.p.l.c. of the acetone-soluble portion of a dried aqueous extract. The nitrosated promutagen fully accounted for the mutagenicity observed with whole fava beans. One gram of fresh fava beans yielded approximately 0.35 nmol of mutagen. Mutagenicity data indicated that this mutagen was more potent than N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The characteristics of the mutagen were typical of an activated N-nitroso compound, that is a compound in which the N-nitroso moiety is attached to an activating group, such as a carbonyl group. Irradiation of the mutagen yielded a Griess positive reaction. By reverse-phase h.p.l.c. photohydrolysis, a single peak could be ascribed to the mutagen. Its stability varied as a function of pH, being most unstable under alkaline conditions. Cysteine and phosphate concentration had no effect on its rate of decomposition, thereby strongly suggesting that the mutagen is an N-nitrosourea. The results obtained in this study support the hypothesis of carcinogenesis via the intragastric production of activated N-nitroso compounds. PMID:7151253

  16. Differential antioxidant and quinone reductase inducing activity of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antioxidant and quinone reductase (QR) inducing activities of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng have been reported using various plant materials, solvents, and assays. To directly establish their comparative bioactivity, the effects of extracts obtained from acidified methanol (MeOH), a gas...

  17. Glyphosate Effect on Shikimate, Nitrate Reductase Activity, Yield, and Seed Composition in Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2-yr field study investigated the effects of glyphosate drift rate on plant injury, shikimate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, leaf nitrogen, yield, and seed composition in non-glyphosate-resistant (non-GR) corn (Zea mays L.) and the effects of glyphosate at label rates on nitrate reducta...

  18. Sequence diversity and enzyme activity of ferric-chelate reductase LeFRO1 in tomato.

    PubMed

    Kong, Danyu; Chen, Chunlin; Wu, Huilan; Li, Ye; Li, Junming; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2013-11-20

    Ferric-chelate reductase which functions in the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron on root surface is a critical protein for iron homeostasis in strategy I plants. LeFRO1 is a major ferric-chelate reductase involved in iron uptake in tomato. To identify the natural variations of LeFRO1 and to assess their effect on the ferric-chelate reductase activity, we cloned the coding sequences of LeFRO1 from 16 tomato varieties collected from different regions, and detected three types of LeFRO1 (LeFRO1(MM), LeFRO1(Ailsa) and LeFRO1(Monita)) with five amino acid variations at the positions 21, 24, 112, 195 and 582. Enzyme activity assay revealed that the three types of LeFRO1 possessed different ferric-chelate reductase activity (LeFRO1(Ailsa) > LeFRO1(MM) > LeFRO1(Monita)). The 112th amino acid residue Ala of LeFRO1 is critical for maintaining the high activity of ferric-chelate reductase, because modification of this amino acid resulted in a significant reduction of enzyme activity. Further, we showed that the combination of the amino acid residue Ile at the site 24 with Lys at the site 582 played a positive role in the enzyme activity of LeFRO1. In conclusion, the findings are helpful to understand the natural adaptation mechanisms of plants to iron-limiting stress, and may provide new knowledge to select and manipulate LeFRO1 for improving the iron deficiency tolerance in tomato.

  19. Stimulation of dihydrofolate reductase promoter activity by antimetabolic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, H B; Swick, A G; Schmitt, M C; Azizkhan, J C

    1991-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR; EC 1.5.1.3) is required in folate metabolism for the synthesis of purines, thymidine, and glycine. Although there have been several reports of induction of DHFR enzyme by methotrexate (MTX), a drug that competitively inhibits DHFR, there are no studies reported that examine the effect of MTX on DHFR gene transcription. We have examined the effect of MTX and other inhibitors of DNA synthesis on DHFR transcription using a transient expression assay. MTX stimulates transient expression in a concentration-dependent manner from a hamster DHFR promoter construct containing 150 base pairs 5' to the start of transcription. Addition of either tetrahydrofolate or hypoxanthine plus thymidine prevents the promoter induction in response to MTX, suggesting that stimulation by MTX results from inhibition of these metabolites. Furthermore, two other antimetabolic drugs--fluorodeoxyuridine and hydroxyurea--also stimulate the DHFR promoter in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, aphidicolin, which blocks cell growth through inhibition of DNA polymerase alpha, has no effect on the DHFR promoter. The potential relevance of these results to cross-resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and to the process of gene amplification is discussed. Images PMID:1833762

  20. Elevated CO2 levels affect the activity of nitrate reductase and carbonic anhydrase in the calcifying rhodophyte Corallina officinalis.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Laurie C; Straub, Sandra; Bischof, Kai

    2013-02-01

    The concentration of CO(2) in global surface ocean waters is increasing due to rising atmospheric CO(2) emissions, resulting in lower pH and a lower saturation state of carbonate ions. Such changes in seawater chemistry are expected to impact calcification in calcifying marine organisms. However, other physiological processes related to calcification might also be affected, including enzyme activity. In a mesocosm experiment, macroalgal communities were exposed to three CO(2) concentrations (380, 665, and 1486 µatm) to determine how the activity of two enzymes related to inorganic carbon uptake and nutrient assimilation in Corallina officinalis, an abundant calcifying rhodophyte, will be affected by elevated CO(2) concentrations. The activity of external carbonic anhydrase, an important enzyme functioning in macroalgal carbon-concentrating mechanisms, was inversely related to CO(2) concentration after long-term exposure (12 weeks). Nitrate reductase, the enzyme responsible for reduction of nitrate to nitrite, was stimulated by CO(2) and was highest in algae grown at 665 µatm CO(2). Nitrate and phosphate uptake rates were inversely related to CO(2), while ammonium uptake was unaffected, and the percentage of inorganic carbon in the algal skeleton decreased with increasing CO(2). The results indicate that the processes of inorganic carbon and nutrient uptake and assimilation are affected by elevated CO(2) due to changes in enzyme activity, which change the energy balance and physiological status of C. officinalis, therefore affecting its competitive interactions with other macroalgae. The ecological implications of the physiological changes in C. officinalis in response to elevated CO(2) are discussed.

  1. Elevated CO2 levels affect the activity of nitrate reductase and carbonic anhydrase in the calcifying rhodophyte Corallina officinalis.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Laurie C; Straub, Sandra; Bischof, Kai

    2013-02-01

    The concentration of CO(2) in global surface ocean waters is increasing due to rising atmospheric CO(2) emissions, resulting in lower pH and a lower saturation state of carbonate ions. Such changes in seawater chemistry are expected to impact calcification in calcifying marine organisms. However, other physiological processes related to calcification might also be affected, including enzyme activity. In a mesocosm experiment, macroalgal communities were exposed to three CO(2) concentrations (380, 665, and 1486 µatm) to determine how the activity of two enzymes related to inorganic carbon uptake and nutrient assimilation in Corallina officinalis, an abundant calcifying rhodophyte, will be affected by elevated CO(2) concentrations. The activity of external carbonic anhydrase, an important enzyme functioning in macroalgal carbon-concentrating mechanisms, was inversely related to CO(2) concentration after long-term exposure (12 weeks). Nitrate reductase, the enzyme responsible for reduction of nitrate to nitrite, was stimulated by CO(2) and was highest in algae grown at 665 µatm CO(2). Nitrate and phosphate uptake rates were inversely related to CO(2), while ammonium uptake was unaffected, and the percentage of inorganic carbon in the algal skeleton decreased with increasing CO(2). The results indicate that the processes of inorganic carbon and nutrient uptake and assimilation are affected by elevated CO(2) due to changes in enzyme activity, which change the energy balance and physiological status of C. officinalis, therefore affecting its competitive interactions with other macroalgae. The ecological implications of the physiological changes in C. officinalis in response to elevated CO(2) are discussed. PMID:23314813

  2. Resolution of two native monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; McKinzie, Audra A.; Codd, Rachel

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Two monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina. {yields} Sequence of napA from napEDABC-type operon and napA from NapDAGHB-type operon. {yields} Isolation of NAP as NapA or NapAB correlated with NapA P47E amino acid substitution. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90 kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90 kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90 kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  3. Copper complexes relevant to the catalytic cycle of copper nitrite reductase: electrochemical detection of NO(g) evolution and flipping of NO2 binding mode upon Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction.

    PubMed

    Maji, Ram Chandra; Barman, Suman Kumar; Roy, Suprakash; Chatterjee, Sudip K; Bowles, Faye L; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Patra, Apurba K

    2013-10-01

    Copper complexes of the deprotonated tridentate ligand, N-2-methylthiophenyl-2'-pyridinecarboxamide (HL1), were synthesized and characterized as part of our investigation into the reduction of copper(II) o-nitrito complexes into the related copper nitric oxide complexes and subsequent evolution of NO(g) such as occurs in the enzyme copper nitrite reductase. Our studies afforded the complexes [(L1)Cu(II)Cl]n (1), [(L1)Cu(II)(ONO)] (2), [(L1)Cu(II)(H2O)](ClO4)·H2O (3·H2O), [(L1)Cu(II)(CH3OH)](ClO4) (4), [(L1)Cu(II)(CH3CO2)]·H2O (5·H2O), and [Co(Cp)2][(L1)Cu(I)(NO2)(CH3CN)] (6). X-ray crystal structure determinations revealed distorted square-pyramidal coordination geometry around Cu(II) ion in 1-5. Substitution of the H2O of 3 by nitrite quantitatively forms 2, featuring the κ(2)-O,O binding mode of NO2(-) to Cu(II). Reduction of 2 generates two Cu(I) species, one with κ(1)-O and other with the κ(1)-N bonded NO2(-) group. The Cu(I) analogue of 2, compound 6, was synthesized. The FTIR spectrum of 6 reveals the presence of κ(1)-N bonded NO2(-). Constant potential electrolysis corresponding to Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction of a CH3CN solution of 2 followed by reaction with acids, CH3CO2H or HClO4 generates 5 or 3, and NO(g), identified electrochemically. The isolated Cu(I) complex 6 independently evolves one equivalent of NO(g) upon reaction with acids. Production of NO(g) was confirmed by forming [Co(TPP)NO] in CH2Cl2 (λ(max) in CH2Cl2: 414 and 536 nm, ν(NO) = 1693 cm(-1)).

  4. Isolation, modification, and aldose reductase inhibitory activity of rosmarinic acid derivatives from the roots of Salvia grandifolia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jie; Tang, Yanbo; Liu, Quan; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Zhiyan; Chen, Ruoyun; Shen, Zhufang

    2016-07-01

    To find aldose reductase inhibitors, two previously unreported compounds, grandifolias H and I, and five known compounds, including rosmarinic acid and rosmarinic acid derivatives, were isolated from the roots of Salvia grandifolia. A series of rosmarinic acid derivatives was obtained from rosmarinic acid using simple synthetic methods. The aldose reductase inhibitory activity of the isolated and synthesized compounds was assessed. Seven of the tested compounds showed moderate aldose reductase inhibition (IC50=0.06-0.30μM). The structure-activity relationship of aldose reductase inhibitory activity of rosmarinic acid derivatives was discussed for the first time. This study provided useful information that will facilitate the development of aldose reductase inhibitors. PMID:27233987

  5. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione reductase activity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, V; Raffaele, R; Cosentino, E; Rizza, V

    1994-01-01

    The chemical composition of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is considered to reflect brain metabolism. In this study we measured malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the activity of enzymes involved in antioxidative processes, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase, in human cerebrospinal fluid of multiple-sclerosis (MS) patients and normal healthy volunteers. Our results indicated that the cerebrospinal fluid in MS showed significantly higher endogenous levels of MDA than the control, as well as a much greater resistance to in-vitro stimulation test. In addition, we found the activity of GSH reductase significantly increased, about twice the control values, whereas the activity of glutathione peroxidase was markedly decreased as compared to control values. Our findings suggest that in MS the activity of antioxidant enzymes is modified, and indicates the conceivable possibility of a pathogenic role of oxidative stress in the determinism of the disease. PMID:7607784

  6. Analytical properties of some commercially available nitrate reductase enzymes evaluated as replacements for cadmium in automated, semiautomated, and manual colorimetric methods for determination of nitrate plus nitrite in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    A multiyear research effort at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) evaluated several commercially available nitrate reductase (NaR) enzymes as replacements for toxic cadmium in longstanding automated colorimetric air-segmented continuous-flow analyzer (CFA) methods for determining nitrate plus nitrite (NOx) in water. This research culminated in USGS approved standard- and low-level enzymatic reduction, colorimetric automated discrete analyzer NOx methods that have been in routine operation at the NWQL since October 2011. The enzyme used in these methods (AtNaR2) is a product of recombinant expression of NaR from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (mouseear cress) in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Because the scope of the validation report for these new automated discrete analyzer methods, published as U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods 5–B8, was limited to performance benchmarks and operational details, extensive foundational research with different enzymes—primarily YNaR1, a product of recombinant expression of NaR from Pichia angusta in the yeast Pichia pastoris—remained unpublished until now. This report documents research and development at the NWQL that was foundational to development and validation of the discrete analyzer methods. It includes: (1) details of instrumentation used to acquire kinetics data for several NaR enzymes in the presence and absence of known or suspected inhibitors in relation to reaction temperature and reaction pH; and (2) validation results—method detection limits, precision and bias estimates, spike recoveries, and interference studies—for standard- and low-level automated colorimetric CFA-YNaR1 reduction NOx methods in relation to corresponding USGS approved CFA cadmium-reduction (CdR) NOx methods. The cornerstone of this validation is paired sample statistical and graphical analysis of NOx concentrations from more than 3,800 geographically and seasonally diverse surface

  7. Ribonucleotide reductase activity is regulated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)

    PubMed Central

    Salguero, Israel; Guarino, Estrella; Shepherd, Marianne; Deegan, Tom; Havens, Courtney G.; MacNeill, Stuart A.; Walter, Johannes C.; Kearsey, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Synthesis of dNTPs is required for both DNA replication and DNA repair and is catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductases (RNR), which convert ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms [1, 2]. Maintaining the correct levels of dNTPs for DNA synthesis is important for minimising the mutation rate [3-7], and this is achieved by tight regulation of ribonucleotide reductase [2, 8, 9]. In fission yeast, ribonucleotide reductase is regulated in part by a small protein inhibitor, Spd1, which is degraded in S phase and after DNA damage to allow up-regulation of dNTP supply [10-12]. Spd1 degradation is mediated by the activity of the CRL4Cdt2 ubiquitin ligase complex [5, 13, 14]. This has been reported to be dependent on modulation of Cdt2 levels which are cell cycle regulated, peaking in S phase, and which also increase after DNA damage in a checkpoint-dependent manner [7, 13]. We show here that Cdt2 levels fluctuations are not sufficient to regulate Spd1 proteolysis and that the key step in this event is the interaction of Spd1 with the polymerase processivity factor PCNA, complexed onto DNA. This mechanism thus provides a direct link between DNA synthesis and ribonucleotide reductase regulation. PMID:22464192

  8. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  9. Comparative azo reductase activity of red azo dyes through caecal and hepatic microsomal fraction in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Das, M; Khanna, S K

    1997-09-01

    In order to study the rate of formation of toxic aromatic amines, anaerobic reduction of four red azo dyes viz. amaranth, carmoisine, fast Red E and ponceau 4R was investigated by incubating caecal content and hepatic microsomal fraction of rats with 37.5 microM concentration of dyes in sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.4 using NADPH generating system, glucose oxidase system and nitrogen as the gaseous phase. Caecal suspension exhibited higher azo reductase activity than that of hepatic microsomal fraction using any of the 4 azo dyes. Caecal microbes showed maximal azo reductase activity when ponceau 4R was used as a substrate followed by fast Red E and carmoisine, while with amaranth the activity was minimum. Similarly ponceau 4 R exhibited maximum hepatic microsomal azo reductase activity followed by fast Red E and carmoisine whereas, amaranth had minimum activity. Caecal flora possessed almost 17 fold higher degradative capability of ponceau 4 R and fast Red E colourants than the hepatic microsomal fraction. The higher reductive ability through caecal flora for ponceau 4R and fast Red E signifies the formation of more aromatic amines which may be re-absorbed through the intestine to be either eliminated through urine as conjugates or retained in the target tissues to elicit toxic effects.

  10. Mineral supplementation increases erythrose reductase activity in erythritol biosynthesis from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ludwika; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Rywińska, Anita

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of divalent copper, iron, manganese, and zinc ions on the production of erythritol from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica and their effect on the activity of erythrose reductase. No inhibitory effect of the examined minerals on yeast growth was observed in the study. Supplementation with MnSO4 · 7H2O (25 mg l(-1)) increased erythritol production by Y. lipolytica by 14.5%. In the bioreactor culture with manganese ion addition, 47.1 g l(-1) of erythritol was produced from 100.0 g l(-1) of glycerol, which corresponded to volumetric productivity of 0.87 g l(-1) h(-1). The addition of Mn(2+) enhanced the intracellular activity of erythrose reductase up to 24.9 U g(-1) of dry weight of biomass (DW), hence, about 1.3 times more than in the control.

  11. 5-alpha reductase inhibitors in patients on active surveillance: do the benefits outweigh the risk?

    PubMed

    Al Edwan, Ghazi; Fleshner, Neil

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a slow, progressive disease. Prostate specific antigen testing, screening, and aggressive case identification has made PCa the most frequently diagnosed cancer. Concerns regarding overdiagnosis and overtreatment flourish on a large scale. In order to avoid overtreatment for those in whom therapeutic intervention is not required, active surveillance for eligible patients with the use of 5-alpha reductase can be considered a safe and a promising approach to delay the progression of the disease with minimal side effects. PMID:23579402

  12. The two-domain structure of 5'-adenylylsulfate (APS) reductase from Enteromorpha intestinalis is a requirement for efficient APS reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Kun; Gomes, Varinnia; Gao, Yu; Chandramouli, Kala; Johnson, Michael K; Knaff, David B; Leustek, Thomas

    2007-01-16

    5'-Adenylylsulfate (APS) reductase from Enteromorpha intestinalis (EiAPR) is composed of two domains that function together to reduce APS to sulfite. The carboxyl-terminal domain functions as a glutaredoxin that mediates the transfer of electrons from glutathione to the APS reduction site on the amino-terminal domain. To study the basis for the interdomain interaction, a heterologous system was constructed in which the C domain of EiAPR was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the APS reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaAPR), an enzyme that normally uses thioredoxin as an electron donor and is incapable of using glutathione for this function. The hybrid enzyme, which retains the [4Fe-4S] cluster from PaAPR, was found to use both thioredoxin and glutathione as an electron donor for APS reduction. The ability to use glutathione was enhanced by the addition of Na2SO4 to the reaction buffer, a property that the hybrid enzyme shares with EiAPR. When the C domain was added as a separate component, it was much less efficient in conferring PaAPR with the ability to use glutathione as an electron donor, despite the fact that the separately expressed C domain functioned in two activities that are typical for glutaredoxins, hydroxyethyl disulfide reduction and electron donation to ribonucleotide reductase. These results suggest that the physical connection of the reductase and C domain on a single polypeptide is critical for the electron-transfer reaction. Moreover, the effect of Na2SO4 suggests that a water-ordering component of the reaction milieu is critical for the catalytic function of plant-type APS reductases by promoting the interdomain interaction.

  13. Isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in giant freshwater pawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): effects on the oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymatic activities and apoptosis in haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufan; Ye, Chaoxia; Wang, Anli; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Changhong; Xian, Jianan; Sun, Zhenzhu

    2015-10-01

    The residual contaminators such as ammonia and nitrite are widely considered as relevant sources of aquatic environmental pollutants, posing a great threat to shrimp survival. To study the toxicological effects of ammonia and nitrite exposure on the innate immune response in invertebrates, we investigated the oxidative stress and apoptosis in haemocytes of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) under isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in order to provide useful information about adult prawn immune responses. M. rosenbergii (13.44 ± 2.75 g) were exposed to 0, 5, and 25 mg/L total ammonia-N (TAN) and 0, 5, and 20 mg/L nitrite-N for 24 h. All ammonia concentrations were combined with all nitrite concentrations, making a total of nine treatments studied. Following the exposure treatment, antioxidant enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes were measured using flow cytometry. Results indicated that ROS generation was sensitive to the combined effect of ammonia and nitrite, which subsequently affected the Cu-Zn SOD activity. In addition, CAT showed the highest activity at 5 mg/L TAN while GPx decreased at 5 mg/L TAN and returned towards baseline at 25 mg/L. NO generation synchronized with the apoptotic cell ratio in haemocytes, indicating that NO production was closely associated with programmed cell death. Both NO production and apoptotic ratios significantly decreased following 25 mg/L TAN, which may be due to the antagonistic regulation of NO and GPx. We hypothesized that the toxicological effect of nitrite exhibited less change in physiological changes compared to that of ammonia, because of the high tolerance to nitrite exposure in mature M. rosenbergii and/or the competitive effects of chloride ions. Taken together, these results showed that ammonia and nitrite caused a series of combined oxidative stress and apoptosis in M. rosenbergi, but further

  14. Sodium nitrite exerts an antihypertensive effect and improves endothelial function through activation of eNOS in the SHR.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Lau, Yeh Siang; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2016-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) induces relaxation in isolated arteries partly through an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving NO-eNOS-sGC-cGMP pathway. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic NaNO2 administration on arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular function in hypertensive rats. NaNO2 (150 mg L-1) was given in drinking water for four weeks to spontaneously (SHR) and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) treated hypertensive SD rats. Arterial SBP and vascular function in isolated aortae were studied. Total plasma nitrate/nitrite and vascular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were measured using commercially available assay kits. Vascular nitric oxide (NO) levels were evaluated by DAF-FM fluorescence while the proteins involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was determined by Western blotting. NaNO2 treatment reduced SBP, improved the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased plasma total nitrate/nitrite level and vascular tissue NO and cGMP levels in SHR. Furthermore, increased presence of phosphorylated eNOS and Hsp-90 was observed in NaNO2-treated SHR. The beneficial effect of nitrite treatment was not observed in L-NAME treated hypertensive SD rats. The present study provides evidence that chronic treatment of genetically hypertensive rats with NaNO2 improves endothelium-dependent relaxation in addition to its antihypertensive effect, partly through mechanisms involving activation of eNOS. PMID:27616322

  15. Sodium nitrite exerts an antihypertensive effect and improves endothelial function through activation of eNOS in the SHR

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Lau, Yeh Siang; Vanhoutte, Paul M.; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2016-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) induces relaxation in isolated arteries partly through an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving NO-eNOS-sGC-cGMP pathway. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic NaNO2 administration on arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular function in hypertensive rats. NaNO2 (150 mg L−1) was given in drinking water for four weeks to spontaneously (SHR) and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) treated hypertensive SD rats. Arterial SBP and vascular function in isolated aortae were studied. Total plasma nitrate/nitrite and vascular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were measured using commercially available assay kits. Vascular nitric oxide (NO) levels were evaluated by DAF-FM fluorescence while the proteins involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was determined by Western blotting. NaNO2 treatment reduced SBP, improved the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased plasma total nitrate/nitrite level and vascular tissue NO and cGMP levels in SHR. Furthermore, increased presence of phosphorylated eNOS and Hsp-90 was observed in NaNO2-treated SHR. The beneficial effect of nitrite treatment was not observed in L-NAME treated hypertensive SD rats. The present study provides evidence that chronic treatment of genetically hypertensive rats with NaNO2 improves endothelium-dependent relaxation in addition to its antihypertensive effect, partly through mechanisms involving activation of eNOS. PMID:27616322

  16. Molecular cloning, expression and catalytic activity of a human AKR7 member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily: evidence that the major 2-carboxybenzaldehyde reductase from human liver is a homologue of rat aflatoxin B1-aldehyde reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, L S; Harrison, D J; Neal, G E; Hayes, J D

    1998-01-01

    The masking of charged amino or carboxy groups by N-phthalidylation and O-phthalidylation has been used to improve the absorption of many drugs, including ampicillin and 5-fluorouracil. Following absorption of such prodrugs, the phthalidyl group is hydrolysed to release 2-carboxybenzaldehyde (2-CBA) and the pharmaceutically active compound; in humans, 2-CBA is further metabolized to 2-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid by reduction of the aldehyde group. In the present work, the enzyme responsible for the reduction of 2-CBA in humans is identified as a homologue of rat aflatoxin B1-aldehyde reductase (rAFAR). This novel human aldo-keto reductase (AKR) has been cloned from a liver cDNA library, and together with the rat protein, establishes the AKR7 family of the AKR superfamily. Unlike its rat homologue, human AFAR (hAFAR) appears to be constitutively expressed in human liver, and is widely expressed in extrahepatic tissues. The deduced human and rat protein sequences share 78% identity and 87% similarity. Although the two AKR7 proteins are predicted to possess distinct secondary structural features which distinguish them from the prototypic AKR1 family of AKRs, the catalytic- and NADPH-binding residues appear to be conserved in both families. Certain of the predicted structural features of the AKR7 family members are shared with the AKR6 beta-subunits of voltage-gated K+-channels. In addition to reducing the dialdehydic form of aflatoxin B1-8,9-dihydrodiol, hAFAR shows high affinity for the gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolite succinic semialdehyde (SSA) which is structurally related to 2-CBA, suggesting that hAFAR could function as both a SSA reductase and a 2-CBA reductase in vivo. This hypothesis is supported in part by the finding that the major peak of 2-CBA reductase activity in human liver co-purifies with hAFAR protein. PMID:9576847

  17. In Situ Characterization of Nitrospira-Like Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria Active in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    Daims, Holger; Nielsen, Jeppe L.; Nielsen, Per H.; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Wagner, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Uncultivated Nitrospira-like bacteria in different biofilm and activated-sludge samples were investigated by cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Initially, the phylogenetic affiliation of Nitrospira-like bacteria in a nitrifying biofilm was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Subsequently, a phylogenetic consensus tree of the Nitrospira phylum including all publicly available sequences was constructed. This analysis revealed that the genus Nitrospira consists of at least four distinct sublineages. Based on these data, two 16S rRNA-directed oligonucleotide probes specific for the phylum and genus Nitrospira, respectively, were developed and evaluated for suitability for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The probes were used to investigate the in situ architecture of cell aggregates of Nitrospira-like nitrite oxidizers in wastewater treatment plants by FISH, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and computer-aided three-dimensional visualization. Cavities and a network of cell-free channels inside the Nitrospira microcolonies were detected that were water permeable, as demonstrated by fluorescein staining. The uptake of different carbon sources by Nitrospira-like bacteria within their natural habitat under different incubation conditions was studied by combined FISH and microautoradiography. Under aerobic conditions, the Nitrospira-like bacteria in bioreactor samples took up inorganic carbon (as HCO3− or as CO2) and pyruvate but not acetate, butyrate, and propionate, suggesting that these bacteria can grow mixotrophically in the presence of pyruvate. In contrast, no uptake by the Nitrospira-like bacteria of any of the carbon sources tested was observed under anoxic or anaerobic conditions. PMID:11679356

  18. Distinguishing two groups of flavin reductases by analyzing the protonation state of an active site carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Cortez, Néstor; Matthias Ullmann, G

    2011-07-01

    Flavin-containing reductases are involved in a wide variety of physiological reactions such as photosynthesis, nitric oxide synthesis, and detoxification of foreign compounds, including therapeutic drugs. Ferredoxin-NADP(H)-reductase (FNR) is the prototypical enzyme of this family. The fold of this protein is highly conserved and occurs as one domain of several multidomain enzymes such as the members of the diflavin reductase family. The enzymes of this family have emerged as fusion of a FNR and a flavodoxin. Although the active sites of these enzymes are very similar, different enzymes function in opposite directions, that is, some reduce oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) and some oxidize reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). In this work, we analyze the protonation behavior of titratable residues of these enzymes through electrostatic calculations. We find that a highly conserved carboxylic acid in the active site shows a different titration behavior in different flavin reductases. This residue is deprotonated in flavin reductases present in plastids, but protonated in bacterial counterparts and in diflavin reductases. The protonation state of the carboxylic acid may also influence substrate binding. The physiological substrate for plastidic enzymes is NADP(+), but it is NADPH for the other mentioned reductases. In this article, we discuss the relevance of the environment of this residue for its protonation and its importance in catalysis. Our results allow to reinterpret and explain experimental data. PMID:21538544

  19. Hydrolysis and volatile fatty acids accumulation of waste activated sludge enhanced by the combined use of nitrite and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Liu, Congcong; Sun, Xiuyun; Sun, Yinglu; Li, Rui; Li, Jiansheng; Shen, Jinyou; Han, Weiqing; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-12-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often limited by the slow hydrolysis and/or poor substrate availability. Increased attention has been given to enhance the hydrolysis and acidification of WAS recently. This study presented an efficient and green strategy based on the combined use of nitrite pretreatment and alkaline pH to stimulate hydrolysis and VFA accumulation from WAS. Results showed that both proteins and polysaccharides increased in the presence of nitrite, indicating the enhancement of sludge solubilization and hydrolysis processes. Mechanism investigations showed that nitrite pretreatment could disintegrate the sludge particle and disperse extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Then, anaerobic digestion tests demonstrated VFA production increased with nitrite treatment. The maximal VFA accumulation was achieved with 0.1 g N/L nitrite dosage and pH 10.0 at a sludge retention time (SRT) of 7 days, which was much higher VFA production in comparison with the blank, sole nitrite pretreatment, or sole pH 10. The potential analysis suggested that the combined nitrite pretreatment and alkaline pH is capable of enhancing WAS digestion with a great benefit for biological nutrient removal (BNR).

  20. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  1. Process-driven bacterial community dynamics are key to cured meat colour formation by coagulase-negative staphylococci via nitrate reductase or nitric oxide synthase activities.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mainar, María; Leroy, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    The cured colour of European raw fermented meats is usually achieved by nitrate-into-nitrite reduction by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), subsequently generating nitric oxide to form the relatively stable nitrosomyoglobin pigment. The present study aimed at comparing this classical curing procedure, based on nitrate reductase activity, with a potential alternative colour formation mechanism, based on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, under different acidification profiles. To this end, meat models with and without added nitrate were fermented with cultures of an acidifying strain (Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494) and either a nitrate-reducing Staphylococcus carnosus strain or a rare NOS-positive CNS strain (Staphylococcus haemolyticus G110), or by relying on the background microbiota. Satisfactory colour was obtained in the models prepared with added nitrate and S. carnosus. In the presence of nitrate but absence of added CNS, however, cured colour was only obtained when L. sakei CTC 494 was also omitted. This was ascribed to the pH dependency of the emerging CNS background microbiota, selecting for nitrate-reducing Staphylococcus equorum strains at mild acidification conditions but for Staphylococcus saprophyticus strains with poor colour formation capability when the pH decrease was more rapid. This reliance of colour formation on the composition of the background microbiota was further explored by a side experiment, demonstrating the heterogeneity in nitrate reduction of a set of 88 CNS strains from different species. Finally, in all batches prepared with S. haemolyticus G110, colour generation failed as the strain was systematically outcompeted by the background microbiota, even when imposing milder acidification profiles. Thus, when aiming at colour formation through CNS metabolism, technological processing can severely interfere with the composition and functionality of the meat-associated CNS communities, for both nitrate reductase and NOS activities

  2. Process-driven bacterial community dynamics are key to cured meat colour formation by coagulase-negative staphylococci via nitrate reductase or nitric oxide synthase activities.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mainar, María; Leroy, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    The cured colour of European raw fermented meats is usually achieved by nitrate-into-nitrite reduction by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), subsequently generating nitric oxide to form the relatively stable nitrosomyoglobin pigment. The present study aimed at comparing this classical curing procedure, based on nitrate reductase activity, with a potential alternative colour formation mechanism, based on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, under different acidification profiles. To this end, meat models with and without added nitrate were fermented with cultures of an acidifying strain (Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494) and either a nitrate-reducing Staphylococcus carnosus strain or a rare NOS-positive CNS strain (Staphylococcus haemolyticus G110), or by relying on the background microbiota. Satisfactory colour was obtained in the models prepared with added nitrate and S. carnosus. In the presence of nitrate but absence of added CNS, however, cured colour was only obtained when L. sakei CTC 494 was also omitted. This was ascribed to the pH dependency of the emerging CNS background microbiota, selecting for nitrate-reducing Staphylococcus equorum strains at mild acidification conditions but for Staphylococcus saprophyticus strains with poor colour formation capability when the pH decrease was more rapid. This reliance of colour formation on the composition of the background microbiota was further explored by a side experiment, demonstrating the heterogeneity in nitrate reduction of a set of 88 CNS strains from different species. Finally, in all batches prepared with S. haemolyticus G110, colour generation failed as the strain was systematically outcompeted by the background microbiota, even when imposing milder acidification profiles. Thus, when aiming at colour formation through CNS metabolism, technological processing can severely interfere with the composition and functionality of the meat-associated CNS communities, for both nitrate reductase and NOS activities

  3. Testosterone 5alpha-reductase inhibitory active constituents of Piper nigrum leaf.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Noriko; Tokunaga, Masashi; Naruto, Shunsuke; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2007-12-01

    Previously we reported that Piper nigrum leaf extract showed a potent stimulation effect on melanogenesis and that (-)-cubebin (1) and (-)-3,4-dimethoxy-3,4-desmethylenedioxycubebin (2) were isolated as active constituents. As a part of our continuous studies on Piper species for the development of cosmetic hair-care agents, testosterone 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity of aqueous ethanolic extracts obtained from several different parts of six Piper species, namely Piper nigrum, P. methysticum, P. betle, P. kadsura, P. longum, and P. cubeba, were examined. Among them, the extracts of P. nigrum leaf, P. nigrum fruit and P. cubeba fruit showed potent inhibitory activity. Activity-guided fractionation of P. nigrum leaf extract led to the isolation of 1 and 2. Fruits of P. cubeba contain 1 as a major lignan, thus inhibitory activity of the fruit may be attributable to 1. As a result of further assay on other known constituents of the cited Piper species, it was found that piperine, a major alkaloid amide of P. nigrum fruit, showed potent inhibitory activity, thus a part of the inhibitory activity of P. nigrum fruit may depend on piperine. The 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activities of 1 and piperine were found for the first time. In addition, the P. nigrum leaf extract showed in vivo anti-androgenic activity using the hair regrowth assay in testosterone sensitive male C57Black/6CrSlc strain mice.

  4. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  5. Antihormonal activities of 5 alpha-reductase and aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zoppi, S; Cocconi, M; Lechuga, M J; Messi, E; Zanisi, M; Motta, M

    1988-10-01

    The problem of developing androgen antagonists has been tackled so far only by synthesizing steroids able to displace testosterone and other androgens from their specific receptor sites. The observation that testosterone has to be converted intracellularly either to 5 alpha-reduced metabolites (DHT, 3 alpha-diol, etc.) or to estrogens, in order to become fully active on androgen-dependent structures (both central and peripheral), has opened the possibility of creating molecules which prevent these conversions, and which could then block the actions of testosterone. The availability of these new compounds has allowed a better understanding of the selective physiological role of each of the metabolites of testosterone, and to provide the basis for the development of new hormone antagonists to be used in those clinical conditions for which an inhibition of the actions of testosterone is foreseen. The usefulness of these enzyme inhibitors is underlined by some examples described in this paper. The results obtained may permit the formulation of the following conclusions: (1) The conversion of testosterone to its 5 alpha-reduced metabolites occurring in the neuroendocrine structures may represent an essential step for the appearance of the inhibitory feedback effect testosterone exerts on LH secretion; (2) Testosterone exhibits its negative feedback effect on FSH secretion as such and not following the local aromatization to estrogens; (3) Testosterone exerts its effect on the intrahypothalamic stores of LHRH acting as such and not following its local conversion either to 5 alpha-reduced metabolites or to estrogenic molecules; (4) Some of the new enzyme inhibitors (e.g. 4-OH-A) may represent an interesting tool for the treatment and/or the prevention of BPH and possibly of other androgen-dependent diseases (prostate carcinoma, acne etc.), as shown by their ability to prevent the in vitro conversion of testosterone to its 5 alpha-reduced metabolites both in the normal

  6. Ribosome display for selection of active dihydrofolate reductase mutants using immobilized methotrexate on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumio; Ebihara, Takashi; Mie, Masayasu; Yanagida, Yasuko; Endo, Yaeta; Kobatake, Eiry; Aizawa, Masuo

    2002-03-01

    Ribosome display was applied to the selection of an enzyme. As a model, we selected and amplified the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene by ribosome display utilizing a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system based on binding affinity to its substrate analog, methotrexate, immobilized on agarose beads. After three rounds of selection, the DHFR gene could be effectively selected and preferentially amplified from a small proportion in a mixture also containing competitive genes. Active enzymes were expressed and amplified and by sequence analysis, four mutants of DHFR were identified. These mutants showed as much activity as the wild-type enzyme.

  7. Differential cytochrome content and reductase activity in Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolz, J.F.; Gugliuzza, T.; Switzer, Blum J.; Oremland, R.; Martinez, Murillo F.

    1997-01-01

    The protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity in the dissimilatory selenate-reducing bacterium Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3, grown with thiosulfate, nitrate, selenate, or fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor, was investigated. Comparison of seven high-molecular-mass membrane proteins (105.3, 90.3, 82.6, 70.2, 67.4, 61.1, and 57.3 kDa) by SDS-PAGE showed that their detection was dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used. Membrane fractions from cells grown on thiosulfate contained a 70.2-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorbance maxima at 552, 522, and 421 nm. A 61.1-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorption maxima at 552, 523, and 423 nm was seen in membrane fractions from cells grown on nitrate. No c-type cytochromes were detected in membrane fractions of either selenate- or fumarate-grown cells. Difference spectra, however, revealed the presence of a cytochrome b554 (absorption maxima at 554, 523, and 422 nm) in membrane fractions from selenate-grown cells and a cytochrome b556 (absorption maxima at 556, 520, and 416 nm) in membrane fractions from fumarate-grown cells. Analysis of reductase activity in the different membrane fractions showed variability in substrate specificity. However, enzyme activity was greatest for the substrate on which the cells had been grown (e.g., membranes from nitrate-grown cells exhibited the greatest activity with nitrate). These results show that protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity are dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used for growth.

  8. Molecular Underpinnings of Nitrite Effect on CymA-Dependent Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Miao; Fu, Huihui; Yin, Jianhua; Yuan, Jie; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella exhibit a remarkable versatility of respiration, with a diverse array of electron acceptors (EAs). In environments where these bacteria thrive, multiple EAs are usually present. However, we know little about strategies by which these EAs and their interaction affect ecophysiology of Shewanella. In this study, we demonstrate in the model strain, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that nitrite, not through nitric oxide to which it may convert, inhibits respiration of fumarate, and probably many other EAs whose reduction depends on quinol dehydrogenase CymA. This is achieved via the repression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, a second messenger required for activation of cAMP-receptor protein (Crp) which plays a primary role in regulation of respiration. If nitrite is not promptly removed, intracellular cAMP levels drop, and this impairs Crp activity. As a result, the production of nitrite reductase NrfA, CymA, and fumarate reductase FccA is substantially reduced. In contrast, nitrite can be simultaneously respired with trimethylamine N-oxide, resulting in enhanced biomass. PMID:27493647

  9. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  10. Glyphosate effect on shikimate, nitrate reductase activity, yield, and seed composition in corn.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Krishna N; Bellaloui, Nacer; Zablotowicz, Robert M

    2010-03-24

    When glyphosate is applied to glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, drift to nonglyphosate-resistant (non-GR) crops may cause significant injury and reduce yields. Tools are needed to quantify injury and predict crop losses. In this study, glyphosate drift was simulated by direct application at 12.5% of the recommended label rate to non-GR corn (Zea mays L.) at 3 or 6 weeks after planting (WAP) during two field seasons in the Mississippi delta region of the southeastern USA. Visual plant injury, shikimate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, leaf nitrogen, yield, and seed composition were evaluated. Effects were also evaluated in GR corn and GR corn with stacked glufosinate-resistant gene at the recommended label rate at 3 and 6 WAP. Glyphosate at 105 g ae/ha was applied once at 3 or 6 weeks after planting to non-GR corn. Glyphosate at 840 (lower label limit) or 1260 (upper label limit) g ae/ha was applied twice at 3 and 6 WAP to transgenic corn. Glyphosate caused injury (45-55%) and increased shikimate levels (24-86%) in non-GR compared to nontreated corn. In non-GR corn, glyphosate drift did not affect starch content but increased seed protein 8-21% while reducing leaf nitrogen reductase activity 46-64%, leaf nitrogen 7-16%, grain yield 49-54%, and seed oil 18-23%. In GR and GR stacked with glufosinate-resistant corn, glyphosate applied at label rates did not affect corn yield, leaf and seed nitrogen, or seed composition (protein, oil, and starch content). Yet, nitrate reductase activity was reduced 5-19% with glyphosate at 840 + 840 g/ha rate and 8-42% with glyphosate at 1260 + 1260 g/ha rate in both GR and GR stacked corn. These results demonstrate the potential for severe yield loss in non-GR corn exposed to glyphosate drift.

  11. Adventitious Arsenate Reductase Activity of the Catalytic Domain of the Human Cdc25B and Cdc25C Phosphatases†

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Sheng, Ju; Ajees, A. Abdul; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Rosen, Barry P.

    2013-01-01

    A number of eukaryotic enzymes that function as arsenate reductases are homologues of the catalytic domain of the human Cdc25 phosphatase. For example, the Leishmania major enzyme LmACR2 is both a phosphatase and an arsenate reductase, and its structure bears similarity to the structure of the catalytic domain of human Cdc25 phosphatase. These reductases contain an active site C-X5-R signature motif, where C is the catalytic cysteine, the five X residues form a phosphate binding loop, and R is a highly conserved arginine, which is also present in human Cdc25 phosphatases. We therefore investigated the possibility that the three human Cdc25 isoforms might have adventitious arsenate reductase activity. The sequences for the catalytic domains of Cdc25A, -B, and -C were cloned individually into a prokaryotic expression vector, and their gene products were purified from a bacterial host using nickel affinity chromatography. While each of the three Cdc25 catalytic domains exhibited phosphatase activity, arsenate reductase activity was observed only with Cdc25B and -C. These two enzymes reduced inorganic arsenate but not methylated pentavalent arsenicals. Alteration of either the cysteine and arginine residues of the Cys-X5-Arg motif led to the loss of both reductase and phosphatase activities. Our observations suggest that Cdc25B and -C may adventitiously reduce arsenate to the more toxic arsenite and may also provide a framework for identifying other human protein tyrosine phosphatases containing the active site Cys-X5-Arg loop that might moonlight as arsenate reductases. PMID:20025242

  12. Activity of type 1 5 alpha-reductase is greater in the follicular infrainfundibulum compared with the epidermis.

    PubMed

    Thiboutot, D M; Knaggs, H; Gilliland, K; Hagari, S

    1997-02-01

    The enzyme 5 alpha-reductase converts testosterone (T) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Although this enzyme has been localized to various regions of the pilosebaceous unit, its activity has not been studied in the follicular portion of either vellus or sebaceous follicles. The goal of our study was to determine the relative activities of 5 alpha-reductase within various regions of these follicles with particular emphasis on the infrainfundibulum. A finding of increased 5 alpha-reductase activity in upper follicles compared to epidermis might support the hypothesis that increased follicular production of DHT is involved in the hyperkeratinization observed in this region of the follicle in acne vulgaris. 5 alpha-reductase activity was determined at pH 5 (optimal for the type 2 isozyme) and pH 7 (optimal for the type 1 isozyme) in isolated infrainfundibular segments from sebaceous and vellus follicles, homogenized epidermis from various anatomical areas and in microdissected segments of the pilosebaceous unit from breast skin of normal subjects. Enzyme activity was also determined at pH 7 in cultured infrainfundibular keratinocytes and in interfollicular epidermal keratinocytes. Homogenates of infrainfundibular segments demonstrated significantly greater activity at pH 7 compared to pH 5 (P < 0.001), confirming activity of the type 1 5 alpha-reductase in this region. Activity of 5 alpha-reductase was much lower in homogenized epidermis and did not demonstrate a clear pH preference. Keratinocytes cultured from the infrainfundibulum demonstrated significantly greater 5 alpha-reductase activity compared to keratinocytes from interfollicular epidermis (P = 0.04). In the dissected segments of pilosebaceous units from breast skin, 5 alpha-reductase activity was greatest in the sebaceous gland followed by the sebaceous duct, infrainfundibulum, whole skin and epidermis. These data indicate that 5 alpha-reductase activity varies within regions of the pilosebaceous unit and

  13. Biomarkers of adverse response to mercury: histopathology versus thioredoxin reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Branco, Vasco; Ramos, Paula; Canário, João; Lu, Jun; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to mercury is normally assessed by measuring its accumulation in hair, blood or urine. Currently, the biomarkers of effect that have been proposed for mercurials, such as coproporphyrines or oxidative stress markers, are not sensitive enough and lack specificity. Selenium and selenoproteins are important targets for mercury and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in particular was shown to be very sensitive to mercury compounds both in vitro and in vivo. In this study we looked into the relation between the inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity and histopathological changes caused by exposure to mercurials. Juvenile zeabra-seabreams were exposed to Hg(2+) or MeHg for 28 days and histopathological changes were analyzed in the liver and kidney as well as TrxR activity. Both mercurials caused histopathological changes in liver and kidney, albeit Hg(2+) caused more extensive and severe lesions. Likewise, both mercurials decreased TrxR activity, being Hg(2+) a stronger inhibitor. Co-exposure to Hg(2+) and Se fully prevented TrxR inhibition in the liver and reduced the severity of lesions in the organ. These results show that upon exposure to mercurials, histopathological alterations correlate with the level of TrxR activity and point to the potential use of this enzyme as a biomarker of mercury toxicity.

  14. The inhibitory activity of aldose reductase in vitro by constituents of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    PubMed

    Fatmawati, Sri; Ersam, Taslim; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-15

    We investigated aldose reductase inhibition of Garcinia mangostana Linn. from Indonesia. Dichloromethane extract of the root bark of this tree was found to demonstrate an IC50 value of 11.98 µg/ml for human aldose reductase in vitro. From the dichloromethane fraction, prenylated xanthones were isolated as potent human aldose reductase inhibitors. We discovered 3-isomangostin to be most potent against aldose reductase, with an IC50 of 3.48 µM.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of the inhibition of the phosphoroclastic system of Clostridium sporogenes by nitrite.

    PubMed

    Payne, M J; Woods, L F; Gibbs, P; Cammack, R

    1990-10-01

    The proposal that nitrite exerts its inhibitory effect on anaerobic bacteria by direct interaction with the iron-sulphur proteins of the phosphoroclastic system was investigated. The effects of nitrate, nitrite with or without ascorbate, and nitric oxide on the growth of Clostridium sporogenes in liquid cultures at pH 7.4, on the rates of hydrogen production, and on the activities of the enzymes pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and hydrogenase, and of ferredoxin were investigated. In agreement with previous studies, nitrate was the least effective inhibitor of cell growth, and nitric oxide the most effective. Nitrite reductase activity was very low in C. sporogenes, indicating that the presence of external reducing agents would be necessary for the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. Inhibition by nitrite was enhanced by ascorbate; 0.5 mM-nitrite with 10 mM-ascorbate stopped growth completely. In partially-purified preparations 4.1 mM-NaNO2 and equimolar ascorbate caused complete inactivation of hydrogenase activity but only partial (up to 78%) inactivation of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase. This agreed with the loss of hydrogen production observed with nitrite in vivo. Inhibition occurred within 5 min, and was irreversible in each case. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy showed that paramagnetic [Fe(NO)2(SR)2] species were formed during growth in the presence of nitrite, and were associated with cells. However, the intensity of these EPR signals did not correlate with the inhibition of cell growth. The [4Fe-4S] clusters in ferredoxin were shown by EPR spectroscopy to be resistant to treatment with 3.6 mM-NaNO2 and 3.6 mM-ascorbate. It is concluded that the effects of nitrite on pre-formed iron-sulphur proteins are not convincing as a basis for the lethal effects on bacterial cells.

  16. Activation of accumulated nitrite reduction by immobilized Pseudomonas stutzeri T13 during aerobic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Sun, Yilu; Li, Ang; Zhang, Xuening; Yang, Jixian

    2015-01-01

    The excellent removal efficiency of nitrate by the aerobic denitrifier, Pseudomonas stutzeri T13, was achieved in free cells system. However, poor nitrite reduction prevents efficient aerobic denitrification because of the nitrite accumulation. This problem could be conquered by immobilizing the cells on supports. In this study, strain T13 was immobilized by mycelial pellets (MPs), polyurethane foam cubes (PFCs) and sodium alginate beads (SABs). Higher removal percentages of TN in MP (43.78%), PFC (42.31%) and SAB (57.25%) systems were achieved compared with the free cell system (29.7%). Furthermore, the optimal condition for immobilized cell systems was as follows: 30°C, 100rpm shaking speed and pH 7. The shock-resistance of SAB system was relatively poor, which could collapse under either alkaline (pH=9) or high rotating (200rpm) conditions. The recycling experiments demonstrated that the high steady TN removal rate could be maintained for seven cycles in both MP and PFC systems. PMID:25827250

  17. Dietary nitrates, nitrites, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G

    2011-12-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO(3)), nitrite (NO(2)), and arginine can serve as sources for production of NO(x) (a diverse group of metabolites including nitric oxide, nitrosothiols, and nitroalkenes) via ultraviolet light exposure to skin, mammalian nitrate/nitrite reductases in tissues, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, respectively. NO(x) are responsible for the hypotensive, antiplatelet, and cytoprotective effects of dietary nitrates and nitrites. Current regulatory limits on nitrate intakes, based on concerns regarding potential risk of carcinogenicity and methemoglobinemia, are exceeded by normal daily intakes of single foods, such as soya milk and spinach, as well as by some recommended dietary patterns such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. This review includes a call for regulatory bodies to consider all available data on the beneficial physiologic roles of nitrate and nitrite in order to derive rational bases for dietary recommendations.

  18. Mutational analysis of the nor gene cluster which encodes nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A P; van der Oost, J; Reijnders, W N; Westerhoff, H V; Stouthamer, A H; van Spanning, R J

    1996-12-15

    The genes that encode the hc-type nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans have been identified. They are part of a cluster of six genes (norCBQDEF) and are found near the gene cluster that encodes the cd1-type nitrite reductase, which was identified earlier [de Boer, A. P. N., Reijnders, W. N. M., Kuenen, J. G., Stouthamer, A. H. & van Spanning, R. J. M. (1994) Isolation, sequencing and mutational analysis of a gene cluster involved in nitrite reduction in Paracoccus denitrificans, Antonie Leeu wenhoek 66, 111-127]. norC and norB encode the cytochrome-c-containing subunit II and cytochrome b-containing subunit I of nitric-oxide reductase (NO reductase), respectively. norQ encodes a protein with an ATP-binding motif and has high similarity to NirQ from Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and CbbQ from Pseudomonas hydrogenothermophila. norE encodes a protein with five putative transmembrane alpha-helices and has similarity to CoxIII, the third subunit of the aa3-type cytochrome-c oxidases. norF encodes a small protein with two putative transmembrane alpha-helices. Mutagenesis of norC, norB, norQ and norD resulted in cells unable to grow anaerobically. Nitrite reductase and NO reductase (with succinate or ascorbate as substrates) and nitrous oxide reductase (with succinate as substrate) activities were not detected in these mutant strains. Nitrite extrusion was detected in the medium, indicating that nitrate reductase was active. The norQ and norD mutant strains retained about 16% and 23% of the wild-type level of NorC, respectively. The norE and norF mutant strains had specific growth rates and NorC contents similar to those of the wild-type strain, but had reduced NOR and NIR activities, indicating that their gene products are involved in regulation of enzyme activity. Mutant strains containing the norCBQDEF region on the broad-host-range vector pEG400 were able to grow anaerobically, although at a lower specific growth rate and with lower

  19. Enhanced Xylitol Production by Mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus 36907-FMEL1 Due to Improved Xylose Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Seong; Park, Jae-Bum; Jang, Seung-Won; Ha, Suk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    A directed evolution and random mutagenesis were carried out with thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 for efficient xylitol production. The final selected strain, K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1, exhibited 120 and 39 % improvements of xylitol concentration and xylitol yield, respectively, as compared to the parental strain, K. marxianus ATCC 36907. According to enzymatic assays for xylose reductase (XR) activities, XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 was around twofold higher than that from the parental strain. Interestingly, the ratios of NADH-linked and NADPH-linked XR activities were highly changed from 1.92 to 1.30 when K. marxianus ATCC 36907 and K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 were compared. As results of KmXYL1 genes sequencing, it was found that cysteine was substituted to tyrosine at position 36 after strain development which might cause enhanced XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1.

  20. Response to Arsenate Treatment in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the Role of Its Arsenate Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Matia-González, Ana M.; Sotelo, Jael; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Muñoz-Olivas, Riansares; Cámara, Carmen; Rodríguez-Gabriel, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity has been studied for a long time due to its effects in humans. Although epidemiological studies have demonstrated multiple effects in human physiology, there are many open questions about the cellular targets and the mechanisms of response to arsenic. Using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as model system, we have been able to demonstrate a strong activation of the MAPK Spc1/Sty1 in response to arsenate. This activation is dependent on Wis1 activation and Pyp2 phosphatase inactivation. Using arsenic speciation analysis we have also demonstrated the previously unknown capacity of S. pombe cells to reduce As (V) to As (III). Genetic analysis of several fission yeast mutants point towards the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc25 as a possible candidate to carry out this arsenate reductase activity. We propose that arsenate reduction and intracellular accumulation of arsenite are the key mechanisms of arsenate tolerance in fission yeast. PMID:22912829

  1. Membrane composition influences the activity of in vitro refolded human vitamin K epoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Jaenecke, Frank; Friedrich-Epler, Beatrice; Parthier, Christoph; Stubbs, Milton T

    2015-10-27

    Human vitamin K epoxide reductase (hVKOR) is an integral membrane protein responsible for the maintenance of reduced vitamin K pools, a prerequisite for the action of γ-glutamyl carboxylase and hence for hemostasis. Here we describe the recombinant expression of hVKOR as an insoluble fusion protein in Escherichia coli, followed by purification and chemical cleavage under denaturing conditions. In vitro renaturation and reconstitution of purified solubilized hVKOR in phospholipids could be established to yield active protein. Crucially, the renatured enzyme is inhibited by the powerful coumarin anticoagulant warfarin, and we demonstrate that enzyme activity depends on lipid composition. The completely synthetic system for protein production allows a rational investigation of the multiple variables in membrane protein folding and paves the way for the provision of pure, active membrane protein for structural studies.

  2. Nitrite reduction in paracoccus halodenitrificans: Evidence for the role of a cd-type cytochrome in ammonia formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Cronin, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Cell-free extracts prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans catalyzed the reduction of nitrate to ammonia in the presence of dithionite and methyl viologen. Enzyme activity was located in the soluble fraction and was associated with a cytochrome whose spectral properties resembled those of a cd-type cytochrome. Unlike the sissimilatory cd-cytochrome nitrate reductase associated with the membrane fraction of P. halodenitrificans, this soluble cd-cytochrome did not reduce nitrite to nitrous oxide.

  3. Xanthones with quinone reductase-inducing activity from the fruits of Garcinia mangostana (Mangosteen).

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Won; Jung, Hyun-Ah; Chai, Heebyung; Keller, William J; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2008-02-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of a dichloromethane-soluble extract of Garcinia mangostana fruits has led to the isolation and identification of five compounds, including two xanthones, 1,2-dihydro-1,8,10-trihydroxy-2-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-9-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)furo[3,2-a]xanthen-11-one (1) and 6-deoxy-7-demethylmangostanin (2), along with three known compounds, 1,3,7-trihydroxy-2,8-di-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)xanthone (3), mangostanin (4), and alpha-mangostin (5). The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were determined from analysis of their spectroscopic data. All isolated compounds in the present study together with eleven other compounds previously isolated from the pericarp of mangosteen, were tested in an in vitro quinone reductase-induction assay using murine hepatoma cells (Hepa 1c1c7) and an in vitro hydroxyl radical antioxidant assay. Of these, compounds 1-4 induced quinone reductase (concentration to double enzyme induction, 0.68-2.2microg/mL) in Hepa 1c1c7 cells and gamma-mangostin (6) exhibited hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (IC50, 0.20microg/mL).

  4. Determination of oenothein B as the active 5-alpha-reductase-inhibiting principle of the folk medicine Epilobium parviflorum.

    PubMed

    Lesuisse, D; Berjonneau, J; Ciot, C; Devaux, P; Doucet, B; Gourvest, J F; Khemis, B; Lang, C; Legrand, R; Lowinski, M; Maquin, P; Parent, A; Schoot, B; Teutsch, G

    1996-05-01

    Several extracts from Epilobium parviflorum, a plant used in Central Europe for the treatment of prostate disorders, were evaluated in a biochemical assay with 5-alpha-reductase. The aqueous extract displaying inhibition of the enzyme was analyzed, the fraction responsible for this activity was purified, and the active compound identified as a macrocyclic tannin, oenothein B (1). PMID:8778238

  5. Proscar (Finasteride) inhibits 5 alpha-reductase activity in the ovaries and testes of Lytechinus variegatus Lamarck (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Wasson, K M; Watts, S A

    1998-10-01

    Recent investigations into the steroid metabolic pathway in the echinoid Lytechinus variegatus demonstrated the capacity of the gonads to convert androstenedione, the classical mammalian precursor to bioactive androgens, into testosterone and a variety of 5 alpha-reduced androgens including 5 alpha-androstane-3 beta, 17 beta-diol and 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol. The synthesis of these steroids, which requires 5 alpha-reductase activity, varies with sex and reproductive state in L. variegatus, suggesting that these steroids may be involved in reproductive processes. The classical method of castration followed by steroid replacement therapy to determine the biological role of steroids in the gonads of higher vertebrates is not possible in echinoids. Therefore, this study was designed to determine the efficacy of finasteride, a selective 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor in the mammalian prostate gland, on 5 alpha-reductase activity in the gonads of L. variegatus. Finasteride inhibits echinoid 5 alpha-reductase in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 approximately 2.7 microM for both ovaries and testes. These echinoid IC50s are significantly higher than those reported for humans and rats. In addition, oral administration of finasteride to the echinoids appeared to inhibit 5 alpha-reductase with no apparent stress (no spine loss) to the animals. These data suggest that finasteride may be used to selectively and chemically ablate 5 alpha-reduced androgen synthesis in the gonads of L. variegatus. PMID:9827060

  6. Esculetin, a Coumarin Derivative, Inhibits Aldose Reductase Activity in vitro and Cataractogenesis in Galactose-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring coumarin compounds have received substantial attention due to their pharmaceutical effects. Esculetin is a coumarin derivative and a polyphenol compound that is used in a variety of therapeutic and pharmacological strategies. However, its effect on aldose reductase activity remains poorly understood. In this study, the potential beneficial effects of esculetin on lenticular aldose reductase were investigated in galactose-fed (GAL) rats, an animal model of sugar cataracts. Cataracts were induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via a 50% galactose diet for 2 weeks, and groups of GAL rats were orally treated with esculetin (10 or 50 mg/kg body weight). In vehicle-treated GAL rats, lens opacification was observed, and swelling and membrane rupture of the lens fiber cells were increased. Additionally, aldose reductase was highly expressed in the lens epithelium and superficial cortical fibers during cataract development in the GAL rats. Esculetin reduced rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) activity in vitro, and esculetin treatment significantly inhibited lens opacity, as well as morphological alterations, such as swelling, vacuolation and liquefaction of lens fibers, via the inhibition of aldose reductase in the GAL rats. These results indicate that esculetin is a useful treatment for galactose-induced cataracts. PMID:26902086

  7. Esculetin, a Coumarin Derivative, Inhibits Aldose Reductase Activity in vitro and Cataractogenesis in Galactose-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring coumarin compounds have received substantial attention due to their pharmaceutical effects. Esculetin is a coumarin derivative and a polyphenol compound that is used in a variety of therapeutic and pharmacological strategies. However, its effect on aldose reductase activity remains poorly understood. In this study, the potential beneficialeffects of esculetin on lenticular aldose reductase were investigated in galactose-fed (GAL) rats, an animal model of sugar cataracts. Cataracts were induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via a 50% galactose diet for 2 weeks, and groups of GAL rats were orally treated with esculetin (10 or 50 mg/kg body weight). In vehicle-treated GAL rats, lens opacificationwas observed, and swelling and membrane rupture of the lens fibercells were increased. Additionally, aldose reductase was highly expressed in the lens epithelium and superficialcortical fibersduring cataract development in the GAL rats. Esculetin reduced rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) activity in vitro, and esculetin treatment significanty inhibited lens opacity, as well as morphological alterations, such as swelling, vacuolation and liquefaction of lens fibers,via the inhibition of aldose reductase in the GAL rats. These results indicate that esculetin is a useful treatment for galactose-induced cataracts. PMID:26902086

  8. Purification, properties, and sequence of glycerol trinitrate reductase from Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed Central

    Snape, J R; Walkley, N A; Morby, A P; Nicklin, S; White, G F

    1997-01-01

    Glycerol trinitrate (GTN) reductase, which enables Agrobacterium radiobacter to utilize GTN and related explosives as sources of nitrogen for growth, was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme was a 39-kDa monomeric protein which catalyzed the NADH-dependent reductive scission of GTN (Km = 23 microM) to glycerol dinitrates (mainly the 1,3-isomer) with a pH optimum of 6.5, a temperature optimum of 35 degrees C, and no dependence on metal ions for activity. It was also active on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), on isosorbide dinitrate, and, very weakly, on ethyleneglycol dinitrate, but it was inactive on isopropyl nitrate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, ammonium ions, nitrate, or nitrite. The amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence was homologous (42 to 51% identity and 61 to 69% similarity) to those of PETN reductase from Enterobacter cloacae, N-ethylmaleimide reductase from Escherichia coli, morphinone reductase from Pseudomonas putida, and old yellow enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, placing the GTN reductase in the alpha/beta barrel flavoprotein group of proteins. GTN reductase and PETN reductase were very similar in many respects except in their distinct preferences for NADH and NADPH cofactors, respectively. PMID:9401040

  9. NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenase activity of carbonyl reductase on glutathionylhydroxynonanal as a new pathway for hydroxynonenal detoxification.

    PubMed

    Moschini, Roberta; Peroni, Eleonora; Rotondo, Rossella; Renzone, Giovanni; Melck, Dominique; Cappiello, Mario; Srebot, Massimo; Napolitano, Elio; Motta, Andrea; Scaloni, Andrea; Mura, Umberto; Del-Corso, Antonella

    2015-06-01

    An NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenase activity on 3-glutathionyl-4-hydroxynonanal (GSHNE) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from a line of human astrocytoma cells (ADF). Proteomic analysis identified this enzymatic activity as associated with carbonyl reductase 1 (EC 1.1.1.184). The enzyme is highly efficient at catalyzing the oxidation of GSHNE (KM 33 µM, kcat 405 min(-1)), as it is practically inactive toward trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and other HNE-adducted thiol-containing amino acid derivatives. Combined mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of the reaction products revealed that carbonyl reductase oxidizes the hydroxyl group of GSHNE in its hemiacetal form, with the formation of the corresponding 3-glutathionylnonanoic-δ-lactone. The relevance of this new reaction catalyzed by carbonyl reductase 1 is discussed in terms of HNE detoxification and the recovery of reducing power.

  10. Rapid reverse phase-HPLC assay of HMG-CoA reductase activity

    PubMed Central

    Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Radioisotope-based and mass spectrometry coupled to chromatographic techniques are the conventional methods for monitoring HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity. Irrespective of offering adequate sensitivity, these methods are often cumbersome and time-consuming, requiring the handling of radiolabeled chemicals or elaborate ad-hoc derivatizing procedures. We propose a rapid and versatile reverse phase-HPLC method for assaying HMGR activity capable of monitoring the levels of both substrates (HMG-CoA and NADPH) and products (CoA, mevalonate, and NADP+) in a single 20 min run with no pretreatment required. The linear dynamic range was 10–26 pmol for HMG-CoA, 7–27 nmol for NADPH, 0.5–40 pmol for CoA and mevalonate, and 2–27 nmol for NADP+, and limit of detection values were 2.67 pmol, 2.77 nmol, 0.27 pmol, and 1.3 nmol, respectively. PMID:20418539

  11. Catalysis of nitrite generation from nitroglycerin by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    PubMed

    Seabra, Amedea B; Ouellet, Marc; Antonic, Marija; Chrétien, Michelle N; English, Ann M

    2013-11-30

    Vascular relaxation to nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate; GTN) requires its bioactivation by mechanisms that remain controversial. We report here that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the release of nitrite from GTN. In assays containing dithiothreitol (DTT) and NAD(+), the GTN reductase activity of purified GAPDH produces nitrite and 1,2-GDN as the major products. A vmax of 2.6nmolmin(-)(1)mg(-)(1) was measured for nitrite production by GAPDH from rabbit muscle and a GTN KM of 1.2mM. Reductive denitration of GTN in the absence of DTT results in dose- and time-dependent inhibition of GAPDH dehydrogenase activity. Disulfiram, a thiol-modifying drug, inhibits both the dehydrogenase and GTN reductase activity of GAPDH, while DTT or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine reverse the GTN-induced inhibition. Incubation of intact human erythrocytes or hemolysates with 2mM GTN for 60min results in 50% inhibition of GAPDH's dehydrogenase activity, indicating that GTN is taken up by these cells and that the dehydrogenase is a target of GTN. Thus, erythrocyte GAPDH may contribute to GTN bioactivation.

  12. Endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal microcirculatory perfusion in necrotizing enterocolitis via eNOS–NO–nitrite signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yazji, Ibrahim; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Lee, Elizabeth K.; Good, Misty; Egan, Charlotte E.; Afrazi, Amin; Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Lin, Joyce; Branca, Maria F.; Prindle, Thomas; Richardson, Ward M.; Ozolek, John; Billiar, Timothy R.; Binion, David G.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants characterized by severe intestinal necrosis and for which breast milk represents the most effective protective strategy. Previous studies have revealed a critical role for the lipopolysaccharide receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in NEC development through its induction of mucosal injury, yet the reasons for which intestinal ischemia in NEC occurs in the first place remain unknown. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling within the endothelium plays an essential role in NEC development by regulating perfusion to the small intestine via the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Using a unique mouse system in which we selectively deleted TLR4 from the endothelium, we now show that endothelial TLR4 activation is required for NEC development and that endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal perfusion without effects on other organs and reduces eNOS expression via activation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88. NEC severity was significantly increased in eNOS−/− mice and decreased upon administration of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, which augments eNOS function. Strikingly, compared with formula, human and mouse breast milk were enriched in sodium nitrate—a precursor for enteral generation of nitrite and nitric oxide—and repletion of formula with sodium nitrate/nitrite restored intestinal perfusion, reversed the deleterious effects of endothelial TLR4 signaling, and reduced NEC severity. These data identify that endothelial TLR4 critically regulates intestinal perfusion leading to NEC and reveal that the protective properties of breast milk involve enhanced intestinal microcirculatory integrity via augmentation of nitrate–nitrite–NO signaling. PMID:23650378

  13. Advance in dietary polyphenols as aldose reductases inhibitors: structure-activity relationship aspect.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo; Ni, Xiaoling; Kai, Guoyin; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    The dietary polyphenols as aldose reductases inhibitors (ARIs) have attracted great interest among researchers. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the research reports on the structure-activity relationship of dietary polyphenols inhibiting aldose reductases (AR). The molecular structures influence the inhibition of the following: (1) The methylation and methoxylation of the hydroxyl group at C3, C3', and C4' of flavonoids decreased or little affected the inhibitory potency. However, the methylation and methoxylation of the hydroxyl group at C5, C6, and C8 significantly enhanced the inhibition. Moreover, the methylation and methoxylation of C7-OH influence the inhibitory activity depending on the substitutes on rings A and B of flavonoids. (2) The glycosylation on 3-OH of flavonoids significantly increased or little affected the inhibition. However, the glycosylation on 7-OH and 4'-OH of flavonoids significantly decreased the inhibition. (3) The hydroxylation on A-ring of flavones and isoflavones, especially at positions 5 and 7, significantly improved the inhibition and the hydroxylation on C3' and C4' of B-ring of flavonoids remarkably enhanced the inhibition; however, the hydroxylation on the ring C of flavones significantly weakened the inhibition. (4) The hydrogenation of the C2=C3 double bond of flavones reduced the inhibition. (5) The hydrogenation of α=β double bond of stilbenes hardly affected the inhibition and the hydroxylation on C3' of stilbenes decreased the inhibition. Moreover, the methylation of the hydroxyl group of stilbenes obviously reduced the activity. (6) The hydroxylation on C4 of chalcone significantly increased the inhibition and the methylation on C4 of chalcone remarkably weakened the inhibition.

  14. Evolutionary origins of retinoid active short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases of SDR16C family

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Olga V.; Chang, Chenbei; Berlett, Michael C; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate enzymes that belong to the 16C family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR16C) were shown to play an essential role in the control of retinoic acid (RA) levels during development. To trace the evolution of enzymatic function of SDR16C family, and to examine the origins of the pathway for RA biosynthesis from vitamin A, we identified putative SDR16C enzymes through the extensive search of available genome sequencing data in a subset of species representing major metazoan phyla. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that enzymes from protostome, non-chordate deuterostome and invertebrate chordate species are found in three clades of SDR16C family containing retinoid active enzymes, which are retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10), retinol dehydrogenases E2 (RDHE2) and RDHE2-similar, and dehydrogenase reductase (SDR family) member 3 (DHRS3). For the initial functional analysis, we cloned RDH10- and RDHE2-related enzymes from the early developmental stages of a non-chordate deuterostome, green sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, and an invertebrate chordate, sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. In situ hybridization revealed that these proteins are expressed in a pattern relevant to development, while assays performed on proteins expressed in mammalian cell culture showed that they possess retinol-oxidizing activity as their vertebrate homologs. The existence of invertebrate homologs of DHRS3 was inferred from the analysis of phylogeny and cofactor-binding residues characteristic of preference for NADP(H). The presence of invertebrate homologs in the DHRS3 group of SDR16C is interesting in light of the complex mutually activating interaction, which we have recently described for human RDH10 and DHRS3 enzymes. Further functional analysis of these homologs will establish whether this interaction evolved to control retinoid homeostasis only in vertebrates, or is also conserved in pre-vertebrates. PMID:25451586

  15. Nitrite in feed: from animal health to human health.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Bordajandi, Luisa R; Cottrill, Bruce; van Peteghem, Carlos; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  16. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    SciTech Connect

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Peteghem, Carlos van; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  17. Nitrite in feed: from animal health to human health.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Bordajandi, Luisa R; Cottrill, Bruce; van Peteghem, Carlos; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  18. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R; Jung, In J; Kang, Sun B; Park, Hee J; Kim, Min G; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability.

  19. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R.; Jung, In J.; Kang, Sun B.; Park, Hee J.; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OXC85S plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OXC85S plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  20. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R; Jung, In J; Kang, Sun B; Park, Hee J; Kim, Min G; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  1. Inhibitory activity of reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and nitrite against vegetative cells and spores of dairy-related Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Avila, Marta; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Hernández, Marta; Garde, Sonia

    2014-02-17

    The butyric acid fermentation, responsible for late blowing of cheese, is caused by the outgrowth in cheese of some species of Clostridium, resulting in texture and flavor defects and economical losses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different antimicrobial compounds against vegetative cells and spores of C. tyrobutyricum, C. butyricum, C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes strains isolated from cheeses with late blowing defect. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and sodium nitrite were determined against Clostridium strains in milk and modified RCM (mRCM) after 7d exposure. Although the sensitivity of Clostridium to the tested antimicrobials was strain-dependent, C. sporogenes and C. beijerinckii generally had higher MIC values than the rest of Clostridium species. The majority of Clostridium strains were more resistant to antimicrobials in milk than in mRCM, and vegetative cells exhibited higher sensitivity than spores. Reuterin (MIC values 0.51-32.5 mM) and nisin (MIC values 0.05-12.5 μg/ml) were able to inhibit the growth of vegetative cells and spores of all assayed Clostridium strains in milk and mRCM. Strains of C. tyrobutyricum exhibited the highest sensitivity to lysozyme (MIC values<0.20-400 μg/ml) and sodium nitrite (MIC values 18.75-150 μg/ml). These results suggest that reuterin and nisin, with a broad inhibitory activity spectrum against Clostridium spp. spores and vegetative cells, may be the best options to control Clostridium growth in dairy products and to prevent associated spoilage, such as late blowing defect of cheese. However, further studies in cheese would be necessary to validate this hypothesis.

  2. Inhibitory activity of reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and nitrite against vegetative cells and spores of dairy-related Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Avila, Marta; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Hernández, Marta; Garde, Sonia

    2014-02-17

    The butyric acid fermentation, responsible for late blowing of cheese, is caused by the outgrowth in cheese of some species of Clostridium, resulting in texture and flavor defects and economical losses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different antimicrobial compounds against vegetative cells and spores of C. tyrobutyricum, C. butyricum, C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes strains isolated from cheeses with late blowing defect. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and sodium nitrite were determined against Clostridium strains in milk and modified RCM (mRCM) after 7d exposure. Although the sensitivity of Clostridium to the tested antimicrobials was strain-dependent, C. sporogenes and C. beijerinckii generally had higher MIC values than the rest of Clostridium species. The majority of Clostridium strains were more resistant to antimicrobials in milk than in mRCM, and vegetative cells exhibited higher sensitivity than spores. Reuterin (MIC values 0.51-32.5 mM) and nisin (MIC values 0.05-12.5 μg/ml) were able to inhibit the growth of vegetative cells and spores of all assayed Clostridium strains in milk and mRCM. Strains of C. tyrobutyricum exhibited the highest sensitivity to lysozyme (MIC values<0.20-400 μg/ml) and sodium nitrite (MIC values 18.75-150 μg/ml). These results suggest that reuterin and nisin, with a broad inhibitory activity spectrum against Clostridium spp. spores and vegetative cells, may be the best options to control Clostridium growth in dairy products and to prevent associated spoilage, such as late blowing defect of cheese. However, further studies in cheese would be necessary to validate this hypothesis. PMID:24361835

  3. An ene reductase from Clavispora lusitaniae for asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Yu, Hui-Lei; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-03-01

    A putative ene reductase gene from Clavispora lusitaniae was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein (ClER) was purified and characterized for its biocatalytic properties. This NADPH-dependent flavoprotein was identified with reduction activities toward a diverse range of activated alkenes including conjugated enones, enals, maleimide derivative and α,β-unsaturated carboxylic esters. The purified ClER exhibited a relatively high activity of 7.3 U mg(prot)⁻¹ for ketoisophorone while a remarkable catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)=810 s⁻¹ mM⁻¹) was obtained for 2-methyl-cinnamaldehyde due to the high affinity. A series of prochiral activated alkenes were stereoselectively reduced by ClER furnishing the corresponding saturated products in up to 99% ee. The practical applicability of ClER was further evaluated for the production of (R)-levodione, a valuable chiral compound, from ketoisophorone. Using the crude enzyme of ClER and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), 500 mM of ketoisophorone was efficiently converted to (R)-levodione with excellent stereoselectivity (98% ee) within 1h. All these positive features demonstrate a high synthetic potential of ClER in the asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes. PMID:24564901

  4. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of Kitaibelia vitifolia extract as alternative to the added nitrite in fermented dry sausage.

    PubMed

    Kurćubić, Vladimir S; Mašković, Pavle Z; Vujić, Jelena M; Vranić, Danijela V; Vesković-Moračanin, Slavica M; Okanović, Đorđe G; Lilić, Slobodan V

    2014-08-01

    Fermented dry sausages (FDS) without nitrite added, fortified with bioactive phenol and flavonoid compounds originating from the ethanol extract of Kitaibelia vitifolia were food matrix for investigation of its antioxidant and antimicrobial potency. These activities were researched in order to improve the sausages' shelf-life, safety, and provide health benefits to consumers as well. The oxidative stability of the FDS, containing two different levels of natural preservative, was evaluated using five different contemporary methods for antioxidative activity. The activity was tested on the 20th day of the refrigerated storage. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of the sausage extract were determined against six microorganisms, using a micro dilution method. Determined optimal effective concentration of dissolved K. vitifolia extract (12.5 g/kg of meat dough) revealed strong antioxidant activity, and moderate antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli (minimum inhibitory concentrations=15.625 μg/mL). The modified sausages had typical chemical-physical characteristics of FDS, controlled on 0, 13, 26 d of ripening and 20, 40 and 60 d of storage.

  5. Structural insights into the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of human omega-class glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huina; Brock, Joseph; Liu, Dan; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-07-13

    The reduction of dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbic acid (AA) is a vital cellular function. The omega-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze several reductive reactions in cellular biochemistry, including DHA reduction. In humans, two isozymes (GSTO1-1 and GSTO2-2) with significant DHA reductase (DHAR) activity are found, sharing 64% sequence identity. While the activity of GSTO2-2 is higher, it is significantly more unstable in vitro. We report the first crystal structures of human GSTO2-2, stabilized through site-directed mutagenesis and determined at 1.9 Å resolution in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The structure of a human GSTO1-1 has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution in complex with the reaction product AA, which unexpectedly binds in the G-site, where the glutamyl moiety of GSH binds. The structure suggests a similar mode of ascorbate binding in GSTO2-2. This is the first time that a non-GSH-based reaction product has been observed in the G-site of any GST. AA stacks against a conserved aromatic residue, F34 (equivalent to Y34 in GSTO2-2). Mutation of Y34 to alanine in GSTO2-2 eliminates DHAR activity. From these structures and other biochemical data, we propose a mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis of DHAR activity.

  6. Design of an activity and stability improved carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Jakoblinnert, Andre; van den Wittenboer, Anne; Shivange, Amol V; Bocola, Marco; Heffele, Lora; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-05-10

    The carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR2) is an industrially attractive biocatalyst for producing chiral alcohols from ketones. The homodimeric enzyme has a broad substrate spectrum and an excellent stereoselectivity, but is rapidly inactivated at aqueous-organic interfaces. The latter limits CPCR2's application in biphasic reaction media. Reengineering the protein surface of CPCR2 yielded a variant CPCR2-(A275N, L276Q) with 1.5-fold increased activity, 1.5-fold higher interfacial stability (cyclohexane/buffer system), and increased thermal resistance (ΔT50=+2.7 °C). Site-directed and site-saturation mutagenesis studies discovered that position 275 mainly influences stability and position 276 governs activity. After single site-saturation of position 275, amino acid exchanges to asparagine and threonine were discovered to be stabilizing. Interestingly, both positions are located at the dimer interface and close to the active site and computational analysis identified an inter-subunit hydrogen bond formation at position 275 to be responsible for stabilization. Finally, the variant CPCR2-(A275S, L276Q) was found by simultaneous site-saturation of positions 275 and 276. CPCR2-(A275S, L276Q) has compared to wtCPCR2 a 1.4-fold increased activity, a 1.5-fold higher interfacial stability, and improved thermal resistance (ΔT50=+5.2 °C). PMID:23471075

  7. Inhibitory effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe derived components on aldose reductase activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kato, Atsushi; Higuchi, Yasuko; Goto, Hirozo; Kizu, Haruhisa; Okamoto, Tadashi; Asano, Naoki; Hollinshead, Jackie; Nash, Robert J; Adachi, Isao

    2006-09-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) continues to be used as an important cooking spice and herbal medicine around the world. Scientific research has gradually verified the antidiabetic effects of ginger. Especially gingerols, which are the major components of ginger, are known to improve diabetes including the effect of enhancement against insulin-sensitivity. Aldose reductase inhibitors have considerable potential for the treatment of diabetes, without increased risk of hypoglycemia. The assay for aldose reductase inhibitors in ginger led to the isolation of five active compounds including 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanol (2) and 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanoic acid (3). Compounds 2 and 3 were good inhibitors of recombinant human aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 19.2 +/- 1.9 and 18.5 +/- 1.1 microM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds significantly suppressed not only sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes but also lens galactitol accumulation in 30% of galactose-fed cataract rat model. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the applicable side alkyl chain length and the presence of a C3 OCH3 group in the aromatic ring are essential features for enzyme recognition and binding. These results suggested that it would contribute to the protection against or improvement of diabetic complications for a dietary supplement of ginger or its extract containing aldose reductase inhibitors. PMID:16939321

  8. In vivo activation of methyl-coenzyme M reductase by carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Dorchak, Alexandria E.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) from methanogenic archaea catalyzes the rate-limiting and final step in methane biosynthesis. Using coenzyme B as the two-electron donor, MCR reduces methyl-coenzyme M (CH3-SCoM) to methane and the mixed disulfide, CoBS-SCoM. MCR contains an essential redox-active nickel tetrahydrocorphinoid cofactor, Coenzyme F430, at its active site. The active form of the enzyme (MCRred1) contains Ni(I)-F430. Rapid and efficient conversion of MCR to MCRred1 is important for elucidating the enzymatic mechanism, yet this reduction is difficult because the Ni(I) state is subject to oxidative inactivation. Furthermore, no in vitro methods have yet been described to convert Ni(II) forms into MCRred1. Since 1991, it has been known that MCRred1 from Methanothermobacter marburgensis can be generated in vivo when cells are purged with 100% H2. Here we show that purging cells or cell extracts with CO can also activate MCR. The rate of in vivo activation by CO is about 15 times faster than by H2 (130 and 8 min-1, respectively) and CO leads to twofold higher MCRred1 than H2. Unlike H2-dependent activation, which exhibits a 10-h lag time, there is no lag for CO-dependent activation. Based on cyanide inhibition experiments, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase is required for the CO-dependent activation. Formate, which also is a strong reductant, cannot activate MCR in M. marburgensis in vivo. PMID:23554601

  9. Rapid suppression of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase activity in keratinocytes by vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ling; Porter, Todd D

    2015-04-01

    7-Dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) serves as the sterol substrate for both cholesterol and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) synthesis. The pivotal enzyme in these two pathways is 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), which converts 7DHC to cholesterol. Treatment of adult human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa) with 10μM cholecalciferol resulted in a rapid decrease in DHCR7 activity (19% of control activity at 2h). This loss of activity was observed only in HEKa cells, a primary cell line cultured from normal human skin, and not in an immortalized skin cell line (HaCaT cells) nor in two hepatoma cell lines. The decrease in DHCR7 activity was not due to direct inhibition or to dephosphorylation of the enzyme, and enzyme protein levels were not decreased. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 had a lesser effect on DHCR7 activity, while 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 had no effect on DHCR7, indicating that the vitamin D receptor is not involved. Treatment with cholecalciferol did not lead to the accumulation of 7-dehydrocholesterol, and a 50% decrease in lanosterol synthesis in these cells suggests that cholecalciferol down-regulates the entire cholesterolgenic pathway. As vitamin D has been reported to be an inhibitor of hedgehog (Hh) signaling through Smo, we tested the effect of cyclopamine, an established inhibitor of the Hh pathway, on DHCR7 activity. Cyclopamine (10μM) also rapidly decreased DHCR7 activity (50% of control activity at 3h), suggesting that vitamin D3 may modulate DHCR7 activity and cholesterol/vitamin D3 synthesis by inhibiting hedgehog signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  10. Toward aldehyde and alkane production by removing aldehyde reductase activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M.; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have enabled the construction of novel biological routes to valuable chemicals using suitable microbial hosts. Aldehydes serve as chemical feedstocks in the synthesis of rubbers, plastics, and other larger molecules. Microbial production of alkanes is dependent on the formation of a fatty aldehyde intermediate which is converted to an alkane by an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). However, microbial hosts such as Escherichia coli are plagued by many highly active endogenous aldehyde reductases (ALRs) that convert aldehydes to alcohols, which greatly complicates strain engineering for aldehyde and alkane production. It has been shown that the endogenous ALR activity outcompetes the ADO enzyme for fatty aldehyde substrate. The large degree of ALR redundancy coupled with an incomplete database of ALRs represents a significant obstacle in engineering E. coli for either aldehyde or alkane production. In this study, we identified 44 ALR candidates encoded in the E. coli genome using bioinformatics tools, and undertook a comprehensive screening by measuring the ability of these enzymes to produce isobutanol. From the pool of 44 candidates, we found five new ALRs using this screening method (YahK, DkgA, GldA, YbbO, and YghA). Combined deletions of all 13 known ALRs resulted in a 90–99% reduction in endogenous ALR activity for a wide range of aldehyde substrates (C2–C12). Elucidation of the ALRs found in E. coli could guide one in reducing competing alcohol formation during alkane or aldehyde production. PMID:25108218

  11. Investigation of the effects of some drugs and phenolic compounds on human dihydrofolate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Erdem; Adem, Sevki

    2015-03-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a fundamental role in cellular metabolism and cell growth. Inhibition of this enzyme will cause a decrease in the amount of folate that occurs in many metabolic processes, and the deficiency of which may cause various diseases. This study investigated the effects of some drugs and phenolic compounds on DHFR activity in vitro. To determine the inhibitory effect of compounds, enzyme activity was measured with a final concentration of an inhibitor ranging from 10 μM to 51 mM. DHFR was inhibited effectively by naringin, ferulic acid, and levofloxacin with IC50 values under 660 μM. Syringic acid, cefepime, ceftizoxime, cefazolin, ceftriaxone, and ceftazidime exhibited inhibitory effects on the enzyme activity with IC50 values in the range of 3.840-30.224 mM. K(i) constants were calculated using the Cheng-Prusoff equation. K(i) constants calculated in the range of 0.009-2.024 mM with respect to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH) and in the range of 0.060-5.830 mM about FH2.

  12. Free energy simulations of active-site mutants of dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Doron, Dvir; Stojković, Vanja; Gakhar, Lokesh; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Kohen, Amnon; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-01-22

    This study employs hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to investigate the effect of mutations of the active-site residue I14 of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) on the hydride transfer. Recent kinetic measurements of the I14X mutants (X = V, A, and G) indicated slower hydride transfer rates and increasingly temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with systematic reduction of the I14 side chain. The QM/MM simulations show that when the original isoleucine residue is substituted in silico by valine, alanine, or glycine (I14V, I14A, and I14G DHFR, respectively), the free energy barrier height of the hydride transfer reaction increases relative to the wild-type enzyme. These trends are in line with the single-turnover rate measurements reported for these systems. In addition, extended dynamics simulations of the reactive Michaelis complex reveal enhanced flexibility in the mutants, and in particular for the I14G mutant, including considerable fluctuations of the donor-acceptor distance (DAD) and the active-site hydrogen bonding network compared with those detected in the native enzyme. These observations suggest that the perturbations induced by the mutations partly impair the active-site environment in the reactant state. On the other hand, the average DADs at the transition state of all DHFR variants are similar. Crystal structures of I14 mutants (V, A, and G) confirmed the trend of increased flexibility of the M20 and other loops. PMID:25382260

  13. Bioactive fraction of Saraca indica prevents diabetes induced cataractogenesis: An aldose reductase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Gauresh; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Saraca indica (SI) flowers extract and different bioactive fraction on in vitro aldose reductase (AR) inhibitory activity, high glucose-induced cataract in goat lens and in vivo streptozotocin (STZ; 45 mg/kg, i.p) induced cataract in rats. Methods: Extract of flowers of SI tested for inhibition against rat lens AR. Furthermore, bioactive fraction was investigated against high glucose-induced opacification of the lens in vitro lens culture and STZ induced diabetic cataract in rats. Identification of the bioactive component was attempted through high-performance thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica (EASI) produced maximum inhibition that may be due to high phenolic content. Goat lenses in media containing glucose developed a distinctly opaque ring in 72 h and treatment with EASI fraction lowered lens opacity in 72 h. Prolonged treatment with EASI to STZ-induced diabetic rats inhibited the AR activity and delayed cataract progression in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica fraction has potential to inhibit rat lens AR enzyme and prevent cataractogenesis not only in goat lens model (in vitro), but also in STZ induced diabetic rats (in vivo). This study is suggestive of the anticataract activity of EASI fraction that could be attributed to the phytoconstituents present in the same. PMID:25709218

  14. Effect of dietary supplementation of vitamin C on growth, reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant enzyme activity of Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) juveniles exposed to nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zuoyong; Wang, Baojie; Liu, Mei; Jiang, Keyong; Liu, Mingxing; Wang, Lei

    2014-07-01

    Different amounts of vitamin C were added to diets fed to juveniles (2.5 ± 0.15 g) of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonic u s (Selenka) in an attempt to reduce the stress response of specimens exposed to nitrite stress. A commercial feed was used as the control diet and three experimental diets were made by supplementing 1 000, 1 500, or 2 000 mg vitamin C/kg diet to control diet separately in a 45-day experiment. Sea cucumbers were exposed to three different levels (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/L) of nitrite stress for 4, 8, and 12 h at four time intervals (0, 15, 30, and 45 d). Growth of the animals was recorded during the experiment. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) (i.e. hydroxyl free radical (-OH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC)) and antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e., superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT)) were measured. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to analyze the effect of multiple factors on ROS indices and enzyme activities. Weight gain (WG) and special growth rate (SGR) of vitamin C supplementation groups were significantly higher than those of control group ( P < 0.05). The levels of -OH and MDA increased under exposure time extending and nitrite concentration increasing, whereas T-AOC level decreased. SOD and CAT activities increased at 4 h and 8 h and decreased at 12 h. During the days in which the animal consumed experimental diets, the levels of -OH and MDA decreased and that of T-AOC increased. This result suggests that diets containing vitamin C could reduce the nitrite stress response in the animals and increase their antioxidant capacity. The multifactor regression equation of growth performance, ROS indices, and duration of feeding results suggest that vitamin C supplementation of 1 400-2 000 mg/kg diet for 29-35 days could reduce effectively the effects of nitrite exposure.

  15. Influence of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase on stable isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangalo, Muna; Einsiedl, Florian; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Stichler, Willibald

    2008-03-01

    The stable isotopes of sulfate are often used as a tool to assess bacterial sulfate reduction on the macro scale. However, the mechanisms of stable isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen at the enzymatic level are not yet fully understood. In batch experiments with water enriched in 18O we investigated the effect of different nitrite concentrations on sulfur isotope fractionation by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. With increasing nitrite concentrations, we found sulfur isotope enrichment factors ranging from -11.2 ± 1.8‰ to -22.5 ± 3.2‰. Furthermore, the δ18O values in the remaining sulfate increased from approximately 50-120‰ when 18O-enriched water was supplied. Since 18O-exchange with ambient water does not take place in sulfate, but rather in intermediates of the sulfate reduction pathway (e.g. SO32-), we suggest that nitrite affects the steady-state concentration and the extent of reoxidation of the metabolic intermediate sulfite to sulfate during sulfate reduction. Given that nitrite is known to inhibit the production of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase, our results suggest that the activity of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase regulates the kinetic isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen during bacterial sulfate reduction. Our novel results also imply that isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction strongly depends on the cell internal enzymatic regulation rather than on the physico-chemical features of the individual enzymes.

  16. Exogenous methyl jasmonate treatment increases glucosinolate biosynthesis and quinone reductase activity in kale leaf tissue.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) spray treatments were applied to the kale varieties 'Dwarf Blue Curled Vates' and 'Red Winter' in replicated field plantings in 2010 and 2011 to investigate alteration of glucosinolate (GS) composition in harvested leaf tissue. Aqueous solutions of 250 µM MeJA were sprayed to saturation on aerial plant tissues four days prior to harvest at commercial maturity. The MeJA treatment significantly increased gluconasturtiin (56%), glucobrassicin (98%), and neoglucobrassicin (150%) concentrations in the apical leaf tissue of these genotypes over two seasons. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity, a biomarker for anti-carcinogenesis, was significantly increased by the extracts from the leaf tissue of these two cultivars. Extracts of apical leaf tissues had greater MeJA mediated increases in phenolics, glucosinolate concentrations, GS hydrolysis products, and QR activity than extracts from basal leaf tissue samples. The concentration of the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, sulforphane was significantly increased in apical leaf tissue of the cultivar 'Red Winter' in both 2010 and 2011. There was interaction between exogenous MeJA treatment and environmental conditions to induce endogenous JA. Correlation analysis revealed that indole-3-carbanol (I3C) generated from the hydrolysis of glucobrassicin significantly correlated with QR activity (r = 0.800, P<0.001). Concentrations required to double the specific QR activity (CD values) of I3C was calculated at 230 µM, which is considerably weaker at induction than other isothiocyanates like sulforphane. To confirm relationships between GS hydrolysis products and QR activity, a range of concentrations of MeJA sprays were applied to kale leaf tissues of both cultivars in 2011. Correlation analysis of these results indicated that sulforaphane, NI3C, neoascorbigen, I3C, and diindolylmethane were all significantly correlated with QR activity. Thus, increased QR activity may be due to combined

  17. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  18. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  19. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34... nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite are subject to prior sanctions issued... without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red meat and poultry products....

  20. Targeted Mutations of Bacillus anthracis Dihydrofolate Reductase Condense Complex Structure-Activity Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    J Beierlein; N Karri; A Anderson

    2011-12-31

    Several antifolates, including trimethoprim (TMP) and a series of propargyl-linked analogues, bind dihydrofolate reductase from Bacillus anthracis (BaDHFR) with lower affinity than is typical in other bacterial species. To guide lead optimization for BaDHFR, we explored a new approach to determine structure-activity relationships whereby the enzyme is altered and the analogues remain constant, essentially reversing the standard experimental design. Active site mutants of the enzyme, Ba(F96I)DHFR and Ba(Y102F)DHFR, were created and evaluated with enzyme inhibition assays and crystal structures. The affinities of the antifolates increase up to 60-fold with the Y102F mutant, suggesting that interactions with Tyr 102 are critical for affinity. Crystal structures of the enzymes bound to TMP and propargyl-linked inhibitors reveal the basis of TMP resistance and illuminate the influence of Tyr 102 on the lipophilic linker between the pyrimidine and aryl rings. Two new inhibitors test and validate these conclusions and show the value of the technique for providing new directions during lead optimization.

  1. Glutathione-dependent extracellular ferric reductase activities in dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase (GSH-FeR) activities in different dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species were characterized. Supernatants from Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in their yeast form were able to reduce iron enzymically with glutathione as a cofactor. Some variations in the level of reduction were noted amongst the strains. This activity was stable in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline environments and was inhibited when trivalent aluminium and gallium ions were present. Using zymography, single bands of GSH-FeRs with apparent molecular masses varying from 430 to 460 kDa were identified in all strains. The same molecular mass range was determined by size exclusion chromatography. These data demonstrate that dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi produce and secrete a family of similar GSH-FeRs that may be involved in the acquisition and utilization of iron. Siderophore production by these and other fungi has sometimes been considered to provide a full explanation of iron acquisition in these organisms. Our work reveals an additional common mechanism that may be biologically and pathogenically important. Furthermore, while some characteristics of these enzymes such as extracellular location, cofactor utilization and large size are not individually unique, when considered together and shared across a range of fungi, they represent an important novel physiological feature. PMID:16000713

  2. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis.

  3. S-nitrosation of conserved cysteines modulates activity and stability of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR)

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Damian; Ballard, Keith; Truebridge, Ian; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO•) regulates diverse physiological processes from vasodilation in humans to gas exchange in plants. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a principal nitroso reservoir due to its chemical stability. GSNO accumulation is attenuated by GSNO reductase (GSNOR), a cysteine-rich cytosolic enzyme. Regulation of protein nitrosation is not well understood since NO•-dependent events proceed without discernible changes in GSNOR expression. Because GSNORs contain evolutionarily-conserved cysteines that could serve as nitrosation sites, we examined the effects of treating plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), mammalian (human), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GSNORs with nitrosating agents in vitro. Enzyme activity was sensitive to nitroso donors, while the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) restored activity, suggesting catalytic impairment was due to S-nitrosation. Protein nitrosation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, by which mono-, di-, and tri-nitrosation were observed, and these signals were sensitive to DTT. GSNOR mutants in specific non-zinc coordinating cysteines were less sensitive to catalytic inhibition by nitroso donors and exhibited reduced nitrosation signals by mass spectrometry. Nitrosation also coincided with decreased tryptophan fluorescence, increased thermal aggregation propensity, and increased polydispersity—properties reflected by differential solvent accessibility of amino acids important for dimerization and the shape of the substrate and coenzyme binding pockets as assessed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Collectively, these data suggest a mechanism for NO• signal transduction in which GSNOR nitrosation and inhibition transiently permit GSNO accumulation. PMID:27064847

  4. Glucose and collagen regulate human platelet activity through aldose reductase induction of thromboxane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Stitham, Jeremiah; Gleim, Scott; Di Febbo, Concetta; Porreca, Ettore; Fava, Cristiano; Tacconelli, Stefania; Capone, Marta; Evangelista, Virgilio; Levantesi, Giacomo; Wen, Li; Martin, Kathleen; Minuz, Pietro; Rade, Jeffrey; Patrignani, Paola; Hwa, John

    2011-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with platelet hyperactivity, which leads to increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. This is coupled with enhanced levels of thromboxane (TX), an eicosanoid that facilitates platelet aggregation. Although intensely studied, the mechanism underlying the relationship among hyperglycemia, TX generation, and platelet hyperactivity remains unclear. We sought to identify key signaling components that connect high levels of glucose to TX generation and to examine their clinical relevance. In human platelets, aldose reductase synergistically modulated platelet response to both hyperglycemia and collagen exposure through a pathway involving ROS/PLCγ2/PKC/p38α MAPK. In clinical patients with platelet activation (deep vein thrombosis; saphenous vein graft occlusion after coronary bypass surgery), and particularly those with diabetes, urinary levels of a major enzymatic metabolite of TX (11-dehydro-TXB2 [TX-M]) were substantially increased. Elevated TX-M persisted in diabetic patients taking low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), suggesting that such patients may have underlying endothelial damage, collagen exposure, and thrombovascular disease. Thus, our study has identified multiple potential signaling targets for designing combination chemotherapies that could inhibit the synergistic activation of platelets by hyperglycemia and collagen exposure. PMID:22005299

  5. Activity improvement of a Kluyveromyces lactis aldo-keto reductase KlAKR via rational design.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wang, Ya-Jun; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-20

    Optically pure t-butyl 6-cyano-(3R, 5R)-dihydroxyhexanoate ((R)-1b) is the key chiral precursor for atorvastatin calcium, the most widely used cholesterol-lowering drug. Wild-type aldo-keto reductase KlAKR from Kluyveromyces lactis has ideal diastereoselectivity toward t-butyl 6-cyano-(5R)-hydroxy-3-oxohexanoate (1a, dep>99.5%) but poor activity. A rational engineering was used to improve the KlAKR activity. Based on homology modeling and molecular docking, two amino acid residues (295 and 296) were selected as mutation sites, and two rounds of site-saturation mutagenesis were performed. Among the mutants, KlAKR-Y295W/W296L exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward 1a up to 12.37s(-1)mM(-1), which was 11.25-fold higher than that of wild-type KlAKR. Moreover, the majority of mutations have no negative impact on stereoselectivity. Using KlAKR-Y295W/W296L coupled with Exiguobacterium sibiricum glucose dehydrogenase (EsGDH) for cofactor regeneration, (R)-1b was accumulated up to 162.7mM with dep value above 99.5%. KlAKR-Y295W/W296L represents a robust tool for (R)-1b synthesis.

  6. Latent nitrate reductase activity is associated with the plasma membrane of corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Grimes, H. D.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Latent nitrate reductase activity (NRA) was detected in corn (Zea mays L., Golden Jubilee) root microsome fractions. Microsome-associated NRA was stimulated up to 20-fold by Triton X-100 (octylphenoxy polyethoxyethanol) whereas soluble NRA was only increased up to 1.2-fold. Microsome-associated NRA represented up to 19% of the total root NRA. Analysis of microsomal fractions by aqueous two-phase partitioning showed that the membrane-associated NRA was localized in the second upper phase (U2). Analysis with marker enzymes indicated that the U2 fraction was plasma membrane (PM). The PM-associated NRA was not removed by washing vesicles with up to 1.0 M NACl but was solubilized from the PM with 0.05% Triton X-100. In contrast, vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity was not solubilized from the PM by treatment with 0.1% Triton X-100. The results show that a protein capable of reducing nitrate is embedded in the hydrophobic region of the PM of corn roots.

  7. Purification and properties of a dissimilatory nitrate reductase from Haloferax denitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Lang, F.

    1991-01-01

    A membrane-bound nitrate reductase (nitrite:(acceptor) oxidoreductase, EC 1.7.99.4) from the extremely halophilic bacterium Haloferax denitrificans was solubilized by incubating membranes in buffer lacking NaCl and purified by DEAE, hydroxylapatite, and Sepharose 6B gel filtration chromatography. The purified nitrate reductase reduced chlorate and was inhibited by azide and cyanide. Preincubating the enzyme with cyanide increased the extent of inhibition which in turn was intensified when dithionite was present. Although cyanide was a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to nitrate, nitrate protected against inhibition. The enzyme, as isolated, was composed of two subunits (Mr 116,000 and 60,000) and behaved as a dimer during gel filtration (Mr 380,000). Unlike other halobacterial enzymes, this nitrate reductase was most active, as well as stable, in the absence of salt.

  8. Human aldo-keto reductases and the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2014-11-17

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1-AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer.

  9. Human Aldo-Keto Reductases and the Metabolic Activation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1–AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer. PMID:25279998

  10. Molecular characterization of thioredoxin-1 and thioredoxin reductase activity in mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Hu, J H; Zhang, F Y; Jiang, K J; Fang, Y B; Wang, J; Zhao, M; Qiao, Z G; Ma, L B

    2014-01-01

    The thioredoxin (Trx) system consists of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), Trx, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). TrxR is an NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase. Trx is a ubiquitous small protein with a redox-active disulfide bridge that plays important regulatory roles in some vital metabolic reactions. In this study, a cDNA sequence (SpTrx1) showing high identity to the first Trx gene was isolated from a hepatopancreas cDNA library of the mud crab Scylla paramamosain. The full-length cDNA of SpTrx1 consisted of 672 bp and contained a complete open reading frame of 318 bp encoding a polypeptide of 105 amino acids. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that SpTrx1 expression was ubiquitous in various organs of S. paramamosain, including the gill, muscle, heart, hemolymph, testis, and hepatopancreas. SpTrx1 expression was upregulated significantly after Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenge: it obviously rose at 48 h and reached the highest level at 72 h. Furthermore, TrxR activity was detected in the gill, heart, muscle, hemolymph, and hepatopancreas. The relative TrxR activity in different tissues after V. parahaemolyticus injection had the same tendency in each tissue (P < 0.01) as SpTrx1 expression. The TrxR activity increased 2 h after injection, peaked at 8 h, slowly decreased from 12 to 24 h, and returned to normal levels at 48 h. The consistency of the expression between the Trx transcript and TrxR activity demonstrated that Trx was closely related to TrxR in the Trx system in S. paramamosain, suggesting that it may participate in the immune system of mud crabs. PMID:25501236

  11. Thioredoxin and Thioredoxin Reductase Control Tissue Factor Activity by Thiol Redox-dependent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei; Wu, Yunfei; Li, Xiaoming; Ma, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Liangwei

    2013-01-01

    Abnormally enhanced tissue factor (TF) activity is related to increased thrombosis risk in which oxidative stress plays a critical role. Human cytosolic thioredoxin (hTrx1) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), also secreted into circulation, have the power to protect against oxidative stress. However, the relationship between hTrx1/TrxR and TF remains unknown. Here we show reversible association of hTrx1 with TF in human serum and plasma samples. The association is dependent on hTrx1-Cys-73 that bridges TF-Cys-209 via a disulfide bond. hTrx1-Cys-73 is absolutely required for hTrx1 to interfere with FVIIa binding to purified and cell-surface TF, consequently suppressing TF-dependent procoagulant activity and proteinase-activated receptor-2 activation. Moreover, hTrx1/TrxR plays an important role in sensing the alterations of NADPH/NADP+ states and transducing this redox-sensitive signal into changes in TF activity. With NADPH, hTrx1/TrxR readily facilitates the reduction of TF, causing a decrease in TF activity, whereas with NADP+, hTrx1/TrxR promotes the oxidation of TF, leading to an increase in TF activity. By comparison, TF is more likely to favor the reduction by hTrx1-TrxR-NADPH. This reversible reduction-oxidation reaction occurs in the TF extracellular domain that contains partially opened Cys-49/-57 and Cys-186/-209 disulfide bonds. The cell-surface TF procoagulant activity is significantly increased after hTrx1-knockdown. The response of cell-surface TF procoagulant activity to H2O2 is efficiently suppressed through elevating cellular TrxR activity via selenium supplementation. Our data provide a novel mechanism for redox regulation of TF activity. By modifying Cys residues or regulating Cys redox states in TF extracellular domain, hTrx1/TrxR function as a safeguard against inappropriate TF activity. PMID:23223577

  12. Protective effect of salivary nitrate and microbial nitrate reductase activity against caries.

    PubMed

    Doel, J J; Hector, M P; Amirtham, C V; Al-Anzan, L A; Benjamin, N; Allaker, R P

    2004-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that a combination of high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing capacity are protective against dental caries, 209 children attending the Dental Institute, Barts and The London NHS Trust were examined. Salivary nitrate and nitrite levels, counts of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp., and caries experience were recorded. Compared with control subjects, a significant reduction in caries experience was found in patients with high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing ability. Production of nitrite from salivary nitrate by commensal nitrate-reducing bacteria may limit the growth of cariogenic bacteria as a result of the production of antimicrobial oxides of nitrogen, including nitric oxide. PMID:15458501

  13. Evidence for Increased 5α-Reductase Activity During Early Childhood in Daughters of Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torchen, Laura C.; Idkowiak, Jan; Fogel, Naomi R.; O'Neil, Donna M.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Arlt, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heritable, complex genetic disease. Animal models suggest that androgen exposure at critical developmental stages contributes to disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation resulting in increased androgen production produces the phenotypic features of PCOS by programming during critical developmental periods. Although we have not found evidence for increased in utero androgen levels in cord blood in the daughters of women with PCOS (PCOS-d), target tissue androgen production may be amplified by increased 5α-reductase activity analogous to findings in adult affected women. It is possible to noninvasively test this hypothesis by examining urinary steroid metabolites. Objective: We performed this study to investigate whether PCOS-d have altered androgen metabolism during early childhood. Design, Setting, and Participants: Twenty-one PCOS-d, 1–3 years old, and 36 control girls of comparable age were studied at an academic medical center. Main Outcome Measures: Urinary steroid metabolites were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-four hour steroid excretion rates and precursor to product ratios suggestive of 5α-reductase and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were calculated. Results: Age did not differ but weight for length Z-scores were higher in PCOS-d compared to control girls (P = .02). PCOS-d had increased 5α-tetrahydrocortisol:tetrahydrocortisol ratios (P = .04), suggesting increased global 5α-reductase activity. There was no evidence for differences in 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity. Steroid metabolite excretion was not correlated with weight. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that differences in androgen metabolism are present in early childhood in PCOS-d. Increased 5α-reductase activity could contribute to the development of PCOS by amplifying target tissue androgen action. PMID:26990942

  14. Structure of recombinant Leishmania donovani pteridine reductase reveals a disordered active site

    PubMed Central

    Barrack, Keri L.; Tulloch, Lindsay B.; Burke, Lynsey-Ann; Fyfe, Paul K.; Hunter, William N.

    2011-01-01

    Pteridine reductase (PTR1) is a potential target for drug development against parasitic Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, protozoa that are responsible for a range of serious diseases found in tropical and subtropical parts of the world. As part of a structure-based approach to inhibitor development, specifically targeting Leishmania species, well ordered crystals of L. donovani PTR1 were sought to support the characterization of complexes formed with inhibitors. An efficient system for recombinant protein production was prepared and the enzyme was purified and crystallized in an orthorhombic form with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. Diffraction data were measured to 2.5 Å resolution and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. However, a sulfate occupies a phosphate-binding site used by NADPH and occludes cofactor binding. The nicotinamide moiety is a critical component of the active site and without it this part of the structure is disordered. The crystal form obtained under these conditions is therefore unsuitable for the characterization of inhibitor complexes. PMID:21206018

  15. The transient catalytically competent coenzyme allocation into the active site of Anabaena ferredoxin NADP+ -reductase.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, José Ramón; Lans, Isaías; Medina, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) catalyses the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) via its flavin FAD cofactor. A molecular dynamics theoretical approach is applied here to visualise the transient catalytically competent interaction of Anabaena FNR with its coenzyme, NADP(+). The particular role of some of the residues identified as key in binding and accommodating the 2'P-AMP moiety of the coenzyme is confirmed in molecular terms. Simulations also indicate that the architecture of the active site precisely contributes to the orientation of the N5 of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide ring in the conformation of the catalytically competent hydride transfer complex and, therefore, contributes to the efficiency of the process. In particular, the side chain of the C-terminal Y303 in Anabaena FNR appears key to providing the optimum geometry by reducing the stacking probability between the isoalloxazine and nicotinamide rings, thus providing the required co-linearity and distance among the N5 of the flavin cofactor, the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide and the hydride that has to be transferred between them. All these factors are highly related to the reaction efficiency, mechanism and reversibility of the process.

  16. Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas enzymes activate metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivate metronidazole (nitroimidazole reductases).

    PubMed

    Pal, Dibyarupa; Banerjee, Sulagna; Cui, Jike; Schwartz, Aaron; Ghosh, Sudip K; Samuelson, John

    2009-02-01

    Infections with Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, and Trichomonas vaginalis, which cause diarrhea, dysentery, and vaginitis, respectively, are each treated with metronidazole. Here we show that Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas have oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase (ntr) genes which are homologous to those genes that have nonsense mutations in metronidazole-resistant Helicobacter pylori isolates. Entamoeba and Trichomonas also have nim genes which are homologous to those genes expressed in metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolates. Recombinant Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas nitroreductases used NADH rather than the NADPH used by Helicobacter, and two recombinant Entamoeba nitroreductases increased the metronidazole sensitivity of transformed Escherichia coli strains. Conversely, the recombinant nitroimidazole reductases (NIMs) of Entamoeba and Trichmonas conferred very strong metronidazole resistance to transformed bacteria. The Ehntr1 gene of the genome project HM-1:IMSS strain of Entamoeba histolytica had a nonsense mutation, and the same nonsense mutation was present in 3 of 22 clinical isolates of Entamoeba. While ntr and nim mRNAs were variably expressed by cultured Entamoeba and Trichomonas isolates, there was no relationship to metronidazole sensitivity. We conclude that microaerophilic protists have bacterium-like enzymes capable of activating metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivating metronidazole (NIMs). While Entamoeba and Trichomonas displayed some of the changes (nonsense mutations and gene overexpression) associated with metronidazole resistance in bacteria, these changes did not confer metronidazole resistance to the microaerophilic protists examined here.

  17. Ribonucleotide reductase activity is coupled to DNA synthesis via proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Israel; Guarino, Estrella; Shepherd, Marianne E A; Deegan, Tom D; Havens, Courtney G; MacNeill, Stuart A; Walter, Johannes C; Kearsey, Stephen E

    2012-04-24

    Synthesis of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) is required for both DNA replication and DNA repair and is catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductases (RNR), which convert ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms [1, 2]. Maintaining the correct levels of dNTPs for DNA synthesis is important for minimizing the mutation rate [3-7], and this is achieved by tight regulation of RNR [2, 8, 9]. In fission yeast, RNR is regulated in part by a small protein inhibitor, Spd1, which is degraded in S phase and after DNA damage to allow upregulation of dNTP supply [10-12]. Spd1 degradation is mediated by the activity of the CRL4(Cdt2) ubiquitin ligase complex [5, 13, 14]. This has been reported to be dependent on modulation of Cdt2 levels, which are cell cycle regulated, peaking in S phase, and which also increase after DNA damage in a checkpoint-dependent manner [7, 13]. We show here that Cdt2 level fluctuations are not sufficient to regulate Spd1 proteolysis and that the key step in this event is the interaction of Spd1 with the polymerase processivity factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), complexed onto DNA. This mechanism thus provides a direct link between DNA synthesis and RNR regulation. PMID:22464192

  18. Effect of treatment on erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase and glutathione reductase activity in patients with primary gout.

    PubMed Central

    Braven, J; Hardwell, T R; Hickling, P; Whittaker, M

    1986-01-01

    The activities of erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase and glutathione reductase (GTR) were studied in 26 patients with primary gout who were receiving no treatment or treatment with either allopurinol or azapropazone, and compared with the activity in a group of healthy controls. The activity of PRPP synthetase was significantly higher in the gout group and was not influenced by either drug. No significant difference in the activity of GTR was observed. The failure of either drug to suppress the increased activity of PRPP synthetase associated with gout is discussed. PMID:3024593

  19. Microbial activity balance in size fractionated suspended growth biomass from full-scale sidestream combined nitritation-anammox reactors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijing; Wells, George; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance, distribution and activity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox in size fractionated aggregates from full-scale suspended growth combined nitritation-anammox sidestream reactors. Plants with or without a cyclone device were also studied to assess a purported enrichment of anammox granules. Specific aerobic ammonium oxidation rates (p=0.01) and specific oxygen uptake rates (p=0.02) were significantly greater in flocs than in granules. AOB abundance measured using quantitative FISH was significantly higher in flocs than in granules (p=0.01). Conversely, anammox abundance was significantly greater in granules (p=0.03). The average ratio of anammox/AOB in systems employing hydrocyclone separation devices was 2.4, significantly higher (p=0.02) than the average ratio (0.5) in a system without a hydrocyclone. Our results demonstrate substantial functional and population-level segregation between floccular and granular fractions, and provide a key corroboration that cyclone separation devices can increase anammox levels in such systems.

  20. Microbial activity balance in size fractionated suspended growth biomass from full-scale sidestream combined nitritation-anammox reactors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijing; Wells, George; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance, distribution and activity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox in size fractionated aggregates from full-scale suspended growth combined nitritation-anammox sidestream reactors. Plants with or without a cyclone device were also studied to assess a purported enrichment of anammox granules. Specific aerobic ammonium oxidation rates (p=0.01) and specific oxygen uptake rates (p=0.02) were significantly greater in flocs than in granules. AOB abundance measured using quantitative FISH was significantly higher in flocs than in granules (p=0.01). Conversely, anammox abundance was significantly greater in granules (p=0.03). The average ratio of anammox/AOB in systems employing hydrocyclone separation devices was 2.4, significantly higher (p=0.02) than the average ratio (0.5) in a system without a hydrocyclone. Our results demonstrate substantial functional and population-level segregation between floccular and granular fractions, and provide a key corroboration that cyclone separation devices can increase anammox levels in such systems. PMID:27347796

  1. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  2. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  3. Dynamics of the active site architecture in plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases catalytic complexes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; López-Rivero, Arleth; Tondo, María Laura; Orellano, Elena G; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic isotope effects in reactions involving hydride transfer and their temperature dependence are powerful tools to explore dynamics of enzyme catalytic sites. In plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases the FAD cofactor exchanges a hydride with the NADP(H) coenzyme. Rates for these processes are considerably faster for the plastidic members (FNR) of the family than for those belonging to the bacterial class (FPR). Hydride transfer (HT) and deuteride transfer (DT) rates for the NADP(+) coenzyme reduction of four plant-type FNRs (two representatives of the plastidic type FNRs and the other two from the bacterial class), and their temperature dependences are here examined applying a full tunnelling model with coupled environmental fluctuations. Parameters for the two plastidic FNRs confirm a tunnelling reaction with active dynamics contributions, but isotope effects on Arrhenius factors indicate a larger contribution for donor-acceptor distance (DAD) dynamics in the Pisum sativum FNR reaction than in the Anabaena FNR reaction. On the other hand, parameters for bacterial FPRs are consistent with passive environmental reorganisation movements dominating the HT coordinate and no contribution of DAD sampling or gating fluctuations. This indicates that active sites of FPRs are more organised and rigid than those of FNRs. These differences must be due to adaptation of the active sites and catalytic mechanisms to fulfil their particular metabolic roles, establishing a compromise between protein flexibility and functional optimisation. Analysis of site-directed mutants in plastidic enzymes additionally indicates the requirement of a minimal optimal architecture in the catalytic complex to provide a favourable gating contribution. PMID:24953402

  4. Differences in nitric oxide steady states between arginine, hypoxanthine, uracil auxotrophs (AHU) and non-AHU strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae during anaerobic respiration in the presence of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Barth, Kenneth; Clark, Virginia L

    2008-08-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae can grow by anaerobic respiration using nitrite as an alternative electron acceptor. Under these growth conditions, N. gonorrhoeae produces and degrades nitric oxide (NO), an important host defense molecule. Laboratory strain F62 has been shown to establish and maintain a NO steady-state level that is a function of the nitrite reductase/NO reductase ratio and is independent of cell number. The nitrite reductase activities (122-197 nmol NO2 reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1)) and NO reductase activities (88-155 nmol NO reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1)) in a variety of gonococcal clinical isolates were similar to the specific activities seen in F62 (241 nmol NO2 reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1) and 88 nmol NO reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1), respectively). In seven gonococcal strains, the NO steady-state levels established in the presence of nitrite were similar to that of F62 (801-2121 nmol x L-1 NO), while six of the strains, identified as arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil auxotrophs (AHU), that cause asymptomatic infection in men had either two- to threefold (373-579 nmol x L-1 NO) or about 100-fold (13-24 nmol x L-1 NO) lower NO steady-state concentrations. All tested strains in the presence of a NO donor, 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazono)bis-ethanimine/NO, quickly lowered and maintained NO levels in the noninflammatory range of NO (<300 nmol x L-1). The generation of a NO steady-state concentration was directly affected by alterations in respiratory control in both F62 and an AHU strain, although differences in membrane function are suspected to be responsible for NO steady-state level differences in AHU strains.

  5. Temperature dependence of methyl-coenzyme M reductase activity and of the formation of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase red2 state induced by coenzyme B.

    PubMed

    Goenrich, Meike; Duin, Evert C; Mahlert, Felix; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2005-06-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyses the formation of methane from methyl-coenzyme M (CH(3)-S-CoM) and coenzyme B (HS-CoB) in methanogenic archaea. The enzyme has an alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2) subunit structure forming two structurally interlinked active sites each with a molecule F(430) as a prosthetic group. The nickel porphinoid must be in the Ni(I) oxidation state for the enzyme to be active. The active enzyme exhibits an axial Ni(I)-based electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal and a UV-vis spectrum with an absorption maximum at 385 nm. This state is called the MCR-red1 state. In the presence of coenzyme M (HS-CoM) and coenzyme B the MCR-red1 state is in part converted reversibly into the MCR-red2 state, which shows a rhombic Ni(I)-based EPR signal and a UV-vis spectrum with an absorption maximum at 420 nm. We report here for MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis that the MCR-red2 state is also induced by several coenzyme B analogues and that the degree of induction by coenzyme B is temperature-dependent. When the temperature was lowered below 20 degrees C the percentage of MCR in the red2 state decreased and that in the red1 state increased. These changes with temperature were fully reversible. It was found that at most 50% of the enzyme was converted to the MCR-red2 state under all experimental conditions. These findings indicate that in the presence of both coenzyme M and coenzyme B only one of the two active sites of MCR can be in the red2 state (half-of-the-sites reactivity). On the basis of this interpretation a two-stroke engine mechanism for MCR is proposed.

  6. Response of AMP-activated protein kinase and energy metabolism to acute nitrite exposure in the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhixin; Li, Erchao; Xu, Chang; Gan, Lei; Qin, Jian G; Chen, Liqiao

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a prevalent mammalian energy metabolism sensor, but little is known about its role as an energy sensor in fish experiencing stress. We aimed to study AMPK in Oreochromis niloticus on both the molecular and the physical level. We found that the cDNAs encoding the AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 variants of the O. niloticus catalytic α subunit were 1753bp and 2563 bp long and encoded 571 and 557 amino acids, respectively. Both the AMPKα1 and the AMPKα2 isoform possess structural features similar to mammalian AMPKα, including a phosphorylation site at Thr172 in the N-terminus, and exhibit high homology with other fish and vertebrate AMPKα sequences (81.3%-98.1%). mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms was widely expressed in various tissues with distinctive patterns. AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 were primarily expressed in the intestines and brain, respectively. Under acute nitrite challenge, the mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms, as well as AMPK activity, changed over time. Its recovery period in freshwater, combined with the fact that it is highly conserved, suggests that fish AMPK, like its mammalian orthologues, acts as an energy metabolism sensor. Furthermore, subsequent decreases in AMPK mRNA levels and activity suggested that its action was transient but efficient. Physically, glucose, lactic acid and TGs in plasma, as well as energy materials in the hepatopancreas and muscle, were significantly altered over time, indicating changes in energy metabolism during the experimental period. These data have enabled us to characterize energy utilization in O. niloticus and further illustrate the role of fish AMPK as an energy sensor. This study provides new insight into energy metabolism and sensing by AMPK in teleost and necessitates further study of the multiple physiologic roles of AMPK in fish.

  7. Response of AMP-activated protein kinase and energy metabolism to acute nitrite exposure in the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhixin; Li, Erchao; Xu, Chang; Gan, Lei; Qin, Jian G; Chen, Liqiao

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a prevalent mammalian energy metabolism sensor, but little is known about its role as an energy sensor in fish experiencing stress. We aimed to study AMPK in Oreochromis niloticus on both the molecular and the physical level. We found that the cDNAs encoding the AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 variants of the O. niloticus catalytic α subunit were 1753bp and 2563 bp long and encoded 571 and 557 amino acids, respectively. Both the AMPKα1 and the AMPKα2 isoform possess structural features similar to mammalian AMPKα, including a phosphorylation site at Thr172 in the N-terminus, and exhibit high homology with other fish and vertebrate AMPKα sequences (81.3%-98.1%). mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms was widely expressed in various tissues with distinctive patterns. AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 were primarily expressed in the intestines and brain, respectively. Under acute nitrite challenge, the mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms, as well as AMPK activity, changed over time. Its recovery period in freshwater, combined with the fact that it is highly conserved, suggests that fish AMPK, like its mammalian orthologues, acts as an energy metabolism sensor. Furthermore, subsequent decreases in AMPK mRNA levels and activity suggested that its action was transient but efficient. Physically, glucose, lactic acid and TGs in plasma, as well as energy materials in the hepatopancreas and muscle, were significantly altered over time, indicating changes in energy metabolism during the experimental period. These data have enabled us to characterize energy utilization in O. niloticus and further illustrate the role of fish AMPK as an energy sensor. This study provides new insight into energy metabolism and sensing by AMPK in teleost and necessitates further study of the multiple physiologic roles of AMPK in fish. PMID:27262938

  8. Shoot-to-Root Signal Transmission Regulates Root Fe(III) Reductase Activity in the dgl Mutant of Pea.

    PubMed

    Grusak, M. A.; Pezeshgi, S.

    1996-01-01

    To understand the root, shoot, and Fe-nutritional factors that regulate root Fe-acquisition processes in dicotyledonous plants, Fe(III) reduction and net proton efflux were quantified in root systems of an Fe-hyperaccumulating mutant (dgl) and a parental (cv Dippes Gelbe Viktoria [DGV]) genotype of pea (Pisum sativum). Plants were grown with (+Fe treated) or without (-Fe treated) added Fe(III)-N,N'-ethylenebis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-glycine] (2 [mu]M); root Fe(III) reduction was measured in solutions containing growth nutrients, 0.1 mM Fe(III)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and 0.1 mM Na2-bathophenanthrolinedisulfonic acid. Daily measurements of Fe(III) reduction (d 10-20) revealed initially low rates in +Fe-treated and -Fe-treated dgl, followed by a nearly 5-fold stimulation in rates by d 15 for both growth types. In DGV, root Fe(III) reductase activity increased only minimally by d 20 in +Fe-treated plants and about 3-fold in -Fe-treated plants, beginning on d 15. Net proton efflux was enhanced in roots of -Fe-treated DGV and both dgl growth types, relative to +Fe-treated DGV. In dgl, the enhanced proton efflux occurred prior to the increase in root Fe(III) reductase activity. Reductase studies using plants with reciprocal shoot:root grafts demonstrated that shoot expression of the dgl gene leads to the generation of a transmissible signal that enhances Fe(III) reductase activity in roots. The dgl gene product may alter or interfere with a normal component of a signal transduction mechanism regulating Fe homeostasis in plants.

  9. Inhibition of type 1 and type 2 5alpha-reductase activity by free fatty acids, active ingredients of Permixon.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Jean Pierre; Cousse, Henri; Martin, Pierre Marie

    2002-10-01

    In different cell systems, the lipido-sterolic extract of Serenoa repens (LSESr, Permixon inhibits both type 1 and type 2 5alpha-reductase activity (5alphaR1 and 5alphaR2). LSESr is mainly constituted of fatty acids (90+/-5%) essentially as free fatty acids (80%). Among these free fatty acids, the main components are oleic and lauric acids which represent 65% and linoleic and myristic acids 15%. To evaluate the inhibitory effect of the different components of LSESr on 5alphaR1 or 5alphaR2 activity, the corresponding type 1 and type 2 human genes have been cloned and expressed in the baculovirus-directed insect cell expression system Sf9. The cells were incubated at pH 5.5 (5alphaR2) and pH 7.4 (5alphaR1) with 1 or 3nM testosterone in presence or absence of various concentrations of LSESr or of its different components. Dihydrotestosterone formation was measured with an automatic system combining HPLC and an on-line radiodetector. The inhibition of 5alphaR1 and 5alphaR2 activity was only observed with free fatty acids: esterified fatty acids, alcohols as well as sterols assayed were inactive. A specificity of the fatty acids in 5alphaR1 or 5alphaR2 inhibition has been found. Long unsaturated chains (oleic and linolenic) were active (IC(50)=4+/-2 and 13+/-3 microg/ml, respectively) on 5alphaR1 but to a much lesser extent (IC(50)>100 and 35+/-21 microg/ml, respectively) on 5alphaR2. Palmitic and stearic acids were inactive on the two isoforms. Lauric acid was active on 5alphaR1 (IC(50)=17+/-3 microg/ml) and 5alphaR2 (IC(50)=19+/-9 microg/ml). The inhibitory activity of myristic acid was evaluated on 5alphaR2 only and found active on this isoform (IC(50)=4+/-2 microg/ml). The dual inhibitory activity of LSESr on 5alpha-reductase type 1 and type 2 can be attributed to its high content in free fatty acids.

  10. Exogenous Methyl Jasmonate Treatment Increases Glucosinolate Biosynthesis and Quinone Reductase Activity in Kale Leaf Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H.; Juvik, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) spray treatments were applied to the kale varieties ‘Dwarf Blue Curled Vates’ and ‘Red Winter’ in replicated field plantings in 2010 and 2011 to investigate alteration of glucosinolate (GS) composition in harvested leaf tissue. Aqueous solutions of 250 µM MeJA were sprayed to saturation on aerial plant tissues four days prior to harvest at commercial maturity. The MeJA treatment significantly increased gluconasturtiin (56%), glucobrassicin (98%), and neoglucobrassicin (150%) concentrations in the apical leaf tissue of these genotypes over two seasons. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity, a biomarker for anti-carcinogenesis, was significantly increased by the extracts from the leaf tissue of these two cultivars. Extracts of apical leaf tissues had greater MeJA mediated increases in phenolics, glucosinolate concentrations, GS hydrolysis products, and QR activity than extracts from basal leaf tissue samples. The concentration of the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, sulforphane was significantly increased in apical leaf tissue of the cultivar ‘Red Winter’ in both 2010 and 2011. There was interaction between exogenous MeJA treatment and environmental conditions to induce endogenous JA. Correlation analysis revealed that indole-3-carbanol (I3C) generated from the hydrolysis of glucobrassicin significantly correlated with QR activity (r = 0.800, P<0.001). Concentrations required to double the specific QR activity (CD values) of I3C was calculated at 230 µM, which is considerably weaker at induction than other isothiocyanates like sulforphane. To confirm relationships between GS hydrolysis products and QR activity, a range of concentrations of MeJA sprays were applied to kale leaf tissues of both cultivars in 2011. Correlation analysis of these results indicated that sulforaphane, NI3C, neoascorbigen, I3C, and diindolylmethane were all significantly correlated with QR activity. Thus, increased QR activity may be due to

  11. Melatonin Reduces Cataract Formation and Aldose Reductase Activity in Lenses of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Marjan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Sharzad, Sahab; Beheshtitabar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between the high activity of aldose reductase (AR) and diabetic cataract formation has been previously investigated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the preventing effect of melatonin on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cataract in rats. Methods: 34 adult healthy male Sprague-Dawely rats were divided into four groups. Diabetic control and diabetic+melatonin received a single dose of STZ (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), whereas the normal control and normal+melatonin received vehicle. The melatonin groups were gavaged with melatonin (5 mg/kg) daily for a period of 8 weeks, whereas the rats in the normal control and diabetic control groups received only the vehicle. The rats’ eyes were examined every week and cataract formation scores (0-4) were determined by slit-lamp microscope. At the end of the eighth week, the rats were sacrificed and markers of the polyol pathway and antioxidative (Glutathione, GSH) in their lens were determined. The levels of blood glucose, HbA1c and plasma malondialdhyde (MDA), as a marker of lipid peroxidation, were also measured. Results: Melatonin prevented STZ-induced hyperglycemia by decreased blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Slit lamp examination indicated that melatonin delayed cataract progression in diabetic rats. The results revealed that melatonin feeding increased the GSH levels, decreased the activities of AR and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and sorbitol formation in catractous lenses as well as plasma MDA content. Conclusion: In summary, for the first time we demonstrated that melatonin delayed the formation and progression of cataract in diabetic rat lenses. PMID:27365552

  12. Dual binding of 14-3-3 protein regulates Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Chi, Jen-Chih; Roeper, Juliane; Schwarz, Guenter; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin

    2015-03-01

    14-3-3 proteins represent a family of ubiquitous eukaryotic proteins involved in numerous signal transduction processes and metabolic pathways. One important 14-3-3 target in higher plants is nitrate reductase (NR), whose activity is regulated by different physiological conditions. Intra-molecular electron transfer in NR is inhibited following 14-3-3 binding to a conserved phospho-serine motif located in hinge 1, a surface exposed loop between the catalytic molybdenum and central heme domain. Here we describe a novel 14-3-3 binding site within the NR N-terminus, an acidic motif conserved in NRs of higher plants, which significantly contributes to 14-3-3-mediated inhibition of NR. Deletion or mutation of the N-terminal acidic motif resulted in a significant loss of 14-3-3 mediated inhibition of Ser534 phosphorylated NR-Mo-heme (residues 1-625), a previously established model of NR regulation. Co-sedimentation and crosslinking studies with NR peptides comprising each of the two binding motifs demonstrated direct binding of either peptide to 14-3-3. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy disclosed high-affinity binding of 14-3-3ω to the well-known phospho-hinge site and low-affinity binding to the N-terminal acidic motif. A binding groove-deficient 14-3-3ω variant retained interaction to the acidic motif, but lost binding to the phospho-hinge motif. To our knowledge, NR is the first enzyme that harbors two independent 14-3-3 binding sites with different affinities, which both need to be occupied by 14-3-3ω to confer full inhibition of NR activity under physiological conditions. PMID:25578809

  13. Exposure to Silver Nanoparticles Inhibits Selenoprotein Synthesis and the Activity of Thioredoxin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Milan; Singh, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Background: Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver (Ag)-based materials are increasingly being incorporated into consumer products, and although humans have been exposed to colloidal Ag in many forms for decades, this rise in the use of Ag materials has spurred interest into their toxicology. Recent reports have shown that exposure to AgNPs or Ag ions leads to oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and reduced cell proliferation. Previous studies have shown that Ag accumulates in tissues as silver sulfides (Ag2S) and silver selenide (Ag2Se). Objectives: In this study we investigated whether exposure of cells in culture to AgNPs or Ag ions at subtoxic doses would alter the effective metabolism of selenium, that is, the incorporation of selenium into selenoproteins. Methods: For these studies we used a keratinocyte cell model (HaCat) and a lung cell model (A549). We also tested (in vitro, both cellular and chemical) whether Ag ions could inhibit the activity of a key selenoenzyme, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Results: We found that exposure to AgNPs or far lower levels of Ag ions led to a dose-dependent inhibition of selenium metabolism in both cell models. The synthesis of protein was not altered under these conditions. Exposure to nanomolar levels of Ag ions effectively blocked selenium metabolism, suggesting that Ag ion leaching was likely the mechanism underlying observed changes during AgNP exposure. Exposure likewise inhibited TrxR activity in cultured cells, and Ag ions were potent inhibitors of purified rat TrxR isoform 1 (cytosolic) (TrxR1) enzyme. Conclusions: Exposure to AgNPs leads to the inhibition of selenoprotein synthesis and inhibition of TrxR1. Further, we propose these two sites of action comprise the likely mechanism underlying increases in oxidative stress, increases endoplasmic reticulum stress, and reduced cell proliferation during exposure to Ag. PMID:21965219

  14. Mercury Resistance and Mercuric Reductase Activities and Expression among Chemotrophic Thermophilic Aquificae

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Zachary; Zhu, Chengsheng

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance (mer) by the reduction of mercuric to elemental Hg is broadly distributed among the Bacteria and Archaea and plays an important role in Hg detoxification and biogeochemical cycling. MerA is the protein subunit of the homodimeric mercuric reductase (MR) enzyme, the central function of the mer system. MerA sequences in the phylum Aquificae form the deepest-branching lineage in Bayesian phylogenetic reconstructions of all known MerA homologs. We therefore hypothesized that the merA homologs in two thermophilic Aquificae, Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 (AAS1) and Hydrogenivirga sp. strain 128-5-R1-1 (R1-1), specified Hg resistance. Results supported this hypothesis, because strains AAS1 and R1-1 (i) were resistant to >10 μM Hg(II), (ii) transformed Hg(II) to Hg(0) during cellular growth, and (iii) possessed Hg-dependent NAD(P)H oxidation activities in crude cell extracts that were optimal at temperatures corresponding with the strains' optimal growth temperatures, 55°C for AAS1 and 70°C for R1-1. While these characteristics all conformed with the mer system paradigm, expression of the Aquificae mer operons was not induced by exposure to Hg(II) as indicated by unity ratios of merA transcripts, normalized to gyrA transcripts for hydrogen-grown AAS1 cultures, and by similar MR specific activities in thiosulfate-grown cultures with and without Hg(II). The Hg(II)-independent expression of mer in the deepest-branching lineage of MerA from bacteria whose natural habitats are Hg-rich geothermal environments suggests that regulated expression of mer was a later innovation likely in environments where microorganisms were intermittently exposed to toxic concentrations of Hg. PMID:22773655

  15. The effect of acute stress and opioid antagonist on the activity of NADPH-P450 reductase in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Kostić, T; Andrić, S; Marić, D; Kovacević, R

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies indicate that acute immobilization stress (IMO; 2 h) impaired testicular steroidogenesis primarily at the testicular level decreasing the activity of certain steroidogenic enzymes. In the present study unstressed rats as well as IMO rats (2 h) were treated by intratesticular injection of naltrexone methobromide (NMB; peripheral opioid receptor antagonist; 36 microg/testis) or vehicle at the beginning of and at 1 h of the IMO period. In IMO rats the activity of P450c17 was significantly reduced as well as the activity of NADPH-P450 reductase (which catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADPH to cytochrome P450), while the activity of NADH-b5 reductase was not affected. Present data confirmed previous results that acute IMO reduced testicular P450c17 activity and implicate that decreased activity of NADPH-P450 reductase could be responsible for the inhibition of P450c17 under IMO conditions, while NADH-b5 reductase is probably not involved. NMB treatment antagonized the inhibitory effect of IMO on P450c17 and NADPH-P450 reductase activities. Such results put forward the implication that endogenous opioid peptides are involved in mediating the inhibitory effect of IMO on testicular steroidogenesis, and allow the speculation that NADPH-P450 reductase could be a possible site of such an inhibition. PMID:9712411

  16. Polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and apolipoprotein E in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Al-Mueilo, Samir; Al-Ali, Amein; Larbi, Emmanuel; Rubaish, Abdullah; Abdulmohsen, Mohammed Fakhry; Al-Zahrani, Alhussain; Al-Ateeq, Suad

    2008-11-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism, apolipoprotein E (apo epsilon4) gene polymorphism and polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been shown to be associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). To determine the prevalence of these mutations in Saudi patients with ESRD on hemodialysis, we studied the allelic frequency and genotype distribution in patients receiving hemodialysis and in a control group, all residing in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. The genotypes were determined using allele specific hybridization procedures and were confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The T allele frequency and homozygous genotype of MTHFR in ESRD patients were 14% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13.4% and 0%, respectively in the control group. The allele frequency and homozygous genotype of 4G/4G PAI-1 gene polymorphism were 46.4% and 4.8% respectively in ESRD patients compared to 57.1% and 32% respectively in the control group. The apo s4 allele frequency and homozygous genotype distribution in hemodialysis patients were 7% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13% and 2% in the control group. Although allele frequency of C677T of MTHFR was statistically similar in the hemodialysis patients and in the control group, the homozygotes T allele genotype was over represented in the hemodialysis group compared to normal. The prevalence of PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism in ESRD patients was lower when compared to the control group. The prevalence of apo s4 allele did not differ significantly between the two groups. The present results demonstrate that all three studied polymorphic mutations are present in our population and that they may contribute to the etiology of the disease in our area. PMID:18974580

  17. A novel method of measuring reduction of nitrite-induced methemoglobin applied to fetal and adult blood of humans and sheep.

    PubMed

    Power, Gordon G; Bragg, Shannon L; Oshiro, Bryan T; Dejam, Andre; Hunter, Christian J; Blood, Arlin B

    2007-10-01

    The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin results in the production of nitric oxide and methemoglobin, a reaction recently proposed as an important oxygen-sensitive source of vasoactive nitric oxide during hypoxic and anoxic stress, with several animal studies suggesting that nitrite may have therapeutic potential. Accumulation of toxic levels of methemoglobin is suppressed by reductase enzymes present within the erythrocyte. Using a novel method of measuring methemoglobin reductase activity in intact erythrocytes, we compared fetal and adult sheep and human blood. After nitrite-induced production of 20% methemoglobin, the blood was equilibrated with carbon monoxide, which effectively stopped further production. Methemoglobin disappearance was first order in nature with specific rate constants (k x 1,000) of 12.9 +/- 1.3 min(-1) for fetal sheep, 5.88 +/- 0.26 min(-1) for adult sheep, 4.27 +/- 0.34 for adult humans, and 3.30 +/- 0.15 for newborn cord blood, all statistically different from one another. The effects of oxygen tensions, pH, hemolysis, and methylene blue are reported. Studies of temperature dependence indicated an activation energy of 8,620 +/- 1,060 calories/mol (2.06 kJ/mol), appreciably higher than would be characteristic of processes limited by passive membrane diffusion. In conclusion, the novel methodology permits absolute quantification of the reduction of nitrite-induced methemoglobin in whole blood.

  18. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    PubMed

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  19. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  20. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  1. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  2. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  3. Nitrite in organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Rassaf, Tienush; Ferdinandy, Peter; Schulz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has emerged to therapeutical importance. Modulation of endogenous nitrate and nitrite levels with the subsequent S-nitros(yl)ation of the downstream signalling cascade open the way for novel cytoprotective strategies. In the following, we summarize the actual literature and give a short overview on the potential of nitrite in organ protection. PMID:23826831

  4. Nitrite impacts the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in response to isoniazid and hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Bussel, Amy; Bange, Franz C; Nathan, Carl F

    2013-01-01

    When access to molecular oxygen is restricted, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) can respire an alternative electron acceptor, nitrate. We found that Mtb within infected primary human macrophages in vitro at physiologic tissue oxygen tensions respired nitrate, generating copious nitrite. A strain of Mtb lacking a functioning nitrate reductase was more susceptible than wild-type Mtb to treatment with isoniazid during infection of macrophages. Likewise, nitrate reductase-deficient Mtb was more susceptible to isoniazid than wild-type Mtb in axenic culture, and more resistant to hydrogen peroxide. These phenotypes were reversed by the addition of exogenous nitrite. Further investigation suggested that nitrite might inhibit the bacterial catalase. To the extent that Mtb itself is the most relevant source of nitrite acting within Mtb, these findings suggest that inhibitors of Mtb's nitrate transporter or nitrate reductase could enhance the efficacy of isoniazid. PMID:24019302

  5. Identification of one-electron reductases that activate both the hypoxia prodrug SN30000 and diagnostic probe EF5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingli; Guise, Chris P; Dachs, Gabi U; Phung, Yen; Hsu, Annie Huai-Ling; Lambie, Neil K; Patterson, Adam V; Wilson, William R

    2014-10-15

    SN30000 is a second-generation benzotriazine-N-oxide hypoxia-activated prodrug scheduled for clinical trial. Previously we showed that covalent binding of the hypoxia probe EF5 predicts metabolic activation of SN30000 in a panel of cancer cell lines under anoxia, suggesting that they are activated by the same reductases. However the identity of these reductases is unknown. Here, we test whether forced expression of nine oxidoreductases with known or suspected roles in bioreductive prodrug metabolism (AKR1C3, CYB5R3, FDXR, MTRR, NDOR1, NOS2A, NQO1, NQO2 and POR) enhances oxic or anoxic reduction of SN30000 and EF5 by HCT116 cells. Covalent binding of (14)C-EF5 and reduction of SN30000 to its 1-oxide and nor-oxide metabolites was highly selective for anoxia in all lines, with significantly elevated anoxic metabolism of both compounds in lines over-expressing POR, MTRR, NOS2A or NDOR1. There was a strong correlation between EF5 binding and SN30000 metabolism under anoxia across the cell lines (R(2)=0.84, p=0.0001). Antiproliferative potency of SN30000 under anoxia was increased most strongly by overexpression of MTRR and POR. Transcript abundance in human tumours, evaluated using public domain mRNA expression data, was highest for MTRR, followed by POR, NOS2A and NDOR1, with little variation between tumour types. Immunostaining of tissue microarrays demonstrated variable MTRR protein expression across 517 human cancers with most displaying low expression. In conclusion, we have identified four diflavin reductases (POR, MTRR, NOS2A and NDOR1) capable of reducing both SN30000 and EF5, further supporting use of 2-nitroimidazole probes to predict the ability of hypoxic cells to activate SN30000. PMID:25130546

  6. Diurnal variation in the fraction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in the active form in the mammary gland of the lactating rat.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R A; Middleton, B; West, D W

    1986-01-01

    'Expressed' and 'total' activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) were measured in freeze-clamped samples of mammary glands from lactating rats at intervals throughout the 24 h light/dark cycle. 'Expressed' activities were measured in microsomal fractions isolated and assayed in the presence of 100 mM-KF. 'Total' activities were determined in microsomal preparations from the same homogenates but washed free of KF and incubated with exogenously added sheep liver phosphoprotein phosphatase before assay. Both 'expressed' and 'total' activities of HMG-CoA reductase underwent a diurnal cycle, which had a major peak 6 h into the light phase and a nadir 15 h later, i.e. 9 h into the dark period. Both activities showed a secondary peak of activity (around 68% of the maximum activity) at the time of changeover from dark to light, with a trough in the value of the 'expressed' activity that was close to the nadir value. 'Expressed' activity was lower than 'total' at all time points, indicating the presence of enzyme molecules inactivated by covalent phosphorylation. Nevertheless the 'expressed'/'total' activity ratio was comparatively constant and varied only between 43% and 75%. Immunotitration of enzyme activity, with antiserum raised in sheep against purified rat liver HMG-CoA reductase, confirmed the presence of both active and inactive forms of the enzyme and indicated that at the peak and nadir the variation in 'expressed' HMG-CoA reductase activity resulted from changes in the total number of enzyme molecules rather than from covalent modification. The sample obtained after 3 h of the light phase exhibited an anomalously low 'total' HMG-CoA reductase activity, which could be increased when Cl- replaced F- in the homogenization medium. The result suggests that at that time the activity of the enzyme could be regulated by mechanisms other than covalent phosphorylation or degradation. PMID:3814075

  7. Location of the redox-active thiols of ribonucleotide reductase: sequences similarity between the Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus leichmannii enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, A.N.I.; Ashley, G.W.; Stubbe, J.

    1987-11-03

    The redox-active thiols of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase and of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase have been located by a procedure involving (1) prereduction of enzyme with dithiothreitol, (2) specific oxidation of the redox-active thiols by treatment with substrate in the absence of exogenous reductant, (3) alkylation of other thiols with iodoacetamide, and (4) reduction of the disulfides with dithiothreitol and alkylation with (1-/sup 14/C)iodoacetamide. The dithiothreitol-reduce E. coli B1 subunit is able to convert 3 equiv of CDP to dCDP and is labeled with 5.4 equiv of /sup 14/C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 2.8 equiv of /sup 14/C is on cysteines-752 and -757 at the C-terminus of B1, while 1.0-1.5 equiv of /sup 14/C is on cysteines-222 and -227. It thus appears that two sets of redox-active dithiols are involved in substrate reduction. The L. leichmannii reductase is able to convert 1.1 equiv of CTP to dCTP and is labeled with 2.1 equiv of /sup 14/C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 1.4 equiv of /sup 14/C is located on the two cysteines of C-E-G-G-A-C-P-I-K. This peptide shows remarkable and unexpected similarity to the thiol-containing region of the C-terminal peptide of E. coli B1, C-E-S-G-A-C-K-I.

  8. Effects of SRT and DO on N2O reductase activity in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Noda, N; Kaneko, N; Mikami, M; Kimochi, Y; Tsuneda, S; Hirata, A; Mizuochi, M; Inamori, Y

    2003-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is emitted from wastewater treatment processes, and is known to be a green house gas contributing to global warming. It is thus important to develop technology that can suppress N2O emission. The effects of sludge retention time (SRT) and dissolved oxygen (DO) on N2O emission in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system were estimated. Moreover, the microbial community structure in the sludge, which plays an important role in N2O suppression, was clarified based on nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) gene analysis by molecular biological techniques. The results showed that under low SRT conditions, nitrification efficiency was reduced and the N2O emission rate in the oxic reactors was increased. It was also observed that N2O emission was enhanced under low DO conditions, where the available oxygen is insufficient for nitrification. Moreover, molecular analysis revealed that the clones identified in this study were closely related to Ralstonia eutropha and Paracoccus denitrificans. The fact that the identified sequences are not closely related to known culturable denitrifier nosZ sequences indicates a substantial in situ diversity of denitrifiers contributing to N2O suppression, which are not reflected in the cultivatable fraction of the population. The further application of these new molecular techniques should serve to enhance our knowledge of the microbial community of denitrifying bacteria contributing to N2O suppression in wastewater treatment systems.

  9. Induction of a deficiency of steroid delta 4-5 alpha-reductase activity in liver by a porphyrinogenic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Kappas, A; Bradlow, H L; Bickers, D R; Alvares, A P

    1977-01-01

    The hepatic enzymes that catalyze drug oxidations and the reductive metabolism of steroid hormones to 5alpha-derivatives are localized in membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Phenobarbital, which exacerbates acute intermittent porphyria in man, induces drug-oxidizing enzymes in liver. Additionally, patients in whome the primary gene defect (uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase deficiency) of acute intermittent porphyria has become clinically expressed have low levels of hepatic steroid delta4-5alpha-reductase activity. This 5alpha-reductase deficiency in acute intermittent porphyria leads to the disproportionate generation of 5beta-steroid metabolites from precursor hormones; such steroid metabolites have significant porphyria-inducing action experimentally. In this study the effects of phenobarbital on drug oxidation and steroid 5alpha-reduction in man were examined to determine if this drug could produce changes in steroid 5alpha-reductase activity which mimicked those seen in patients with acute intermittent porphyria. Metabolic studies with [14C]-testosterone and 11beta-[3H]hydroxyandrostenedione were carried out in five normal volunteers. In all five subjects phenobarbital administration (2 mg/kg/per day for 21 days) enhanced plasma removal of the test drugs antipyrine and phenylbutazone as expected; but in four subjects phenobarbital also substantially depressed 5alpha-metabolite formation from [14C]testosterone and resulted in a pattern of hormone biotransformation characterized by a high ratio of 5beta/5alpha-metabolite formation. Studies with 11beta-[3H]hydroxy-androstenedione in three subjects confirmed that phenobarbital produced this high 5beta/5alpha ratio of steroid metabolism by depressing 5alpha-reductase activity for steroid hormones in liver. The high ratio of 5beta/5alpha-metabolites formed in normals after drug treatment mimicks the high 5beta/5alpha-steroid metabolite ratio formed from endogenous hormones in acute intermittent porphyria. The

  10. Antihyperlipidemic Activity of Aloe succotrina in Rats: Possibly Mediated by Inhibition of HMG-CoA Reductase.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Dinesh; Lamba, Deepak; Kumar, Ramesh; Nath, Pashupati; Gauttam, Satyaprakash

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate antihyperlipidemic activity of dried pulp of Aloe succotrina leaves in Wistar albino rats. Hyperlipidemia was induced in rats by feeding them high fat diet (HFD) or D-fructose (25% w/v) for 4 successive weeks. From 15th to 28th day, dried pulp (100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o) and atorvastatin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) per se were administered 2 h prior to feeding rats with HFD or fructose. Aloe succotrina did not significantly decrease the body weight of rats. The dried pulp and atorvastatin per se significantly decreased relative liver weight but did not significantly affect relative heart weight. HFD or fructose significantly increased serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-c, and VLDL, and decreased HDL-c; significantly increased liver MDA and decreased GSH levels. The dried pulp (200 mg/kg p.o.) significantly reversed high fat diet-induced and fructose-induced hyperlipidemia and atherogenic index. Aloe succotrina significantly decreased HMG Co-A reductase activity. Antihyperlipidemic effect of the dried pulp was comparable to atorvastatin. Thus, Aloe succotrina produced significant antihyperlipidemic activity in both HFD and fructose-induced hyperlipidemic rats, possibly through normalization of serum lipid profile, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity, and amelioration of oxidative stress in liver. PMID:24693447

  11. Inhibitory Activities of Phenolic Compounds Isolated from Adina rubella Leaves Against 5α-Reductase Associated with Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Heo, Jun Hyeok; Hwang, Yoon Jeong; Le, Thi Tam; Lee, Min Won

    2016-01-01

    Adina rubella Hance (AR), a plant native to Korea, has been used as traditional medicine for dysentery, eczema, intoxication, and external hemorrhages. Previous phytochemical studies of AR have reported several components, including terpenoids, phenolics, and alkaloids. The current study evaluated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities and 5α-reductase inhibition of isolated compounds of AR leaves to find a potential therapeutic agent for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Repeated chromatographic isolation of an 80% acetone extract of AR leaves yielded seven phenolic compounds: caffeic acid (1), chlorogenic acid (2), methyl chlorogenate (3), quercetin-3-rutinoside (4), kaempferol-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-d-glucopyranoside (5), hyperoside (6), and grandifloroside (7). Compound 7 is a novel compound in AR. Caffeoyl derivatives 1-3 and 7 showed good anti-oxidative activities. In particular, caffeic acid (1) and grandifloroside (7) showed potent anti-inflammatory activities, and 7 also exhibited potent inhibitory activity against TNF-α and 5α-reductase. Our results show that the extract and grandifloroside (7) from leaves of AR might be developed as a source of potent anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agents and therapeutic agent for BPH. PMID:27399661

  12. Both Plant and Bacterial Nitrate Reductases Contribute to Nitric Oxide Production in Medicago truncatula Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Horchani, Faouzi; Prévot, Marianne; Boscari, Alexandre; Evangelisti, Edouard; Meilhoc, Eliane; Bruand, Claude; Raymond, Philippe; Boncompagni, Eric; Aschi-Smiti, Samira; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling and defense molecule of major importance in living organisms. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, NO production has been detected in the nitrogen fixation zone of the nodule, but the systems responsible for its synthesis are yet unknown and its role in symbiosis is far from being elucidated. In this work, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we explored the enzymatic source of NO production in M. truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti nodules under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. When transferred from normoxia to hypoxia, nodule NO production was rapidly increased, indicating that NO production capacity is present in functioning nodules and may be promptly up-regulated in response to decreased oxygen availability. Contrary to roots and leaves, nodule NO production was stimulated by nitrate and nitrite and inhibited by tungstate, a nitrate reductase inhibitor. Nodules obtained with either plant nitrate reductase RNA interference double knockdown (MtNR1/2) or bacterial nitrate reductase-deficient (napA) and nitrite reductase-deficient (nirK) mutants, or both, exhibited reduced nitrate or nitrite reductase activities and NO production levels. Moreover, NO production in nodules was found to be inhibited by electron transfer chain inhibitors, and nodule energy state (ATP-ADP ratio) was significantly reduced when nodules were incubated in the presence of tungstate. Our data indicate that both plant and bacterial nitrate reductase and electron transfer chains are involved in NO synthesis. We propose the existence of a nitrate-NO respiration process in nodules that could play a role in the maintenance of the energy status required for nitrogen fixation under oxygen-limiting conditions. PMID:21139086

  13. Nitrite inhalants: history, epidemiology, and possible links to AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Haverkos, H W; Kopstein, A N; Wilson, H; Drotman, P

    1994-01-01

    Nitrite inhalants have been commonly abused substances in the United States. Nitrite inhalants and AIDS was a popular topic in the early 1980s, when the cause of AIDS was not known. With the discovery of HIV, concern about nitrite use in the USA waned. However, nitrite inhalant use is associated with behavioral relapse and HIV transmission among gay men, with decreased lymphocyte counts and natural killer cell activity in a few laboratory studies, and it remains a candidate cofactor in the pathogenesis of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. Discouraging nitrite use continues to be a worthwhile public health goal. PMID:9644194

  14. Mercuric reductase activity and evidence of broad-spectrum mercury resistance among clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Steingrube, V.A.; Wallace, R.J. Jr.; Steele, L.C.; Pang, Y.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Resistance to mercury was evaluated in 356 rapidly growing mycobacteria belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Resistance to inorganic Hg2+ ranged from 0% among the unnamed third biovariant complex of Mycobacterium fortuitum to 83% among M. chelonae-like organisms. With cell extracts and 203Hg(NO3)2 as the substrate, mercuric reductase (HgRe) activity was demonstrable in six of eight taxonomic groups. HgRe activity was inducible and required NADPH or NADH and a thiol donor for optimai activity. Species with HgRe activity were also resistant to organomercurial compounds, including phenylmercuric acetate. Attempts at intraspecies and intragenus transfer of HgRe activity by conjugation or transformation were unsuccessful. Mercury resistance is common in rapidly growing mycobacteria and appears to function via the same inducible enzyme systems already defined in other bacterial species. This system offers potential as a strain marker for epidemiologic investigations and for studying genetic systems in rapidly growing mycobacteria.

  15. Genome sequence of the chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Nb-255

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Larimer, Frank W; Arp, D J; Hickey, W J

    2006-03-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi (ATCC 25391) is a gram-negative facultative chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy from the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Sequencing and analysis of its genome revealed a single circular chromosome of 3,402,093 bp encoding 3,143 predicted proteins. There were extensive similarities to genes in two alphaproteobacteria, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 (1,300 genes) and Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 CG (815 genes). Genes encoding pathways for known modes of chemolithotrophic and chemoorganotrophic growth were identified. Genes encoding multiple enzymes involved in anapleurotic reactions centered on C2 to C4 metabolism, including a glyoxylate bypass, were annotated. The inability of N. winogradskyi to grow on C6 molecules is consistent with the genome sequence, which lacks genes for complete Embden-Meyerhof and Entner-Doudoroff pathways, and active uptake of sugars. Two gene copies of the nitrite oxidoreductase, type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, cytochrome c oxidase, and gene homologs encoding an aerobic-type carbon monoxide dehydrogenase were present. Similarity of nitrite oxidoreductases to respiratory nitrate reductases was confirmed. Approximately 10% of the N. winogradskyi genome codes for genes involved in transport and secretion, including the presence of transporters for various organic-nitrogen molecules. The N. winogradskyi genome provides new insight into the phylogenetic identity and physiological capabilities of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The genome will serve as a model to study the cellular and molecular processes that control nitrite oxidation and its interaction with other nitrogen-cycling processes.

  16. Hydrogen Bonding Networks Tune Proton-Coupled Redox Steps during the Enzymatic Six-Electron Conversion of Nitrite to Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multielectron multiproton reactions play an important role in both biological systems and chemical reactions involved in energy storage and manipulation. A key strategy employed by nature in achieving such complex chemistry is the use of proton-coupled redox steps. Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) catalyzes the six-electron seven-proton reduction of nitrite to ammonia. While a catalytic mechanism for ccNiR has been proposed on the basis of studies combining computation and crystallography, there have been few studies directly addressing the nature of the proton-coupled events that are predicted to occur along the nitrite reduction pathway. Here we use protein film voltammetry to directly interrogate the proton-coupled steps that occur during nitrite reduction by ccNiR. We find that conversion of nitrite to ammonia by ccNiR adsorbed to graphite electrodes is defined by two distinct phases; one is proton-coupled, and the other is not. Mutation of key active site residues (H257, R103, and Y206) modulates these phases and specifically alters the properties of the detected proton-dependent step but does not inhibit the ability of ccNiR to conduct the full reduction of nitrite to ammonia. We conclude that the active site residues examined are responsible for tuning the protonation steps that occur during catalysis, likely through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, but are not necessarily required for the reaction to proceed. These results provide important insight into how enzymes can specifically tune proton- and electron transfer steps to achieve high turnover numbers in a physiological pH range. PMID:25137350

  17. Evaluation of the impact on food safety of a Lactobacillus coryniformis strain from pickled vegetables with degradation activity against nitrite and other undesirable compounds.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Feng, Tingting; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Four strains of lactic acid bacteria showing antimicrobial activity against some food-spoilage microorganisms or pathogens, including both Gram-negative and -positive strains, were isolated from naturally fermented pickled vegetables and a traditional cheese product. Among these isolates, Lactobacillus coryniformis strain BBE-H3, characterised previously to be a non-biogenic amine producer, showed a high level of activity in degrading sodium nitrite and exhibited the ability to eliminate ethyl carbamate and one of its precursors, urea. The antimicrobial substance produced by L. coryniformis BBE-H3 was found to be active at an acidic pH range of 4.0-4.5. The antimicrobial activity of this strain decreased differentially after treatment with proteolytic enzymes (pepsin, papain, trypsin and proteinase K), implying this growth inhibitory compound is either a protein or a polypeptide. The results of this study show the suitability of L. coryniformis BBE-H3 as a starter in food manufacturing processes, and demonstrate its potential role in eliminating food origin carcinogens such as sodium nitrite and ethyl carbamate. PMID:26898528

  18. Acetate limitation and nitrite accumulation during denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, J.; Silverstein, J.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrite accumulated in denitrifying activated sludge mixed liquor when the carbon and electron source, acetate, was limited. If acetate was added to obtain a carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio in the range of 2:1 to 3:1, nitrate was completely consumed at the same rate with no nitrite accumulation, indicating that nitrate concentration controlled the respiration rate as long as sufficient substrate was present. However, when acetate was reduced to a C:N ratio of 1:1, while nitrate continued to be consumed, > 50% of the initial nitrate-nitrogen accumulated as nitrite and 29% persisted as nitrite throughout an endogenous denitrification period of 8--9 h. While nitrite accumulated during acetate-limited denitrification, the specific nitrate reduction rate increased significantly compared with the rate when excess acetate was provided as follows: 0.034 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h versus 0.023 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h, respective. This may be explained by nitrate respiration out-competing nitrite respiration for limited acetate electrons. Complete restoration of balanced denitrification and elimination of nitrite accumulation during denitrification required several weeks after the C:N ratio was increased back to 2:1.

  19. FVT-1 is a mammalian 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase with an active site that faces the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Akio; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2004-11-19

    Sphingolipids are essential membrane components of eukaryotic cells. Their synthesis is initiated with the condensation of l-serine with palmitoyl-CoA, producing 3-ketodihydrosphingosine (KDS), followed by a reduction to dihydrosphingosine by KDS reductase. Until now, only yeast TSC10 has been identified as a KDS reductase gene. Here, we provide evidence that the human FVT-1 (hFVT-1) and mouse FVT-1 (mFVT-1) are functional mammalian KDS reductases. The forced expression of hFVT-1 or mFVT-1 in TSC10-null yeast cells suppressed growth defects, and hFVT-1 overproduced in cultured cells exhibited KDS reductase activity in vitro. Moreover, purified recombinant hFVT-1 protein exhibited NADPH-dependent KDS reductase activity. The identification of the FVT-1 genes enabled us to characterize the mammalian KDS reductase at the molecular level. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that both hFVT-1 and mFVT-1 mRNAs are ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that FVT-1 is a major KDS reductase. We also found the presence of hFVT-1 variants, which were differentially expressed among tissues. Immunofluorescence microscopic analysis revealed that hFVT-1 is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, a proteinase K digestion assay revealed that the large hydrophilic domain of hFVT-1, which contains putative active site residues, faces the cytosol. These results suggest that KDS is converted to dihydrosphingosine in the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Moreover, the topology studies provide insight into the spatial organization of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway.

  20. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense.

  1. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense. PMID:24288981

  2. Probing the Active Site of Candida Glabrata Dihydrofolate Reductase with High Resolution Crystal Structures and the Synthesis of New Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Smith, A; Priestley, N; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a fungal strain resistant to many commonly administered antifungal agents, has become an emerging threat to human health. In previous work, we validated that the essential enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase, is a drug target in C. glabrata. Using a crystal structure of dihydrofolate reductase from C. glabrata bound to an initial lead compound, we designed a class of biphenyl antifolates that potently and selectively inhibit both the enzyme and the growth of the fungal culture. In this work, we explore the structure-activity relationships of this class of antifolates with four new high resolution crystal structures of enzyme:inhibitor complexes and the synthesis of four new inhibitors. The designed inhibitors are intended to probe key hydrophobic pockets visible in the crystal structure. The crystal structures and an evaluation of the new compounds reveal that methyl groups at the meta and para positions of the distal phenyl ring achieve the greatest number of interactions with the pathogenic enzyme and the greatest degree of selectivity over the human enzyme. Additionally, antifungal activity can be tuned with substitution patterns at the propargyl and para-phenyl positions.

  3. Inhabitancy of active Nitrosopumilus-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the sponge Theonella swinhoei

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guofang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification directly contributes to the ammonia removal in sponges, and it plays an indispensable role in sponge-mediated nitrogen cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated genomic evidences of nitrifying lineages in the sponge Theonella swinhoei. However, little is known about the transcriptional activity of nitrifying community in this sponge. In this study, combined DNA- and transcript-based analyses were performed to reveal the composition and transcriptional activity of the nitrifiers in T. swinhoei from the South China Sea. Transcriptional activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in this sponge were confirmed by targeting their nitrifying genes,16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis coupled with RDP rRNA classification indicated that archaeal 16S rRNA genes, amoA (the subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrosopumilus-like AOA; whereas nitrifying bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nxrB (the subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrospira NOB. Quantitative assessment demonstrated relative higher abundances of nitrifying genes and transcripts of Nitrosopumilus-like AOA than those of Nitrospira NOB in this sponge. This study illustrated the transcriptional potentials of Nitrosopumilus-like archaea and Nitrospira bacteria that would predominantly contribute to the nitrification functionality in the South China Sea T. swinhoei. PMID:27113140

  4. Inhabitancy of active Nitrosopumilus-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the sponge Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guofang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification directly contributes to the ammonia removal in sponges, and it plays an indispensable role in sponge-mediated nitrogen cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated genomic evidences of nitrifying lineages in the sponge Theonella swinhoei. However, little is known about the transcriptional activity of nitrifying community in this sponge. In this study, combined DNA- and transcript-based analyses were performed to reveal the composition and transcriptional activity of the nitrifiers in T. swinhoei from the South China Sea. Transcriptional activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in this sponge were confirmed by targeting their nitrifying genes,16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis coupled with RDP rRNA classification indicated that archaeal 16S rRNA genes, amoA (the subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrosopumilus-like AOA; whereas nitrifying bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nxrB (the subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrospira NOB. Quantitative assessment demonstrated relative higher abundances of nitrifying genes and transcripts of Nitrosopumilus-like AOA than those of Nitrospira NOB in this sponge. This study illustrated the transcriptional potentials of Nitrosopumilus-like archaea and Nitrospira bacteria that would predominantly contribute to the nitrification functionality in the South China Sea T. swinhoei. PMID:27113140

  5. Inhabitancy of active Nitrosopumilus-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the sponge Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guofang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification directly contributes to the ammonia removal in sponges, and it plays an indispensable role in sponge-mediated nitrogen cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated genomic evidences of nitrifying lineages in the sponge Theonella swinhoei. However, little is known about the transcriptional activity of nitrifying community in this sponge. In this study, combined DNA- and transcript-based analyses were performed to reveal the composition and transcriptional activity of the nitrifiers in T. swinhoei from the South China Sea. Transcriptional activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in this sponge were confirmed by targeting their nitrifying genes,16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis coupled with RDP rRNA classification indicated that archaeal 16S rRNA genes, amoA (the subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrosopumilus-like AOA; whereas nitrifying bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nxrB (the subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrospira NOB. Quantitative assessment demonstrated relative higher abundances of nitrifying genes and transcripts of Nitrosopumilus-like AOA than those of Nitrospira NOB in this sponge. This study illustrated the transcriptional potentials of Nitrosopumilus-like archaea and Nitrospira bacteria that would predominantly contribute to the nitrification functionality in the South China Sea T. swinhoei.

  6. NAD(P)H nitroblue tetrazolium reductase levels in apparently normoxic tissues: a histochemical study correlating enzyme activity with binding of radiolabelled misonidazole.

    PubMed

    Cobb, L M; Hacker, T; Nolan, J

    1990-04-01

    Hack and Helmy's method for the histochemical identification of NAD(P)H nitroblue tetrazolium reductase activity was employed to pinpoint reductase activity in certain cells in the mouse. High activity was observed in the following: lower airway epithelium, liver (centrilobular zone), eyelid (meibomian and sebaceous glands), vulval gland and parotid gland (striated cells of intralobular ducts). All of these cells had previously been identified as sites of binding of the reactive metabolites formed from the enzymic reduction of misonidazole (MISO) (Cobb et al., 1989). It had previously been thought that MISO binding would only take place in significant amounts in hypoxic tissues (tumour and possibly liver) since in normoxic tissues oxygen should reverse the initial one electron enzymic reduction, thus preventing progressive reduction to reactive species. We suggest that the very high levels of reductase in the above listed, probably normoxic, tissues contribute significantly to the accumulation of bound reactive MISO metabolite(s).

  7. Variation of glucosinolates and quinone reductase activity among different varieties of Chinese kale and improvement of glucoraphanin by metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hongmei; Sun, Bo; Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Xu, Chaojiong; Wang, Qiaomei

    2015-02-01

    The variation of glucosinolates and quinone reductase (QR) activity in fourteen varieties of Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey) was investigated in the present study. Results showed that gluconapin (GNA), instead of glucoraphanin (GRA), was the most predominant glucosinolate in all varieties, and QR activity was remarkably positively correlated with the glucoraphanin level. AOP2, a tandem 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, catalyzes the conversion of glucoraphanin to gluconapin in glucosinolate biosynthesis. Here, antisense AOP2 was transformed into Gailan-04, the variety with the highest gluconapin content and ratio of GNA/GRA. The glucoraphanin content and corresponding QR activity were notably increased in transgenic plants, while no significant difference at the level of other main nutritional compounds (total phenolics, vitamin C, carotenoids and chlorophyll) was observed between the transgenic lines and the wide-type plants. Taken together, metabolic engineering is a good practice for improvement of glucoraphanin in Chinese kale.

  8. New enzyme belonging to the family of molybdenum-free nitrate reductases.

    PubMed Central

    Antipov, Alexey N; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; L'Vov, Nikolay P; Kuenen, J Gijs

    2003-01-01

    A novel molybdenum-free nitrate reductase was isolated from the obligate chemolithoautotrophic and facultative anaerobic, (halo)alkaliphilic sulphur-oxidizing bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens strain ALEN 2. The enzyme was found to contain vanadium and haem c as cofactors. Its native molecular mass was determined as 195 kDa, and the enzyme consists of four identical subunits with apparent molecular masses of 57 kDa. Apart from nitrate, the enzyme can utilize nitrite, chlorate, bromate, selenate and sulphite as electron acceptors. Moreover, it also has a haloperoxidase activity. PMID:12238951

  9. Nitrite-catalase interaction as an important element of nitrite toxicity.

    PubMed

    Titov, V Yu; Petrenko, Yu M

    2003-06-01

    It was established that nitrite in the presence of chloride, bromide, and thiocyanate decreases the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase. The decrease was recorded by the permanganatometric method and by a method of dynamic calorimetry. Nitrite was not destroyed in the course of the reaction and the total value of heat produced in the process was not changed by its presence. These facts suggest that nitrite induces inhibition of catalase with no change in the essence of the enzymatic process. Even micromolar nitrite concentrations induced a considerable decrease in catalase activity. However, in the absence of chloride, bromide, and thiocyanate inhibition was not observed. In contrast, fluoride protected catalase from nitrite inhibition in the presence of the above-mentioned halides and pseudohalide. As hydrogen peroxide is a necessary factor for triggering a number of important toxic effects of nitrite, the latter increases its toxicity by inhibiting catalase. This was shown by the example of nitrite-induced hemoglobin oxidation. The naturally existing gradient of chloride and other anion concentrations between intra- and extracellular media appears to be the most important mechanism of cell protection from inhibition of intracellular catalase by nitrite. Possible mechanisms of this inhibition are discussed. PMID:12943506

  10. Activity assays of mammalian thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase: fluorescent disulfide substrates, mechanisms, and use with tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Montano, Sergio J; Lu, Jun; Gustafsson, Tomas N; Holmgren, Arne

    2014-03-15

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a protein disulfide reductase that, together with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), controls oxidative stress or redox signaling via thiol redox control. Human cytosolic Trx1 has Cys32 and Cys35 as the active site and three additional cysteine residues (Cys62, Cys69, and Cys73), which by oxidation generates inactive Cys62 to Cys69 two-disulfide Trx. This, combined with TrxR with a broad substrate specificity, complicates assays of mammalian Trx and TrxR. We sought to understand the autoregulation of Trx and TrxR and to generate new methods for quantification of Trx and TrxR. We optimized the synthesis of two fluorescent substrates, di-eosin-glutathione disulfide (Di-E-GSSG) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled insulin (FiTC-insulin), which displayed higher fluorescence on disulfide reduction. Di-E-GSSG showed a very large increase in fluorescence quantum yield but had a relatively low affinity for Trx and was also a weak direct substrate for TrxR, in contrast to GSSG. FiTC-insulin was used to develop highly sensitive assays for TrxR and Trx. Reproducible conditions were developed for reactivation of modified Trx, commonly present in frozen or oxidized samples. Trx in cell extracts and tissue samples, including plasma and serum, were subsequently analyzed, showing highly reproducible results and allowing measurement of trace amounts of Trx.

  11. Effects of methodological variation on assessment of riboflavin status using the erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient assay.

    PubMed

    Hill, Marilyn H E; Bradley, Angela; Mushtaq, Sohail; Williams, Elizabeth A; Powers, Hilary J

    2009-07-01

    Riboflavin status is usually measured as the in vitro stimulation with flavin adenine dinucleotide of the erythrocyte enzyme glutathione reductase, and expressed as an erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient (EGRAC). This method is used for the National Diet and Nutrition Surveys (NDNS) of the UK. In the period between the 1990 and 2003 surveys of UK adults, the estimated prevalence of riboflavin deficiency, expressed as an EGRAC value > or = 1.30, increased from 2 to 46 % in males and from 1 to 34 % in females. We hypothesised that subtle but important differences in the detail of the methodology between the two NDNS accounted for this difference. We carried out an evaluation of the performance of the methods used in the two NDNS and compared against an 'in-house' method, using blood samples collected from a riboflavin intervention study. Results indicated that the method used for the 1990 NDNS gave a significantly lower mean EGRAC value than both the 2003 NDNS method and the 'in-house' method (P < 0.0001). The key differences between the methods relate to the concentration of FAD used in the assay and the duration of the period of incubation of FAD with enzyme. The details of the EGRAC method should be standardised for use in different laboratories and over time. Additionally, it is proposed that consideration be given to re-evaluating the basis of the EGRAC threshold for riboflavin deficiency.

  12. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:27051453

  13. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:27051453

  14. Chemical constituents from the aerial parts of Aster koraiensis with protein glycation and aldose reductase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Lee, Yun Mi; Lee, Byong Won; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-02-24

    Two new eudesmane-type sesquiterpene glucosides, 9β-O-(E-p-hydroxycinnamoyl)-1β,6β-dihydroxy-trans-eudesm-3-en-6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1) and 9α-O-(E-p-hydroxycinnamoyl)-1α,6α-11-trihydroxy-trans-eudesm-3-en-6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), were isolated by the activity-guidedfractionation of an EtOAc-soluble fraction from the aerial parts of Aster koraiensis. A new dihydrobenzofuran glucoside, (2R,3S)-6-acetyl-2-[1-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-propenyl]-5-hydroxy-3-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran (3), was also isolated, in addition to 15 known compounds. The structures of 1-3 were determined by spectroscopic data interpretation. All of the isolates were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against the formation of advanced glycation end-products and rat lens aldose reductase.

  15. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of diaryl ether inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Muench, Stephen P.; Zhou, Ying; Afanador, Gustavo A.; Mui, Ernest J.; Fomovska, Alina; Lai, Bo Shiun; Prigge, Sean T.; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patty J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Rice, David W.; McLeod, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Triclosan is a potent inhibitor of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase (TgENR), which is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. In view of triclosan’s poor druggability, which limits its therapeutic use, a new set of B-ring modified analogs were designed to optimize its physico-chemical properties. These derivatives were synthesized and evaluated by in vitro assay and TgENR enzyme assay. Some analogs display improved solubility, permeability and a comparable MIC50 value to that of triclosan. Modeling of these inhibitors revealed the same overall binding mode with the enzyme as triclosan, but the Bring modifications have additional interactions with the strongly conserved Asn130. PMID:23453069

  16. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  17. Metabolism of hydroxypyruvate in a mutant of barley lacking NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase, an important photorespiratory enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.J.S.; Blackwell, R.D.; Lea, P.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), LaPr 88/29, deficient in NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been isolated. The activities of both NADH (5%) and NADPH-dependent (19%) HPR were severely reduced in this mutant compared to the wild type. Although lacking an enzyme in the main carbon pathway of photorespiration, this mutant was capable of CO{sub 2} fixation rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type, in normal atmospheres and 50% O{sub 2}. There also appeared to be little disruption to the photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C)serine feeding were similar in both mutant and wild-type leaves. When leaves of LaPr 88/29 were fed either ({sup 14}C)serine or {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, the accumulation of radioactivity was in serine and not in hydroxypyruvate, although the mutant was still able to metabolize over 25% of the supplied ({sup 14}C)serine into sucrose. After 3 hours in air the soluble amino acid pool was almost totally dominated by serine and glycine. LaPr 88/29 has also been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-dependent HPR activity is due to the NADH-dependent enzyme. We also suggest that the alternative NADPH activity can metabolize a proportion, but not all, of the hydroxypyruvate produced during photorespiration and may thus form a useful backup to the NADH-dependent enzyme under conditions of maximal photorespiration.

  18. Selected Line Difference in the Effects of Ethanol Dependence and Withdrawal On Allopregnanolone Levels and 5α-reductase Enzyme Activity and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tanchuck, Michelle A.; Long, Season L.; Ford, Matthew M.; Hashimoto, Joel; Crabbe, John C.; Roselli, Charles E.; Wiren, Kristine M.; Finn, Deborah A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Allopregnanolone (ALLO) is a progesterone derivative that rapidly potentiates γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor mediated inhibition and modulates symptoms of ethanol withdrawal. Since clinical and preclinical data indicate that ALLO levels are inversely related to symptoms of withdrawal, the present studies determined whether ethanol dependence and withdrawal differentially altered plasma and cortical ALLO levels in mice selectively bred for differences in ethanol withdrawal severity and determined whether the alterations in ALLO levels corresponded to a concomitant change in activity and expression of the biosynthetic enzyme 5α-reductase. Methods Male Withdrawal Seizure—Prone (WSP) and —Resistant (WSR) mice were exposed to 72 hr ethanol vapor or air and euthanized at select times following removal from the inhalation chambers. Blood was collected for analysis of ALLO and corticosterone levels by radioimmunoassay. Dissected amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain and cortex as well as adrenals were examined for 5α-reductase enzyme activity and expression levels. Results Plasma ALLO was decreased significantly only in WSP mice, and this corresponded to a decrease in adrenal 5α-reductase expression. Cortical ALLO was decreased up to 54% in WSP mice and up to 46% in WSR mice, with a similar decrease in cortical 5α-reductase activity during withdrawal in the lines. While cortical gene expression was significantly decreased during withdrawal in WSP mice, there was a 4-fold increase in expression in the WSR line during withdrawal. Hippocampal 5α-reductase activity and gene expression was decreased only in dependent WSP mice. Conclusions These results suggest that there are line and brain regional differences in the regulation of the neurosteroid biosynthetic enzyme 5α-reductase during ethanol dependence and withdrawal. In conjunction with the finding that WSP mice exhibit reduced sensitivity to ALLO during withdrawal, the present results are consistent

  19. Sequence and properties of pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase from Enterobacter cloacae PB2.

    PubMed Central

    French, C E; Nicklin, S; Bruce, N C

    1996-01-01

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase, which reductively liberates nitrite from nitrate esters, is related to old yellow enzyme. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase follows a ping-pong mechanism with competitive substrate inhibition by NADPH, is strongly inhibited by steroids, and is capable of reducing the unsaturated bond of 2-cyclohexen-1-one. PMID:8932320

  20. Relationship of changing delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity to (125I)iododeoxyuridine uptake during regeneration of involuted rat prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, S.; Higashi, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Oshima, H. )

    1989-04-01

    To elucidate the phenotypic expression of proliferating prostatic cells, rats were castrated, and the regenerating process of involuted ventral prostates during testosterone propionate (TP) administration was investigated by examining morphology, (5-{sup 125}I)iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}I-UdR) uptake, DNA content, weight, acid phosphatase, and delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-reductase) activities. Morphologically, TP treatment initially increased the number of epithelial cells lining glandular lobules and subsequently restored the shape of epithelial cells. {sup 125}I-UdR uptake peaked on Day 3 of TP treatment and stayed at higher levels than for uncastrated controls until Day 14 of treatment. Prostatic weight, protein content, acid phosphatase, and DNA content returned to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of TP treatment. TP administration markedly stimulated prostatic 5 alpha-reductase activity, which peaked on the Day 5 of treatment and decreased to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of treatment. It is concluded that TP administration to castrated rats initially induced active mitotic division of the remaining stem cells, followed by formation of differentiated functional epithelial cells. Prostatic 5 alpha-reductase was highly active at the initial phase of active mitotic cell division. The major portion of the increased enzyme activity can be regarded as a phenotypic expression of stem or transient cells of prostatic epithelium.

  1. Kinetic assays for determining in vitro APS reductase activity in plants without the use of radioactive substances.

    PubMed

    Brychkova, Galina; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Sagi, Moshe

    2012-09-01

    Adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (APR; EC 1.8.4.9) catalyzes the two-electron reduction of APS to sulfite and AMP, a key step in the sulfate assimilation pathway in higher plants. In spite of the importance of this enzyme, methods currently available for detection of APR activity rely on radioactive labeling and can only be performed in a very few specially equipped laboratories. Here we present two novel kinetic assays for detecting in vitro APR activity that do not require radioactive labeling. In the first assay, APS is used as substrate and reduced glutathione (GSH) as electron donor, while in the second assay APS is replaced by an APS-regenerating system in which ATP sulfurylase catalyzes APS in the reaction medium, which employs sulfate and ATP as substrates. Both kinetic assays rely on fuchsin colorimetric detection of sulfite, the final product of APR activity. Incubation of the desalted protein extract, prior to assay initiation, with tungstate that inhibits the oxidation of sulfite by sulfite oxidase activity, resulted in enhancement of the actual APR activity. The reliability of the two methods was confirmed by assaying leaf extract from Arabidopsis wild-type and APR mutants with impaired or overexpressed APR2 protein, the former lacking APR activity and the latter exhibiting much higher activity than the wild type. The assays were further tested on tomato leaves, which revealed a higher APR activity than Arabidopsis. The proposed APR assays are highly specific, technically simple and readily performed in any laboratory.

  2. Experimental evaluation of the nitrite sensitivity coefficient in granular anammox biomass.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, A; Ramalingam, K; Beckmann, K; Deur, A; Fillos, J

    2013-01-01

    Nitrite is widely reported to inhibit anammox activity and growth. One modeling approach for nitrite impairment of anammox growth is the use of a nitrite sensitivity coefficient which increases the endogenous decay coefficient of anammox bacteria proportionally to nitrite concentration. The objective of this study was to measure nitrite concentration profiles within active anammox granules incubated at fixed bulk nitrite concentrations and to compare these with nitrite concentration profiles predicted by a biofilm model that incorporates the nitrite sensitivity coefficient. We developed an apparatus for the repeated measurement of nitrite concentration profiles along the radius of granular anammox biomass over a period of 6 days at fixed bulk nitrite concentrations. Granular anammox biomass was obtained from a two-stage bench-scale partial nitritation/anammox reactor system. There was no apparent effect of nitrite concentration on nitrite utilization kinetics after 6 days at exposures up to 90 mg NO(2)(-)-N/L. These findings suggest that anammox bacteria tolerate extended exposures to elevated nitrite concentrations, and in its present form, the nitrite sensitivity coefficient is not applicable for anammox growth modeling.

  3. Evidence that biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical.

    PubMed Central

    Shalloe, F; Elliott, G; Ennis, O; Mantle, T J

    1996-01-01

    A search of the database shows that human biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical. We have isolated flavin reductase from bovine erythrocytes and show that the activity co-elutes with biliverdin-IX beta reductase. Preparations of the enzyme that are electrophoretically homogeneous exhibit both flavin reductase and biliverdin-IX beta reductase activities; however, they are not capable of catalysing the reduction of biliverdin-IX alpha. Although there is little obvious sequence identity between biliverdin-IX alpha reductase (BVR-A) and biliverdin-IX beta reductase (BVR-B), they do show weak immunological cross-reactivity. Both enzymes bind to 2',5'-ADP-Sepharose. PMID:8687377

  4. Construction of effective disposable biosensors for point of care testing of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Tiago; Rodrigues, Patrícia R; Gonçalves, Ana Luisa; Moura, José J G; Jubete, Elena; Añorga, Larraitz; Piknova, Barbora; Schechter, Alan N; Silveira, Célia M; Almeida, M Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we aim to demonstrate, as a proof-of-concept, the feasibility of the mass production of effective point of care tests for nitrite quantification in environmental, food and clinical samples. Following our previous work on the development of third generation electrochemical biosensors based on the ammonia forming nitrite reductase (ccNiR), herein we reduced the size of the electrodes' system to a miniaturized format, solved the problem of oxygen interference and performed simple quantification assays in real samples. In particular, carbon paste screen printed electrodes (SPE) were coated with a ccNiR/carbon ink composite homogenized in organic solvents and cured at low temperatures. The biocompatibility of these chemical and thermal treatments was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry showing that the catalytic performance was higher with the combination acetone and a 40°C curing temperature. The successful incorporation of the protein in the carbon ink/solvent composite, while remaining catalytically competent, attests for ccNiR's robustness and suitability for application in screen printed based biosensors. Because the direct electrochemical reduction of molecular oxygen occurs when electroanalytical measurements are performed at the negative potentials required to activate ccNiR (ca.-0.4V vs Ag/AgCl), an oxygen scavenging system based on the coupling of glucose oxidase and catalase activities was successfully used. This enabled the quantification of nitrite in different samples (milk, water, plasma and urine) in a straightforward way and with small error (1-6%). The sensitivity of the biosensor towards nitrite reduction under optimized conditions was 0.55 A M(-1) cm(-2) with a linear response range 0.7-370 μM. PMID:26003719

  5. Construction of effective disposable biosensors for point of care testing of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Tiago; Rodrigues, Patrícia R; Gonçalves, Ana Luisa; Moura, José J G; Jubete, Elena; Añorga, Larraitz; Piknova, Barbora; Schechter, Alan N; Silveira, Célia M; Almeida, M Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we aim to demonstrate, as a proof-of-concept, the feasibility of the mass production of effective point of care tests for nitrite quantification in environmental, food and clinical samples. Following our previous work on the development of third generation electrochemical biosensors based on the ammonia forming nitrite reductase (ccNiR), herein we reduced the size of the electrodes' system to a miniaturized format, solved the problem of oxygen interference and performed simple quantification assays in real samples. In particular, carbon paste screen printed electrodes (SPE) were coated with a ccNiR/carbon ink composite homogenized in organic solvents and cured at low temperatures. The biocompatibility of these chemical and thermal treatments was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry showing that the catalytic performance was higher with the combination acetone and a 40°C curing temperature. The successful incorporation of the protein in the carbon ink/solvent composite, while remaining catalytically competent, attests for ccNiR's robustness and suitability for application in screen printed based biosensors. Because the direct electrochemical reduction of molecular oxygen occurs when electroanalytical measurements are performed at the negative potentials required to activate ccNiR (ca.-0.4V vs Ag/AgCl), an oxygen scavenging system based on the coupling of glucose oxidase and catalase activities was successfully used. This enabled the quantification of nitrite in different samples (milk, water, plasma and urine) in a straightforward way and with small error (1-6%). The sensitivity of the biosensor towards nitrite reduction under optimized conditions was 0.55 A M(-1) cm(-2) with a linear response range 0.7-370 μM.

  6. Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase (NapABC Enzyme) Supports Anaerobic Respiration by Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Valley; Lu, Yiran; Darwin, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapABC enzyme) has been characterized from a variety of proteobacteria, especially Paracoccus pantotrophus. Whole-genome sequencing of Escherichia coli revealed the structural genes napFDAGHBC, which encode NapABC enzyme and associated electron transfer components. E. coli also expresses two membrane-bound proton-translocating nitrate reductases, encoded by the narGHJI and narZYWV operons. We measured reduced viologen-dependent nitrate reductase activity in a series of strains with combinations of nar and nap null alleles. The napF operon-encoded nitrate reductase activity was not sensitive to azide, as shown previously for the P. pantotrophus NapA enzyme. A strain carrying null alleles of narG and narZ grew exponentially on glycerol with nitrate as the respiratory oxidant (anaerobic respiration), whereas a strain also carrying a null allele of napA did not. By contrast, the presence of napA+ had no influence on the more rapid growth of narG+ strains. These results indicate that periplasmic nitrate reductase, like fumarate reductase, can function in anaerobic respiration but does not constitute a site for generating proton motive force. The time course of Φ(napF-lacZ) expression during growth in batch culture displayed a complex pattern in response to the dynamic nitrate/nitrite ratio. Our results are consistent with the observation that Φ(napF-lacZ) is expressed preferentially at relatively low nitrate concentrations in continuous cultures (H. Wang, C.-P. Tseng, and R. P. Gunsalus, J. Bacteriol. 181:5303-5308, 1999). This finding and other considerations support the hypothesis that NapABC enzyme may function in E. coli when low nitrate concentrations limit the bioenergetic efficiency of nitrate respiration via NarGHI enzyme. PMID:11844760

  7. Osmotic Stress, not Aldose Reductase Activity, Directly induces Growth Factors and MAPK Signaling changes during Sugar Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Kuiyi; Randazzo, James; Blessing, Karen; Lou, Marjorie F.; Kador, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    In sugar cataract formation in rats, aldose reductase (AR) actitvity is not only linked to lenticular sorbitol (diabetic) or galactitol (galactosemic) formation but also to signal transduction changes, cytotoxic signals and activation of apoptosis. Using both in vitro and in vivo techniques, the interrelationship between AR activity, polyol (sorbitol and galactitol) formation, osmotic stress, growth factor induction, and cell signaling changes have been investigated. For in vitro studies, lenses from Sprague Dawley rats were cultured for up to 48 hrs in TC-199-bicarbonate media containing either 30 mM fructose (control), or 30 mM glucose or galctose with/without the aldose reductase inhibitors AL1576 or tolrestat, the sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI) CP-470,711, or 15 mM mannitol (osmotic-compensated media). For in vivo studies, lenses were obtained from streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats fed diet with/without the ARIs AL1576 or tolrestat for 10 weeks. As expected, lenses cultured in high glucose / galactose media or from untreated diabetic rats all showed a decrease in the GSH pool that was lessened by ARI treatment. Lenses either from diabetic rats or from glucose/galactose culture conditions showed increased expression of basic-FGF, TGF-β, and increased signaling through P-Akt, P-ERK1/2 and P-SAPK/JNK which were also normalized by ARIs to the expression levels observed in non-diabetic controls. Culturing rat lenses in osomotically compensated media containing 30 mM glucose or galactose did not lead to increased growth factor expression or altered signaling. These studies indicate that it is the biophysical response of the lens to osmotic stress that results in an increased intralenticular production of basic-FGF and TGF-β and the altered cytotoxic signaling that is observed during sugar cataract formation. PMID:22710095

  8. Crp-dependent cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huihui; Chen, Haijiang; Wang, Jixuan; Zhou, Guangqi; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is able to respire on a variety of organic and inorganic substrates, including nitrate and nitrite. Conversion of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonium is catalysed by periplasmic nitrate and nitrite reductases (NAP and NRF) respectively. Global regulator Crp (cyclic AMP receptor protein) is essential for growth of S. oneidensis on both nitrate and nitrite. In this study, we discovered that crp mutants are not only severely deficient in nitrate or nitrite respiration, but are also hypersensitive to nitrite. This hypersusceptibility phenotype is independent of nitrite respiration. Using random transposon mutagenesis, we obtained 73 Δcrp suppressor strains resistant to nitrite. Transposon insertion sites in 24 suppressor strains were exclusively mapped in the region upstream of the cyd operon encoding a cytochrome bd oxidase, resulting in expression of the operon now driven by a Crp-independent promoter. Further investigation indicated that the promoter in suppressor strains comes from the transposon. Mutational analysis of the cydB gene (encoding the essential subunit II of the bd oxidase) confirmed that the cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to S. oneidensis.

  9. Adaptation of cytochrome-b5 reductase activity and methaemoglobinaemia in areas with a high nitrate concentration in drinking-water.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S. K.; Gupta, R. C.; Seth, A. K.; Gupta, A. B.; Bassin, J. K.; Gupta, A.

    1999-01-01

    An epidemiological investigation was undertaken in India to assess the prevalence of methaemoglobinaemia in areas with high nitrate concentration in drinking-water and the possible association with an adaptation of cytochrome-b5 reductase. Five areas were selected, with average nitrate ion concentrations in drinking-water of 26, 45, 95, 222 and 459 mg/l. These areas were visited and house schedules were prepared in accordance with a statistically designed protocol. A sample of 10% of the total population was selected in each of the areas, matched for age and weight, giving a total of 178 persons in five age groups. For each subject, a detailed history was documented, a medical examination was conducted and blood samples were taken to determine methaemoglobin level and cytochrome-b5 reductase activity. Collected data were subjected to statistical analysis to test for a possible relationship between nitrate concentration, cytochrome-b5 reductase activity and methaemoglobinaemia. High nitrate concentrations caused methaemoglobinaemia in infants and adults. The reserve of cytochrome-b5 reductase activity (i.e. the enzyme activity not currently being used, but which is available when needed; for example, under conditions of increased nitrate ingestion) and its adaptation with increasing water nitrate concentration to reduce methaemoglobin were more pronounced in children and adolescents. PMID:10534899

  10. Modeling the Impact of Ingoing Sodium Nitrite, Sodium Ascorbate, and Residual Nitrite Concentrations on Growth Parameters of Listeria monocytogenes in Cooked, Cured Pork Sausage.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Seman, Dennis L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-01

    Sodium nitrite has been identified as a key antimicrobial ingredient to control pathogens in ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products, including Listeria monocytogenes. This study was designed to more clearly elucidate the relationship between chemical factors (ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and residual nitrite) and L. monocytogenes growth in RTE meats. Treatments of cooked, cured pork sausage (65% moisture, 1.8% salt, pH 6.6, and water activity 0.98) were based on response surface methodology with ingoing nitrite and ascorbate concentrations as the two main factors. Concentrations of nitrite and ascorbate, including star points, ranged from 0 to 352 and 0 to 643 ppm, respectively. At one of two time points after manufacturing (days 0 and 28), half of each treatment was surface inoculated to target 3 log CFU/g of a five-strain L. monocytogenes cocktail, vacuum packaged, and stored at 7°C for up to 4 weeks. Growth of L. monocytogenes was measured twice per week, and enumerations were used to estimate lag time and growth rates for each treatment. Residual nitrite concentrations were measured on days 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28, and nitrite depletion rate was estimated by using first-order kinetics. The response surface methodology was used to model L. monocytogenes lag time and growth rate based on ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and the residual nitrite remaining at the point of inoculation. Modeling results showed that lag time was impacted by residual nitrite concentration remaining at inoculation, as well as the squared term of ingoing nitrite, whereas growth rate was affected by ingoing nitrite concentration but not by the remaining residual nitrite at the point of inoculation. Residual nitrite depletion rate was dependent upon ingoing nitrite concentration and was only slightly affected by ascorbate concentration. This study confirmed that ingoing nitrite concentration influences L. monocytogenes growth in RTE products, yet residual nitrite concentration contributes

  11. Novel role of the nitrite transporter NirC in Salmonella pathogenesis: SPI2-dependent suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Das, Priyanka; Lahiri, Amit; Lahiri, Ayan; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2009-08-01

    Activation of macrophages by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and the subsequent production of nitric oxide (NO) are critical for the host defence against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. We report here the inhibition of IFN-gamma-induced NO production in RAW264.7 macrophages infected with wild-type Salmonella. This phenomenon was shown to be dependent on the nirC gene, which encodes a potential nitrite transporter. We observed a higher NO output from IFN-gamma-treated macrophages infected with a nirC mutant of Salmonella. The nirC mutant also showed significantly decreased intracellular proliferation in a NO-dependent manner in activated RAW264.7 macrophages and in liver, spleen and secondary lymph nodes of mice, which was restored by complementing the gene in trans. Under acidified nitrite stress, a twofold more pronounced NO-mediated repression of SPI2 was observed in the nirC knockout strain compared to the wild-type. This enhanced SPI2 repression in the nirC knockout led to a higher level of STAT-1 phosphorylation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression than seen with the wild-type strain. In iNOS knockout mice, the organ load of the nirC knockout strain was similar to that of the wild-type strain, indicating that the mutant is exclusively sensitive to the host nitrosative stress. Taken together, these results reveal that intracellular Salmonella evade killing in activated macrophages by downregulating IFN-gamma-induced NO production, and they highlight the critical role of nirC as a virulence gene.

  12. Markedly inhibited 7-dehydrocholesterol-delta 7-reductase activity in liver microsomes from Smith-Lemli-Opitz homozygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Shefer, S; Salen, G; Batta, A K; Honda, A; Tint, G S; Irons, M; Elias, E R; Chen, T C; Holick, M F

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the enzyme defect in late cholesterol biosynthesis in the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, a recessively inherited developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism, mental retardation, and multiple organ congenital anomalies. Reduced plasma and tissue cholesterol with increased 7-dehydrocholesterol concentrations are biochemical features diagnostic of the inherited enzyme defect. Using isotope incorporation assays, we measured the transformation of the precursors, [3 alpha- 3H]lathosterol and [1,2-3H]7-dehydrocholesterol into cholesterol by liver microsomes from seven controls and four Smith-Lemli-Opitz homozygous subjects. The introduction of the double bond in lathosterol at C-5[6] to form 7-dehydrocholesterol that is catalyzed by lathosterol-5-dehydrogenase was equally rapid in controls and homozygotes liver microsomes (120 +/- 8 vs 100 +/- 7 pmol/mg protein per min, P = NS). In distinction, the reduction of the double bond at C-7 [8] in 7-dehydrocholesterol to yield cholesterol catalyzed by 7-dehydrocholesterol-delta 7-reductase was nine times greater in controls than homozygotes microsomes (365 +/- 23 vs 40 +/- 4 pmol/mg protein per min, P < 0.0001). These results demonstrate that the pathway of lathosterol to cholesterol in human liver includes 7-dehydrocholesterol as a key intermediate. In Smith-Lemli-Opitz homozygotes, the transformation of 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol by hepatic microsomes was blocked although 7-dehydrocholesterol was produced abundantly from lathosterol. Thus, lathosterol 5-dehydrogenase is equally active which indicates that homozygotes liver microsomes are viable. Accordingly, microsomal 7-dehydrocholesterol-delta 7-reductase is inherited abnormally in Smith-Lemli-Opitz homozygotes. PMID:7560069

  13. YNL134C from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a novel protein with aldehyde reductase activity for detoxification of furfural derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianxian; Tang, Juan; Wang, Xu; Yang, Ruoheng; Zhang, Xiaoping; Gu, Yunfu; Li, Xi; Ma, Menggen

    2015-05-01

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are the two main aldehyde compounds derived from pentoses and hexoses, respectively, during lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. These two compounds inhibit microbial growth and interfere with subsequent alcohol fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the in situ ability to detoxify furfural and HMF to the less toxic 2-furanmethanol (FM) and furan-2,5-dimethanol (FDM), respectively. Herein, we report that an uncharacterized gene, YNL134C, was highly up-regulated under furfural or HMF stress and Yap1p and Msn2/4p transcription factors likely controlled its up-regulated expression. Enzyme activity assays showed that YNL134C is an NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase, which plays a role in detoxification of furfural to FM. However, no NADH- or NADPH-dependent enzyme activity was observed for detoxification of HMF to FDM. This enzyme did not catalyse the reverse reaction of FM to furfural or FDM to HMF. Further studies showed that YNL134C is a broad-substrate aldehyde reductase, which can reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Although YNL134C is grouped into the quinone oxidoreductase family, no quinone reductase activity was observed using 1,2-naphthoquinone or 9,10-phenanthrenequinone as a substrate, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is genetically distant to quinone reductases. Proteins similar to YNL134C in sequence from S. cerevisiae and other microorganisms were phylogenetically analysed.

  14. Profiles of Glucosinolates, Their Hydrolysis Products, and Quinone Reductase Inducing Activity from 39 Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) Accessions.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Kim, Moo Jung; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Kang, Young-Hwa; Juvik, John A

    2016-08-31

    Glucosinolates, their hydrolysis product concentrations, and the quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity of extracts of leaf tissue were assayed from 39 arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) accessions. Arugula accessions from Mediterranean countries (n = 16; Egypt, Greece, Italy, Libya, Spain, and Turkey) and Northern Europe (n = 2; Poland and United Kingdom) were higher in glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products, especially glucoraphanin and sulforaphane, compared to those from Asia (n = 13; China, India, and Pakistan) and Middle East Asia (n = 8; Afghanistan, Iran, and Israel). The QR inducing activity was also the highest in Mediterranean and Northern European arugula accessions, possibly due to a significant positive correlation between sulforaphane and QR inducing activity (r = 0.54). No nitrile hydrolysis products were found, suggesting very low or no epithiospecifier protein activity from these arugula accessions. Broad sense heritability (H(2)) was estimated to be 0.91-0.98 for glucoinolates, 0.55-0.83 for their hydrolysis products, and 0.90 for QR inducing activity. PMID:27523193

  15. Probing the active site of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Patel, Krunal; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Srivastava, Sameer; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-09-01

    Lack of three dimensional crystal structure of cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) limits its detailed active site characterization studies. Putative active site residues involved in the substrate/NADPH binding and catalysis for Leucaena leucocephala CCR (Ll-CCRH1; GenBank: DQ986907) were identified by amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling. Putative active site residues and proximal H215 were subjected for site directed mutagenesis, and mutated enzymes were expressed, purified and assayed to confirm their functional roles. Mutagenesis of S136, Y170 and K174 showed complete loss of activity, indicating their pivotal roles in catalysis. Mutant S212G exhibited the catalytic efficiencies less than 10% of wild type, showing its indirect involvement in substrate binding or catalysis. R51G, D77G, F30V and I31N double mutants showed significant changes in Km values, specifying their roles in substrate binding. Finally, chemical modification and substrate protection studies corroborated the presence Ser, Tyr, Lys, Arg and carboxylate group at the active site of Ll-CCRH1. PMID:23688416

  16. Profiles of Glucosinolates, Their Hydrolysis Products, and Quinone Reductase Inducing Activity from 39 Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) Accessions.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Kim, Moo Jung; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Kang, Young-Hwa; Juvik, John A

    2016-08-31

    Glucosinolates, their hydrolysis product concentrations, and the quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity of extracts of leaf tissue were assayed from 39 arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) accessions. Arugula accessions from Mediterranean countries (n = 16; Egypt, Greece, Italy, Libya, Spain, and Turkey) and Northern Europe (n = 2; Poland and United Kingdom) were higher in glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products, especially glucoraphanin and sulforaphane, compared to those from Asia (n = 13; China, India, and Pakistan) and Middle East Asia (n = 8; Afghanistan, Iran, and Israel). The QR inducing activity was also the highest in Mediterranean and Northern European arugula accessions, possibly due to a significant positive correlation between sulforaphane and QR inducing activity (r = 0.54). No nitrile hydrolysis products were found, suggesting very low or no epithiospecifier protein activity from these arugula accessions. Broad sense heritability (H(2)) was estimated to be 0.91-0.98 for glucoinolates, 0.55-0.83 for their hydrolysis products, and 0.90 for QR inducing activity.

  17. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  18. Cytochrome cb-type nitric oxide reductase with cytochrome c oxidase activity from Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 35512.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, T; Fukumori, Y

    1996-04-01

    A highly active nitric oxide reductase was purified from Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 35512, formerly named Thiosphaera pantotropha, which was anaerobically cultivated in the presence of nitrate. The enzyme was composed of two subunits with molecular masses of 34 and 15 kDa and contained two hemes b and one heme c per molecule. Copper was not found in the enzyme. The spectral properties suggested that one of the two hemes b and heme c were in six-coordinated low-spin states and another heme b was in a five-coordinated high-spin state and reacted with carbon monoxide. The enzyme showed high cytochrome c-nitric oxide oxidoreductase activity and formed nitrous oxide from nitric oxide with the expected stoichiometry when P. denitrificans ATCC 35512 ferrocytochrome c-550 was used as the electron donor. The V max and Km values for nitric oxide were 84 micromol of nitric oxide per min/mg of protein and 0.25 microM, respectively. Furthermore, the enzyme showed ferrocytochrome c-550-O2 oxidoreductase activity with a V max of 8.4 micromol of O2 per min/mg of protein and a Km value of 0.9 mM. Both activities were 50% inhibited by about 0.3 mM KCN. PMID:8606159

  19. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with (/sup 14/C)iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined.

  20. In silico screening, structure-activity relationship, and biologic evaluation of selective pteridine reductase inhibitors targeting visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jaspreet; Kumar, Pranav; Tyagi, Sargam; Pathak, Richa; Batra, Sanjay; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Neeloo

    2011-02-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of rational drug design to identify novel compounds with optimal selectivity, efficacy and safety, which would bind to the target enzyme pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1) in Leishmania parasites. Twelve compounds afforded from Baylis-Hillman chemistry were docked by using the QUANTUM program into the active site of Leishmania donovani PTR1 homology model. The biological activity for these compounds was estimated in green fluorescent protein-transfected L. donovani promastigotes, and the most potential analogue was further investigated in intracellular amastigotes. Structure-activity relationship based on homology model drawn on our recombinant enzyme was substantiated by recombinant enzyme inhibition assay and growth of the cell culture. Flow cytometry results indicated that 7-(4-chlorobenzyl)-3-methyl-4-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3,4,6,7,8,9-hexahydro-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-2-one (compound 7) was 10 times more active on L. donovani amastigotes (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] = 3 μM) than on promastigotes (IC(50) = 29 μM). Compound 7 exhibited a K(i) value of 0.72 μM in a recombinant enzyme inhibition assay. We discovered that novel pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-2-one systems generated from the allyl amines afforded from the Baylis-Hillman acetates could have potential as a valuable pharmacological tool against the neglected disease visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:21115787

  1. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zejun; Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming; Song, Mintao; Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  2. FAD-induced in vitro activation of glutathione reductase in the lens of B2 deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Hirano, H

    1984-04-01

    We studied the FAD-induced in vitro stimulation of lenticular glutathione reductase in riboflavin-deficient rats. The stimulatory effect of FAD on lenticular glutathione reductase in rats fed a B2-deficient diet for 4 weeks was remarkably higher than in paired control rats fed a B2-supplemented basal diet and control rats had ad libitum access to a B2-supplemented basal diet. The in vitro FAD stimulation effect on rat lenticular glutathione reductase represents a sensitive indicator of the B2 deficient status.

  3. Melatonin and nitric oxide modulate glutathione content and glutathione reductase activity in sunflower seedling cotyledons accompanying salt stress.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harmeet; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-09-30

    The present findings demonstrate significant modulation of total glutathione content, reduced glutathione (GSH) content, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content, GSH/GSSG ratio and glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) activity in dark-grown seedling cotyledons in response to salt-stress (120 mM NaCl) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings. A differential spatial distribution of GR activity (monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging) is also evident. Melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) differentially ameliorate salt stress effect by modulating GR activity and GSH content in seedling cotyledons. Total glutathione content (GSH + GSSG) exhibit a seedling age-dependent increase in the cotyledons, more so in salt-stressed conditions and when subjected to melatonin treatment. Seedlings raised in presence of 15 μM of melatonin exhibit significant increase in GR activity in cotyledon homogenates (10,000 g supernatant) coinciding with significant increase in GSH content. GSSG content and GSH/GSSG ratio also increased due to melatonin treatment. A correlation is thus evident in NaCl-sensitized modulation of GSH content and GR activity by melatonin. GSH content is down regulated by NO provided as 250 μM of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) although total glutathione content remained in similar range. A reversal of response (enhanced total glutathione accumulation) by NO scavenger (cPTIO) highlights the critical role of NO in modulating glutathione homeostasis. SNP lowers the activity of hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT) - a regulatory enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in control seedlings whereas its activity is upregulated in salt-stressed seedling cotyledons. Melatonin content of seedling cotyledons is also modulated by NO. NO and melatonin thus seem to modulate GR activity and GSH content during seedling growth under salt stress. PMID:27432590

  4. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  5. A nanotherapy strategy significantly enhances anticryptosporidial activity of an inhibitor of bifunctional thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase from Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Iyidogan, Pinar; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Cisneros, José A; Czyzyk, Daniel; Ranjan, Amalendu Prakash; Jorgensen, William L; White, A Clinton; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Anderson, Karen S

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a gastrointestinal disease caused by protozoans of the genus Cryptosporidium, is a common cause of diarrheal diseases and often fatal in immunocompromised individuals. Bifunctional thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase (TS-DHFR) from Cryptosporidium hominis (C. hominis) has been a molecular target for inhibitor design. C. hominis TS-DHFR inhibitors with nM potency at a biochemical level have been developed however drug delivery to achieve comparable antiparasitic activity in Cryptosporidium infected cell culture has been a major hurdle for designing effective therapies. Previous mechanistic and structural studies have identified compound 906 as a nM C. hominis TS-DHFR inhibitor in vitro, having μM antiparasitic activity in cell culture. In this work, proof of concept studies are presented using a nanotherapy approach to improve drug delivery and the antiparasitic activity of 906 in cell culture. We utilized PLGA nanoparticles that were loaded with 906 (NP-906) and conjugated with antibodies to the Cryptosporidium specific protein, CP2, on the nanoparticle surface in order to specifically target the parasite. Our results indicate that CP2 labeled NP-906 (CP2-NP-906) reduces the level of parasites by 200-fold in cell culture, while NP-906 resulted in 4.4-fold decrease. Moreover, the anticryptosporidial potency of 906 improved 15 to 78-fold confirming the utility of the antibody conjugated nanoparticles as an effective drug delivery strategy.

  6. Correlation of quinone reductase activity and allyl isothiocyanate formation among different genotypes and grades of horseradish roots.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A; Kushad, Mosbah M

    2015-03-25

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a perennial crop and its ground root tissue is used in condiments because of the pungency of the glucosinolate (GS)-hydrolysis products allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) derived from sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, respectively. Horseradish roots are sold in three grades: U.S. Fancy, U.S. No. 1, and U.S. No. 2 according to the USDA standards. These grading standards are primarily based on root diameter and length. There is little information on whether root grades vary in their phytochemical content or potential health promoting properties. This study measured GS, GS-hydrolysis products, potential anticancer activity (as quinone reductase inducing activity), total phenolic content, and antioxidant activities from different grades of horseradish accessions. U.S. Fancy showed significantly higher sinigrin and AITC concentrations than U.S. No. 1 ,whereas U.S. No. 1 showed significantly higher concentrations of 1-cyano 2,3-epithiopropane, the epithionitrile hydrolysis product of sinigrin, and significantly higher total phenolic concentrations than U.S. Fancy.

  7. Spectrophotometric method for the assay of steroid 5α-reductase activity of rat liver and prostate microsomes.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Teruki; Wada, Keiji; Watabe, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuki; Ito, Etsuro; Miura, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric method for the assay of steroid 5α-reductase (5α-SR) was developed in which 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) and 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5α-diol), metabolites formed in the NADPH-dependent reduction of testosterone with enzyme sources of 5α-SR, were measured by enzymatic cycling using 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the presence of excess thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (thio-NAD) and NADH. It was found that 5α-SR activity was proportional to the accumulated thio-NADH having an absorption maximum at 400 nm. Because of the high cycling rate (> 600 cycle per min) and no interference from testosterone, enzymatic cycling can determine the sum of 5α-DHT and 5α-diol at the picomole level without separation from excess testosterone. The present method was readily applicable to the assay of 5α-SR activity of rat liver and prostate microsomes as well as to the assay of inhibitory activity of finasteride, a synthetic inhibitor of 5α-SR. PMID:23574674

  8. Structure-Activity Relationships of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis Dihydrofolate Reductase: toward the Identification of New Potent Drug Leads

    PubMed Central

    Joska, Tammy M.; Anderson, Amy C.

    2006-01-01

    New and improved therapeutics are needed for Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax. To date, antimicrobial agents have not been developed against the well-validated target dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). In order to address whether DHFR inhibitors could have potential use as clinical agents against Bacillus, 27 compounds were screened against this enzyme from Bacillus cereus, which is identical to the enzyme from B. anthracis at the active site. Several 2,4-diamino-5-deazapteridine compounds exhibit submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s). Four of the inhibitors displaying potency in vitro were tested in vivo and showed a marked growth inhibition of B. cereus; the most potent of these has MIC50 and minimum bactericidal concentrations at which 50% are killed of 1.6 μg/ml and 0.09 μg/ml, respectively. In order to illustrate structure-activity relationships for the classes of inhibitors tested, each of the 27 inhibitors was docked into homology models of the B. cereus and B. anthracis DHFR proteins, allowing the development of a rationale for the inhibition profiles. A combination of favorable interactions with the diaminopyrimidine and substituted phenyl rings explains the low IC50 values of potent inhibitors; steric interactions explain higher IC50 values. These experiments show that DHFR is a reasonable antimicrobial target for Bacillus anthracis and that there is a class of inhibitors that possess sufficient potency and antibacterial activity to suggest further development. PMID:17005826

  9. A novel thiol-reductase activity of Arabidopsis YUC6 confers drought tolerance independently of auxin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Kang, Sun Bin; Kim, Jeong Im; Baek, Dongwon; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Mi Ri; Li, Ning; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Asami, Tadao; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J.; Bressan, Ray A.; Pardo, Jose M.; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    YUCCA (YUC) proteins constitute a family of flavin monooxygenases (FMOs), with an important role in auxin (IAA) biosynthesis. Here we report that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing YUC6 display enhanced IAA-related phenotypes and exhibit improved drought stress tolerance, low rate of water loss and controlled ROS accumulation under drought and oxidative stresses. Co-overexpression of an IAA-conjugating enzyme reduces IAA levels but drought stress tolerance is unaffected, indicating that the stress-related phenotype is not based on IAA overproduction. YUC6 contains a previously unrecognized FAD- and NADPH-dependent thiol-reductase activity (TR) that overlaps with the FMO domain involved in IAA biosynthesis. Mutation of a conserved cysteine residue (Cys-85) preserves FMO but suppresses TR activity and stress tolerance, whereas mutating the FAD- and NADPH-binding sites, that are common to TR and FMO domains, abolishes all outputs. We provide a paradigm for a single protein playing a dual role, regulating plant development and conveying stress defence responses. PMID:26314500

  10. Involvement of tristetraprolin in transcriptional activation of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, Gene C.; Edelman, Jeffrey L.; Brooks, Patricia A.

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin blocks transcription of HMGR in vivo in rat liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin inhibits insulin activation of HMGR transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin acts to rapidly increase tristetraprolin in liver nuclear extracts. -- Abstract: Several AU-rich RNA binding element (ARE) proteins were investigated for their possible effects on transcription of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) in normal rats. Using in vivo electroporation, four different siRNAs to each ARE protein were introduced together with HMGR promoter (-325 to +20) luciferase construct and compared to saline controls. All four siRNAs to tristetraprolin (TTP) completely eliminated transcription from the HMGR promoter construct. Since insulin acts to rapidly increase hepatic HMGR transcription, the effect of TTP siRNA on induction by insulin was tested. The 3-fold stimulation by insulin was eliminated by this treatment. In comparison, siRNA to AU RNA binding protein/enoyl coenzyme A hydratase (AUH) had no effect. These findings indicate a role for TTP in the insulin-mediated activation of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  11. Dissimilatory arsenate reductase activity and arsenate-respiring bacteria in bovine rumen fluid, hamster feces, and the termite hindgut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbel, M.J.; Switzer, Blum J.; Hoeft, S.E.; Cohen, S.M.; Arnold, L.L.; Lisak, J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine rumen fluid and slurried hamster feces completely reduced millimolar levels of arsenate to arsenite upon incubation under anoxic conditions. This activity was strongly inhibited by autoclaving or aerobic conditions, and partially inhibited by tungstate or chloramphenicol. The rate of arsenate reduction was faster in feces from a population of arsenate-watered (100 ppm) hamsters compared to a control group watered without arsenate. Using radioisotope methods, arsenate reductase activity in hamster feces was also detected at very low concentrations of added arsenate (???10 ??M). Bacterial cultures were isolated from these materials, as well as from the termite hindgut, that grew using H2 as their electron donor, acetate as their carbon source, and arsenate as their respiratory electron acceptor. The three cultures aligned phylogenetically either with well-established enteric bacteria, or with an organism associated with feedlot fecal wastes. Because arsenite is transported across the gut epithelium more readily than arsenate, microbial dissimilatory reduction of arsenate in the gut may promote the body's absorption of arsenic and hence potentiate its toxicity. ?? 2002 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Coamplification and coexpression of human tissue-type plasminogen activator and murine dihydrofolate reductase sequences in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, R J; Wasley, L C; Spiliotes, A J; Gossels, S D; Latt, S A; Larsen, G R; Kay, R M

    1985-01-01

    Expression of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) at high levels has been achieved in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by cotransfection and subsequent coamplification of the transfected sequences. Expression vectors containing the t-PA cDNA gene and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) cDNA gene were cotransfected into CHO DHFR-deficient cells. Transformants expressing DHFR were selected by growth in media lacking nucleosides and contained low numbers of t-PA genes and DHFR genes. Stepwise selection of the DHFR+ transformants in increasing concentrations of methotrexate generated cells which had amplified both DHFR genes and t-PA genes over 100-fold. These cell lines expressed elevated levels of enzymatically active t-PA. To optimize both t-PA sequence amplification and t-PA expression, various modifications of the original procedure were used. These included alterations to the DHFR expression vector, optimization of the molar ratio of t-PA to DHFR sequences in the cotransfection, and modification of the methotrexate resistance selection procedure. The structure of the amplified DNA, its chromosomal location, and its stability during growth in the absence of methotrexate are reported. Images PMID:4040603

  13. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  14. Control of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Activity in Cultured Human Fibroblasts by Very Low Density Lipoproteins of Subjects with Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Gianturco, Sandra H.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Jackson, Richard L.; Patsch, Josef R.; Sybers, Harley D.; Taunton, O. David; Yeshurun, Daniel L.; Smith, Louis C.

    1978-01-01

    Very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human normolipemic plasma, and the VLDL, the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL), and LDL from patients with Type III hyperlipoproteinemic plasma were tested for their abilities to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in cultured human fibroblasts from normal subjects and a Type III patient. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in the fibroblasts of a patient with Type III hyperlipoproteinemia appears to be normal. VLDL from normal subjects, isolated by angle head ultracentrifugation (d < 1.006) or by gel filtration on BioGel A-5m, were about 5 times less effective than LDL in suppressing HMG-CoA reductase activity, based on protein content, in agreement with previous reports with normal fibroblasts. Zonal centrifugation of normal VLDL isolated by both methods showed that the VLDL contained IDL. Normal VLDL from the angle head rotor, refractionated by the zonal method, had little, if any, ability to suppress the HMG-CoA reductase activity in either normal or Type III fibroblasts. VLDL, IDL, and LDL fractionated by zonal ultracentrifugation from Type III plasma gave half-maximum inhibition at 0.2-0.5 μg of protein/ml, indistinguishable from the suppression caused by normal LDL. Type III VLDL did not suppress HMG-CoA reductase in mutant LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. Zonally isolated VLDL obtained from one Type IV and one Type V patient gave half-maximal suppression at 5 and 0.5 μg of protein/ml, respectively. Molecular diameters and apoprotein compositions of the zonally isolated normal and Type III VLDL were similar; the major difference in composition was that Type III VLDL contained more cholesteryl esters and less triglyceride than did normal VLDL. The compositions and diameters of the Type IV and Type V VLDL were similar to normal VLDL. These findings show that the basic defect in Type III hyperlipoproteinemia is qualitatively

  15. Post-translational control of nitrate reductase activity responding to light and photosynthesis evolved already in the early vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Królicka, Adriana; Førland, Nina; Hansen, Margarita; Heidari, Behzad; Lillo, Cathrine

    2013-05-01

    Regulation of nitrate reductase (NR) by reversible phosphorylation at a conserved motif is well established in higher plants, and enables regulation of NR in response to rapid fluctuations in light intensity. This regulation is not conserved in algae NR, and we wished to test the evolutionary origin of the regulatory mechanism by physiological examination of ancient land plants. Especially a member of the lycophytes is of interest since their NR is candidate for regulation by reversible phosphorylation based on sequence analysis. We compared Selaginella kraussiana, a member of the lycophytes and earliest vascular plants, with the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana, and also tested the moss Physcomitrella patens. Interestingly, optimization of assay conditions revealed that S. kraussiana NR used NADH as an electron donor like A. thaliana, whereas P. patens NR activity depended on NADPH. Examination of light/darkness effects showed that S. kraussiana NR was rapidly regulated similar to A. thaliana NR when a differential (Mg(2+) contra EDTA) assay was used to reveal activity state of NR. This implies that already existing NR enzyme was post-translationally activated by light in both species. Light had a positive effect also on de novo synthesis of NR in S. kraussiana, which could be shown after the plants had been exposed to a prolonged dark period (7 days). Daily variations in NR activity were mainly caused by post-translational modifications. As for angiosperms, the post-translational light activation of NR in S. kraussiana was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1*1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthesis and stomata opening. Evolutionary, a post-translational control mechanism for NR have occurred before or in parallel with development of vascular tissue in land plants, and appears to be part of a complex mechanisms for coordination of CO2 and nitrogen metabolism in these plants.

  16. Chromate/Nitrite Interactions in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1: Evidence for Multiple Cr(VI) Reduction Mechanisms Dependent on Physiological Growth Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William Arnold; Viamajala, S.; Peyton, Brent Michael; Petersen, J. N.

    2002-06-01

    Inhibition of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] reduction due to nitrate and nitrite was observed during tests with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (previously named Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 and henceforth referred to as MR-1). Initial Cr(VI) reduction rates were measured at various nitrite concentrations, and a mixed inhibition kinetic model was used to determine the kinetic parameters-maximum Cr(VI) reduction rate and inhibition constant [V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI))]. Values of V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI)) obtained with MR-1 cultures grown under denitrifying conditions were observed to be significantly different from the values obtained when the cultures were grown with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor. It was also observed that a single V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI)) did not adequately describe the inhibition kinetics of either nitrate-grown or fumarate-grown cultures. The inhibition patterns indicate that Cr(VI) reduction in MR-1 is likely not limited to a single pathway, but occurs via different mechanisms some of which are dependent on growth conditions. Inhibition of nitrite reduction due to the presence of Cr(VI) was also studied, and the kinetic parameters V(max,NO2) and K(i,NO2) were determined. It was observed that these coefficients also differed significantly between MR-1 grown under denitrifying conditions and fumarate reducing conditions. The inhibition studies suggest the involvement of nitrite reductase in Cr(VI) reduction. Because nitrite reduction is part of the anaerobic respiration process, inhibition due to Cr(VI) might be a result of interaction with the components of the anaerobic respiration pathway such as nitrite reductase. Also, differences in the degree of inhibition of nitrite reduction activity by chromate at different growth conditions suggest that the toxicity mechanism of Cr(VI) might also be dependent on the conditions of growth. Cr(VI) reduction has been shown to occur via different pathways, but to our knowledge, multiple

  17. Coordinated regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae-truncated denitrification pathway by the nitric oxide-sensitive repressor, NsrR, and nitrite-insensitive NarQ-NarP.

    PubMed

    Overton, Tim W; Whitehead, Rebekah; Li, Ying; Snyder, Lori A S; Saunders, Nigel J; Smith, Harry; Cole, Jeff A

    2006-11-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives anaerobically by reducing nitrite to nitrous oxide catalyzed by the nitrite and nitric oxide reductases, AniA and NorB. P(aniA) is activated by FNR (regulator of fumarate and nitrate reduction), the two-component regulatory system NarQ-NarP, and induced by nitrite; P(norB) is induced by NO independently of FNR by an uncharacterized mechanism. We report the results of microarray analysis, bioinformatic analysis, and chromatin immunoprecipitation, which revealed that only five genes with readily identified NarP-binding sites are differentially expressed in narP(+) and narP strains. These include three genes implicated in the truncated gonococcal denitrification pathway: aniA, norB, and narQ. We also report that (i) nitrite induces aniA transcription in a narP mutant; (ii) nitrite induction involves indirect inactivation by nitric oxide of a gonococcal repressor, NsrR, identified from a multigenome bioinformatic study; (iii) in an nsrR mutant, aniA, norB, and dnrN (encoding a putative reactive nitrogen species response protein) were expressed constitutively in the absence of nitrite, suggesting that NsrR is the only NO-sensing transcription factor in N. gonorrhoeae; and (iv) NO rather than nitrite is the ligand to which NsrR responds. When expressed in Escherichia coli, gonococcal NarQ and chimaeras of E. coli and gonococcal NarQ are ligand-insensitive and constitutively active: a "locked-on" phenotype. We conclude that genes involved in the truncated denitrification pathway of N. gonorrhoeae are key components of the small NarQP regulon, that NarP indirectly regulates P(norB) by stimulating NO production by AniA, and that NsrR plays a critical role in enabling gonococci to evade NO generated as a host defense mechanism. PMID:16954205

  18. Loss of nitrous oxide reductase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured under N sub 2 O as determined by rocket immunoelectrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    SooHoo, C.K.; Hollocher, T.C. )

    1990-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is unusual among denitrifiers in that it grows poorly on N{sub 2}O alone but can grow efficiently on the N{sub 2}O produced as a metabolic intermediate during the reduction of nitrate or nitrite to N{sub 2}. Previous studies in our laboratory have determined that the immediate cause for poor growth on N{sub 2}O is a progressive loss of nitrous oxide uptake and reductase activities in cells grown under N{sub 2}O. In this study, we determined by using rocket immunoelectrophoresis that the mass ratio of nitrous oxide reductase to total protein in the soluble protein fraction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa P2 was highest in cells grown on nitrate, decreased in cells grown on N{sub 2}O following the exhaustion of the initial charge of nitrate, and was nearly zero in cells exposed solely to N{sub 2}O.

  19. Inhibitors of 7-Dehydrocholesterol Reductase: Screening of a Collection of Pharmacologically Active Compounds in Neuro2a Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Young H; Korade, Zeljka; Tallman, Keri A; Liu, Wei; Weaver, C David; Mirnics, Karoly; Porter, Ned A

    2016-05-16

    A small library of pharmacologically active compounds (the NIH Clinical Collection) was assayed in Neuro2a cells to determine their effect on the last step in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, the transformation of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) to cholesterol promoted by 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase, DHCR7. Of some 727 compounds in the NIH Clinical Collection, over 30 compounds significantly increased 7-DHC in Neuro2a cells when assayed at 1 μM. Active compounds that increased 7-DHC with a Z-score of +3 or greater generally gave rise to modest decreases in desmosterol and increases in lanosterol levels. Among the most active compounds identified in the library were the antipsychotic, antidepressant, and anxiolytic compounds that included perospirone, nefazodone, haloperidol, aripiprazole, trazodone, and buspirone. Fluoxetine and risperidone were also active at 1 μM, and another 10 compounds in this class of pharmaceuticals were identified in the screen at concentrations of 10 μM. Increased levels of 7-DHC are associated with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), a human condition that results from a mutation in the gene that encodes DHCR7. The SLOS phenotype includes neurological deficits and congenital malformations, and it is linked to a higher incidence of autism spectrum disorder. The significance of the current study is that it identifies common pharmacological compounds that may induce a biochemical presentation similar to SLOS. Little is known about the side effects of elevated 7-DHC postdevelopmentally, and the elevated 7-DHC that results from exposure to these compounds may also be a confounder in the diagnosis of SLOS. PMID:27097157

  20. A Reduction in Ribonucleotide Reductase Activity Slows Down the Chromosome Replication Fork but Does Not Change Its Localization

    PubMed Central

    Odsbu, Ingvild; Morigen; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that the enzymes of nucleotide biosynthesis may be compartmentalized or concentrated in a structure affecting the organization of newly replicated DNA. Here we have investigated the effect of changes in ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) activity on chromosome replication and organization of replication forks in Escherichia coli. Methodology/Principal Findings Reduced concentrations of deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs) obtained by reducing the activity of wild type RNR by treatment with hydroxyurea or by mutation, resulted in a lengthening of the replication period. The replication fork speed was found to be gradually reduced proportionately to moderate reductions in nucleotide availability. Cells with highly extended C periods showed a “delay” in cell division i.e. had a higher cell mass. Visualization of SeqA structures by immunofluorescence indicated no change in organization of the new DNA upon moderate limitation of RNR activity. Severe nucleotide limitation led to replication fork stalling and reversal. Well defined SeqA structures were not found in situations of extensive replication fork repair. In cells with stalled forks obtained by UV irradiation, considerable DNA compaction was observed, possibly indicating a reorganization of the DNA into a “repair structure” during the initial phase of the SOS response. Conclusion/Significance The results indicate that the replication fork is slowed down in a controlled manner during moderate nucleotide depletion and that a change in the activity of RNR does not lead to a change in the organization of newly replicated DNA. Control of cell division but not control of initiation was affected by the changes in replication elongation. PMID:19898675

  1. Mechanistic insights into ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase catalysis involving the conserved glutamate in the active site.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Essigke, Timm; Cortez, Néstor; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2010-04-01

    Plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are flavoenzymes harboring one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide that catalyze reversible reactions between obligatory one-electron carriers and obligatory two-electron carriers. A glutamate next to the C-terminus is strictly conserved in FNR and has been proposed to function as proton donor/acceptor during catalysis. However, experimental studies of this proposed function led to contradicting conclusions about the role of this glutamate in the catalytic mechanism. In the present work, we study the titration behavior of the glutamate in the active site of FNR using theoretical methods. Protonation probabilities for maize FNR were computed for the reaction intermediates of the catalytic cycle by Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations and Metropolis Monte Carlo titration. The titration behavior of the highly conserved glutamate was found to vary depending on the bound substrates NADP(H) and ferredoxin and also on the redox states of these substrates and the flavin adenine dinucleotide. Our results support the involvement of the glutamate in the FNR catalytic mechanism not only as a proton donor but also as a key residue for stabilizing and destabilizing reaction intermediates. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model rationalizing the function of the glutamate in the reaction cycle, which allows reinterpretation of previous experimental results.

  2. Galloyl glucoses from the seeds of Cornus officinalis with inhibitory activity against protein glycation, aldose reductase, and cataractogenesis ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Jang, Dae Sik; Kim, Nan Hee; Lee, Yun Mi; Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Jin Sook

    2011-01-01

    In an ongoing project directed toward the discovery of novel treatments for diabetic complications from traditional herbal medicines, six galloyl glucoses, 1,2,3-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (1), 1,2,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (2), 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (3), 1,2,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (4), 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (5), and tellimagrandin II (6), and two phenolic acids, gallic acid 4-O-β-D-glucoside (7) and gallic acid 4-O-β-D-(6'-O-galloyl)-glucoside (8), were isolated from an EtOAc-soluble fraction of the seeds of Cornus officinalis (Cornaceae). The structures of the compounds were identified using physical and spectroscopic methods, as well as by comparison of their data with values reported in the literature. All the isolates were evaluated in vitro for inhibitory activity against the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR). Compounds 1-6 were subjected to further bioassay to examine their inhibitory effects on AGE cross-linking. The opacity of lenses was significantly prevented when treated with 3 in an ex vivo experiment.

  3. Effect of pH and nitrite concentration on nitrite oxidation rate.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, E; Giménez, J B; Ruano, M V; Ferrer, J; Serralta, J

    2011-10-01

    The effect of pH and nitrite concentration on the activity of the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in an activated sludge reactor has been determined by means of laboratory batch experiments based on respirometric techniques. The bacterial activity was measured at different pH and at different total nitrite concentrations (TNO₂). The experimental results showed that the nitrite oxidation rate (NOR) depends on the TNO₂ concentration independently of the free nitrous acid (FNA) concentration, so FNA cannot be considered as the real substrate for NOB. NOB were strongly affected by low pH values (no activity was detected at pH 6.5) but no inhibition was observed at high pH values (activity was nearly the same for the pH range 7.5-9.95). A kinetic expression for nitrite oxidation process including switch functions to model the effect of TNO₂ concentration and pH inhibition is proposed. Substrate half saturation constant and pH inhibition constants have been obtained.

  4. Accommodation of two diatomic molecules in cytochrome bo3: insights into NO reductase activity in terminal oxidases†

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Lin, Myat T.; Ganesan, Krithika; Chen, Ying; Fee, James A.; Gennis, Robert B.; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial heme-copper terminal oxidases react quickly with NO to form a heme-nitrosyl complex, which, in some of these enzymes, can further react with a second NO molecule to produce N2O. Previously, we characterized the heme a3-NO complex formed in cytochrome ba3 from Thermus thermophilus and the product of its low-temperature illumination. We showed that the photolyzed NO group binds to CuB(I) to form an end-on NO-CuB or side-on copper-nitrosyl complex which is likely to represent the binding characteristics of the second NO molecule at the heme-copper active site. Here we present a comparative study with cytochrome bo3 from Escherichia coli. Both terminal oxidases are shown to catalyze the same two-electron reduction of NO to N2O. The EPR and resonance Raman signatures of the heme o3-NO complex are comparable to those of the a3-NO complex. However, low-temperature FTIR experiments reveal that photolysis of the heme o3-NO complex does not produce a CuB-nitrosyl complex, but that instead, the NO remains unbound in the active-site cavity. Additional FTIR photolysis experiments on the heme-nitrosyl complexes of these terminal oxidases, in the presence of CO demonstrate that an [o3–NO • OC–CuB] tertiary complex can form in bo3 but not in ba3. We assign these differences to a greater iron-copper distance in the reduced form of bo3 compared to that of ba3. Because this difference in metal-metal distance does not appear to affect the NO reductase activity, our results suggest that the coordination of the second NO to CuB is not an essential step of the reaction mechanism. PMID:19187032

  5. Inhibition of Rat 5α-Reductase Activity and Testosterone-Induced Sebum Synthesis in Hamster Sebocytes by an Extract of Quercus acutissima Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Junichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Matsubara, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Junko; Kaneko, Atsushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Maemura, Kazuya; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Bokusoku (BK) is an extract from the Quercus cortex used in folk medicine for treatment of skin disorders and convergence, and is present in jumihaidokuto, a traditional Japanese medicine that is prescribed for purulent skin diseases like acne vulgaris. The excess of sebum production induced by androgen is involved in the development of acne. Our aim is to examine whether BK and its constituents inhibit testosterone metabolism and testosterone-induced sebum synthesis. Methods. Measurements of 5α-reductase activity and lipogenesis were performed using rat liver microsomes and hamster sebocytes, respectively. Results. BK dose-dependently reduced the conversion of testosterone to a more active androgen, dihydrotestosterone in a 5α-reductase enzymatic reaction. Twenty polyphenols in BK categorized as gallotannin, ellagitannin, and flavonoid were identified by LC-MS/MS. Nine polyphenols with gallate group, tetragalloyl glucose, pentagalloyl glucose, eugeniin, 1-desgalloyl eugeniin, casuarinin, castalagin, stenophyllanin C, (−)-epicatechin gallate, and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate, inhibited testosterone metabolism. In particular, pentagalloyl glucose showed the strongest activity. BK and pentagalloyl glucose suppressed testosterone-induced lipogenesis, whereas they weakly inhibited the lipogenic action of insulin. Conclusions. BK inhibited androgen-related pathogenesis of acne, testosterone conversion, and sebum synthesis, partially through 5α-reductase inhibition, and has potential to be a useful agent in the therapeutic strategy of acne. PMID:25709710

  6. Effect of nitrite and nitrate on in situ sulfide production in an activated sludge immobilized agar gel film as determined by use of microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Satoshi; Santegoeds, Cecilia M; De Beer, Dirk

    2003-03-01

    Microelectrode, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses were used to investigate the effect of nitrite and nitrate on in situ sulfide production in an activated sludge immobilized agar gel film. Microelectrode measurements of O(2), H(2)S, NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), and pH revealed that the addition of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) forced sulfate reduction zones deeper in the agar gel and significantly reduced the in situ sulfide production levels. The sulfate reduction zone was consequently separated from O(2) and NO(2)(-) or NO(3)(-) respiration zones with increasing the concentrations of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-). These NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) treatments had only a transient effect on sulfide production. The in situ sulfide production quickly recovered to the previous levels when NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) were removed. The PCR-DGGE and FISH analyses revealed that 2-day-continuous addition of 500 microM NO(3)(-) did not change the metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) community. On the basis of these data, it could be concluded that the addition of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) did not kill SRB, but induced the interspecies competition for common carbon source (i.e., acetate) between nitrate-reducing heterotrophic bacteria and SRB and enhanced the oxidation of the produced sulfide, which were main possible causes of the suppression of in situ sulfide production in the agar gel.

  7. Biological Nitrogen Removal through Nitritation Coupled with Thiosulfate-Driven Denitritation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Zhou, Junmei; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Rulong; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    A novel biological nitrogen removal system based on nitritation coupled with thiosulfate-driven denitritation (Nitritation-TDD) was developed to achieve a high nitrogen removal rate and low sludge production. A nitritation sequential batch reactor (nitritation SBR) and an anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) reactor were applied for effective nitritation and denitritation, respectively. Above 75% nitrite was accumulated in the nitritation SBR with an influent ammonia loading rate of 0.43 kg N/d/m3. During Nitritation-TDD operation, particle sizes (d50) of the sludge decreased from 406 to 225 um in nitritation SBR and from 327–183 um in AnUSB reactor. Pyrosequencing tests revealed that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) population was stabilized at approximately 7.0% (calculated as population of AOB-related genus divided by the total microbial population) in the nitritation SBR. In contrast, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population decreased from 6.5–0.6% over the same time, indicating the effective nitrite accumulation in the nitritation SBR. Thiobacillus, accounting for 34.2% in the AnUSB reactor, was mainly responsible for nitrogen removal via autotrophic denitritation, using an external source of thiosulfate as electron donor. Also, it was found that free nitrous acid could directly affect the denitritation activity. PMID:27272192

  8. Detection and diversity of fungal nitric oxide reductase genes (p450nor) in agricultural soils

    DOE PAGES

    Higgins, Steven A.; Welsh, Allana; Orellana, Luis H.; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Chee-Sanford, Joanne C.; Sanford, Robert A.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2016-03-11

    Members of the Fungi convert nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) to gaseous nitrous oxide (N2O) (denitrification), but the fungal contributions to N-loss from soil remain uncertain. Cultivation-based methodologies that include antibiotics to selectively assess fungal activities have limitations and complementary molecular approaches to assign denitrification potential to fungi are desirable. Microcosms established with soils from two representative U.S. Midwest agricultural regions produced N2O from added NO3- or NO2- in the presence of antibiotics to inhibit bacteria. Cultivation efforts yielded 214 fungal isolates belonging to at least 15 distinct morphological groups, of which 151 produced N2O from NO2-. Novel PCR primersmore » targeting the p450nor gene that encodes the nitric oxide (NO) reductase responsible for N2O production in fungi yielded 26 novel p450nor amplicons from DNA of 37 isolates and 23 amplicons from environmental DNA obtained from two agricultural soils. The sequences shared 54-98% amino acid identity to reference P450nor sequences within the phylum Ascomycota, and expand the known fungal P450nor sequence diversity. p450nor was detected in all fungal isolates that produced N2O from nitrite, whereas nirK (encoding the NO-forming nitrite reductase) was amplified in only 13-74% of the N2O-forming isolates using two separate nirK primer sets. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the value of p450nor-targeted PCR to complement existing approaches to assess the fungal contributions to denitrification and N2O formation.« less

  9. Nitrite inhibition of denitrification by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, J.S.; Julio, S.M.; Reis, M.A.M. |

    1995-05-05

    Using a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a model system nitrite inhibition of denitrification was studied. A mineral media with acetate and nitrate as sole electron donor and acceptor, respectively, was used. Results obtained in continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR) operated at pH values between 6.6 and 7.8 showed that growth inhibition depended only on the nitrite undissociated fraction concentration (nitrous acid). A mathematical model to describe this dependence is put forward. The maximum nitrous acid concentration compatible with cell growth and denitrification activity was found to be 66 {mu}g N/L. Denitrification activity was partially associated with growth, as described by the Luedeking-Piret equation. However, when the freshly inoculated reactor was operated discontinuously, nitrite accumulation caused growth uncoupling from denitrification activity. The authors suggest that these results can be interpreted considering that (a) nitrous acid acts as a proton uncoupler; and (b) cultures continuously exposed to nitrous acid prevent the uncoupling effect but not the growth inhibition. Examination of the growth dependence on nitrite concentration at pH 7.0 showed that adapted cultures (growth on CSTR) are less sensitive to nitrous acid inhibition than the ones cultivated in batch.

  10. Mainstream partial nitritation and anammox in a 200,000 m3/day activated sludge process in Singapore: scale-down by using laboratory fed-batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Yeshi, Cao; Hong, Kwok Bee; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Daigger, Glen T; Yi, Png Hui; Wah, Yuen Long; Chye, Chua Seng; Ghani, Yahya Abd

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory fed-batch reactor has been used to study under controlled conditions the performance of partial nitritation/anammox for the 200,000 m(3)/day step-feed activated sludge process at the Changi Water Reclamation Plant, Singapore. The similarity of the concentrations of NH(4), NO(2), NO(3), PO(4), suspended chemical oxygen demand (sCOD), pH, and alkalinity (ALK) between the on-site process and laboratory reactor illustrates that the laboratory fed-batch reactor can be used to simulate the site performance. The performance of the reactor fed by primary effluent illustrated the existence of anammox and heterotrophic denitrification and apparent excessive biological phosphorus removal as observed from the site. The performance of the reactor fed by final effluent proved the presence of anammox process on site. Both the laboratory reactor and on-site process showed that higher influent 5-day biochemical oxygen demand/total nitrogen (BOD(5)/TN) (COD/TN) ratio increases the nitrogen removal efficiency of the process.

  11. Mainstream partial nitritation and anammox in a 200,000 m3/day activated sludge process in Singapore: scale-down by using laboratory fed-batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Yeshi, Cao; Hong, Kwok Bee; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Daigger, Glen T; Yi, Png Hui; Wah, Yuen Long; Chye, Chua Seng; Ghani, Yahya Abd

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory fed-batch reactor has been used to study under controlled conditions the performance of partial nitritation/anammox for the 200,000 m(3)/day step-feed activated sludge process at the Changi Water Reclamation Plant, Singapore. The similarity of the concentrations of NH(4), NO(2), NO(3), PO(4), suspended chemical oxygen demand (sCOD), pH, and alkalinity (ALK) between the on-site process and laboratory reactor illustrates that the laboratory fed-batch reactor can be used to simulate the site performance. The performance of the reactor fed by primary effluent illustrated the existence of anammox and heterotrophic denitrification and apparent excessive biological phosphorus removal as observed from the site. The performance of the reactor fed by final effluent proved the presence of anammox process on site. Both the laboratory reactor and on-site process showed that higher influent 5-day biochemical oxygen demand/total nitrogen (BOD(5)/TN) (COD/TN) ratio increases the nitrogen removal efficiency of the process. PMID:27386982

  12. Dissecting the Structural Elements for the Activation of β-Ketoacyl-(Acyl Carrier Protein) Reductase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Shumilin, Igor A.; Osinski, Tomasz; Demas, Matt; Grimshaw, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT β-Ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) reductase (FabG) catalyzes the key reductive reaction in the elongation cycle of fatty acid synthesis (FAS), which is a vital metabolic pathway in bacteria and a promising target for new antibiotic development. The activation of the enzyme is usually linked to the formation of a catalytic triad and cofactor binding, and crystal structures of FabG from different organisms have been captured in either the active or inactive conformation. However, the structural elements which enable activation of FabG require further exploration. Here we report the findings of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of the FabG protein found in the causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). vcFabG exists predominantly as a dimer in solution and is able to self-associate to form tetramers, which is the state seen in the crystal structure. The formation of the tetramer may be promoted by the presence of the cofactor NADP(H). The transition between the dimeric and tetrameric states of vcFabG is related to changes in the conformations of the α4/α5 helices on the dimer-dimer interface. Two glycine residues adjacent to the dimer interface (G92 and G141) are identified to be the hinge for the conformational changes, while the catalytic tyrosine (Y155) and a glutamine residue that forms hydrogen bonds to both loop β4-α4 and loop β5-α5 (Q152) stabilize the active conformation. The functions of the aforementioned residues were confirmed by binding and enzymatic assays for the corresponding mutants. IMPORTANCE This paper describes the results of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of FabG from Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). In this work, we dissected the structural elements responsible for the activation of vcFabG. The structural information provided here is essential for the development of antibiotics specifically targeting bacterial FabG, especially for the multidrug-resistant strains of V. cholerae. PMID:26553852

  13. Effect of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase Inhibitor on Disease Activity in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Bin; Yin, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Li-Dan; Wang, Li; Zheng, Wen-Jie; Chen, Hua; Wu, Qing-Jun; Tang, Fu-Lin; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Shan, Guangliang; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (also known as statins) are widely used as lipid-lowering agents in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to reduce their cardiovascular risk. However, whether they have an effect on RA disease activity is controversial. This study aimed to investigate the effect of statins on disease activity in RA patients. A systematic literature review was performed using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ISI WEB of Knowledge, Scopus, and Clinical Trials Register databases. Only prospective randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing the efficacy of statins with placebo on adult RA patients were included. The efficacy was measured according to the ACR criteria, EULAR criteria, DAS28, HAQ score, ESR, or CRP. The Jadad score was used for quality assessment. The inverse variance method was used to analyze continuous outcomes. A fixed-effects model was used when there was no significant heterogeneity; otherwise, a random-effects model was used. For stability of results, we performed leave-one-study-out sensitivity analysis by omitting individual studies one at a time from the meta-analysis. Publication bias was assessed using Egger test. A total 13 studies involving 737 patients were included in the meta-analysis; 11 studies were included in the meta-analysis based on DAS28, while the other 2 studies were only included in the meta-analysis based on ESR or CRP. The standardized mean difference (SMD) in DAS28 between the statin group and the placebo group was −0.55 (95% CI [−0.83, −0.26], P = 0.0002), with an I2 value of 68%. Subgroup analysis showed that patients with more active disease tended to benefit more from statin therapy (SMD −0.73, P = 0.01) than patients with moderate or low disease activity (SMD −0.38, P = 0.03). Statin therapy also significantly reduced tender joint counts, swollen joint counts, ESR, and CRP compared with placebo, but the reduction in HAQ score and VAS was not

  14. Acrolein-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is mediated by alkylation of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin 1.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Spiess, Page C; Hristova, Milena; Hondal, Robert J; van der Vliet, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking remains a major health concern worldwide, and many of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke (CS) can be attributed to its abundant electrophilic aldehydes, such as acrolein (2-propenal). Previous studies indicate that acrolein readily reacts with thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), a critical enzyme involved in regulation of thioredoxin (Trx)-mediated redox signaling, by alkylation at its selenocysteine (Sec) residue. Because alkylation of Sec within TrxR1 has significant implications for its enzymatic function, we explored the potential importance of TrxR1 alkylation in acrolein-induced activation or injury of bronchial epithelial cells. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial HBE1 cells to acrolein (1-30 μM) resulted in dose-dependent loss of TrxR thioredoxin reductase activity, which coincided with its alkylation, as determined by biotin hydrazide labeling, and was independent of initial GSH status. To test the involvement of TrxR1 in acrolein responses in HBE1 cells, we suppressed TrxR1 using siRNA silencing or augmented TrxR1 by cell supplementation with sodium selenite. Acrolein exposure of HBE1 cells induced dose-dependent activation of the MAP kinases, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38, and activation of JNK was markedly enhanced after selenite-mediated induction of TrxR1, and was associated with increased alkylation of TrxR1. Conversely, siRNA silencing of TrxR1 significantly suppressed the ability of acrolein to activate JNK, and also appeared to attenuate acrolein-dependent activation of ERK and p38. Alteration of initial TrxR1 levels by siRNA or selenite supplementation also affected initial Trx1 redox status and acrolein-mediated alkylation of Trx1, but did not significantly affect acrolein-mediated activation of HO-1 or cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that alkylation of TrxR1 and/or Trx1 may contribute directly to acrolein-mediated activation of MAP kinases such as JNK, and

  15. Details in the catalytic mechanism of mammalian thioredoxin reductase 1 revealed using point mutations and juglone-coupled enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianqiang; Cheng, Qing; Arnér, Elias S J

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) is a key enzyme in redox regulation, antioxidant defense, and cellular growth. TrxR1 can catalyze efficient reduction of juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone; walnut toxin) in a reaction which, in contrast to reduction of most other substrates of TrxR1, is not dependent upon an intact selenocysteine (Sec, U) residue of the enzyme. Using a number of TrxR1 mutant variants, we here found that a sole Cys residue at the C-terminal tail of TrxR1 is required for high-efficiency juglone-coupled NADPH oxidase activity of Sec-deficient enzyme, occurring with mixed one- and two-electron reactions producing superoxide. The activity also utilizes the FAD and the N-terminal redox active disulfide/dithiol motif of TrxR1. If a sole Cys residue at the C-terminal tail of TrxR1, in the absence of Sec, was moved further towards the C-terminal end of the protein compared to its natural position at residue 497, juglone reduction was, surprisingly, further increased. Ala substitutions of Trp407, Asn418 and Asn419 in a previously described "guiding bar", thought to mediate interactions of the C-terminal tail of TrxR1 with the FAD/dithiol site at the N-terminal domain of the other subunit in the dimeric enzyme, lowered turnover with juglone about 4.5-fold. Four residues of Sec-deficient TrxR1 were found to be easily arylated by juglone, including the Cys residue at position 497. Based upon our observations we suggest a model for involvement of the juglone-arylated C-terminal motif of TrxR1 to explain its high activity with juglone. This study thus provides novel insights into the catalytic mechanisms of TrxR1. One-electron juglone reduction by TrxR1 producing superoxide should furthermore contribute to the well-known prooxidant cytotoxicity of juglone. PMID:26898501

  16. Electron transport to periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) of Wolinella succinogenes is independent of a NapC protein.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Sänger, Monica; Schuster, Stephan C; Gross, Roland

    2003-07-01

    The rumen bacterium Wolinella succinogenes grows by respiratory nitrate ammonification with formate as electron donor. Whereas the enzymology and coupling mechanism of nitrite respiration is well known, nitrate reduction to nitrite has not yet been examined. We report here that intact cells and cell fractions catalyse nitrate and chlorate reduction by reduced viologen dyes with high specific activities. A gene cluster encoding components of a putative periplasmic nitrate reductase system (napA, G, H, B, F, L, D) was sequenced. The napA gene was inactivated by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette. The resulting mutant did not grow by nitrate respiration and did not reduce nitrate during growth by fumarate respiration, in contrast to the wild type. An antigen was detected in wild-type cells using an antiserum raised against the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) from Paracoccus pantotrophus. This antigen was absent in the W. succinogenes napA mutant. It is concluded that the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA is the only respiratory nitrate reductase in W. succinogenes, although a second nitrate-reducing enzyme is apparently induced in the napA mutant. The nap cluster of W. succinogenes lacks a napC gene whose product is thought to function in quinol oxidation and electron transfer to NapA in other bacteria. The W. succinogenes genome encodes two members of the NapC/NirT family, NrfH and FccC. Characterization of corresponding deletion mutants indicates that neither of these two proteins is required for nitrate respiration. A mutant lacking the genes encoding respiratory nitrite reductase (nrfHA) had wild-type properties with respect to nitrate respiration. A model of the electron transport chain of nitrate respiration is proposed in which one or more of the napF, G, H and L gene products mediate electron transport from menaquinol to the periplasmic NapAB complex. Inspection of the W. succinogenes genome sequence suggests that ammonia formation from

  17. Convenient synthesis of deazaflavin cofactor FO and its activity in F(420)-dependent NADP reductase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad S; Le, Cuong Q; Joseph, Ebenezer; Nguyen, Toan Q; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Foss, Frank W

    2015-05-14

    F420 and FO are phenolic 5-deazaflavin cofactors that complement nicotinamide and flavin redox coenzymes in biochemical oxidoreductases and photocatalytic systems. Specifically, these 5-deazaflavins lack the single electron reactivity with O2 of riboflavin-derived coenzymes (FMN and FAD), and, in general, have a more negative redox potential than NAD(P)(+). For example, F420-dependent NADP(+) oxidoreductase (Fno) is critical to the conversion of CO2 to CH4 by methanogenic archaea, while FO functions as a light-harvesting agent in DNA repair. The preparation of these cofactors is an obstacle to their use in biochemical studies and biotechnology. Here, a convenient synthesis of FO was achieved by improving the redox stability of synthetic intermediates containing a polar, electron-rich aminophenol fragment. Improved yields and simplified purification techniques for FO are described. Additionally, Fno activity was restored with FO in the absence of F420. Investigating the FO-dependent NADP(+)/NADPH redox process by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, steady state kinetics were defined as having a Km of 4.00 ± 0.39 μM and a kcat of 5.27 ± 0.14 s(-1). The preparation of FO should enable future biochemical studies and novel uses of F420 mimics.

  18. Effect of short term external perturbations on bacterial ecology and activities in a partial nitritation and anammox reactor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sha; Bhattacharjee, Ananda S; Weissbrodt, David G; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Goel, Ramesh

    2016-11-01

    This research investigated the short term effects of temperature changes (lasting 2-4weeks each) from 35±2°C to 21±2°C and 13±2°C and sulfide toxicity on partial nitrification-anammox (PN/A) system. Temperatures below 20°C and sulfide content as low as 5mgSL(-1) affected both aerobic and anaerobic catabolic activities of ammonia oxidation and the expression of related functional gene markers. The activity of AOB was inversely correlated with ammonium monooxygenase (amoA) gene expression. In contrast, the activity of AMX bacteria was positively correlated with the expression of their hydrazine synthase (hzsA) gene. Although the overall activities of AMX bacteria decreased at lower temperatures, the AMX bacteria were still active at the low temperatures. The inverse correlation between amoA gene expressions and the corresponding AOB activities was surprising. 16S rDNA based high throughput amplicon sequencing revealed the dominance of Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria phyla the distribution of which changed with temperature changes. PMID:27522119

  19. Purification and Characterization of the Nitrate Reductase from the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana1

    PubMed Central

    Amy, Nancy K.; Garrett, Reginald H.

    1974-01-01

    The assimilatory nitrate reductase (NADH: nitrate oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.6.6.2.) from the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, Hasle and Heimdal, has been purified 200-fold and characterized. The regulation of nitrate reductase in response to various conditions of nitrogen nutrition has been investigated. Nitrate reductase activity is repressed by the presence of ammonium in vivo, and its synthesis is derepressed when ammonium is absent. The derepression process is sensitive to cycloheximide and apparently requires protein synthesis. Repression of enzyme activity by ammonium is neither inhibited nor delayed by the presence of cycloheximide. In vitro, ammonium does not inhibit enzyme activity. NADH is the physiological electron donor for the enzyme in a flavin-dependent reaction. Spectral studies have indicated the presence of a b-type cytochrome associated with the enzyme. It is possible to observe enzymatic oxidation-reduction reactions which represent partial functions of the over-all electron transport capacity of this enzyme. Nitrate reductase will accept electrons from artificial electron donors such as reduced methyl viologen in a flavin-independent reaction. Further, dithionitereduced flavin adenine dinucleotide can donate electrons to the enzyme to reduce nitrate to nitrite. Finally, the nitrate reductase will exhibit a diaphorase activity and reduce the artificial electron acceptor mammalian cytochrome c in flavin-adeninedinucleotide-dependent reaction. Inhibition studies with potassium cyanide, sodium azide, and o-phenanthroline have yielded indirect evidence for metal component (s) of the enzyme. The inhibition of the NADH-requiring enzyme activities by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate has shown that an essential sulfhydryl group is involved in the initial portion of the electron transport. Heat treatment exerts an effect similar to the p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibition; namely, the NADH-requiring activities are rapidly inactivated, whereas the terminal

  20. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen. PMID:26969041

  1. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury.

  2. Synthesis and activity of novel 16-dehydropregnenolone acetate derivatives as inhibitors of type 1 5α-reductase and on cancer cell line SK-LU-1.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ortiz, Aylin Viviana; Bratoeff, Eugene; Ramírez-Apan, Teresa; Heuze, Yvonne; Sánchez, Araceli; Soriano, Juan; Cabeza, Marisa

    2015-12-15

    Testosterone (T) plays a crucial role in prostate growth. In androgen-dependent tissues T is reduced to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) because of the presence of the 5α-reductase enzyme. This androgen is more active than T, since it has a higher affinity for the androgen receptor (AR). When this mechanism is altered, androgen-dependent diseases, including prostate cancer, could result. The aim of this study was to synthesize several 16-dehydropregnenolone acetate derivatives containing a triazole ring at C-21 and a linear or alicyclic ester moiety at C-3 of the steroidal skeleton. These steroids were designed as potential inhibitors of the activity of both types (1 and 2) of 5α-reductase. The cytotoxic activity of these compounds was also evaluated on a panel of PC-3, MCF7, and SK-LU-1 human cancer cell lines. The results from this study showed that with the exception of steroids 20-oxo-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-3β-yl-propionate and 20-oxo-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-3β-yl-pentanoate, the compounds exhibit a lower inhibitory activity for both isoenzymes of 5α-reductase than finasteride. Furthermore the 3β-hydroxy-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-20-one and 20-oxo-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-3β-yl-acetate derivatives display 80% cytotoxic activity on the SK-LU-1 cell line. These results also indicated that the triazole derivatives, which have a hydroxyl or acetoxy group at C-3, could have an anticancer effect, whereas the derivatives with a alicyclic ester group at C-3 do not show biological activity.

  3. Synthesis and activity of novel 16-dehydropregnenolone acetate derivatives as inhibitors of type 1 5α-reductase and on cancer cell line SK-LU-1.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ortiz, Aylin Viviana; Bratoeff, Eugene; Ramírez-Apan, Teresa; Heuze, Yvonne; Sánchez, Araceli; Soriano, Juan; Cabeza, Marisa

    2015-12-15

    Testosterone (T) plays a crucial role in prostate growth. In androgen-dependent tissues T is reduced to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) because of the presence of the 5α-reductase enzyme. This androgen is more active than T, since it has a higher affinity for the androgen receptor (AR). When this mechanism is altered, androgen-dependent diseases, including prostate cancer, could result. The aim of this study was to synthesize several 16-dehydropregnenolone acetate derivatives containing a triazole ring at C-21 and a linear or alicyclic ester moiety at C-3 of the steroidal skeleton. These steroids were designed as potential inhibitors of the activity of both types (1 and 2) of 5α-reductase. The cytotoxic activity of these compounds was also evaluated on a panel of PC-3, MCF7, and SK-LU-1 human cancer cell lines. The results from this study showed that with the exception of steroids 20-oxo-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-3β-yl-propionate and 20-oxo-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-3β-yl-pentanoate, the compounds exhibit a lower inhibitory activity for both isoenzymes of 5α-reductase than finasteride. Furthermore the 3β-hydroxy-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-20-one and 20-oxo-21-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)pregna-5,16-dien-3β-yl-acetate derivatives display 80% cytotoxic activity on the SK-LU-1 cell line. These results also indicated that the triazole derivatives, which have a hydroxyl or acetoxy group at C-3, could have an anticancer effect, whereas the derivatives with a alicyclic ester group at C-3 do not show biological activity. PMID:26631442

  4. The structure of glycerol trinitrate reductase NerA from Agrobacterium radiobacter reveals the molecular reason for nitro- and ene-reductase activity in OYE homologues.

    PubMed

    Oberdorfer, Gustav; Binter, Alexandra; Wallner, Silvia; Durchschein, Katharina; Hall, Mélanie; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2013-05-10

    In recent years, Old Yellow Enzymes (OYEs) and their homologues have found broad application in the efficient asymmetric hydrogenation of activated C=C bonds with high selectivities and yields. Members of this class of enzymes have been found in many different organisms and are rather diverse on the sequence level, with pairwise identities as low as 20 %, but they exhibit significant structural similarities with the adoption of a conserved (αβ)(8)-barrel fold. Some OYEs have been shown not only to reduce C=C double bonds, but also to be capable of reducing nitro groups in both saturated and unsaturated substrates. In order to understand this dual activity we determined and analyzed X-ray crystal structures of NerA from Agrobacterium radiobacter, both in its apo form and in complex with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and with 1-nitro-2-phenylpropene. These structures, together with spectroscopic studies of substrate binding to several OYEs, indicate that nitro-containing substrates can bind to OYEs in different binding modes, one of which leads to C=C double bond reduction and the other to nitro group reduction.

  5. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  6. Comparative bioavailability of ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and urea to typically harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Zhang, Jibiao; Huang, Wei; Kong, Fanlong; Li, Yue; Xi, Min; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-09-15

    Phosphorus is generally considered as the prime limiting nutrient responsible for cyanobacterial blooms. However, recent research is drawing attention to the importance of bioavailable nitrogen (N) in freshwater eutrophication. This study investigated the bioavailability of NO3(-)-N, NO2(-)-N, NH4(+)-N and Urea-N under different concentrations of 1.2, 3.6 and 6.0mgL(-1) to Microcystis aeruginosa. Overall, Urea-N ranked the first in promoting M. aeruginosa growth, followed by NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N. However, the algal growth cultured in NH4(+)-N was depressed under test N levels. The bioavailability of N to M. aeruginosa was seriously influenced by both N forms and N concentrations (p<0.01). Total N concentrations in Urea-N treatment decreased the fastest, which were corresponding with the μ values of M. aeruginosa. The high enzymic activities of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase and glutamine synthetase indicated that the decomposition process for urea is effective, which contributed in N assimilation and utilization in M. aeruginosa cells. PMID:27357916

  7. Comparative bioavailability of ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and urea to typically harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Zhang, Jibiao; Huang, Wei; Kong, Fanlong; Li, Yue; Xi, Min; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-09-15

    Phosphorus is generally considered as the prime limiting nutrient responsible for cyanobacterial blooms. However, recent research is drawing attention to the importance of bioavailable nitrogen (N) in freshwater eutrophication. This study investigated the bioavailability of NO3(-)-N, NO2(-)-N, NH4(+)-N and Urea-N under different concentrations of 1.2, 3.6 and 6.0mgL(-1) to Microcystis aeruginosa. Overall, Urea-N ranked the first in promoting M. aeruginosa growth, followed by NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N. However, the algal growth cultured in NH4(+)-N was depressed under test N levels. The bioavailability of N to M. aeruginosa was seriously influenced by both N forms and N concentrations (p<0.01). Total N concentrations in Urea-N treatment decreased the fastest, which were corresponding with the μ values of M. aeruginosa. The high enzymic activities of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase and glutamine synthetase indicated that the decomposition process for urea is effective, which contributed in N assimilation and utilization in M. aeruginosa cells.

  8. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils.

  9. Comparison of the relative propensities of isoamyl nitrite and sodium nitrite to ameliorate acute cyanide poisoning in mice and a novel antidotal effect arising from anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Cambal, Leah K; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Xi; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2013-05-20

    Isoamyl nitrite has previously been considered acceptable as an inhaled cyanide antidote; therefore, the antidotal utility of this organic nitrite compared with sodium nitrite was investigated. To facilitate a quantitative comparison, doses of both sodium nitrite and isoamyl nitrite were given intraperitoneally in equimolar amounts to sublethally cyanide-challenged mice. Righting recovery from the knockdown state was clearly compromised in the isoamyl nitrite-treated animals, the effect being attributable to the toxicity of the isoamyl alchol produced during hydrolysis of the isoamyl nitrite to release nitrite anion. Subsequently, inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite aerosol was demonstrated to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity, when provided to mice after the toxic dose, by the more rapid recovery of righting ability compared to that of the control animals given only the toxicant. Aerosolized sodium nitrite has thus been shown by these experiments to have promise as a better alternative to organic nitrites for development as an inhaled cyanide antidote. The inhaled sodium nitrite led to the production of NO in the bloodstream as determined by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. The aerosol delivery was performed in an unmetered inhalation chamber, and in this study, no attempt was made to optimize the procedure. It is argued that administration of an effective inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite dose in humans is possible, though just beyond the capability of current individual metered-dose inhaler designs, such as those used for asthma. Finally, working at slightly greater than LD50 NaCN doses, it was fortuitously discovered that (i) anesthesia leads to significantly prolonged survival compared to that of unanesthetized animals and that (ii) the antidotal activity of nitrite anion was completely abolished under anesthesia. Plausible explanations for these effects in mice and their practical consequences in relation to

  10. Comparison of the relative propensities of isoamyl nitrite and sodium nitrite to ameliorate acute cyanide poisoning in mice and a novel antidotal effect arising from anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Cambal, Leah K; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Xi; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2013-05-20

    Isoamyl nitrite has previously been considered acceptable as an inhaled cyanide antidote; therefore, the antidotal utility of this organic nitrite compared with sodium nitrite was investigated. To facilitate a quantitative comparison, doses of both sodium nitrite and isoamyl nitrite were given intraperitoneally in equimolar amounts to sublethally cyanide-challenged mice. Righting recovery from the knockdown state was clearly compromised in the isoamyl nitrite-treated animals, the effect being attributable to the toxicity of the isoamyl alchol produced during hydrolysis of the isoamyl nitrite to release nitrite anion. Subsequently, inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite aerosol was demonstrated to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity, when provided to mice after the toxic dose, by the more rapid recovery of righting ability compared to that of the control animals given only the toxicant. Aerosolized sodium nitrite has thus been shown by these experiments to have promise as a better alternative to organic nitrites for development as an inhaled cyanide antidote. The inhaled sodium nitrite led to the production of NO in the bloodstream as determined by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. The aerosol delivery was performed in an unmetered inhalation chamber, and in this study, no attempt was made to optimize the procedure. It is argued that administration of an effective inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite dose in humans is possible, though just beyond the capability of current individual metered-dose inhaler designs, such as those used for asthma. Finally, working at slightly greater than LD50 NaCN doses, it was fortuitously discovered that (i) anesthesia leads to significantly prolonged survival compared to that of unanesthetized animals and that (ii) the antidotal activity of nitrite anion was completely abolished under anesthesia. Plausible explanations for these effects in mice and their practical consequences in relation to

  11. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions.

  12. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions. PMID:8597660

  13. Antimicrobial activity of Satureja montana L. essential oil against Clostridium perfringens type A inoculated in mortadella-type sausages formulated with different levels of sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2011-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the winter savory (Satureja montana L.) essential oil (EO) against Clostridium perfringens type A (ATCC 3624) inoculated in mortadella-type sausages formulated with different levels of sodium nitrite (NaNO₂: 0 ppm, 100 ppm and 200 ppm) in addition to EO at concentrations of 0.0%, 0.78%, 1.56% and 3.125% stored at 25°C for 30 days. The EO extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (CG-MS) was tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion method for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on C. perfringens. According to compositional analysis of the winter savory EO, 26 chemical compounds were identified, and the major constituents were thymol (28.99%), p-cymene (12.00%), linalool (11.00%) and carvacrol (10.71%). The results obtained showed that EO applied at a concentration of 1.56%, which was defined as the MIC, exhibited antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens in the in vitro assays, and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed structural damage and cell lysis of C. perfringens caused by EO treatment. A synergistic effect between NaNO₂ and EO was observed. In mortadella-type sausages formulated with 100 ppm of NaNO₂ and EO at all concentrations tested, the population of target microorganisms was reduced (p≤0.05) compared to control samples during all storage period. This data suggests the potential combined use of savory EO and minimal amounts of the synthetic additive, NaNO₂ to control C. perfringens in mortadella, which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products. PMID:21131083

  14. Microbial community and metabolism activity in a bioelectrochemical denitrification system under long-term presence of p-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Yang, Kai; Wei, Li; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-10-01

    Bioelectrochemical denitrification system (BEDS) is a promising technology for nitrate removal from wastewaters. The hazards and effects concerning p-nitrophenol (PNP) towards BEDS lack enough investigations and possess great research prospects. This study investigated how PNP affected the nitrate removal efficiency, microbial communities, functional denitrifying genes abundances, nitrate and nitrite reductase activities, diffusible signal factors (DSF) release, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production in the BEDS. Results indicated that nitrate removal efficiency decreased with initial PNP concentration increased from 0 to 100mg/L. Phylum Firmicutes and class Clostridia were the main contributors for denitrification process in this BEDS. The abundances of the denitrifying genes nirS, nirK, napA, and narG all presented decreased trends with increasing PNP. In addition, the concentrations of nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NIR), and EPS obviously decreased, while the concentration of DSF increased with increasing PNP, which demonstrated that higher PNP would inhibit the biofilm formation. PMID:27367815

  15. Simplified nitrate-reductase-based nitrate detection by a hybrid thin-layer controlled potential coulometry/spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Schlueter, Kevin T; Riehl, Bill L; Johnson, Jay M; Heineman, William R

    2013-10-15

    A novel method for the detection of nitrate was developed using simplified nitrate reductase (SNaR) that was produced by genetic recombination techniques. The SNaR consists of the fragments of the Mo-molybdopterin (MO-MPT) binding site and nitrate reduction active site and has high activity for nitrate reduction. The method is based on a unique combination of the enzyme-catalyzed reduction of nitrate to nitrite by thin-layer coulometry followed by spectroscopic measurement of the colored product generated from the reaction of nitrite with Griess reagents. Coulometric reduction of nitrate to nitrite used methyl viologen (MV(2+)) as the electron transfer mediator for SNaR and controlled potential coulometry in an indium tin oxide (ITO) thin-layer electrochemical cell. Absorbance at 540 nm was proportional to the concentration of nitrate in the sample with a linear range of 1-160 μM and a sensitivity of 8000 AU M(-1). The method required less than 60 μL of sample. Detection of nitrate could also be performed by measuring the charge associated with coulometry. However, the spectroscopic procedure gave superior performance because of interference from the large background charge associated with coulometry. Results for the determination of nitrate concentration in several natural water samples using this device with spectroscopic detection are in good agreement with analysis done with a standard method.

  16. Structural analysis of the active sites of dihydrofolate reductase from two species of Candida uncovers ligand-induced conformational changes shared among species

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Janet L.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Wright, Dennis L.; Anderson, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    A novel strategy for targeting the pathogenic organisms Candida albicans and Candida glabrata focuses on the development of potent and selective antifolates effective against dihydrofolate reductase. Crystal structure analysis suggested that an essential loop at the active site (Thr 58-Phe 66) differs from the analogous residues in the human enzyme, potentially providing a mechanism for achieving selectivity. In order to probe the role of this loop, we employed chemical synthesis, crystal structure determination and molecular dynamics simulations. The results of these analyses show that the loop residues undergo ligand-induced conformational changes that are similar among the fungal and human species. PMID:23375226

  17. Persistent nicotine treatment potentiates amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in rat lung epithelial cells as a consequence of Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinjin; Chu, Michelle; Abbeyquaye, Tetteh; Chen, Chang-Yan

    2005-08-26

    Although nicotine has been suggested to promote lung carcinogenesis, the mechanism of its action in this process remains unknown. The present investigation demonstrates that the treatment of rat lung epithelial cells with nicotine for various periods differentially mobilizes multiple intracellular pathways. Protein kinase C and phosphoinositide 3-OH-kinase are transiently activated after the treatment. Also, Ras and its downstream effector ERK1/2 are activated after long term exposure to nicotine. The activation of Ras by nicotine treatment is responsible for the subsequent perturbation of the methotrexate (MTX)-mediated G1 cell cycle restriction as well as an increase in production of reactive oxygen species. When p53 expression is suppressed by introducing E6, persistent exposure to nicotine enables dihydrofolate reductase gene amplification in the presence of methotrexate (MTX) and the formation of the MTX-resistant colonies. Altering the activity of phosphoinositide 3-OH-kinase has no effect on dihydrofolate reductase amplification. However, the suppression of protein kinase C dramatically affects the colony formation in soft agar. Thus, our data suggest that persistent exposure to nicotine perturbs the G1 checkpoint and causes DNA damage through the increase of the production of reactive oxygen species. However, a third element rendered by loss of p53 is required for the initiation of the process of gene amplification. Under p53-deficient conditions, the establishment of a full oncogenic transformation, in response to long term nicotine exposure, is achieved through the cooperation of multiple signaling pathways. PMID:15983034

  18. Aldo-keto Reductase 1B15 (AKR1B15): a mitochondrial human aldo-keto reductase with activity toward steroids and 3-keto-acyl-CoA conjugates.

    PubMed

    Weber, Susanne; Salabei, Joshua K; Möller, Gabriele; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Adamski, Jerzy; Barski, Oleg A

    2015-03-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) comprise a superfamily of proteins involved in the reduction and oxidation of biogenic and xenobiotic carbonyls. In humans, at least 15 AKR superfamily members have been identified so far. One of these is a newly identified gene locus, AKR1B15, which clusters on chromosome 7 with the other human AKR1B subfamily members (i.e. AKR1B1 and AKR1B10). We show that alternative splicing of the AKR1B15 gene transcript gives rise to two protein isoforms with different N termini: AKR1B15.1 is a 316-amino acid protein with 91% amino acid identity to AKR1B10; AKR1B15.2 has a prolonged N terminus and consists of 344 amino acid residues. The two gene products differ in their expression level, subcellular localization, and activity. In contrast with other AKR enzymes, which are mostly cytosolic, AKR1B15.1 co-localizes with the mitochondria. Kinetic studies show that AKR1B15.1 is predominantly a reductive enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of androgens and estrogens with high positional selectivity (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity) as well as 3-keto-acyl-CoA conjugates and exhibits strong cofactor selectivity toward NADP(H). In accordance with its substrate spectrum, the enzyme is expressed at the highest levels in steroid-sensitive tissues, namely placenta, testis, and adipose tissue. Placental and adipose expression could be reproduced in the BeWo and SGBS cell lines, respectively. In contrast, AKR1B15.2 localizes to the cytosol and displays no enzymatic activity with the substrates tested. Collectively, these results demonstrate the existence of a novel catalytically active AKR, which is associated with mitochondria and expressed mainly in steroid-sensitive tissues.

  19. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitor Improves Endothelial Dysfunction in Spontaneous Hypertensive Rats Via Down-regulation of Caveolin-1 and Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung-Won; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Hyo-soo; Oh, Buyng-Hee; Park, Young-Bae

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Caveolin-1 regulates nitric oxide (NO) signaling by modulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The purpose of this study was to examine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor improves impaired endothelial function of the aorta in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to determine the underlying mechanisms involved. Eight-week-old male SHR were assigned to either a control group (CON, n=11) or a rosuvastatin group (ROS, n=12), rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg/day) administered for eight weeks. Abdominal aortic rings were prepared and responses to acetylcholine (10-9-10-4 M) were determined in vitro. To evaluate the potential role of NO and caveolin-1, we examined the plasma activity of NOx, eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and expression of caveolin-1. The relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly enhanced in ROS compared to CON. Expression of eNOS RNA was unchanged, whereas NOx level and phosphorylated-eNOS at serine-1177 was increased accompanied with depressed level of caveolin-1 in ROS. We conclude that 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor can improve impaired endothelial dysfunction in SHR, and its underlying mechanisms are associated with increased NO production. Furthermore, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor can activate the eNOS by phosphorylation related to decreased caveolin-1 abundance. These results imply the therapeutic strategies for the high blood pressure-associated endothelial dysfunction through modifying caveolin status. PMID:20052342

  20. Nitrates and nitrites in the treatment of ischemic cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Nossaman, Vaughn E; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    The organic nitrite, amyl of nitrite, was initially used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of angina pectoris, but was replaced over a decade later by the organic nitrate, nitroglycerin (NTG), due to the ease of administration and longer duration of action. The administration of organic nitrate esters, such as NTG, continues to be used in the treatment of angina pectoris and heart failure since the birth of modern pharmacology. Their clinical effectiveness is due to vasodilator activity in large veins and arteries through an as yet unidentified method of delivering nitric oxide (NO), or a NO-like compound. The major drawback is the development of tolerance with NTG, and the duration and route of administration with amyl of nitrite. Although the nitrites are no longer used in the treatment of hypertension or ischemic heart disease, the nitrite anion has recently been discovered to possess novel pharmacologic actions, such as modulating hypoxic vasodilation, and providing cytoprotection in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Although the actions of these 2 similar chemical classes (nitrites and organic nitrates) have often been considered to be alike, we still do not understand their mechanism of action. Finally, the nitrite anion, either from sodium nitrite or an intermediate NTG form, may act as a storage form for NO and provide support for investigating the use of these agents in the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular states. We review what is presently known about the use of nitrates and nitrites including the historical, current, and potential uses of these agents, and their mechanisms of action.

  1. Direct electrochemistry of nitrate reductase from the fungus Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Palraj; Ringel, Phillip; Kruse, Tobias; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2016-09-01

    We report the first direct (unmediated) catalytic electrochemistry of a eukaryotic nitrate reductase (NR). NR from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, is a member of the mononuclear molybdenum enzyme family and contains a Mo, heme and FAD cofactor which are involved in electron transfer from NAD(P)H to the (Mo) active site where reduction of nitrate to nitrite takes place. NR was adsorbed on an edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPG) working electrode. Non-turnover redox responses were observed in the absence of nitrate from holo NR and three variants lacking the FAD, heme or Mo cofactor. The FAD response is due to dissociated cofactor in all cases. In the presence of nitrate, NR shows a pronounced cathodic catalytic wave with an apparent Michaelis constant (KM) of 39μM (pH7). The catalytic cathodic current increases with temperature from 5 to 35°C and an activation enthalpy of 26kJmol(-1) was determined. In spite of dissociation of the FAD cofactor, catalytically activity is maintained. PMID:27060250

  2. Retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash under the landfill circumstance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Kong, Qingna; Zhu, Huayue; Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could affect its migration in the landfill. In this study, the effect of the dosage of MSWI bottom ash as well as the variation of the landfill environmental parameters including pH, anions and organic matter on the nitrite retention and leaching behavior was investigated by batch experiments. The highest removal percentage (73.0%) of nitrite was observed when the dosage of MSWI bottom ash was 10 g L(-1) in 2 mg L(-1) nitrite solution. Further increase of the dosage would retard the retention, as the nitrite leaching from MSWI bottom ash was enhanced. The optimum retention of nitrite was observed when the pH was 5.0, while the leaching of nitrite showed a consistent reduction with the increase of pH. Besides, the presence of Cl(-), SO4(2)(-) and acetic acid could enhance the leaching of nitrite and mitigate the retention process. However, the retention of nitrite was enhanced by PO4(3)(-), which was probably due to the formation of the apatite, an active material for the adsorption of the nitrite. These results suggested that MSWI bottom ash could affect the migration of nitrite in the landfill, which was related to the variation of the landfill circumstance. PMID:25033242

  3. Retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash under the landfill circumstance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Kong, Qingna; Zhu, Huayue; Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could affect its migration in the landfill. In this study, the effect of the dosage of MSWI bottom ash as well as the variation of the landfill environmental parameters including pH, anions and organic matter on the nitrite retention and leaching behavior was investigated by batch experiments. The highest removal percentage (73.0%) of nitrite was observed when the dosage of MSWI bottom ash was 10 g L(-1) in 2 mg L(-1) nitrite solution. Further increase of the dosage would retard the retention, as the nitrite leaching from MSWI bottom ash was enhanced. The optimum retention of nitrite was observed when the pH was 5.0, while the leaching of nitrite showed a consistent reduction with the increase of pH. Besides, the presence of Cl(-), SO4(2)(-) and acetic acid could enhance the leaching of nitrite and mitigate the retention process. However, the retention of nitrite was enhanced by PO4(3)(-), which was probably due to the formation of the apatite, an active material for the adsorption of the nitrite. These results suggested that MSWI bottom ash could affect the migration of nitrite in the landfill, which was related to the variation of the landfill circumstance.

  4. Oxygen as Intermediate in Anoxic Environments: Nitrite-Dependent Methane Oxidation and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettwig, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years the known diversity of hydrocarbon activation mechanisms under anaerobic conditions has been extended by intra-aerobic denitrification, a process in which oxygen is derived from NO and used for substrate activation. For two phylogenetically unrelated bacterial species, the freshwater NC10 phylum bacterium Methylomirabilis oxyfera [1] and the marine γ-proteobacterial strain HdN1 [2] it has been shown that, under anoxic conditions with nitrate and/or nitrite, mono-oxygenases are used for methane and hexadecane oxidation, respectively. No degradation was observed with nitrous oxide (N2O) only. In the anaerobic methanotroph M. oxyfera, which lacks apparent nitrous oxide reductase in its genome, substrate activation in the presence of nitrite was directly associated with both O2 and N2 formation. These findings strongly argue for the role of nitric oxide (NO), or an oxygen species derived from it, in the activation reaction of methane. Although intracellular oxygen generation has been experimentally documented and elegantly explains the utilization of 'aerobic' pathways under anoxic conditions, research about the underlying molecular mechanism has just started. The proposed candidate enzymes for oxygen (or possibly another another reactive intermediate) production from NO, an NO dismutase (NOD) [3], related to quinol-dependent NO reductases (qNORs), is present and highly expressed in both M. oxyfera and strain HdN1. Besides that, several recently sequenced species from the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group harbor Nod/Nor genes, but experimential evidence is needed to show if these have NOD activity, are unusual but functional qNORs, or represent transition states between the two. Additionally, for several anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading organisms the biochemical mechanism of substrate activation has not been elucidated yet: whereas signature genes of anaerobic degradation are missing, monooxygenase genes are present. Also these microorganisms

  5. Production of a highly active, soluble form of the cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR A) from Candida tropicalis

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark

    2006-08-01

    The present invention provides soluble cytochrome p450 reductase (CPR) proteins from Candida sp. having an altered N-terminal region which results in reduced hydrophobicity of the N-terminal region. Also provided are host cells comprising the subject soluble CPR proteins. In addition, the present invention provides nucleotide and corresponding amino acid sequences for soluble CPR proteins and vectors comprising the nucleotide sequences. Methods for producing a soluble CPR, for increasing production of a dicarboxylic acid, and for detecting a cytochrome P450 are also provided.

  6. Severe Methemoglobinemia due to Sodium Nitrite Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Case. We report a case of severe methemoglobinemia due to sodium nitrite poisoning. A 28-year-old man was brought to our emergency department because of transient loss of consciousness and cyanosis. He was immediately intubated and ventilated with 100% oxygen. A blood test revealed a methemoglobin level of 92.5%. Outcome. We treated the patient with gastric lavage, activated charcoal, and methylene blue (2 mg/kg) administered intravenously. Soon after receiving methylene blue, his cyanosis resolved and the methemoglobin level began to decrease. After relocation to the intensive care unit, his consciousness improved and he could recall ingesting approximately 15 g sodium nitrite about 1 hour before he was brought to our hospital. The patient was discharged on day 7 without neurologic impairment. Conclusion. Severe methemoglobinemia may be fatal. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of methemoglobinemia is very important so that treatment can be started as soon as possible. PMID:27563472

  7. Severe Methemoglobinemia due to Sodium Nitrite Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Katabami, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Case. We report a case of severe methemoglobinemia due to sodium nitrite poisoning. A 28-year-old man was brought to our emergency department because of transient loss of consciousness and cyanosis. He was immediately intubated and ventilated with 100% oxygen. A blood test revealed a methemoglobin level of 92.5%. Outcome. We treated the patient with gastric lavage, activated charcoal, and methylene blue (2 mg/kg) administered intravenously. Soon after receiving methylene blue, his cyanosis resolved and the methemoglobin level began to decrease. After relocation to the intensive care unit, his consciousness improved and he could recall ingesting approximately 15 g sodium nitrite about 1 hour before he was brought to our hospital. The patient was discharged on day 7 without neurologic impairment. Conclusion. Severe methemoglobinemia may be fatal. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of methemoglobinemia is very important so that treatment can be started as soon as possible. PMID:27563472

  8. 5 alpha-reductase deficiency without hypospadias.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, W K; Taylor, N F; Hughes, I A; Taylor, J; Ransley, P G; Grant, D B

    1990-01-01

    A boy aged 4 with penoscrotal hypospadias and his brother aged 12 with micropenis had typical changes of homozygous 5 alpha-reductase deficiency. After three injections of chorionic gonadotrophin there was a trivial rise in plasma dihydrotestosterone with a normal increase in plasma testosterone. Urine steroid chromatography showed abnormally high 5 beta: 5 alpha ratios and 5 alpha-reductase activity was appreciably reduced in genital skin fibroblasts. The results indicate that 5 alpha-reductase deficiency is not invariably associated with genital ambiguity. PMID:2248513

  9. Augmentation of CFTR maturation by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Khalequz; Sawczak, Victoria; Zaidi, Atiya; Butler, Maya; Bennett, Deric; Getsy, Paulina; Zeinomar, Maryam; Greenberg, Zivi; Forbes, Michael; Rehman, Shagufta; Jyothikumar, Vinod; DeRonde, Kim; Sattar, Abdus; Smith, Laura; Corey, Deborah; Straub, Adam; Sun, Fei; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi; Randell, Scott; Kelley, Thomas J; Lewis, Stephen J; Gaston, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase regulates novel endogenous S-nitrosothiol signaling pathways, and mice deficient in GSNO reductase are protected from airways hyperreactivity. S-nitrosothiols are present in the airway, and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) tend to have low S-nitrosothiol levels that may be attributed to upregulation of GSNO reductase activity. The present study demonstrates that 1) GSNO reductase activity is increased in the cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o(-)) cells expressing mutant F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) compared with the wild-type CFBE41o(-) cells, 2) GSNO reductase expression level is increased in the primary human bronchial epithelial cells expressing mutant F508del-CFTR compared with the wild-type cells, 3) GSNO reductase colocalizes with cochaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop; Stip1) in human airway epithelial cells, 4) GSNO reductase knockdown with siRNA increases the expression and maturation of CFTR and decreases Stip1 expression in human airway epithelial cells, 5) increased levels of GSNO reductase cause a decrease in maturation of CFTR, and 6) a GSNO reductase inhibitor effectively reverses the effects of GSNO reductase on CFTR maturation. These studies provide a novel approach to define the subcellular location of the interactions between Stip1 and GSNO reductase and the role of S-nitrosothiols in these interactions.

  10. The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    PubMed

    Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes.

  11. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yi; Huang, Meng; Penning, Trevor M

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis.

  12. Mutagenicity of some alkyl nitrites used as recreational drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkel, V.C.; Cameron, T.P. ); Rogers-Back, A.M.; Lawlor, T.E.; Harbell, J.W. )

    1989-01-01

    When the AIDS epidemic was in its earliest stages, and prior to identification of HIV as the etiological factor, the use of volatile nitrites by the male homosexual community to enhance sexual activities appeared to have a significant role in this disease. Preliminary observations indicated that that portion of the male homosexual community which developed Kaposi's sarcoma were also heavy nitrite users. These nitrites had been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria and thus it was postulated that they could be responsible for the appearance of the sarcoma. To evaluate further the genotoxic activity of these chemicals, six nitrites, including those most commonly used by homosexuals for sexual gratification, were selected for testing in the mouse lymphoma TK {plus minus} and Salmonell typhimurium mutagenicity assays. One chemical, n-amyl nitrite, was negative in the mouse lymphoma assay, while the other five chemicals, n-butyl, isobutyl, iso-amyl, sec-butyl, and n-propyl nitrite, were positive. All six compounds were positive in the Salmonella assay. The mutagenic and known toxic effects of these chemicals remain a concern because a large population of teenagers and young adults continue to abuse these substances.

  13. The catabolic function of the alpha-aminoadipic acid pathway in plants is associated with unidirectional activity of lysine-oxoglutarate reductase, but not saccharopine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X; Tang, G; Galili, G

    2000-01-01

    Whereas plants and animals use the alpha-aminoadipic acid pathway to catabolize lysine, yeast and fungi use the very same pathway to synthesize lysine. These two groups of organisms also possess structurally distinct forms of two enzymes in this pathway, namely lysine-oxoglutarate reductase (lysine-ketoglutarate reductase; LKR) and saccharopine dehydrogenase (SDH): in plants and animals these enzymes are linked on to a single bifunctional polypeptide, while in yeast and fungi they exist as separate entities. In addition, yeast LKR and SDH possess bi-directional activities, and their anabolic function is regulated by complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional controls, which apparently ascertain differential accumulation of intermediate metabolites; in plants, the regulation of the catabolic function of these two enzymes is not known. To elucidate the regulation of the catabolic function of plant bifunctional LKR/SDH enzymes, we have used yeast as an expression system to test whether a plant LKR/SDH also possesses bi-directional LKR and SDH activities, similar to the yeast enzymes. The Arabidopsis enzyme complemented a yeast SDH, but not LKR, null mutant. Identical results were obtained when deletion mutants encoding only the LKR or SDH domains of this bifunctional polypeptide were expressed individually in the yeast cells. Moreover, activity assays showed that the Arabidopsis LKR possessed catabolic, but not anabolic, activity, and its uni-directional activity stems from its structure rather than its linkage to SDH. Our results suggest that the uni-directional activity of LKR plays an important role in regulating the catabolic function of the alpha-amino adipic acid pathway in plants. PMID:10998364

  14. Purification and characterization of a highly active chromate reductase from endophytic Bacillus sp. DGV19 of Albizzia lebbeck (L.) Benth. actively involved in phytoremediation of tannery effluent-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Muthu; Gopal, Judy; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Kannan, Vijayaraghavan; Chun, Sechul

    2016-01-01

    Phytoremediation using timber-yielding tree species is considered to be the most efficient method for chromium/tannery effluent-contaminated sites. In this study, we have chosen Albizzia lebbeck, a chromium hyperaccumulator plant, and studied one of its chromium detoxification processes operated by its endophytic bacterial assemblage. Out of the four different groups of endophytic bacteria comprising Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, Bacillus, and Salinicoccus identified from A. lebbeck employed in phytoremediation of tannery effluent-contaminated soil, Bacillus predominated with three species, which exhibited not only remarkable chromium accumulation ability but also high chromium reductase activity. A chromate reductase was purified to homogeneity from the most efficient chromium accumulator, Bacillus sp. DGV 019, and the purified 34.2-kD enzyme was observed to be stable at temperatures from 20°C to 60°C. The enzyme was active over a wide range of pH values (4.0-9.0). Furthermore, the enzyme activity was enhanced with the electron donors NADH, followed by NADPH, not affected by glutathione and ascorbic acid. Cu(2+) enhanced the activity of the purified enzyme but was inhibited by Zn(2+) and etheylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). In conclusion, due to its versatile adaptability the chromate reductase can be used for chromium remediation. PMID:26444299

  15. Purification and characterization of a highly active chromate reductase from endophytic Bacillus sp. DGV19 of Albizzia lebbeck (L.) Benth. actively involved in phytoremediation of tannery effluent-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Muthu; Gopal, Judy; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Kannan, Vijayaraghavan; Chun, Sechul

    2016-01-01

    Phytoremediation using timber-yielding tree species is considered to be the most efficient method for chromium/tannery effluent-contaminated sites. In this study, we have chosen Albizzia lebbeck, a chromium hyperaccumulator plant, and studied one of its chromium detoxification processes operated by its endophytic bacterial assemblage. Out of the four different groups of endophytic bacteria comprising Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, Bacillus, and Salinicoccus identified from A. lebbeck employed in phytoremediation of tannery effluent-contaminated soil, Bacillus predominated with three species, which exhibited not only remarkable chromium accumulation ability but also high chromium reductase activity. A chromate reductase was purified to homogeneity from the most efficient chromium accumulator, Bacillus sp. DGV 019, and the purified 34.2-kD enzyme was observed to be stable at temperatures from 20°C to 60°C. The enzyme was active over a wide range of pH values (4.0-9.0). Furthermore, the enzyme activity was enhanced with the electron donors NADH, followed by NADPH, not affected by glutathione and ascorbic acid. Cu(2+) enhanced the activity of the purified enzyme but was inhibited by Zn(2+) and etheylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). In conclusion, due to its versatile adaptability the chromate reductase can be used for chromium remediation.

  16. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A; Harter, Theresa M; Petrash, J Mark

    2007-03-01

    We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  17. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A.; Harter, Theresa M.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  18. Nitrate/Nitrite as Critical Mediators to Limit Oxidative Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, Paul; Escobar, Daniel; Botero, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical signaling molecule marked by complex chemistry and varied biological responses depending on the context of the redox environment. In the setting of inflammation, NO can not only contribute to tissue injury and be causative of oxidative damage but can also signal as an adaptive molecule to limit inflammatory signaling in multiple cell types and tissues. Recent Advances: An advance in our understanding of NO biology was the recognition of the nitrate-nitrite-NO axis, whereby nitrate (predominantly from dietary sources) could be converted to nitrite and nitrite could be reduced to NO. Critical Issues: Intriguingly, the recognition of multiple enzymes that serve as nitrite reductases in the setting of hypoxia or ischemia established the concept of nitrite as a circulating endocrine reservoir of NO, with the selective release of NO at sites that were primed for this reaction. This review highlights the anti-inflammatory roles of nitrite in numerous clinical conditions, including ischemia/reperfusion, transplant, cardiac arrest, and vascular injury, and in gastrointestinal inflammation. Future Directions: These preclinical and clinical investigations set up further clinical trials and studies that elucidate the endogenous role this pathway plays in protection against inflammatory signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 328–339. PMID:26140517

  19. [NADH:ubiquinone reductase and succinate dehydrogenase activity in the liver of rats with acetaminophen-induced toxic hepatitis on the background of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kopylchuk, G P; Voloshchuk, O M

    2015-01-01

    The ratio between the redox forms of the nicotinamide coenzymes and key enzymatic activity of the I and II respiratory chain complexes in the liver cells mitochondria of rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis under the conditions of alimentary deprivation of protein was studied. It was estimated, that under the conditions of acute acetaminophen-induced hepatitis of rats kept on a low-protein diet during 4 weeks a significant decrease of the NADH:ubiquinone reductase and succinate dehydrogenase activity with simultaneous increase of the ratio between redox forms of the nicotinamide coenzymes (NAD+/NADH) is observed compared to the same indices in the liver cells of animals with experimental hepatitis kept on the ration balanced by all nutrients. Results of research may become basic ones for the biochemical rationale for the approaches directed to the correction and elimination of the consequences of energy exchange in the toxic hepatitis, induced on the background of protein deficiency. PMID:26036138

  20. Synthesis and highly potent hypolipidemic activity of alpha-asarone- and fibrate-based 2-acyl and 2-alkyl phenols as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mendieta, Aarón; Jiménez, Fabiola; Garduño-Siciliano, Leticia; Mojica-Villegas, Angélica; Rosales-Acosta, Blanca; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Medina-Franco, José L; Meurice, Nathalie; Gutiérrez, Rsuini U; Montiel, Luisa E; Cruz, María Del Carmen; Tamariz, Joaquín

    2014-11-01

    In the search for new potential hypolipidemic agents, the present study focused on the synthesis of 2-acyl phenols (6a-c and 7a-c) and their saturated side-chain alkyl phenols (4a-c and 5a-c), and on the evaluation of their hypolipidemic activity using a murine Tyloxapol-induced hyperlipidemic protocol. The whole series of compounds 4-7 greatly and significantly reduced elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides, with series 6 and 7 showing the greatest potency ever found in our laboratory. At the minimum dose (25mg/kg/day), the latter compounds lowered cholesterol by 68-81%, LDL by 72-86%, and triglycerides by 59-80%. This represents a comparable performance than that shown by simvastatin. Experimental evidence and docking studies suggest that the activity of these derivatives is associated with the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase.

  1. Dietary nitrite prevents hypercholesterolemic microvascular inflammation and reverses endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Karen Y; Dugas, Tammy R; Tang, Yaoping; Garg, Harsha; Guidry, Eric; Bryan, Nathan S

    2009-05-01

    The nitrite anion is an endogenous product of mammalian nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, a key intermediate in the nitrogen cycle in plants, and a constituent of many foods. Research over the past 6 years has revealed surprising biological and cytoprotective activity of this anion. Hypercholesterolemia causes a proinflammatory phenotype in the microcirculation. This phenotype appears to result from a decline in NO bioavailability that results from a reduction in NO biosynthesis, inactivation of NO by superoxide, or both. Since nitrite has been shown to be potently cytoprotective and restore NO biochemical homeostasis, we investigated if supplemental nitrite could attenuate microvascular inflammation caused by a high cholesterol diet. C57Bl/6J mice were fed either a normal diet or a high cholesterol diet for 3 wk to induce microvascular inflammation. Mice on the high cholesterol diet received either nitrite-free drinking water or supplemental nitrite at 33 or 99 mg/l ad libitum in their drinking water. The results from this investigation reveal that mice fed a cholesterol-enriched diet exhibited significantly elevated leukocyte adhesion to and emigration through the venular endothelium as well as impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in arterioles. Administration of nitrite in the drinking water inhibited the leukocyte adhesion and emigration and prevented the arteriolar dysfunction. This was associated with sparing of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin and decreased levels of C-reactive protein. These data reveal novel anti-inflammatory properties of nitrite and implicate the use of nitrite as a new natural therapy for microvascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction associated with hypercholesterolemia.

  2. Transcriptional activation of the aldehyde reductase YqhD by YqhC and its implication in glyoxal metabolism of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Kim, Insook; Lee, Junghoon; Lee, Kang-Lok; Min, Bumchan; Park, Chankyu

    2010-08-01

    The reactive alpha-oxoaldehydes such as glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MG) are generated in vivo from sugars through oxidative stress. GO and MG are believed to be removed from cells by glutathione-dependent glyoxalases and other aldehyde reductases. We isolated a number of GO-resistant (GO(r)) mutants from Escherichia coli strain MG1655 on LB plates containing 10 mM GO. By tagging the mutations with the transposon TnphoA-132 and determining their cotransductional linkages, we were able to identify a locus to which most of the GO(r) mutations were mapped. DNA sequencing of the locus revealed that it contains the yqhC gene, which is predicted to encode an AraC-type transcriptional regulator of unknown function. The GO(r) mutations we identified result in missense changes in yqhC and were concentrated in the predicted regulatory domain of the protein, thereby constitutively activating the product of the adjacent gene yqhD. The transcriptional activation of yqhD by wild-type YqhC and its mutant forms was established by an assay with a beta-galactosidase reporter fusion, as well as with real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We demonstrated that YqhC binds to the promoter region of yqhD and that this binding is abolished by a mutation in the potential target site, which is similar to the consensus sequence of its homolog SoxS. YqhD facilitates the removal of GO through its NADPH-dependent enzymatic reduction activity by converting it to ethadiol via glycolaldehyde, as detected by nuclear magnetic resonance, as well as by spectroscopic measurements. Therefore, we propose that YqhC is a transcriptional activator of YqhD, which acts as an aldehyde reductase with specificity for certain aldehydes, including GO.

  3. Regulation of nitrate reductase (NR) synthesis investigated by using mutants of Chl. sorokiniana partially NR deficient

    SciTech Connect

    Knobloch, O.; Tischner, R.

    1986-04-01

    After X-ray irradiation 13 NR and 8 nitrite reductase (NiR) deficient mutants of Chl.sorokiniana were obtained. In order to assure best experimental conditions for the characterization of the NR mutants, for which NO/sub 3//sup -/-containing medium in fact is a N-medium, they transferred wild type cells from NH/sub 4//sup +/ to NO/sub 3//sup -/ or N-medium, respectively. It turned out, that NO/sub 3//sup -/ is not necessary for starting de-novo-synthesis of NR. Therefore NR in Chlorella is a derepressible enzyme rather than an inducible one. Maximum amount of NR is present 80 min. after transfer of cells. Derepression experiments with the mutant strains characterized 3 of them as defect in Mo-co subunit of NR with best cytochrome c reductase (CCR)-activity, although xanthine oxidase (XO) was inducible. One other mutant is CCR-defect but contains intact Mo-co. The latter strain produced 4-6 times more Mo-co than the wild type, giving some evidence for an unbalanced self-regulation of NR-synthesis. Another strain lacked XO-activity, indicating a common cofactor among XO and NR as reported for other organisms.

  4. Nitrite toxicity to the crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    SciTech Connect

    Gutzmer, M.P.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of acute nitrite exposure to the crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Decapoda). Specific objectives of this study included (1) determining the 24-, 48-, 72- and 96-h LC-50's of nitrite to crayfish of different weights and genders in freshwater, (2) determining the LC-50's of nitrite to crayfish in water with elevated chloride concentrations, and (3), in order to gain insight into the mechanisms of nitrite toxicity in crayfish, determining hemolymph nitrite concentrations in crayfish exposed to nitrite in freshwater and water with elevated chloride concentrations.

  5. Overexpression of a GmCnx1 Gene Enhanced Activity of Nitrate Reductase and Aldehyde Oxidase, and Boosted Mosaic Virus Resistance in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Luping; Yu, Xiaoqian; Mi, Qian; Pang, Jingsong; Tang, Guixiang; Liu, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is required for the activities of Moco-dependant enzymes. Cofactor for nitrate reductase and xanthine dehydrogenase (Cnx1) is known to be involved in the biosynthesis of Moco in plants. In this work, a soybean (Glycine max L.) Cnx1 gene (GmCnx1) was transferred into soybean using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Twenty seven positive transgenic soybean plants were identified by coating leaves with phosphinothricin, bar protein quick dip stick and PCR analysis. Moreover, Southern blot analysis was carried out to confirm the insertion of GmCnx1 gene. Furthermore, expression of GmCnx1 gene in leaf and root of all transgenic lines increased 1.04-2.12 and 1.55-3.89 folds, respectively, as compared to wild type with GmCnx1 gene and in line 10 , 22 showing the highest expression. The activities of Moco-related enzymes viz nitrate reductase (NR) and aldehydeoxidase (AO) of T1 generation plants revealed that the best line among the GmCnx1 transgenic plants accumulated 4.25 μg g-1 h-1 and30 pmol L-1, respectively (approximately 2.6-fold and 3.9-fold higher than non-transgenic control plants).In addition, overexpression ofGmCnx1boosted the resistance to various strains of soybean mosaic virus (SMV). DAS-ELISA analysis further revealed that infection rate of GmCnx1 transgenic plants were generally lower than those of non-transgenic plants among two different virus strains tested. Taken together, this study showed that overexpression of a GmCnx1 gene enhanced NR and AO activities and SMV resistance, suggesting its important role in soybean genetic improvement. PMID:25886067

  6. Energy coupling to nitrite respiration in the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, L.L.; LeGall, J.; Odom, J.M.; Peck, H.D. Jr.

    1983-02-01

    By use of a membrane fraction prepared from Desulfovibrio gigas grown in a lactate-sulfate medium, synthesis of ATP was demonstrated to be coupled to the oxidation of molecular hydrogen and reduction of either nitrite or hydroxylamine. This phosphorylation was uncoupled from electron transport by pentachlorophenol, methyl viologen, and gramicidin, but not by oligomycin. The extrusion of protons from the cells was shown to be coupled to the hydrogen-nitrite respiratory system, and, assuming the localization of nitrite reductase on the outer side of the plasma membrane, H/sup +//2e/sup -/ values of 2.0 +/- 0.3 were obtained. Energy coupling observed with this system appears to be due to electron transfer-coupled proton translocation rather than vectorial electron transfer associated with hydrogen oxidation. 29 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  7. Aerobic degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by Enterobacter cloacae PB2 and by pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    French, C.E.; Bruce, N.C.; Nicklin, S.

    1998-08-01

    Enterobacter cloacae PB2 was originally isolated on the basis of its ability to utilize nitrate esters, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and glycerol trinitrate, as the sole nitrogen source for growth. The enzyme responsible is an NADPH-dependent reductase designated PETN reductase. E. cloacae PB2 was found to be capable of slow aerobic growth with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as the sole nitrogen source. Dinitrotoluenes were not produced and could not be used as nitrogen sources. Purified PETN reductase was found to reduce TNT to its hydride-Meisenheimer complex, which was further reduced to the dihydride-Meisenheimer complex. Purified PETN reductase and recombinant Escherichia coli expressing PETN reductase were able to liberate nitrogen as nitrite from TNT. The ability to remove nitrogen from TNT suggests that PB2 or recombinant organisms expressing PETN reductase may be useful for bioremediation of TNT-contaminated soil and water.

  8. Ribonucleotide Reductase-- a Radical Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Peter; Ehrenberg, Anders

    1983-08-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases catalyze the enzymatic formation of deoxyribonucleotides, an obligatory step in DNA synthesis. The native form of the enzyme from Escherichia coli or from mammalian sources contains as part of its polypeptide structure a free tyrosyl radical, stabilized by an iron center. The radical participates in all probability in the catalytic process during the substitution of the hydroxyl group at C-2 of ribose by a hydrogen atom. A second, inactive form of the E. coli reductase lacks the tyrosyl radical. Extracts from E. coli contain activities that interconvert the two forms. The tyrosyl radical is introduced in the presence of oxygen, while anaerobiosis favors its removal, suggesting a regulatory role in DNA synthesis for oxygen.

  9. The enzymatic activities of brain COMT and methionine sulfoxide reductase are correlated in a COMT Val/Met allele-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Moskovitz, Jackob; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Cruz, Dianne A; Thompson, Peter M.; Hairston, Jenaqua; Bortolato, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Aims The enzyme catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) plays a primary role in the metabolism of catecholamine neurotransmitters and is implicated in the modulation of cognitive and emotional responses. The best-characterized single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the COMT gene consists of a valine (Val)-to-methionine (Met) substitution at codon 108/158. The Met-containing variant confers a marked reduction in COMT catalytic activity. We recently showed that the activity of recombinant COMT is positively regulated by the enzyme Met sulfoxide reductase (MSR), which counters the oxidation of Met residues of proteins. The current study was designed to assess whether brain COMT activity may be correlated to MSR in an allele-dependent fashion. Methods COMT and MSR activities were measured from post-mortem samples of prefrontal cortices, striata and cerebella of 32 subjects, by using catechol and dabsyl-Met sulfoxide as substrates, respectively. Allelic discrimination of COMT Val108/185Met SNP was performed using the Taqman 5’nuclease assay. Results Our studies revealed that, in homozygous carriers of Met, but not Val alleles, the activity of COMT and MSR were significantly correlated throughout all tested brain regions. Discussion These results suggest that the reduced enzymatic activity of Met-containing COMT may be secondary to Met sulfoxidation, and point to MSR as a key molecular determinant for the modulation of COMT activity. PMID:25640985

  10. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, targets thioredoxin reductase to activate JNK and cell death pathways in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fang-Yuan; Wang, Sheng; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Wen-Bo; Wang, Guo-Cai; Ma, Dong-Lei; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants and found to have potential anticancer activities. However, the intracellular molecular targets of SLs and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In this study, we observed that EM23, a natural SL, exhibited anti-cancer activity in human cervical cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3 activation, XIAP downregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23-induced apoptosis was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the knockdown of thioredoxin (Trx) or thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) resulted in a reduction in apoptosis. EM23 attenuated TrxR activity by alkylation of C-terminal redox-active site Sec498 of TrxR and inhibited the expression levels of Trx/TrxR to facilitate ROS accumulation. Furthermore, inhibition of Trx/TrxR system resulted in the dissociation of ASK1 from Trx and the downstream activation of JNK. Pretreatment with ASK1/JNK inhibitors partially rescued cells from EM23-induced apoptosis. Additionally, EM23 inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy, which was observed to be proapoptotic and mediated by ROS. Together, these results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for the apoptotic induction observed with SL compound EM23, and emphasize its putative role as a therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer. PMID:26758418

  11. O2 activation by non-heme diiron proteins: identification of a symmetric mu-1,2-peroxide in a mutant of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Moënne-Loccoz, P; Baldwin, J; Ley, B A; Loehr, T M; Bollinger, J M

    1998-10-20

    Non-heme diiron clusters occur in a number of enzymes (e.g., ribonucleotide reductase, methane monooxygenase, and Delta9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase) that activate O2 for chemically difficult oxidation reactions. In each case, a kinetically labile peroxo intermediate is believed to form when O2 reacts with the diferrous enzyme, followed by O-O bond cleavage and the formation of high-valent iron intermediates [formally Fe(IV)] that are thought to be the reactive oxidants. Greater kinetic stability of a peroxodiiron(III) intermediate in protein R2 of ribonucleotide reductase was achieved by the iron-ligand mutation Asp84 --> Glu and the surface mutation Trp48 --> Phe. Here, we present the first definitive evidence for a bridging, symmetrical peroxo adduct from vibrational spectroscopic studies of the freeze-trapped intermediate of this mutant R2. Isotope-sensitive bands are observed at 870, 499, and 458 cm-1 that are assigned to the intraligand peroxo stretching frequency and the asymmetric and symmetric Fe-O2-Fe stretching frequencies, respectively. Similar results have been obtained in the resonance Raman spectroscopic study of a peroxodiferric species of Delta9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase [Broadwater, J. A., Ai, J., Loehr, T. M., Sanders-Loehr, J., and Fox, B. G. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 14664-14671]. Similarities among these adducts and transient species detected during O2 activation by methane monooxygenase hydroxylase, ferritin, and wild-type protein R2 suggest the symmetrical peroxo adduct as a common intermediate in the diverse oxidation reactions mediated by members of this class.

  12. Effect of inhibition of sterol delta 14-reductase on accumulation of meiosis-activating sterol and meiotic resumption in cumulus-enclosed mouse oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Leonardsen, L; Strömstedt, M; Jacobsen, D; Kristensen, K S; Baltsen, M; Andersen, C Y; Byskov, A G

    2000-01-01

    Two sterols of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway induce resumption of meiosis in mouse oocytes in vitro. The sterols, termed meiosis-activating sterols (MAS), have been isolated from human follicular fluid (FF-MAS, 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8,14,24-triene-3 beta-ol) and from bull testicular tissue (T-MAS, 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8,24-diene-3 beta-ol). FF-MAS is the first intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis from lanosterol and is converted to T-MAS by sterol delta 14-reductase. An inhibitor of delta 7-reductase and delta 14 reductase, AY9944-A-7, causes cells with a constitutive cholesterol biosynthesis to accumulate FF-MAS and possibly other intermediates between lanosterol and cholesterol. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether AY9944-A-7 added to cultures of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) from mice resulted in accumulation of MAS and meiotic maturation. AY9944-A-7 stimulated dose dependently (5-25 mumol l-1) COC to resume meiosis when cultured for 22 h in alpha minimal essential medium (alpha-MEM) containing 4 mmol hypoxanthine l-1, a natural inhibitor of meiotic maturation. In contrast, naked oocytes were not induced to resume meiosis by AY9944-A-7. When cumulus cells were separated from their oocytes and co-cultured, AY9944-A-7 did not affect resumption of meiosis, indicating that intact oocyte-cumulus cell connections are important for AY9944-A-7 to exert its effect on meiosis. Cultures of COC with 10 mumol AY9944-A-7 l-1 in the presence of [3H]mevalonic acid, a natural precursor for steroid synthesis, resulted in accumulation of labelled FF-MAS, which had an 11-fold greater amount of radioactivity incorporated per COC compared with the control culture without AY9944-A-7. In contrast, incorporation of radioactivity into the cholesterol fraction was reduced 30-fold in extracts from the same oocytes. The present findings demonstrate for the first time that COC can synthesize cholesterol from mevalonate and accumulate FF-MAS in

  13. Long-term effects of engineered nanoparticles on enzyme activity and functional bacteria in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiong; Huang, Haining; Su, Yinglong; Wei, Yuanyuan; Chen, Yinguang

    2015-01-01

    The pervasive use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in a wide range of fields raises concerns about their potential environmental impacts. Previous studies confirmed that some NPs had already entered wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Wastewater nutrient removal depends on the metabolisms of activated sludge bacteria and their related key enzymes. Therefore, this study compared the possible influences of Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, and ZnO NPs on the key enzymes activities and microbial community structures involved in wastewater treatment facilities. It was found that long-term exposure to these NPs significantly affected the microbial communities and changed the relative abundances of key functional bacteria, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Also, the gene expressions and catalytic activities of essential enzymes, such as ammonia monooxygenase, nitrite oxidoreductase, nitrate reductase, and nitrite reductase, were decreased, which finally resulted in a lower efficiency of biological nitrogen removal.

  14. Long-term effects of engineered nanoparticles on enzyme activity and functional bacteria in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiong; Huang, Haining; Su, Yinglong; Wei, Yuanyuan; Chen, Yinguang

    2015-01-01

    The pervasive use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in a wide range of fields raises concerns about their potential environmental impacts. Previous studies confirmed that some NPs had already entered wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Wastewater nutrient removal depends on the metabolisms of activated sludge bacteria and their related key enzymes. Therefore, this study compared the possible influences of Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, and ZnO NPs on the key enzymes activities and microbial community structures involved in wastewater treatment facilities. It was found that long-term exposure to these NPs significantly affected the microbial communities and changed the relative abundances of key functional bacteria, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Also, the gene expressions and catalytic activities of essential enzymes, such as ammonia monooxygenase, nitrite oxidoreductase, nitrate reductase, and nitrite reductase, were decreased, which finally resulted in a lower efficiency of biological nitrogen removal. PMID:26114277

  15. Relation between coumarate decarboxylase and vinylphenol reductase activity with regard to the production of volatile phenols by native Dekkera bruxellensis strains under 'wine-like' conditions.

    PubMed

    Sturm, M E; Assof, M; Fanzone, M; Martinez, C; Ganga, M A; Jofré, V; Ramirez, M L; Combina, M

    2015-08-01

    Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis is considered a major cause of wine spoilage, and 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol are the most abundant off-aromas produced by this species. They are produced by decarboxylation of the corresponding hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs), followed by a reduction of the intermediate 4-vinylphenols. The aim of the present study was to examine coumarate decarboxylase (CD) and vinylphenol reductase (VR) enzyme activities in 5 native D. bruxellensis strains and determine their relation with the production of ethylphenols under 'wine-like' conditions. In addition, biomass, cell culturability, carbon source utilization and organic acids were monitored during 60 days. All strains assayed turned out to have both enzyme activities. No significant differences were found in CD activity, whilst VR activity was variable among the strains. Growth of D. bruxellensis under 'wine-like' conditions showed two growth phases. Sugars were completely consumed during the first growth phase. Transformation of HCAs into ethylphenols also occurred during active growth of the yeast. No statistical differences were observed in volatile phenol levels produced by the strains growing under 'wine-like' conditions, independently of the enzyme activity previously recorded. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a relationship between the physiological state of D. bruxellensis and its ability to produce ethylphenols. Inhibition of growth of D. bruxellensis in wine seems to be the most efficient way to avoid ethylphenol production and the consequent loss of wine quality.

  16. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein’s internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  17. Role of the Dinitrogenase Reductase Arginine 101 Residue in Dinitrogenase Reductase ADP-Ribosyltransferase Binding, NAD Binding, and Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ludden, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Dinitrogenase reductase is posttranslationally regulated by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) via ADP-ribosylation of the arginine 101 residue in some bacteria. Rhodospirillum rubrum strains in which the arginine 101 of dinitrogenase reductase was replaced by tyrosine, phenylalanine, or leucine were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the nifH gene. The strain containing the R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase retains 91%, the strain containing the R101Y form retains 72%, and the strain containing the R101L form retains only 28% of in vivo nitrogenase activity of the strain containing the dinitrogenase reductase with arginine at position 101. In vivo acetylene reduction assays, immunoblotting with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, and [adenylate-32P]NAD labeling experiments showed that no switch-off of nitrogenase activity occurred in any of the three mutants and no ADP-ribosylation of altered dinitrogenase reductases occurred either in vivo or in vitro. Altered dinitrogenase reductases from strains UR629 (R101Y) and UR630 (R101F) were purified to homogeneity. The R101F and R101Y forms of dinitrogenase reductase were able to form a complex with DRAT that could be chemically cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide. The R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase and DRAT together were not able to cleave NAD. This suggests that arginine 101 is not critical for the binding of DRAT to dinitrogenase reductase but that the availability of arginine 101 is important for NAD cleavage. Both DRAT and dinitrogenase reductase can be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD individually upon UV irradiation, but most 14C label is incorporated into DRAT when both proteins are present. The ability of R101F dinitrogenase reductase to be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD suggested that Arg 101 is not absolutely required for NAD binding. PMID:11114923

  18. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and... Listing § 573.700 Sodium nitrite. Sodium nitrite may be safely used in canned pet food containing meat and... as a preservative and color fixative in canned pet food containing fish, meat, and fish and...

  19. Transcriptional and metabolic regulation of denitrification in Paracoccus denitrificans allows low but significant activity of nitrous oxide reductase under oxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhi; Bakken, Lars R; Molstad, Lars; Frostegård, Åsa; Bergaust, Linda L

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen is known to repress denitrification at the transcriptional and metabolic levels. It has been a common notion that nitrous oxide reductase (N2 OR) is the most sensitive enzyme among the four N-oxide reductases involved in denitrification, potentially leading to increased N2 O production under suboxic or fluctuating oxygen conditions. We present detailed gas kinetics and transcription patterns from batch culture experiments with Paracoccus denitrificans, allowing in vivo estimation of e(-) -flow to O2 and N2 O under various O2 regimes. Transcription of nosZ took place concomitantly with that of narG under suboxic conditions, whereas transcription of nirS and norB was inhibited until O2 levels approached 0 μM in the liquid. Catalytically functional N2 OR was synthesized and active in aerobically raised cells transferred to vials with 7 vol% O2 in headspace, but N2 O reduction rates were 10 times higher when anaerobic pre-cultures were subjected to the same conditions. Upon oxygen exposure, there was an incomplete and transient inactivation of N2 OR that could be ascribed to its lower ability to compete for electrons compared with terminal oxidases. The demonstrated reduction of N2 O at high O2 partial pressure and low N2 O concentrations by a bacterium not known as a typical aerobic denitrifier may provide one clue to the understanding of why some soils appear to act as sinks rather than sources for atmospheric N2 O. PMID:26568281

  20. Effect of treatment with a hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor on fasting and postprandial plasma lipoproteins and cholesteryl ester transfer activity in patients with NIDDM.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, D; Durrington, P N; Kumar, S; Mackness, M I; Dean, J; Boulton, A J

    1995-04-01

    Patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have a greater risk of developing coronary heart disease than would be expected from a similar degree of hyperlipidemia in nondiabetic populations. Accelerated transfer of cholesteryl esters (CET) from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), a process that is associated with atherosclerosis, may be a possible explanation for this. CET, plasma lipoprotein concentration, and mass in the fasting and postprandial state have been examined in 31 hyperlipidemic patients with NIDDM before and after 8 weeks of treatment with the hydroxymethylglutaryl (HMG)-coenzyme A (CoA) reductase inhibitor pravastatin in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study. Body mass index, glycemic control, and blood pressure remained unaltered during the study period. Compared with placebo, pravastatin decreased fasting serum cholesterol (P < 0.001) and LDL cholesterol (P < 0.002) levels. The high basal CET (34.4 +/- 13.1 nmol.ml-1.h-1) was decreased significantly by pravastatin treatment (27.5 +/- 13.7 nmol.ml-1.h-1, P = 0.013). There was a fall in the total cholesterol, free cholesterol, and phospholipid content of the Sf 0-12, 20-60, and 60-400 lipoproteins (all P = 0.001). Lecithin: cholesterol acyl transferase activity was not altered. The postprandial increase in VLDL cholesterol 5 h after a standardized mixed meal was attenuated after pravastatin treatment (P = 0.011). Inhibition of hepatic cholesterol synthesis with an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor in hyperlipidemic patients with NIDDM decreased serum cholesterol content of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein, thereby decreasing the transfer of cholesteryl ester from HDL to LDL and VLDL. PMID:7698516

  1. Prioritization of active antimalarials using structural interaction profile of Plasmodium falciparum enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (PfENR)-triclosan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S P; George, L B; Jasrai, Y T; Pandya, H A

    2015-01-01

    An empirical relationship between the experimental inhibitory activities of triclosan derivatives and its computationally predicted Plasmodium falciparum enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (PfENR) dock poses was developed to model activities of known antimalarials. A statistical model was developed using 57 triclosan derivatives with significant measures (r = 0.849, q(2) = 0.619, s = 0.481) and applied on structurally related and structurally diverse external datasets. A substructure-based search on ChEMBL malaria dataset (280 compounds) yielded only two molecules with significant docking energy, whereas eight active antimalarials (EC(50) < 100 nM, tested on 3D7 strain) with better predicted activities (pIC(50) ~ 7) from Open Access Malaria Box (400 compounds) were prioritized. Further, calculations on the structurally diverse rhodanine molecules (known PfENR inhibitors) distinguished actives (experimental IC(50) = 0.035 μM; predicted pIC(50) = 6.568) and inactives (experimental IC(50) = 50 μM; predicted pIC50 = -4.078), which showed that antimalarials possessing dock poses similar to experimental interaction profiles can be used as leads to test experimentally on enzyme assays.

  2. Effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water treatment on the reduction of nitrite levels in fresh spinach during storage.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianxiong; Li, Huiying; Wan, Yangfang; Liu, Haijie

    2015-03-01

    Leafy vegetables are the major source of nitrite intake in the human diet, and technological processing to control nitrite levels in harvested vegetables is necessary. In the current work, the effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) on the nitrite and nitrate levels in fresh spinach during storage was studied. EOW treatment, including slightly acidic electrolyzed water and acidic electrolyzed water, was found to effectively reduce nitrite levels in fresh spinach during storage; levels in the late period were 30 to 40% lower than that of the control. However, the nitrate levels in fresh spinach during storage were not influenced by EOW treatment. The reduction of nitrite levels in EOW-treated fresh spinach during storage can be attributed to the inactivation of nitrate reductase directly and to the reduction of bacterial populations. Our results suggest that treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water may be a better choice to control nitrite levels in fresh vegetables during storage. This study provided a useful method to reduce nitrite levels in fresh spinach.

  3. UPTAKE OF NITRATE AND NITRITE BY DITYLUM BRIGHTWELLII-KINETICS AND MECHANISMS(1) (2).

    PubMed

    Eppley, R W; Coatsworth, J L

    1968-06-01

    Ditylum brightwellii grown on NO2 - as a nitrogen source took up and assimilated NO2 - only in the light, apparently via a photosynthetic nitrite reductase. Assimilation was inhibited by dichlorophenyldimethylurea (DCMU), KCN, partially by 2,4 dinitrophenol, and by NO3 -. Kinetics of inhibition of NO2 - assimilation by NO3 - appeared to be "competitive." D. brightwellii cells grown on NO2 - took up NO3 - in both light and dark and in both cases the uptake was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, but not by DCMU, KCN, or by NO2 -. Most of the NO3 - taken up in the dark was recovered unchanged from the cells. However only 40% of NO3 - taken up in light was recovered from the cells and no NO2 - was found. This suggests that a photosynthetic nitrate reduction mechanism was active in these cells. DCMU inhibited the light-induced NO3 - reduction. This mechanism of NO3 - reduction is distinct from that involving NADH nitrate reductase in D. brightwellii since the concentration of the latter enzyme is very low in cells grown on NO2 -. Saturation kinetics were observed for NO2 - and NO3 - uptake. Half-saturation concentrations (Ks values) were 4 and 2 μM, respectively. These values are compared with those obtained for NO2 - and NO3 - assimilation by other unicellular algae. The comparisons show lower Ks values in oceanic species compared with tide-pool or freshwater algae and they support the idea that Ks values for NO3 - assimilation may provide a key to understanding species succession when this is due to declining: nitrate concentrations in the sea. PMID:27067951

  4. High pressure NMR reveals active-site hinge motion of folate-bound Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, R; Sareth, S; Yamada, H; Ohmae, E; Gekko, K; Akasaka, K

    2000-10-24

    A high-pressure (15)N/(1)H two-dimensional NMR study has been carried out on folate-bound dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli in the pressure range between 30 and 2000 bar. Several cross-peaks in the (15)N/(1)H HSQC spectrum are split into two with increasing pressure, showing the presence of a second conformer in equilibrium with the first. Thermodynamic analysis of the pressure and temperature dependencies indicates that the second conformer is characterized by a smaller partial molar volume (DeltaV = -25 mL/mol at 15 degrees C) and smaller enthalpy and entropy values, suggesting that the second conformer is more open and hydrated than the first. The splittings of the cross-peaks (by approximately 1 ppm on (15)N axis at 2000 bar) arise from the hinges of the M20 loop, the C-helix, and the F-helix, all of which constitute the major binding site for the cofactor NADPH, suggesting that major differences in conformation occur in the orientations of the NADPH binding units. The Gibbs free energy of the second, open conformer is 5.2 kJ/mol above that of the first at 1 bar, giving an equilibrium population of about 10%. The second, open conformer is considered to be crucial for NADPH binding, and the NMR line width indicates that the upper limit for the rate of opening is 20 s(-)(1) at 2000 bar. These experiments show that high pressure NMR is a generally useful tool for detecting and analyzing "open" structures of a protein that may be directly involved in function.

  5. Structure-activity relationships and molecular modelling of new 5-arylidene-4-thiazolidinone derivatives as aldose reductase inhibitors and potential anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Maccari, Rosanna; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Ottanà, Rosaria; Rocchiccioli, Marco; Marrazzo, Agostino; Cardile, Venera; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Amodeo, Pietro; Mura, Umberto; Del Corso, Antonella

    2014-06-23

    A series of 5-(carbamoylmethoxy)benzylidene-2-oxo/thioxo-4-thiazolidinone derivatives (6-9) were synthesized as inhibitors of aldose reductase (AR), enzyme which plays a crucial role in the development of diabetes complications as well as in the inflammatory processes associated both to diabetes mellitus and to other pathologies. In vitro inhibitory activity indicated that compounds 6-9a-d were generally good AR inhibitors. Acetic acid derivatives 8a-d and 9a-d were shown to be the best enzyme inhibitors among the tested compounds endowed with significant inhibitory ability levels reaching submicromolar IC50 values. Moreover, some representative AR inhibitors (7a, 7c, 9a, 9c, 9d) were assayed in cultures of human keratinocytes in order to evaluate their capability to reduce NF-kB activation and iNOS expression. Compound 9c proved to be the best derivative endowed with both interesting AR inhibitory effectiveness and ability to reduce NF-kB activation and iNOS expression. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were undertaken to investigate the binding modes of selected compounds into the active site of AR in order to rationalize the inhibitory effectiveness of these derivatives.

  6. Reductive activation in periplasmic nitrate reductase involves chemical modifications of the Mo-cofactor beyond the first coordination sphere of the metal ion.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Julien G J; Fourmond, Vincent; Arnoux, Pascal; Sabaty, Monique; Etienne, Emilien; Grosse, Sandrine; Biaso, Frédéric; Bertrand, Patrick; Pignol, David; Léger, Christophe; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Burlat, Bénédicte

    2014-02-01

    In Rhodobacter sphaeroides periplasmic nitrate reductase NapAB, the major Mo(V) form (the "high g" species) in air-purified samples is inactive and requires reduction to irreversibly convert into a catalytically competent form (Fourmond et al., J. Phys. Chem., 2008). In the present work, we study the kinetics of the activation process by combining EPR spectroscopy and direct electrochemistry. Upon reduction, the Mo (V) "high g" resting EPR signal slowly decays while the other redox centers of the protein are rapidly reduced, which we interpret as a slow and gated (or coupled) intramolecular electron transfer between the [4Fe-4S] center and the Mo cofactor in the inactive enzyme. Besides, we detect spin-spin interactions between the Mo(V) ion and the [4Fe-4S](1+) cluster which are modified upon activation of the enzyme, while the EPR signatures associated to the Mo cofactor remain almost unchanged. This shows that the activation process, which modifies the exchange coupling pathway between the Mo and the [4Fe-4S](1+) centers, occurs further away than in the first coordination sphere of the Mo ion. Relying on structural data and studies on Mo-pyranopterin and models, we propose a molecular mechanism of activation which involves the pyranopterin moiety of the molybdenum cofactor that is proximal to the [4Fe-4S] cluster. The mechanism implies both the cyclization of the pyran ring and the reduction of the oxidized pterin to give the competent tricyclic tetrahydropyranopterin form.

  7. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem ‘modules’ similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV–visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  8. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas A; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S; Fredrickson, Jim K; Zachara, John M; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David J

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem 'modules' similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV-visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  9. Microbicidal activity of neutrophils is inhibited by isolates from recurrent vaginal candidiasis (RVVC) caused by Candida albicans through fungal thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Godoy, Janine Silva Ribeiro; de Souza Bonfim Mendonça, Patrícia; Bidóia, Danielle Lazarin; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Lopes Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is characterized by an infection of the vulva and vagina, mainly caused by Candida albicans, a commensal microorganism that inhabits the vaginal, digestive, and respiratory mucosae. Vulvovaginal candidiasis affects approximately 75% of women, and 5% develop the recurrent form (RVVC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether neutrophils microbicidal response is triggered when activated with RVVC isolates caused by C. albicans. Our results showed that RVVC isolates induced neutrophil migration but significantly decrease the microbicidal activity of neutrophils, compared with VVC and ASS isolates. The microbicidal activity of neutrophils is highly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). However, this isolate induced detoxification of ROS/RNS produced by neutrophils, reflected by the high level of thiol groups and by the oxygen consumption. Therefore, RVVC isolates induced biochemical changes in the inflammatory response triggered by neutrophils, and these effects were mainly related to the detoxification of ROS/RNS through the thioredoxin reductase (TR), a key antioxidant enzyme in fungi. This might be one of the resistance mechanisms triggered by RVVC caused by C. albicans. PMID:25497972

  10. The relationship between inhibition of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide reductase and reduction of clotting factor activity with warfarin.

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, I A; Malia, R G; Haynes, B P; Hay, C R; Cholerton, S; Breckenridge, A M; Preston, F E; Park, B K

    1988-01-01

    1 The effect of low dose steady state warfarin (0.2 mg and 1 mg daily) on clotting factor activity and vitamin K1 metabolism was studied in seven healthy volunteers. 2 Steady state plasma warfarin concentrations were 41-99 ng ml-1 for the 0.2 mg dose and 157-292 ng ml-1 for the 1 mg dose. 3 There was a significant prolongation of the mean prothrombin time (0.9 s) after 1 mg warfarin daily, but no significant change in prothrombin time after 0.2 mg warfarin daily. There was no significant change in individual clotting factor activity (II, VII, IX or X) with either dose of warfarin. 4 Following the administration of a pharmacological dose of vitamin K1 (10 mg), all seven volunteers had detectable levels of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide with both doses of warfarin (Cpmax 31-409 ng ml-1). 5 Both the Cpmax and the AUC for vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide were significantly greater on 1 mg of warfarin daily than 0.2 mg daily (P less than 0.01). 6 The apparent dissociation between inhibition of vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide reductase and reduction of clotting factor activity, produced by warfarin, may reflect the insensitivity of functional clotting factor assays to a small reduction in clotting factor concentration. PMID:3370190

  11. Improvement of erythrose reductase activity, deletion of by-products and statistical media optimization for enhanced erythritol production from Yarrowia lipolytica mutant 49.

    PubMed

    Ghezelbash, Gholam Reza; Nahvi, Iraj; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to produce erythritol by Yarrowia lipolytica mutant without any by-products. Mutants of Y. lipolytica were generated by ultra-violet for enhancing erythrose reductase (ER) activity and erythritol production. The mutants showing the highest ER activity were screened by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride agar plate assay. Productivity of samples was analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with the refractive index detector. One of the mutants named as mutant 49 gave maximum erythritol production without any other by-products (particularly glycerol). Erythritol production and specific ER activity in mutant 49 increased to 1.65 and 1.47 times, respectively, in comparison with wild-type strain. The ER gene of wild and mutant strains was sequenced and analyzed. A general comparison of wild and mutant gene sequences showed the replacement of Asp(270) with Glu(270) in ER protein. In order to enhance erythritol production, we used a three component-three level-one response Box-Behnken of response surface methodology model. The optimum medium composition for erythritol production was found to be (g/l) glucose 279.49, ammonium sulfate 9.28, and pH 5.41 with 39.76 erythritol production.

  12. Toxicity of nitrite to fish: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.M. Jr.; Morris, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Nitrite, an intermediate in the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, changes hemoglobin to methemoglobin, which does not carry oxygen; nitrite may thus cause anoxia in fish and other aquatic organisms. The published literature on nitrite toxicity to fish, which consists of about 40 papers, shows that the ratio of the 24-h LC50 (concentration lethal to half of the test organisms in 24 h) to the 96-h LC50 has a median value of 2.0 and is fairly uniform across species; toxicity tests of differing duration can therefore be standardized to a common duration. In general, chronic effects are difficult to detect at concentrations below one-fifth of the 96-h LC50. Most fish concentrate nitrite in fresh water; chloride in the external environment offsets the toxicity of nitrite by competing with nitrite for uptake through the chloride cells of the gills. Bicarbonate also reduces the toxicity of nitrite, but it is less than 1% as effective as chloride. Calcium reduces the toxicity of nitrite, but much less than chloride; the effects of other metal cations have not been studied. Hydrogen ion concentration of the medium has not been shown to have a discrete effect on the toxicity of nitrite except at extreme concentrations uncharacteristic of the environments in which fish ordinarily live. Nitrite toxicity is exacerbated by low oxygen concentrations because nitrite reduces the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. Very small fish seem less sensitive to nitrite than fish of intermediate or large size. Present evidence suggests that salmonids are among the fishes most sensitive to nitrite. The least-sensitive species tested thus far are the largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus; the largemouth bass does not concentrate nitrite.

  13. The Prostaglandin F Synthase Activity of the Human Aldose Reductase AKR1B1 Brings New Lenses to Look at Pathologic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bresson, Eva; Lacroix-Pépin, Nicolas; Boucher-Kovalik, Sofia; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Fortier, Michel A.

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandins are important regulators of female reproductive functions to which aldose reductases exhibiting hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity also contribute. Our work on the regulation of reproductive function by prostaglandins (PGs), lead us to the discovery that AKR1B5 and later AKR1B1were highly efficient and physiologically relevant PGF synthases. PGE2 and PGF2α are the main prostanoids produced in the human endometrium and proper balance in their relative production is important for normal menstruation and optimal fertility. Recent evidence suggests that PGE2/EP2 and PGF2α/FP may constitute a functional dyad with physiological relevance comparable to the prostacyclin-thromboxane dyad in the vascular system. We have recently reported that AKR1B1 was expressed and modulated in association with PGF2α production in response to IL-1β in the human endometrium. In the present study, we show that the human AKR1B1 (gene ID: 231) also known as ALDR1 or ALR2 is a functional PGF2α synthase in different models of living cells and tissues. Using human endometrial cells, prostate, and vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells we demonstrate that IL-1β is able to up regulate COX-2 and AKR1B1 proteins as well as PGF2α production under normal glucose concentrations. We show that the promoter activity of AKR1B1 gene is increased by IL-1β particularly around the multiple stress response region containing two putative antioxidant response elements adjacent to TonE and AP1. We also show that AKR1B1 is able to regulate PGE2 production through PGF2α acting on its FP receptor and that aldose reductase inhibitors like alrestatin, Statil (ponalrestat), and EBPC exhibit distinct and characteristic inhibition of PGF2α production in different cell models. The PGF synthase activity of AKR1B1 represents a new and important target to regulate ischemic and inflammatory responses associated with several human pathologies. PMID:22654757

  14. Crystal Structures of the Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Complexes of Horse Heart Myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland,D.; Soares, A.; West, A.; Richter-Addo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrite is an important species in the global nitrogen cycle, and the nitrite reductase enzymes convert nitrite to nitric oxide (NO). Recently, it has been shown that hemoglobin and myoglobin catalyze the reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions. We have determined the 1.20 Angst