Science.gov

Sample records for nitrogen 16 target

  1. Rapid detection and identification of the free-living nitrogen fixing genus Azospirillum by 16S rRNA-gene-targeted genus-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2011-05-01

    The modern agricultural practice utilizing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has brought great benefits in the promotion of crop growth. Among PGPR, Azospirillum is considered as an important genus which is not only closely-associated with plants but also shows potential in the degradation of organic contaminants. However, lack of media for selective isolation or techniques for specific detection or identification limit the exploration of these rhizobacteria. This motivated us to design a genus-specific oligonucleotide primer pair which could assist in rapid detection of species of the genus Azospirillum by means of PCR-specific amplification. The sensitivity and specificity of the newly designed primer pair Azo494-F/Azo756-R were tested against 12 Azospirillum type strains and other closely-related genera. The Azospirillum-specific 16S rRNA gene fragment (263 bp) was successfully amplified for all the reference Azospirillum species with the designed primer pair. No amplification was noted for closely-related species from other genera. The genus specificity was validated with 18 strains including environmental isolates. Interestingly, two strains assigned earlier as Azospirillum amazonense (DSM 2787(T)) and Azospirillum irakense (DSM 11586(T)) failed to produce an Azospirillum-specific fragment with this primer pair. Further phylogenetic analysis of these two isolates based on 16S rRNA gene sequences shows that these two strains might belong to other genera rather than Azospirillum. Preliminary screening of isolates and soil samples with the Azospirillum-specific primers was successful in terms of the rapid detection of Azospirillum isolates. By using real-time PCR analysis the minimum limit of Azospirillum detection was 10(2) CFU g(-1) in the seeded soil sample. The newly designed primers can be used to study the diversity of Azospirillum in ecosystems and aid in the exploration of novel species.

  2. XUV radiation from gaseous nitrogen and argon target laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbová, M.; Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Krejčí, F.; Kroupa, M.; Jakůbek, J.

    2012-06-01

    Laser plasma created in gaseous target is studied as a source of radiation in the "water window" wavelength range. Plasma is created by focusing an 800 mJ/7 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse into the gas-puff target. Using nitrogen gas results in emission of an intense quasi-monochromatic radiation with the wavelength 2.88 nm, corresponding to the quantum transition 1s2p → 1s2 of helium -like nitrogen ion. The emission spectrum with argon target covers all the water window range. Laboratory and computer experiments have been performed for both target gases. The spatial distributions of emitted energy in the water window spectral range were compared. The total emitted energy with argon was one order higher than with nitrogen.

  3. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelqvist, E. Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-07

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  4. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  5. Chapter 16Tracing Nitrogen Sources and Cycling in Catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, Carol

    1998-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the uses of isotopes to understand water chemistry.I Isotopic compositions generally cannot be interpreted successfully in the absence of other chemical and hydrologic data. The chapter focusses on uses of isotopes in tracing sources and cycling of nitrogen in the water-component of forested catchment, and on dissolved nitrate in shallow waters, nutrient uptake studies in agricultural areas, large-scale tracer experiments, groundwater contamination studies, food-web investigations, and uses of compound-specific stable isotope techniques. Shallow waters moving along a flowpath through a relatively uniform material and reacting with minerals probably do not achieve equilibrium but gradually approach some steady-state composition. The chapter also discusses the use of isotopic techniques to assess impacts of changes in land-management practices and land use on water quality. The analysis of individual molecular components for isotopic composition has much potential as a method for tracing the source, biogeochemistry, and degradation of organic liquids and gases because different materials have characteristic isotope spectrums or biomarkers.

  6. Target cell cyclophilins facilitate human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    PubMed

    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Patel, Hetalkumar D; Sapp, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB) facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV-induced diseases.

  7. Target Cell Cyclophilins Facilitate Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB) facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV–induced diseases. PMID:19629175

  8. TG16 point target detection experiment POLLEX, Livorno 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Arie N.; Winkel, Hans; Moerman, Marcel M.; Stein, Karin; Weiss-Wrana, Karin; Forand, J. Luc; Potvin, Guy; Buss, James R.; Cini, Andrea; Vogel, Henrik H.; Stark, Espen

    2003-01-01

    NATO Task group TG16 is cooperating on topics related to ship self-defence. One of these topics is related to IR Search and Track sensors, which are in development for detection of low altitude air targets. In particular the group is working on models to predict the range performance of these sensors. Newly developed models include marine boundary layer effects such as refraction due to temperature gradients, scintillation due to turbulence and particle size distributions. TG16 organized in May 2001a trial in the Mediterranean Sea near Livorno, Italy, called POLLEX to further validate these models. Seven nations particulated with complementary instruments for measurements of the target signatures and environmental characteristics. Three targets were provided, a series of small visual/IR sources at a fixed distance, visual/IR soruces on a ship moving in and out up-to and beyond the horizon and a helicopter. The weather conditions during the measurement period showed interesting variations in Air to Sea Temperature DIfference and atmospheric turbulence. Data have been analzyed and samples of the results, as collected and/or analyzed by the participants, are discussed in this paper.

  9. 48 CFR 52.216-16 - Incentive Price Revision-Firm Target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Firm Target. 52.216-16 Section 52.216-16 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Clauses 52.216-16 Incentive Price Revision—Firm Target. As prescribed in 16.406(a), insert the following clause: Incentive Price Revision—Firm Target (OCT 1997) (a) General. The supplies or services identified...

  10. 48 CFR 52.216-16 - Incentive Price Revision-Firm Target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Firm Target. 52.216-16 Section 52.216-16 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Clauses 52.216-16 Incentive Price Revision—Firm Target. As prescribed in 16.406(a), insert the following clause: Incentive Price Revision—Firm Target (OCT 1997) (a) General. The supplies or services identified...

  11. 48 CFR 52.216-16 - Incentive Price Revision-Firm Target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Firm Target. 52.216-16 Section 52.216-16 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Clauses 52.216-16 Incentive Price Revision—Firm Target. As prescribed in 16.406(a), insert the following clause: Incentive Price Revision—Firm Target (OCT 1997) (a) General. The supplies or services identified...

  12. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  13. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 16.403-1 Section 16.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract specifies a target cost, a target profit, a price ceiling (but not a profit ceiling or floor), and...

  14. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 16.403-1 Section 16.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract specifies a target cost, a target profit, a price ceiling (but not a profit ceiling or floor), and...

  15. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (firm target) contracts. 16.403-1 Section 16.403-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract specifies a target cost, a target profit, a price ceiling (but not a profit ceiling or floor), and...

  16. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  17. Ocean's 16: Optimal protein:RNA ratio has near Redfield nitrogen:phosphorus ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elser, J. J.; Loladze, I.

    2010-12-01

    One of the biosphere’s most intriguing patterns is the near equality of the atomic nitrogen:phosphorus ratio (N:P) found in waters throughout the deep ocean (~16) and its average in plankton in the upper ocean. When Redfield discovered this pattern 75 years ago, he suggested that it is driven by the cellular composition of plankton. However, no theoretical explanation for an N:P ~16 in microorganisms has ever been found. Moreover, recently it has been suggested that N:P ~16 may have no significance for either plankton nor for N/P cycling on geological time scales. Here we show that an N:P ratio of 16 emerges from fundamental biochemical and biomolecular properties: N in amino acids, N and P in nucleotides, and the square root of the ratio of the maximal translation and transcription rates. Our theoretical results are supported by a comprehensive compilation of literature data on microbial protein:rRNA ratios. Thus, the N:P ratio of ~16 appears to correspond to the biochemically optimal protein:RNA ratio for maximal growth rates for both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  18. Targeting reactive nitrogen species suppresses hereditary pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo; Chen, Qian; Ma, Teng; Yu, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Germline mutation of BRCA2 induces hereditary pancreatic cancer. However, how BRCA2 mutation specifically induces pancreatic tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we have examined a mouse model of Brca2-deficiency–induced pancreatic tumors and found that excessive reactive nitrogen species (RNS), such as nitrite, are generated in precancerous pancreases, which induce massive DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks. RNS-induced DNA lesions cause genomic instability in the absence of Brca2. Moreover, with the treatment of antioxidant tempol to suppress RNS, not only are DNA lesions significantly reduced, but also the onset of pancreatic cancer is delayed. Thus, this study demonstrates that excess RNS are a nongenetic driving force for Brca2-deficiency–induced pancreatic tumors. Suppression of RNS could be an important strategy for pancreatic cancer prevention. PMID:28630313

  19. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 16.403-2 Section 16.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. (a) Description. (1) A fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contract specifies the following elements, all of which are negotiated at the outset: (i...

  20. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 16.403-2 Section 16.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. (a) Description. (1) A fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contract specifies the following elements, all of which are negotiated at the outset: (i...

  1. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (successive targets) contracts. 16.403-2 Section 16.403-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. (a) Description. (1) A fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contract specifies the following elements, all of which are negotiated at the outset: (i...

  2. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  3. Effect of carbon and nitrogen on the properties of chromium-manganese steels of the Kh16G18 type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Pestryakova, E. P.; Rakhshtadt, A. G.; Barseg'yan, L. V.; Blinov, V. M.

    1991-01-01

    It is established that the level of carbide and nitride phase dissolution in chromium-manganese steels of type Kh16G18 with a varible ratio of carbon and nitrogen in them reaches a maximum at 1150°C. With an almost identical lattice spacing the degree of its distortion in steel with nitrogen is greater and therefore the specific electrical resistivity of the steel is higher.

  4. Corrosion Behavior of High Nitrogen Nickel-Free Fe-16Cr-Mn-Mo-N Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K. L.; Liao, H. Y.; Shyue, J. J.; Lian, S. S.

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the current study is to develop austenitic nickel-free stainless steels with lower chromium content and higher manganese and nitrogen contents. In order to prevent nickel-induced skin allergy, cobalt, manganese, and nitrogen were used to substitute nickel in the designed steel. Our results demonstrated that manganese content greater than 14 wt pct results in a structure that is in full austenite phase. The manganese content appears to increase the solubility of nitrogen; however, a lower corrosion potential was found in steel with high manganese content. Molybdenum appears to be able to increase the pitting potential. The effects of Cr, Mn, Mo, and N on corrosion behavior of Fe-16Cr-2Co-Mn-Mo-N high nitrogen stainless steels were evaluated with potentiodynamic tests and XPS surface analysis. The results reveal that anodic current and pits formation of the Fe-16Cr-2Co-Mn-Mo-N high nitrogen stainless steels were smaller than those of lower manganese and nitrogen content stainless steel.

  5. What plant and soil testing from 16 sites in eight midwestern states tells us about split nitrogen applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is hypothesized that split-nitrogen (N) relative to single near-planting applications improve corn (Zea mays L.) production, N recovery efficiency, and lessen environmental impacts of fertilization. However, these hypotheses have not been fully tested. A 16-site study across eight US Midwestern s...

  6. Karyopherin {beta}3: A new cellular target for the HPV-16 E5 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Ewa; Hanover, John A.; Schlegel, Richard; Suprynowicz, Frank A.

    2008-07-11

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer worldwide, and that HPV-16 is associated with more than half of these cases. In addition to the well-characterized E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV-16, recent evidence increasingly has implicated the HPV-16 E5 protein (16E5) as an important mediator of oncogenic transformation. Since 16E5 has no known intrinsic enzymatic activity, its effects on infected cells are most likely mediated by interactions with various cellular proteins and/or its documented association with lipid rafts. In the present study, we describe a new cellular target that binds to 16E5 in COS cells and in stable human ectocervical cell lines. This target is karyopherin {beta}3, a member of the nuclear import receptor family with critical roles in the nuclear import of ribosomal proteins and in the secretory pathway.

  7. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 12 companies at 27 plants in 15 states in the United States during 2011. Sixty-one percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2011, U.S. producers operated at about 84 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Four companies — CF Industries Holdings Inc.; Koch Nitrogen Co.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 77 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity.

  8. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase: a target for improvement of crop nitrogen use efficiency?

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Hanne C; Eriksson, Dennis; Møller, Inge S; Schjoerring, Jan K

    2014-10-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude that GS1 activity may be downregulated via a chain of processes elicited by metabolic imbalances and environmental constraints. We suggest that a pivotal role of GS1 may be related to the maintenance of essential nitrogen (N) flows and internal N sensing during critical stages of plant development. A number of more refined overexpression strategies exploiting gene stacking combined with tissue and cell specific targeting to overcome metabolic bottlenecks are considered along with their potential in relation to new N management strategies.

  9. Determination of nitrogen reduction levels necessary to reach groundwater quality targets in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Andelov, Miso; Kunkel, Ralf; Uhan, Jože; Wendland, Frank

    2014-09-01

    Within a collaborative project between Slovenian Environment Agency (ARSO) and Research Center Jülich (FZJ), nitrogen reduction levels necessary to reach groundwater quality targets in Slovenia were assessed. For this purpose the hydrological model GROWA-DENUZ was coupled with agricultural N balances and applied consistently to the whole territory of Slovenia in a spatial resolution of 100×100m. GROWA was used to determine the water balance in Slovenia for the hydrologic period 1971-2000. Simultaneously, the displaceable N load in soil was assessed from agricultural Slovenian N surpluses for 2011 and the atmospheric N deposition. Subsequently, the DENUZ model was used to assess the nitrate degradation in soil and, in combination with the percolation water rates from the GROWA model, to determine nitrate concentration in the leachate. The areas showing predicted nitrate concentrations in the leachate above the EU groundwater quality standard of 50mg NO3(-)/L have been identified as priority areas for implementing nitrogen reduction measures. For these "hot spot" areas DENUZ was used in a backward mode to quantify the maximal permissible nitrogen surplus levels in agriculture to guarantee a nitrate concentration in percolation water below 50mg NO3(-)/L. Model results indicate that additional N reduction measures should be implemented in priority areas rather than area-covering. Research work will directly support the implementation of the European Union Water Framework Directive in Slovenia, e.g., by using the maximal permissible nitrogen surplus levels as a framework for the derivation of regionally adapted and hence effective nitrogen reduction measures.

  10. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  11. Simulation of (16)O (n, p) (16)N reaction rate and nitrogen-16 inventory in a high performance light water reactor with one pass core.

    PubMed

    Kebwaro, Jeremiah Monari; Zhao, Yaolin; He, Chaohui

    2014-12-01

    The rate of activation of the isotope (16)O to (16)N in a typical HPLWR one pass concept was calculated using MCNP code. A mathematical model was used to track the inventory of the radioisotope (16)N in a unit mass of coolant traversing the system. The water leaving the moderator channels has the highest activity in the circuit, but due to interaction with fresh coolant at the lower plenum, the activity is downscaled. The calculated core exit activity is higher than values reported in literature for commercial boiling water reactors.

  12. The ^16N experiment at ATLAS---a Target Preparation phTour de Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, John; Neubauer, Janelle; Henderson, Dale; Zabransky, Bruce; Nardi, Bruce; Tang, Xiaodong; Pardo, Richard; Rehm, Ernst

    2004-10-01

    For a new measurement of the β-delayed α spectrum of ^16N, a 60 MeV ^16N beam was produced via the d(^15N,n) ^16N reaction at Argonne National Laboratory. The ^15N beam bombarded a cooled d target employing Havar windows. The resulting ^16N ions were slowed down in a gas-filled attenuation cell having Ti windows and mylar energy degrader foil. The gas pressure was adjusted to stop the ions 2 cm beyond the exit window, where a catcher foil mounted on a target wheel. After irradiation, this foil is rotated into an ionization chamber for the detection of the β-delayed α decay. Detector calibrations were accomplished using a Pt backed, double-sided ^148Gd α source. Collection efficiencies were investigated for catcher foils of carbon, Ti, Al, TiN, and melamine and found to be independent of the target chemical properties. For normalization, the ^16N β decays from a thick Al target were measured using a Si detector mounted 180^o from the irradiation position.

  13. Direct targeting of HGF by miR-16 regulates proliferation and migration in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Xinyi; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Liu, Rui; Deng, Ting; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le; Bai, Ming; Zhou, Likun; Wang, Xia; Ge, Shaohua; Ying, Guoguang; Ba, Yi

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be involved in each stage of tumor development in various types of cancers. We have previously showed that miR-16 is downregulated in cancer and acts as a tumor suppressor. Other studies indicated that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met is implicated in proliferation, migration, and other pathophysiological processes. However, little is known about the relationship between miR-16 and HGF/c-Met in gastric cancer (GC). In the present study, we used bioinformatics tools and related experiments to search for miRNAs targeting HGF. Here, we found that miR-16 suppressed HGF protein expression by directly targeting 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of HGF mRNA. Subsequently, it was illustrated the downregulation of miR-16 promotes, while overexpressed of miR-16 significantly inhibits cell proliferation and migration by negatively regulating HGF/c-Met pathway. Moreover, the biological role of HGF in GC cells was determined by using HGF siRNA and HGF-overexpressing plasmid, respectively. To conclude, our results provide a potential target by using miR-16 for the future clinical treatment of GC.

  14. Towards understanding the lifespan extension by reduced insulin signaling: bioinformatics analysis of DAF-16/FOXO direct targets in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Gai-Gai

    2016-01-01

    DAF-16, the C. elegans FOXO transcription factor, is an important determinant in aging and longevity. In this work, we manually curated FOXODB http://lyh.pkmu.cn/foxodb/, a database of FOXO direct targets. It now covers 208 genes. Bioinformatics analysis on 109 DAF-16 direct targets in C. elegans found interesting results. (i) DAF-16 and transcription factor PQM-1 co-regulate some targets. (ii) Seventeen targets directly regulate lifespan. (iii) Four targets are involved in lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction. And (iv) DAF-16 direct targets might play global roles in lifespan regulation. PMID:27027346

  15. Towards understanding the lifespan extension by reduced insulin signaling: bioinformatics analysis of DAF-16/FOXO direct targets in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Gai-Gai

    2016-04-12

    DAF-16, the C. elegans FOXO transcription factor, is an important determinant in aging and longevity. In this work, we manually curated FOXODB http://lyh.pkmu.cn/foxodb/, a database of FOXO direct targets. It now covers 208 genes. Bioinformatics analysis on 109 DAF-16 direct targets in C. elegans found interesting results. (i) DAF-16 and transcription factor PQM-1 co-regulate some targets. (ii) Seventeen targets directly regulate lifespan. (iii) Four targets are involved in lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction. And (iv) DAF-16 direct targets might play global roles in lifespan regulation.

  16. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase is the molecular target of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    van Beek, E; Pieterman, E; Cohen, L; Löwik, C; Papapoulos, S

    1999-10-14

    Bisphosphonates (Bps), inhibitors of osteoclastic bone resorption, are used in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Recent evidence indicated that farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase and/or isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) isomerase is the intracellular target(s) of bisphosphonate action. To examine which enzyme is specifically affected, we determined the effect of different Bps on incorporation of [(14)C]mevalonate (MVA), [(14)C]IPP, and [(14)C]dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) into polyisoprenyl pyrophosphates in a homogenate of bovine brain. HPLC analysis revealed that the three intermediates were incorporated into FPP and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). In contrast to clodronate, the nitrogen-containing Bps (NBps), alendronate, risedronate, olpadronate, and ibandronate, completely blocked FPP and GGPP formation and induced in incubations with [(14)C]MVA a 3- to 5-fold increase in incorporation of label into IPP and/or DMAPP. Using a method that could distinguish DMAPP from IPP on basis of their difference in stability in acid, we found that none of the NBps affected the conversion of [(14)C]IPP into DMAPP, catalyzed by IPP isomerase, excluding this enzyme as target of NBp action. On the basis of these and our previous findings, we conclude that none of the enzymes up- or downstream of FPP synthase are affected by NBps, and FPP synthase is, therefore, the exclusive molecular target of NBp action.

  17. FIP200 regulates targeting of Atg16L1 to the isolation membrane.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Taki; Kaizuka, Takeshi; Cadwell, Ken; Sahani, Mayurbhai H; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo; Virgin, Herbert W; Mizushima, Noboru

    2013-03-01

    Autophagosome formation is a dynamic process that is strictly controlled by autophagy-related (Atg) proteins. However, how these Atg proteins are recruited to the autophagosome formation site or autophagic membranes remains poorly understood. Here, we found that FIP200, which is involved in proximal events, directly interacts with Atg16L1, one of the downstream Atg factors, in an Atg14- and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent manner. Atg16L1 deletion mutants, which lack the FIP200-interacting domain, are defective in proper membrane targeting. Thus, FIP200 regulates not only early events but also late events of autophagosome formation through direct interaction with Atg16L1.

  18. Robust Differences in p16-Dependent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Distant Metastasis: Implications for Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jaber, James J; Murrill, Lauren; Clark, Joseph I; Johnson, Jonas T; Feustel, Paul J; Mehta, Vikas

    2015-08-01

    Historically, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been earmarked a lymphatic malignancy. Recently, this has been called into question. Our study aims to (1) illustrate the robust differences in distant metastases between p16+ and p16- oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and (2) provide support that p16+ OPSCC has a predilection toward vasculature invasion and hematogenous spread. Multi-institutional, case series with chart review. Four academic institutions. Within a group of 1113 patients with primary OPSCC who received treatment between 1979 and 2013, those who developed distant metastasis (DM) were divided into 2 cohorts based on p16 status. Intergroup and intragroup univariate analysis was performed as well as descriptive analysis of end-organ sites. Of the 1058 patients included, 89 developed DM. Thirty were p16- and 59 were p16+. Of the p16- patients with DM, only 10% had disseminated disease (distant metastases at ≥2 sites) compared with 74% of p16+ patients. Distant disease in p16+ patients included brain, abdomen, and a distinct pattern of pulmonary metastases. Our large, multi-institutional study supports published reports that p16+ OPSCC metastasizes with a unique phenotype that is hematogenous and widely disseminated with atypical end-organ sites. Our data suggest that p16+ OPSCC has a predilection toward active vasculature invasion as evidenced by the results and illustrative radiologic and pathohistologic examples. These findings may have implications for future targeted therapy when treating p16+ OPSCC. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Approach for MicroRNA Target Prediction Based on 18O/16O Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuepo; Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Tegeler, Tony; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Zhang, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    MOTIVATION Among many large-scale proteomic quantification methods, 18O/16O labeling requires neither specific amino acid in peptides nor label incorporation through several cell cycles, as in metabolic labeling; it does not cause significant elution time shifts between heavy- and light-labeled peptides, and its dynamic range of quantification is larger than that of tandem mass spectrometry-based quantification methods. These properties offer 18O/16O labeling the maximum flexibility in application. However, 18O/16O labeling introduces large quantification variations due to varying labeling efficiency. There lacks a processing pipeline that warrants the reliable identification of differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). This motivates us to develop a quantitative proteomic approach based on 18O/16O labeling and apply it on Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) microRNA (miR) target prediction. KSHV is a human pathogenic γ-herpesvirus strongly associated with the development of B-cell proliferative disorders, including primary effusion lymphoma. Recent studies suggest that miRs have evolved a highly complex network of interactions with the cellular and viral transcriptomes, and relatively few KSHV miR targets have been characterized at the functional level. While the new miR target prediction method, photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP), allows the identification of thousands of miR targets, the link between miRs and their targets still cannot be determined. We propose to apply the developed proteomic approach to establish such links. METHOD We integrate several 18O/16O data processing algorithms that we published recently and identify the messenger RNAs of downregulated proteins as potential targets in KSHV miR-transfected human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Various statistical tests are employed for picking DEPs, and we select the best test by examining the enrichment of PAR-CLIP-reported targets with

  20. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 12 companies at 24 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2010. Sixty percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  1. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 25 plants in 16 states during 2012. Sixty-one percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states’ large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  2. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Potential New Targets for Improving Nitrogen Uptake and Utilization in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Massel, Karen; Campbell, Bradley C.; Mace, Emma S.; Tai, Shuaishuai; Tao, Yongfu; Worland, Belinda G.; Jordan, David R.; Botella, Jose R.; Godwin, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizers are a major agricultural input where more than 100 million tons are supplied annually. Cereals are particularly inefficient at soil N uptake, where the unrecovered nitrogen causes serious environmental damage. Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) is an important cereal crop, particularly in resource-poor semi-arid regions, and is known to have a high NUE in comparison to other major cereals under limited N conditions. This study provides the first assessment of genetic diversity and signatures of selection across 230 fully sequenced genes putatively involved in the uptake and utilization of N from a diverse panel of sorghum lines. This comprehensive analysis reveals an overall reduction in diversity as a result of domestication and a total of 128 genes displaying signatures of purifying selection, thereby revealing possible gene targets to improve NUE in sorghum and cereals alike. A number of key genes appear to have been involved in selective sweeps, reducing their sequence diversity. The ammonium transporter (AMT) genes generally had low allelic diversity, whereas a substantial number of nitrate/peptide transporter 1 (NRT1/PTR) genes had higher nucleotide diversity in domesticated germplasm. Interestingly, members of the distinct race Guinea margaritiferum contained a number of unique alleles, and along with the wild sorghum species, represent a rich resource of new variation for plant improvement of NUE in sorghum. PMID:27826302

  3. Targeting B16 tumors in vivo with peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan; Bekah, Devesh; Teodoro, Jose G.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide conjugation on the biodistribution of ultrasmall (2.7 nm) gold nanoparticles in mice bearing B16 melanoma allografts. Nanoparticles were delivered intravenously, and biodistribution was measured at specific timepoints by organ digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. All major organs were examined. Two peptides were tested: the cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD, which targets integrins); and a recently described peptide derived from the myxoma virus. We found the greatest specific tumor delivery using the myxoma peptide, with or without PEGylation. Un-PEGylated cRGD performed poorly, but PEGylated RGD showed a significant transient collection in the tumor. Liver and kidney were the primary targets of all constructs. None of the particles were able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although it was able to deliver Au to B16 cells, the myxoma peptide did not show any cytotoxic activity against these cells, in contrast to previous reports. These results indicate that the effect of passive targeting by PEGylation and active targeting by peptides can be independent or combined, and that they should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis when designing new nanosystems for targeted therapies. Both myxoma peptide and cRGD should be considered for specific targeting to melanoma, but a thorough investigation of the cytotoxicity of the myxoma peptide to different cell lines remains to be performed.

  4. Regulation of Differentiation of Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria by Microsymbiont Targeting of Plant Thioredoxin s1.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carolina Werner; Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Pierre, Olivier; Larousse, Marie; Benyamina, Sofiane; Lambert, Annie; Hopkins, Julie; Castella, Claude; Cazareth, Julie; Alloing, Geneviève; Boncompagni, Eric; Couturier, Jérémy; Mergaert, Peter; Gamas, Pascal; Rouhier, Nicolas; Montrichard, Françoise; Frendo, Pierre

    2017-01-23

    Legumes associate with rhizobia to form nitrogen (N2)-fixing nodules, which is important for plant fitness [1, 2]. Medicago truncatula controls the terminal differentiation of Sinorhizobium meliloti into N2-fixing bacteroids by producing defensin-like nodule-specific cysteine-rich peptides (NCRs) [3, 4]. The redox state of NCRs influences some biological activities in free-living bacteria, but the relevance of redox regulation of NCRs in planta is unknown [5, 6], although redox regulation plays a crucial role in symbiotic nitrogen fixation [7, 8]. Two thioredoxins (Trx), Trx s1 and s2, define a new type of Trx and are expressed principally in nodules [9]. Here, we show that there are four Trx s genes, two of which, Trx s1 and s3, are induced in the nodule infection zone where bacterial differentiation occurs. Trx s1 is targeted to the symbiosomes, the N2-fixing organelles. Trx s1 interacted with NCR247 and NCR335 and increased the cytotoxic effect of NCR335 in S. meliloti. We show that Trx s silencing impairs bacteroid growth and endoreduplication, two features of terminal bacteroid differentiation, and that the ectopic expression of Trx s1 in S. meliloti partially complements the silencing phenotype. Thus, our findings show that Trx s1 is targeted to the bacterial endosymbiont, where it controls NCR activity and bacteroid terminal differentiation. Similarly, Trxs are critical for the activation of defensins produced against infectious microbes in mammalian hosts. Therefore, our results suggest the Trx-mediated regulation of host peptides as a conserved mechanism among symbiotic and pathogenic interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Production of thin targets by implantation for the measurement of the 16O + 16O elastic scattering below the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Cruz, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Santos, C.; Luís, H.; Fonseca, M.; Jesus, A. P.

    2017-09-01

    In recent decades, the processes of fusion of 16O were studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, the theoretical calculations are unable to fit both elastic scattering cross sections and fusion S-factors. The use of 16O thin transmission targets is required to measure the elastic forward scattering 16O + 16O reaction. The areal density of the target must be high to maximize the reaction products yields, but not so high as to allow a correct calculation of the effective beam energy. Besides this, the target must withstand beam interactions without noticeable deterioration, and contaminants must be minimal. In this study, the production of thin targets is performed with an innovative technique. Beam characterization and preliminary spectrum for the elastic scattering are also presented, showing the suitability of these targets for the proposed reaction.

  6. (R)-Cysteate-nitrogen assimilation by Cupriavidus necator H16 with excretion of 3-sulfolactate: a patchwork pathway.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Jutta; Denger, Karin; Hollemeyer, Klaus; Schleheck, David; Cook, Alasdair M

    2012-11-01

    Cupriavidus necator H16 grew exponentially with (R)-cysteate, a structural analogue of aspartate, as sole source of nitrogen in succinate-salts medium. Utilization of cysteate was quantitative and concomitant with growth and with the excretion of the deaminated product (R)-sulfolactate, which was identified thoroughly. The deaminative pathway started with transport of (R)-cysteate into the cell, which we attributed to an aspartate transporter. Transamination to sulfopyruvate involved an aspartate/(R)-cysteate:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (Aoa/Coa) and regeneration of the amino group acceptor by NADP⁺-coupled glutamate dehydrogenase. Reduction of sulfopyruvate to (R)-sulfolactate was catalyzed by a (S)-malate/(R)-sulfolactate dehydrogenase (Mdh/Sdh). Excretion of the sulfolactate could be attributed to the sulfite/organosulfonate exporter TauE, which was co-encoded and co-expressed, with sulfoacetaldehyde acetyltransferase (Xsc), though Xsc was irrelevant to the current pathway. The metabolic enzymes could be assayed biochemically. Aoa/Coa and Mdh/Sdh were highly enriched by protein separation, partly characterized, and the relevant locus-tags identified by peptide-mass fingerprinting. Finally, RT-PCR was used to confirm the transcription of all appropriate genes. We thus demonstrated that Cupriavidus necator H16 uses a patchwork pathway by recruitment of 'housekeeping' genes and sulfoacetaldehyde-degradative genes to scavenge for (R)-cysteate-nitrogen.

  7. MicroRNA-16 suppresses the activation of inflammatory macrophages in atherosclerosis by targeting PDCD4

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, XUE; XU, ZHAO; YUAN, MENG; ZHANG, YUE; ZHAO, BO; WANG, JUNQIAN; ZHANG, AIXUE; LI, GUANGPING

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is involved in a number of bioprocesses, such as apoptosis and inflammation. However, its regulatory mechanisms in atherosclerosis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role and mechanisms of action of PDCD4 in high-fat diet-induced atherosclerosis in mice and in foam cells (characteristic pathological cells in atherosclerotic lesions) derived from ox-LDL-stimulated macrophages. MicroRNA (miR)-16 was predicted to bind PDCD4 by bioinformatics analysis. In the mice with atherosclerosis and in the foam cells, PDCD4 protein expression (but not the mRNA expression) was enhanced, while that of miR-16 was reduced. Transfection with miR-16 mimic decreased the activity of a luciferase reporter containing the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of PDCD4 in the macrophage-derived foam cells. Conversely, treatment with miR-16 inhibitor enhanced the luciferase activity. However, by introducing mutations in the predicted binding site located in the 3′UTR of PDCD4, the miR-16 mimic and inhibitor were unable to alter the level of PDCD4, suggesting that miR-16 is a direct negative regulator of PDCD4 in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, transfection wtih miR-16 mimic and siRNA targeting PDCD4 suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas it enhanced the secretion and mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory factor, IL-10. Treatment with miR-16 inhibitor exerted the opposite effects. In addition, the phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression were altered by miR-16. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the targeting of PDCD4 by miR-16 may suppress the activation of inflammatory macrophages though mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB signaling in atherosclerosis; thus, PDCD4 may prove to be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of

  8. Polypyrrole-based nitrogen-doped carbon replicas of SBA-15 and SBA-16 containing magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Jaroniec, Mietek; Liang, Chengdu

    2008-01-01

    Polypyrrole-based ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) were synthesized via chemical vapor infiltration of pyrrole into pores of the SBA-15 and SBA-16 silica templates containing iron(III) chloride catalyst (FeCl{sub 3}). After carbonization of polypyrrole at 800 C and etching of the silica templates with hydrofluoric acid solution, nitrogen-doped and graphitic OMCs with incorporated magnetic nanoparticles were obtained. These materials were analyzed by CHNS elemental analysis, thermogravimetry (TG), nitrogen adsorption, small and wide angle powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The resulting carbon replicas retained the crystallographic symmetry of the silica templates: namely, P6mm in the case of the SBA-15 template, and Im3m in the case of the SBA-16 template. The uniformity, size, and volume of ordered mesopores in the carbon replicas were affected by structural properties of the templates used as shown by analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms and pore size distributions. A better infiltration of carbon precursor was achieved for the templates with larger pores, which resulted in the carbon replicas of improved adsorption and structural properties. Elemental analysis revealed the presence of nitrogen in the carbon replicas studied in the range of 3-8 wt %, whereas TG analysis of the replica samples in air gave about 2-5% residue, which was identified as hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The presence of graphitic domains was confirmed by characteristic TG oxidation profile above 400 C, the D and G bands on the Raman spectra, and the intense reflections on the wide angle XRD patterns. Powder XRD also showed the presence of extra-framework magnetic iron ({alpha}-Fe) and iron carbide (Fe{sub 3}C) nanoparticles having crystallite size in the ranges of 40-80 and 20-40 nm, respectively. TEM images also revealed that these nanoparticles were larger than the carbon rods and pore widths of the SBA-15 carbon

  9. Epigenetic activation of a cryptic TBC1D16 transcript enhances melanoma progression by targeting EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Vizoso, Miguel; Ferreira, Humberto J; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Javier Carmona, F; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Girotti, Maria Romina; Villanueva, Alberto; Guil, Sonia; Moutinho, Catia; Liz, Julia; Portela, Anna; Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, August; Martinez-Iniesta, Maria; Manzano, Jose L; Fernandez-Figueras, Maria Teresa; Elez, Elena; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Berrocal, Alfonso; Pontén, Fredrik; van den Oord, Joost; Gallagher, William M; Frederick, Dennie T; Flaherty, Keith T; McDermott, Ultan; Lorigan, Paul; Marais, Richard; Esteller, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer-related deaths, and, among common tumor types, melanoma is one with great potential to metastasize. Here we study the contribution of epigenetic changes to the dissemination process by analyzing the changes that occur at the DNA methylation level between primary cancer cells and metastases. We found a hypomethylation event that reactivates a cryptic transcript of the Rab GTPase activating protein TBC1D16 (TBC1D16-47 kDa; referred to hereafter as TBC1D16-47KD) to be a characteristic feature of the metastatic cascade. This short isoform of TBC1D16 exacerbates melanoma growth and metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. By combining immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified RAB5C as a new TBC1D16 target and showed that it regulates EGFR in melanoma cells. We also found that epigenetic reactivation of TBC1D16-47KD is associated with poor clinical outcome in melanoma, while conferring greater sensitivity to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. PMID:26030178

  10. In vitro antigene therapy targeting HPV-16 E6 and E7 in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Madrigal, M; Janicek, M F; Sevin, B U; Perras, J; Estape, R; Peñalver, M; Averette, H E

    1997-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is believed to play a central role in cervical carcinogenesis. Specifically, two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, possess transforming ability and have been shown to interact with the cellular tumor suppressors p53 and p105, the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene product. To test the hypothesis that E6 and E7 play an active role in the maintenance of the malignant phenotype and may be ideal targets for antigene therapy, we tested the antiproliferative effects of phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (oligos) targeting HPV-16 E6 and E7 in cervical cancer cell lines and primary tumor explants. The ATP cell viability assay was used to measure growth effects of 27-mer antisense oligos targeting the ATG translational start region of HPV-16 E6 and E7 sequences in HPV-16-positive cell lines SiHa and CaSki and four advanced, primary cervical tumor explants. A random oligo sequence, an HPV-18-positive and HPV-negative cell line, one histologically confirmed endometrial and two ovarian tumors were used as negative controls. HPV type was confirmed by hybrid capture techniques. Cell lines and sterile (staging laparotomy) tumor cells were plated at 5000 cells/0.1 ml and 100,000 cells/0.5 ml in 96-well plates or soft agar, respectively, and incubated at 37 degrees C with a single treatment of oligos at 0-16 microM. E6/E7 combinations at a fixed ratio of 1:1 were used at 0-8 microM for each oligo. Cellular ATP was measured by luciferin/luciferase fluorescence on Day 6. HPV-16 E6 and E7 oligos showed antiproliferative effects in all HPV-16-positive cell lines and primary tumor explants (IC50s 6.9-9.5 microM for cell lines, 9.1-12.1 microM primary cervical tumors), while the HPV-negative C33-A cell line and HPV-18-positive cell line HeLa were relatively insensitive to the HPV-16 oligos (IC50s > 30 microM extrapolated). The endometrial and two ovarian primary tumors were also insensitive to the HPV E6 and E7 oligos (IC50s > 25 microM extrapolated). Random

  11. 16S Ribosomal DNA Characterization of Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria Isolated from Banana (Musa spp.) and Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril)

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães Cruz, Leonardo; Maltempi de Souza, Emanuel; Weber, Olmar Baler; Baldani, José Ivo; Döbereiner, Johanna; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from banana (Musa spp.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril) were characterized by amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Herbaspirillum seropedicae, Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans, Burkholderia brasilensis, and Burkholderia tropicalis were identified. Eight other types were placed in close proximity to these genera and other alpha and beta Proteobacteria. PMID:11319127

  12. 16S ribosomal DNA characterization of nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from banana (Musa spp.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril).

    PubMed

    Magalhães Cruz, L; de Souza, E M; Weber, O B; Baldani, J I; Döbereiner, J; Pedrosa, F de O

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from banana (Musa spp.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril) were characterized by amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Herbaspirillum seropedicae, Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans, Burkholderia brasilensis, and Burkholderia tropicalis were identified. Eight other types were placed in close proximity to these genera and other alpha and beta Proteobacteria.

  13. Increased sucrose level and altered nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic plants expressing antisense chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sahrawy, Mariam; Avila, Concepción; Chueca, Ana; Cánovas, Francisco M; López-Gorgé, Julio

    2004-12-01

    The pea chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) antisense construct reduced the endogenous level of expression of the corresponding Arabidopsis thaliana gene. The reduction of foliar FBPase activity in the transformants T(2) and T(3) generation ranged from 20% to 42%, and correlated with lower levels of FBPase protein. FBPase antisense plants displayed different phenotypes with a clear increase in leaf fresh weight. Measurements of photosynthesis revealed a higher carbon-assimilation rate. Decreased FBPase activity boosted the foliar carbohydrate contents, with a shift in the sucrose:starch ratio, which reached a maximum of 0.99 when the activity loss was 41%. Nitrate reductase activity decreased simultaneously with an increase in glutamine synthetase activity, which could be explained in terms of ammonium assimilation regulation by sugar content. These results suggest the role of FBPase as a key enzyme in CO(2) assimilation, and also in co-ordinating carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

  14. Targeting of endopeptidase 24.16 to different subcellular compartments by alternative promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Kato, A; Sugiura, N; Saruta, Y; Hosoiri, T; Yasue, H; Hirose, S

    1997-06-13

    Endopeptidase 24.16 or mitochondrial oligopeptidase, abbreviated here as EP 24.16 (MOP), is a thiol- and metal-dependent oligopeptidase that is found in multiple intracellular compartments in mammalian cells. From an analysis of the corresponding gene, we found that the distribution of the enzyme to appropriate subcellular locations is achieved by the use of alternative sites for the initiation of transcription. The pig EP 24.16 (MOP) gene spans over 100 kilobases and is organized into 16 exons. The core protein sequence is encoded by exons 5-16 which match perfectly with exons 2-13 of the gene for endopeptidase 24.15, another member of the thimet oligopeptidase family. These two sets of 11 exons share the same splice sites, suggesting a common ancestor. Multiple species of mRNA for EP 24.16 (MOP) were detected by the 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends and they were shown to have been generated from a single gene by alternative choices of sites for the initiation of transcription and splicing. Two types of transcript were prepared, corresponding to transcription from distal and proximal sites. Their expression in vitro in COS-1 cells indicated that they encoded two isoforms (long and short) which differed only at their amino termini: the long form contained a cleavable mitochondrial targeting sequence and was directed to mitochondria; the short form, lacking such a signal sequence, remained in the cytosol. The complex structure of the EP 24.16 (MOP) gene thus allows, by alternative promoter usage, a fine transcriptional regulation of coordinate expression, in the different subcellular compartments, of the two isoforms arising from a single gene.

  15. Modulation of microRNA-mRNA Target Pairs by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Mallory E.; Prasad, Nripesh; Griffiths, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The E6 and E7 proteins are the major oncogenic drivers encoded by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs). While many aspects of the transforming activities of these proteins have been extensively studied, there are fewer studies that have investigated how HPV E6/E7 expression affects the expression of cellular noncoding RNAs. The goal of our study was to investigate HPV16 E6/E7 modulation of cellular microRNA (miR) levels and to determine the potential consequences for cellular gene expression. We performed deep sequencing of small and large cellular RNAs in primary undifferentiated cultures of human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) with stable expression of HPV16 E6/E7 or a control vector. After integration of the two data sets, we identified 51 differentially expressed cellular miRs associated with the modulation of 1,456 potential target mRNAs in HPV16 E6/E7-expressing HFKs. We discovered that the degree of differential miR expression in HFKs expressing HPV16 E6/E7 was not necessarily predictive of the number of corresponding mRNA targets or the potential impact on gene expression. Additional analyses of the identified miR-mRNA pairs suggest modulation of specific biological activities and biochemical pathways. Overall, our study supports the model that perturbation of cellular miR expression by HPV16 E6/E7 importantly contributes to the rewiring of cellular regulatory circuits by the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 proteins that contribute to oncogenic transformation. PMID:28049151

  16. Interleukin 16- (IL-16-) Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Improves Detection of Ovarian Tumors in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Barua, Animesh; Yellapa, Aparna; Bahr, Janice M; Adur, Malavika K; Utterback, Chet W; Bitterman, Pincas; Basu, Sanjib; Sharma, Sameer; Abramowicz, Jacques S

    2015-01-01

    Limited resolution of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) scanning is a significant barrier to early detection of ovarian cancer (OVCA). Contrast agents have been suggested to improve the resolution of TVUS scanning. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of interleukin 16 (IL-16) by the tumor epithelium and microvessels increases in association with OVCA development and offers a potential target for early OVCA detection. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility of IL-16-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from ovarian tumors in hens, a model of spontaneous OVCA. Contrast agents were developed by conjugating biotinylated anti-IL-16 antibodies with streptavidin coated microbubbles. Enhancement of ultrasound signal intensity was determined before and after injection of contrast agents. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were processed for the detection of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. Compared with precontrast, contrast imaging enhanced ultrasound signal intensity significantly in OVCA hens at early (P < 0.05) and late stages (P < 0.001). Higher intensities of ultrasound signals in OVCA hens were associated with increased frequencies of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. These results suggest that IL-16-targeted contrast agents improve the visualization of ovarian tumors. The laying hen may be a suitable model to test new imaging agents and develop targeted anti-OVCA therapeutics.

  17. SU-E-J-142: Prompt Gamma Emission Measurements From a Passively Scattered Proton Beam On Targets Containing 16O, 12C and 14N

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyasugiththan, J; Peterson, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the prompt gamma emission from the important elements found in tissue ({sup 16}O,{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N) in a clinical passive-scatter treatment environment. Methods: The targets (composed of water, Perspex, graphite and liquid nitrogen) were irradiated with a 200 MeV passive-scatter proton beam and the discrete prompt gamma energy spectra was detected by a high resolution 2′ × 2′ LaBr. detector. In order to reduce the high level of radiation produced by the beam line elements, the detector was surrounded by 10 cm of lead to attenuate the scattered gamma-rays entering the detector with an extra 5 cm thick layer of lead added along the beam direction. A 10 cm thick collimator with a 5 cm × 10 cm rectangular opening was also used. Results: The prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were clearly identified as a Result of the inelastic nuclear reaction between the protons and the 16O atoms found in the water target. The 6.13 MeV peak was 5% higher than the peak at 4.44 MeV for the water target. The 4.44 MeV peak was the only identified emission in the prompt gamma energy spectra from the graphite target ({sup 12}C). The expected 2.313 MeV peak form the{sup 14}N (liquid nitrogen target) was identified, but the other expected {sup 14}N peaks could not be resolved. Conclusion: Prompt gamma measurements with a passive-scatter proton beam are possible, but the presence of a high amount of background radiation from the patient final collimator presents a challenge at the treatment isocenter. The prominent prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were identified from the water, Perspex and graphite targets. The prompt gammas from the liquid nitrogen target were difficult to see, but may not be significant in the in-vivo verification process.

  18. REVISED STELLAR PROPERTIES OF KEPLER TARGETS FOR THE QUARTER 1-16 TRANSIT DETECTION RUN

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Daniel; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Gaidos, Eric; García, Rafael A.; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoit; Torres, Guillermo; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Basu, Sarbani; Bedding, Timothy R.; Chaplin, William J.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Fleming, Scott W.; and others

    2014-03-01

    We present revised properties for 196,468 stars observed by the NASA Kepler mission and used in the analysis of Quarter 1-16 (Q1-Q16) data to detect and characterize transiting planets. The catalog is based on a compilation of literature values for atmospheric properties (temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) derived from different observational techniques (photometry, spectroscopy, asteroseismology, and exoplanet transits), which were then homogeneously fitted to a grid of Dartmouth stellar isochrones. We use broadband photometry and asteroseismology to characterize 11,532 Kepler targets which were previously unclassified in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We report the detection of oscillations in 2762 of these targets, classifying them as giant stars and increasing the number of known oscillating giant stars observed by Kepler by ∼20% to a total of ∼15,500 stars. Typical uncertainties in derived radii and masses are ∼40% and ∼20%, respectively, for stars with photometric constraints only, and 5%-15% and ∼10% for stars based on spectroscopy and/or asteroseismology, although these uncertainties vary strongly with spectral type and luminosity class. A comparison with the Q1-Q12 catalog shows a systematic decrease in radii of M dwarfs, while radii for K dwarfs decrease or increase depending on the Q1-Q12 provenance (KIC or Yonsei-Yale isochrones). Radii of F-G dwarfs are on average unchanged, with the exception of newly identified giants. The Q1-Q16 star properties catalog is a first step toward an improved characterization of all Kepler targets to support planet-occurrence studies.

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 Is a Target of MicroRNA-16 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Agra Andrieu, Noelia; Motiño, Omar; Mayoral, Rafael; Llorente Izquierdo, Cristina; Fernández-Alvarez, Ana; Boscá, Lisardo; Casado, Marta; Martín-Sanz, Paloma

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression has been detected in human hepatoma cell lines and in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, the contribution of COX-2 to the development of HCC remains controversial. COX-2 expression is higher in the non-tumoral tissue and inversely correlates with the differentiation grade of the tumor. COX-2 expression depends on the interplay between different cellular pathways involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. The aim of this work was to assess whether COX-2 could be regulated by microRNAs in human hepatoma cell lines and in human HCC specimens since these molecules contribute to the regulation of genes implicated in cell growth and differentiation. Our results show that miR-16 silences COX-2 expression in hepatoma cells by two mechanisms: a) by binding directly to the microRNA response element (MRE) in the COX-2 3′-UTR promoting translational suppression of COX-2 mRNA; b) by decreasing the levels of the RNA-binding protein Human Antigen R (HuR). Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-16 inhibits cell proliferation, promotes cell apoptosis and suppresses the ability of hepatoma cells to develop tumors in nude mice, partially through targeting COX-2. Moreover a reduced miR-16 expression tends to correlate to high levels of COX-2 protein in liver from patients affected by HCC. Our data show an important role for miR-16 as a post-transcriptional regulator of COX-2 in HCC and suggest the potential therapeutic application of miR-16 in those HCC with a high COX-2 expression. PMID:23226427

  20. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 16S rDNA for bacterial identification in empyema.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajniti; Kumari, Chhaya; Das, B K; Nath, Gopal

    2014-05-01

    Empyema in children causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, identification of organisms is a major concern. To detect bacterial pathogens in pus specimens of children with empyema by 16S rDNA nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and correlate it with culture and sensitivity. Sixty-six children admitted to the paediatric ward with a diagnosis of empyema were enrolled prospectively. Aspirated pus was subjected to cytochemical examination, culture and sensitivity, and nested PCR targeting 16S rDNA using a universal eubacterial primer. Mean (SD) age was 5·8 (1·8) years (range 1-13). Analysis of aspirated pus demonstrated total leucocyte count >1000×10(6)/L, elevated protein (≧20 g/L) and decreased glucose (≤2·2 mmol/L) in 80·3%, 98·5% and 100%, respectively. Gram-positive cocci were detected in 29 (43·9%) and Gram-negative bacilli in two patients. Nested PCR for the presence of bacterial pathogens was positive in 50·0%, compared with 36·3% for culture. 16S rDNA PCR improves rates of detection of bacteria in pleural fluid, and can detect bacterial species in a single assay as well as identifying unusual and unexpected causal agents.

  1. Specific 16S ribosomal RNA targeted oligonucleotide probe against Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M S; Rademaker, J L; Janse, J D; Akkermans, A D

    1993-11-01

    In this article we report on the polymerase chain reaction amplification of a partial 16S rRNA gene from the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. A partial sequence (about 400 base pairs) of the gene was determined that covered two variable regions important for oligonucleotide probe development. A specific 24mer oligonucleotide probe targeted against the V6 region of 16S rRNA was designed. Specificity of the probe was determined using dot blot hybridization. Under stringent conditions (60 degrees C), the probe hybridized with all 16 Cl. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus strains tested. Hybridization did not occur with 32 plant pathogenic and saprophytic bacteria used as controls under the same conditions. Under less stringent conditions (55 degrees C) the related Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. insidiosus, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. tesselarius also showed hybridization. At even lower stringency (40 degrees C), all Cl. michiganensis subspecies tested including Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis showed hybridization signal, suggesting that under these conditions the probe may be used as a species-specific probe for Cl. michiganensis.

  2. Comprehensive description of blood microbiome from healthy donors assessed by 16S targeted metagenomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Païssé, Sandrine; Valle, Carine; Servant, Florence; Courtney, Michael; Burcelin, Rémy; Amar, Jacques; Lelouvier, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the blood of healthy humans is not as sterile as previously supposed. The objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the microbiome present in different fractions of the blood of healthy individuals. The study was conducted in 30 healthy blood donors to the French national blood collection center (Établissement Français du Sang). We have set up a 16S rDNA quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay as well as a 16S targeted metagenomics sequencing pipeline specifically designed to analyze the blood microbiome, which we have used on whole blood as well as on different blood fractions (buffy coat [BC], red blood cells [RBCs], and plasma). Most of the blood bacterial DNA is located in the BC (93.74%), and RBCs contain more bacterial DNA (6.23%) than the plasma (0.03%). The distribution of 16S DNA is different for each fraction and spreads over a relatively broad range among donors. At the phylum level, blood fractions contain bacterial DNA mostly from the Proteobacteria phylum (more than 80%) but also from Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. At deeper taxonomic levels, there are striking differences between the bacterial profiles of the different blood fractions. We demonstrate that a diversified microbiome exists in healthy blood. This microbiome has most likely an important physiologic role and could be implicated in certain transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections. In this regard, the amount of 16S bacterial DNA or the microbiome profile could be monitored to improve the safety of the blood supply. © 2016 AABB.

  3. 16S rRNA-targeted polymerase chain reaction and oligonucleotide hybridization to screen for Azoarcus spp., grass-associated diazotrophs.

    PubMed

    Hurek, T; Burggraf, S; Woese, C R; Reinhold-Hurek, B

    1993-11-01

    Phylogenetic analyses after reverse transcriptase sequencing of 16S rRNA of nitrogen-fixing, grass-associated Azoarcus strains confirmed their affiliation to the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Strains representing three different species formed a phylogenetically coherent unit related to Rhodocyclus purpureus, with actual percent similarities among the three sequences ranging from 93.1 to 97.3%. Within variable regions V2 and V5, we found stretches of sequences considerably conserved within the genus Azoarcus but differing from most other gram-negative bacteria, with the specificity being enhanced when different regions were combined. Genus-specific primers selected from both regions amplified fragments from all but one Azoarcus species in polymerase chain reactions (PCR) but not from any reference strain tested. Primers of lesser specificity generated fragments from members of all five Azoarcus species as well as from some reference strains. Those unspecific amplifications could be differentiated by oligonucleotide hybridization, detecting only fragments generated from Azoarcus strains except strain 6a3, which represents the same group which could not be detected by genus-specific PCR. Thus we propose the application of PCR amplification with 16S rRNA-targeted, genus-specific primers in combination with hybridization of a 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide to PCR-generated fragments as diagnostic tests; this allows an initial screening for presence of members of the genus Azoarcus.

  4. 16S rRNA-targeted polymerase chain reaction and oligonucleotide hybridization to screen for Azoarcus spp., grass-associated diazotrophs.

    PubMed Central

    Hurek, T; Burggraf, S; Woese, C R; Reinhold-Hurek, B

    1993-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses after reverse transcriptase sequencing of 16S rRNA of nitrogen-fixing, grass-associated Azoarcus strains confirmed their affiliation to the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Strains representing three different species formed a phylogenetically coherent unit related to Rhodocyclus purpureus, with actual percent similarities among the three sequences ranging from 93.1 to 97.3%. Within variable regions V2 and V5, we found stretches of sequences considerably conserved within the genus Azoarcus but differing from most other gram-negative bacteria, with the specificity being enhanced when different regions were combined. Genus-specific primers selected from both regions amplified fragments from all but one Azoarcus species in polymerase chain reactions (PCR) but not from any reference strain tested. Primers of lesser specificity generated fragments from members of all five Azoarcus species as well as from some reference strains. Those unspecific amplifications could be differentiated by oligonucleotide hybridization, detecting only fragments generated from Azoarcus strains except strain 6a3, which represents the same group which could not be detected by genus-specific PCR. Thus we propose the application of PCR amplification with 16S rRNA-targeted, genus-specific primers in combination with hybridization of a 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide to PCR-generated fragments as diagnostic tests; this allows an initial screening for presence of members of the genus Azoarcus. Images PMID:7506895

  5. Synthesis of boron/nitrogen-incorporated diamond-like carbon films by pulsed laser deposition using nitrogen gas and a boron-containing graphite target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Hideki; Osozawa, Ryoichi; Mohnai, Yusuke; Nara, Yuki

    2017-10-01

    We have deposited boron/nitrogen-incorporated diamond-like carbon (B–N-DLC) films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using N2 gas and a B-containing graphite target, and compared the mechanical, tribological, electrical, and surface properties of the B–N-DLC films with those of pure DLC, boron-incorporated DLC (B-DLC), and nitrogen-incorporated DLC (N-DLC) films prepared by PLD. The B-DLC film had a much higher critical load than the pure DLC. The critical load of the B–N-DLC films became maximum at an optimum N2 pressure, which was higher than those of the pure DLC, B-DLC, and N-DLC films. The friction property in air was degraded by the N incorporation, whereas the B incorporation did not have a significant effect on the friction coefficient. The B–N-DLC films deposited at higher N2 pressures exhibited superhydrophilic wetting properties. The B–N-DLC films prepared at moderate N2 pressures had resistivities much less than that of the pure DLC film.

  6. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) An initial target cost. (ii) An initial target profit. (iii) An initial profit adjustment formula to... target cost and firm target profit will be negotiated (usually before delivery or shop completion of the..., the parties negotiate the firm target cost, giving consideration to cost experience under the...

  7. Global Analysis of Quorum Sensing Targets in the Intracellular Pathogen Brucella melitensis 16 M

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria use a regulatory process termed quorum sensing (QS) to produce and detect small diffusible molecules to synchronize gene expression within a population. In Gram-negative bacteria, the detection of, and response to, these molecules depends on transcriptional regulators belonging to the LuxR family. Such a system has been discovered in the intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis, a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis that remains a serious public health concern in countries were the disease is endemic. Genes encoding two LuxR-type regulators, VjbR and BabR, have been identified in the genome of B. melitensis 16 M. A ΔvjbR mutant is highly attenuated in all experimental models of infection tested, suggesting a crucial role for QS in the virulence of Brucella. At present, no function has been attributed to BabR. The experiments described in this report indicate that 5% of the genes in the B. melitensis 16 M genome are regulated by VjbR and/or BabR, suggesting that QS is a global regulatory system in this bacterium. The overlap between BabR and VjbR targets suggest a cross-talk between these two regulators. Our results also demonstrate that VjbR and BabR regulate many genes and/or proteins involved in stress response, metabolism, and virulence, including those potentially involved in the adaptation of Brucella to the oxidative, pH, and nutritional stresses encountered within the host. These findings highlight the involvement of QS as a major regulatory system in Brucella and lead us to suggest that this regulatory system could participate in the spatial and sequential adaptation of Brucella strains to the host environment. PMID:20387905

  8. MicroRNA-16 inhibits feto-maternal angiogenesis and causes recurrent spontaneous abortion by targeting vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongsheng; Lu, Hong; Huo, Zhenghao; Ma, Zhanbin; Dang, Jie; Dang, Wei; Pan, Lin; Chen, Jing; Zhong, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) is a common health problem that affects women of reproductive age. Recent studies have indicated that microRNAs are important factors in miscarriage. This study investigated the role of miR-16 in regulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and the pathogenesis of RSA. In this report, clinical samples revealed that miR-16 expression was significantly elevated in the villi and decidua of RSA patients. In vitro, miR-16 upregulation inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Conversely, the downregulation of miR-16 reversed these effects. In vivo, we demonstrated that abnormal miR-16 levels affect the weights of the placenta and embryo and the number of progeny and microvascular density, as well as cause recurrent abortions by controlling VEGF expression in pregnant mice. VEGF, a potential target gene of miR-16, was inversely correlated with miR-16 expression in the decidua of clinical samples. Furthermore, the luciferase reporter system demonstrated that miR-16 was found to directly downregulate the expression of VEGF by binding a specific sequence of its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Collectively, these data strongly suggest that miR-16 regulates placental angiogenesis and development by targeting VEGF expression and is involved in the pathogenesis of RSA. PMID:27748453

  9. MicroRNA-16 inhibits feto-maternal angiogenesis and causes recurrent spontaneous abortion by targeting vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongsheng; Lu, Hong; Huo, Zhenghao; Ma, Zhanbin; Dang, Jie; Dang, Wei; Pan, Lin; Chen, Jing; Zhong, Huijun

    2016-10-17

    Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) is a common health problem that affects women of reproductive age. Recent studies have indicated that microRNAs are important factors in miscarriage. This study investigated the role of miR-16 in regulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and the pathogenesis of RSA. In this report, clinical samples revealed that miR-16 expression was significantly elevated in the villi and decidua of RSA patients. In vitro, miR-16 upregulation inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Conversely, the downregulation of miR-16 reversed these effects. In vivo, we demonstrated that abnormal miR-16 levels affect the weights of the placenta and embryo and the number of progeny and microvascular density, as well as cause recurrent abortions by controlling VEGF expression in pregnant mice. VEGF, a potential target gene of miR-16, was inversely correlated with miR-16 expression in the decidua of clinical samples. Furthermore, the luciferase reporter system demonstrated that miR-16 was found to directly downregulate the expression of VEGF by binding a specific sequence of its 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR). Collectively, these data strongly suggest that miR-16 regulates placental angiogenesis and development by targeting VEGF expression and is involved in the pathogenesis of RSA.

  10. Magnetization enhancement due to incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content in (Co{sub 84}Zr{sub 16})N{sub x} nano-composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jitendra Akhtar, Jamil; Shukla, Rishabh; Bagri, Anita; Dhaka, Rajendra S.

    2016-01-15

    We report the magnetic, electronic, and structural properties of nano-composite (Co{sub 84}Zr{sub 16})N{sub x} or CZN films prepared by reactive co-sputter deposition method. As-deposited CZN films have shown enhancement in magnetization (M{sub s}) with incorporation of nitrogen content, which is related to the evolution of nano-composite phase. X-ray diffraction study has confirmed poly-crystalline growth of CZN films with fcc(331) and fcc(422) phases. High-resolution transmission electron microscope study reveals that CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Co nano-clusters, which are embedded in the nano-composite matrix. Photoemission measurements show the change in the intensity near the Fermi level most likely due to defects and shift in the core-levels binding energy with nitrogen concentration. Raman spectroscopy data show an increase in the intensity of the Raman lines with nitrogen concentration upto 20%. However, the intensity is significantly lower for 30% sample. This indicates that less nitrogen or defect states are being substituted into the lattice above 20% and is consistent with the observed magnetic behavior. Our studies indicate that defects induced due to the incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content play a key role to enhance the magnetization.

  11. Magnetization enhancement due to incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content in (Co84Zr16)Nx nano-composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jitendra; Shukla, Rishabh; Bagri, Anita; Dhaka, Rajendra S.; Akhtar, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    We report the magnetic, electronic, and structural properties of nano-composite (Co84Zr16)Nx or CZN films prepared by reactive co-sputter deposition method. As-deposited CZN films have shown enhancement in magnetization (Ms) with incorporation of nitrogen content, which is related to the evolution of nano-composite phase. X-ray diffraction study has confirmed poly-crystalline growth of CZN films with fcc(331) and fcc(422) phases. High-resolution transmission electron microscope study reveals that CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Co nano-clusters, which are embedded in the nano-composite matrix. Photoemission measurements show the change in the intensity near the Fermi level most likely due to defects and shift in the core-levels binding energy with nitrogen concentration. Raman spectroscopy data show an increase in the intensity of the Raman lines with nitrogen concentration upto 20%. However, the intensity is significantly lower for 30% sample. This indicates that less nitrogen or defect states are being substituted into the lattice above 20% and is consistent with the observed magnetic behavior. Our studies indicate that defects induced due to the incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content play a key role to enhance the magnetization.

  12. 48 CFR 52.216-16 - Incentive Price Revision-Firm Target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... final negotiated cost is equal to the total target cost, the adjustment is the total target profit. (ii) If the total final negotiated cost is greater than the total target cost, the adjustment is the total target profit, less _ percent of the amount by which the total final negotiated cost exceeds the...

  13. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) contract specifies a target cost, a target profit, a price ceiling (but not a profit ceiling or floor), and... established by applying the formula. When the final cost is less than the target cost, application of the formula results in a final profit greater than the target profit; conversely, when final cost is more...

  14. Characterization of metabolic states of Arabidopsis thaliana under diverse carbon and nitrogen nutrient conditions via targeted metabolomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeru; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2014-02-01

    Plant growth and metabolism are regulated in response to various environmental factors. To investigate modulations in plant metabolism by the combined action of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and other nutritional factors, we performed targeted metabolomic analysis using Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under 24 different conditions where the CO2 concentration, amounts and species of nitrogen source, and light intensity were modified. Our results indicate that both the biosynthesis of diverse metabolites and growth are promoted in proportion to the CO2 concentration at a wide range of CO2 levels, from ambient concentrations to an extremely high concentration (3,600 p.p.m.) of CO2. This suggests that A. thaliana has the potential to utilize effectively very high concentrations of CO2. On the other hand, ammonium (but not nitrate) supplied as an additional nitrogen source induced drastic alterations in metabolite composition, including increases in the contents of glucose, starch and several amino acids, and reductions in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle-related organic acid content under any CO2 conditions. Hierarchical clustering analysis using the metabolite profiles revealed that ammonium is a prominent factor determining metabolic status, while the CO2 concentration is not. However, ammonium-induced metabolic alterations were differently modified by high concentrations of CO2. Hence, our results imply that increases in CO2 concentration may differently influence plant metabolism depending on the nitrogen nutrient conditions.

  15. Design and application of specific 16S rDNA-targeted primers for assessing endophytic diversity in Dendrobium officinale using nested PCR-DGGE.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Zhou, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Sui-Juan; Liu, Wen-Hong; Hu, Xiu-Fang

    2013-11-01

    Novel specific 16S rDNA-targeted primers were successfully designed and applied to the characterization of endophytic diversity in Dendrobium officinale. Using the popular universal bacterial primers 27f/1492r, the fragments of chloroplast and mitochondrion 16S/18S rDNA were amplified from D. officinale. They shared high nucleotide identity with the chloroplast 16S rDNAs (99-100 %) and with the mitochondrion 18S rDNAs (93-100 %) from various plants, respectively, and both shared 73-86 % identities with the bacterial 16S rDNA sequences in GenBank. The current bacterial universal primers, including 27f/1492r, match well with the chloroplast and mitochondrion 16S/18S rDNAs, which accordingly renders these primers not useful for endophytic diversity analysis. Novel 16S rDNA-targeted primers fM1 (5'-CCGCGTGNRBGAHGAAGGYYYT-3') and rC5 (5'-TAATCCTGTTTGCTCC CCAC-3') were designed, which show good specificity compared to the 16S/18S rDNAs of D. officinale, and perfect universality within bacteria except for Cyanobacteria. The primers fM1/rC5, together with 515f-GC/rC5, which overlaps the whole V4 region of 16S rDNA, were subjected to nested polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) to analyze the diversity of endophytic bacteria in D. officinale from three different sources in China. The results showed diversities in roots and stems of the plants from all three locations. Altogether, 29 bands were identified as bacteria, with the dominant group being Proteobacteria and the dominant genus being Burkholderia, some of which commonly has the function of nitrogen fixation and thus may play potentially important roles in D. officinale. Therefore, the nested PCR-DGGE method based on the novel primers provides a good alternative for investigating the communities and roles of endophytes in D. officinale.

  16. Integration of general amino acid control and target of rapamycin (TOR) regulatory pathways in nitrogen assimilation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Staschke, Kirk A; Dey, Souvik; Zaborske, John M; Palam, Lakshmi Reddy; McClintick, Jeanette N; Pan, Tao; Edenberg, Howard J; Wek, Ronald C

    2010-05-28

    Two important nutrient-sensing and regulatory pathways, the general amino acid control (GAAC) and the target of rapamycin (TOR), participate in the control of yeast growth and metabolism during changes in nutrient availability. Amino acid starvation activates the GAAC through Gcn2p phosphorylation of translation factor eIF2 and preferential translation of GCN4, a transcription activator. TOR senses nitrogen availability and regulates transcription factors such as Gln3p. We used microarray analyses to address the integration of the GAAC and TOR pathways in directing the yeast transcriptome during amino acid starvation and rapamycin treatment. We found that GAAC is a major effector of the TOR pathway, with Gcn4p and Gln3p each inducing a similar number of genes during rapamycin treatment. Although Gcn4p activates a common core of 57 genes, the GAAC directs significant variations in the transcriptome during different stresses. In addition to inducing amino acid biosynthetic genes, Gcn4p in conjunction with Gln3p activates genes required for the assimilation of secondary nitrogen sources such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Gcn2p activation upon shifting to secondary nitrogen sources is suggested to occur by means of a dual mechanism. First, Gcn2p is induced by the release of TOR repression through a mechanism involving Sit4p protein phosphatase. Second, this eIF2 kinase is activated by select uncharged tRNAs, which were shown to accumulate during the shift to the GABA medium. This study highlights the mechanisms by which the GAAC and TOR pathways are integrated to recognize changing nitrogen availability and direct the transcriptome for optimal growth adaptation.

  17. Identification of Cold-Responsive miRNAs and Their Target Genes in Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Senlei; Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Zou, Yanmin; Chen, Liang; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    As a warm climate species, soybean is highly sensitive to chilling temperatures. Exposure to chilling temperatures causes a significant reduction in the nitrogen fixation rate in soybean plants and subsequent yield loss. However, the molecular basis for the sensitivity of soybean to chilling is poorly understood. In this study, we identified cold-responsive miRNAs in nitrogen-fixing nodules of soybean. Upon chilling, the expression of gma-miR397a, gma-miR166u and gma-miR171p was greatly upregulated, whereas the expression of gma-miR169c, gma-miR159b, gma-miR319a/b and gma-miR5559 was significantly decreased. The target genes of these miRNAs were predicted and validated using 5' complementary DNA ends (5'-RACE) experiments, and qPCR analysis identified putative genes targeted by the cold-responsive miRNAs in response to chilling temperatures. Taken together, our results reveal that miRNAs may be involved in the protective mechanism against chilling injury in mature nodules of soybean. PMID:25100171

  18. Proton induced gamma-ray production cross sections and thick-target yields for boron, nitrogen and silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Benoît; Mizohata, Kenichiro; Räisänen, Jyrki

    2016-07-01

    The excitation functions for the reactions 14N(p,p‧γ)14N, 28Si(p,p‧γ)28Si and 29Si(p,p‧γ)29Si were measured at an angle of 55° by bombarding a thin Si3N4 target with protons in the energy range of 3.6-6.9 MeV. The deduced γ-ray production cross section data is compared with available literature data relevant for ion beam analytical work. Thick-target γ-ray yields for boron, nitrogen and silicon were measured at 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 and 6.5 MeV proton energies utilizing thick BN and Si3N4 targets. The measured yield values are put together with available yield data found in the literature. The experimental yield data has been used to cross-check the γ-ray production cross section values by comparing them with calculated thick-target yields deduced from the present and literature experimental excitation curves. All values were found to be in reasonable agreement taking into account the experimental uncertainties.

  19. Stability of Nitrogen-Oxygen Cages N12O2, N14O2, N14O3, and N16O4

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Karleta D.

    2008-01-01

    Molecules consisting entirely of nitrogen have been studied extensively for their potential as high energy density materials (HEDM). However, many such molecules are too unstable to serve as practical energy sources. This has prompted many studies of molecules that are mostly nitrogen but which incorporate heteroatoms into the structure to provide additional stability. In the current study, cages of three-coordinate nitrogen are viewed as candidates for stabilization by insertion of oxygen atoms into the nitrogen framework. Cages of N12, N14, and N16 with four-membered rings are studied because four-membered rings have been previously shown to be a destabilizing influence. Insertion of oxygen atoms, which converts N-N bonds to N-O-N bonding groups, relieves ring strain and can potentially result in stable molecules. These molecules are studied by theoretical calculations, using Hartree-Fock and Moller-Plesset (MP3 and MP4) theories, to determine the dissociation energies of the molecules. The primary result of the study is that stable molecules can result from oxygen insertion, but that oxygen-oxygen proximity destabilizes the insertion products. PMID:16834183

  20. The sRNA NsiR4 is involved in nitrogen assimilation control in cyanobacteria by targeting glutamine synthetase inactivating factor IF7.

    PubMed

    Klähn, Stephan; Schaal, Christoph; Georg, Jens; Baumgartner, Desirée; Knippen, Gernot; Hagemann, Martin; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-11-10

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in biological nitrogen assimilation, is regulated in multiple ways in response to varying nitrogen sources and levels. Here we show a small regulatory RNA, NsiR4 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 4), which plays an important role in the regulation of GS in cyanobacteria. NsiR4 expression in the unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is stimulated through nitrogen limitation via NtcA, the global transcriptional regulator of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. NsiR4 is widely conserved throughout the cyanobacterial phylum, suggesting a conserved function. In silico target prediction, transcriptome profiling on pulse overexpression, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments using a heterologous reporter system showed that NsiR4 interacts with the 5'UTR of gifA mRNA, which encodes glutamine synthetase inactivating factor (IF)7. In Synechocystis, we observed an inverse relationship between the levels of NsiR4 and the accumulation of IF7 in vivo. This NsiR4-dependent modulation of gifA (IF7) mRNA accumulation influenced the glutamine pool and thus [Formula: see text] assimilation via GS. As a second target, we identified ssr1528, a hitherto uncharacterized nitrogen-regulated gene. Competition experiments between WT and an ΔnsiR4 KO mutant showed that the lack of NsiR4 led to decreased acclimation capabilities of Synechocystis toward oscillating nitrogen levels. These results suggest a role for NsiR4 in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria, especially for the adaptation to rapid changes in available nitrogen sources and concentrations. NsiR4 is, to our knowledge, the first identified bacterial sRNA regulating the primary assimilation of a macronutrient.

  1. Two Young MicroRNAs Originating from Target Duplication Mediate Nitrogen Starvation Adaptation via Regulation of Glucosinolate Synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana1[W

    PubMed Central

    He, Hua; Liang, Gang; Li, Yang; Wang, Fang; Yu, Diqiu

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential macronutrient required for plant growth and development. A number of genes respond to nitrogen starvation conditions. However, the functions of most of these nitrogen starvation-responsive genes are unclear. Our recent survey suggested that many microRNAs (miRNAs) are responsive to nitrogen starvation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we identified a new miRNA (miR5090) from the complementary transcript of the MIR826 gene. Further investigation uncovered that both miRNA genes recently evolved from the inverse duplication of their common target gene, ALKENYL HYDROXALKYL PRODUCING2 (AOP2). Similar to miR826, miR5090 is induced by nitrogen starvation. By contrast, the AOP2 transcript level was negatively correlated with miR826 and miR5090 under nitrogen starvation. GUS-fused AOP2 expression suggested that AOP2 was posttranscriptionally suppressed by miR826 and miR5090. miRNA transgenic plants with significantly low AOP2 expression accumulated fewer Met-derived glucosinolates, phenocopying the aop2 mutants. Most glucosinolate synthesis-associated genes were repressed under nitrogen starvation conditions. Furthermore, miRNA transgenic plants with less glucosinolate displayed enhanced tolerance to nitrogen starvation, including high biomass, more lateral roots, increased chlorophyll, and decreased anthocyanin. Meanwhile, nitrogen starvation-responsive genes were up-regulated in transgenic plants, implying improved nitrogen uptake activity. Our study reveals a mechanism by which Arabidopsis thaliana regulates the synthesis of glucosinolates to adapt to environmental changes in nitrogen availability. PMID:24367020

  2. 48 CFR 16.403-1 - Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... Fixed-price incentive (firm target) contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive (firm target... positive, calculable profit incentive for the contractor to control costs. (b) Application. A fixed-price...

  3. Targeting and Photodynamic Killing of Cancer Cell by Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Dioxide Coupled with Folic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jin; Pan, Xiaobo; Wang, Mengyan; Yao, Longfang; Liang, Xinyue; Ma, Jiong; Fei, Yiyan; Wang, Pei-Nan; Mi, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has attracted wide attention as a potential photosensitizer (PS) in photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, bare TiO2 can only be excited by ultraviolet illumination, and it lacks specific targeting ligands, which largely impede its application. In our study, we produced nitrogen-doped TiO2 and linked it with an effective cancer cell targeting agent, folic acid (FA), to obtain N-TiO2-FA nanoconjugates. Characterization of N-TiO2-FA included Zeta potential, absorption spectra and thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that N-TiO2-FA was successfully produced and it possessed better dispersibility in aqueous solution than unmodified TiO2. The N-TiO2-FA was incubated with human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (KB) and human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. The KB cells that overexpress folate receptors (FR) on cell membranes were used as FR-positive cancer cells, while A549 cells were used as FR-negative cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy results showed that KB cells had a higher uptake efficiency of N-TiO2-FA, which was about twice that of A549 cells. Finally, N-TiO2-FA is of no cytotoxicity, and has a better photokilling effect on KB cells under visible light irradiation. In conclusion, N-TiO2-FA can be as high-value as a PS in cancer targeting PDT.

  4. Uncertainties in critical loads and target loads of sulphur and nitrogen for European forests: analysis and quantification.

    PubMed

    Reinds, Gert Jan; de Vries, Wim

    2010-03-15

    An analysis of the uncertainties in critical loads and target loads of sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) for 182 European forest soils was carried out using the Very Simple Dynamic (VSD) model. The VSD model was calibrated with a Bayesian approach using prior probability functions for model parameters based on literature data, data from 200 Dutch forest sites and from simulated denitrification rates from a detailed ecosystem model. The calibration strongly improved the fit of the model to observed soil and soil solution concentrations, especially for pH and base saturation. Calibration also narrowed down the ranges in input parameters. The uncertainty analysis showed which parameters contribute most to the uncertainty in the critical loads and target loads. Base cation weathering and deposition and the parameters describing the H-Al equilibrium in the soil solution determine the uncertainty in the maximum critical loads for S, CL(max)(S), when based on the aluminium to base cation (Al/Bc) criterion. Uncertainty in CL(max)(S) based on an acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) criterion is completely determined by base cation inputs alone. The denitrification fraction is the most important source of uncertainty for the maximum critical loads of N, CL(max)(N). N uptake and N immobilisation determine the uncertainties in the critical load for N as a nutrient, CL(nut)(N). Calibration of VSD reduced the uncertainty: the coefficient of variation (CV) was reduced for all critical loads and criteria. After calibration, the CV for CL(max)(S) was below 0.4 for almost all plots; however for CL(max)(N) high values occurred for plots with high denitrification rates. Model calibration also improved the robustness of target load estimates: after calibration, no target loads were needed in any of the simulations for 40% of the plots, with the uncalibrated model there was a positive probability for the need of a target load for almost all plots.

  5. Evaluation of a new biocompatible poly(N-(morpholino ethyl methacrylate)-based copolymer for the delivery of ruthenium oligonucleotides, targeting HPV16 E6 oncogene.

    PubMed

    Reschner, Anca; Shim, Yong Ho; Dubois, Philippe; Delvenne, Philippe; Evrard, Brigitte; Marcélis, Lionel; Moucheron, Cécile; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée; Defrancq, Eric; Raes, Martine; Piette, Jacques; Collard, Laurence; Piel, Géraldine

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the use of a new biocompatible block copolymer poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-N-(morpholino)ethyl methacrylate (PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA) for the delivery of a particular antisense oligonucleotide targeting E6 gene from human papilloma virus. This antisense oligonucleotide was derivatized with a polyazaaromatic Ru(II) complex which, under visible illumination, is able to produce an irreversible crosslink with the complementary targeted sequence. The purpose of this study is to determine whether by the use of a suitable transfection agent, it is possible to increase the efficiency of the antisense oligonucleotide targeting E6 gene, named Ru-P-4. In a recent study, we showed that Oligofectamine transfected Ru-P-4 antisense oligonucleotide failed to inhibit efficiently the growth of cervical cancer cell line SiHa, contrarily to the Ru-P-6 antisense oligonucleotide, another sequence also targeting the E6 gene. The ability of PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA to form polyplexes with optimal physicochemical characteristics was investigated first. Then the ability of the PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA/Ru-P-4 antisense oligonucleotide polyplexes to transfect two keratinocyte cell lines (SiHa and HaCat) and the capacity of polyplexes to inhibit HPV16+ cervical cancer cell growth was evaluated. PDMAEMA-b-PMEMA base polyplexes at the optimal molar ratio of polymer nitrogen atoms to DNA phosphates (N/P), were able to deliver Ru-P-4 antisense oligonucleotide and to induce a higher growth inhibition in human cervical cancer SiHa cells, compared to other formulations based on Oligofectamine.

  6. Targeting Cancer Cells with Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species Generated by Atmospheric-Pressure Air Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH−, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells. PMID:24465942

  7. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  8. Targeting of HPV-16+ epithelial cancer cells by TCR gene engineered T cells directed against E6

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Lindsey M.; Kwong, Mei Li; Gros, Alena; Stevanović, Sanja; Tran, Eric; Kerkar, Sid; Raffeld, Mark; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hinrichs, Christian S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV-associated epithelial cancers are in principle ideal immunotherapeutic targets, but evidence that T cells specific for these antigens can recognize and kill HPV+ tumor cells is limited. We sought to determine if TCR gene engineered T cells directed against an HPV oncoprotein can successfully target HPV+ tumor cells. Experimental design T cell responses against the HPV-16 oncoproteins were investigated in a patient with an ongoing 22-month disease-free interval after her second resection of distant metastatic anal cancer. T cells genetically engineered to express an oncoprotein-specific TCR from this patient’s tumor-infiltrating T cells were tested for specific reactivity against HPV+ epithelial tumor cells. Results We identified, from an excised metastatic anal cancer tumor, T cells that recognized an HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitope of HPV-16 E6. The frequency of the dominant T cell clonotype from these cells was approximately 400-fold greater in the patient’s tumor than in her peripheral blood. T cells genetically engineered to express the TCR from this clonotype displayed high avidity for an HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitope of HPV-16, and they showed specific recognition and killing of HPV-16+ cervical, and head and neck cancer cell lines. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that HPV-16+ tumors can be targeted by E6-specific TCR gene engineered T cells, and they provide the foundation for a novel cellular therapy directed against HPV-16+ malignancies including cervical, oropharyngeal, anal, vulvar, vaginal, and penile cancers. PMID:26429982

  9. miR-15 and miR-16 induce apoptosis by targeting BCL2.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Amelia; Calin, George Adrian; Fabbri, Muller; Iorio, Marilena V; Ferracin, Manuela; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Wojcik, Sylwia E; Aqeilan, Rami I; Zupo, Simona; Dono, Mariella; Rassenti, Laura; Alder, Hansjuerg; Volinia, Stefano; Liu, Chang-Gong; Kipps, Thomas J; Negrini, Massimo; Croce, Carlo M

    2005-09-27

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common human leukemia and is characterized by predominantly nondividing malignant B cells overexpressing the antiapoptotic B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) protein. miR-15a and miR-16-1 are deleted or down-regulated in the majority of CLLs. Here, we demonstrate that miR-15a and miR-16-1 expression is inversely correlated to Bcl2 expression in CLL and that both microRNAs negatively regulate Bcl2 at a posttranscriptional level. BCL2 repression by these microRNAs induces apoptopsis in a leukemic cell line model. Therefore, miR-15 and miR-16 are natural antisense Bcl2 interactors that could be used for therapy of Bcl2-overexpressing tumors.

  10. Dynamics of 16,18O-induced reactions using Ni, Ge and Mo targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajni; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2016-11-01

    Dynamical cluster decay model (DCM) based on the collective clusterization approach is employed to explore the dynamics of various even-mass Zr isotopes formed in 16O-induced reactions. In reference to the measured fusion cross-section data, various decay modes contributing towards 86,88,90,92Zr∗ nuclei are investigated. Also, the role of deformations and orientation degree of freedom is analyzed by comparing results with spherical choice of fragmentation. In addition to this, the effect of entrance channel is explored for 92Zr∗ and 76Kr∗ nuclei formed in 16O and 18O-induced reactions. Besides this, the dynamics of relatively heavier mass Sn isotopes is exercised using 16O and 18O projectiles. The DCM calculated decay cross-sections find good agreement with available experimental data.

  11. Identification of a New Target of miR-16, Vacuolar Protein Sorting 4a

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Brian; Mackey, Aaron J.; Carlson, Marjorie; Ramakrishnan, Sundaram; Walek, Dinesha; Gupta, Manu; Mitchell, Adam; Eckman, Peter; John, Ranjit; Ashley, Euan; Barton, Paul J.; Hall, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The rationale was to utilize a bioinformatics approach to identify miRNA binding sites in genes with single nucleotide mutations (SNPs) to discover pathways in heart failure (HF). Objective The objective was to focus on the genes containing miRNA binding sites with miRNAs that were significantly altered in end-stage HF and in response to a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Methods and Results BEDTools v2.14.3 was used to discriminate SNPs within predicted 3′UTR miRNA binding sites. A member of the miR-15/107 family, miR-16, was decreased in the circulation of end-stage HF patients and increased in response to a LVAD (p<0.001). MiR-16 decreased Vacuolar Protein Sorting 4a (VPS4a) expression in HEK 293T cells (p<0.01). The SNP rs16958754 was identified in the miR-15/107 family binding site of VPS4a which abolished direct binding of miR-16 to the 3′UTR of VPS4a (p<0.05). VPS4a was increased in the circulation of end-stage HF patients (p<0.001), and led to a decrease in the number of HEK 293T cells in vitro (p<0.001). Conclusions We provide evidence that miR-16 decreases in the circulation of end-stage HF patients and increases with a LVAD. Modeling studies suggest that miR-16 binds to and decreases expression of VPS4a. Overexpression of VPS4a decreases cell number. Together, these experiments suggest that miR-16 and VPS4a expression are altered in end-stage HF and in response to unloading with a LVAD. This signaling pathway may lead to reduced circulating cell number in HF. PMID:25033200

  12. Nitrogen isotopes in the recent solar wind from the analysis of genesis targets: evidence for large scale isotope heterogeneity in the nascent solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, Roger C; Marty, Bernard; Zimmermann, Laurent; Burnard, Peter G; Burnett, Donald L; Heber, Veronika S; Wieler, Rainer; Bochsler, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen, the fifth most abundant element in the universe, displays the largest stable isotope variations in the solar system reservoirs after hydrogen. Yet the value of isotopic composition of solar nitrogen, presumably the best proxy of the protosolar nebula composition, is not known. Nitrogen isotopes trapped in Genesis spacecraft target material indicate a 40 % depletion of {sup 15}N in solar wind N relative to inner planets and meteorites, and define a composition for the present-day Sun undistinguishable from that of Jupiter's atmosphere. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of of nitrogen in the outer convective zone of the Sun (OCZ) has not changed through time, and is representative of the protosolar nebula. Large {sup 15}N enrichments during e.g., irradiation, or contributions from {sup 15}N-rich presolar components, are required to account for planetary values.

  13. Sprouty1, a new target of the angiostatic agent 16K prolactin, negatively regulates angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Disorganized angiogenesis is associated with several pathologies, including cancer. The identification of new genes that control tumor neovascularization can provide novel insights for future anti-cancer therapies. Sprouty1 (SPRY1), an inhibitor of the MAPK pathway, might be one of these new genes. We identified SPRY1 by comparing the transcriptomes of untreated endothelial cells with those of endothelial cells treated by the angiostatic agent 16 K prolactin (16 K hPRL). In the present study, we aimed to explore the potential function of SPRY1 in angiogenesis. Results We confirmed 16 K hPRL induced up-regulation of SPRY1 in primary endothelial cells. In addition, we demonstrated the positive SPRY1 regulation in a chimeric mouse model of human colon carcinoma in which 16 K hPRL treatment was shown to delay tumor growth. Expression profiling by qRT-PCR with species-specific primers revealed that induction of SPRY1 expression by 16 K hPRL occurs only in the (murine) endothelial compartment and not in the (human) tumor compartment. The regulation of SPRY1 expression was NF-κB dependent. Partial SPRY1 knockdown by RNA interference protected endothelial cells from apoptosis as well as increased endothelial cell proliferation, migration, capillary network formation, and adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. SPRY1 knockdown was also shown to affect the expression of cyclinD1 and p21 both involved in cell-cycle regulation. These findings are discussed in relation to the role of SPRY1 as an inhibitor of ERK/MAPK signaling and to a possible explanation of its effect on cell proliferation. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that SPRY1 is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. PMID:20813052

  14. Membrane targeting of MnSOD is essential for oxidative stress tolerance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC7120 encodes for a membrane-targeted 30 kDa Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and a cytosolic FeSOD. The MnSOD is post-translationally processed to 27 and 24 kDa forms in the cytosol and periplasm/thylakoid lumen. The extent of cleavage of signal and linker peptides at the N-terminus is dependent on the availability of combined nitrogen during growth. While the 24 and 27 kDa forms are present in near equal proportions under nitrogen-fixing conditions, the 24 kDa form is predominant under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Individual contribution of these forms of MnSOD to total oxidative stress tolerance was analysed using recombinant Anabaena strains overexpressing either different molecular forms of MnSOD or MnSOD defective in the cleavage of signal/linker peptide. Targeting of MnSOD to the membrane and subsequent cleavage to release both the 24 and 27 kDa forms was essential for oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-fixing conditions. On the other hand, the cleavage of linker peptide was absolutely essential and the release of cytosolic 24 kDa form of MnSOD was obligatory for developing oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Thus, a single MnSOD caters to the reduction of superoxide radical in both cytosol and thylakoid lumen/periplasm irrespective of the N-status of growth by regulating its cleavage. This is the first report on the physiological advantage of membrane-targeting and processing of MnSOD in either bacteria or plants. The higher oxidative stress tolerance offered by the cytosolic form of MnSOD has possibly resulted in retention of only the cytosolic form in bacterial non-nitrogen-fixers during evolution.

  15. 48 CFR 16.403-2 - Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... Fixed-price incentive (successive targets) contracts. (a) Description. (1) A fixed-price incentive... parties have two alternatives, as follows: (i) They may negotiate a firm fixed price, using the firm...

  16. Targeting binding partners of the CBFβ-SMMHC fusion protein for the treatment of inversion 16 acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, R. Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Inversion of chromosome 16 (inv(16)) generates the CBFβ-SMMHC fusion protein and is found in nearly all patients with acute myeloid leukemia subtype M4 with Eosinophilia (M4Eo). Expression of CBFβ-SMMHC is causative for leukemia development, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its activity are unclear. Recently, there have been important advances in defining the role of CBFβ-SMMHC and its binding partners, the transcription factor RUNX1 and the histone deacetylase HDAC8. Importantly, initial trials demonstrate that small molecules targeting these binding partners are effective against CBFβ-SMMHC induced leukemia. This review will discuss recent advances in defining the mechanism of CBFβ-SMMHC activity, as well as efforts to develop new therapies for inv(16) AML. PMID:27542261

  17. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive π+ and π– electroproduction with 1.6- to 5.7-GeV electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Bosted, P. E.; Biselli, A. S.; Careccia, S.; ...

    2016-11-01

    Here, beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries in exclusive π+ and quasiexclusive π– electroproduction were obtained from scattering of 1.6- to 5.7-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from longitudinally polarized protons (for π+) and deuterons (for π–) using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The kinematic range covered is 1.1 < W < 2.6 GeV and 0.05 < Q2 < 5GeV2, with good angular coverage in the forward hemisphere. The asymmetry results were divided into approximately 40 000 kinematic bins for π+ from free protons and 15 000 bins for π– production from bound nucleons in the deuteron.more » The present results are found to be in reasonable agreement with fits to previous world data for W < 1.7 GeV and Q2 < 0.5GeV2, with discrepancies increasing at higher values of Q2, especially for W > 1.5 GeV. Very large target-spin asymmetries are observed for W > 1.6 GeV. When combined with cross-section measurements, the present results can provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.3 GeV.« less

  18. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive π+ and π- electroproduction with 1.6- to 5.7-GeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosted, P. E.; Biselli, A. S.; Careccia, S.; Dodge, G.; Fersch, R.; Guler, N.; Kuhn, S. E.; Pierce, J.; Prok, Y.; Zheng, X.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, Ivana; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries in exclusive π+ and quasiexclusive π- electroproduction were obtained from scattering of 1.6- to 5.7-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from longitudinally polarized protons (for π+) and deuterons (for π-) using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The kinematic range covered is 1.1 1.5 GeV. Very large target-spin asymmetries are observed for W >1.6 GeV. When combined with cross-section measurements, the present results can provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.3 GeV.

  19. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus,B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. PMID:24532571

  20. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns.

    PubMed

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-04-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Proton emission from thin hydrogenated targets irradiated by laser pulses at 10(16) W∕cm2.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, L; Giuffrida, L; Cutroneo, M; Cirrone, P; Picciotto, A; Krasa, J; Margarone, D; Velyhan, A; Laska, L; Ullschmied, J; Wolowski, J; Badziak, J; Rosinski, M

    2012-02-01

    The iodine laser at PALS Laboratory in Prague, operating at 1315 nm fundamental harmonics and at 300 ps FWHM pulse length, is employed to irradiate thin hydrogenated targets placed in vacuum at intensities on the order of 10(16) W∕cm(2). The laser-generated plasma is investigated in terms of proton and ion emission in the forward and backward directions. The time-of-flight technique, using ion collectors and semiconductor detectors, is used to measure the ion currents and the corresponding velocities and energies. Thomson parabola spectrometer is employed to separate the contribution of the ion emission from single laser shots. A particular attention is given to the proton production in terms of the maximum energy, emission yield, and angular distribution as a function of the laser energy, focal position, target thickness, and composition. Metallic and polymeric targets allow to generate protons with large energy range and different yield, depending on the laser, target composition, and target geometry properties.

  2. Ribosomal RNA gene detection and targeted culture of novel nitrogen-responsive fungal taxa from temperate pine forest soil.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Cedar Nelson; Torres-Cruz, Terry; Billingsley Tobias, Terri L; Al-Matruk, Maryam; Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2016-09-12

    Soil fungal communities are responsible for carbon and nitrogen (N) cycling. The high complexity of the soil fungal community and the high proportion of taxonomically unidentifiable sequences confound ecological interpretations in field studies because physiological information is lacking for many organisms known only by their rRNA sequences. This situation forces experimental comparisons to be made at broader taxonomic racks where functions become difficult to infer. The objective of this study was to determine OTU (operational taxonomic units) level responses of the soil fungal community to N enrichment in a temperate pine forest experiment and to use the sequencing data to guide culture efforts of novel N-responsive fungal taxa. Replicate samples from four soil horizons (up to 10 cm depth) were obtained from ambient, enriched CO2 and N-fertilization plots. Through a fungal large subunit rRNA gene (LSU) sequencing survey, we identified two novel fungal clades that were abundant in our soil sampling (representing up to 27% of the sequences in some samples) and responsive to changes in soil N. The two N-responsive taxa with no predicted taxonomic association were targeted for isolation and culturing from specific soil samples where their sequences were abundant. Representatives of both OTUs were successfully cultured using a filtration approach. One taxon (OTU6) was most closely related to Saccharomycotina; the second taxon (OTU69) was most closely related to Mucoromycotina. Both taxa likely represent novel species. This study shows how observation of specific OTUs level responses to altered N status in a large rRNA gene field survey provided the impetus to design targeted culture approaches for isolation of novel N-responsive fungal taxa.

  3. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of nitrogen-containing macrocyclic bisbibenzyl derivatives as potent anticancer agents by targeting the lysosome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Liu, Jun; Gao, Yun; Zheng, Hong-Bo; Li, Lin; Hu, Qing-Wen; Yuan, Hui-Qing; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2017-08-18

    A series of novel nitrogen-containing macrocyclic bisbibenzyl derivatives was designed, synthesized, and evaluated for antiproliferative activity against three anthropic cancer cell lines. Among these novel molecules, the tri-O-alkylated compound 18a displayed the most potent anticancer activity against the A549, MCF-7, and k562 cancer cell lines, with IC50 values of 0.51, 0.23, and 0.19 μM, respectively, which were obviously superior to those of the parent compound riccardin D, and were 3-10-fold better than those of the clinical used drug ADR. The bis-Mannich derivative 11b also exhibited significantly enhanced antiproliferative potency, with submicromolar IC50 values. Structure-activity relationship analyses of these newly synthesized compounds were also performed. Mechanistic studies indicated that these compounds could target the lysosome to induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and could also induce cell death that displayed features characteristic of both apoptosis and necrosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Reaction cross section for solar flare neutrinos with Cl-37 and O-16 targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Kohyama, Y.; Kubodera, K.; Kuramoto, T.

    1989-02-01

    Neutrino reaction cross sections are calculated for Cl-37 (electron neutrino, electron) Ar-37 and electron neutrino + O-16 yields electron + anything for the neutrino energy range 50-200 MeV. If the excess neutrino captures observed in the Davis experiment, which seem to correspond to the period during which large solar flares were recorded, are ascribed to the solar-flare neutrinos, 5000 (300) recoil electron events are expected in a 1000-ton water Cerenkov detector, if neutrino energy is 100 (50) MeV. Such detectors have a sensitivity to monitor the solar-flare neutrino event to the level of the maximum theoretical estimate for the flare neutrino flux. 22 refs.

  5. Targeted search for anticancer drugs--CNIO cancer conference. 16-18 March, Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Lacal, Juan-Carlos; Carnero, Amancio

    2003-05-01

    The Spanish National Cancer Center has launched a new series of cancer conferences devoted to timely themes in oncology. These meetings aim to bring together a maximum of 50 participants, including 20 to 25 speakers along with 25 to 30 participants for in-depth discussion of new results and ideas in frontline cancer research. There is no registration fee to attend, but participants must organize their own travel and accommodation expenses; free communications are presented as posters, but a few may be selected for short (15 min) oral presentations. This particular meeting was organized by Amancio Carnero and David H Beach, and was mostly devoted to state of the art methodologies for the identification of new targets for anticancer drug design, although the development of novel drugs was also discussed.

  6. Pulmonary Effects of Eight Hours Underwater Breathing 1.35 ATM Oxygen: 100% Oxygen or 16% Nitrogen, 84% Oxygen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    absorption atelectasis is not a factor in most pulmonary oxygen toxicity signs and symptoms after eight hours underwater while breathing oxygen at a...partial pressure of 1.35 atm, or 16% N2 is not sufficient to prevent it. Minor absorption atelectasis probably did occur during these dives; immersion...during oxygen breathing has been shown to reduce vital capacity significantly after two hours, probably because of atelectasis in dependent alveoli

  7. The Ascaris suum nicotinic receptor, ACR-16, as a drug target: Four novel negative allosteric modulators from virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fudan; Robertson, Alan P.; Abongwa, Melanie; Yu, Edward W.; Martin, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections in humans and livestock cause significant debility, reduced productivity and economic losses globally. There are a limited number of effective anthelmintic drugs available for treating helminths infections, and their frequent use has led to the development of resistance in many parasite species. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic drugs for treating these parasites. We have chosen the ACR-16 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Ascaris suum (Asu-ACR-16), as a drug target and have developed three-dimensional models of this transmembrane protein receptor to facilitate the search for new bioactive compounds. Using the human α7 nAChR chimeras and Torpedo marmorata nAChR for homology modeling, we defined orthosteric and allosteric binding sites on the Asu-ACR-16 receptor for virtual screening. We identified four ligands that bind to sites on Asu-ACR-16 and tested their activity using electrophysiological recording from Asu-ACR-16 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The four ligands were acetylcholine inhibitors (SB-277011-A, IC50, 3.12 ± 1.29 μM; (+)-butaclamol Cl, IC50, 9.85 ± 2.37 μM; fmoc-1, IC50, 10.00 ± 1.38 μM; fmoc-2, IC50, 16.67 ± 1.95 μM) that behaved like negative allosteric modulators. Our work illustrates a structure-based in silico screening method for seeking anthelmintic hits, which can then be tested electrophysiologically for further characterization. PMID:27054065

  8. The Ascaris suum nicotinic receptor, ACR-16, as a drug target: Four novel negative allosteric modulators from virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fudan; Robertson, Alan P; Abongwa, Melanie; Yu, Edward W; Martin, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections in humans and livestock cause significant debility, reduced productivity and economic losses globally. There are a limited number of effective anthelmintic drugs available for treating helminths infections, and their frequent use has led to the development of resistance in many parasite species. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic drugs for treating these parasites. We have chosen the ACR-16 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Ascaris suum (Asu-ACR-16), as a drug target and have developed three-dimensional models of this transmembrane protein receptor to facilitate the search for new bioactive compounds. Using the human α7 nAChR chimeras and Torpedo marmorata nAChR for homology modeling, we defined orthosteric and allosteric binding sites on the Asu-ACR-16 receptor for virtual screening. We identified four ligands that bind to sites on Asu-ACR-16 and tested their activity using electrophysiological recording from Asu-ACR-16 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The four ligands were acetylcholine inhibitors (SB-277011-A, IC50, 3.12 ± 1.29 μM; (+)-butaclamol Cl, IC50, 9.85 ± 2.37 μM; fmoc-1, IC50, 10.00 ± 1.38 μM; fmoc-2, IC50, 16.67 ± 1.95 μM) that behaved like negative allosteric modulators. Our work illustrates a structure-based in silico screening method for seeking anthelmintic hits, which can then be tested electrophysiologically for further characterization.

  9. Nitrogen Source Activates TOR (Target of Rapamycin) Complex 1 via Glutamine and Independently of Gtr/Rag Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Stracka, Daniele; Jozefczuk, Szymon; Rudroff, Florian; Sauer, Uwe; Hall, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary conserved TOR complex 1 (TORC1) activates cell growth in response to nutrients. In yeast, TORC1 responds to the nitrogen source via a poorly understood mechanism. Leucine, and perhaps other amino acids, activates TORC1 via the small GTPases Gtr1 and Gtr2, orthologs of the mammalian Rag GTPases. Here we investigate the activation of TORC1 by the nitrogen source and how this might be related to TORC1 activation by Gtr/Rag. The quality of the nitrogen source, as defined by its ability to promote growth and glutamine accumulation, directly correlates with its ability to activate TORC1 as measured by Sch9 phosphorylation. Preferred nitrogen sources stimulate rapid, sustained Sch9 phosphorylation and glutamine accumulation. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis reduces TORC1 activity and growth. Poor nitrogen sources stimulate rapid but transient Sch9 phosphorylation. A Gtr1 deficiency prevents the transient stimulation of TORC1 but does not affect the sustained TORC1 activity in response to good nitrogen sources. These findings suggest that the nitrogen source must be converted to glutamine, the preferred nitrogen source in yeast, to sustain TORC1 activity. Furthermore, sustained TORC1 activity is independent of Gtr/Rag. Thus, the nitrogen source and Gtr/Rag activate TORC1 via different mechanisms. PMID:25063813

  10. Novel 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-ones as potential anticancer agents targeting Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Montoir, David; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Tonnerre, Alain; Juin, Philippe; Duflos, Muriel; Bazin, Marc-Antoine

    2016-08-25

    Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent chaperone known to be overexpressed in many cancers. This way, Hsp90 is an important target for drug discovery. Novobiocin, an aminocoumarin antibiotic, was reported to inhibit Hsp90 targeting C-terminal domain, and showed anti-proliferative properties, leading to the development of new and more active compounds. Consequently, a new set of novobiocin analogs derived from 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one scaffold was designed, synthesized and evaluated against two breast cancer cell lines. Subsequently, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were conducted on best candidates, finally Western Blot analysis was performed to measure their ability to induce degradation of Hsp90 client proteins.

  11. Yeast β-1,6-Glucan Is a Primary Target for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lukša, Juliana; Podoliankaitė, Monika; Vepštaitė, Iglė; Strazdaitė-Žielienė, Živilė; Urbonavičius, Jaunius

    2015-01-01

    Certain Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains secrete different killer proteins of double-stranded-RNA origin. These proteins confer a growth advantage to their host by increasing its survival. K2 toxin affects the target cell by binding to the cell surface, disrupting the plasma membrane integrity, and inducing ion leakage. In this study, we determined that K2 toxin saturates the yeast cell surface receptors in 10 min. The apparent amount of K2 toxin, bound to a single cell of wild type yeast under saturating conditions, was estimated to be 435 to 460 molecules. It was found that an increased level of β-1,6-glucan directly correlates with the number of toxin molecules bound, thereby impacting the morphology and determining the fate of the yeast cell. We observed that the binding of K2 toxin to the yeast surface receptors proceeds in a similar manner as in case of the related K1 killer protein. It was demonstrated that the externally supplied pustulan, a poly-β-1,6-glucan, but not the glucans bearing other linkage types (such as laminarin, chitin, and pullulan) efficiently inhibits the K2 toxin killing activity. In addition, the analysis of toxin binding to the intact cells and spheroplasts confirmed that majority of K2 protein molecules attach to the β-1,6-glucan, rather than the plasma membrane-localized receptors. Taken together, our results reveal that β-1,6-glucan is a primary target of K2 toxin and is important for the execution of its killing property. PMID:25710965

  12. Yeast β-1,6-glucan is a primary target for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Lukša, Juliana; Podoliankaitė, Monika; Vepštaitė, Iglė; Strazdaitė-Žielienė, Živilė; Urbonavičius, Jaunius; Servienė, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Certain Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains secrete different killer proteins of double-stranded-RNA origin. These proteins confer a growth advantage to their host by increasing its survival. K2 toxin affects the target cell by binding to the cell surface, disrupting the plasma membrane integrity, and inducing ion leakage. In this study, we determined that K2 toxin saturates the yeast cell surface receptors in 10 min. The apparent amount of K2 toxin, bound to a single cell of wild type yeast under saturating conditions, was estimated to be 435 to 460 molecules. It was found that an increased level of β-1,6-glucan directly correlates with the number of toxin molecules bound, thereby impacting the morphology and determining the fate of the yeast cell. We observed that the binding of K2 toxin to the yeast surface receptors proceeds in a similar manner as in case of the related K1 killer protein. It was demonstrated that the externally supplied pustulan, a poly-β-1,6-glucan, but not the glucans bearing other linkage types (such as laminarin, chitin, and pullulan) efficiently inhibits the K2 toxin killing activity. In addition, the analysis of toxin binding to the intact cells and spheroplasts confirmed that majority of K2 protein molecules attach to the β-1,6-glucan, rather than the plasma membrane-localized receptors. Taken together, our results reveal that β-1,6-glucan is a primary target of K2 toxin and is important for the execution of its killing property.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K.; Maitra, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process. PMID:26568700

  14. Clinicopathological Significance and Potential Drug Target of CDKN2A/p16 in Endometrial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Wang, Hanwei; Miao, Jingwei; Liang, Ying

    2015-08-18

    Previous studies demonstrated that the loss of function of the CDKN2A/p16/INK4A gene is mainly caused by the hypermethylation of CDKN2A, however, whether or not it is associated with the incidence and clinicopathological characteristics of endometrial carcinoma (EC) remains unclear. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis aiming to comprehensively assess the role of CDKN2A hypermethylation in the pathogenesis of EC. A detailed literature search was made to identify the related research publications. Analysis of pooled data was performed. Odds ratio (OR) was calculated and summarized. Final analysis of 638 EC patients from 12 eligible studies was performed. The results showed that CDKN2A hypermethylation was significantly higher in EC than in normal control tissue, the pooled OR from 8 studies including 400 EC patients and 131 controls, OR = 8.39 with 95% CI 4.03-17.45, test for overall effect, Z = 5.69, P < 0.00001. Further analysis showed that CDKN2A hypermethylation was not significantly associated with tumor differentiation and clinical stage status in EC patients. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that CDKN2A hypermethylation may be implicated in the pathogenesis of EC. CDKN2A hypermethylation was not significantly associated with tumor differentiation and clinical stage status in EC patients, indicating that CDKN2A hypermethylation might be early event of EC.

  15. Proteomic profiling of 16 cereal grains and the application of targeted proteomics to detect wheat contamination.

    PubMed

    Colgrave, Michelle L; Goswami, Hareshwar; Byrne, Keren; Blundell, Malcolm; Howitt, Crispin A; Tanner, Gregory J

    2015-06-05

    Global proteomic analysis utilizing SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and LC-MS/MS of total protein and gluten-enriched extracts derived from 16 economically important cereals was undertaken, providing a foundation for the development of MS-based quantitative methodologies that would enable the detection of wheat contamination in foods. The number of proteins identified in each grain correlated with the number of entries in publicly available databases, highlighting the importance of continued advances in genome sequencing to facilitate accurate protein identification. Subsequently, candidate wheat-specific peptide markers were evaluated by multiple-reaction monitoring MS. The selected markers were unique to wheat, yet present in a wide range of wheat varieties that represent up to 80% of the bread wheat genome. The final analytical method was rapid (15 min) and robust (CV < 10%), showed linearity (R(2) > 0.98) spanning over 3 orders of magnitude, and was highly selective and sensitive with detection down to 15 mg/kg in intentionally contaminated soy flour. Furthermore, application of this technology revealed wheat contamination in commercially sourced flours, including rye, millet, oats, sorghum, buckwheat and three varieties of soy.

  16. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 107 erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25–30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 1017/cm2.

  17. 16S rRNA gene-based characterization of bacteria potentially associated with phosphate and carbonate precipitation from a granular autotrophic nitrogen removal bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Rivadeneyra, María Angustias; Rivadeneyra, Almudena; Martin-Ramos, Daniel; Vahala, Riku; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    A bench-scale granular autotrophic nitrogen removal bioreactor (completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) system) used for the treatment of synthetic wastewater was analyzed for the identification of microbiota with potential capacity for carbonate and phosphate biomineral formation. 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-based studies revealed that different bacterial species found in the granular biomass could trigger the formation of phosphate and calcite minerals in the CANON bioreactor. iTag analysis of the microbial community in the granular biomass with potential ability to precipitate calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite constituted around 0.79-1.32 % of total bacteria. Specifically, the possible hydroxyapatite-producing Candidatus Accumulibacter had a relative abundance of 0.36-0.38 % and was the highest phosphate-precipitating bacteria in the granular CANON system. With respect to calcite precipitation, the major potential producer was thought to be Stenotrophomonas with a 0.38-0.50 % relative abundance. In conclusion, our study showed evidences that the formation of hydroxyapatite and calcite crystals inside of the granular biomass of a CANON system for the treatment wastewater with high ammonium concentration was a biological process. Therefore, it could be suggested that microorganisms play an important role as a precipitation core and also modified the environment due to their metabolic activities.

  18. Aberrant epilepsy-associated mutant Nav1.6 sodium channel activity can be targeted with cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Patel, Reesha R; Barbosa, Cindy; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay; Cummins, Theodore R

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in brain isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels have been identified in patients with distinct epileptic phenotypes. Clinically, these patients often do not respond well to classic anti-epileptics and many remain refractory to treatment. Exogenous as well as endogenous cannabinoids have been shown to target voltage-gated sodium channels and cannabidiol has recently received attention for its potential efficacy in the treatment of childhood epilepsies. In this study, we further investigated the ability of cannabinoids to modulate sodium currents from wild-type and epilepsy-associated mutant voltage-gated sodium channels. We first determined the biophysical consequences of epilepsy-associated missense mutations in both Nav1.1 (arginine 1648 to histidine and asparagine 1788 to lysine) and Nav1.6 (asparagine 1768 to aspartic acid and leucine 1331 to valine) by obtaining whole-cell patch clamp recordings in human embryonic kidney 293T cells with 200 μM Navβ4 peptide in the pipette solution to induce resurgent sodium currents. Resurgent sodium current is an atypical near threshold current predicted to increase neuronal excitability and has been implicated in multiple disorders of excitability. We found that both mutations in Nav1.6 dramatically increased resurgent currents while mutations in Nav1.1 did not. We then examined the effects of anandamide and cannabidiol on peak transient and resurgent currents from wild-type and mutant channels. Interestingly, we found that cannabidiol can preferentially target resurgent sodium currents over peak transient currents generated by wild-type Nav1.6 as well as the aberrant resurgent and persistent current generated by Nav1.6 mutant channels. To further validate our findings, we examined the effects of cannabidiol on endogenous sodium currents from striatal neurons, and similarly we found an inhibition of resurgent and persistent current by cannabidiol. Moreover, current clamp recordings show that cannabidiol reduces

  19. Aberrant epilepsy-associated mutant Nav1.6 sodium channel activity can be targeted with cannabidiol

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Reesha R.; Barbosa, Cindy; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in brain isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels have been identified in patients with distinct epileptic phenotypes. Clinically, these patients often do not respond well to classic anti-epileptics and many remain refractory to treatment. Exogenous as well as endogenous cannabinoids have been shown to target voltage-gated sodium channels and cannabidiol has recently received attention for its potential efficacy in the treatment of childhood epilepsies. In this study, we further investigated the ability of cannabinoids to modulate sodium currents from wild-type and epilepsy-associated mutant voltage-gated sodium channels. We first determined the biophysical consequences of epilepsy-associated missense mutations in both Nav1.1 (arginine 1648 to histidine and asparagine 1788 to lysine) and Nav1.6 (asparagine 1768 to aspartic acid and leucine 1331 to valine) by obtaining whole-cell patch clamp recordings in human embryonic kidney 293T cells with 200 μM Navβ4 peptide in the pipette solution to induce resurgent sodium currents. Resurgent sodium current is an atypical near threshold current predicted to increase neuronal excitability and has been implicated in multiple disorders of excitability. We found that both mutations in Nav1.6 dramatically increased resurgent currents while mutations in Nav1.1 did not. We then examined the effects of anandamide and cannabidiol on peak transient and resurgent currents from wild-type and mutant channels. Interestingly, we found that cannabidiol can preferentially target resurgent sodium currents over peak transient currents generated by wild-type Nav1.6 as well as the aberrant resurgent and persistent current generated by Nav1.6 mutant channels. To further validate our findings, we examined the effects of cannabidiol on endogenous sodium currents from striatal neurons, and similarly we found an inhibition of resurgent and persistent current by cannabidiol. Moreover, current clamp recordings show that cannabidiol reduces

  20. Designation of Streptomycete 16S and 23S rRNA-based target regions for oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Stackebrandt, E; Witt, D; Kemmerling, C; Kroppenstedt, R; Liesack, W

    1991-05-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA of various Streptomyces species were partially sequenced and screened for the presence of stretches that could define all members of the genus, groups of species, or individual species. Nucleotide 929 (Streptomyces ambofaciens nomenclature [J.L. Pernodet, M.T. Alegre, F. Boccard, and M. Guerineau, Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) is a nucleotide highly unique to Streptomyces species which, in combination with flanking regions, allowed the designation of a genus-specific probe. Regions 158 through 203 of the 16S rRNA and 1518 through 1645 of the 23S rRNA (helix 54 [Pernodet et al., Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) have a high potential to define species, whereas the degree of variation in regions 982 through 998 and 1102 through 1122 of the 16S rRNA is less pronounced but characteristic for at least certain species. Alone or in combination with each other, these regions may serve as target sites for synthetic oligonucleotide probes and primers to be used in the determination of pure cultures and in the characterization of community structures. The specificity of several probes is demonstrated by dot blot hybridization.

  1. Measurement and R-matrix analysis of the nitrogen-15(p,gamma0)oxygen-16 reaction cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Paul James, IV

    2010-12-01

    Along with the p-p chains, the CNO cycle is the main source of energy production inside of stars with masses larger than the sun. The 15 N + p reaction is the first branch point of this cycle, where the (p,alpha) reaction returns material to the CN cycle and the (p,gamma) reaction leads to the NO cycle, and thus plays a role in determining the final energy production of the process and influences the abundances of oxygen isotopes. This project involves obtaining new measurements for the 15N(p,gamma 0)16O reaction. Dominated by two broad resonances at Ep = 338 and 1028 keV [45], measurements of this reaction were performed in the proton energy range from 1800 keV down to 130 keV. Particular attention was paid to the area between the two dominant resonances, along with the low energy region, as these are the most important regions in determining the S(0) extrapolations [48]. To obtain this measurement, article accelerators at both the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory (NSL) and the Underground Laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) in Gran Sasso, Italy were used. In both locations, high purity germanium detectors were used to detect gamma-rays from the reaction of around 13 MeV. It was not possible to measure down to energies corresponding to relevant stellar environment temperatures, and so theoretical fits and extrapolations to the data must be made. To this end, the multi-level, multi-channel R-matrix code AZURE was used. The resulting S factor calculations were used to calculate new reaction rates for different temperature values, and gives up to a factor of 2 difference from currently used compilations [4].

  2. Mechanism of metabolic control. Target of rapamycin signaling links nitrogen quality to the activity of the Rtg1 and Rtg3 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Komeili, A; Wedaman, K P; O'Shea, E K; Powers, T

    2000-11-13

    De novo biosynthesis of amino acids uses intermediates provided by the TCA cycle that must be replenished by anaplerotic reactions to maintain the respiratory competency of the cell. Genome-wide expression analyses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveal that many of the genes involved in these reactions are repressed in the presence of the preferred nitrogen sources glutamine or glutamate. Expression of these genes in media containing urea or ammonia as a sole nitrogen source requires the heterodimeric bZip transcription factors Rtg1 and Rtg3 and correlates with a redistribution of the Rtg1p/Rtg3 complex from a predominantly cytoplasmic to a predominantly nuclear location. Nuclear import of the complex requires the cytoplasmic protein Rtg2, a previously identified upstream regulator of Rtg1 and Rtg3, whereas export requires the importin-beta-family member Msn5. Remarkably, nuclear accumulation of Rtg1/Rtg3, as well as expression of their target genes, is induced by addition of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinases. We demonstrate further that Rtg3 is a phosphoprotein and that its phosphorylation state changes after rapamycin treatment. Taken together, these results demonstrate that target of rapamycin signaling regulates specific anaplerotic reactions by coupling nitrogen quality to the activity and subcellular localization of distinct transcription factors.

  3. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 107 erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25–30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 1017/cm2. PMID:27145983

  4. Identification of bacteria associated with underground parts of Crocus sativus by 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Sangwan, Naseer; Manjula, A; Rajendhran, J; Gunasekaran, P; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2014-10-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L), an autumn-flowering perennial sterile plant, reproduces vegetatively by underground corms. Saffron has biannual corm-root cycle that makes it an interesting candidate to study microbial dynamics in its rhizosphere and cormosphere (area under influence of corm). Culture independent 16S rRNA gene metagenomic study of rhizosphere and cormosphere of Saffron during flowering stage revealed presence of 22 genera but none of the genus was common in all the three samples. Bulk soil bacterial community was represented by 13 genera with Acidobacteria being dominant. In rhizosphere, out of eight different genera identified, Pseudomonas was the most dominant genus. Cormosphere bacteria comprised of six different genera, dominated by the genus Pantoea. This study revealed that the bacterial composition of all the three samples is significantly different (P < 0.05) from each other. This is the first report on the identification of bacteria associated with rhizosphere, cormosphere and bulk soil of Saffron, using cultivation independent 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

  5. MicroRNA-133 Controls Brown Adipose Determination in Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells by Targeting Prdm16

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Pasut, Alessandra; Soleimani, Vahab D.; Bentzinger, C. Florian; Antoun, Ghadi; Thorn, Stephanie; Seale, Patrick; Fernando, Pasan; van IJcken, Wilfred; Grosveld, Frank; Dekemp, Robert A.; Boushel, Robert; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an energy-dispensing thermogenic tissue that plays an important role in balancing energy metabolism. Lineage-tracing experiments indicate that brown adipocytes are derived from myogenic progenitors during embryonic development. However, adult skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) have long been considered uniformly determined toward the myogenic lineage. Here, we report that adult satellite cells give rise to brown adipocytes and that microRNA-133 regulates the choice between myogenic and brown adipose determination by targeting the 3′UTR of Prdm16. Antagonism of microRNA-133 during muscle regeneration increases uncoupled respiration, glucose uptake, and thermogenesis in local treated muscle and augments whole-body energy expenditure, improves glucose tolerance, and impedes the development of diet-induced obesity. Finally, we demonstrate that miR-133 levels are downregulated in mice exposed to cold, resulting in de novo generation of satellite cell-derived brown adipocytes. Therefore, microRNA-133 represents an important therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. PMID:23395168

  6. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of the aging and tempering of high nitrogen quenched Fe-N alloys: Kinetics of formation of Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} nitride by interstitial ordering in martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Fall, I.; Genin, J.M.R. |

    1996-08-01

    The distribution of nitrogen atoms in austenite and during the different stages of aging and tempering of martensite is studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy (TMS) and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) are used for studying the austenite phase where the distribution of nitrogen atoms is found to depend on the nitriding method, gas nitriding in the authors` case, or ion implantation. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, which concerns a depth predominantly less than 200 nm, reveals a nitrogen atom distribution different from that found in the bulk by TMS. The identification and kinetics of the stages of aging and tempering of martensite are followed by TMS measurements, and the phase characterization is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and TEM. The major stages are the early ordering of nitrogen atoms, which leads to small coherent precipitates of {alpha}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}; the passage by thickening to semicoherent precipitates of {alpha}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}; the dissolution of {alpha}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} with the concomitant formation of {gamma}-Fe{sub 4}N; and the decomposition of retained austenite by tempering. The three first stages correspond to activation energies of 95, 126, and 94 kJ/mole, respectively, consistent with the nitrogen diffusion for the first and third stages and the dislocation pipe diffusion of iron for the second.

  7. Comparison of Gull Feces-specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Gene of Catellicoccus Marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two novel gull-specific qPCR assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR-green-based assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (i.e., gull3) and a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (i.e., gull4). The main objectives ...

  8. Comparison of Gull Feces-specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Gene of Catellicoccus Marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two novel gull-specific qPCR assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR-green-based assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (i.e., gull3) and a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (i.e., gull4). The main objectives ...

  9. Food Targeting: A Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting 16S rDNA for Direct Quantification of Alicyclobacillus spp. Spores after Aptamer-Based Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Hünniger, Tim; Felbinger, Christine; Wessels, Hauke; Mast, Sophia; Hoffmann, Antonia; Schefer, Anna; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Paschke-Kratzin, Angelika; Fischer, Markus

    2015-05-06

    Spore-forming Alicyclobacillus spp. are able to form metabolites that induce even in small amounts an antiseptical or medicinal off-flavor in fruit juices. Microbial contaminations could occur by endospores, which overcame the pasteurization process. The current detection method for Alicyclobacillus spp. can take up to 1 week because of microbiological enrichment. In a previous study, DNA aptamers were selected and characterized for an aptamer-driven rapid enrichment of Alicyclobacillus spp. spores from orange juice by magnetic separation. In the present work, a direct quantification assay for Alicyclobacillus spp. spores was developed to complete the two-step approach of enrichment and detection. After mechanical treatment of the spores, the isolated DNA was quantified in a real-time PCR-assay targeting 16S rDNA. The assay was evaluated by the performance requirements of the European Network of Genetically Modified Organisms Laboratories (ENGL). Hence, the presented method is applicable for direct spore detection from orange juice in connection with an enrichment step.

  10. Targeting Natural Killer cells to Acute Myeloid Leukemia in vitro with a CD16x33 bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) and ADAM17 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wiernik, Andres; Foley, Bree; Zhang, Bin; Verneris, Michael R.; Warlick, Erica; Gleason, Michelle K.; Ross, Julie A.; Luo, Xianghua; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Walcheck, Bruce; Vallera, Daniel A; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect by Natural Killer (NK) cells prevents relapse following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We determined whether a novel bi-specific killer cell engager (BiKE) signaling through CD16 and targeting CD33 could activate NK cells at high potency against AML targets. Experimental Design We investigated the ability of our fully humanized CD16x33 BiKE to trigger in vitro NK cell activation against HL60 (CD33+), RAJI (CD33−), and primary AML targets (de novo, refractory and post transplant) to determine whether treatment with CD16x33 BiKE in combination with an ADAM17 inhibitor could prevent CD16 shedding (a novel inhibitory mechanism induced by NK cell activation) and overcome inhibition of class I MHC recognizing inhibitory receptors. Results NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine release were specifically triggered by the CD16x33 BiKE when cells were cultured with HL60 targets, CD33+ de novo and refractory AML targets. Combination treatment with CD16x33 BiKE and ADAM17 inhibitor resulted in inhibition of CD16 shedding in NK cells, and enhanced NK cell activation. Treatment of NK cells from double umbilical cord blood transplant (UCBT) recipients with the CD16x33 BiKE resulted in activation, especially in those recipients with CMV reactivation. Conclusion CD16x33 BiKE can overcome self inhibitory signals and effectively elicit NK cell effector activity against AML. These in vitro studies highlight the potential of CD16x33 BiKE ± ADAM17 inhibition to enhance NK cell activation and specificity against CD33+ AML, which optimally could be applied in patients with relapsed AML or for adjuvant anti-leukemic therapy post-transplantation. PMID:23690482

  11. Modeling of ns and ps laser-induced soft X-ray sources using nitrogen gas puff target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbova, M.; Zakharov, S. V.; Zakharov, V. S.

    2014-07-01

    Gas puff laser plasma is studied as a source of water window radiation with 2.88 nm wavelength, corresponding to quantum transition 1s2 → 1s2p of helium-like nitrogen ions. Spatial development of plasma induced by Nd:YAG laser beam is simulated by 2D Radiation-Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic code Z*. The results for nitrogen gas layer (0.72 mm thickness, 1 bar pressure) and two different laser pulses (600 mJ/7 ns and 525 mJ/170 ps), corresponding to the experiments done in Laser Laboratory Gottingen are presented.

  12. Modeling of ns and ps laser-induced soft X-ray sources using nitrogen gas puff target

    SciTech Connect

    Vrba, P.; Vrbova, M.; Zakharov, S. V.

    2014-07-15

    Gas puff laser plasma is studied as a source of water window radiation with 2.88 nm wavelength, corresponding to quantum transition 1s{sup 2} → 1s2p of helium-like nitrogen ions. Spatial development of plasma induced by Nd:YAG laser beam is simulated by 2D Radiation-Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic code Z*. The results for nitrogen gas layer (0.72 mm thickness, 1 bar pressure) and two different laser pulses (600 mJ/7 ns and 525 mJ/170 ps), corresponding to the experiments done in Laser Laboratory Gottingen are presented.

  13. Phylogeny based on 16S rDNA and nifH sequences of Ralstonia taiwanensis strains isolated from nitrogen-fixing nodules of Mimosa pudica, in India.

    PubMed

    Verma, Subhash Chandra; Chowdhury, Soumitra Paul; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2004-05-01

    Bacterial symbionts present in the indeterminate-type nitrogen (N)-fixing nodules of Mimosa pudica grown in North and South India showed maximum similarity to Ralstonia taiwanensis on the basis of carbon-source utilization patterns and 16S rDNA sequence. Isolates from the nodules of M. pudica from North India and South India showed identical ARDRA (Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis) patterns with Sau3AI and RsaI, but AluI revealed dimorphy between the North Indian and South Indian isolates. Alignment of 16S rDNA sequences revealed similarity of North Indian isolates with an R. taiwanensis strain isolated from M. pudica in Taiwan, whereas South Indian isolates showed closer relatedness with the isolates from Mimosa diplotricha. Alignment of nifH sequences from both North Indian and South Indian isolates with that of the related isolates revealed their closer affinity to alpha-rhizobia, suggesting that nif genes in the beta-rhizobia might have been acquired from alpha-rhizobia via lateral transfer during co-occupancy of nodules by alpha-rhizobia and progenitors of R. taiwanensis, members of the beta-subclass of Proteobacteria. Immunological cross-reaction of the bacteroid preparation of M. pudica nodules showed strong a positive signal with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, whereas a weak positive cross-reaction was observed with free-living R. taiwanensis grown microaerobically in minimal medium with and without NH4Cl. In spite of the expression of dinitrogenase reductase under free-living conditions, acetylene reduction was not observed under N-free conditions even after prolonged incubation.

  14. MicroRNA-15b/16 attenuates vascular neointima formation by promoting the contractile phenotype of vascular smooth muscle through targeting YAP

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Ahmed, Abu Shufian Ishtiaq; Kang, Xiuhua; Hu, Guoqing; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Jiliang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the functional role of the miR-15b/16 in vascular smooth muscle phenotypic modulation. Approach and Results We found that miR-15b/16 is the one of most abundant microRNAs expressed in contractile vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, when contractile VSMCs convert to a synthetic phenotype miR-15b/16 expression is significantly reduced. Knocking-down endogenous miR-15b/16 in VSMCs attenuates smooth muscle-specific gene expression but promotes VSMC proliferation and migration. Conversely, over-expression of miR-15b/16 promotes smooth muscle contractile gene expression while attenuating VSMC migration and proliferation. Consistent with this, over-expression of miR-15b/16 in a rat carotid balloon injury model markedly attenuates injury-induced smooth muscle de-differentiation and neointima formation. Mechanistically, we identified the potent oncoprotein yes-associated protein (YAP) as a downstream target of miR-15b/16 in VSMCs. Reporter assays validated that miR-15b/16 targets YAP’s 3′-untranslated region. Moreover, overexpression of miR-15b/16 significantly represses YAP expression, whereas conversely, depletion of endogenous miR-15b/16 results in up-regulation of YAP expression. Conclusions These results indicate that miR-15b/16 plays a critical role in smooth muscle phenotypic modulation at least partly through targeting YAP. Restoring expression of miR-15b/16 would be a potential therapeutic approach for treatment of proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:26293467

  15. MicroRNA-16 Alleviates Inflammatory Pain by Targeting Ras-Related Protein 23 (RAB23) and Inhibiting p38 MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjin; Guo, Shengdong; Wang, Shenggang

    2016-10-22

    BACKGROUND The purpose of our study was to determine the functional role of microRNA (miR)-16 in chronic inflammatory pain and to disclose its underlying molecular mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS Inflammatory pain was induced by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to Wistar rats. The pWPXL-miR-16, PcDNA3.1- Ras-related protein (RAB23), and/or SB203580 were delivered intrathecally to the rats. Behavioral tests were detected at 0 h, 4 h, 1 d, 4 d, 7 d, and 14 d after CFA injection. After behavioral tests, L4-L6 dorsal spinal cord were obtained and the levels of miR-16, RAB23, and phosphorylation of p38 (p-p38) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). In addition, luciferase reporter assay was performed to explore whether RAB23 was a target of miR-16, and qRT-PCR and Western blotting were used to confirm the regulation between RAB23 and miR-16. RESULTS The level of miR-16 was significantly decreased in the CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Intrathecal injection of miR-16 alleviates pain response and raised pain threshold. The level of RAB23 was significantly increased in the pain model, and intrathecal injection of RAB23 aggravated pain response. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed that RAB23 was a direct target of miR-16, and RAB23 was negatively regulated by miR-16. In addition, we found that simultaneous administration of SB203580 and miR-16 further alleviates pain response compared to only administration of miR-16. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that miR-16 relieves chronic inflammatory pain by targeting RAB23 and inhibiting p38 MAPK activation.

  16. Target loads of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition for protection of acid sensitive aquatic resources in the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, T.J.; Cosby, B.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; McDonnell, T.C.; Herlihy, A.T.; Burns, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic watershed acid-base chemistry model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC) was used to calculate target loads (TLs) of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition expected to be protective of aquatic health in lakes in the Adirondack ecoregion of New York. The TLs were calculated for two future dates (2050 and 2100) and three levels of protection against lake acidification (acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 0, 20, and 50 eq L -1). Regional sulfur and nitrogen deposition estimates were combined with TLs to calculate exceedances. Target load results, and associated exceedances, were extrapolated to the regional population of Adirondack lakes. About 30% of Adirondack lakes had simulated TL of sulfur deposition less than 50 meq m -2 yr to protect lake ANC to 50 eq L -1. About 600 Adirondack lakes receive ambient sulfur deposition that is above this TL, in some cases by more than a factor of 2. Some critical criteria threshold values were simulated to be unobtainable in some lakes even if sulfur deposition was to be decreased to zero and held at zero until the specified endpoint year. We also summarize important lessons for the use of target loads in the management of acid-impacted aquatic ecosystems, such as those in North America, Europe, and Asia. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. 16S rRNA gene-targeted TTGE in determining diversity of gut microbiota during acute diarrhoea and convalescence.

    PubMed

    Monira, Shirajum; Shabnam, Syeda Antara; Alam, Nur Haque; Endtz, Hubert Ph; Cravioto, Alejandro; Alam, Munirul

    2012-09-01

    The human gut microbiota play a vital role in health and nutrition but are greatly modified during severe diarrhoea due to purging and pathogenic colonization. To understand the extent of loss during and after diarrhoea, faecal samples collected from children (n=21) suffering from acute diarrhoea and from their healthy siblings (n=9) were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted universal primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). The gut microbiota decreased significantly as indicated by the number of TTGE bands at day 0 of acute diarrhoea [patients vs healthy siblings: 11±0.9 vs 21.8±1.1 (mean ± standard error), p<0.01]. The number of bands showed a steady increase from day 1 to day 7; however, it remained significantly less than that in healthy siblings (15±0.9, p<0.01). These results suggest that appropriate therapeutic and post-diarrhoeal nutritional intervention might be beneficial for the early microbial restoration and recovery.

  18. 16S rRNA Gene-targeted TTGE in Determining Diversity of Gut Microbiota during Acute Diarrhoea and Convalescence

    PubMed Central

    Monira, Shirajum; Shabnam, Syeda Antara; Alam, Nur Haque; Endtz, Hubert Ph.; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The human gut microbiota play a vital role in health and nutrition but are greatly modified during severe diarrhoea due to purging and pathogenic colonization. To understand the extent of loss during and after diarrhoea, faecal samples collected from children (n=21) suffering from acute diarrhoea and from their healthy siblings (n=9) were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted universal primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). The gut microbiota decreased significantly as indicated by the number of TTGE bands at day 0 of acute diarrhoea [patients vs healthy siblings: 11±0.9 vs 21.8±1.1 (mean±standard error), p<0.01]. The number of bands showed a steady increase from day 1 to day 7; however, it remained significantly less than that in healthy siblings (15±0.9, p<0.01). These results suggest that appropriate therapeutic and post-diarrhoeal nutritional intervention might be beneficial for the early microbial restoration and recovery. PMID:23082626

  19. Differential sensitivity of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes used for fluorescence in situ hybridization is a result of ribosomal higher order structure.

    PubMed

    Frischer, M E; Floriani, P J; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1996-10-01

    The use of 16S rRNA targeted gene probes for the direct analysis of microbial communities has revolutionized the field of microbial ecology, yet a comprehensive approach for the design of such probes does not exist. The development of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes for use with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures has been especially difficult as a result of the complex nature of the rRNA target molecule. In this study a systematic comparison of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide gene probes was conducted to determine if target location influences the hybridization efficiency of oligonucleotide probes when used with in situ hybridization protocols for the detection of whole microbial cells. Five unique universal 12-mer oligonucleotide sequences, located at different regions of the 16S rRNA molecule, were identified by a computer-aided sequence analysis of over 1000 partial and complete 16S rRNA sequences. The complements of these oligomeric sequences were chemically synthesized for use as probes and end labeled with either [gamma-32P]ATP or the fluorescent molecule tetramethylrhodamine-5/-6. Hybridization sensitivity for each of the probes was determined by hybridization to heat-denatured RNA immobilized on blots or to formaldehyde fixed whole cells. All of the probes hybridized with equal efficiency to denatured RNA. However, the probes exhibited a wide range of sensitivity (from none to very strong) when hybridized with whole cells using a previously developed FISH procedure. Differential hybridization efficiencies against whole cells could not be attributed to cell wall type, since the relative probe efficiency was preserved when either Gram-negative or -positive cells were used. These studies represent one of the first attempts to systematically define criteria for 16S rRNA targeted probe design for use against whole cells and establish target site location as a critical parameter in probe design.

  20. Development of Water Target for Radioisotope Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripp, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Ongoing studies of plant physiology at TUNL require a supply of nitrogen-13 for use as a radiotracer. Production of nitrogen-13 using a water target and a proton beam follows the nuclear reaction 16-O(p,a)13-N. Unfortunately the irradiation of trace amounts of oxygen-18 within a natural water target produces fluorine-18 by the reaction 18-O(p, n)18-F. The presence of this second radioisotope reduces the efficacy of nitrogen-13 as a radiotracer. Designing a natural water target for nitrogen-13 production at TUNL required the design of several new systems to address the problems inherent in nitrogen-13 production. A heat exchanger cools the target water after irradiation within the target cell. The resulting improved thermal regulation of the target water prevents the system from overheating and minimizes the effect of the cavitations occurring within the target. Alumina pellets within a scrubbing unit remove the fluorine-18 contamination from the irradiated water. The modular design of the water target apparatus makes the system highly adaptable, allowing for easy reuse and adaptation of the different components into future projects. The newly designed and constructed water target should meet the current and future needs of TUNL researchers in the production of nitrogen-13. This TUNL REU project was funded in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) NSF-PHY-08-51813.

  1. Sequence-specific bacterial growth inhibition by peptide nucleic acid targeted to the mRNA binding site of 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Nakai, Kazufumi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2009-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeted to the functional domains of 23S rRNA can inhibit translation and cell growth. However, effective inhibition of translation and cell growth using 16S rRNA-targeted PNA has still not been achieved. Here, we report that PNA targeted to the functional site of 16S rRNA could inhibit both gene expression in vitro and bacterial growth in pure culture with sequence specificity. We used 10-mer PNAs conjugated with a cell-penetrating peptide, which targeted the mRNA binding site at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. Using 0.6 microM of the peptide-PNAs, cell-free ss-galactosidase production decreased by 50%, whereas peptide-PNAs with one or two mismatches to the target sequence showed much weaker inhibition effects. To determine the growth inhibition and bactericidal effects of the peptide-PNA conjugate, we performed OD measurement and viable cell counting. We observed dose- and sequence-dependent inhibition of cell growth and bactericidal effects. These growth inhibitory effects are observed both in the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Corynebacterium efficiens, although inhibitory concentrations were different for each bacterial species. These results present possibilities for 16S rRNA sequence-based specific bacterial growth inhibition using a peptide-PNA conjugate.

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of the plasma generated during the deposition of AlxGa1-xN films by pulsed laser co-ablation of Al and GaAs targets in electron cyclotron resonance nitrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Peipei; Cai, Hua; Li, Yanli; Yang, Xu; You, Qinghu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2015-06-01

    A nitrogen-aluminum-gallium-arsenic plasma is formed by pulsed laser co-ablation of an Al target and a GaAs target in electron cyclotron resonance discharge-generated nitrogen plasma for AlxGa1-xN film deposition. The formed plasma was characterized by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements and the process of AlxGa1-xN deposition was discussed. The plasma contains excited species originally present in the working N2 gas and energetic species ablated from the targets, and its emission is abundant in the emission bands of diatomic nitrogen molecules and molecular ions and the emission lines of monoatomic aluminum, gallium, and arsenic atoms and atomic ions. The temporal and spatial features of the plasma emission reveal that the nitrogen species in the electron cyclotron resonance nitrogen plasma experience additional excitations due to the expanding ablation plumes, and the ablated species are excited frequently when traveling with the expanding plumes in the nitrogen plasma, making the formed plasma very reactive, which is very important in the process of AlxGa1-xN film deposition. The deposited film was evaluated for composition analysis by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and structure characterization by x-ray diffraction. The AlxGa1-xN film is slightly nitrogen rich with an aluminum content x of about 0.6 and featured with hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure with preferred c-axis orientation.

  3. MicroRNA16 regulates glioma cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion by targeting Wip1-ATM-p53 feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Qiu-Yan; Tian, Rui; Yan, Hong; Zhang, Min; Wu, Jing; Wang, Wei; He, Jie

    2017-08-15

    The present study aimed to investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of microRNA16 (miR-16) on proliferation, apoptosis and invasion of glioma cells. The cell models of miR-16 upregulation and Negative control group (NC group) were built. The cell functions of different groups were detected by colony formation assay, transwell chamber assay, proliferation, apoptosis and cycle experiments. The intracranial orthotopic transplantation animal models were built to different groups: miR-16 agomir group, miR-16 antagomir group and their NC group. The expressions of miR-16, Wip1, ATM and p53 were measured by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. As a result, miR-16 overexpressed groups had lower cloning formation rate and proliferation rate, less invasive cells, higher early apoptosis rate than the control groups. G1 phase was significantly smaller compared miR-16 overexpressed groups with the control groups, and S phase significantly lesser. Cell growth was retardated. Differences were statistically significant (P <0.05). Compared with miR-16 overexpressed groups and NC groups, the Wip1 gene and protein expression were downregulated, while ATM and p53 genes, p-ATM and p-p53 proteins were upregulated. The differences were statistically significant (P <0.05). Taken together, our findings demonstrated that miR-16 suppressed glioma cell proliferation and invasion, promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell cycle by targeting Wip1-ATM-p53 signaling pathway.

  4. CD16xCD33 bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) activates NK cells against primary MDS and MDSC CD33+ targets.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Michelle K; Ross, Julie A; Warlick, Erica D; Lund, Troy C; Verneris, Michael R; Wiernik, Andres; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Michael D; Lenvik, Alexander J; Litzow, Mark R; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K; Blazar, Bruce R; Weiner, Louis M; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Vallera, Daniel A; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2014-05-08

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are stem cell disorders that can progress to acute myeloid leukemia. Although hematopoietic cell transplantation can be curative, additional therapies are needed for a disease that disproportionally afflicts the elderly. We tested the ability of a CD16xCD33 BiKE to induce natural killer (NK) cell function in 67 MDS patients. Compared with age-matched normal controls, CD7(+) lymphocytes, NK cells, and CD16 expression were markedly decreased in MDS patients. Despite this, reverse antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays showed potent degranulation and cytokine production when resting MDS-NK cells were triggered with an agonistic CD16 monoclonal antibody. Blood and marrow MDS-NK cells treated with bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) significantly enhanced degranulation and tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ production against HL-60 and endogenous CD33(+) MDS targets. MDS patients had a significantly increased proportion of immunosuppressive CD33(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that negatively correlated with MDS lymphocyte populations and CD16 loss on NK cells. Treatment with the CD16xCD33 BiKE successfully reversed MDSC immunosuppression of NK cells and induced MDSC target cell lysis. Lastly, the BiKE induced optimal MDS-NK cell function irrespective of disease stage. Our data suggest that the CD16xCD33 BiKE functions against both CD33(+) MDS and MDSC targets and may be therapeutically beneficial for MDS patients.

  5. Ecologically based targets for bioavailable (reactive) nitrogen discharge from the drainage basins of the Wet Tropics region, Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Scott A; Brodie, Jon E; Kroon, Frederieke J; Turner, Ryan D R

    2015-08-15

    A modelling framework is developed for the Wet Tropics region of the Great Barrier Reef that links a quantitative river discharge parameter (viz. dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentration, DIN) with an eutrophication indicator within the marine environment (viz. chlorophyll-a concentration, chl-a). The model predicts catchment-specific levels of reduction (%) in end-of-river DIN concentrations (as a proxy for total potentially reactive nitrogen, PRN) needed to ensure compliance with chl-a 'trigger' guidelines for the ecologically distinct, but PRN-related issues of crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS) outbreaks, reef biodiversity loss, and thermal bleaching sensitivity. The results indicate that even for river basins dominated by agricultural land uses, quite modest reductions in end-of-river PRN concentrations (∼20-40%) may assist in mitigating the risk of primary COTS outbreaks from the mid-shelf reefs of the Wet Tropics. However, more significant reductions (∼60-80%) are required to halt and reverse declines in reef biodiversity, and loss of thermal bleaching resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of constructed wetlands in performance intensifications for wastewater treatment: a nitrogen and organic matter targeted review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shubiao; Kuschk, Peter; Brix, Hans; Vymazal, Jan; Dong, Renjie

    2014-06-15

    The knowledge on the performance enhancement of nitrogen and organic matter in the expanded constructed wetlands (CWs) with various new designs, configurations, and technology combinations are still not sufficiently summarized. A comprehensive review is accordingly necessary for better understanding of this state-of-the-art-technology for optimum design and new ideas. Considering that the prevailing redox conditions in CWs have a strong effect on removal mechanisms and highly depend on wetland designs and operations, this paper reviews different operation strategies (recirculation, aeration, tidal operation, flow direction reciprocation, and earthworm integration), innovative designs, and configurations (circular-flow corridor wetlands, towery hybrid CWs, baffled subsurface CWs) for the intensifications of the performance. Some new combinations of CWs with technologies in other field for wastewater treatment, such as microbial fuel cell, are also discussed. To improve biofilm development, the selection and utilization of some specific substrates are summarized. Finally, we review the advances in electron donor supply to enhance low C/N wastewater treatment and in thermal insulation against low temperature to maintain CWs running in the cold areas. This paper aims to provide and inspire some new ideas in the development of intensified CWs mainly for the removal of nitrogen and organic matter. The stability and sustainability of these technologies should be further qualified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of heat treatment on the structure and the mechanical and technological properties of corrosion-resistant nitrogen-bearing 0Kh16N4AFD steel for high-strength welding constructions of railway engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Blinov, V. M.; Kostina, M. V.; Lukin, E. I.; Blinov, E. V.; Rigina, L. G.

    2015-07-01

    The problems of applying a new nitrogen-alloyed martensitic corrosion-resistant 0Kh16N4AFD steel as a promising material for manufacturing car bodies are considered. The microstructure and properties of the steel after various heat treatments have been studied. It is shown that the steel is not behind 12Kh18N9T steel in the characteristics of ductility and corrosion resistance and significantly exceeds it in the static and cyclic strengths.

  8. MiR-16 mediates trastuzumab and lapatinib response in ErbB-2-positive breast and gastric cancer via its novel targets CCNJ and FUBP1.

    PubMed

    Venturutti, L; Cordo Russo, R I; Rivas, M A; Mercogliano, M F; Izzo, F; Oakley, R H; Pereyra, M G; De Martino, M; Proietti, C J; Yankilevich, P; Roa, J C; Guzmán, P; Cortese, E; Allemand, D H; Huang, T H; Charreau, E H; Cidlowski, J A; Schillaci, R; Elizalde, P V

    2016-12-01

    ErbB-2 amplification/overexpression accounts for an aggressive breast cancer (BC) subtype (ErbB-2-positive). Enhanced ErbB-2 expression was also found in gastric cancer (GC) and has been correlated with poor clinical outcome. The ErbB-2-targeted therapies trastuzumab (TZ), a monoclonal antibody, and lapatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, have proved highly beneficial. However, resistance to such therapies remains a major clinical challenge. We here revealed a novel mechanism underlying the antiproliferative effects of both agents in ErbB-2-positive BC and GC. TZ and lapatinib ability to block extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT in sensitive cells inhibits c-Myc activation, which results in upregulation of miR-16. Forced expression of miR-16 inhibited in vitro proliferation in BC and GC cells, both sensitive and resistant to TZ and lapatinib, as well as in a preclinical BC model resistant to these agents. This reveals miR-16 role as tumor suppressor in ErbB-2-positive BC and GC. Using genome-wide expression studies and miRNA target prediction algorithms, we identified cyclin J and far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FUBP1) as novel miR-16 targets, which mediate miR-16 antiproliferative effects. Supporting the clinical relevance of our results, we found that high levels of miR-16 and low or null FUBP1 expression correlate with TZ response in ErbB-2-positive primary BCs. These findings highlight a potential role of miR-16 and FUBP1 as biomarkers of sensitivity to TZ therapy. Furthermore, we revealed miR-16 as an innovative therapeutic agent for TZ- and lapatinib-resistant ErbB-2-positive BC and GC.

  9. Gut Microbiota Analysis Results Are Highly Dependent on the 16S rRNA Gene Target Region, Whereas the Impact of DNA Extraction Is Minor.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Anniina; Pietilä, Sami; Munukka, Eveliina; Eerola, Erkki; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Laiho, Asta; Pekkala, Satu; Huovinen, Pentti

    2017-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is currently the method of choice for analyzing gut microbiota composition. As gut microbiota composition is a potential future target for clinical diagnostics, it is of utmost importance to enhance and optimize the NGS analysis procedures. Here, we have analyzed the impact of DNA extraction and selected 16S rDNA primers on the gut microbiota NGS results. Bacterial DNA from frozen stool specimens was extracted with 5 commercially available DNA extraction kits. Special attention was paid to the semiautomated DNA extraction methods that could expedite the analysis procedure, thus being especially suitable for clinical settings. The microbial composition was analyzed with 2 distinct protocols: 1 targeting the V3-V4 and the other targeting the V4-V5 area of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The overall effect of DNA extraction on the gut microbiota 16S rDNA profile was relatively small, whereas the 16S rRNA gene target region had an immense impact on the results. Furthermore, semiautomated DNA extraction methods clearly appeared suitable for NGS procedures, proposing that application of these methods could importantly reduce hands-on time and human errors without compromising the validity of results.

  10. Gut Microbiota Analysis Results Are Highly Dependent on the 16S rRNA Gene Target Region, Whereas the Impact of DNA Extraction Is Minor

    PubMed Central

    Rintala, Anniina; Pietilä, Sami; Munukka, Eveliina; Eerola, Erkki; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Laiho, Asta; Pekkala, Satu; Huovinen, Pentti

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is currently the method of choice for analyzing gut microbiota composition. As gut microbiota composition is a potential future target for clinical diagnostics, it is of utmost importance to enhance and optimize the NGS analysis procedures. Here, we have analyzed the impact of DNA extraction and selected 16S rDNA primers on the gut microbiota NGS results. Bacterial DNA from frozen stool specimens was extracted with 5 commercially available DNA extraction kits. Special attention was paid to the semiautomated DNA extraction methods that could expedite the analysis procedure, thus being especially suitable for clinical settings. The microbial composition was analyzed with 2 distinct protocols: 1 targeting the V3–V4 and the other targeting the V4–V5 area of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The overall effect of DNA extraction on the gut microbiota 16S rDNA profile was relatively small, whereas the 16S rRNA gene target region had an immense impact on the results. Furthermore, semiautomated DNA extraction methods clearly appeared suitable for NGS procedures, proposing that application of these methods could importantly reduce hands-on time and human errors without compromising the validity of results. PMID:28260999

  11. Vaccinia virus F16 protein, a predicted catalytically inactive member of the prokaryotic serine recombinase superfamily, is targeted to nucleoli

    PubMed Central

    Senkevich, Tatiana G.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The F16L gene of vaccinia virus (VACV) is conserved in all chordopoxviruses except avipoxviruses. The crocodile poxvirus F16 protein ortholog has highly significant similarity to prokaryotic serine recombinases and contains all amino acids that comprise the catalytic site. In contrast, F16 orthologs encoded by other poxviruses show only marginally significant similarity to serine recombinases, lack essential amino acids of the active site and are most likely inactive derivatives of serine recombinases. Nevertheless, the conservation of F16L in non-avian poxviruses suggested an important function. However, a VACV mutant with the F16L gene knocked out replicated normally in dividing and quiescent cells. The F16 protein was synthesized early after infection and detected in virus cores. When expressed in infected or uninfected cells, F16 accumulated in nucleoli depending on the level of expression and confluency of cells. Evidence was obtained that F16 forms multimers, which might regulate concentration-dependent intracellular localization. PMID:21752417

  12. Fatty acid synthase is a primary target of MiR-15a and MiR-16-1 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingxuan; Zhang, Xiao; Shi, Jinming; Cao, Paul; Wan, Meimei; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Yunxuan; Kridel, Steven J.; Liu, Wennuan; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qingyuan; Sui, Guangchao

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is upregulated in breast cancer and correlates with poor prognosis. FASN contributes to mammary oncogenesis and serves as a bona fide target in cancer therapies. MicroRNAs inhibit gene expression through blocking mRNA translation or promoting mRNA degradation by targeting their 3′-UTRs. We identified four microRNAs in two microRNA clusters miR-15a-16-1 and miR-497-195 that share a common seed sequence to target the 3′-UTR of the FASN mRNA. In reporter assays, both of these microRNA clusters inhibited the expression of a reporter construct containing the FASN 3′-UTR. However, only ectopic miR-15a-16-1, but not miR-497-195, markedly reduced the levels of endogenous FASN in breast cancer cells. Both miR-15a and miR-16-1 contributes to inhibiting FASN expression and breast cancer cell proliferation. Consistently, a sponge construct consisting of eight repeats of the FASN 3′-UTR region targeted by these microRNAs could markedly increase endogenous FASN levels in mammary cells. When FASN expression was restored by ectopic expression in breast cancer cells, retarded cell proliferation caused by miR-15a-16-1 was partially rescued. In conclusion, we demonstrated that FASN expression is primarily downregulated by miR-15a and miR-16-1 in mammary cells and FASN is one of the major targets of these two tumor suppressive microRNAs. PMID:27713175

  13. Expression of the Cardiac Maintenance and Survival Factor FGF-16 Gene Is Regulated by Csx/Nkx2.5 and Is an Early Target of Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Jin, Yan; Cattini, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 16 gene (Fgf-16) is preferentially expressed by neonatal cardiomyocytes after birth, with levels increasing into adulthood. Null mice and isolated heart studies suggest a role for FGF-16 in cardiac maintenance and survival, including increased resistance to doxorubicin (DOX)-induced injury. However, the effect of DOX on endogenous FGF-16 synthesis and specifically regulation of cardiac Fgf-16 expression has not been reported. Here we assess the effect of DOX on FGF-16 RNA levels and stability as well as promoter activity and use sequence analysis, knockdown, and overexpression to investigate the role of cardiac transcription factor(s) implicated in the response. Endogenous FGF-16 RNA levels were reduced >70% in 8-week-old rats treated with 15 mg DOX/kg for 6 h. This was modeled in neonatal rat cardiomyocyte cultures, where an equivalent decrease was also seen within 6 h of 1 μM DOX treatment. Six kilobases of mouse Fgf-16 upstream flanking and promoter DNA was also assessed for DOX responsiveness in transfected cardiomyocytes. A decrease in FGF-16 promoter activity was seen with only 747 base pairs containing the Fgf-16 TATA box that includes a putative and highly conserved binding site for the cardiac transcription factor Csx/Nkx2.5. There was also no effect of DOX on FGF-16 RNA stability, consistent with transcriptional control. Levels and binding of Csx/Nkx2.5 to the FGF-16 promoter were reduced with DOX treatment. Knockdown of Csx/Nkx2.5 specifically decreased endogenous FGF-16 RNA and protein levels, whereas Csx/Nkx2.5 overexpression stimulated levels, and increased resistance to the rapid DOX-induced depletion of FGF-16. These observations indicate that Fgf-16 expression is directly regulated by Csx/Nkx2.5 in neonatal cardiomyocytes, and a negative effect of DOX on Csx/Nkx2.5 and, thus, endogenous FGF-16 synthesis may contribute indirectly to its cardiotoxic effects. Targeting FGF-16 levels could, however, offer

  14. MiR-15a/16 deficiency enhances anti-tumor immunity of glioma-infiltrating CD8+ T cells through targeting mTOR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiao; Liu, Ronghua; Deng, Yuting; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Wang, Yuedi; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Feifei; Chu, Yiwei

    2017-11-15

    MiR-15a/16, a miRNA cluster located at chromosome 13q14, has been reported to act as an immune regulator in inflammatory disorders besides its aberrant expression in cancers. However, little is known about its regulation in tumor-infiltrating immune cells. In our study, using an orthotropic GL261 mouse glioma model, we found that miR-15a/16 deficiency in host inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mice survival, which might be associated with the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. More importantly, tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells without miR-15a/16 showed lower expression of PD-1, Tim-3 and LAG-3, and stronger secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α than WT tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. Also, our in vitro experiments further confirmed that miR-15a/16(-/-) CD8+ T displayed higher active phenotypes, more cytokines secretion and faster expansion, compared to WT CD8+ T cells. Mechanismly, mTOR was identified as a target gene of miR-15a/16 to negatively regulate the activation of CD8+ T cells. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-15a/16 deficiency resists the exhaustion and maintains the activation of glioma-infiltrating CD8+ T cells to alleviate glioma progression via targeting mTOR. Our findings provide evidence for the potential immunotherapy through targeting miR-15a/16 in tumor-infiltrating immune cells. © 2017 UICC.

  15. Influence of grassing targeted into the recharge zone on the nitrate concentrations and nitrogen leaching out of the drained catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajíček, Antonín; Fučík, Petr; Kvítek, Tomáš

    2015-04-01

    Long term experiment with the land use change in tile drainage recharge zone was conducted in the catchment Dehtáře (57.9 ha, Bohemian-Moravian Highlands, Czech Republic). It is a locally typical small agricultural catchment, where the tile drainage acts as the only permanent runoff and the drainage system was built in the slope. Several drainage subsystems with various land use in their recharge and discharge zones has been monitored since 2003. Recharge zones of some subsystems were grassed since the hydrological year 2007 and nitrate concentrations, theirs trends and nitrogen loads were statistically analysed and compared with subsystems without the land use change. The statistical analysis showed that the flow-weighted nitrate concentrations before grassing the recharge zone were surprisingly higher in drainage subsystems with the permanent grassland in drained area (discharge zone) than in the subsystem under arable land. Approximately one year after grassing the recharge zone, the long-term course of NO3 concentrations became decreasing. The statistically significant decreases in nitrate concentrations of 32.1% and 25.7% were detected in drainage subsystems under the grassed recharge zone. In the same period, an increase in nitrate concentration was detected in sites without land use change. There was an increase of 10.8% in the drainage subsystem with arable land in both (recharge and discharge) zones and of 8.6% in the subsystem with grassland in the discharge zone, but arable land in the recharge zone. Evaluating the whole drainage system, the fall in nitrate concentrations by 10.5% was detected after grassing about 20% of this systems recharge zone. In association with the change in nitrate concentrations, the nitrate-nitrogen leaching decreased after grassing. In the scale of whole drainage system, the monthly average load decreased by 23% from 3.2 kg N/month/ha to 2.6 kg N/month/ha. In the drainage subsystem, where the recharge zone was grassed

  16. Direct Solvent-Derived Polymer-Coated Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanodots with High Water Solubility for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Meng, Ying; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Chengyi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Jian; Wang, Jianxin; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-08-05

    Cancer imaging requires biocompatible and bright contrast-agents with selective and high accumulation in the tumor region but low uptake in normal tissues. Herein, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP)-derived polymer-coated nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots (pN-CNDs) with a particle size in the range of 5-15 nm are prepared by a facile direct solvothermal reaction. The as-prepared pN-CNDs exhibit stable and adjustable fluorescence and excellent water solubility. Results of a cell viability test (CCK-8) and histology analysis both demonstrate that the pN-CNDs have no obvious cytotoxicity. Most importantly, the pN-CNDs can expediently enter glioma cells in vitro and also mediate glioma fluorescence imaging in vivo with good contrast via elevated passive targeting. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. High blood sugar levels significantly impact the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients through down-regulation of microRNA-16 by targeting Myb and VEGFR2.

    PubMed

    Yang, I-Ping; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Lu, Chien-Yu; Miao, Zhi-Feng; Chang, Se-Fen; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-04-05

    The high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in colorectal cancer patients is a crucial public health issue worldwide. The deregulation of microRNAs has been shown to be associated with the progression of CRC; however, the effects of high blood sugar levels on miR deregulation and, in turn, CRC remain unexplored. In this study, 520 CRC patients were classified into two groups according to their blood sugar levels (≧110 or <110 mg/dL). Clinicopathologic features, clinical outcomes, and serum miR-16 levels of the two groups were then analyzed, while cell cycles, cell proliferation, migration, and cellular miR-16 expression were investigated via D-(+)-glucose administration. Additionally, the target genes of miR-16 were identified. Through multivariate analysis, both the disease-free survival and overall survival of the CRC patients were found to be associated with the UICC stage, perineural invasion, and blood glucose levels (P < 0.05). Serum miR-16 levels were significantly lower in the high blood glucose patients than in the normal blood glucose patients (P = 0.0329). With D-(+)-glucose administration, the proliferation and migration of CRC cells in vitro increased remarkably (P < 0.05), while their accumulation in the G1 phase decreased significantly. Cellular miR-16 expression was suppressed by D-(+)-glucose administration. The expression levels of two target genes, Myb and VEGFR2, were affected significantly by miR-16, while glucose administration inhibited miR-16 expression and enhanced tumor cell proliferation and migration. Hyperglycemia can impact the clinical outcomes of CRC patients, likely by inhibiting miR-16 expression and the expression of its downstream genes Myb and VEGFR2.

  18. The Use of Recombinant Pseudotype Virus-Like Particles Harbouring Inserted Target Antigen to Generate Antibodies against Cellular Marker p16INK4A

    PubMed Central

    Lasickienė, Rita; Gedvilaite, Alma; Norkiene, Milda; Simanaviciene, Vaida; Sezaite, Indre; Dekaminaviciute, Dovile; Shikova, Evelina; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2012-01-01

    Protein engineering provides an opportunity to generate new immunogens with desired features. Previously, we have demonstrated that hamster polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) are highly immunogenic and can be employed for the insertion of foreign epitopes at certain surface-exposed positions. In the current study, we have designed pseudotype VLPs consisting of an intact VP1 protein and VP2 protein fused with the target antigen—cellular marker p16INK4A—at its N terminus. Both proteins coexpressed in yeast were self-assembled to pseudotype VLPs harbouring the inserted antigen on the surface. The pseudotype VLPs were used for generation of antibodies against p16INK4A that represents a potential biomarker for cells transformed by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). The pseudotype VLPs induced in immunized mice a strong immune response against the target antigen. The antisera raised against pseudotype VLPs showed specific immunostaining of p16INK4A protein in malignant cervical tissue. Spleen cells of the immunized mice were used to generate monoclonal antibodies against p16INK4A protein. The specificity of antibodies was proven by the immunostaining of HPV-transformed cells. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates the potential of pseudotype VLPs with inserted target antigen as a new type of immunogens to generate antibodies of high diagnostic value. PMID:22629125

  19. Comparative phenomics and targeted use of genomics reveals variation in carbon and nitrogen assimilation among different Brettanomyces bruxellensis strains.

    PubMed

    Crauwels, S; Van Assche, A; de Jonge, R; Borneman, A R; Verreth, C; Troels, P; De Samblanx, G; Marchal, K; Van de Peer, Y; Willems, K A; Verstrepen, K J; Curtin, C D; Lievens, B

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested a correlation between genotype groups of Brettanomyces bruxellensis and their source of isolation. To further explore this relationship, the objective of this study was to assess metabolic differences in carbon and nitrogen assimilation between different B. bruxellensis strains from three beverages, including beer, wine, and soft drink, using Biolog Phenotype Microarrays. While some similarities of physiology were noted, many traits were variable among strains. Interestingly, some phenotypes were found that could be linked to strain origin, especially for the assimilation of particular α- and β-glycosides as well as α- and β-substituted monosaccharides. Based upon gene presence or absence, an α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase were found explaining the observed phenotypes. Further, using a PCR screen on a large number of isolates, we have been able to specifically link a genomic deletion to the beer strains, suggesting that this region may have a fitness cost for B. bruxellensis in certain fermentation systems such as brewing. More specifically, none of the beer strains were found to contain a β-glucosidase, which may have direct impacts on the ability for these strains to compete with other microbes or on flavor production.

  20. Empirical testing of 16S rRNA gene PCR primer pairs reveals variance in target specificity and efficacy not suggested by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sergio E; Holben, William E

    2009-05-01

    Phylogenetic and "fingerprinting" analyses of the 16S rRNA genes of prokaryotes have been a mainstay of microbial ecology during the last two decades. However, many methods and results from studies that rely on the 16S rRNA gene for detection and quantification of specific microbial taxa have seemingly received only cursory or even no validation. To directly examine the efficacy and specificity of 16S rRNA gene-based primers for phylum-, class-, and operational taxonomic unit-specific target amplification in quantitative PCR, we created a collection of primers based solely on an extensive soil bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library containing approximately 5,000 sequences from a single soil sample (i.e., a closed site-specific library was used to create PCR primers for use at this site). These primers were initially tested in silico prior to empirical testing by PCR amplification of known target sequences and of controls based on disparate phylogenetic groups. Although all primers were highly specific according to the in silico analysis, the empirical analyses clearly exhibited a high degree of nonspecificity for many of the phyla or classes, while other primers proved to be highly specific. These findings suggest that significant care must be taken when interpreting studies whose results were obtained with target specific primers that were not adequately validated, especially where population densities or dynamics have been inferred from the data. Further, we suggest that the reliability of quantification of specific target abundance using 16S rRNA-based quantitative PCR is case specific and must be determined through rigorous empirical testing rather than solely in silico.

  1. [Targeting p16(INK4a) by therapeutic vaccination : Concept and status of clinical investigations in HPV-associated head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, M

    2015-02-01

    Up to 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are attributable to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection; however, a therapy specific for patients with HPV-associated cancers is currently not available. Overexpression of the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 results in cellular alterations that represent interesting targets for novel therapies. One consequence of E6/E7 overexpression is strong expression of the cellular protein p16(INK4a). The elimination of p16(INK4a)-expressing tumor cells by the immune system could be achieved through a therapeutic p16(INK4a) vaccine. The current article provides an overview of HPV-associated head and neck cancers and the associated p16(INK4a) expression. Based on this overview, the concept and status of the clinical investigation of therapeutic p16(INK4a) vaccination is described. In addition to discussing published literature, a clinical study is described. In this phase I/IIa study, patients with advanced HPV-associated p16(INK4a)-expressing tumors were vaccinated with a p16(INK4a) peptide. HPV-associated head and neck cancers continuously display strong overexpression of the cellular protein p16(INK4a). Vaccination with p16(INK4a) could represent a novel therapy for patients with HPV-associated carcinomas. Further studies will evaluate the clinical efficacy of therapeutic p16(INK4a) vaccination. Combinations with other immunotherapeutic approaches are interesting considering the modulating role of the immune system, particularly in HPV-associated tumors.

  2. ZBTB16 as a Downstream Target Gene of Osterix Regulates Osteoblastogenesis of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onizuka, Satoru; Park, Sung‐Joon; Nakai, Kenta; Yamato, Masayuki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) possess the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, and they can be utilized as a source for bone regenerative therapy. Osteoinductive pretreatment, which induces the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs in vitro, has been widely used for bone tissue engineering prior to cell transplantation. However, the molecular basis of osteoblastic differentiation induced by osteoinductive medium (OIM) is still unknown. Therefore, we used a next‐generation sequencer to investigate the changes in gene expression during the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs. The hMSCs used in this study possessed both multipotency and self‐renewal ability. Whole‐transcriptome analysis revealed that the expression of zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16 (ZBTB16) was significantly increased during the osteoblastogenesis of hMSCs. ZBTB16 mRNA and protein expression was enhanced by culturing the hMSCs with OIM. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)‐mediated gene silencing of ZBTB16 decreased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP); the expression of osteogenic genes, such as osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP), and the mineralized nodule formation induced by OIM. siRNA‐mediated gene silencing of Osterix (Osx), which is known as an essential regulator of osteoblastic differentiation, markedly downregulated the expression of ZBTB16. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that Osx associated with the ZBTB16 promoter region containing the GC‐rich canonical Sp1 sequence, which is the specific Osx binding site. These findings suggest that ZBTB16 acts as a downstream transcriptional regulator of Osx and can be useful as a late marker of osteoblastic differentiation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2423–2434, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27335174

  3. Assessment of experimental d-PIGE γ-ray production cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O and comparison with absolute thick target yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csedreki, L.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Measured differential cross sections for deuteron induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 12C(d,pγ)13C, (Eγ = 3089 keV), 14N(d,pγ)15N (Eγ = 8310 keV) and 16O(d,pγ)17O (Eγ = 871 keV) available in the literature were assessed. In order to cross check the assessed γ-ray production cross section data, thick target γ-yields calculated from the differential cross sections were compared with available measured thick target yields. Recommended differential cross section data for each reaction were deduced for particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) applications.

  4. Fast neutron yields and spectra from targets of varying atomic number bombarded with deuterons from 16 to 50 MeV.

    PubMed

    Meulders, J P; Leleux, P; Macq, P C; Pirart, C

    1975-03-01

    Neutron production from targets of Be, C, Mo, Cu, Ta and Au bombarded with deuterons of 16, 33 and 50 MeV has been studied at the isochronous cyclotron at Louvain-la-Neuve. Neutron spectra were measured by the time of flight method. The yields of neutrons and gamma rays were also measured, and the greatest ratio of neutrons to gamma rays in the forward direction was found to occur with 50 MeV deuterons on a Be target. The angular distribution of neutrons from Be was measured at 16, 33 and 50 MeV, and neutron spectra were measured as function of angle with 50 MeV deuterons on Be.

  5. Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences.

  6. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  7. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  8. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis.

  9. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  10. Characterization of nitrogen-fixing Paenibacillus species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of part of genes encoding 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Marcia Reed Rodrigues; von der Weid, Irene; Zahner, Viviane; Seldin, Lucy

    2003-05-28

    Forty-two strains representing the eight recognized nitrogen-fixing Paenibacillus species and 12 non-identified strains were examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of part of 16S and 23S rRNA genes amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eleven different 16S rDNA genotypes were obtained from the combined data of RFLP analysis with four endonucleases and they were in agreement with the established taxonomic classification. Only one group of unclassified strains (Group I) was assigned in a separate genotype, suggesting they belong to a new species. Using the 23S PCR-RFLP method only six genotypes were detected, showing that this method is less discriminative than the 16S PCR-RFLP. Using the multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) assay, the 48 strains tested could be classified into 35 zymovars. The seven enzymatic loci tested were polymorphic and the different profiles obtained among strains allowed the grouping of strains into 10 clusters. The PCR-RFLP methods together with the MLEE assay provide a rapid tool for the characterization and the establishment of the taxonomic position of isolates belonging to this nitrogen-fixing group, which shows a great potentiality in promoting plant growth.

  11. miR-15a/16 Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Targeting the TLR1/NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Fengming; Yue, Xiao; Ren, Gang; Li, Hongqi; Ping, Li; Wang, Yingjie; Xia, Tingyi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Many miRNAs have been identified as essential issues and core determining factors in tumor radiation. Recent reports have demonstrated that miRNAs and Toll-like receptors could exert reciprocal effects to control cancer development in various ways. However, a novel role of miR-15a/16 in enhancing radiation sensitivity by directly targeting TLR1 has not been reported, to our knowledge. Methods and Materials: Bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assay, biochemical assays, and subcutaneous tumor establishment were used to characterize the signaling pathways of miRNA-15a/16 in response to radiation treatment. Results: First, an inverse correlation between the expression of miR-15a/16 and TLR1 protein was revealed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and normal lung tissues. Next, we corroborated that miR-15a/16 specifically bound to TLR1 3′UTR and inhibited the expression of TLR1 in H358 and A549 cells. Furthermore, miR-15a/16 downregulated the activity of the NF-κB signaling pathway through TLR1. In addition, overexpression of miR-15a/16 inhibited survival capability and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting in enhancement of radiosensitivity in H358 and A549 cells. Finally, subcutaneous tumor bearing NSCLC cells in a nude mice model was established, and the results showed that combined groups (miR-15a/16 + radiation) inhibited tumor growth more significantly than did radiation alone. Conclusions: We mainly elucidate that miRNA-15a/16 can enhance radiation sensitivity by regulating the TLR1/NF-κB signaling pathway and act as a potential therapeutic approach to overcome radioresistance for lung cancer treatment.

  12. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes of hyperthermophilic archaea in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Masuda, Harue; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2007-04-01

    International drilling projects for the study of microbial communities in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere have been expanded. Core samples obtained by deep drilling are commonly contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, making it difficult to examine the microbial community by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate mesophilic organism contamination, we previously developed a new method (selective phylogenetic analysis [SePA]) based on the strong correlation between the guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) contents of the 16S rRNA genes and the optimal growth temperatures of prokaryotes, and we verified the method's effectiveness (H. Kimura, M. Sugihara, K. Kato, and S. Hanada, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:21-27, 2006). In the present study we ascertained SePA's ability to eliminate contamination by archaeal rRNA genes, using deep-sea hydrothermal fluid (117 degrees C) and surface seawater (29.9 degrees C) as substitutes for deep-subsurface geothermal samples and drilling fluid, respectively. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments, PCR amplified from the surface seawater, were denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested with exonuclease I (Exo I), while gene fragments from the deep-sea hydrothermal fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C because of their high G+C contents. An examination using mixtures of DNAs from the two environmental samples showed that denaturation at 84 degrees C and digestion with Exo I completely eliminated archaeal 16S rRNA genes from the surface seawater. Our method was quite useful for culture-independent community analysis of hyperthermophilic archaea in core samples recovered from deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

  13. Implementation of a Target State Estimator for the Air-to-Air Attack Mode of the AFTI/F-16.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    an extended Kalman filter, on the AFTI/F-16. Several possible reasons for the poor performance it exhibits are investigated; the major reason for...Concepts.12 2.4. Kalman Filtering ..... ............ 14 2.4.1. Extended Kalman Filter Equations. .15 2.4.2. Wordlength Problems ........ 17 2.4.3. U-D...reasons for this poor performance are presented as well as suggestions to upgrade the performance. The TSE exists as extended Kalman filter equations in a

  14. Transcriptional factor HBP1 targets P16(INK4A), upregulating its expression and consequently is involved in Ras-induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, W; Liu, X; Paulson, K E; Yee, A S; Zhang, X

    2010-09-09

    Oncogene-mediated premature senescence has emerged as a potential tumor-suppressive mechanism in early cancer transitions. Many studies showed that Ras and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) participate in premature senescence. Our previous work indicated that the HMG box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) transcription factor is involved in Ras- and p38 MAPK-induced premature senescence, but the mechanism of which has not yet been identified. Here, we showed that the p16(INK4A) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor is a novel target of HBP1 participating in Ras-induced premature senescence. The promoter of the p16(INK4A) gene contains an HBP1-binding site at position -426 to -433 bp from the transcriptional start site. HBP1 regulates the expression of the endogenous p16(INK4A) gene through direct sequence-specific binding. With HBP1 expression and the subsequent increase of p16(INK4A) gene expression, Ras induces premature senescence in primary cells. The data suggest a model in which Ras and p38 MAPK signaling engage HBP1 and p16(INK4A) to trigger premature senescence. In addition, we report that HBP1 knockdown is also required for Ras-induced transformation. All the data indicate that the mechanism of HBP1-mediated transcriptional regulation is important for not only premature senescence but also tumorigenesis.

  15. JAM-A and ALCAM are therapeutic targets to inhibit diapedesis across the BBB of CD14+CD16+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dionna W; Anastos, Kathryn; Morgello, Susan; Berman, Joan W

    2015-02-01

    Monocyte transmigration across the BBB is a critical step in the development of cognitive deficits termed HAND that affect 40-70% of HIV-infected individuals, even with successful antiretroviral therapy. The monocyte subsets that enter the CNS during HIV infection are not fully characterized. We examined PBMC from HIV-positive individuals from 2 distinct cohorts and enumerated monocyte populations, characterized their transmigration properties across an in vitro human BBB model, and identified surface proteins critical for the entry of these cells into the CNS. We demonstrated that the frequency of peripheral blood CD14(+)CD16(+) and CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes was increased in HIV-seropositive compared with -seronegative individuals, despite virologic control. We showed that CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes selectively transmigrated across our BBB model as a result of their increased JAM-A and ALCAM expression. Antibody blocking of these proteins inhibited diapedesis of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes but not of T cells from the same HIV-infected people across the BBB. Our data indicate that JAM-A and ALCAM are therapeutic targets to decrease the entry of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes into the CNS of HIV-seropositive individuals, contributing to the eradication of neuroinflammation, HAND, and CNS viral reservoirs.

  16. Melanoma-targeted delivery system (part 2): Synthesis, radioiodination and biological evaluation in B16F0 bearing mice.

    PubMed

    El Aissi, Radhia; Miladi, Imen; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Chavignon, Olivier; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Moreau, Emmanuel

    2016-09-14

    Here we report the synthesis and radiolabelling with iodine-125 of a melanoma-selective prodrug (17a*) and its parent drug IUdR. The in vivo and ex vivo biodistributions of [(125)I](17a*) and [(125)I]IUdR were evaluated in a model of melanoma B16F0-bearing mice. The pharmacokinetic profile of [(125)I](17a*) suggests rapid release of the active drug [(125)I]IUdR after i.v. administration of [(125)I](17a*). Preliminary metabolism studies in dedicated compartments (i.e. blood, urine and tumour) yielded results consistent with this hypothesis.

  17. CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes are the main target of Zika virus infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a paediatric study in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Michlmayr, Daniela; Andrade, Paulina; Gonzalez, Karla; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2017-10-02

    The recent Zika pandemic in the Americas is linked to congenital birth defects and Guillain-Barré syndrome. White blood cells (WBCs) play an important role in host immune responses early in arboviral infection. Infected WBCs can also function as 'Trojan horses' and carry viruses into immune-sheltered spaces, including the placenta, testes and brain. Therefore, defining which WBCs are permissive to Zika virus (ZIKV) is critical. Here, we analyse ZIKV infectivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro and from Nicaraguan Zika patients and show CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes are the main target of infection, with ZIKV replication detected in some dendritic cells. The frequency of CD14(+) monocytes was significantly decreased, while the CD14(+)CD16(+) monocyte population was significantly expanded during ZIKV infection compared to uninfected controls. Viral RNA was detected in PBMCs from all patients, but in serum from only a subset, suggesting PBMCs may be a reservoir for ZIKV. In Zika patients, the frequency of infected cells was lower but the percentage of infected CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes was significantly higher compared to dengue cases. The gene expression profile in monocytes isolated from ZIKV- and dengue virus-infected patients was comparable, except for significant differences in interferon-γ, CXCL12, XCL1, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 levels. Thus, our study provides a detailed picture of the innate immune profile of ZIKV infection and highlights the important role of monocytes, and CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in particular.The main targets of Zika virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells are monocytes, particularly CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes, which are expanded in Zika patients and in in vitro-infected samples.

  18. Potential antitumor applications of a monoclonal antibody specifically targeting human papilloma virus 16 E7 49-57 peptide.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jianqiang; Zhang, GaoXia

    2012-07-01

    Our study aims to evaluate whether the approach of TCRm mAb has therapeutic potential against HPV-induced tumors. In the present study, we generated a murine IgG2a mAb 6C10 specifically recognizing HPV-16-E7(49-57) epitope (RAHYNIVTF) in the polypeptides and in complex with a MHC class I molecule. Analysis of the primary structure shows that the 6C10 Ab displays a novel sequence in the CDR of the heavy chain, compared to the sequences in the Kabat database, which suggests the Ab has completed its affinity maturation. The 6C10 Ab can specifically recognize E7 and Trx-E7(30-67) protein in ELISA, and can also specifically bind to T2 cell carrying HPV-16-E7(49-57) peptide. In the TC-1 cell tumor-bearing mouse model, 6C10 exhibits tumor suppression activity when compared to the isotype control Ab. 6C10 Ab has showed tumor-inhibition potency in a mouse model and this Ab may have the prospect of cancer therapy. © 2012 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Endogenous target mimics down-regulate miR160 mediation of ARF10, -16, and -17 cleavage during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuling; Lai, Zhongxiong; Tian, Qilin; Lin, Lixia; Lai, Ruilian; Yang, Manman; Zhang, Dongmin; Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Zihao

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA160 plays a critical role in plant development by negatively regulating the auxin response factors ARF10, -16, and -17. However, the ways in which miR160 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level, and how miR160 interacts with its targets during plant embryo development, remain unknown. Here, we studied the regulatory relationships among endogenous target mimics (eTMs), and miR160 and its targets, and their involvement in hormone signaling and somatic embryogenesis (SE) in Dimocarpus longan. We identified miR160 family members and isolated the miR160 precursor, primary transcript, and promoter. The promoter contained cis-acting elements responsive to stimuli such as light, abscisic acid, salicylic acid (SA) and heat stress. The pri-miR160 was down-regulated in response to SA but up-regulated by gibberellic acid, ethylene, and methyl jasmonate treatment, suggesting that pri-miR160 was associated with hormone transduction. Dlo-miR160a, -a∗ and -d∗ reached expression peaks in torpedo-shaped embryos, globular embryos and cotyledonary embryos, respectively, but were barely detectable in friable-embryogenic callus. This suggests that they have expression-related and functional diversity, especially during the middle and later developmental stages of SE. Four potential eTMs for miR160 were identified. Two of them, glucan endo-1,3-beta- glucosidase-like protein 2-like and calpain-type cysteine protease DEK1, were confirmed to control the corresponding dlo-miR160a∗ expression level. This suggests that they may function to abolish the binding between dlo-miR160a∗ and its targets. These two eTMs also participated in 2,4-D and ABA signal transduction. DlARF10, -16, and -17 targeting by dlo-miR160a was confirmed; their expression levels were higher in friable-embryogenic callus and incomplete compact pro-embryogenic cultures and responded to 2,4-D, suggesting they may play a major role in the early stages of longan SE dependent on 2,4-D. The eTMs, mi

  20. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene to detect and differentiate Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-08-01

    A PCR-based method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene was developed for differential identification of Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for 176 Legionella 16S rRNA gene fragments of 56 different Legionella species, a set of SNPs, A(628)C(629) was found to be highly specific to L. pneumophila strains. A multiplex assay was designed that was able to distinguish sites with limited sequence heterogeneity between L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila in the targeted 16S rRNA gene. The assay amplified a 261-bp amplicon for Legionella spp. and a set of 203- and 97-bp amplicons only specific to L. pneumophila species. Among 49 ATCC strains and 284 Legionella isolates from environmental water and clinical samples, 100 % of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this assay. The assay presents a more rapid, sensitive and alternative method to the currently available PCR-sequencing detection and differentiation method.

  1. 21-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-16 alpha-ethyl-19-norprogesterone: synthesis and target tissue selective uptake of a progestin receptor based radiotracer for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pomper, M.G.; Katzenellenbogen, J.A.; Welch, M.J.; Brodack, J.W.; Mathias, C.J.

    1988-07-01

    We have synthesized 21-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-16 alpha-ethyl-19-norprogesterone (FENP), a high affinity ligand for the progesterone receptor, labeled with the positron-emitting radionuclide fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 110 min). The synthesis proceeds in two steps from 21-hydroxy-16 alpha-ethyl-19-norprogesterone and involves (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion displacement of the 21-trifluoromethanesulfonate (21-triflate). This material is purified by HPLC and is obtained in 4-30% overall yield (decay corrected) within 40 min after the end of bombardment to produce (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion. The effective specific activity, determined by competitive radioreceptor binding assays, is 700-1400 Ci/mmol. In vivo, (/sup 18/F)FENP demonstrates highly selective, receptor-mediated uptake by the uterus of estrogen-primed rats; the uterus to blood and uterus to muscle ratios were respectively 26 and 16 at 1 h and 71 and 41 at 3 h after injection. The high target tissue selectivity of this uptake suggests that this compound may be useful for the in vivo imaging of progestin target tissues and receptor-rich tumors (such as human breast tumors) by positron emission tomography.

  2. PCR-based method for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Vibrio is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria comprised of 74 species. Furthermore, the genus has and is expected to continue expanding with the addition of several new species annually. Consequently, it is of paramount importance to have a method which is able to reliably and efficiently differentiate the numerous Vibrio species. Results In this study, a novel and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based intergenic spacer (IGS)-typing system for vibrios was developed that is based on the well-known IGS regions located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes on the bacterial chromosome. The system was optimized to resolve heteroduplex formation as well as to take advantage of capillary gel electrophoresis technology such that reproducible analyses could be achieved in a rapid manner. System validation was achieved through testing of 69 archetypal Vibrio strains, representing 48 Vibrio species, from which an 'IGS-type' profile database was generated. These data, presented here in several cluster analyses, demonstrated successful differentiation of the 69 type strains showing that this PCR-based fingerprinting method easily discriminates bacterial strains at the species level among Vibrio. Furthermore, testing 36 strains each of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, important food borne pathogens, isolated from a variety of geographical locations with the IGS-typing method demonstrated distinct IGS-typing patterns indicative of subspecies divergence in both populations making this technique equally useful for intraspecies differentiation, as well. Conclusion This rapid, reliable and efficient IGS-typing system, especially in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, has the capacity to not only discern and identify vibrios at the species level but, in some cases, at the sub-species level, as well. This procedure is particularly well-suited for preliminary species identification and, lends itself nicely to epidemiological investigations

  3. p16(INK4A) inhibits the pro-metastatic potentials of osteosarcoma cells through targeting the ERK pathway and TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriela; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-05-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is a downstream component of the evolutionarily conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathway, which controls the expression of a plethora of genes implicated in various physiological processes. This pathway is often hyper-activated by mutations or abnormal extracellular signaling in different types of human cancer, including the most common primary malignant bone tumor osteosarcomas. p16(INK4A) is an important tumor suppressor gene frequently lost in osteosarcomas, and is associated with the progression of these malignancies. We have shown, here, that the ERK1/2 protein kinase is also activated by p16(INK4A) down-regulation in osteosarcoma cells and normal human as well as mouse cells. This inhibitory effect is associated with the suppression of the upstream kinase MEK1/2, and is mediated via the repression of miR-21-5p and the consequent up-regulation of the MEK/ERK antagonist SPRY2 in osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, we have shown that p16(INK4) inhibits the migration/invasion abilities of these cells through miR-21-5p-dependent inhibition of ERK1/2. In addition, we present clear evidence that p16(INK4) represses the paracrine pro-migratory effect of osteosarcoma cells on stromal fibroblasts through the inhibition of the TGF-β1 expression/secretion. This effect is also ERK1/2-dependent, indicating that in addition to their cell-autonomous actions, p16(INK4) and ERK1/2 have also non-cell-autonomous cancer-related functions. Together, these results indicate that the tumor suppressor p16(INK4) protein represses the carcinogenic process of osteosarcoma cells not only as a cell cycle regulator, but also as a negative regulator of pro-carcinogenic/-metastatic pathways. This indicates that targeting the ERK pathway is of utmost therapeutic value. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Targeted O-glycoproteomics explored increased sialylation and identified MUC16 as a poor prognosis biomarker in advanced stage bladder tumours.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Sofia; Azevedo, Rita; Gaiteiro, Cristiana; Ferreira, Dylan; Lima, Luís; Peixoto, Andreia; Fernandes, Elisabete; Neves, Manuel; Neves, Diogo; Amaro, Teresina; Cruz, Ricardo; Tavares, Ana; Rangel, Maria; Silva, André M N; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Ferreira, José Alexandre

    2017-02-03

    Bladder carcinogenesis and tumour progression is accompanied by profound alterations in protein glycosylation on the cell surface, which may be explored for improving disease management. In a search for prognosis biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets we have screened, using immunohistochemistry, a series of bladder tumours with differing clinicopathology for short-chain O-glycans commonly found in glycoproteins of human solid tumours. These included the Tn and T antigens and their sialylated counterparts sialyl-Tn(STn) and sialyl-T(ST), which are generally associated with poor prognosis. We have also explored the nature of T antigen sialylation, namely the sialyl-3-T(S3T) and sialyl-6-T(S6T) sialoforms, based on combinations of enzymatic treatments. We observed a predominance of sialoglycans over neutral glycoforms (Tn and T antigens) in bladder tumours. In particular, the STn antigen was associated with high-grade disease and muscle invasion, in accordance with our previous observations. The S3T and S6T antigens were detected for the first time in bladder tumours but not in healthy urothelia, highlighting their cancer-specific nature. These glycans were also overexpressed in advanced lesions, especially in cases showing muscle invasion. Glycoproteomic analyses of advanced bladder tumours based on enzymatic treatments, Vicia Villosa lectin-affinity chromatography enrichment and nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of several key cancer-associated glycoproteins (MUC16, CD44, integrins) carrying altered glycosylation. Of particular interest were MUC16 STn(+) -glycoforms, characteristic of ovarian cancers, which were found in a subset of advanced-stage bladder tumours facing the worst prognosis. In summary, significant alterations in the O-glycome and O-glycoproteome of bladder tumors hold promise for the development of novel non-invasive diagnostic tools and targeted therapeutics. Furthermore, abnormal MUC16 glycoforms hold potential as

  5. Combined treatment of the experimental human papilloma virus-16-positive cervical and head and neck cancers with cisplatin and radioimmunotherapy targeting viral E6 oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Harris, M; Wang, X G; Jiang, Z; Phaeton, R; Koba, W; Goldberg, G L; Casadevall, A; Dadachova, E

    2013-03-05

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is implicated in >99% of cervical cancers and ∼40% of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We previously targeted E6 oncogene with (188)Rhenium-labelled monoclonal antibody (mAb) C1P5 to HPV16 E6 in cervical cancer and HNSCC. Intranuclear E6 can be accessed by mAbs in non-viable cells with leaky membranes. As radioimmunotherapy (RIT) efficacy depends on the availability of target protein-we hypothesised that pretreatment with cisplatin will kill some tumour cells and increase E6 availability for RIT. Mice with subcutaneous HPV16+ cervical (CasKi) and HNSCC (2A3) tumours were pretreated with 0-7.5 mg kg(-1) per day cisplatin for 3 days followed by (188)Re-C1P5 and biodistribution was performed 24 h later. For RIT, the animals were treated with: 5 mg kg(-1) per day cisplatin for 3 days; or 5 mg kg(-1) per day cisplatin for 3 days followed 200 or 400μCi (188)Re-C1P5 mAb; or 200 or 400μCi (188)Re-C1P5 mAb; or left untreated, and observed for tumour growth for 24 days. Pretreatment with cisplatin increased the uptake of (188)Re-C1P5 in the tumours 2.5 to 3.5-fold and caused significant retardation in tumour growth for CasKi and 2A3 tumours in both RIT alone and cisplatin, and RIT groups in comparison with the untreated control and cisplatin alone groups (P<0.05). The combined treatment was more effective than either modality alone (P<0.05). Our study demonstrates that preceding RIT targeting E6 oncogene with chemotherapy is effective in suppressing tumour growth in mouse models of HPV16+ cancers.

  6. Reversal of dendritic phenotypes in 16p11.2 microduplication mouse model neurons by pharmacological targeting of a network hub

    PubMed Central

    Blizinsky, Katherine D.; Diaz-Castro, Blanca; Forrest, Marc P.; Schürmann, Britta; Bach, Anthony P.; Martin-de-Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Wang, Lei; Csernansky, John G.; Duan, Jubao; Penzes, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The architecture of dendritic arbors contributes to neuronal connectivity in the brain. Conversely, abnormalities in dendrites have been reported in multiple mental disorders and are thought to contribute to pathogenesis. Rare copy number variations (CNVs) are genetic alterations that are associated with a wide range of mental disorders and are highly penetrant. The 16p11.2 microduplication is one of the CNVs most strongly associated with schizophrenia and autism, spanning multiple genes possibly involved in synaptic neurotransmission. However, disease-relevant cellular phenotypes of 16p11.2 microduplication and the driver gene(s) remain to be identified. We found increased dendritic arborization in isolated cortical pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of 16p11.2 duplication (dp/+). Network analysis identified MAPK3, which encodes ERK1 MAP kinase, as the most topologically important hub in protein–protein interaction networks within the 16p11.2 region and broader gene networks of schizophrenia-associated CNVs. Pharmacological targeting of ERK reversed dendritic alterations associated with dp/+ neurons, outlining a strategy for the analysis and reversal of cellular phenotypes in CNV-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27402753

  7. Dual TNF-α/IL-12p40 Interference as a Strategy to Protect Against Colitis Based on miR-16 Precursors With Macrophage Targeting Vectors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Ma, Junting; Chen, Mengjie; Jiang, Haoyang; Fu, Yong; Gan, Jingjing; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Jiangning

    2015-10-01

    Cytokines are central components of the mucosal inflammatory responses that take place during the development of Crohn's disease. Cell-specific combination therapies against cytokines may lead to increased efficacy and even reduced side effects. Therefore, a colonic macrophage-specific therapy using miR-16 precursors that can target both TNF-α and IL-12p40 was tested for its efficacy in experimental colitic mice. Galactosylated low molecular weight chitosan (G-LMWC) associated with miR-16 precursors were intracolonically injected into mice. The cellular localization of miR-16 precursors was determined. The therapeutic effects and possible mechanism were further studied in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitic mice. The results show that specific upregulation of miR-16 level in colonic macrophages significantly reduces TNF-α and IL-12p40 expression, which could suppress the associated mucosal inflammation and ultimately result in the relief of colitic symptoms. This strategy, based on the dual silencing of colonic macrophage-specific cytokines, represents a potential therapeutic approach that may be valuable for colitis therapy.

  8. SARS-CoV ORF1b-encoded nonstructural proteins 12-16: replicative enzymes as antiviral targets.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Imbert, Isabelle; Ferron, François; Collet, Axelle; Coutard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) pandemic caused ten years ago by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has stimulated a number of studies on the molecular biology of coronaviruses. This research has provided significant new insight into many mechanisms used by the coronavirus replication-transcription complex (RTC). The RTC directs and coordinates processes in order to replicate and transcribe the coronavirus genome, a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA of outstanding length (∼27-32kilobases). Here, we review the up-to-date knowledge on SARS-CoV replicative enzymes encoded in the ORF1b, i.e., the main RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nsp12), the helicase/triphosphatase (nsp13), two unusual ribonucleases (nsp14, nsp15) and RNA-cap methyltransferases (nsp14, nsp16). We also review how these enzymes co-operate with other viral co-factors (nsp7, nsp8, and nsp10) to regulate their activity. These last ten years of research on SARS-CoV have considerably contributed to unravel structural and functional details of one of the most fascinating replication/transcription machineries of the RNA virus world. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. cRGD-installed docetaxel-loaded mertansine prodrug micelles: redox-triggered ratiometric dual drug release and targeted synergistic treatment of B16F10 melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ping; Qiu, Min; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Huanli; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2017-07-01

    Combinatorial chemotherapy, which has emerged as a promising treatment modality for intractable cancers, is challenged by a lack of tumor-targeting, robust and ratiometric dual drug release systems. Here, docetaxel-loaded cRGD peptide-decorated redox-activable micellar mertansine prodrug (DTX-cRGD-MMP) was developed for targeted and synergistic treatment of B16F10 melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 mice. DTX-cRGD-MMP exhibited a small size of ca. 49 nm, high DTX and DM1 loading, low drug leakage under physiological conditions, with rapid release of both DTX and DM1 under a cytoplasmic reductive environment. Notably, MTT and flow cytometry assays showed that DTX-cRGD-MMP brought about a synergistic antitumor effect to B16F10 cancer cells, with a combination index of 0.37 and an IC50 over 3- and 13-fold lower than cRGD-MMP (w/o DTX) and DTX-cRGD-Ms (w/o DM1) controls, respectively. In vivo studies revealed that DTX-cRGD-MMP had a long circulation time and a markedly improved accumulation in the B16F10 tumor compared with the non-targeting DTX-MMP control (9.15 versus 3.13% ID/g at 12 h post-injection). Interestingly, mice treated with DTX-cRGD-MMP showed almost complete growth inhibition of B16F10 melanoma, with tumor inhibition efficacy following an order of DTX-cRGD-MMP > DTX-MMP (w/o cRGD) > cRGD-MMP (w/o DTX) > DTX-cRGD-Ms (w/o DM1) > free DTX. Consequently, DTX-cRGD-MMP significantly improved the survival rates of B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice. Importantly, DTX-cRGD-MMP caused little adverse effects as revealed by mice body weights and histological analyses. The combination of two mitotic inhibitors, DTX and DM1, appears to be an interesting approach for effective cancer therapy.

  10. Proton-helium correlation in 94 MeV/nucleon sup 16 O-induced reactions on Al, Ni, and Au targets

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S. ); Riggi, F. ); Bizard, G.; Durand, D.; Laville, J.L. )

    1992-04-01

    Azimuthal distributions of helium ions have been measured in coincidence with high-energy protons in reactions induced by {sup 16}O at 94 MeV/nucleon on {sup 27}Al, {sup 58}Ni, and {sup 197}Au. Helium ions have been detected in a large area multidetector. Protons have been observed at 90{degree}. Mean multiplicities of light charged particles (H and He) are found slightly dependent on the target mass. Strong azimuthal asymmetries whose intensity is larger for the Al target and vanishes with the increasing of the target mass are observed in the He distributions. Experimental data are discussed in the framework of the participant-spectator picture of a modified fireball model, taking into account intermediate energy corrections. In this framework the behavior of the azimuthal asymmetries, as a function of the target mass, indicates a strong final-state interaction between participant and spectator fragments. Such a result is found in agreement with interaction time predictions of a microscopical calculation based on the Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov equation.

  11. A new lipid-rich microalga Scenedesmus sp. strain R-16 isolated using Nile red staining: effects of carbon and nitrogen sources and initial pH on the biomass and lipid production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production from oleaginous microalgae shows great potential as a promising alternative to conventional fossil fuels. Currently, most research focus on algal biomass production with autotrophic cultivation, but this cultivation strategy induces low biomass concentration and it is difficult to be used in large-scale algal biomass production. By contrast, heterotrophic algae allows higher growth rate and can accumulate higher lipid. However, the fast-growing and lipid-rich microalgae that can be cultivated in heterotrophic system for the industrial application of biodiesel production are still few. Traditional solvent extraction and gravimetric determination to detect the microalgal total lipid content is time-consuming and laborious, which has become a major limiting factor for selecting large number of algae specimens. Thus, it is critical to develop a rapid and efficient procedure for the screening of lipid-rich microalgae. Results A novel green microalga Scenedesmus sp. strain R-16 with high total lipid content was selected using the Nile red staining from eighty-eight isolates. Various carbon sources (fructose, glucose and acetate) and nitrogen sources (nitrate, urea, peptone and yeast extract) can be utilized for microalgal growth and lipid production, and the optimal carbon and nitrogen sources were glucose (10 g L-1) and nitrate (0.6 g L-1), respectively. Compared to autotrophic situation, the strain R-16 can grow well heterotrophically without light and the accumulated total lipid content and biomass reached 43.4% and 3.46 g L-1, respectively. In addition, nitrogen deficiency led to an accumulation of lipid and the total lipid content was as high as 52.6%, and it was worth noting that strain R-16 exhibited strong tolerance to high glucose (up to 100 g L-1) and a wide range of pH (4.0-11.0). Conclusions The newly developed ultrasonic-assisted Nile red method proved to be an efficient isolation procedure and was successfully used in

  12. Coronavirus nsp10/nsp16 Methyltransferase Can Be Targeted by nsp10-Derived Peptide In Vitro and In Vivo To Reduce Replication and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Wu, Andong; Xu, Shan; Pan, Ruangang; Zeng, Cong; Jin, Xu; Ge, Xingyi; Shi, Zhengli; Ahola, Tero; Chen, Yu; Guo, Deyin

    2015-08-01

    The 5' cap structures of eukaryotic mRNAs are important for RNA stability and protein translation. Many viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes have evolved 2'-O-methyltransferases (2'-O-MTase) to autonomously modify their mRNAs and carry a cap-1 structure (m7GpppNm) at the 5' end, thereby facilitating viral replication and escaping innate immune recognition in host cells. Previous studies showed that the 2'-O-MTase activity of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nonstructural protein 16 (nsp16) needs to be activated by nsp10, whereas nsp16 of feline coronavirus (FCoV) alone possesses 2'-O-MTase activity (E. Decroly et al., J Virol 82:8071-8084, 2008, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00407-08; M. Bouvet et al., PLoS Pathog 6:e1000863, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000863; E. Decroly et al., PLoS Pathog 7:e1002059, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1002059; Y. Chen et al., PLoS Pathog 7:e1002294, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1002294) . In this study, we demonstrate that stimulation of nsp16 2'-O-MTase activity by nsp10 is a universal and conserved mechanism in coronaviruses, including FCoV, and that nsp10 is functionally interchangeable in the stimulation of nsp16 of different coronaviruses. Based on our current and previous studies, we designed a peptide (TP29) from the sequence of the interaction interface of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nsp10 and demonstrated that the peptide inhibits the 2'-O-MTase activity of different coronaviruses in biochemical assays and the viral replication in MHV infection and SARS-CoV replicon models. Interestingly, the peptide TP29 exerted robust inhibitory effects in vivo in MHV-infected mice by impairing MHV virulence and pathogenesis through suppressing virus replication and enhancing type I interferon production at an early stage of infection. Therefore, as a proof of principle, the current results indicate that coronavirus 2'-O-MTase activity can be targeted

  13. Coronavirus nsp10/nsp16 Methyltransferase Can Be Targeted by nsp10-Derived Peptide In Vitro and In Vivo To Reduce Replication and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Wu, Andong; Xu, Shan; Pan, Ruangang; Zeng, Cong; Jin, Xu; Ge, Xingyi; Shi, Zhengli; Ahola, Tero

    2015-01-01

    -O-MTase activity can be targeted in vitro and in vivo. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses are important pathogens of animals and human with high zoonotic potential. SARS-CoV encodes the 2′-O-MTase that is composed of the catalytic subunit nsp16 and the stimulatory subunit nsp10 and plays an important role in virus genome replication and evasion from innate immunity. Our current results demonstrate that stimulation of nsp16 2′-O-MTase activity by nsp10 is a common mechanism for coronaviruses, and nsp10 is functionally interchangeable in the stimulation of nsp16 among different coronaviruses, which underlies the rationale for developing inhibitory peptides. We demonstrate that a peptide derived from the nsp16-interacting domain of MHV nsp10 could inhibit 2′-O-MTase activity of different coronaviruses in vitro and viral replication of MHV and SARS-CoV replicon in cell culture, and it could strongly inhibit virus replication and pathogenesis in MHV-infected mice. This work makes it possible to develop broad-spectrum peptide inhibitors by targeting the nsp16/nsp10 2′-O-MTase of coronaviruses. PMID:26041293

  14. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease brucellosis, a chronic condition in humans affecting renal and cardiac systems and causing osteoarthritis, is caused by Brucella, a genus of Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens. The mode of transmission and the virulence of the pathogens are still enigmatic. Transcription regulatory elements, such as rho proteins, play an important role in the termination of transcription and/or the selection of genes in Brucella. Adverse effects of the transcription inhibitors play a key role in the non-successive transcription challenges faced by the pathogens. In the investigation presented here, we computationally predicted the transcription termination factor rho (TtFRho) inhibitors against Brucella melitensis 16M via a structure-based method. In view the unknown nature of its crystal structure, we constructed a robust three-dimensional homology model of TtFRho’s structure by comparative modeling with the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli TtFRho (Protein Data Bank ID: 1PVO) as a template in MODELLER (v 9.10). The modeled structure was optimized by applying a molecular dynamics simulation for 2 ns with the CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics) 27 force field in NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program; v 2.9) and then evaluated by calculating the stereochemical quality of the protein. The flexible docking for the interaction phenomenon of the template consists of ligand-related inhibitor molecules from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial) database using a structure-based virtual screening strategy against minimized TtFRho. Docking simulations revealed two inhibitors compounds – ZINC24934545 and ZINC72319544 – that showed high binding affinity among 2,829 drug analogs that bind with key active-site residues; these residues are considered for protein-ligand binding and unbinding pathways via steered molecular dynamics simulations. Arg215 in the model plays an important role in the stability of the protein

  15. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease brucellosis, a chronic condition in humans affecting renal and cardiac systems and causing osteoarthritis, is caused by Brucella, a genus of Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens. The mode of transmission and the virulence of the pathogens are still enigmatic. Transcription regulatory elements, such as rho proteins, play an important role in the termination of transcription and/or the selection of genes in Brucella. Adverse effects of the transcription inhibitors play a key role in the non-successive transcription challenges faced by the pathogens. In the investigation presented here, we computationally predicted the transcription termination factor rho (TtFRho) inhibitors against Brucella melitensis 16M via a structure-based method. In view the unknown nature of its crystal structure, we constructed a robust three-dimensional homology model of TtFRho's structure by comparative modeling with the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli TtFRho (Protein Data Bank ID: 1PVO) as a template in MODELLER (v 9.10). The modeled structure was optimized by applying a molecular dynamics simulation for 2 ns with the CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics) 27 force field in NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program; v 2.9) and then evaluated by calculating the stereochemical quality of the protein. The flexible docking for the interaction phenomenon of the template consists of ligand-related inhibitor molecules from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial) database using a structure-based virtual screening strategy against minimized TtFRho. Docking simulations revealed two inhibitors compounds - ZINC24934545 and ZINC72319544 - that showed high binding affinity among 2,829 drug analogs that bind with key active-site residues; these residues are considered for protein-ligand binding and unbinding pathways via steered molecular dynamics simulations. Arg215 in the model plays an important role in the stability of the protein-ligand complex

  16. Identification of Phosphoribosyl-AMP cyclohydrolase, as drug target and its inhibitors in Brucella melitensis bv. 1 16M using metabolic pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Money; Prasad, Yamuna; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Chakresh Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Brucella melitensis is a pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium which is known for causing zoonotic diseases (Brucellosis). The organism is highly contagious and has been reported to be used as bioterrorism agent against humans. Several antibiotics and vaccines have been developed but these antibiotics have exhibited the sign of antibiotic resistance or ineffective at lower concentrations, which imposes an urgent need to identify the novel drugs/drug targets against this organism. In this work, metabolic pathways analysis has been performed with different filters such as non-homology with humans, essentially of genes and choke point analysis, leading to identification of novel drug targets. A total of 18 potential drug target proteins were filtered out and used to develop the high confidence protein-protein interaction network The Phosphoribosyl-AMP cyclohydrolase (HisI) protein has been identified as potential drug target on the basis of topological parameters. Further, a homology model of (HisI) protein has been developed using Modeller with multiple template (1W6Q (48%), 1ZPS (55%), and 2ZKN (48%)) approach and validated using PROCHECK and Verify3D. The virtual high throughput screening (vHTS) using DockBlaster tool has been performed against 16,11,889 clean fragments from ZINC database. Top 500 molecules from DockBlaster were docked using Vina. The docking analysis resulted in ZINC04880153 showing the lowest binding energy (-9.1 kcal/mol) with the drug target. The molecular dynamics study of the complex HisI-ZINC04880153 was conducted to analyze the stability and fluctuation of ligand within the binding pocket of HisI. The identified ligand could be analyzed in the wet-lab based experiments for future drug discovery.

  17. Development of a signature probe targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer of a ruminal Ruminococcus flavefaciens isolate from reindeer.

    PubMed

    Præsteng, K E; Mackie, R I; Cann, I K O; Mathiesen, S D; Sundset, M A

    2011-03-01

    The cellulolytic Ruminococcus flavefaciens has previously been introduced into the ruminant rumen to increase microbial degradation of plant cell wall carbohydrates. The functional effect of an introduced bacterium depends on its ability to establish in the digestive tract, and signature probes can be used as a tool to track and quantify introduced strains. The purpose of this current study was to develop an oligonucleotide signature probe targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of a putative probiotic cellulolytic isolate (R. flavefaciens strain 8/94-32) from the rumen of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus). The 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS of three Ruminococcus strains; R. flavefaciens strain 8/94-32, R. flavefaciens FD-1 and Ruminococcus albus Ra-8, was investigated. The ITS region has been reported to vary more between closely related bacteria compared to the widely used 16S rRNA gene, and a high degree of sequence polymorphism was indeed detected between the three Ruminococcus strains studied. Based on observed sequence differences, two oligonucloetide probes, ITSRumi1 and ITSRumi2, targeting the ITS region of the R. flavefaciens isolate 8/94-32 were developed. Probe specificity was evaluated in dot blot hybridisations with R. flavefaciens isolate 8/94-32 and four other Ruminococcus-strains tested. The probe ITSRumi1 gave positive signals for the R. flavefaciens isolate 8/94-32 only, while probe ITSRumi2 gave positive signals for R. flavefaciens isolate 8/94-32 as well as for R. albus Ra-8. The result of hybridisations with the probe ITSRumi1 indicates that the probe is specific for the R. flavefaciens strain 8/94-32 amongst the four Ruminococcus-strains tested, and is promising for further studies using it as a signature probe for tracking this strain when re-introduced to the reindeer rumen.

  18. [Identification of 23 mycobacterial species by Invader assay with targeting 16S rRNA gene and ITS-1 region--comparison with DDH method in clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    Nagano, Makoto; Ichimura, Sadahiro; Ito, Nobuko; Tomii, Takayuki; Kazumi, Yuko; Takei, Katsuaki; Abe, Chiyoji; Sugawara, Isamu

    2008-07-01

    The Invader assay was developed to identify 23 mycobacterial species using probes derived from the species-specific region of the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) region, with minor modifications of our previous study. In the present study, we compared the identification capability between the Invader assay and DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) method. DDH is commonly used to identify non-tuberculosis mycobacterium in Japan and 636 clinical mycobacterial strains cultured on Ogawa slants were tested. The Invader assay could identify 615 (96.7%) of the 636 strains. The results contained 14 M.lentiflavum, 3 M. parascrofulaceum and 1 M. intermedium, which were undetectable with DDH method. On the other hand, DDH method could identify 580 (91.2%) strains with duplicate assay. Of 628 strains except 8 strains identified as a few species by Invader assay, 551 (87.7%) strains were identified as the same species by two methods. Discordant results were mainly recognized for the identification of M. gordonae, M. avium, M. lentiflavum and M. intracellurare. The results of other methods targeting 16S rRNA indicated correctness of the Invader assay. These results indicate that Invader assay could identify more correctly than DDH method and could identify about 97% of clinically important mycobacterium.

  19. The oncofusion protein FUS-ERG targets key hematopoietic regulators and modulates the all-trans retinoic acid signaling pathway in t(16;21) acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sotoca, A M; Prange, K H M; Reijnders, B; Mandoli, A; Nguyen, L N; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    2016-04-14

    The ETS transcription factor ERG has been implicated as a major regulator of both normal and aberrant hematopoiesis. In acute myeloid leukemias harboring t(16;21), ERG function is deregulated due to a fusion with FUS/TLS resulting in the expression of a FUS-ERG oncofusion protein. How this oncofusion protein deregulates the normal ERG transcription program is unclear. Here, we show that FUS-ERG acts in the context of a heptad of proteins (ERG, FLI1, GATA2, LYL1, LMO2, RUNX1 and TAL1) central to proper expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell hematopoietic phenotype. Moreover, in t(16;21) FUS-ERG co-occupies genomic regions bound by the nuclear receptor heterodimer RXR:RARA inhibiting target gene expression and interfering with hematopoietic differentiation. All-trans retinoic acid treatment of t(16;21) cells as well as FUS-ERG knockdown alleviate the myeloid-differentiation block. Together, the results suggest that FUS-ERG acts as a transcriptional repressor of the retinoic acid signaling pathway.

  20. A supersonic jet target for the cross section measurement of the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction with the recoil mass separator ERNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapagnani, D.; Buompane, R.; Di Leva, A.; Gialanella, L.; Busso, M.; De Cesare, M.; De Stefano, G.; Duarte, J. G.; Gasques, L. R.; Morales Gallegos, L.; Palmerini, S.; Romoli, M.; Tufariello, F.

    2017-09-01

    12C(α, γ)16O cross section plays a key-role in the stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis of massive stars. Hence, it must be determined with the precision of about 10% at the relevant Gamow energy of 300 keV. The ERNA (European Recoil mass separator for Nuclear Astrophysics) collaboration measured, for the first time, the total cross section of 12C(α, γ)16O by means of the direct detection of the 16O ions produced in the reaction down to an energy of Ecm = 1.9 MeV. To extend the measurement at lower energy, it is necessary to limit the extension of the He gas target. This can be achieved using a supersonic jet, where the oblique shock waves and expansion fans formed at its boundaries confine the gas, which can be efficiently collected using a catcher. A test version of such a system has been designed, constructed and experimentally characterized as a bench mark for a full numerical simulation using FV (Finite Volume) methods. The results of the commissioning of the jet test version and the design of the new system that will be used in combination with ERNA are presented and discussed.

  1. Specific detection and identification of [Actinobacillus] muris by PCR using primers targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Gougoula, Christina; Sager, Martin

    2013-08-01

    [Actinobacillus] muris represents along with [Pasteurella] pneumotropica the most prevalent Pasteurellaceae species isolated from the laboratory mouse. Despite the biological and economic importance of Pasteurellaceae in relation to experimental animals, no molecular based methods for the identification of [A.] muris are available. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a PCR method allowing detection and identification of [A.] muris. In this assay, a Pasteurellaceae common forward primer based on a conserved region of the 16S rRNA gene was used in conjunction with two different reverse primers specific for [A.] muris, targeting the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer sequences. The specificity of the assay was tested against 78 reference and clinical isolates of Pasteurellaceae, including 37 strains of [A.] muris. In addition, eight other mice associated bacterial species which could pose a diagnostic problem were included. The assay showed 100% sensitivity and 97.95% specificity. Identification of the clinical isolates was validated by ITS profiling and when necessary by 16S rRNA sequencing. This multiplex PCR represents the first molecular tool able to detect [A.] muris and may become a reliable alternative to the present diagnostic methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The oncofusion protein FUS–ERG targets key hematopoietic regulators and modulates the all-trans retinoic acid signaling pathway in t(16;21) acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sotoca, A M; Prange, K H M; Reijnders, B; Mandoli, A; Nguyen, L N; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    2016-01-01

    The ETS transcription factor ERG has been implicated as a major regulator of both normal and aberrant hematopoiesis. In acute myeloid leukemias harboring t(16;21), ERG function is deregulated due to a fusion with FUS/TLS resulting in the expression of a FUS–ERG oncofusion protein. How this oncofusion protein deregulates the normal ERG transcription program is unclear. Here, we show that FUS–ERG acts in the context of a heptad of proteins (ERG, FLI1, GATA2, LYL1, LMO2, RUNX1 and TAL1) central to proper expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell hematopoietic phenotype. Moreover, in t(16;21) FUS–ERG co-occupies genomic regions bound by the nuclear receptor heterodimer RXR:RARA inhibiting target gene expression and interfering with hematopoietic differentiation. All-trans retinoic acid treatment of t(16;21) cells as well as FUS–ERG knockdown alleviate the myeloid-differentiation block. Together, the results suggest that FUS–ERG acts as a transcriptional repressor of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. PMID:26148230

  3. System-based proteomic and metabonomic analysis of the Df(16)A+/− mouse identifies potential miR-185 targets and molecular pathway alterations

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, H; Xu, B; Want, E J; Holmes, E; Guest, P C; Karayiorgou, M; Gogos, J A; Bahn, S

    2017-01-01

    Deletions on chromosome 22q11.2 are a strong genetic risk factor for development of schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction. We employed shotgun liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) proteomic and metabonomic profiling approaches on prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal (HPC) tissue from Df(16)A+/− mice, a model of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Proteomic results were compared with previous transcriptomic profiling studies of the same brain regions. The aim was to investigate how the combined effect of the 22q11.2 deletion and the corresponding miRNA dysregulation affects the cell biology at the systems level. The proteomic brain profiling analysis revealed PFC and HPC changes in various molecular pathways associated with chromatin remodelling and RNA transcription, indicative of an epigenetic component of the 22q11.2DS. Further, alterations in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial function and lipid biosynthesis were identified. Metabonomic profiling substantiated the proteomic findings by identifying changes in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS)-related pathways, such as changes in ceramide phosphoethanolamines, sphingomyelin, carnitines, tyrosine derivates and panthothenic acid. The proteomic findings were confirmed using selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, validating decreased levels of several proteins encoded on 22q11.2, increased levels of the computationally predicted putative miR-185 targets UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-peptide N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 110 kDa subunit (OGT1) and kinesin heavy chain isoform 5A and alterations in the non-miR-185 targets serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2B catalytic subunit gamma isoform, neurofilament light chain and vesicular glutamate transporter 1. Furthermore, alterations in the proteins associated with mammalian target of rapamycin signalling were detected in the PFC and with glutamatergic signalling in the hippocampus. Based on the proteomic and metabonomic findings, we were

  4. Trends and implications for achieving VISION 2020 human resources for eye health targets in 16 countries of sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2020

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of human resources for eye health (HReH) is a major global eye health strategy to reduce the prevalence of avoidable visual impairment by the year 2020. Building on our previous analysis of current progress towards key HReH indicators and cataract surgery rates (CSRs), we predicted future indicator achievement among 16 countries of sub-Saharan Africa by 2020. Methods Surgical and HReH data were collected from national eye care programme coordinators on six practitioner cadres: ophthalmologists, cataract surgeons, ophthalmic clinical officers, ophthalmic nurses, optometrists and ‘mid-level refractionists’ and combined them with publicly available population data to calculate practitioner-to-population ratios and CSRs. Data on workforce entry and exit (2008 to 2010) was used to project practitioner population and CSR growth between 2011 and 2020 in relation to projected growth in the general population. Associations between indicator progress and the presence of a non-physician cataract surgeon cadre were also explored using Wilcoxon rank sum tests and Spearman rank correlations. Results In our 16-country sample, practitioner per million population ratios are predicted to increase slightly for surgeons (ophthalmologists/cataract surgeons, from 3.1 in 2011 to 3.4 in 2020) and ophthalmic nurses/clinical officers (5.8 to 6.8) but remain low for refractionists (including optometrists, at 3.6 in 2011 and 2020). Among countries that have not already achieved target indicators, however, practitioner growth will be insufficient for any additional countries to reach the surgeon and refractionist targets by year 2020. Without further strategy change and investment, even after 2020, surgeon growth is only expected to sufficiently outpace general population growth to reach the target in one country. For nurses, two additional countries will achieve the target while one will fall below it. In 2011, high surgeon practitioner ratios were associated with

  5. Novel feline autoimmune blistering disease resembling bullous pemphigoid in humans: IgG autoantibodies target the NC16A ectodomain of type XVII collagen (BP180/BPAG2).

    PubMed

    Olivry, T; Chan, L S; Xu, L; Chace, P; Dunston, S M; Fahey, M; Marinkovich, M P

    1999-07-01

    In humans and dogs, bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease associated with the production of basement membrane autoantibodies that target the 180-kd type XVII collagen (BP180, BPAG2) and/or the 230-kd plakin epidermal isoform BPAG1e (BP230). In two adult cats, an acquired dermatosis and stomatitis was diagnosed as BP subsequent to the fulfillment of the following criteria: 1) presence of cutaneous vesicles, erosions, and ulcers; 2) histologic demonstration of subepidermal vesiculation with inflammatory cells, including eosinophils; 3) in vivo deposition of IgG autoantibodies at the epidermal basement membrane zone; and 4) serum IgG autoantibodies targeting a 180-kd epidermal protein identified as type XVII collagen. In both cats, the antigenic epitopes targeted by IgG autoantibodies were shown to be situated in the NC16A ectodomain of type XVII collagen, a situation similar to that of humans and dogs with BP. Feline BP therefore can be considered a clinical, histopathologic, and immunologic homologue of BP in humans and dogs.

  6. Impact on estrogen receptor binding and target tissue uptake of [18F]fluorine substitution at the 16alpha-position of fulvestrant (faslodex; ICI 182,780).

    PubMed

    Seimbille, Yann; Bénard, François; Rousseau, Jacques; Pepin, Emilie; Aliaga, Antonio; Tessier, Guillaume; van Lier, Johan E

    2004-08-01

    Fulvestrant (Faslodex; ICI 182,780) is a pure estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist recently approved for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer in post-menopausal women with disease progression following antiestrogen therapy. Fulvestrant strongly binds to the ER and its mode of action consists of inhibition of ER dimerization leading to a down regulation of ER protein cellular levels. With the aim to develop a probe for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging capable of predicting the potential therapeutic efficacy of selective ER modulators (SERM), we prepared three new 16alpha-[18F]fluoro-fulvestrant derivatives. These new radiopharmaceuticals were evaluated for their binding affinity to the human ERalpha and for their target tissue uptake in immature female rats. Substitution of one of the side-chain F-atoms of fulvestrant for 18F would have led to a product of low specific activity; instead we selected the 16alpha-position for 18F-labeling, which at least in the case of estradiol (ES) is well tolerated by the ER. Radiochemical synthesis proceeds by stereoselective introduction of the [18F]fluoride at the 16-18F-position of fulvestrant via opening of an intermediate O-cyclic sulfate followed by hydrolysis of the protecting methoxymethyl (MOM) ether and sulfate groups. Three analogs with different oxidation states of the side chain sulfur, i.e. sulfide, sulfone or sulfoxide (fulvestrant) were prepared. Introduction of the 16(18)F-fluorine led to a dramatic decrease of the apparent binding affinity for ER, as reported by Wakeling et al. (Cancer Res. 1991;51:3867-73). Likewise, in vivo ER-mediated uterus uptake values in immature female rats were disappointing. Overall, our findings suggest that these new PET radiopharmaceuticals are not suitable as tracers to predict ER(+) breast cancer response to hormonal therapy with selective ER modulators. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Combined treatment of the experimental human papilloma virus-16-positive cervical and head and neck cancers with cisplatin and radioimmunotherapy targeting viral E6 oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M; Wang, X G; Jiang, Z; Phaeton, R; Koba, W; Goldberg, G L; Casadevall, A; Dadachova, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) is implicated in >99% of cervical cancers and ∼40% of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We previously targeted E6 oncogene with 188Rhenium-labelled monoclonal antibody (mAb) C1P5 to HPV16 E6 in cervical cancer and HNSCC. Intranuclear E6 can be accessed by mAbs in non-viable cells with leaky membranes. As radioimmunotherapy (RIT) efficacy depends on the availability of target protein—we hypothesised that pretreatment with cisplatin will kill some tumour cells and increase E6 availability for RIT. Methods Mice with subcutaneous HPV16+ cervical (CasKi) and HNSCC (2A3) tumours were pretreated with 0–7.5 mg kg−1 per day cisplatin for 3 days followed by 188Re-C1P5 and biodistribution was performed 24 h later. For RIT, the animals were treated with: 5 mg kg−1 per day cisplatin for 3 days; or 5 mg kg−1 per day cisplatin for 3 days followed 200 or 400μCi 188Re-C1P5 mAb; or 200 or 400μCi 188Re-C1P5 mAb; or left untreated, and observed for tumour growth for 24 days. Results: Pretreatment with cisplatin increased the uptake of 188Re-C1P5 in the tumours 2.5 to 3.5-fold and caused significant retardation in tumour growth for CasKi and 2A3 tumours in both RIT alone and cisplatin, and RIT groups in comparison with the untreated control and cisplatin alone groups (P<0.05). The combined treatment was more effective than either modality alone (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that preceding RIT targeting E6 oncogene with chemotherapy is effective in suppressing tumour growth in mouse models of HPV16+ cancers. PMID:23385729

  8. Indicators: Nitrogen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nitrogen, like phosphorus, is a critical nutrient required for all life. Nitrogen can occur in rivers and streams, lakes, and coastal waters in several forms including ammonia (NH3), nitrates (NO3), and nitrites (NO2).

  9. Use of 16S rRNA Gene-Targeted Group-Specific Primers for Real-Time PCR Analysis of Predominant Bacteria in Mouse Feces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Wen; Chen, Mang-Kun; Yang, Bing-Ya; Huang, Xian-Jie; Zhang, Xue-Rui; He, Liang-Qiang; Zhang, Jing; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2015-10-01

    Mouse models are widely used for studying gastrointestinal (GI) tract-related diseases. It is necessary and important to develop a new set of primers to monitor the mouse gut microbiota. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-targeted group-specific primers for Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Deferribacteres, "Candidatus Saccharibacteria," Verrucomicrobia, Tenericutes, and Proteobacteria were designed and validated for quantification of the predominant bacterial species in mouse feces by real-time PCR. After confirmation of their accuracy and specificity by high-throughput sequencing technologies, these primers were applied to quantify the changes in the fecal samples from a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis mouse model. Our results showed that this approach efficiently predicted the occurrence of colitis, such as spontaneous chronic inflammatory bowel disease in transgenic mice. The set of primers developed in this study provides a simple and affordable method to monitor changes in the intestinal microbiota at the phylum level.

  10. Dataset of the human homologues and orthologues of lipid-metabolic genes identified as DAF-16 targets their roles in lipid and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lavender Yuen-Nam; Saavedra-García, Paula; Lam, Eric Wing-Fai

    2017-04-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the review article entitled 'Unravelling the role of fatty acid metabolism in cancer through the FOXO3-FOXM1 axis' (Saavedra-Garcia et al., 2017) [24]. Here, we have matched the DAF-16/FOXO3 downstream genes with their respective human orthologues and reviewed the roles of these targeted genes in FA metabolism. The list of genes listed in this article are precisely selected from literature reviews based on their functions in mammalian FA metabolism. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans gene orthologues of the genes are obtained from WormBase, the online biological database of C. elegans. This dataset has not been uploaded to a public repository yet.

  11. MAPK3 at the Autism-Linked Human 16p11.2 Locus Influences Precise Synaptic Target Selection at Drosophila Larval Neuromuscular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Mee; Park, Hae Ryoun; Lee, Ji Hye

    2017-02-01

    Proper synaptic function in neural circuits requires precise pairings between correct pre- and post-synaptic partners. Errors in this process may underlie development of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Development of ASD can be influenced by genetic factors, including copy number variations (CNVs). In this study, we focused on a CNV occurring at the 16p11.2 locus in the human genome and investigated potential defects in synaptic connectivity caused by reduced activities of genes located in this region at Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions, a well-established model synapse with stereotypic synaptic structures. A mutation of rolled, a Drosophila homolog of human mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPK3) at the 16p11.2 locus, caused ectopic innervation of axonal branches and their abnormal defasciculation. The specificity of these phenotypes was confirmed by expression of wild-type rolled in the mutant background. Albeit to a lesser extent, we also observed ectopic innervation patterns in mutants defective in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93, all of which were expected to interact with Rolled MAPK3. A further genetic analysis in double heterozygous combinations revealed a synergistic interaction between rolled and Gp93. In addition, results from RT-qPCR analyses indicated consistently reduced rolled mRNA levels in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93 mutants. Taken together, these data suggest a central role of MAPK3 in regulating the precise targeting of presynaptic axons to proper postsynaptic targets, a critical step that may be altered significantly in ASD.

  12. MAPK3 at the Autism-Linked Human 16p11.2 Locus Influences Precise Synaptic Target Selection at Drosophila Larval Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Mee; Park, Hae Ryoun; Lee, Ji Hye

    2017-01-01

    Proper synaptic function in neural circuits requires precise pairings between correct pre- and post-synaptic partners. Errors in this process may underlie development of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Development of ASD can be influenced by genetic factors, including copy number variations (CNVs). In this study, we focused on a CNV occurring at the 16p11.2 locus in the human genome and investigated potential defects in synaptic connectivity caused by reduced activities of genes located in this region at Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions, a well-established model synapse with stereotypic synaptic structures. A mutation of rolled, a Drosophila homolog of human mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPK3) at the 16p11.2 locus, caused ectopic innervation of axonal branches and their abnormal defasciculation. The specificity of these phenotypes was confirmed by expression of wild-type rolled in the mutant background. Albeit to a lesser extent, we also observed ectopic innervation patterns in mutants defective in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93, all of which were expected to interact with Rolled MAPK3. A further genetic analysis in double heterozygous combinations revealed a synergistic interaction between rolled and Gp93. In addition, results from RT-qPCR analyses indicated consistently reduced rolled mRNA levels in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93 mutants. Taken together, these data suggest a central role of MAPK3 in regulating the precise targeting of presynaptic axons to proper postsynaptic targets, a critical step that may be altered significantly in ASD. PMID:28196412

  13. microRNA-20a Inhibits Autophagic Process by Targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and Favors Mycobacterial Survival in Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Le; Zhao, Jin; Qu, Yuliang; Yin, Runting; Gao, Qian; Ding, Shuqin; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Jun; Xu, Guangxian

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in the host immune response against mycobacterial infection. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) can live in macrophages owing to its ability to evade attacks by regulating autophagic response. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding, endogenously encoded RNA which plays critical roles in precise regulation of macrophage functions. Whether miRNAs specifically influence the activation of macrophage autophagy during M. tuberculosis infection are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that BCG infection of macrophages resulted in enhanced expression of miRNA-20a, which inhibits autophagic process by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and promotes BCG survival in macrophages. Forced overexpression of miR-20a decreased the expression levels of LC3-II and the number of LC3 puncta in macrophages, and promoted BCG survival in macrophages, while transfection with miR-20a inhibitor had the opposite effect. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of miR-20a on autophagy was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Quantification of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section revealed a significant reduction upon transfection with miR-20a mimic, but transfection with miR-20a inhibitor increased the number of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section. Moreover, silencing of ATG7 significantly inhibited autophagic response, and transfection with ATG7 siRNA plus miR-20a mimic could further decrease autophagic response. Collectively, our data reveal that miR-20a inhibits autophagic response and promotes BCG survival in macrophages by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1, which may have implications for a better understanding of pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27803889

  14. Single and double electron capture from He by Ar{sup 16+} studied using cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, M.A.; Wolff, W.; Wolf, H.E.; Kamber, E.Y.; Stoeckli, M.; Cocke, C.L.

    1998-10-01

    Single and double electron capture from He targets by Ar{sup 16+} ions have been studied at projectile velocities from 0.3 to 1.5 a.u. Cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy was used to record the energy gain and scattering angle simultaneously. For single capture, the reaction window is found to spread in width approximately as the square root of the projectile velocity and to shift slightly toward smaller energy-gain values as the velocity increases. The angular distributions center at the half Coulomb angle over most of the velocity range covered, but differ in shape from multichannel Landau-Zener model results. For double capture, transfer ionization dominates and feeds primarily n-symmetric states, where {ital n} is the principal quantum number. True double capture feeds mainly n-asymmetric states. The angular distributions for double capture lie outside the half Coulomb angle, indicating the importance of two-step processes in populating doubly excited states. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Specific Detection of Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium Strains Colonizing Rice (Oryza sativa) Roots by 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer-Targeted PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhiyuan; Hurek, Thomas; Vinuesa, Pablo; Müller, Peter; Ladha, Jagdish K.; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    In addition to forming symbiotic nodules on legumes, rhizobial strains are members of soil or rhizosphere communities or occur as endophytes, e.g., in rice. Two rhizobial strains which have been isolated from root nodules of the aquatic legumes Aeschynomene fluminensis (IRBG271) and Sesbania aculeata (IRBG74) were previously found to promote rice growth. In addition to analyzing their phylogenetic positions, we assessed the suitability of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences for the differentiation of closely related rhizobial taxa and for the development of PCR protocols allowing the specific detection of strains in the environment. 16S rDNA sequence analysis (sequence identity, 99%) and phylogenetic analysis of IGS sequences showed that strain IRBG271 was related to but distinct from Bradyrhizobium elkanii. Rhizobium sp. (Sesbania) strain IRBG74 was located in the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium cluster as a novel lineage according to phylogenetic 16S rDNA analysis (96.8 to 98.9% sequence identity with Agrobacterium tumefaciens; emended name, Rhizobium radiobacter). Strain IRBG74 harbored four copies of rRNA operons whose IGS sequences varied only slightly (2 to 9 nucleotides). The IGS sequence analyses allowed intraspecies differentiation, especially in the genus Bradyrhizobium, as illustrated here for strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, B. elkanii, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Chamaecytisus) strain BTA-1. It also clearly differentiated fast-growing rhizobial species and strains, albeit with lower statistical significance. Moreover, the high sequence variability allowed the development of highly specific IGS-targeted nested-PCR assays. Strains IRBG74 and IRBG271 were specifically detected in complex DNA mixtures of numerous related bacteria and in the DNA of roots of gnotobiotically cultured or even of soil-grown rice plants after inoculation. Thus, IGS sequence analysis is an attractive technique for both microbial

  16. The evolution of nitrogen cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    The energetics of nitrogen transformation reactions and the evolution of nitrogen cycling are examined. It is suggested that meteor impact-produced fixed nitrogen could have caused the entire reservoir of the earth's N2 to convert into fixed nitrogen at the end of accretion. The abiotic fixation rate on the early earth by lightning is estimated at about 1-3 X 10 to the 16th molecules of NO/J. It is found that biological nitrogen fixation may have evolved after the development of an aerobic atmosphere. It is shown that HNO could eventually become NO2(-) and NO3(-) after reaching the earth's surface. It is concluded that the evolutionary sequence for the biological transformation of nitrogen compounds is ammonification - denitrification - nitrification - nitrogen fixation.

  17. High Nitrogen Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-19

    Hydrogen Embrittlement in Steel by the Increment Loading Technique. Fractography: After the stress-life fatigue tests, the fracture surface morphology...study was conducted to clarify the mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of high nitrogen stainless steel (HNSS) plates...Corrosion Cracking 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

  18. Short communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Leclercq, M; Nezer, C; Crevecoeur, S; Ferauche, C; Detry, E; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2015-06-01

    Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis

  19. Development of quantitative PCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA genes of Enterococcus spp. and their application to the identification of enterococcus species in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Henson, Michael; Elk, Michael; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Griffith, John; Blackwood, Denene; Noble, Rachel; Gourmelon, Michèle; Glassmeyer, Susan; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2013-01-01

    The detection of environmental enterococci has been determined primarily by using culture-based techniques that might exclude some enterococcal species as well as those that are nonculturable. To address this, the relative abundances of enterococci were examined by challenging fecal and water samples against a currently available genus-specific assay (Entero1). To determine the diversity of enterococcal species, 16S rRNA gene-based group-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed and evaluated against eight of the most common environmental enterococcal species. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 439 presumptive environmental enterococcal strains were analyzed to study further the diversity of enterococci and to confirm the specificities of group-specific assays. The group-specific qPCR assays showed relatively high amplification rates with targeted species (>98%), although some assays cross-amplified with nontargeted species (1.3 to 6.5%). The results with the group-specific assays also showed that different enterococcal species co-occurred in most fecal samples. The most abundant enterococci in water and fecal samples were Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, although we identified more water isolates as Enterococcus casseliflavus than as any of the other species. The prevalence of the Entero1 marker was in agreement with the combined number of positive signals determined by the group-specific assays in most fecal samples, except in gull feces. On the other hand, the number of group-specific assay signals was lower in all water samples tested, suggesting that other enterococcal species are present in these samples. While the results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays for detecting the major enterococcal groups in environmental water samples, additional studies are needed to determine further the diversity, distributions, and relative abundances of all enterococcal species found in water.

  20. Development of Quantitative PCR Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Genes of Enterococcus spp. and Their Application to the Identification of Enterococcus Species in Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hodon; Henson, Michael; Elk, Michael; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Griffith, John; Blackwood, Denene; Noble, Rachel; Gourmelon, Michèle; Glassmeyer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The detection of environmental enterococci has been determined primarily by using culture-based techniques that might exclude some enterococcal species as well as those that are nonculturable. To address this, the relative abundances of enterococci were examined by challenging fecal and water samples against a currently available genus-specific assay (Entero1). To determine the diversity of enterococcal species, 16S rRNA gene-based group-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed and evaluated against eight of the most common environmental enterococcal species. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 439 presumptive environmental enterococcal strains were analyzed to study further the diversity of enterococci and to confirm the specificities of group-specific assays. The group-specific qPCR assays showed relatively high amplification rates with targeted species (>98%), although some assays cross-amplified with nontargeted species (1.3 to 6.5%). The results with the group-specific assays also showed that different enterococcal species co-occurred in most fecal samples. The most abundant enterococci in water and fecal samples were Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, although we identified more water isolates as Enterococcus casseliflavus than as any of the other species. The prevalence of the Entero1 marker was in agreement with the combined number of positive signals determined by the group-specific assays in most fecal samples, except in gull feces. On the other hand, the number of group-specific assay signals was lower in all water samples tested, suggesting that other enterococcal species are present in these samples. While the results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays for detecting the major enterococcal groups in environmental water samples, additional studies are needed to determine further the diversity, distributions, and relative abundances of all enterococcal species found in water. PMID:23087032

  1. Tumor-targeted delivery of a C-terminally truncated FADD (N-FADD) significantly suppresses the B16F10 melanoma via enhancing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yun-Wen; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Huang, Xian-Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Zhang, Lin-Kai; Li, Jia-Huang; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), a pivotal adaptor protein transmitting apoptotic signals, is indispensable for the induction of extrinsic apoptosis. However, overexpression of FADD can form large, filamentous aggregates, termed death effector filaments (DEFs) by self-association and initiate apoptosis independent of receptor cross-linking. A mutant of FADD, which is truncated of the C-terminal tail (m-FADD, 182–205 aa) named N-FADD (m-FADD, 1–181 aa), can dramatically up-regulate the strength of FADD self-association and increase apoptosis. In this study, it was found that over-expression of FADD or N-FADD caused apoptosis of B16F10 cells in vitro, even more, N-FADD showed a more potent apoptotic effect than FADD. Meanwhile, Attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium strain VNP20009 was engineered to express FADD or N-FADD under the control of a hypoxia-induced NirB promoter and each named VNP-pN-FADD and VNP-pN-N-FADD. The results showed both VNP-pN-FADD and VNP-pN-N-FADD delayed tumor growth in B16F10 mice model, while VNP-pN-N-FADD suppressed melanoma growth more significantly than VNP-pN-FADD. Additionally, VNP-pN-FADD and VNP-pN-N-FADD induced apoptosis of tumor cells by activating caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Our results show that N-FADD is a more potent apoptotic inducer and VNP20009-mediated targeted expression of N-FADD provides a possible cancer gene therapeutic approach for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:27767039

  2. Genus-specific primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene for PCR detection of members of the genus Verrucosispora.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingyi; Hong, Kui; Goodfellow, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about the genus Verrucosispora though it does contain organisms which produce novel antibiotics. A set of genus-specific oligonucleotide primers was generated to gain an insight into the presence, distribution and taxonomic diversity of members of this genus in diverse samples taken from marine habitats. In silico and pure culture studies showed that the primers matched perfectly with target sequences of the 16S rRNA genes of representatives of the genus Verrucosispora. The primers, designated S-G-Verr-0195-a-S-20 and S-G-Verr-1152-a-A-18, amplified an ≈960 bp stretch of the 16S rRNA genes of Verrucosispora strains but not those of representatives of other genera classified in the family Micromonosporaceae. Genus-specific amplicons were detected from 17 out of 20 community DNA samples prepared from diverse marine sediments and coastal soils. Phylogenetic analysis of over 40% of clones derived from five of the samples indicated they belonged to novel Verrucosispora species. The primers were also used to confirm the identity of Verrucosispora-like strains isolated from two of the environmental samples. The primers can be used to facilitate the isolation of novel Verrucosispora strains by allowing prescreening of environmental samples and the subsequent identification of verrucosisporae on selective isolation plates. For this purpose, a novel medium facilitating the recovery of Verrucosispora strains was formulated and used to recover novel isolates validated using the novel PCR primers. This medium may be useful as the basis for development of a selective medium.

  3. Comparison of Gull Feces-Specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Genes of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hodon; Griffith, John F.; Khan, Izhar U. H.; Hill, Stephen; Edge, Thomas A.; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Gonzalez-Nieves, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Two novel gull-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR green assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (gull3) and a hydrolysis TaqMan assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (gull4). The objectives of this study were to compare the host specificity of a previous C. marimammalium qPCR assay (gull2) with that of the new markers and to examine the presence of the three gull markers in environmental water samples from different geographic locations. Most of the gull fecal samples tested (n = 255) generated positive signals with the gull2 and gull4 assays (i.e., >86%), whereas only 28% were positive with gull3. Low prevalence and abundance of tested gull markers (0.6 to 15%) were observed in fecal samples from six nonavian species (n = 180 fecal samples), whereas the assays cross-reacted to some extent (13 to 31%) with other (nongull) avian fecal samples. The gull3 assay was positive against fecal samples from 11 of 15 avian species, including gull. Of the presumed gull-impacted water samples (n = 349), 86%, 59%, and 91% were positive with the gull2, the gull3, and the gull4 assays, respectively. Approximately 5% of 239 non-gull-impacted water samples were positive with the gull2 and the gull4 assays, whereas 21% were positive witg the gull3 assay. While the relatively high occurrence of gull2 and gull4 markers in waters impacted by gull feces suggests that these assays could be used in environmental monitoring studies, the data also suggest that multiple avian-specific assays will be needed to accurately assess the contribution of different avian sources in recreational waters. PMID:22226950

  4. Variations of Bacterial Populations in Human Feces Measured by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization with Group-Specific 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Alison H.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; Raangs, Gerwin C.; Jansen, Gijsbert J.; Schut, Frits; Welling, Gjalt W.

    1998-01-01

    Six 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed, validated, and used to quantify predominant groups of anaerobic bacteria in human fecal samples. A set of two probes was specific for species of the Bacteroides fragilis group and the species Bacteroides distasonis. Two others were designed to detect species of the Clostridium histolyticum and the Clostridium lituseburense groups. Another probe was designed for the genera Streptococcus and Lactococcus, and the final probe was designed for the species of the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group. The temperature of dissociation of each of the probes was determined. The specificities of the probes for a collection of target and reference organisms were tested by dot blot hybridization and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The new probes were used in initial FISH experiments to enumerate human fecal bacteria. The combination of the two Bacteroides-specific probes detected a mean of 5.4 × 1010 cells per g (dry weight) of feces; the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group-specific probe detected a mean of 7.2 × 1010 cells per g (dry weight) of feces. The Clostridium histolyticum, Clostridium lituseburense, and Streptococcus-Lactococcus group-specific probes detected only numbers of cells ranging from 1 × 107 to 7 × 108 per g (dry weight) of feces. Three of the newly designed probes and three additional probes were used in further FISH experiments to study the fecal flora composition of nine volunteers over a period of 8 months. The combination of probes was able to detect at least two-thirds of the fecal flora. The normal biological variations within the fecal populations of the volunteers were determined and indicated that these variations should be considered when evaluating the effects of agents modulating the flora. PMID:9726880

  5. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the Commission... cost to the Commission. The compensation to be paid to such consultant may not exceed the maximum...

  6. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the Commission... cost to the Commission. The compensation to be paid to such consultant may not exceed the maximum...

  7. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the Commission... cost to the Commission. The compensation to be paid to such consultant may not exceed the maximum...

  8. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the Commission... cost to the Commission. The compensation to be paid to such consultant may not exceed the maximum...

  9. Development of a group-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probe set for the identification of Marinobacter by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Luke J.; Gutierrez, Tony; Teske, Andreas P.

    2016-07-01

    Members of the Marinobacter genus play an important role in hydrocarbon degradation in the ocean - a topic of special significance in light of the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010. The Marinobacter group has thus far lacked a genus level phylogenetic probe that would allow in situ identification of representative members. Here, we developed two new 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (Mrb-0625-a and Mrb-0625-b) to enumerate Marinobacter species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In silico analysis of this probe set demonstrated 80% coverage of the Marinobacter genus. A competitor probe was developed to block hybridization by Mrb-0625-a to six Halomonas species with which it shared a one base pair mismatch. The probe set was optimized using pure cultures, and then used in an enrichment experiment with a deep sea oil plume water sample collected from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Marinobacter cells rapidly increased as a significant fraction of total microbial abundance in all incubations of original contaminated seawater as well as those amended with n-hexadecane, suggesting this group may be among the first microbial responders to oil pollution in the marine environment. The new probe set will provide a reliable tool for quantifying Marinobacter in the marine environment, particularly at contaminated sites where these organisms can play an important role in the biodegradation of oil pollutants.

  10. Use of 16S rRNA Gene-Targeted Group-Specific Primers for Real-Time PCR Analysis of Predominant Bacteria in Mouse Feces

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yun-Wen; Chen, Mang-Kun; Yang, Bing-Ya; Huang, Xian-Jie; Zhang, Xue-Rui; He, Liang-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are widely used for studying gastrointestinal (GI) tract-related diseases. It is necessary and important to develop a new set of primers to monitor the mouse gut microbiota. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-targeted group-specific primers for Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Deferribacteres, “Candidatus Saccharibacteria,” Verrucomicrobia, Tenericutes, and Proteobacteria were designed and validated for quantification of the predominant bacterial species in mouse feces by real-time PCR. After confirmation of their accuracy and specificity by high-throughput sequencing technologies, these primers were applied to quantify the changes in the fecal samples from a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis mouse model. Our results showed that this approach efficiently predicted the occurrence of colitis, such as spontaneous chronic inflammatory bowel disease in transgenic mice. The set of primers developed in this study provides a simple and affordable method to monitor changes in the intestinal microbiota at the phylum level. PMID:26187967

  11. Quantification of different Eubacterium spp. in human fecal samples with species-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Schwiertz, A; Le Blay, G; Blaut, M

    2000-01-01

    Species-specific 16S rRNA-targeted, Cy3 (indocarbocyanine)-labeled oligonucleotide probes were designed and validated to quantify different Eubacterium species in human fecal samples. Probes were directed at Eubacterium barkeri, E. biforme, E. contortum, E. cylindroides (two probes), E. dolichum, E. hadrum, E. lentum, E. limosum, E. moniliforme, and E. ventriosum. The specificity of the probes was tested with the type strains and a range of common intestinal bacteria. With one exception, none of the probes showed cross-hybridization under stringent conditions. The species-specific probes were applied to fecal samples obtained from 12 healthy volunteers. E. biforme, E. cylindroides, E. hadrum, E. lentum, and E. ventriosum could be determined. All other Eubacterium species for which probes had been designed were under the detection limit of 10(7) cells g (dry weight) of feces(-1). The cell counts obtained are essentially in accordance with the literature data, which are based on colony counts. This shows that whole-cell in situ hybridization with species-specific probes is a valuable tool for the enumeration of Eubacterium species in feces.

  12. Tetrahydrobenzo[h][1,6]naphthyridine-6-chlorotacrine hybrids as a new family of anti-Alzheimer agents targeting β-amyloid, tau, and cholinesterase pathologies.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Ornella; Pérez-Areales, F Javier; Juárez-Jiménez, Jordi; Espargaró, Alba; Clos, M Victòria; Pérez, Belén; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Sabaté, Raimon; Luque, F Javier; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego

    2014-09-12

    Optimization of an essentially inactive 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrano[3,2-c]quinoline carboxylic ester derivative as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) peripheral anionic site (PAS)-binding motif by double O → NH bioisosteric replacement, combined with molecular hybridization with the AChE catalytic anionic site (CAS) inhibitor 6-chlorotacrine and molecular dynamics-driven optimization of the length of the linker has resulted in the development of the trimethylene-linked 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[h][1,6]naphthyridine-6-chlorotacrine hybrid 5a as a picomolar inhibitor of human AChE (hAChE). The tetra-, penta-, and octamethylene-linked homologues 5b-d have been also synthesized for comparison purposes, and found to retain the nanomolar hAChE inhibitory potency of the parent 6-chlorotacrine. Further biological profiling of hybrids 5a-d has shown that they are also potent inhibitors of human butyrylcholinesterase and moderately potent Aβ42 and tau anti-aggregating agents, with IC50 values in the submicromolar and low micromolar range, respectively. Also, in vitro studies using an artificial membrane model have predicted a good brain permeability for hybrids 5a-d, and hence, their ability to reach their targets in the central nervous system. The multitarget profile of the novel hybrids makes them promising leads for developing anti-Alzheimer drug candidates with more balanced biological activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitrogen Index

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  14. Identification of Rhodospirillum rubrum GlnB Variants That Are Altered in Their Ability To Interact with Different Targets in Response to Nitrogen Status Signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Conrad, Mary C.; Zhang, Yaoping; Roberts, Gary P.

    2006-01-01

    In Rhodospirillum rubrum, NifA, the transcriptional activator for the nif genes, is posttranslationally activated only by the uridylylated form of GlnB, one of three PII homologs in the organism. We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to detect variants of GlnB that interact better with NifA than does wild-type GlnB. When examined for physiological effects in R. rubrum, these GlnB* variants activated NifA in the presence of NH4+, which normally blocks NifA activation completely, and in the absence of GlnD, whose uridylylation of GlnB is also normally essential for NifA activation. When these variants were tested in the two-hybrid system for their interaction with NtrB, a receptor that should interact with the nonuridylylated form of GlnB, they were uniformly weaker than wild-type GlnB in that interaction. When expressed in R. rubrum either as single-copy integrants or on multiple-copy plasmids, these variants were also dramatically altered in terms of their ability to regulate several other receptors involved in nitrogen metabolism, including GlnE, NtrB/NtrC, and DRAT (dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyl transferase)-DRAG (dinitrogenase reductase-activating glycohydrolase). The consistent pattern throughout is that these GlnB variants partially mimic the uridylylated form of wild-type GlnB, even under nitrogen-excess conditions and in strains lacking GlnD. The results suggest that the role of uridylylation of GlnB is primarily to shift the equilibrium of GlnB from a “nitrogen-sufficient” form to a “nitrogen-deficient” form, each of which interacts with different but overlapping receptor proteins in the cell. These GlnB variants apparently shift that equilibrium through direct structural changes. PMID:16484197

  15. Nitro and amino substitution in the D-ring of 5-(2-dimethylaminoethyl)- 2,3-methylenedioxy-5H-dibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-ones: effect on topoisomerase-I targeting activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir K; Ruchelman, Alexander L; Li, Tsai-Kun; Liu, Angela; Liu, Leroy F; LaVoie, Edmond J

    2003-05-22

    5H-8,9-dimethoxy-5-(2-N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)-2,3-methylenedioxydibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-one exhibits potent TOP1-targeting activity and pronounced antitumor activity. It was hypothesized that replacement of the two methoxyl groups with a nitro substituent would allow for retention of similar activity. In this study 8-, 9-, and 10-nitro-5H-2,3-methylenedioxy-5-(2-N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)dibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-one and their amino derivatives were synthesized and assessed for their relative TOP1-targeting activity and cytotoxicity. In the case of both the 8- and 9-nitro analogues, their TOP1-targeting activity and cytotoxicity are greater than that of camptothecin and comparable to that of 5H-8,9-dimethoxy-5-(2-N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)-2,3-methylenedioxydibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-one.

  16. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  17. An Airborne Ultrasonic Imaging System Based on 16 Elements: 150 kHz Piezopolymer Transducer Arrays—Preliminary Simulated and Experimental Results for Cylindrical Targets Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capineri, L.; Bulletti, A.; Calzolai, M.; Giannelli, P.

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a 16-element transducer array for airborne ultrasonic imaging operating at 150 kHz, that can operate both at close range (50 mm) in the near field of a synthetic aperture, and up to 250 mm. The proposed imaging technique is based on a modified version of the delay and sum algorithm implemented with a synthetic aperture where each pixel amplitude is determined by the integration of the signal obtained by the coherent summation of the acquired signals over a delayed window with fixed length. The image reconstruction methods using raw data provides the possibility to detect targets with smaller feature size on the order of one wavelength because the coherent signals summation over the selected window length while the image reconstruction methods using the summation of enveloped signals increases the amplitude response at the expenses of a lower spatial resolution. For the implementation of this system it is important to design compact airborne transducers with large field of view and this can be obtained with a new design of hemi-cylindrical polyvinylidene fluoride film transducers directly mounted on a printed circuit board. This new method is low cost and has repeatable transducer characteristics. The complete system is compact, with a modular architecture, in which eight boards with dual ultrasonic channels are mounted on a mother board. Each daughter board hosts a microcontroller unit and can operate with transducers in the bandwidth 40-200 kHz with on-board data acquisition, pre-processing and transfer on a dedicated bus.

  18. Targeted enhancement of glutamate-to-γ-aminobutyrate conversion in Arabidopsis seeds affects carbon-nitrogen balance and storage reserves in a development-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fait, Aaron; Nesi, Adriano Nunes; Angelovici, Ruthie; Lehmann, Martin; Pham, Phuong Anh; Song, Luhua; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2011-11-01

    In seeds, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) operates at the metabolic nexus between carbon and nitrogen metabolism by catalyzing the unidirectional decarboxylation of glutamate to form γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To elucidate the regulatory role of GAD in seed development, we generated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transgenic plants expressing a truncated GAD from Petunia hybrida missing the carboxyl-terminal regulatory Ca(2+)-calmodulin-binding domain under the transcriptional regulation of the seed maturation-specific phaseolin promoter. Dry seeds of the transgenic plants accumulated considerable amounts of GABA, and during desiccation the content of several amino acids increased, although not glutamate or proline. Dry transgenic seeds had higher protein content than wild-type seeds but lower amounts of the intermediates of glycolysis, glycerol and malate. The total fatty acid content of the transgenic seeds was 50% lower than in the wild type, while acyl-coenzyme A accumulated in the transgenic seeds. Labeling experiments revealed altered levels of respiration in the transgenic seeds, and fractionation studies indicated reduced incorporation of label in the sugar and lipid fractions extracted from transgenic seeds. Comparative transcript profiling of the dry seeds supported the metabolic data. Cellular processes up-regulated at the transcript level included the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid elongation, the shikimate pathway, tryptophan metabolism, nitrogen-carbon remobilization, and programmed cell death. Genes involved in the regulation of germination were similarly up-regulated. Taken together, these results indicate that the GAD-mediated conversion of glutamate to GABA during seed development plays an important role in balancing carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in storage reserve accumulation.

  19. First approach to nitrogen-containing fused aromatic hydrocarbons as targets for organoelectronics utilizing a new transformation of O-protected diaryl methanols.

    PubMed

    Bałczewski, Piotr; Bodzioch, Agnieszka; Rózycka-Sokołowska, Ewa; Marciniak, Bernard; Uznański, Paweł

    2010-02-22

    A new concise approach for the construction of heteroatom analogues of polycyclic aromatic benzo[g]quinoline, benzo[b]carbazole, and pyrido[b]carbazole systems via diaryl methanols is described. This transformation involves formation of a central benzene ring fused to two aromatic 5- or 6-membered rings of pyrrole and/or pyridine by using a combination of two aromatic aldehydes, of which at least one contains a ring nitrogen. Analysis of the UV and fluorescent properties, Stokes shifts, quantum yields in solution, and pi-stacking interactions in the crystal structures of the new materials was performed. These polycyclic aromatic compounds show potential as small-molecule organoelectronic materials.

  20. Degradative capacities and 16S rRNA-targeted whole-cell hybridization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in an anaerobic enrichment culture utilizing alkylbenzenes from crude oil.

    PubMed Central

    Rabus, R; Fukui, M; Wilkes, H; Widdle, F

    1996-01-01

    A mesophilic sulfate-reducing enrichment culture growing anaerobically on crude oil was used as a model system to study which nutritional types of sulfate-reducing bacteria may develop on original petroleum constituents in oil wells, tanks, and pipelines. Chemical analysis of oil hydrocarbons during growth revealed depletion of toluene and o-xylene within 1 month and of m-xylene, o-ethyltoluene, m-ethyltoluene, m-propyltoluene, and m-isopropyltoluene within approximately 2 months. In anaerobic counting series, the highest numbers of CFU (6 x 10(6) to 8 x 10(6) CFU ml-1) were obtained with toluene and benzoate. Almost the same numbers were obtained with lactate, a substrate often used for detection of the vibrio-shaped, incompletely oxidizing Desulfovibrio sp. In the present study, however, lactate yielded mostly colonies of oval to rod-shaped, completely oxidizing, sulfate-reducing bacteria which were able to grow slowly on toluene or crude oil. Desulfovibrio species were detected only at low numbers (3 x 10(5) CFU ml-1). In agreement with this finding, a fluorescently labeled, 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe described in the literature as specific for members of the Desulfovibrionaceae (suggested family) hybridized only with a small portion (< 5%) of the cells in the enrichment culture. These results are consistent with the observation that known Desulfovibrio species do not utilize aromatic hydrocarbons, the predominant substrates in the enrichment culture. All known sulfate-reducing bacteria which utilize aromatic compounds belong to a separate branch, the Desulfobacteriaceae (suggested family). Most members of this family are complete oxidizers. For specific hybridization with members of this branch, the probe had to be modified by a nucleotide exchange. Indeed, this modified probe hybridized with more than 95% of the cells in the enrichment culture. The results show that completely oxidizing, alkylbenzene-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacteria rather than

  1. Comparison of nitrogen depletion and repletion on lipid production in yeast and fungal species

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Shihui; Wang, Wei; Wei, Hui; ...

    2016-08-29

    Although it is well known that low nitrogen stimulates lipid accumulation, especially for algae and some oleaginous yeast, few studies have been conducted in fungal species, especially on the impact of different nitrogen deficiency strategies. In this study, we use two promising consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) candidates to examine the impact of two nitrogen deficiency strategies on lipid production, which are the extensively investigated oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, and the commercial cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei. We first utilized bioinformatics approaches to reconstruct the fatty acid metabolic pathway and demonstrated the presence of a triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis pathway in Trichoderma reesei. Wemore » then examined the lipid production of Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces in different media using two nitrogen deficiency strategies of nitrogen natural repletion and nitrogen depletion through centrifugation. Our results demonstrated that nitrogen depletion was better than nitrogen repletion with about 30% lipid increase for Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces, and could be an option to improve lipid production in both oleaginous yeast and filamentous fungal species. The resulting distinctive lipid composition profiles indicated that the impacts of nitrogen depletion on yeast were different from those for fungal species. Under three types of C/N ratio conditions, C16 and C18 fatty acids were the predominant forms of lipids for both Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipolytica. In addition, while the overall fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles of Trichoderma reesei were similar, the overall FAME profiles of Y. lipolytica observed a shift. The fatty acid metabolic pathway reconstructed in this work supports previous reports of lipid production in T. reesei, and provides a pathway for future omics studies and metabolic engineering efforts. Further investigation to identify the genetic targets responsible for the effect of nitrogen depletion

  2. Comparison of cytology, HPV DNA testing and HPV 16/18 genotyping alone or combined targeting to the more balanced methodology for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Chatzistamatiou, Kimon; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Moschaki, Viktoria; Panteleris, Nikolaos; Agorastos, Theodoros

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify the most effective cervical cancer screening algorithm incorporating different combinations of cytology, HPV testing and genotyping. Women 25-55years old recruited for the "HERMES" (HEllenic Real life Multicentric cErvical Screening) study were screened in terms of cytology and high-risk (hr) HPV testing with HPV 16/18 genotyping. Women positive for cytology or/and hrHPV were referred for colposcopy, biopsy and treatment. Ten screening algorithms based on different combinations of cytology, HPV testing and HPV 16/18 genotyping were investigated in terms of diagnostic accuracy. Three clusters of algorithms were formed according to the balance between effectiveness and harm caused by screening. The cluster showing the best balance included two algorithms based on co-testing and two based on HPV primary screening with HPV 16/18 genotyping. Among these, hrHPV testing with HPV 16/18 genotyping and reflex cytology (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance - ASCUS threshold) presented the optimal combination of sensitivity (82.9%) and specificity relative to cytology alone (0.99) with 1.26 false positive rate relative to cytology alone. HPV testing with HPV 16/18 genotyping, referring HPV 16/18 positive women directly to colposcopy, and hrHPV (non 16/18) positive women to reflex cytology (ASCUS threshold), as a triage method to colposcopy, reflects the best equilibrium between screening effectiveness and harm. Algorithms, based on cytology as initial screening method, on co-testing or HPV primary without genotyping, and on HPV primary with genotyping but without cytology triage, are not supported according to the present analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Co-regulation of the DAF-16 target gene, cyp-35B1/dod-13, by HSF-1 in C. elegans dauer larvae and daf-2 insulin pathway mutants.

    PubMed

    Iser, Wendy B; Wilson, Mark A; Wood, William H; Becker, Kevin; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2011-03-09

    Insulin/IGF-I-like signaling (IIS) has both cell autonomous and non-autonomous functions. In some cases, targets through which IIS regulates cell-autonomous functions, such as cell growth and metabolism, have been identified. In contrast, targets for many non-autonomous IIS functions, such as C. elegans dauer morphogenesis, remain elusive. Here, we report the use of genomic and genetic approaches to identify potential non-autonomous targets of C. elegans IIS. First, we used transcriptional microarrays to identify target genes regulated non-autonomously by IIS in the intestine or in neurons. C. elegans IIS controls expression of a number of stress response genes, which were differentially regulated by tissue-restricted IIS. In particular, expression of sod-3, a MnSOD enzyme, was not regulated by tissue-restricted IIS on the microarrays, while expression of hsp-16 genes was rescued back to wildtype by tissue restricted IIS. One IIS target regulated non-autonomously by age-1 was cyp-35B1/dod-13, encoding a cytochrome P450. Genetic analysis of the cyp-35B1 promoter showed both DAF-16 and HSF-1 are direct regulators. Based on these findings, we propose that hsf-1 may participate in the pathways mediating non-autonomous activities of age-1 in C. elegans.

  4. Host cell subversion by Toxoplasma GRA16, an exported dense granule protein that targets the host cell nucleus and alters gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Durandau, Eric; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Ortet, Philippe; Barakat, Mohamed; Kieffer, Sylvie; Curt-Varesano, Aurélie; Curt-Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Bastien, Olivier; Coute, Yohann; Pelloux, Hervé; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2013-04-17

    After invading host cells, Toxoplasma gondii multiplies within a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that is maintained by parasite proteins secreted from organelles called dense granules. Most dense granule proteins remain within the PV, and few are known to access the host cell cytosol. We identify GRA16 as a dense granule protein that is exported through the PV membrane and reaches the host cell nucleus, where it positively modulates genes involved in cell-cycle progression and the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. GRA16 binds two host enzymes, the deubiquitinase HAUSP and PP2A phosphatase, which exert several functions, including regulation of p53 and the cell cycle. GRA16 alters p53 levels in a HAUSP-dependent manner and induces nuclear translocation of the PP2A holoenzyme. Additionally, certain GRA16-deficient strains exhibit attenuated virulence, indicating the importance of these host alterations in pathogenesis. Therefore, GRA16 represents a potentially emerging subfamily of exported dense granule proteins that modulate host function.

  5. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  6. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeted at 16S rRNA genes of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles in deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76 degrees C) and river water (14 degrees C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84 degrees C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained.

  7. Selective Phylogenetic Analysis Targeted at 16S rRNA Genes of Thermophiles and Hyperthermophiles in Deep-Subsurface Geothermal Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76°C) and river water (14°C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82°C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84°C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84°C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained. PMID:16391020

  8. Tumor Bioimaging: Morphology-Tailoring of a Red AIEgen from Microsized Rods to Nanospheres for Tumor-Targeted Bioimaging (Adv. Mater. 16/2016).

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsheng; Shao, Andong; Wang, Yao; Mei, Ju; Niu, Dechao; Gu, Jinlou; Shi, Ping; Zhu, Weihong; Tian, He; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-04-01

    Y. Li, W. Zhu, and co-workers develop a convenient and versatile "make-up" strategy to modulate the micro-sized rods of a near-infrared-emissive AIEgen probe integrated into nanospheres via a self-assembly encapsulation process, as presented on page 3187. The obtained nanospheres outperform microrods in terms of brightness, photostability, biocompatibility, tumor-accumulation, and targeting ability, making them perfect bioprobes for tumor-targeted bioimaging. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  10. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  11. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  12. Assessment of rpoB and 16S rRNA genes as targets for PCR-based identification of Pasteurella pneumotropica.

    PubMed

    Dole, Vandana S; Banu, Laila A; Fister, Richard D; Nicklas, Werner; Henderson, Kenneths S

    2010-12-01

    Diagnosis of Pasteurella pneumotropica in laboratory animals relies on isolation of the organism, biochemical characterization, and, more recently, DNA-based diagnostic methods. 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences were examined for development of a real-time PCR assay. Partial sequencing of rpoB (456 bp) and 16S rRNA (1368 bp) of Pasteurella pneumotropica isolates identified by microbiologic and biochemical assays indicated that either gene sequence can be used to distinguish P. pneumotropica from other members of the Pasteurellaceae family. However, alignment of rpoB sequences from the Pasteurella pneumotropica Heyl (15 sequences) and Jawetz (16 sequences) biotypes with other Pasteurellaceae sequences from GenBank indicated that although rpoB DNA sequencing could be used for diagnosis, development of diagnostic primers and probes would be difficult, because the sequence variability between Heyl and Jawetz biotypes is not clustered in any particular region of the rpoB sequence. In contrast, alignment of 16S rRNA sequences revealed a region with unique and stable nucleotide motifs sufficient to permit development of a specific fluorogenic real-time PCR assay to confirm P. pneumotropica isolated by culture and to differentiate Heyl and Jawetz biotypes.

  13. Assessment of rpoB and 16S rRNA Genes as Targets for PCR-Based Identification of Pasteurella pneumotropica

    PubMed Central

    Dole, Vandana S; Banu, Laila A; Fister, Richard D; Nicklas, Werner; Henderson, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01

    Diagnosis of Pasteurella pneumotropica in laboratory animals relies on isolation of the organism, biochemical characterization, and, more recently, DNA-based diagnostic methods. 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences were examined for development of a real-time PCR assay. Partial sequencing of rpoB (456 bp) and 16S rRNA (1368 bp) of Pasteurella pneumotropica isolates identified by microbiologic and biochemical assays indicated that either gene sequence can be used to distinguish P. pneumotropica from other members of the Pasteurellaceae family. However, alignment of rpoB sequences from the Pasteurella pneumotropica Heyl (15 sequences) and Jawetz (16 sequences) biotypes with other Pasteurellaceae sequences from GenBank indicated that although rpoB DNA sequencing could be used for diagnosis, development of diagnostic primers and probes would be difficult, because the sequence variability between Heyl and Jawetz biotypes is not clustered in any particular region of the rpoB sequence. In contrast, alignment of 16S rRNA sequences revealed a region with unique and stable nucleotide motifs sufficient to permit development of a specific fluorogenic real-time PCR assay to confirm P. pneumotropica isolated by culture and to differentiate Heyl and Jawetz biotypes. PMID:21262128

  14. Combined synthetic and recombinant techniques for the development of lipoprotein-based, self-adjuvanting vaccines targeting human papillomavirus type-16 associated tumors.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Peter M; Dai, Wei; Liu, Tzu-Yu; Hussein, Waleed M; Maruthayanar, Pirashanthini; Wells, James W; McMillan, Nigel A J; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2015-12-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with various cancers, with HPV16 linked to more than half of cervical cancer cases. Vaccines to prevent HPV infection and cancer development have proven effective, but are not useful in individuals with prior HPV exposure. Treatment vaccines to eradicate or control HPV-associated lesions are therefore desirable for these patients. Herein we describe the development of a process to enable the production of semisynthetic vaccines based on the site-specific attachment of synthetic bacterial lipid analogs (e.g., Pam2Cys) to a non-oncogenic mutant HPV16 E7 protein to generate molecularly defined vaccines. Many cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from E7 are delivered by this approach; potentially ensuring that large numbers of immunized individuals can generate CTLs to clear HPV infected cells. Delivery of this construct reduced the growth of HPV16-associated tumors in a TC1 mouse model, the effects of which were better than the potent CTL epitope HPV16 E7(44-57) administered with Montanide ISA51 adjuvant.

  15. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  16. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  17. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  18. Curriculum Development for the "Generalist Nurse." Report on a WHO Consultation (Turin, Italy, June 13-16, 1990). EUR/HFA Target 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This report presents the findings and advice of a Steering Committee whose purpose in accordance with Health for All (HFA) Target 27 of the World Health Organization (WHO), "Rational and preferential distribution of resources according to need," was to provide the EURO Nursing Unit relevant information towards the development of an…

  19. Curriculum Development for the "Generalist Nurse." Report on a WHO Consultation (Turin, Italy, June 13-16, 1990). EUR/HFA Target 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This report presents the findings and advice of a Steering Committee whose purpose in accordance with Health for All (HFA) Target 27 of the World Health Organization (WHO), "Rational and preferential distribution of resources according to need," was to provide the EURO Nursing Unit relevant information towards the development of an…

  20. Carnitine transporter CT2 (SLC22A16) is over-expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and target knockdown reduces growth and viability of AML cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Hurren, Rose; MacLean, Neil; Gronda, Marcela; Jitkova, Yulia; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Minden, Mark D; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-08-01

    AML (acute myeloid leukemia) cells have a unique reliance on mitochondrial metabolism and fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Thus, blocking FAO is a potential therapeutic strategy to target these malignant cells. In the current study, we assessed plasma membrane carnitine transporters as novel therapeutic targets for AML. We examined the expression of the known plasma membrane carnitine transporters, OCTN1, OCTN2, and CT2 in AML cell lines and primary AML samples and compared expression to normal hematopoietic cells. Of the three carnitine transporters, CT2 demonstrated the greatest differential expression between AML and normal cells. Using shRNA, we knocked down CT2 and demonstrated that target knockdown impaired the function of the transporter. In addition, knockdown of CT2 reduced the growth and viability of AML cells with high expression of CT2 (OCI-AML2 and HL60), but not low expression. CT2 knockdown reduced basal oxygen consumption without a concomitant increase in glycolysis. Thus, CT2 may be a novel target for a subset of AML.

  1. Direct Screening of Blood by PCR and Pyrosequencing for a 16S rRNA Gene Target from Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit Patients Being Evaluated for Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moore, M. S.; McCarroll, M. G.; McCann, C. D.; May, L.; Younes, N.

    2015-01-01

    Here we compared the results of PCR/pyrosequencing to those of culture for detecting bacteria directly from blood. DNA was extracted from 1,130 blood samples from 913 patients suspected of bacteremia (enrollment criteria were physician-ordered blood culture and complete blood count [CBC]), and 102 controls (healthy blood donors). Real-time PCR assays for beta-globin and Universal 16S rRNA gene targets were performed on all 1,232 extracts. Specimens identified by Universal 16S rRNA gene PCR/pyrosequencing as containing staphylococci, streptococci, or enteric Gram-negative rods had target-specific PCR/pyrosequencing performed. Amplifiable beta-globin (melting temperature [Tm], 87.2°C ± 0.2°C) occurred in 99.1% (1,120/1,130) of patient extracts and 100% (102/102) of controls. Concordance between PCR/pyrosequencing and culture was 96.9% (1,085/1,120) for Universal 16S rRNA gene targets, with positivity rates of 9.4% (105/1,120) and 11.3% (126/1,120), respectively. Bacteria cultured included staphylococci (59/126, 46.8%), Gram-negative rods (34/126, 27%), streptococci (32/126, 25.4%), and a Gram-positive rod (1/126, 0.8%). All controls screened negative by PCR/pyrosequencing. Clinical performance characteristics (95% confidence interval [CI]) for Universal 16S rRNA gene PCR/pyrosequencing included sensitivity of 77.8% (69.5 to 84.7), specificity of 99.3% (98.6 to 99.7), positive predictive value (PPV) of 93.3% (86.8 to 97.3), and negative predictive value (NPV) of 97.2% (96.0 to 98.2). Bacteria were accurately identified in 77.8% (98/126) of culture-confirmed sepsis samples with Universal 16S PCR/pyrosequencing and in 76.4% (96/126) with follow-up target-specific PCR/pyrosequencing. The initial PCR/pyrosequencing took ∼5.5 h to complete or ∼7.5 h when including target-specific PCR/pyrosequencing compared to 27.9 ± 13.6 h for Gram stain or 81.6 ± 24.0 h for phenotypic identification. In summary, this molecular approach detected the causative bacteria in over

  2. Evaluation of bacterial communities by bacteriome analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes and quantitative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase gene in different types of compost.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Rika; Ishii, Kazuo; Maeda, Isamu; Kozaki, Toshinori; Iwabuchi, Kazunori; Saito, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration technology based on microbial degradation and assimilation is used for the removal of malodorous compounds, such as ammonia. Microbes that degrade malodorous and/or organic substances are involved in composting and are retained after composting; therefore, mature composts can serve as an ideal candidate for a biofilter medium. In this study, we focused on different types of raw compost materials, as these are important factors determining the bacterial community profile and the chemical component of the compost. Therefore, bacterial community profiles, the abundance of the bacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA), and the quantities of chemical components were analyzed in composts produced from either food waste or cattle manure. The community profiles with the lowest beta diversity were obtained from single type of cattle manure compost. However, cattle manure composts showed greater alpha diversity, contained higher amounts of various rRNA gene fragments than those of food waste composts and contained the amoA gene by relative quantification, and Proteobacteria were abundantly found and nitrifying bacteria were detected in it. Nitrifying bacteria are responsible for ammonia oxidation and mainly belong to the Proteobacteria or Nitrospira phyla. The quantities of chemical components, such as salt, phosphorus, and nitrogen, differed between the cattle manure and food waste composts, indicating that the raw materials provided different fermentation environments that were crucial for the formation of different community profiles. The results also suggest that cattle manure might be a more suitable raw material for the production of composts to be used in the biofiltration of ammonia. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitrogen removal from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

  4. A pixel unit-cell targeting 16 ns resolution and radiation hardness in a column read-out particle vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.; Millaud, J.; Nygren, D.

    1992-10-01

    A pixel unit cell (PUC) circuit architecture, optimized for a column read out architecture, is reported. Each PUC contains an integrator, active filter, comparator, and optional analog store. The time-over-threshold (TOT) discriminator allows an all-digital interface to the array periphery readout while passing an analog measure of collected charge. Use of (existing) radiation hard processes, to build a detector bump-bonded to a pixel readout array, is targeted. Here, emphasis is on a qualitative explanation of how the unique circuit implementation benefits operation for Super Collider (SSC) detector application.

  5. Fluorescent Whole-Cell Hybridization with 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes To Identify Brucella spp. by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Lago, Luis; Vallejo, F. Javier; Trujillano, Ignacio; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2000-01-01

    A whole-cell hybridization assay with fluorescent oligonucleotide probes derived from the 16S rRNA sequence of Brucella abortus in combination with flow cytometry has been developed. With the three fluorescent probes selected, a positive signal was observed with all the representative strains of the species and biovars of Brucella and with a total of nine different Brucella clinical isolates. Using the B9 probe in the hybridization assay, it was possible to discriminate between Brucella suis biovars 2, 3, 4, and 5 and almost all the other Brucella spp. On the basis of differences in fluorescence intensities, no discrimination was established between Brucella spp. and other phylogenetically related microorganisms. No positive fluorescence signals were detected with any of the bacteria showing serological cross-reactions with Brucella spp. and with a total of 17 clinical isolates not belonging to the genus Brucella. These results suggest that the 16S rRNA whole-cell hybridization technique could be a valuable diagnostic tool for the detection and identification of Brucella spp. PMID:10878084

  6. Nitrogen Saturation in Temperate Forest Ecosystems

    Treesearch

    John Aber; William McDowell; Knute Nadelhoffer; Alison Magill; Glenn Berntson; Mark Kamakea; Steven McNulty; William Currie; Lindsey Rustad; Ivan Fernandez

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere due to human activity remain elevated in industrialized regions of the world and are accelerating in many developing regions (Galloway 1995). Although the deposition of sulfur has been reduced over much of the United States and Europe by aggressive environmental protection policies, current nitrogen deposition reduction targets in...

  7. Nitrogen in Ancient Mud: A Biosignature?

    PubMed

    Stüeken, Eva E

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for all life on Earth and possibly elsewhere. Burial of nitrogen bound to organic matter constitutes the major flux of nitrogen into sediments today, which has led to the inference that nitrogen enrichments in sedimentary rocks may be a biosignature. However, abiotic processes such as lightning or volcanism can fix atmospheric N2 and contribute to sedimentary nitrogen burial in the absence of life. It is therefore uncertain whether observed nitrogen enrichments of up to 430 ppm in Paleoarchean metasedimentary biotite grains are indeed biogenic. This study seeks to address that problem with a numerical model. The NH4(+) concentration of an abiotic ocean is modeled as a function of source fluxes, pH-dependent NH3 volatilization, and equilibrated adsorption of NH4(+) onto clay particles. The results suggest that the observed nitrogen concentrations in Paleoarchean biotite can only be reconciled with purely abiotic processes if the ocean was more acidic (pH <6) and/or if the source fluxes from lightning and volcanism were at least an order of magnitude higher (≥10(12) mol/yr) than previously thought. The bulk of the nitrogen is thus most likely of biological origin. While this does not necessitate a particular metabolism such as biological N2 fixation, the data provide evidence of nitrogen utilization back to 3.8 Gyr. Nitrogen abundances could thus provide useful information in extraterrestrial missions. Early Earth-Biosignatures-Nitrogen fixation. Astrobiology 16, 730-735.

  8. Development of real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for specific detection of Tsukamurella by targeting the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Atteyet F; Müller, Jens

    2012-03-01

    Recently, members of the genus Tsukamurella have been implicated as important etiologic pathogens contributing to bloodstream and pulmonary infections in immunocompromised patients. Tsukamurella species share many features with other mycolic acid-containing genera of the order Actinomycetales and might therefore be misidentified as belonging to one of these genera. We developed a TaqMan-based real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the rapid and specific detection of infections due to Tsukamurella species. The assay amplifies and detects a 157-bp segment of the 16S rRNA gene of Tsukamurella. The specificity of the assay was confirmed using a panel of DNAs from 12 Tsukamurella strains and 11 strains belonging to 8 phylogenetic closely related genera. The sensitive and specific nature of the assay provides a valuable tool for the early and precise diagnosis of Tsukamurella infections in clinical diagnostic laboratories. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Optical spectroscopy of X-Mega targets in the Carina nebula - VII. On the multiplicity of Tr16-112, HD93343 and HD93250

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, G.; Nazé, Y.; Fernández Lajús, E.; Lanotte, A. A.; Solivella, G. R.; Sana, H.; Gosset, E.

    2009-09-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic monitoring campaign devoted to three O-type stars in the Carina nebula. We derive the full SB2 orbital solution of the binary system Tr16-112, an exceptional dissymmetrical system consisting of an O5.5-6V((f+?p)) primary and a B2V-III secondary. We also report on low-amplitude brightness variations in Tr16-112 that are likely due to the ellipsoidal shape of the O5.5-6 primary revolving in an eccentric orbit around the system's centre of mass. We detect for the first time a clear SB2 binary signature in the spectrum of HD93343 (O8 + O8), although our data are not sufficient to establish an orbital solution. This system also displays low-amplitude photometric modulations. On the other hand, no indication of multiplicity is found in the optical spectra of HD93250. Finally, we discuss the general properties of multiple massive stars in the Carina OB1 association. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile), at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (Argentina), at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) and with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA). E-mail: rauw@astro.ulg.ac.be ‡ Research Associate FRS/FNRS (Belgium). § Postdoctoral Researcher FRS/FNRS (Belgium). ¶ Senior Research Associate FRS/FNRS (Belgium).

  10. Nitrogen metabolism in haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Pire, Carmen; Zafrilla, Basilio; Richardson, David J

    2008-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle (N-cycle), principally supported by prokaryotes, involves different redox reactions mainly focused on assimilatory purposes or respiratory processes for energy conservation. As the N-cycle has important environmental implications, this biogeochemical cycle has become a major research topic during the last few years. However, although N-cycle metabolic pathways have been studied extensively in Bacteria or Eukarya, relatively little is known in the Archaea. Halophilic Archaea are the predominant microorganisms in hot and hypersaline environments such as salted lakes, hot springs or salted ponds. Consequently, the denitrifying haloarchaea that sustain the nitrogen cycle under these conditions have emerged as an important target for research aimed at understanding microbial life in these extreme environments. The haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei was isolated 20 years ago from Santa Pola salted ponds (Alicante, Spain). It was described as a denitrifier and it is also able to grow using NO3-, NO2- or NH4+ as inorganic nitrogen sources. This review summarizes the advances that have been made in understanding the N-cycle in halophilic archaea using Hfx mediterranei as a haloarchaeal model. The results obtained show that this microorganism could be very attractive for bioremediation applications in those areas where high salt, nitrate and nitrite concentrations are found in ground waters and soils. PMID:18593475

  11. Nitrogen metabolism in haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Pire, Carmen; Zafrilla, Basilio; Richardson, David J

    2008-07-01

    The nitrogen cycle (N-cycle), principally supported by prokaryotes, involves different redox reactions mainly focused on assimilatory purposes or respiratory processes for energy conservation. As the N-cycle has important environmental implications, this biogeochemical cycle has become a major research topic during the last few years. However, although N-cycle metabolic pathways have been studied extensively in Bacteria or Eukarya, relatively little is known in the Archaea. Halophilic Archaea are the predominant microorganisms in hot and hypersaline environments such as salted lakes, hot springs or salted ponds. Consequently, the denitrifying haloarchaea that sustain the nitrogen cycle under these conditions have emerged as an important target for research aimed at understanding microbial life in these extreme environments.The haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei was isolated 20 years ago from Santa Pola salted ponds (Alicante, Spain). It was described as a denitrifier and it is also able to grow using NO3(-), NO2(-) or NH4(+) as inorganic nitrogen sources. This review summarizes the advances that have been made in understanding the N-cycle in halophilic archaea using Hfx mediterranei as a haloarchaeal model. The results obtained show that this microorganism could be very attractive for bioremediation applications in those areas where high salt, nitrate and nitrite concentrations are found in ground waters and soils.

  12. miR-2861 acts as a tumor suppressor via targeting EGFR/AKT2/CCND1 pathway in cervical cancer induced by human papillomavirus virus 16 E6.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junfen; Wan, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xiaojing; Fang, Yifeng; Cheng, Xiaodong; Xie, Xing; Lu, Weiguo

    2016-07-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus viruses (HPVs) is a casual factor for cervical cancer and its precursors, and the abnormal constitutive expression of viral oncoprotein E6 is a key event during the malignant transformation. Here, we performed miRNA microarray to identify changes of miRNAs following ectopic HPV16 E6 overexpression in HEK293T cells and found miR-2861 was greatly decreased in both HEK293T and HaCaT cells expressing HPV16 E6 compared to vector control. Further, we demonstrated a biological link among HPV16 E6, miR-2861, EGFR, AKT2, and CCND1 in cervical cancer cells. We showed that miR-2861 was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues and negatively correlated with advanced tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of miR-2861 suppressed cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion and enhanced apoptosis. Subsequent investigation revealed that EGFR, AKT2, and CCND1 were all the direct targets of miR-2861. Importantly, silencing EGFR, AKT2, and/or CCND1 recapitulated the cellular effects seen upon miR-2861 overexpression. Restoration of EGFR, AKT2, and/or CCND1 counteracted the effects of miR-2861 expression. Thus, we identified a new pathway employing miR-2861, EGFR, AKT2, and CCND1 that may mediate HPV16 E6 induced initiation and progression of cervical cancer.

  13. miR-2861 acts as a tumor suppressor via targeting EGFR/AKT2/CCND1 pathway in cervical cancer induced by human papillomavirus virus 16 E6

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junfen; Wan, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xiaojing; Fang, Yifeng; Cheng, Xiaodong; Xie, Xing; Lu, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus viruses (HPVs) is a casual factor for cervical cancer and its precursors, and the abnormal constitutive expression of viral oncoprotein E6 is a key event during the malignant transformation. Here, we performed miRNA microarray to identify changes of miRNAs following ectopic HPV16 E6 overexpression in HEK293T cells and found miR-2861 was greatly decreased in both HEK293T and HaCaT cells expressing HPV16 E6 compared to vector control. Further, we demonstrated a biological link among HPV16 E6, miR-2861, EGFR, AKT2, and CCND1 in cervical cancer cells. We showed that miR-2861 was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues and negatively correlated with advanced tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of miR-2861 suppressed cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion and enhanced apoptosis. Subsequent investigation revealed that EGFR, AKT2, and CCND1 were all the direct targets of miR-2861. Importantly, silencing EGFR, AKT2, and/or CCND1 recapitulated the cellular effects seen upon miR-2861 overexpression. Restoration of EGFR, AKT2, and/or CCND1 counteracted the effects of miR-2861 expression. Thus, we identified a new pathway employing miR-2861, EGFR, AKT2, and CCND1 that may mediate HPV16 E6 induced initiation and progression of cervical cancer. PMID:27364926

  14. Development of real-time PCR assays for detection of the Streptococcus milleri group from cystic fibrosis clinical specimens by targeting the cpn60 and 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Olson, A B; Sibley, C D; Schmidt, L; Wilcox, M A; Surette, M G; Corbett, C R

    2010-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multiorgan disease, with the majority of mortalities resulting from pulmonary failure due to repeated pulmonary exacerbations. Recently, members of the Streptococcus anginosus group (S. anginosus, S. constellatus, and S. intermedius), herein referred to as the "Streptococcus milleri group" (SMG) have been implicated as important etiological pathogens contributing to pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients. This is partly due to better microbiological detection of the SMG species through the development of a novel specific medium termed "McKay agar." McKay agar demonstrated that SMG has been an underreported respiratory pathogen contributing to lung exacerbations. Our aim was to develop a real-time PCR assay to expedite the detection of SMG within diagnostic samples. The cpn60 gene was chosen as a target, with all three members amplified using a single hybridization probe set. SMG strain analysis showed that speciation based on melting curve analysis allowed for the majority of the S. constellatus (96%), S. intermedius (94%), and S. anginosus (60%) strains to be correctly identified. To increase specificity for S. anginosus, two 16S rRNA real-time PCR assays were developed targeting the 16S rRNA gene. The 16s_SA assay is specific for S. anginosus (100%), while the 16s_SCI assay is specific for S. constellatus and S. intermedius (100%). These assays can detect <10 genome equivalents in pure culture and >10(4) genome equivalents in sputum samples, making this a great tool for assessment of the presence of SMG in complex polymicrobial samples. Novel molecular methods were developed providing detection ability for SMG, an emerging opportunistic pathogen.

  15. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: prompt photons produced by 4He, 12C and 16O ion beams in a PMMA target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, I.; Bini, F.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Iarocci, E.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.; Battistoni, G.

    2017-02-01

    Charged particle beams are used in particle therapy (PT) to treat oncological patients due to their selective dose deposition in tissues with respect to the photons and electrons used in conventional radiotherapy. Heavy (Z  >  1) PT beams can additionally be exploited for their high biological effectiveness in killing cancer cells. Nowadays, protons and carbon ions are used in PT clinical routines. Recently, interest in the potential application of helium and oxygen beams has been growing. With respect to protons, such beams are characterized by their reduced multiple scattering inside the body, increased linear energy transfer, relative biological effectiveness and oxygen enhancement ratio. The precision of PT demands online dose monitoring techniques, crucial to improving the quality assurance of any treatment: possible patient mis-positioning and biological tissue changes with respect to the planning CT scan could negatively affect the outcome of the therapy. The beam range confined in the irradiated target can be monitored thanks to the neutral or charged secondary radiation emitted by the interactions of hadron beams with matter. Among these secondary products, prompt photons are produced by nuclear de-excitation processes, and at present, different dose monitoring and beam range verification techniques based on prompt-γ detection are being proposed. It is hence of importance to perform γ yield measurement in therapeutic-like conditions. In this paper we report on the yields of prompt photons produced by the interaction of helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams with a poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) beam stopping target. The measurements were performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) with beams of different energies. An LYSO scintillator, placed at {{60}\\circ} and {{90}\\circ} with respect to the beam direction, was used as the photon detector. The obtained γ yields for the carbon ion beams are compared with results from the literature

  16. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: prompt photons produced by (4)He, (12)C and (16)O ion beams in a PMMA target.

    PubMed

    Mattei, I; Bini, F; Collamati, F; De Lucia, E; Frallicciardi, P M; Iarocci, E; Mancini-Terracciano, C; Marafini, M; Muraro, S; Paramatti, R; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Pinci, D; Rucinski, A; Russomando, A; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Toppi, M; Traini, G; Voena, C; Battistoni, G

    2017-02-21

    Charged particle beams are used in particle therapy (PT) to treat oncological patients due to their selective dose deposition in tissues with respect to the photons and electrons used in conventional radiotherapy. Heavy (Z  >  1) PT beams can additionally be exploited for their high biological effectiveness in killing cancer cells. Nowadays, protons and carbon ions are used in PT clinical routines. Recently, interest in the potential application of helium and oxygen beams has been growing. With respect to protons, such beams are characterized by their reduced multiple scattering inside the body, increased linear energy transfer, relative biological effectiveness and oxygen enhancement ratio. The precision of PT demands online dose monitoring techniques, crucial to improving the quality assurance of any treatment: possible patient mis-positioning and biological tissue changes with respect to the planning CT scan could negatively affect the outcome of the therapy. The beam range confined in the irradiated target can be monitored thanks to the neutral or charged secondary radiation emitted by the interactions of hadron beams with matter. Among these secondary products, prompt photons are produced by nuclear de-excitation processes, and at present, different dose monitoring and beam range verification techniques based on prompt-γ detection are being proposed. It is hence of importance to perform γ yield measurement in therapeutic-like conditions. In this paper we report on the yields of prompt photons produced by the interaction of helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams with a poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) beam stopping target. The measurements were performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) with beams of different energies. An LYSO scintillator, placed at [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] with respect to the beam direction, was used as the photon detector. The obtained γ yields for the carbon ion beams are compared with results from

  17. A comparison of two real-time polymerase chain reaction assays using hybridization probes targeting either 16S ribosomal RNA or a subsurface lipoprotein gene for detecting leptospires in canine urine.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Fabio; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Zambon, Elisa; Turba, Maria Elena

    2015-11-01

    Leptospires are excreted in the urine of infected animals, and the prompt detection of leptospiral DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is increasingly being used. However, contradictory data has emerged concerning the diagnostic accuracy of the most popular PCR assays that target either the 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs) or the subsurface lipoprotein (LipL32) genes. In order to clarify the effect of the gene target, a novel hydrolysis probe-based, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the LipL32 gene was developed, validated, and then compared directly to the previously described rrs hydrolysis probe-based qPCR using a convenience collection of canine urine samples. The novel LipL32 qPCR assay was linear from 5.9 × 10(6) to 59 genome equivalents per reaction. Both the LipL32 and the rrs qPCR assays showed a limit of detection of 10 target copies per reaction indicating an approximately equivalent analytical sensitivity. Both assays amplified all 20 pathogenic leptospiral strains tested but did not amplify a representative collection of bacteria commonly found in voided canine urine. When the field samples were assayed, 1 and 5 out of 184 samples yielded an amplification signal in the LipL32 and rrs assays, respectively. Nevertheless, when the limit of detection was considered as the cutoff for interpreting findings, the 4 discordant cases were judged as negative. In conclusion, our study confirmed that both LipL32 and rrs are suitable targets for qPCR for the detection of leptospiral DNA in canine urine. However, the rrs target requires the mandatory use of a cutoff value in order to correctly interpret spurious amplifications.

  18. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting 16S rRNA gene for rapid detection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Ning, Changshen; Wang, Jinhong; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiaoxing; Cui, Yanyan; Yan, Yaqun; Wang, Rongjun; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Longxian

    2017-01-24

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) in humans and tick-borne fever in various kinds of animals. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid detection of A. phagocytophilum was developed using primers specific to 16S rRNA gene of this organism. The LAMP assay was performed at 65 C for 60 min and terminated at 80 C for 10 min. The optimal reaction conditions, under which no cross-reaction was observed with other closely related tick borne parasites (Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma ovis, Theileria luwenshuni, Babesia motasi and Schistosoma japonicum) was established. The assay exhibited much higher sensitivity when compared with conventional PCR (1 copy vs 1000 copies). To evaluate the applicability of the LAMP assay, 94 sheep field blood samples were analyzed for A. phagocytophilum infection using LAMP, nested PCR and conventional PCR assay at the same time. A positive LAMP result was obtained from 53 of the 94 samples (56.4%), while only 12 (12.8%) and 3 (3.2%) were tested positive by nested PCR and conventional PCR, respectively. In conclusion, this LAMP assay is a specific, sensitive, and rapid method for the detection of A. phagocytophilum in sheep.

  19. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of drinking water using RNA and DNA extracts as targets for clone library development.

    PubMed

    Revetta, Randy P; Matlib, Robin S; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2011-07-01

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based clone sequences showed that unclassified bacteria were the most abundant group, representing nearly 62% of all DNA sequences analyzed. Other phylogenetic groups identified included Proteobacteria (20%), Actinobacteria (9%), Cyanobacteria (4%), and Bacteroidetes (2%). The composition of RNA-based libraries (1122 sequences) was similar to the DNA-based libraries with a few notable exceptions: Proteobacteria were more dominant in the RNA clone libraries (i.e., 35% RNA; 20% DNA). Differences in the Proteobacteria composition were also observed; alpha-Proteobacteria was 22 times more abundant in the RNA-based clones while beta-Proteobacteria was eight times more abundant in the DNA libraries. Nearly twice as many DNA operational taxonomic units (OTUs) than RNA OTUs were observed at distance 0.03 (101 DNA; 53 RNA). Twenty-four OTUs were shared between all RNA- and DNA-based libraries (OTU0.03) representing only 18% of the total OTUs, but 81% (1527/1883) of all sequences. Such differences between clone libraries demonstrate the necessity of generating both RNA- and DNA-derived clone libraries to compare these two different molecular approaches for community analyses.

  20. 40 CFR 60.332 - Standard for nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for nitrogen oxides. 60.332... Turbines § 60.332 Standard for nitrogen oxides. (a) On and after the date on which the performance test... stationary gas turbine, any gases which contain nitrogen oxides in excess of: EC16NO91.020 where:...

  1. 40 CFR 60.332 - Standard for nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for nitrogen oxides. 60.332... Turbines § 60.332 Standard for nitrogen oxides. (a) On and after the date on which the performance test... stationary gas turbine, any gases which contain nitrogen oxides in excess of: EC16NO91.020 where:...

  2. 40 CFR 60.332 - Standard for nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for nitrogen oxides. 60.332... Turbines § 60.332 Standard for nitrogen oxides. (a) On and after the date on which the performance test... stationary gas turbine, any gases which contain nitrogen oxides in excess of: EC16NO91.020 where:...

  3. 40 CFR 60.332 - Standard for nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for nitrogen oxides. 60.332... Turbines § 60.332 Standard for nitrogen oxides. (a) On and after the date on which the performance test... stationary gas turbine, any gases which contain nitrogen oxides in excess of: EC16NO91.020 where:...

  4. 40 CFR 60.332 - Standard for nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for nitrogen oxides. 60.332... Turbines § 60.332 Standard for nitrogen oxides. (a) On and after the date on which the performance test... stationary gas turbine, any gases which contain nitrogen oxides in excess of: EC16NO91.020 where:...

  5. Development of collection precedes targeted reaching: resting shapes of the hands and digits in 1-6-month-old human infants.

    PubMed

    Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2010-12-06

    Hand shaping is an important part of many skilled hand movements and includes a number of hand shapes prominent amongst which is collection. In collection, the hand is held with the digits lightly closed and flexed. It occurs when the hand is at rest and it occurs as the hand is transported to a target in behaviors such as reaching for an object, crawling, and climbing a ladder. Collection also frequently precedes hand gestures associated with speaking. The development of collection in infancy has not been described but it might be predicted that collection should develop before grasping and reaching movements. The present study examines the development of collection and arm position during the first 6 months of infant development. Infants were filmed while awake and photographed while asleep and hand shape and the hands location relative to the torso was documented. Collection associated with a relaxed position of the arm became increasingly prominent over the first 4 weeks of life in both awake and sleeping infants. It replaces a clenched (spastic) fist that was typically held proximal to the upper torso. The results are discussed in relation to the idea that the development of collection is an important antecedent to other hand shaping movements, especially skilled movements of grasping and reaching.

  6. Evaluation of the effects of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on newborn intestinal microbiota using a sequencing approach targeted to multi hypervariable 16S rDNA regions.

    PubMed

    Aloisio, Irene; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Luiselli, Donata; De Filippo, Carlotta; Albanese, Davide; Corvaglia, Luigi Tommaso; Faldella, Giacomo; Di Gioia, Diana

    2016-06-01

    Different factors are known to influence the early gut colonization in newborns, among them the perinatal use of antibiotics. On the other hand, the effect on the baby of the administration of antibiotics to the mother during labor, referred to as intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP), has received less attention, although routinely used in group B Streptococcus positive women to prevent the infection in newborns. In this work, the fecal microbiota of neonates born to mothers receiving IAP and of control subjects were compared taking advantage for the first time of high-throughput DNA sequencing technology. Seven different 16S rDNA hypervariable regions (V2, V3, V4, V6 + V7, V8, and V9) were amplified and sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. The results obtained showed significant differences in the microbial composition of newborns born to mothers who had received IAP, with a lower abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes as well as an overrepresentation of Proteobacteria. Considering that the seven hypervariable regions showed different discriminant ability in the taxonomic identification, further analyses were performed on the V4 region evidencing in IAP infants a reduced microbial richness and biodiversity, as well as a lower number of bacterial families with a predominance of Enterobacteriaceae members. In addition, this analysis pointed out a significant reduction in Bifidobacterium spp. strains. The reduced abundance of these beneficial microorganisms, together with the increased amount of potentially pathogenic bacteria, may suggest that IAP infants are more exposed to gastrointestinal or generally health disorders later in age.

  7. Global expression studies in baker's yeast reveal target genes for the improvement of industrially-relevant traits: the cases of CAF16 and ORC2

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent years have seen a huge growth in the market of industrial yeasts with the need for strains affording better performance or to be used in new applications. Stress tolerance of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts is, without doubt, a trait that needs improving. Such trait is, however, complex, and therefore only in-depth knowledge of their biochemical, physiological and genetic principles can help us to define improvement strategies and to identify the key factors for strain selection. Results We have determined the transcriptional response of commercial baker's yeast cells to both high-sucrose and lean dough by using DNA macroarrays and liquid dough (LD) model system. Cells from compressed yeast blocks display a reciprocal transcription program to that commonly reported for laboratory strains exposed to osmotic stress. This discrepancy likely reflects differences in strain background and/or experimental design. Quite remarkably, we also found that the transcriptional response of starved baker's yeast cells was qualitatively similar in the presence or absence of sucrose in the LD. Nevertheless, there was a set of differentially regulated genes, which might be relevant for cells to adapt to high osmolarity. Consistent with this, overexpression of CAF16 or ORC2, two transcriptional factor-encoding genes included in this group, had positive effects on leavening activity of baker's yeast. Moreover, these effects were more pronounced during freezing and frozen storage of high-sucrose LD. Conclusions Engineering of differentially regulated genes opens the possibility to improve the physiological behavior of baker's yeast cells under stress conditions like those encountered in downstream applications. PMID:20626860

  8. Global expression studies in baker's yeast reveal target genes for the improvement of industrially-relevant traits: the cases of CAF16 and ORC2.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Panadero, Joaquín; Hernández-López, María José; Prieto, José Antonio; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2010-07-13

    Recent years have seen a huge growth in the market of industrial yeasts with the need for strains affording better performance or to be used in new applications. Stress tolerance of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts is, without doubt, a trait that needs improving. Such trait is, however, complex, and therefore only in-depth knowledge of their biochemical, physiological and genetic principles can help us to define improvement strategies and to identify the key factors for strain selection. We have determined the transcriptional response of commercial baker's yeast cells to both high-sucrose and lean dough by using DNA macroarrays and liquid dough (LD) model system. Cells from compressed yeast blocks display a reciprocal transcription program to that commonly reported for laboratory strains exposed to osmotic stress. This discrepancy likely reflects differences in strain background and/or experimental design. Quite remarkably, we also found that the transcriptional response of starved baker's yeast cells was qualitatively similar in the presence or absence of sucrose in the LD. Nevertheless, there was a set of differentially regulated genes, which might be relevant for cells to adapt to high osmolarity. Consistent with this, overexpression of CAF16 or ORC2, two transcriptional factor-encoding genes included in this group, had positive effects on leavening activity of baker's yeast. Moreover, these effects were more pronounced during freezing and frozen storage of high-sucrose LD. Engineering of differentially regulated genes opens the possibility to improve the physiological behavior of baker's yeast cells under stress conditions like those encountered in downstream applications.

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of Real-Time PCR Assays Targeting 16S rRNA and lipl32 Genes for Human Leptospirosis in Thailand: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Thaipadunpanit, Janjira; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Amornchai, Premjit; Boonslip, Siriphan; Smythe, Lee D.; Limpaiboon, Roongrueng; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Rapid PCR-based tests for the diagnosis of leptospirosis can provide information that contributes towards early patient management, but these have not been adopted in Thailand. Here, we compare the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of two real-time PCR assays targeting rrs or lipL32 for the diagnosis of leptospirosis in northeast Thailand. Methods/Principal Findings A case-control study of 266 patients (133 cases of leptospirosis and 133 controls) was constructed to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity (DSe & DSp) of both PCR assays. The median duration of illness prior to admission of cases was 4 days (IQR 2–5 days; range 1–12 days). DSe and DSp were determined using positive culture and/or microscopic agglutination test (MAT) as the gold standard. The DSe was higher for the rrs assay than the lipL32 assay (56%, (95% CI 47–64%) versus 43%, (95% CI 34–52%), p<0.001). No cases were positive for the lipL32 assay alone. There was borderline evidence to suggest that the DSp of the rrs assay was lower than the lipL32 assay (90% (95% CI 83–94%) versus 93%, (95%CI 88–97%), p = 0.06). Nine controls gave positive reactions for both assays and 5 controls gave a positive reaction for the rrs assay alone. The DSe of the rrs and lipL32 assays were high in the subgroup of 39 patients who were culture positive for Leptospira spp. (95% and 87%, respectively, p = 0.25). Conclusions/Significance Early detection of Leptospira using PCR is possible for more than half of patients presenting with leptospirosis and could contribute to individual patient care. PMID:21283633

  10. CXCL16 regulates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hua; Zhang, Zhengmao; He, Liqun; Wang, Yanlin

    2016-05-31

    The pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by tubular cell apoptosis and inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We found that CXCL16 was induced in renal tubular epithelial cells in response to cisplatin-induced AKI. Therefore, we investigated whether CXCL16 played a role in cisplatin-induced tubular cell apoptosis and inflammation. Wild-type and CXCL16 knockout mice were administrated with vehicle or cisplatin at 20 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection. CXCL16 knockout mice had lower blood urea nitrogen and less tubular damage following cisplatin-induced AKI as compared with wild-type mice. Genetic disruption of CXCL16 reduced tubular epithelial cell apoptosis and decreased caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, CXCL16 deficiency inhibited infiltration of macrophages and T cells into the kidneys following cisplatin treatment, which was associated with reduced expression of the proinflammatory cytokines in the kidneys. Taken together, our results indicate that CXCL16 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced AKI through regulation of apoptosis and inflammation and maybe a novel therapeutic target for cisplatin-induced AKI.

  11. Managing nitrogen for sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Davidson, Eric A; Mauzerall, Denise L; Searchinger, Timothy D; Dumas, Patrice; Shen, Ye

    2015-12-03

    Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them.

  12. Managing nitrogen for sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Davidson, Eric A.; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Searchinger, Timothy D.; Dumas, Patrice; Shen, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them.

  13. A tradeoff frontier for global nitrogen use and cereal production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Nathaniel D.; West, Paul C.; Gerber, James S.; MacDonald, Graham K.; Polasky, Stephen; Foley, Jonathan A.

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen fertilizer use across the world’s croplands enables high-yielding agricultural production, but does so at considerable environmental cost. Imbalances between nitrogen applied and nitrogen used by crops contributes to excess nitrogen in the environment, with negative consequences for water quality, air quality, and climate change. Here we utilize crop input-yield models to investigate how to minimize nitrogen application while achieving crop production targets. We construct a tradeoff frontier that estimates the minimum nitrogen fertilizer needed to produce a range of maize, wheat, and rice production levels. Additionally, we explore potential environmental consequences by calculating excess nitrogen along the frontier using a soil surface nitrogen balance model. We find considerable opportunity to achieve greater production and decrease both nitrogen application and post-harvest excess nitrogen. Our results suggest that current (circa 2000) levels of cereal production could be achieved with ˜50% less nitrogen application and ˜60% less excess nitrogen. If current global nitrogen application were held constant but spatially redistributed, production could increase ˜30%. If current excess nitrogen were held constant, production could increase ˜40%. Efficient spatial patterns of nitrogen use on the frontier involve substantial reductions in many high-use areas and moderate increases in many low-use areas. Such changes may be difficult to achieve in practice due to infrastructure, economic, or political constraints. Increases in agronomic efficiency would expand the frontier to allow greater production and environmental gains.

  14. EXPERIMENT - APOLLO 16 (UV)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-06-06

    S72-40821 (21 April 1972) --- An artificially reproduced color enhancement of a ten-minute far-ultraviolet exposure of Earth, taken with a filter which blocks the glow caused by atomic hydrogen but which transmits the glow caused by atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen. Note that airglow emission bands are visible on the night side of Earth, one roughly centered between the two polar auroral zones and one at an angle to this extending northward toward the sunlit side of Earth. The UV camera was operated by astronaut John W. Young on the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission. It was designed and built at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. EDITOR'S NOTE: The photographic number of the original black & white UV camera photograph, from which this artificially reproduced version was made, is AS16-123-19657.

  15. [Effects of water deficit and nitrogen fertilization on winter wheat growth and nitrogen uptake].

    PubMed

    Qi, You-Ling; Zhang, Fu-Cang; Li, Kai-Feng

    2009-10-01

    Winter wheat plants were cultured in vitro tubes to study their growth and nitrogen uptake under effects of water deficit at different growth stages and nitrogen fertilization. Water deficit at any growth stages could obviously affect the plant height, leaf area, dry matter accumulation, and nitrogen uptake. Jointing stage was the most sensitive stage of winter wheat growth to water deficit, followed by flowering stage, grain-filling stage, and seedling stages. Rewatering after the water deficit at seedling stage had a significant compensation effect on winter wheat growth, and definite compensation effect was observed on the biomass accumulation and nitrogen absorption when rewatering was made after the water deficit at flowering stage. Under the same nitrogen fertilization levels, the nitrogen accumulation in root with water deficit at seedling, jointing, flowering, and grain-filling stages was reduced by 25.82%, 55.68%, 46.14%, and 16.34%, and the nitrogen accumulation in aboveground part was reduced by 33.37%, 51.71%, 27.01%, and 2.60%, respectively, compared with no water deficit. Under the same water deficit stages, the nitrogen content and accumulation of winter wheat decreased with decreasing nitrogen fertilization level, i. e., 0.3 g N x kg(-1) FM > 0.2 g N x kg(-1) FM > 0.1 g N x kg(-1) FM. Nitrogen fertilization had obvious regulation effect on winter wheat plant growth, dry matter accumulation, and nitrogen uptake under water stress.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF NITROGEN IN DOMESTIC WASTEWATER FROM INDIVIDUAL HOMES, AQUAPOINT, INC. BIOCLERE MODEL 16/12 - 02/02/WQPC-SWP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Aquapoint, Inc. (AQP) BioclereTM Model 16/12 was conducted over a thirteen month period at the Massachusetts Alternative Septic System Test Center (MASSTC), located at Otis Air National Guard Base in Bourne, Massachusetts. Sanitary sewerage from the ba...

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF NITROGEN IN DOMESTIC WASTEWATER FROM INDIVIDUAL HOMES, AQUAPOINT, INC. BIOCLERE MODEL 16/12 - 02/02/WQPC-SWP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Aquapoint, Inc. (AQP) BioclereTM Model 16/12 was conducted over a thirteen month period at the Massachusetts Alternative Septic System Test Center (MASSTC), located at Otis Air National Guard Base in Bourne, Massachusetts. Sanitary sewerage from the ba...

  18. Measurements of thick target neutron yields and shielding studies using beams of 4He, 12C and 16O at 155 MeV/nucleon from the K1200 cyclotron at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britvich, G. I.; Chumakov, A. A.; Ronningen, R. M.; Blue, R. A.; Heilbronn, L. H.

    1999-05-01

    Measurements of neutrons from a thick target of Hevimet were made, using beams of 4He, 12C, and 16O ions at 155 MeV per nucleon. These measurements were made both inside and outside of thick concrete shielding, using Bonner-sphere techniques. Yields, spectra, and spectral integral quantities were obtained. The neutron yields were parameterized, and a Moyer-model approach was taken to estimate the dose-equivalent outside of the thick concrete shielding. The effect of local iron shielding, and the dose equivalent outside of iron roof shielding were also investigated. Finally, two methods to obtain neutron field integral values, the "reconstructed spectra" and "six-spheres" methods, were compared. The measurements and analyses should prove useful to other present or planned medium-energy heavy-ion accelerator facilities.

  19. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive π+ and π- electroproduction with 1.6- to 5.7-GeV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P. E.; Biselli, A. S.; Careccia, S.; Dodge, G.; Fersch, R.; Guler, N.; Kuhn, S. E.; Pierce, J.; Prok, Y.; Zheng, X.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, Ivana; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2016-11-01

    Beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries in exclusive pi(+) and quasiexclusive pi(-) electroproduction were obtained from scattering of 1.6- to 5.7-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from longitudinally polarized protons (for pi(+)) and deuterons (for pi(-)) using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The kinematic range covered is 1.1 < W < 2.6 GeV and 0.05 < Q(2) < 5 GeV2, with good angular coverage in the forward hemisphere. The asymmetry results were divided into approximately 40 000 kinematic bins for pi(+) from free protons and 15 000 bins for pi(-) production from bound nucleons in the deuteron. The present results are found to be in reasonable agreement with fits to previous world data for W < 1.7 GeV and Q(2) < 0.5 GeV2, with discrepancies increasing at higher values of Q(2), especially for W > 1.5 GeV. Very large target-spin asymmetries are observed for W > 1.6 GeV. When combined with cross-section measurements, the present results can provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q(2), for resonances with masses as high as 2.3 GeV.

  20. Molecular analysis of the sulfate reducing and archaeal community in a meromictic soda lake (Mono Lake, California) by targeting 16S rRNA, mcrA, apsA, and dsrAB genes.

    PubMed

    Scholten, J C M; Joye, S B; Hollibaugh, J T; Murrell, J C

    2005-07-01

    Sulfate reduction is the most important process involved in the mineralization of carbon in the anoxic bottom waters of Mono Lake, an alkaline, hypersaline, meromictic Lake in California. Another important biogeochemical process in Mono Lake is thought to be sulfate-dependent methane oxidation (SDMO). However little is known about what types of organisms are involved in these processes in Mono Lake. Therefore, the sulfate-reducing and archaeal microbial community in Mono Lake was analyzed by targeting 16S rRNA, methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (apsA), and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) genes to investigate the sulfate-reducing and archaeal community with depth. Most of the 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the samples fell into the delta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the clones obtained represented sulfate-reducing bacteria, which are probably involved in the mineralization of carbon in Mono Lake, many of them belonging to a novel line of descent in the delta-Proteobacteria. Only 6% of the sequences retrieved from the samples affiliated to the domain Euryarchaeota but did not represent Archaea, which is considered to be responsible for SDMO [Orphan et al. 2001: Appl Environ Microbiol 67:1922-1934; Teske et al.: Appl Environ Microbiol 68:1994-2007]. On the basis of our results and thermodynamic arguments, we proposed that SDMO in hypersaline environments is presumably carried out by SRB alone. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications of the mcrA-, apsA-, and dsrAB genes in Mono Lake samples were, in most cases, not successful. Only the PCR amplification of the apsA gene was partially successful. The amplification of these functional genes was not successful because there was either insufficient "target" DNA in the samples, or the microorganisms in Mono Lake have divergent functional genes.

  1. Molecular analyses of the methane-oxidizing microbial community in rice field soil by targeting the genes of the 16S rRNA, particulate methane monooxygenase, and methanol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Henckel, T.; Friedrich, M.; Conrad, R.

    1999-05-01

    Rice field soil with a nonsaturated water content induced CH{sub 4} consumption activity when it was supplemented with 5% CH{sub 4}. After a lag phase of 3 days, CH{sub 4} was consumed rapidly until the concentration was less than 1.8 parts per million by volume (ppmv). However, the soil was not able to maintain the oxidation activity at near-atmospheric CH{sub 4} mixing ratios. The soil microbial community was monitored by performing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) during the oxidation process with different PCR primer sets based on the 16S rRNA gene and on functional genes. A universal small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) primer set and 16S rDNA primer sets specifically targeting type 1 methylotrophs and type 2 methylotrophs were used. Functional PCR primers targeted the genes for particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) and methanol dehydrogenase (mxaF), which code for key enzymes in the catabolism of all methanotrophs. The yield of PCR products amplified from DNA in soil that oxidized CH{sub 4} was the same as the yield of PCR products amplified from control soil when the universal SSU rDNA primer set was used but was significantly greater when primer sets specific for methanotrophs were used. The DGGE patterns and the sequences of major DGGE bands obtained with the universal SSU rDNA primer set showed that the community structure was dominated by nonmethanotrophic populations related to the genera Flavobacterium and Bacillus and was not influenced by CH{sub 4}.

  2. Novel Bacterial Lineages at the (Sub)Division Level as Detected by Signature Nucleotide-Targeted Recovery of 16S rRNA Genes from Bulk Soil and Rice Roots of Flooded Rice Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Derakshani, Manigee; Lukow, Thomas; Liesack, Werner

    2001-01-01

    Using a newly developed 16S rRNA gene (rDNA)-targeted PCR assay with proposed group specificity for planctomycetes, we examined anoxic bulk soil of flooded rice microcosms for the presence of novel planctomycete-like diversity. For comparison, oxic rice roots were included as an additional sample in this investigation. The bacterial diversity detectable by this PCR assay was assessed by using a combined approach that included terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and comparative sequence analysis of cloned 16S rDNA. T-RFLP fingerprint patterns generated from rice roots contained 12 distinct terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs). In contrast, the T-RFLP fingerprint patterns obtained from the anoxic bulk soil contained 33 distinct T-RFs, a clearly higher level of complexity. A survey of 176 bulk soil 16S rDNA clone sequences permitted correlation of 20 T-RFs with phylogenetic information. The other 13 T-RFs remained unidentified. The predominant T-RFs obtained from rice roots could be assigned to members of the genus Pirellula within the Planctomycetales, while most of the T-RFs obtained from the bulk soil corresponded to novel lines of bacterial descent. Using a level of 16S rDNA sequence dissimilarity to cultured microorganisms of approximately 20% as a threshold value, we detected 11 distinct bacterial lineages for which pure-culture representatives are not known. Four of these lineages could be assigned to the order Planctomycetales, while one lineage was affiliated with the division Verrucomicrobia and one lineage was affiliated with the spirochetes. The other five lineages either could not be assigned to any of the main lines of bacterial descent or clearly expanded the known diversity of division level lineages WS3 and OP3. Our results indicate the presence of bacterial diversity at a subdivision and/or division level that has not been detected previously by the so-called universal 16S rDNA PCR assays. PMID:11157225

  3. Study of 232Th(n, γ) and 232Th(n,f) reaction rates in a graphite moderated spallation neutron field produced by 1.6 GeV deuterons on lead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asquith, N. L.; Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Westmeier, W.; Zhuk, I.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Adam, J.

    2015-02-01

    The Gamma-3 assembly of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia is designed to emulate the neutron spectrum of a thermal Accelerator Driven System (ADS). It consists of a lead spallation target surrounded by reactor grade graphite. The target was irradiated with 1.6 GeV deuterons from the Nuclotron accelerator and the neutron capture and fission rate of 232Th in several locations within the assembly were experimentally measured. 232Th is a proposed fuel for envisaged Accelerator Driven Systems and these two reactions are fundamental to the performance and feasibility of 232Th in an ADS. The irradiation of the Gamma-3 assembly was also simulated using MCNPX 2.7 with the INCL4 intra-nuclear cascade and ABLA fission/evaporation models. Good agreement between the experimentally measured and calculated reaction rates was found. This serves as a good validation for the computational models and cross section data used to simulate neutron production and transport of spallation neutrons within a thermal ADS.

  4. Breakup of the projectile in [sup 16]O-induced reactions on [sup 27]Al, [sup 58]Ni, and [sup 197]Au targets around 100 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S. ); Riggi, F. Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Catania, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania )

    1993-08-01

    The spatial correlation among the four He ions coming from the disassembly of the [sup 16]O projectile on [sup 27]Al, [sup 58]Ni, and [sup 197]Au targets has been studied at 94 MeV/nucleon. Charged particles have been detected by a multielement array of plastic scintillators covering the angular domain between 3[degree] and 150[degree]. Standard relativistic kinematics has been used to reconstruct the excitation energy of the primary projectilelike nucleus ([ital E][sub PLN][sup *]). Mean values of this quantity are found independent of the target mass and the comparison with existing similar data taken at lower bombarding energies shows a saturation of [ital E][sub PLN][sup *] around 3 MeV/nucleon. An event-by-event analysis has been performed in order to study the distributions of some global variables such as coplanarity, sphericity, and relative angle, helpful in the understanding of the topological characteristics of the process and in the evaluation of its time scale. Experimental data have also been compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations based on different reaction mechanisms and it is possible to conclude that sequential emission of the fragments is preferred.

  5. MicroRNA-27b up-regulated by human papillomavirus 16 E7 promotes proliferation and suppresses apoptosis by targeting polo-like kinase2 in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Mao, Xinru; Huang, Jinlan; Wu, Zixian; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The infection with high-risk human papillomavirus is linked to cervical cancer, nevertheless, the role of miRNAs regulated by HPV oncogenes in cancer progression remain largely unknown. Here, we knocked down endogenous E6/E7 in HPV16-positive CaSki cell lines, screened differences in miRNA expression profile with control using miRNA array. 38 miRNAs were down-regulated and 6 miRNAs were up-regulated in the E6/E7 silenced CaSki cells (>2-fold changes with P <0.05). The levels of miR-27b, miR-20a, miR-24, miR-93, and miR-106b were verified by qPCR in E6/E7 silenced CaSki and SiHa cells. MiR-27b, up-regulated by E7, promoted CaSki and SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, inhibit paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Dual-luciferase experiment confirmed miR-27b down-regulated its target gene PLK2 through the “seed regions”. The tumor suppressor PLK2 inhibited SiHa cell proliferation, reduced cell viability, and promoted paclitaxel/cisplatin -induced apoptosis. Furthermore, DGCR8 was found to mediate the up-regulation of miR-27b by HPV16 E7. Our study demonstrated that HPV16 E7 could increase DGCR8 to promote the generation of miR-27b, which accelerated cell proliferation and inhibited paclitaxel-induced cell apoptosis through down-regulating PLK2. These findings provide an insight into the interaction network of viral oncogene, miR-27b and PLK2, and support the potential strategies using antisense nucleic acid of miR-27b for therapy of cervical cancer in the future. PMID:26910911

  6. Reactive nitrogen species in cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Levi; Franco, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    The transduction of cellular signals occurs through the modification of target molecules. Most of these modifications are transitory, thus the signal transduction pathways can be tightly regulated. Reactive nitrogen species are a group of compounds with different properties and reactivity. Some reactive nitrogen species are highly reactive and their interaction with macromolecules can lead to permanent modifications, which suggested they were lacking the specificity needed to participate in cell signaling events. However, the perception of reactive nitrogen species as oxidizers of macromolecules leading to general oxidative damage has recently evolved. The concept of redox signaling is now well established for a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In this context, the post-translational modifications introduced by reactive nitrogen species can be very specific and are active participants in signal transduction pathways. This review addresses the role of these oxidative modifications in the regulation of cell signaling events. PMID:25888647

  7. Development of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei generated by proton irradiation of targets containing (12)C, (16)O, and (40)Ca nuclei in preparation of clinical application.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new calculation algorithm that is satisfactory in terms of the requirements for both accuracy and calculation time for a simulation of imaging of the proton-irradiated volume in a patient body in clinical proton therapy. The activity pencil beam algorithm (APB algorithm), which is a new technique to apply the pencil beam algorithm generally used for proton dose calculations in proton therapy to the calculation of activity distributions, was developed as a calculation algorithm of the activity distributions formed by positron emitter nuclei generated from target nuclear fragment reactions. In the APB algorithm, activity distributions are calculated using an activity pencil beam kernel. In addition, the activity pencil beam kernel is constructed using measured activity distributions in the depth direction and calculations in the lateral direction. (12)C, (16)O, and (40)Ca nuclei were determined as the major target nuclei that constitute a human body that are of relevance for calculation of activity distributions. In this study, "virtual positron emitter nuclei" was defined as the integral yield of various positron emitter nuclei generated from each target nucleus by target nuclear fragment reactions with irradiated proton beam. Compounds, namely, polyethylene, water (including some gelatin) and calcium oxide, which contain plenty of the target nuclei, were irradiated using a proton beam. In addition, depth activity distributions of virtual positron emitter nuclei generated in each compound from target nuclear fragment reactions were measured using a beam ON-LINE PET system mounted a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp). The measured activity distributions depend on depth or, in other words, energy. The irradiated proton beam energies were 138, 179, and 223 MeV, and measurement time was about 5 h until the measured activity reached the background level. Furthermore, the activity pencil beam data were made using the activity pencil

  8. Development of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei generated by proton irradiation of targets containing {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei in preparation of clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a new calculation algorithm that is satisfactory in terms of the requirements for both accuracy and calculation time for a simulation of imaging of the proton-irradiated volume in a patient body in clinical proton therapy. Methods: The activity pencil beam algorithm (APB algorithm), which is a new technique to apply the pencil beam algorithm generally used for proton dose calculations in proton therapy to the calculation of activity distributions, was developed as a calculation algorithm of the activity distributions formed by positron emitter nuclei generated from target nuclear fragment reactions. In the APB algorithm, activity distributions are calculated using an activity pencil beam kernel. In addition, the activity pencil beam kernel is constructed using measured activity distributions in the depth direction and calculations in the lateral direction. {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei were determined as the major target nuclei that constitute a human body that are of relevance for calculation of activity distributions. In this study, ''virtual positron emitter nuclei'' was defined as the integral yield of various positron emitter nuclei generated from each target nucleus by target nuclear fragment reactions with irradiated proton beam. Compounds, namely, polyethylene, water (including some gelatin) and calcium oxide, which contain plenty of the target nuclei, were irradiated using a proton beam. In addition, depth activity distributions of virtual positron emitter nuclei generated in each compound from target nuclear fragment reactions were measured using a beam ON-LINE PET system mounted a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp). The measured activity distributions depend on depth or, in other words, energy. The irradiated proton beam energies were 138, 179, and 223 MeV, and measurement time was about 5 h until the measured activity reached the background level. Furthermore, the activity pencil beam data

  9. The adenoviral E1A N-terminal domain represses MYC transcription in human cancer cells by targeting both p300 and TRRAP and inhibiting MYC promoter acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M.; Green, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers frequently arise from increased expression of proto-oncogenes, such as MYC and HER2. Understanding the cellular pathways regulating the transcription and expression of proto-oncogenes is important for targeted therapies for cancer treatment. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A 243R (243 aa residues) is a viral oncoprotein that interacts with key regulators of gene transcription and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the 80 amino acid N-terminal transcriptional repression domain of E1A 243R (E1A 1-80) can target the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 and repress HER2 in the HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Expression of E1A 1-80 induces death of SKBR3 and other cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed total cell RNA sequence analysis and identified MYC as the regulatory gene for cellular proliferation most strongly repressed by E1A 1-80. By RT-quantitative PCR analysis we show that repression of MYC in SKBR3 cells occurs early after expression of E1A 1-80, suggesting that MYC may be an early responder of E1A 1-80-mediated transcriptional repression. Of interest, while E1A 1-80 repression of MYC occurs in all eight human cancer cell lines examined, repression of HER2 is cell-type dependent. We demonstrate by ChIP analysis that MYC transcriptional repression by E1A 1-80 is associated with inhibition of acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16 on the MYC promoter, as well as inhibition of RNA Pol II binding to the MYC promoter. Deletion mutant analysis of E1A 1-80 suggests that both p300/CBP and TRRAP are involved in E1A 1-80 repression of MYC transcription. Further, E1A 1-80 interaction with p300/CBP and TRRAP is correlated with inhibition of H3K18 and H4K16 acetylation on the MYC promoter, respectively. Our results indicate that E1A 1-80 may target two important pathways for histone modification to repress transcription in human cancer cells. PMID:27382434

  10. Luna 16

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-25

    Luna 16 was the first robotic mission to land on the Moon on basaltic plains of Mare Fecunditatis and return a sample to the Earth. It was launched by the Soviet Union on 12 September 1970. This image was taken by NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  11. Comparison of nitrogen depletion and repletion on lipid production in yeast and fungal species

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shihui; Wang, Wei; Wei, Hui; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-08-29

    Although it is well known that low nitrogen stimulates lipid accumulation, especially for algae and some oleaginous yeast, few studies have been conducted in fungal species, especially on the impact of different nitrogen deficiency strategies. In this study, we use two promising consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) candidates to examine the impact of two nitrogen deficiency strategies on lipid production, which are the extensively investigated oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, and the commercial cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei. We first utilized bioinformatics approaches to reconstruct the fatty acid metabolic pathway and demonstrated the presence of a triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis pathway in Trichoderma reesei. We then examined the lipid production of Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces in different media using two nitrogen deficiency strategies of nitrogen natural repletion and nitrogen depletion through centrifugation. Our results demonstrated that nitrogen depletion was better than nitrogen repletion with about 30% lipid increase for Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces, and could be an option to improve lipid production in both oleaginous yeast and filamentous fungal species. The resulting distinctive lipid composition profiles indicated that the impacts of nitrogen depletion on yeast were different from those for fungal species. Under three types of C/N ratio conditions, C16 and C18 fatty acids were the predominant forms of lipids for both Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipolytica. In addition, while the overall fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles of Trichoderma reesei were similar, the overall FAME profiles of Y. lipolytica observed a shift. The fatty acid metabolic pathway reconstructed in this work supports previous reports of lipid production in T. reesei, and provides a pathway for future omics studies and metabolic engineering efforts. Further investigation to

  12. Solubility of Nitrogen in Stishovite: A Possible Storage Mechanism for Nitrogen in Earth's Deep Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S. M.; Shim, S. H. D.; Hervig, R. L.; Prakapenka, V.

    2016-12-01

    Although studies have suggested the flux of nitrogen from the mantle as well as the subduction of nitrogen back into the mantle, it is unknown how much nitrogen can be stored in the deep mantle. Some key questions remain unknown: Does nitrogen exist in major mantle minerals or in minor phases? Or does nitrogen form nitrides or oxynitrides in the mantle? We have synthesized stishovite under nitrogen saturated conditions in laser-heated diamond-anvil cells at pressures between 16 and 44 GPa and temperatures centered at 1800 K. Experimental products were recovered and analyzed for nitrogen content via SIMS, SEM and EDX analysis at Arizona State University, while unit cell parameters were measured through synchrotron x-ray diffraction at the GSECARS sector of the Advanced Photon Source. Our SIMS data show that nitrogen solubility in stishovite is 1.54 wt %. The existence of nitrogen was also confirmed through energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in SEM. Diffraction data indicates a slightly higher unit cell volume of stishovite synthesized under a nitrogen saturated environment than pure stishovite at pressures above 28 GPa. Because stishovite is expected to be a major phase in subducting oceanic crust in the mantle (more than 15%), according to our new experiments, stishovite can serve as a host for nitrogen in the mantle. With similar atomic radii, slightly smaller-sized nitrogen may substitute for oxygen atoms in the crystal structure of stishovite. At a storage capacity of 1.54 wt % for N in stishovite, this study indicates a potentially large nitrogen reservoir within the Earth's mantle.

  13. Improved RDX detoxification with starch addition using a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium from soil contaminated with explosives.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Yang, Jihoon; Yoo, Byungun; Park, Joonhong

    2015-04-28

    In this work, we developed and characterized a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium for the complete detoxification of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Aerobic RDX biodegradation coupled with microbial growth and nitrogen fixation activity were effectively stimulated by the co-addition of starch and RDX under nitrogen limiting conditions. In the starch-stimulated nitrogen-fixing RDX degradative consortium, the RDX degradation activity was correlated with the xplA and nifH gene copy numbers, suggesting the involvement of nitrogen fixing populations in RDX biodegradation. Formate, nitrite, nitrate, and ammonia were detected as aerobic RDX degradation intermediates without the accumulation of any nitroso-derivatives or NDAB (4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal), indicating nearly complete mineralization. Pyrosequencing targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the Rhizobium, Rhizobacter and Terrimonas population increased as the RDX degradation activity increased, suggesting their involvement in the degradation process. These findings imply that the nitrogen-fixing aerobic RDX degrading consortium is a valuable microbial resource for improving the detoxification of RDX-contaminated soil or groundwater, especially when combined with rhizoremediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nitrogen concentrations in mosses indicate the spatial distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe.

    PubMed

    Harmens, H; Norris, D A; Cooper, D M; Mills, G; Steinnes, E; Kubin, E; Thöni, L; Aboal, J R; Alber, R; Carballeira, A; Coşkun, M; De Temmerman, L; Frolova, M; González-Miqueo, L; Jeran, Z; Leblond, S; Liiv, S; Maňkovská, B; Pesch, R; Poikolainen, J; Rühling, A; Santamaria, J M; Simonèiè, P; Schröder, W; Suchara, I; Yurukova, L; Zechmeister, H G

    2011-10-01

    In 2005/6, nearly 3000 moss samples from (semi-)natural location across 16 European countries were collected for nitrogen analysis. The lowest total nitrogen concentrations in mosses (<0.8%) were observed in northern Finland and northern UK. The highest concentrations (≥ 1.6%) were found in parts of Belgium, France, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia and Bulgaria. The asymptotic relationship between the nitrogen concentrations in mosses and EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition (averaged per 50 km × 50 km grid) across Europe showed less scatter when there were at least five moss sampling sites per grid. Factors potentially contributing to the scatter are discussed. In Switzerland, a strong (r(2) = 0.91) linear relationship was found between the total nitrogen concentration in mosses and measured site-specific bulk nitrogen deposition rates. The total nitrogen concentrations in mosses complement deposition measurements, helping to identify areas in Europe at risk from high nitrogen deposition at a high spatial resolution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 48 CFR 16.402-1 - Cost incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... contracts (see 16.404 and 16.401 (e)), incentive contracts include a target cost, a target profit or fee... maximum fee) provides that— (1) Actual cost that meets the target will result in the target profit or fee; (2) Actual cost that exceeds the target will result in downward adjustment of target profit or fee...

  16. 48 CFR 16.402-1 - Cost incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... contracts (see 16.404 and 16.401 (e)), incentive contracts include a target cost, a target profit or fee... maximum fee) provides that— (1) Actual cost that meets the target will result in the target profit or fee; (2) Actual cost that exceeds the target will result in downward adjustment of target profit or fee...

  17. 48 CFR 16.402-1 - Cost incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... contracts (see 16.404 and 16.401 (e)), incentive contracts include a target cost, a target profit or fee... maximum fee) provides that— (1) Actual cost that meets the target will result in the target profit or fee; (2) Actual cost that exceeds the target will result in downward adjustment of target profit or fee...

  18. 48 CFR 16.402-1 - Cost incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... contracts (see 16.404 and 16.401 (e)), incentive contracts include a target cost, a target profit or fee... maximum fee) provides that— (1) Actual cost that meets the target will result in the target profit or fee; (2) Actual cost that exceeds the target will result in downward adjustment of target profit or fee...

  19. 48 CFR 16.402-1 - Cost incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... contracts (see 16.404 and 16.401 (e)), incentive contracts include a target cost, a target profit or fee... maximum fee) provides that— (1) Actual cost that meets the target will result in the target profit or fee; (2) Actual cost that exceeds the target will result in downward adjustment of target profit or fee...

  20. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to China: a model analysis on nitrogen budget and critical load exceedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, L.; Chen, Y.; Liu, X.; Xu, W.; Pan, Y.; Duan, L.

    2016-12-01

    We present a national-scale model analysis of the sources and processes of inorganic nitrogen deposition over China using the GEOS-Chem model at 1/2°×1/3° horizontal resolution. Averaged model results for 2008-2012 are evaluated with an ensemble of surface measurements of nitrogen wet deposition flux and concentration, and satellite measurements of tropospheric NO2 columns. Annual inorganic nitrogen deposition fluxes are shown to be generally less than 10 kg N ha-1 a-1 in the western China, 15-50 kg N ha-1 a-1 in the eastern China, and 15.6 kg N ha-1 a-1 averaged over China. The model simulates an annual total deposition flux of 16.4 Tg N to China, with 10.3 Tg N (63%) from reduced nitrogen (NHx) and 6.2 Tg N from oxidized nitrogen (NOy). Domestic anthropogenic sources contribute 86% of the total deposition; foreign anthropogenic sources 7% and natural sources 7%. Annually 23% of domestically emitted NH3 and 36% for NOx are exported out of China. We also find while nitrogen deposition to China is comparable to the nitrogen input from fertilizer application (16.5 Tg N a-1) on the national scale, it is much more widely distributed spatially. The deposition flux is also much higher than natural biological fixation (7.3 Tg N a-1). A comparison with estimates of nitrogen critical load for eutrophication indicates that about 40% of the land over China faces nitrogen critical load exceedances. However, 45% of the exceeding areas, mainly in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei, Central China, East China, and South China, will not occur in the absence of nitrogen deposition, demonstrating the necessity of nitrogen emission controls to avoid potential negative ecological effects over these areas.

  1. How much DNA is lost? Measuring DNA loss of short-tandem-repeat length fragments targeted by the PowerPlex 16® system using the Qiagen MinElute Purification Kit.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Brian M; Winters, Misa; Monroe, Cara; Barta, Jodi Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The success in recovering genetic profiles from aged and degraded biological samples is diminished by fundamental aspects of DNA extraction, as well as its long-term preservation, that are not well understood. While numerous studies have been conducted to determine whether one extraction method was superior to others, nearly all of them were initiated with no knowledge of the actual starting DNA quantity in the samples prior to extraction, so they ultimately compared the outcome of all methods relative to the best. Using quantitative PCR to estimate the copy count of synthetic standards before (i.e., "copies in") and after (i.e., "copies out") purification by the Qiagen MinElute PCR Purification Kit, we documented DNA loss within a pool of 16 different-sized fragments ranging from 106 to 409 bp in length, corresponding to those targeted by the PowerPlex 16 System (Promega, Madison, WI). Across all standards from 10(4) to 10(7) copies/μL, loss averaged between 21.75% and 60.56% (mean, 39.03%), which is not congruent with Qiagen's claim that 80% of 70 bp to 4 kb fragments are retained using this product (i.e., 20% loss). Our study also found no clear relationship either between DNA strand length and retention or between starting copy number and retention. This suggests that there is no molecule bias across the MinElute column membrane and highlights the need for manufacturers to clearly and accurately describe on what their claims are based, and should also encourage researchers to document DNA retention efficiencies of their own methods and protocols. Understanding how and where to reduce loss of molecules during extraction and purification will serve to generate clearer and more accurate data, which will enhance the utility of ancient and low-copy-number DNA as a tool for closing forensic cases or in reconstructing the evolutionary history of humans and other organisms.

  2. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes elicited by dendritic cell-targeted delivery of human papillomavirus type-16 E6/E7 fusion gene exert lethal effects on CaSki cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-Mei; Liu, Xing; Jiao, Qing-Fang; Fu, Shao-Yue; Bu, You-Quan; Song, Fang-Zhou; Yi, Fa-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary etiologic agent of cervical cancer. Consideration of safety and non human leukocyte antigen restriction, protein vaccine has become the most likely form of HPV therapeutic vaccine, although none have so far been reported as effective. Since tumor cells consistently express the two proteins E6 and E7, most therapeutic vaccines target one or both of them. In this study, we fabricated DC vaccines by transducing replication-defective recombinant adenoviruses expressing E6/E7 fusion gene of HPV-16, to investigate the lethal effects of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against CaSki cells in vitro. Mouse immature dendritic cells (DC) were generated from bone marrow, and transfected with pAd-E6/E7 to prepare a DC vaccine and to induce specific CTL. The surface expression of CD40, CD68, MHC II and CD11c was assessed by flow cytometry (FCM), and the lethal effects of CTL against CaSki cells were determined by DAPI, FCM and CCK-8 methods. Immature mouse DC was successfully transfected by pAd-E6/E7 in vitro, and the transfecting efficiency was 40%-50%. A DC vaccine was successfully prepared and was used to induce specific CTL. Experimental results showed that the percentage of apoptosis and killing rate of CaSki cells were significantly increased by coculturing with the specific CTL (p <0.05). These results illustrated that a DC vaccine modified by HPV-16 E6/E7 gene can induce apoptosis of CaSki cells by inducing CTL, which may be used as a new strategy for biological treatment of cervical cancer.

  3. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of classical propionibacteria with specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes and its application to enumeration in Gruyère cheese.

    PubMed

    Babot, Jaime D; Hidalgo, Maximiliano; Argañaraz-Martínez, Eloy; Apella, María C; Perez Chaia, Adriana

    2011-01-31

    The classical or dairy propionibacteria have well-documented industrial applications and have been proposed for probiotic applications. Given their industrial importance it is necessary to employ fast and reliable techniques to monitor the growth during products elaboration, industrial fermentations or the intestinal transit. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to design oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S rRNA of dairy propionibacteria and optimise the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol to detect these bacteria. Two specific probes were in silico designed to detect Propionibacterium freudenreichii and P. jensenii, named Pfr435 and Pj446 respectively. The FISH protocol was optimised for the hybridisation of propionibacteria cells with the universal probe Eub338 and the designed probes. These probes were assayed in situ for their specificity to hybridise species of propionibacteria by observation using fluorescence microscopy and results were compared with the probe Pap446 previously designed for P. acidipropionici. Probes Pap446, Pfr435 and Pj446 were also evaluated by fluorescence spectrophotometry to assess the influence of cells physiological state during growth in batch culture in the fluorescence intensity. The maximum fluorescence intensity was observed at the onset of the stationary phase of growth and was then reduced. However, changes on the cells permeability did not reduce the efficiency of 16S rRNA hybridisation with the fluorescence-labelled probes. Propionibacteria counts obtained by FISH and plate count methods were compared in a commercial Gruyère cheese. The results showed that this method can be used as a rapid technique for the enumeration of these bacteria in cheese samples.

  4. Rapid identification of veterinary-relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species using 16S rDNA, IS6110 and Regions of Difference-targeted dual-labelled hydrolysis probes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Amaro, Ana; Ferreira, Ana S; Machado, Diana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Couto, Isabel; Botelho, Ana; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) are causative agents of tuberculosis (TB) in both humans and animals. MTC species are genetically very similar but may differ in their epidemiology, namely geographic distribution and host preferences, virulence traits and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. However, the conventional laboratory diagnosis does not routinely differentiate between the species of the MTC. In this work we describe a rapid and robust two-step five-target probe-based real-time PCR identification algorithm, based on genomic deletion analysis, to identify the MTC species most commonly associated with TB in livestock and other animals. The first step allows the confirmation of the cultures as MTC members, by targeting their IS6110 element, or as a mycobacterial species, if only a 16S rDNA product is detected in the duplex amplification reaction. If a MTC member is identified, the second amplification step allows the assessment of the presence or absence of the RD1, RD4 and RD9 genomic regions. The correspondent pattern allows us to infer the species of the isolate as M. tuberculosis (if all RDs are present), Mycobacterium caprae (if only RD1 and RD4 are present) and Mycobacterium bovis (if only RD1 is present). The identification algorithm developed presented an almost perfect agreement with the results of the routine bacteriological analysis, with a kappa coefficient of 0.970 (CI(P95%) 0.929-1.000). The assay is able to be adaptable to automation and implementation in the routine diagnostic framework of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, with a particular focus for reference laboratories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Target and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive π+ and π electroproduction with 1.6- to 5.7-GeV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P. E.; Biselli, A. S.; Careccia, S.; Dodge, G.; Fersch, R.; Guler, N.; Kuhn, S. E.; Pierce, J.; Prok, Y.; Zheng, X.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, Ivana; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2016-11-01

    Here, beam-target double-spin asymmetries and target single-spin asymmetries in exclusive π+ and quasiexclusive π electroproduction were obtained from scattering of 1.6- to 5.7-GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from longitudinally polarized protons (for π+) and deuterons (for π) using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The kinematic range covered is 1.1 < W < 2.6 GeV and 0.05 < Q2 < 5GeV2, with good angular coverage in the forward hemisphere. The asymmetry results were divided into approximately 40 000 kinematic bins for π+ from free protons and 15 000 bins for π production from bound nucleons in the deuteron. The present results are found to be in reasonable agreement with fits to previous world data for W < 1.7 GeV and Q2 < 0.5GeV2, with discrepancies increasing at higher values of Q2, especially for W > 1.5 GeV. Very large target-spin asymmetries are observed for W > 1.6 GeV. When combined with cross-section measurements, the present results can provide powerful constraints on nucleon resonance amplitudes at moderate and large values of Q2, for resonances with masses as high as 2.3 GeV.

  6. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Agnew, Stephen F.; Christensen, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  7. Nitrogen segregation in nanocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Erbahar, D; Wagner, Ph; Rocquefelte, X; Arenal, R; Pochet, P; Rayson, M; Scardamaglia, M; Bittencourt, C; Briddon, P

    2014-01-01

    We explore the behaviour of nitrogen doping in carbon nanomaterials, notably graphene, nanotubes, and carbon thin films. This is initially via a brief review of the literature, followed by a series of atomistic density functional calculations. We show that at low concentrations, substitutional nitrogen doping in the sp(2)-C graphenic basal plane is favoured, however once the nitrogen concentration reaches a critical threshold there is a transition towards the formation of the more thermodynamically-favoured nitrogen terminated 'zigzag' type edges. These can occur either via formation of finite patches (polycyclic aromatic azacarbons), strips of sp(2) carbon with zigzag nitrogen edges, or internal nitrogen-terminated hole edges within graphenic planes. This transition to edge formation is especially favoured when the nitrogen can be partially functionalised with, e.g. hydrogen. By comparison with available literature results, notably from electron energy loss spectroscopy and X-ray spectroscopy, the current results suggest that much of the nitrogen believed to be incorporated into carbon nanoobjects is instead likely to be present terminating the edges of carbonaceous impurities attached to nanoobject's surface. By comparison to nitrogen-doped tetrahedrally amorphous carbon, we suggest that this transition at around 10-20% nitrogen concentration and above towards sp(2) coordination via internal nitrogen-terminated edge formation may be a general property of nitrogen-doped carbon materials.

  8. The use of 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to study competition between ruminal fibrolytic bacteria: pure-culture studies with cellulose and alkaline peroxide-treated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Odenyo, A A; Mackie, R I; Stahl, D A; White, B A

    1994-10-01

    Specific oligonucleotide probes targeted to sites on the 16S rRNA of Ruminococcus albus 8, Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1, and Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 and a domain Bacteria probe were used to study bacterial interactions during the fermentation of cellulose and alkaline hydrogen peroxide-treated wheat straw in monocultures, dicultures, and tricultures. Results showed that R. albus 8 inhibited the growth of R. flavefaciens FD-1 when grown as a diculture with cellulose or alkaline hydrogen peroxide-treated wheat straw as the carbon source. In dicultures containing R. albus 8 and F. succinogenes S85 grown on cellulose or alkaline hydrogen peroxide-treated wheat straw, competition was not detected. R. flavefaciens FD-1 outcompeted F. succinogenes S85 when cellulose was used as the carbon source. In tricultures with cellulose as the carbon source, R. flavefaciens FD-1 was inhibited, R. albus 8 appeared to dominate during the early phase of degradation (12 to 48 h), while F. succinogenes S85 became predominant during the later phase of degradation (60 to 70 h). When alkaline hydrogen peroxide-treated wheat straw was used as a growth substrate, F. succinogenes S85 showed better growth than either R. albus 8 or R. flavefaciens FD-1. However, R. flavefaciens FD-1 was present in small numbers throughout the incubation period, unlike the growth patterns when cellulose was the carbon source.

  9. Identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) in South Korea by sequencing analysis targeting hsp65, rpoB and 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Ram; Kim, Jae Myung; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Jang, Yunho; Ryoo, Soyoon; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2014-10-10

    Combinatorial molecular taxonomic approaches targeting 3 genes, 16S rRNA (1.2-1.3kbp), hsp65 (603-bp), and rpoB genes (711-bp) were applied to 43 non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) strains isolated from a Korean native cattle from bronchial lymph nodes and lung, Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) in South Korea. Of 43 NTM isolates, Mycobacterium avium complex strains (MAC) were isolated with the highest frequency (31 strains, 72.1%). Contrary to other reports, M. intracellulare strains (23 strains, 53.5%) of MACs were more prevalent than M. avium strains (8 strains, 18.6%). Further separation of isolated M. intracellulare into genotype level by hsp65 analysis showed that isolates of the HG-1 genotype (60.9%, 14/23 isolates), known to be specific to Korean patients, was more prevalent than the HG-2 type (17.4%, 4/23 strains), which include the type strain, M. intracellulare ATCC 13950(T). Compared to NTM infections of Korean human patients, the pronounced difference found in this study is that no M. abscessus infections in Hanwoo were found. In conclusion, our data showed that the isolated species frequency of NTMs, particularly MACs from Hanwoo, was very comparable to that obtained from Korean human infection, suggesting that humans and Korean native cattle may share common environmental sources for NTM infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Losses of nitrogen fractions from herring to brine during marinating.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Mariusz; Kołakowski, Edward

    2012-05-01

    Fish meat is characterized by a high content of valuable nutrients. During the marinating process, however, the process of proteins diffusion and other nitrogen fractions from fish to the surrounding brine is commonly observed. It was determined that the total nitrogen loss from herring meat of industrial maturity (4-5day) amounted to 6-19% of raw material nitrogen. Extension of the marinating time to 16-18days increases nitrogen losses even to 18-27%. Less loss was observed during marinating of fresh than of frozen herring and during marinating of carcasses, as opposite to fillets. Higher nitrogen content in fish was not proved to influence higher nitrogen losses in a brine. The majority of loss consisted of nitrogen fractions soluble in TCA, of which one third was formed by α-amine nitrogen. Nitrogen contained in brine suspension accounted for only 1.5-4% of total nitrogen losses. With increasing salt or acid concentration the amount of total nitrogen loss was lower from fresh herring and higher from frozen one. Higher salt concentration significantly reduced the amount of non-protein nitrogen and all its fractions during marinating of fresh and frozen herring. In case of acetic acid, the influence of its concentration was diverse and depended on type of herring and its dressing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermal stability of partially ordered Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} film on non-magnetic Ag under layer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Jian-Ping; Yang, Meiyin; Jiang, Yanfeng; Allard, Lawrence F.

    2014-05-07

    Partially ordered Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} thin film with (001) texture is successfully grown on a Ag under layer using a facing target sputtering system. Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase is formed after post-annealing, which is detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). High saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} thin films is observed by vibrating sample magnetometry. It is found that Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase can be stable up to 225 °C, which is demonstrated by the Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} finger print peak (002) in XRD. After heating to 250 °C, the Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase decomposes, which leads to low M{sub s} and soft magnetic behavior. To further study Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} decomposition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is performed to detect the binding energy of nitrogen atoms. Differences of binding energy corresponding to before and after heat treatment show the variation of nitrogen atom in electronic state with surrounding Fe atoms, indicating nitrogen atomic migration during heat treatment.

  12. Excitation of cavitation bubbles in low-temperature liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Harada, Shingo

    2017-06-01

    We excited a cavitation bubble by irradiating a Nd:YAG laser pulse onto a titanium target that was installed in liquid nitrogen at a temperature below the boiling point. To our knowledge, this is the first experiment in which a cavitation bubble has been successfully excited in liquid nitrogen. We compared the cavitation bubble in liquid nitrogen with that in water on the basis of an equation reported by Florschuetz and Chao [J. Heat Transfer 87, 209 (1965)].

  13. Nitrogen spark denoxer

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Henry K.; Novick, Vincent J.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.

    1997-01-01

    A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

  14. Flameless nitrogen skid unit

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, S.B.; John, J.C.; Mints, D.K.

    1984-03-27

    A flameless nitrogen vaporizing unit includes a first internal combustion engine driving a nitrogen pump through a transmission. A second internal combustion engine drives three hydraulic oil pumps against a variable back pressure so that a variable load may be imposed upon the second engine. Liquid nitrogen is pumped from the nitrogen pump driven by the first engine into a first heat exchanger where heat is transferred from exhaust gases from the first and second internal combustion engines to the liquid nitrogen to cause the nitrogen to be transformed into a gaseous state. The gaseous nitrogen then flows into a second heat exchanger where it is superheated by an engine coolant fluid to heat the gaseous nitrogen to essentially an ambient temperature. The superheated nitrogen is then injected into the well. The engine coolant fluid flows in a coolant circulation system. Heat is transferred to the coolant fluid directly from the internal combustion engine. Heat is also provided to the coolant fluid from lubrication oil pumped by the three pumps attached to the second internal combustion engine. The coolant fluid circulating system includes a comingling chamber for comingling warmer coolant fluid flowing from the internal combustion engines to the second heat exchanger with cooler coolant fluids flowing from the second heat exchanger to the internal combustion engines. Methods of vaporizing nitrogen are also disclosed.

  15. Nitrogen In Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M. D.; Baragiola, R.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Crary, F.; Young, D. T.

    2004-12-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions in the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to our models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  16. Liquid nitrogen energy storage unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, J.; Catarino, I.; Patrício, R.; Rocaboy, A.; Linder, M.; Bonfait, G.

    2011-11-01

    An energy storage unit is a device able to store thermal energy with a limited temperature drift. After precooling such unit with a cryocooler it can be used as a temporary cold source if the cryocooler is stopped or as a thermal buffer to attenuate temperature fluctuations due to heat bursts. In this article, after a brief study of the possible solutions for such devices, we show that a low temperature cell filled with liquid nitrogen and coupled to a room temperature expansion volume offers the most compact and light solution in the temperature range 60-80 K. For instance, a low temperature cell as small as 23 cm 3 allows the storage of 3.7 kJ between 76 K and 81 K. Experimental results were obtained varying the expansion volume size, the filling pressure and the temperature range. These results agree with our simple model based on thermodynamical properties of nitrogen. A cell filled with porous material was tested to confine the liquid in the cell independently of the gravity. This material enhances the thermal exchange for high liquid filling ratio whereas below ≈16% a solution must be found to improve the heat exchange coefficient between the fluid and the cell walls. Our calculations are extended to the 80-120 K temperature range for nitrogen and argon in order to clarify the various parameters to take into account for an energy storage unit dimensioning.

  17. [Effects of nitrogen management on yield, quality, nitrogen accumulation and its transportation of watermelon in gravel-mulched field].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong-ming; Du, Shao-ping; Xue, Liang

    2015-11-01

    The effects of nitrogen management on yield, quality, nitrogen and dry matter accumulation and transportation of watermelon in sand field were studied based on a field experiment. The results showed that too low or too high basal nitrogen fertilzation was unfavorable to seedling growth of watermelon in sand field, and no nitrogen application at vine extension or fruiting stages limited the formation of 'source' or 'sink'. At the same nitrogen rate, compared with the traditional T1 treatment (30% basal N fertilizer + 70% N fertilizer in vine extension), the nitrogen and dry matter accumulation of vegetative organs of T4 treatment (30% basal N fertilizer + 30% N fertilizer in vine extension + 40% N fertilizer in fruiting) and T6 treatment (100% basal N fertilizer + NAM) were reduced significantly, but the nitrogen and dry matter accumulation of fruit were increased significantly in the flushing period. The nitrogen transportation ratio and nitrogen contribution ratio of T4 were 33.6% and 12.0%, respectively. Compared to T1, the nitrogen harvest index, nitrogen fertilizer partial factor productivity and nitrogen fertilizer recovery efficiency of T4 and T6 treatments increased by 14.1% and 12.7%, 11.6% and 12.5%, 5.3% and 8.7%, respectively, and yield of watermelon increased by 11.6% and 12.5%, the soluble sugar, effective acid, the ratio of sugar and acid, Vc content increased by 16.5% and 11.7%, 4.5% and 2.8%, 19.4% and 13.4%, 35.6% and 19.0%, respectively. Therefore, T4 and T6 treatments were the optimal nitrogen fertilizer management mode which could not only achieve high yield and quality but also obtain high nitrogen fertilizer use efficiency in sand field. T6 treatment was the best nitrogen fertilizer management mode considering reduction of fertilizing labor intensity and extending service time of gravel-mulched field.

  18. Targeted Enhancement of Glutamate-to-γ-Aminobutyrate Conversion in Arabidopsis Seeds Affects Carbon-Nitrogen Balance and Storage Reserves in a Development-Dependent Manner1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fait, Aaron; Nesi, Adriano Nunes; Angelovici, Ruthie; Lehmann, Martin; Pham, Phuong Anh; Song, Luhua; Haslam, Richard P.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2011-01-01

    In seeds, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) operates at the metabolic nexus between carbon and nitrogen metabolism by catalyzing the unidirectional decarboxylation of glutamate to form γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To elucidate the regulatory role of GAD in seed development, we generated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transgenic plants expressing a truncated GAD from Petunia hybrida missing the carboxyl-terminal regulatory Ca2+-calmodulin-binding domain under the transcriptional regulation of the seed maturation-specific phaseolin promoter. Dry seeds of the transgenic plants accumulated considerable amounts of GABA, and during desiccation the content of several amino acids increased, although not glutamate or proline. Dry transgenic seeds had higher protein content than wild-type seeds but lower amounts of the intermediates of glycolysis, glycerol and malate. The total fatty acid content of the transgenic seeds was 50% lower than in the wild type, while acyl-coenzyme A accumulated in the transgenic seeds. Labeling experiments revealed altered levels of respiration in the transgenic seeds, and fractionation studies indicated reduced incorporation of label in the sugar and lipid fractions extracted from transgenic seeds. Comparative transcript profiling of the dry seeds supported the metabolic data. Cellular processes up-regulated at the transcript level included the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid elongation, the shikimate pathway, tryptophan metabolism, nitrogen-carbon remobilization, and programmed cell death. Genes involved in the regulation of germination were similarly up-regulated. Taken together, these results indicate that the GAD-mediated conversion of glutamate to GABA during seed development plays an important role in balancing carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in storage reserve accumulation. PMID:21921115

  19. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Ohlert, Janet M.; Knutson, Carolann M.; Plunkett, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. PMID:25888177

  20. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Barney, Brett M; Eberhart, Lauren J; Ohlert, Janet M; Knutson, Carolann M; Plunkett, Mary H

    2015-07-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. 12 CFR 16.16 - Effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effectiveness. 16.16 Section 16.16 Banks and....16 Effectiveness. (a) Registration statements and amendments filed with the OCC pursuant to this part will become effective in accordance with sections 8(a) and (c) of the Securities Act (15 U.S.C....

  2. 16 CFR 16.8 - Closed meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Closed meetings. 16.8 Section 16.8... COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.8 Closed meetings. (a) Paragraphs (e), (f), and (g) of § 16.7 of this part, which require that meetings shall be open to the public and that the public shall be afforded an opportunity to...

  3. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  4. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  5. Nitrogen trading tool

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  6. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  7. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  8. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  9. A nitrogen mass balance for California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liptzin, D.; Dahlgren, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    , requires a net influx of N in feed to the state. In terms of exports, the riverine N loads are smaller than many more mesic climates. Because many of the large population centers are on the coast, N discharged directly from wastewater treatment plants into the ocean is almost four times greater than the N discharge of all of the watersheds in the state combined. Gas losses are estimated through a combination of bottom up approaches using field data, emissions inventories, and numerical models. The largest uncertainties are in emissions of N2 and NH3. Calculated by difference, groundwater N loading represents the largest loss term in the mass balance. Contamination of groundwater with nitrates is a serious concern in many areas of the state. Given the long residence time of groundwater in many aquifers like the Central Valley the current and past N inputs to groundwater pose a hazard to drinking water supplies for decades to come. These calculations along with the analysis of management and policy tools will help elucidate the spatial location or activities that would be best to target to reduce the negative consequences of human alteration of the nitrogen cycle.

  10. Nitrogen in Chinese coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, D.; Lei, J.; Zheng, B.; Tang, X.; Wang, M.; Hu, Jiawen; Li, S.; Wang, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and six coal samples were taken from main coal mines of twenty-six provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China, according to the resource distribution and coal-forming periods as well as the coal ranks and coal yields. Nitrogen was determined by using the Kjeldahl method at U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), which exhibit a normal frequency distribution. The nitrogen contents of over 90% Chinese coal vary from 0.52% to 1.41% and the average nitrogen content is recommended to be 0.98%. Nitrogen in coal exists primarily in organic form. There is a slight positive relationship between nitrogen content and coal ranking. ?? 2011 Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

  11. The microbial nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Mike S M

    2008-11-01

    This special issue highlights several recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle including the diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in special habitats, distribution and contribution of aerobic ammonium oxidation by bacteria and crenarchaea in various aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, regulation of metabolism in nitrifying bacteria, the molecular diversity of denitrifying microorganisms and their enzymes, the functional diversity of freshwater and marine anammox bacteria, the physiology of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation and the degradation of recalcitrant organic nitrogen compounds. Simultaneously the articles in this issue show that many questions still need to be addressed, and that the microbes involved in catalyzing the nitrogen conversions still harbour many secrets that need to be disclosed to fully understand the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, and make future predictions and global modelling possible.

  12. Nitrogen Lewis Acids.

    PubMed

    Pogoreltsev, Alla; Tulchinsky, Yuri; Fridman, Natalia; Gandelman, Mark

    2017-03-22

    Being a major conception of chemistry, Lewis acids have found countless applications throughout chemical enterprise. Although many chemical elements can serve as the central atom of Lewis acids, nitrogen is usually associated with Lewis bases. Here, we report on the first example of robust and modifiable Lewis acids centered on the nitrogen atom, which provide stable and well-characterized adducts with various Lewis bases. On the basis of the reactivity of nitrogen Lewis acids, we prepared, for the first time, cyclic triazanes, a class of cyclic organic compounds sequentially bearing three all-saturated nitrogen atoms (N-N-N motif). Reactivity abilities of these N-Lewis acids were explained by theoretical calculations. Properties and future applications of nitrogen Lewis acids are intriguing.

  13. Demonstrating Paramagnetism Using Liquid Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Ray; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how liquid nitrogen is attracted to the poles of neodymium magnets. Nitrogen is not paramagnetic, so the attraction suggests that the liquid nitrogen contains a small amount of oxygen, which causes the paramagnetism. (MVL)

  14. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  15. Demonstrating Paramagnetism Using Liquid Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Ray; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how liquid nitrogen is attracted to the poles of neodymium magnets. Nitrogen is not paramagnetic, so the attraction suggests that the liquid nitrogen contains a small amount of oxygen, which causes the paramagnetism. (MVL)

  16. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  17. Modeling nitrogen fluxes in Germany - where does the nitrogen go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, Laura; Bach, Martin; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    According to the latest inventory of the EU Water Framework Directive, 26.3% of German groundwater bodies are in a poor chemical state regarding nitrate. Additionally, the EU initiated infringement proceedings against Germany for not meeting the quality standards of the EU Nitrate Directive. Agriculture has been determined as the main source of nitrate pollution due to over-fertilization and regionally high density of livestock farming. The nitrogen balance surplus is commonly used as an indicator characterizing the potential of nitrate leaching into groundwater bodies and thus also serves as a foundation to introduce legislative restrictions or to monitor the success of mitigation measures. Currently, there is an ongoing discussion which measures are suitable for reducing the risk of nitrate leaching and also to what extent. However, there is still uncertainty about just how much the nitrogen surplus has to be reduced to meet the groundwater quality standards nationwide. Therefore, the aims of our study were firstly to determine the level of the nitrogen surplus that would be acceptable at the utmost and secondly whether the currently discussed target value of 30 kg N per hectare agricultural land for the soil surface nitrogen balance would be sufficient. The models MONERIS (Modeling Nutrient Emissions in River System) and MoRE (Modelling of Regionalized Emissions), the latter based on the first, are commonly used for estimating nitrogen loads into the river system in Germany at the mesoscale, as well as the effect of mitigation measures in the context of the EU directive 2008/105/EC (Environmental quality standards applicable to surface water). We used MoRE to calculate nitrate concentration for 2759 analytical units in Germany. Main factors are the surplus of the soil surface nitrogen balance, the percolation rate and an exponent representing the denitrification in the vadose zone. The modeled groundwater nitrate concentrations did not correspond to the regional

  18. EXPERIMENT - APOLLO 16 (UV)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-06-06

    S72-40820 (21 April 1972) --- A color enhancement of a photograph taken on ultra-violet light showing the spectrum of the upper atmosphere of Earth and geocorona. The bright horizontal line is far ultra-violet emission (1216 angstrom) of hydrogen extending 10 degrees (40,000 miles) either side of Earth. The knobby vertical line shows several ultra-violet emissions from Earth's sunlit atmosphere, each "lump" being produced by one type gas (oxygen, nitrogen, helium, etc.). The spectral dispersion is about 10 angstrom per millimeter on this enlargement. The UV camera/spectrograph was operated on the lunar surface by astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission. It was designed and built at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. While astronauts Young and Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Orion" to explore the Descartes highlands region of the moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Casper" in lunar orbit.

  19. Efficient boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    DOEpatents

    Whitney, R Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael W

    2015-03-24

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  20. Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

  1. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to China: A model analysis on nitrogen budget and critical load exceedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuanhong; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Youfan; Liu, Xuejun; Xu, Wen; Pan, Yuepeng; Duan, Lei

    2017-03-01

    We present a national-scale model analysis on the sources and processes of inorganic nitrogen deposition over China using the GEOS-Chem model at 1/2° × 1/3° horizontal resolution. Model results for 2008-2012 are evaluated with an ensemble of surface measurements of wet deposition flux and gaseous ammonia (NH3) concentration, and satellite measurements of tropospheric NO2 columns. Annual total inorganic nitrogen deposition fluxes are simulated to be generally less than 10 kg N ha-1 a-1 in western China (less than 2 kg N ha-1 a-1 over Tibet), 15-50 kg N ha-1 a-1 in eastern China, and 16.4 kg N ha-1 a-1 averaged over China. Annual total deposition to China is 16.4 Tg N, with 10.2 Tg N (62%) from reduced nitrogen (NHx) and 6.2 Tg N from oxidized nitrogen (NOy). Domestic anthropogenic sources contribute 86% of the total deposition; foreign anthropogenic sources 7% and natural sources 7%. Annually 23% of domestically emitted NH3 and 36% for NOx are exported outside the terrestrial land of China. We find that atmospheric nitrogen deposition is about half of the nitrogen input from fertilizer application (29.6 Tg N a-1), and is much higher than that from natural biological fixation (7.3 Tg N a-1) over China. A comparison of nitrogen deposition with critical load estimates for eutrophication indicates that about 15% of the land over China experiences critical load exceedances, demonstrating the necessity of nitrogen emission controls to avoid potential negative ecological effects.

  2. The nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-08

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation.

  3. Fertilizer nitrogen isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alison S; Kelly, Simon D

    2007-09-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the potential application of nitrogen isotope analysis in discriminating between organically and conventionally grown crops. A prerequisite of this approach is that there is a difference in the nitrogen isotope compositions of the fertilizers used in organic and conventional agriculture. We report new measurements of delta15N values for synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and present a compilation of the new data with existing literature nitrogen isotope data. Nitrogen isotope values for fertilizers that may be permitted in organic cultivation systems are also reported (manures, composts, bloodmeal, bonemeal, hoof and horn, fishmeal and seaweed based fertilizers). The delta15N values of the synthetic fertilizers in the compiled dataset fall within a narrow range close to 0 per thousand with 80% of samples lying between-2 and 2 per thousand and 98.5% of the data having delta15N values of less than 4 per thousand (mean=0.2 per thousand n=153). The fertilizers that may be permitted in organic systems have a higher mean delta15N value of 8.5 per thousand and exhibit a broader range in delta15N values from 0.6 to 36.7 per thousand (n=83). The possible application of the nitrogen isotope approach in discriminating between organically and conventionally grown crops is discussed in light of the fertilizer data presented here and with regard to other factors that are also important in determining crop nitrogen isotope values.

  4. AFTI/F-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The AFTI F-16 in its final configuration, flying in the vicinity of Edwards Air Force Base, California. During this phase, the two forward infrared turrets were added ahead of the cockpit, the chin canards were removed, and the aircraft was repainted in a standard Air Force scheme. A fuel drop tank is visible below the wing. During the 1980s and 1990s, NASA and the U.S. Air Force participated in a joint program to integrate and demonstrate new avionics technologies to improve close air support capabilities in next-generation aircraft. The testbed aircraft, seen here in flight over the desert at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was called the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI) F-16. The tests demonstrated technologies to improve navigation and the pilot's ability to find and destroy enemy ground targets day or night, including adverse weather. The aircraft--an F-16A Fighting Falcon (Serial #75-0750)--underwent numerous modifications. A relatively low-cost testbed, it evaluated the feasability of advanced, intergrated-sensor, avionics, and flight control technologies. During the first phase of the AFTI/F-16 program, which began in 1983, the aircraft demonstrated voice-actuated commands, helmet-mounted sights, flat turns, and selective fuselage pointing using forward-mounted canards and a triplex digital flight control computer system. The second phase of research, which began in the summer of 1991, demonstrated advanced technologies and capabilities to find and destroy ground targets day or night, and in adverse weather while using maneuverability and speed at low altitude. This phase was known as the close air support and battlefield air interdiction (CAS/BAI) phase. Finally, the aircraft was used to assess the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto - GCAS), a joint project with the Swedish Government. For these tests, the pilot flew the aircraft directly toward the ground, simulating a total loss of control. The GCAS

  5. AFTI/F-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The AFTI F-16 flying at high angle of attack, shown in the final configuration and paint finish. Dummy Sidewinder air-to-air missles are attached to the wing tips. The white objects visible on the wing racks represent practice bomb dispensers, used in weapon tests. During the 1980s and 1990s, NASA and the U.S. Air Force participated in a joint program to integrate and demonstrate new avionics technologies to improve close air support capabilities in next-generation aircraft. The testbed aircraft, seen here in flight over the desert at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was called the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration (AFTI) F-16. The tests demonstrated technologies to improve navigation and the pilot's ability to find and destroy enemy ground targets day or night, including adverse weather. The aircraft--an F-16A Fighting Falcon (Serial #75-0750)--underwent numerous modifications. A relatively low-cost testbed, it evaluated the feasability of advanced, intergrated-sensor, avionics, and flight control technologies. During the first phase of the AFTI/F-16 program, which began in 1983, the aircraft demonstrated voice-actuated commands, helmet-mounted sights, flat turns, and selective fuselage pointing using forward-mounted canards and a triplex digital flight control computer system. The second phase of research, which began in the summer of 1991, demonstrated advanced technologies and capabilities to find and destroy ground targets day or night, and in adverse weather while using maneuverability and speed at low altitude. This phase was known as the close air support and battlefield air interdiction (CAS/BAI) phase. Finally, the aircraft was used to assess the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto - GCAS), a joint project with the Swedish Government. For these tests, the pilot flew the aircraft directly toward the ground, simulating a total loss of control. The GCAS was designed to take command in such emergencies and bring

  6. Nitrogen Backbone Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Eremets, Mikhail I; Troyan, Ivan; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming; Vereecken, Luc

    2015-08-19

    We found that nitrogen and hydrogen directly react at room temperature and pressures of ~35 GPa forming chains of single-bonded nitrogen atom with the rest of the bonds terminated with hydrogen atoms - as identified by IR absorption, Raman, X-ray diffraction experiments and theoretical calculations. At releasing pressures below ~10 GPa, the product transforms into hydrazine. Our findings might open a way for the practical synthesis of these extremely high energetic materials as the formation of nitrogen-hydrogen compounds is favorable already at pressures above 2 GPa according to the calculations.

  7. Nitrogen Backbone Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbo; Eremets, Mikhail I.; Troyan, Ivan; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming; Vereecken, Luc

    2015-01-01

    We found that nitrogen and hydrogen directly react at room temperature and pressures of ~35 GPa forming chains of single-bonded nitrogen atom with the rest of the bonds terminated with hydrogen atoms - as identified by IR absorption, Raman, X-ray diffraction experiments and theoretical calculations. At releasing pressures below ~10 GPa, the product transforms into hydrazine. Our findings might open a way for the practical synthesis of these extremely high energetic materials as the formation of nitrogen-hydrogen compounds is favorable already at pressures above 2 GPa according to the calculations. PMID:26286836

  8. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  9. 16 CFR 1210.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Production testing. 1210.16 Section 1210.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.16 Production testing. (a) General...

  10. 16 CFR 16.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions. 16.2 Section 16.2 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.2 Definitions. For purposes of this part: (a) Administrator means the Administrator of the... Commission for the purpose of obtaining advice or recommendations for the Commission or other agency or...

  11. 16 CFR 1204.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Production testing. 1204.16 Section 1204.16... STANDARD FOR OMNIDIRECTIONAL CITIZENS BAND BASE STATION ANTENNAS Certification § 1204.16 Production testing... production testing. Each production test shall be conducted at a production interval short enough to...

  12. 16 CFR 1204.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production testing. 1204.16 Section 1204.16... STANDARD FOR OMNIDIRECTIONAL CITIZENS BAND BASE STATION ANTENNAS Certification § 1204.16 Production testing... production testing. Each production test shall be conducted at a production interval short enough to...

  13. 16 CFR 1210.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production testing. 1210.16 Section 1210.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.16 Production testing. (a)...

  14. 16 CFR 16.7 - Meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meetings. 16.7 Section 16.7 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.7 Meetings. (a) The Commission shall designate an officer or employee of the Federal... attend the meetings of the advisory committee, and shall adjourn committee meetings whenever he or she...

  15. 16 CFR 1204.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Production testing. 1204.16 Section 1204.16... STANDARD FOR OMNIDIRECTIONAL CITIZENS BAND BASE STATION ANTENNAS Certification § 1204.16 Production testing... production testing. Each production test shall be conducted at a production interval short enough to provide...

  16. 16 CFR 1204.16 - Production testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Production testing. 1204.16 Section 1204.16... STANDARD FOR OMNIDIRECTIONAL CITIZENS BAND BASE STATION ANTENNAS Certification § 1204.16 Production testing... production testing. Each production test shall be conducted at a production interval short enough to provide...

  17. 16 CFR 300.16 - Ornamentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ornamentation. 300.16 Section 300.16... REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.16 Ornamentation. (a) Where the wool... § 300.23 of this part (Rule 23)....

  18. 16 CFR 1.6 - How promulgated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How promulgated. 1.6 Section 1.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Industry Guidance Industry Guides § 1.6 How promulgated. Industry guides 1 are promulgated by...

  19. 16 CFR 1.6 - How promulgated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How promulgated. 1.6 Section 1.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Industry Guidance Industry Guides § 1.6 How promulgated. Industry guides 1 are promulgated by...

  20. Milk urea nitrogen (MUN) tool reduces nitrogen emissions from dairy farms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The milk urea nitrogen (MUN) tool was developed to monitor dietary crude protein (CP) use and feed costs. MUN within the range of 12 to 10 mg/100 ml milk usually indicates the recommended dietary CP level of 16.5%. MUN levels greater than 12 mg/100 ml indicate dietary CP is being wasted and excreted...

  1. 48 CFR 16.406 - Contract clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... clause at 52.216-16, Incentive Price Revision—Firm Target, in solicitations and contracts when a fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract is contemplated. If the contract calls for supplies or services... Alternate I. (b) Insert the clause at 52.216-17, Incentive Price Revision—Successive Targets, in...

  2. 48 CFR 16.406 - Contract clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... clause at 52.216-16, Incentive Price Revision—Firm Target, in solicitations and contracts when a fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract is contemplated. If the contract calls for supplies or services... Alternate I. (b) Insert the clause at 52.216-17, Incentive Price Revision—Successive Targets, in...

  3. 48 CFR 16.406 - Contract clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... clause at 52.216-16, Incentive Price Revision—Firm Target, in solicitations and contracts when a fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract is contemplated. If the contract calls for supplies or services... Alternate I. (b) Insert the clause at 52.216-17, Incentive Price Revision—Successive Targets,...

  4. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  5. The Liquid Nitrogen Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, Robin; Rahn, Jeffrey A.; Beamer, Timothy W.; Lebret, Norm

    2002-10-01

    Details of a demonstration using liquid nitrogen are presented. The demonstration is based on a 500-mL transparent polyethylene soft-drink bottle with a screw-on pop-up drink top. Prior to the demonstration, a balloon is placed over the popped-up spout of the bottle top. The bottle is filled with liquid nitrogen and the top, with the balloon affixed, is quickly put in place and screwed on tightly. As the liquid nitrogen in the bottle boils, the balloon inflates. When the balloon bursts the noise produced is far greater than would ordinarily be expected, and a fountain of liquid nitrogen and condensing water vapor shoots into the air above the bottle.

  6. Protein Nitrogen Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The protein content of foods can be determined by numerous methods. The Kjeldahl method and the nitrogen combustion (Dumas) method for protein analysis are based on nitrogen determination. Both methods are official for the purposes of nutrition labeling of foods. While the Kjeldahl method has been used widely for over a hundred years, the recent availability of automated instrumentation for the Dumas method in many cases is replacing use of the Kjeldahl method.

  7. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  8. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the des moines river, iowa using SWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km2 in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  9. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the Des Moines River, Iowa using SWAT.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F

    2009-10-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km(2) in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed.

  10. Groundbased studies of spacecraft glow and erosion caused by impact of oxygen and nitrogen beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Cohen, S. A.; Manos, D. M.; Motley, R. W.; Paul, S. F.

    1987-01-01

    To simulate surface reactions in the space environment a ground-based facility was developed that produces a very high flux 10(14) to 10(16)/sq cm/s of low energy (2 to 20 eV) neutral atoms and molecules. The neutral beams are created using a method involving neutralization and reflection of ions from a biased limiter, where the ions are extracted from a toroidal plasma source. The spectra of emission due to beam-solid interactions on targets of Chemglaze Z-306 optical paint and Kapton are presented. Erosion yields for carbon and Kapton targets with low energy (approx. 10 eV) nitrogen and oxygen beams were measured. The reaction rates and surface morphology for the erosion of Kapton are similar to those measured in experiments on STS-5.

  11. Climate change impacts of US reactive nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Robert W; Davidson, Eric A; Goodale, Christine L; Greaver, Tara L; Herrick, Jeffrey D; Liu, Lingli

    2012-05-15

    Fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer application in the United States have substantially altered the nitrogen cycle, with serious effects on climate change. The climate effects can be short-lived, by impacting the chemistry of the atmosphere, or long-lived, by altering ecosystem greenhouse gas fluxes. Here we develop a coherent framework for assessing the climate change impacts of US reactive nitrogen emissions, including oxides of nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide (N(2)O). We use the global temperature potential (GTP), calculated at 20 and 100 y, in units of CO(2) equivalents (CO(2)e), as a common metric. The largest cooling effects are due to combustion sources of oxides of nitrogen altering tropospheric ozone and methane concentrations and enhancing carbon sequestration in forests. The combined cooling effects are estimated at -290 to -510 Tg CO(2)e on a GTP(20) basis. However, these effects are largely short-lived. On a GTP(100) basis, combustion contributes just -16 to -95 Tg CO(2)e. Agriculture contributes to warming on both the 20-y and 100-y timescales, primarily through N(2)O emissions from soils. Under current conditions, these warming and cooling effects partially offset each other. However, recent trends show decreasing emissions from combustion sources. To prevent warming from US reactive nitrogen, reductions in agricultural N(2)O emissions are needed. Substantial progress toward this goal is possible using current technology. Without such actions, even greater CO(2) emission reductions will be required to avoid dangerous climate change.

  12. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use.

  13. Nitrogen loss from Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Johnson, R. E.; Michael, M.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2003-08-01

    Dissociation and dissociative ionization of molecular nitrogen by solar UV radiation and by photoelectrons and sputtering by the magnetospheric ions and pickup ions are the main sources of translationally excited (hot) nitrogen atoms and molecules in the upper atmosphere of Titan. As Titan does not posses an intrinsic magnetic field, Saturn's magnetospheric ions can penetrate Titan's exobase and sputter atoms and molecules from it. The sputtering of nitrogen from Titan's upper atmosphere by the corotating nitrogen ions and by photodissociation was addressed earlier [Lammer and Bauer, 1993; Shematovich et al., 2001]. Here penetration of slowed and deflected magnetospheric N+ and carbon-containing pickup ions is described using a Monte Carlo model. The interaction of these ions with the atmospheric neutrals leads to the production of fast neutrals that collide with other atmospheric neutrals producing heating and ejection of atoms and molecules. Results from Brecht et al. [2000] are used to estimate the net flux and energy spectra of the magnetospheric and pickup ions onto the exobase. Sputtering is primarily responsible for any ejected molecular nitrogen, and, for the ion fluxes used, we show that the total sputtering contribution is comparable to or larger than the dissociation contribution giving a total loss rate of ~3.6 × 1025 nitrogen neutrals per second.

  14. Nitrogen Uptake in Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J.; VanBenthem, P.

    2013-12-01

    A plant's absorption of nitrogen can be encouraged by a variety of environmental factors, especially the application of fertilizers. As a common limiting factor in plant growth, not up taking enough nitrogen can be a result of an unhealthy plant. Moreover, as farmers seek out methods to increase growth of plants, fertilizers are used as a solution to the issue of nitrogen deficiency to incorporate additional nitrogen from chemical or organic sources, by not using the right fertilizer can greatly affect the plats. The point of this research project is to determine the effect of various fertilizers on the plant growth, and to correlate the measured nitrogen, water and chlorophyll content in spinach leaves. Spinach leaves were used because they are known to quickly uptake chemicals in the environment. The spinach plants were exposed to four different growing parameters, which are referred to as control, ammonium nitrate, MiracleGro , and organic. The spinach was originally placed in nitrogen deficient soil with only 2.2x10 4 weight percent (wt. %) nitrogen. The leaves in the control group were grown in this nitrogen deficient soil without any fertilizer added. Ammomium nitrate and MiracleGro were added to the spinach in the A and MG groups, respectively, and organic chicken stool was used for the O group. By using a spectral imaging system and flame combustion techniques, the chlorophyll content can be related to the nitrogen content in the spinach leaves. In these spinach leaves, nitrogen and chlorophyll content were measured, chlorophyll is a green pigment that plays a crucial role in producing nutrients for green plants. The lack of chlorophyll will allow the plant to become susceptible to diseases, so it is extremely important that the plants have a high content of chlorophyll. The role of nitrogen in chlorophyll is very important and helps in the creation of chlorophyll; therefore it is necessary that an appropriate amount of nitrogen is added for optimal growth

  15. Planning Targets for Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On August 1, 2011, EPA provided planning targets for nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment for the Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs) of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. This page provides the letters containing those planning targets.

  16. Can Canopy Uptake Influence Nitrogen Acquisition and Allocation by Trees?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Richard; Perks, Mike; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    field conditions, and if this extra N supplies growth in woody tissues such as the stem, as well as the canopy. To test these ideas, we applied a low (~ 2.5 % above ambient NDEP) 15N treatment to Picea sitchensis saplings, targeting the soil or the canopy in monthly fertilizations for 16 months, and investigating 15N return in different age classes of biomass and over time. While soil-targeted deposition treatments agreed well with existing knowledge of N partitioning from this source, we could infer 2-3 times more 15N was retained above-ground in canopy-targeted treatments, including a relative increase in 15N allocation to stem and woody biomass when compared to the soil treatment. These results suggest that existing forest 15N-fertilization experiments could under-estimate the overall ΔCΔN effect of atmospheric deposition.

  17. An Analysis of the Impact of the Research Utilization Project on Principals' Attitudes and on the Use of Information Services By Teachers and Other Field Personnel in 16 Target Elementary Schools of the District of Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Erika L.

    Bridging the gap between the research resources and field personnel becomes an increasingly important problem. This study investigated the impact of the Research Utilization Project (RUP) on public elementary schools in the District of Columbia. In the 16 schools selected by a multistage stratified sampling method, the total number of information…

  18. Tracking historical increases in nitrogen-driven crop production possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, N. D.; Lassaletta, L.; Billen, G.; Garnier, J.; Gerber, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The environmental costs of nitrogen use have prompted a focus on improving the efficiency of nitrogen use in the global food system, the primary source of nitrogen pollution. Typical approaches to improving agricultural nitrogen use efficiency include more targeted field-level use (timing, placement, and rate) and modification of the crop mix. However, global efficiency gains can also be achieved by improving the spatial allocation of nitrogen between regions or countries, due to consistent diminishing returns at high nitrogen use. This concept is examined by constructing a tradeoff frontier (or production possibilities frontier) describing global crop protein yield as a function of applied nitrogen from all sources, given optimal spatial allocation. Yearly variation in country-level input-output nitrogen budgets are utilized to parameterize country-specific hyperbolic yield-response models. Response functions are further characterized for three ~15-year eras beginning in 1961, and series of calculations uses these curves to simulate optimal spatial allocation in each era and determine the frontier. The analyses reveal that excess nitrogen (in recent years) could be reduced by ~40% given optimal spatial allocation. Over time, we find that gains in yield potential and in-country nitrogen use efficiency have led to increases in the global nitrogen production possibilities frontier. However, this promising shift has been accompanied by an actual spatial distribution of nitrogen use that has become less optimal, in an absolute sense, relative to the frontier. We conclude that examination of global production possibilities is a promising approach to understanding production constraints and efficiency opportunities in the global food system.

  19. 16 CFR 1018.16 - Membership selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Membership selection. 1018.16 Section 1018... Establishment of Advisory Committees § 1018.16 Membership selection. (a) Whenever new applicants are required... individuals to submit, on or before a specified date, applications or nominations for membership. (b)...

  20. 16 CFR 1018.16 - Membership selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Membership selection. 1018.16 Section 1018... Establishment of Advisory Committees § 1018.16 Membership selection. (a) Whenever new applicants are required... individuals to submit, on or before a specified date, applications or nominations for membership. (b)...

  1. 16 CFR 1018.16 - Membership selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Membership selection. 1018.16 Section 1018... Establishment of Advisory Committees § 1018.16 Membership selection. (a) Whenever new applicants are required... individuals to submit, on or before a specified date, applications or nominations for membership. (b)...

  2. 16 CFR 1018.16 - Membership selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Membership selection. 1018.16 Section 1018... Establishment of Advisory Committees § 1018.16 Membership selection. (a) Whenever new applicants are required... individuals to submit, on or before a specified date, applications or nominations for membership. (b)...

  3. Co-delivery of VP-16 and Bcl-2-targeted antisense on PEG-grafted oMWCNTs for synergistic in vitro anti-cancer effects in non-small and small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Polanska, Hana; Krizkova, Sona; Balvan, Jan; Raudenska, Martina; Dostalova, Simona; Moulick, Amitava; Masarik, Michal; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-02-01

    Present study describes the preparation of a polyethylene glycol-grafted oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (oMWCNTs-PEG) hybrid nanosystem as a carrier of etoposide (VP-16) and Bcl-2 phosphorothioate antisense deoxyoligonucleotides (Aso) to achieve a superior cytostastic efficacy in non-small and small cell lung cancer in vitro. We have demonstrated that the adsorption of hydrophobic VP-16 and Bcl-2 Aso results in a stable nanotransporter exhibiting good dispersion with excellent release profiles (both, in pH 7.4 and 4.8) and negligible hemolytic activity (up to 6.5%). The evaluation of cytotoxicity was carried out in in vitro using small cell (SCLC; DMS53) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; NCIH2135) cell lines. It was found that Bcl-2 interference significantly increased the anti-cancer efficiency of VP-16 in the chemoresistant NSCLC cells. This was further supported using a flow-cytometry (Annexin V/propidium iodide assay), which revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells in both the cell lines after the co-administration of VP-16 and Bcl-2 Aso using oMWCNTs-PEG hybrid, and fluorescence microscopy, which showed an increase in reactive oxygen species identified after Bcl-2 knock-down. Overall, oMWCNTs-PEG provided an exceptional biocompatible vehicle enabling the internalization of negatively charged nucleic acids and pH-sensitive release of cargoes in a hypoxic environment of the most of solid tumors. Moreover, Aso specifically binding to the first six codons of the Bcl-2 mRNA gave a satisfactorily decrease in Bcl-2 translation and an increase in NCIH2135 chemosensitivity towards VP-16.

  4. Nitrogen Inputs via Nitrogen Fixation in Northern Plants and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dominated by cold and often acidic water logged environments, mineralization of organic matter is slow in the majority of northern ecosystems. Measures of extractable ammonium and nitrate are generally low and can be undetectable in peat pore waters. Despite this apparent nitrogen limitation, many of these environments produce deep deposits of soil organic matter. Biological nitrogen fixation carried out by autotrophic and heterotrophic diazotrophs associated with cryptograms provides the majority of known nitrogen inputs in these northern ecosystems. Nitrogen fixation was assessed in a variety of northern soils within rhizospheres of dominant plant communities. We investigated the availability of this newly fixed nitrogen to the vascular plant community in nitrogen limited northern plant communities. We tracked nitrogen flow from 15N2 gas fixed in Sphagnum mosses into tissues of two native vascular plant species, boreal cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and black spruce (Picea mariana). 15N-labeled Sphagnum microcosms were grown within variable mesh size exclusion/inclusion fabrics in a nitrogen addition experiment in situ in order to investigate the role of mycorrhizal fungi in the uptake of newly fixed nitrogen. Up to 24% of daily fixed 15N label was transferred to vascular plant tissues during 2 months. Nitrogen addition resulted in decreased N2 fixation rates; however, with higher nitrogen availability there was a higher rate of 15N label uptake into the vascular plants, likely the result of increased production of dissolved organic nitrogen. Reliance on mycorrhizal networks for nitrogen acquisition was indicated by nitrogen isotope fractionation patterns. Moreover, N2 fixation activities in mosses were stimulated when vascular plants were grown in moss microcosms versus "moss only" treatments. Results indicate that bog vascular plants may derive considerable nitrogen from atmospheric N2 biologically fixed within Sphagnum mosses. This work demonstrates that

  5. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  6. Assessing mycoplasma contamination of cell cultures by qPCR using a set of universal primer pairs targeting a 1.5 kb fragment of 16S rRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Audrey; Tardy, Florence; Allatif, Omran; Grosjean, Isabelle; Blanquier, Bariza

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasmas (a generic name for Mollicutes) are a predominant bacterial contaminant of cell culture and cell derived products including viruses. This prokaryote class is characterized by very small size and lack of a cell wall. Consequently, mycoplasmas escape ultrafiltration and visualization under routine microscopic examination, hence the ease with which cells in culture can be contaminated, with routinely more than 10% of cell lines being contaminated. Mycoplasma are a formidable threat both in fundamental research by perverting a whole range of cell properties and functions and in the pharmacological use of cells and cell derived products. Although many methods have been developed, there is still a need for a sensitive, universal assay. Here is reported the development and validation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based on the amplification of a 1.5 kb fragment covering the 16S rDNA of the Mollicute class by real-time PCR using universal U1 and U8 degenerate primers. The method includes the addition of a DNA loading probe to each sample to monitor DNA extraction and the absence of PCR inhibitors in the extracted DNA, a positive mycoplasma 16S rDNA traceable reference sample to exclude any accidental contamination of an unknown sample with this reference DNA, an analysis procedure based on the examination of the melting curve and the size of the PCR amplicon, followed by quantification of the number of 16S rDNA copies (with a lower limit of 19 copies) when relevant, and, if useful, the identification of the contaminating prokaryote by sequencing. The method was validated on a collection of mycoplasma strains and by testing over 100 samples of unknown contamination status including stocks of viruses requiring biosafety level 2, 3 or 4 containments. When compared to four established methods, the m16S_qPCR technique exhibits the highest sensitivity in detecting mycoplasma contamination. PMID:28225826

  7. Evaluation of Borrelia real time PCR DNA targeting OspA, FlaB and 5S-23S IGS and Borrelia 16S rRNA RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Bertie H C G M; Maraha, Boulos; Hollemans, Leonie; Sprong, Hein; Brandenburg, Afke H; Westenend, Pieter J; Kusters, Johannes G

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi non-sensu lato (s.l.) strains occurred in the Netherlands. A multiplex OspA, FlaB, IGS real time PCR was compared to 16S rRNA/rDNA RT-qPCR with lower average Cycle threshold (Ct) and LOD on strain dilutions. Multiplexing increased sensitivity on CSF samples (n=74), distinguishing B. burgdorferi s.l. from non-s.l. strains.

  8. Inactivation of microorganisms and endotoxins by low temperature nitrogen gas plasma exposure.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Hideharu; Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Sekiya, Takayuki; Tamazawa, Kahoru; Taniguchi, Akira; Kido, Nobuo

    2007-12-01

    The plasma of several different gases has shown a sporicidal activity. From these gases, nitrogen gas was most difficult to produce atomic nitrogen radicals. However, these radicals have a high energy, indicating that nitrogen gas plasma could be used to sterilize microorganisms and inactivate endotoxins. The sterilization mechanism of nitrogen gas plasma is the synergistic effect of a high rising-up voltage pulse, UV irradiation and atomic nitrogen radicals. Thus, the target cells were damaged by degradation, which resulted in death. The biological indicator (BI) used in this study was Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 at a population of 1 x 10(6) CFU/sheet. Sterility assurance was confirmed by using the BI. Moreover, endotoxins were successfully inactivated. More than 5 log reduction of endotoxins could be attained with 30 minutes of nitrogen gas plasma exposure. Material functionality influenced by nitrogen gas plasma presented a satisfactory result. No deterioration of polymers could be observed by nitrogen gas plasma exposure.

  9. An Improved Multiplex Real-Time SYBR Green PCR Assay for Analysis of 24 Target Genes from 16 Bacterial Species in Fecal DNA Samples from Patients with Foodborne Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Jun; Etoh, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Keiji; Watahiki, Masanori; Shima, Tomoko; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Horikawa, Kazumi; Fukushima, Hiroshi; Goto, Ryoichi; Shirabe, Komei

    2016-05-20

    Here, we developed a new version of our original screening system (Rapid Foodborne Bacterial Screening 24; RFBS24), which can simultaneously detect 24 genes of foodborne pathogens in fecal DNA samples. This new version (RFBS24 ver. 5) detected all known stx2 subtypes, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STh genotype), and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (trh2), which were not detected by the original RFBS24 assay. The detection limits of RFBS24 ver. 5 were approximately 5.6 × 10(-2)-5.6 × 10(-5) (ng DNA)/reaction, significantly lower (10- to 100-fold) than those of the original RFBS24 for the 22 target genes analyzed here. We also tested the new assay on fecal DNA samples from patients infected with Salmonella, Campylobacter, or enterohemorrhagic E. coli. The number of bacterial target genes detected by RFBS24 ver. 5 was greater than that detected by RFBS24. RFBS24 ver. 5 combined with an Ultra Clean Fecal DNA Isolation Kit showed adequate performance (sensitivity and specificity 89% and 100%, respectively, for Salmonella spp. and 100% and 83%, respectively, for Campylobacter jejuni) in terms of rapid detection of a causative pathogen during foodborne-illness outbreaks. Thus, RFBS24 ver. 5 is more useful than the previous assay system for detection of foodborne pathogens and offers quick simultaneous analysis of many targets and thus facilitates rapid dissemination of information to public health officials.

  10. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  11. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  12. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  13. Nitrogen Limitation of Terrestrial Net Primary Production: Global Patterns From Field Studies with Nitrogen Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebauer, D. S.; Treseder, K. K.

    2006-12-01

    Net primary production (NPP) transfers carbon from the atmospheric CO2 pool into the biosphere. Experimental evidence demonstrates that NPP is often limited by nitrogen availability. Hence, accelerated nitrogen availability due to fertilizer production, fossil fuel use, and biomass burning could stimulate global NPP. Over the next century, these nitrogen sources are expected to both increase in strength and expand from their current concentration in the temperate regions of Europe and the United States into the tropical regions of South America, Southeast Asia, and India. In order to predict future carbon budgets, it is necessary to quantify the impact of nitrogen on NPP. Currently there is no synthesis of ecosystem scale experiments that evaluates responses among biomes and across environmental gradients. The aim of this investigation is to test the prediction that nitrogen limitation is widespread, and to evaluate global patterns of NPP response to nitrogen. The present study compiles results from field-based nitrogen addition experiments in a comprehensive meta-analysis. Published studies were obtained through key word searches and referenced articles. A response metric was derived from each study based on measurements of plant growth under ambient nitrogen deposition (control) and experimental nitrogen addition (treatment). This metric is the response ratio (R): the ratio of mean growth in treatment divided by control plots. Therefore, a positive effect of nitrogen results in R>1. A meta-analysis was performed on ln(R) weighted by within-study variance. We found that most ecosystems are nitrogen limited (P<0.0001) and that average growth response to nitrogen was 32%. However, response was not uniform across biomes. Significant responses were observed in grasslands and forests (P<0.0001), but not wetlands and tundra (P=0.08 and P=0.16). While mean annual precipitation (MAP) was significantly correlated to R overall (P<0.0001), the direction of the effect varied

  14. Ruminant nitrogen usage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book brings together the latest research on protein absorption by ruminants and takes a look at the calculation of optimum nutrient requirements, including bacterial digestion, in the calculations. It also describes the parameters of nitrogen conversion in the ruminant and examines the different kinds of protein found in animal feedstuffs.

  15. Nitrogen Trading Tool (NTT)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) recently developed a prototype web-based nitrogen trading tool to facilitate water quality credit trading. The development team has worked closely with the Agriculture Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit (ARS-SPNR) and the Environmenta...

  16. Nitrogen recommendation systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen fertilization for corn production is complicated by soil and weather variability, yet has far-reaching economic and environmental implications. To address this challenge, alternative N management strategies have been explored extensively in recent years by both public and private groups for...

  17. Commercial Nitrogen Fertilizer Purchased

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Amounts of fertilizer nitrogen (N) purchased by states in individual years 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009 and 2011, and the % change in average amounts purchased per year from 2002-2006 to 2007-2011. Fertilizer information is reported by state fertilizer control offices and excludes livestock manure, liming materials, peat, potting soils, soil amendments, soil additives, and soil conditioners.

  18. The nitrogen cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway J.N.; Aber J.D.; Erisman J.W.; Seitzinger S.P.; Howarth R.W.; Cowling E.B.; Cosby B.J.

    2003-04-01

    Human production of food and energy is the dominant continental process that breaks the triple bond in molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and creates reactive nitrogen (Nr) species. Circulation of anthropogenic Nr in Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere has a wide variety of consequences, which are magnified with time as Nr moves along its biogeochemical pathway. The same atom of Nr can cause multiple effects in the atmosphere, in terrestrial ecosystems, in freshwater and marine systems, and on human health. We call this sequence of effects the nitrogen cascade. As the cascade progresses, the origin of Nr becomes unimportant. Reactive nitrogen does not cascade at the same rate through all environmental systems; some systems have the ability to accumulate Nr, which leads to lag times in the continuation of the cascade. These lags slow the cascade and result in Nr accumulation in certain reservoirs, which in turn can enhance the effects of Nr on that environment. The only way to eliminate Nr accumulation and stop the cascade is to convert Nr back to nonreactive N{sub 2}.

  19. ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Harold S.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter is in three parts. The first concerns interpretations that can be made from atmospheric observations regarding nitrogen compounds and ozone, the second reviews some predictions made by atmospheric models, and the third compares between certain model results and atmospheric measurements with an emphasis on detecting evidence of significant disagreements.

  20. Nitrogen in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rabalais, Nancy N

    2002-03-01

    Aquatic ecosystems respond variably to nutrient enrichment and altered nutrient ratios, along a continuum from fresh water through estuarine, coastal, and marine systems. Although phosphorus is considered the limiting nutrient for phytoplankton production in freshwater systems, the effects of atmospheric nitrogen and its contribution to acidification of fresh waters can be detrimental. Within the estuarine to coastal continuum, multiple nutrient limitations occur among nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon along the salinity gradient and by season, but nitrogen is generally considered the primary limiting nutrient for phytoplankton biomass accumulation. There are well-established, but nonlinear, positive relationships among nitrogen and phosphorus flux, phytoplankton primary production, and fisheries yield. There are thresholds, however, where the load of nutrients to estuarine, coastal and marine systems exceeds the capacity for assimilation of nutrient-enhanced production, and water-quality degradation occurs. Impacts can include noxious and toxic algal blooms, increased turbidity with a subsequent loss of submerged aquatic vegetation, oxygen deficiency, disruption of ecosystem functioning, loss of habitat, loss of biodiversity, shifts in food webs, and loss of harvestable fisheries.

  1. Nitrogen use efficiency revisited.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tadaki

    2011-08-01

    Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) was originally defined as the dry mass productivity per unit N taken up from soil. The term was subsequently redefined as the product of nitrogen productivity (NP) and mean residence time of nitrogen (MRT). However, this redefinition was found to contradict the original definition under certain conditions, and confusion arose when the MRT defined for a steady-state system was applied to a system that was actually not at steady state. As MRT is the expected length of time that a unit of N newly taken up from soil is retained before being lost, it can be translated into the plant nitrogen duration (PND) divided by the total N uptake. This MRT is determined equally well for a steady state- and a non-steady state system and is in accordance with the original definition of NUE. It can be applied to a herbaceous perennial stand (that was at a steady state) and to an annual stand (that was not at a steady state) to determine NUE. NUE is also applicable when plant growth and reproduction are analyzed in relation to N use.

  2. Nitrogen catch crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High costs of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and the potential for N losses to ground and surface water have resulted in increased interest in using catch crops to recover this N. Research on potatoes has shown that the amount of N lost to leaching can be as much as the amount of N removed from the field ...

  3. Estimation of nitrogen ion energy calculated using distribution for nitrogen in Si implanted by PBII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Watanabe, S.; Takagi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) using N2 gas is examined as a sterilization technique for three-dimensional targets. The application of a pulsed negative voltage (5 μs pulse width, 300 pulses/s, -800 V to -13 kV) at an N2 gas pressure of 2.4 Pa is shown to reduce the number of Bacillus pumilus survivors by up to 105 times after just 5 min of exposure. The energy of nitrogen ions is calculated based on the depth profile of nitrogen concentration in Si implanted by PBII, and it is revealed that the actual nitrogen ion energy is much lower than that calculated based on the voltage applied during processing.

  4. Atomic nitrogen measurements in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Engebretson, M. J.; Potter, W. E.; Kayser, D. C.; Nier, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    The open-source neutral mass spectrometer (OSS) on the Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite (AE-C) measures the neutral constituents of the upper atmosphere. It has been found that atomic nitrogen densities can be determined at altitudes above 380 km. Most of the nitrogen atoms combine with oxygen adsorbed on the walls of the ion source to form NO. The measured net peaks at 14 amu and 30 amu show the scale height expected for atomic nitrogen; both peaks have a pronounced diurnal variation. Absolute number densities at 400 km are computed for a time period between February and April 1974 when measurements were taken in the northern hemisphere. Minimum and maximum densities of atomic nitrogen occur between 4 and 6 hr LST in the morning and around 16 hr LST in the afternoon, respectively. At 400 km, the minimum particle density is 100,000/cu cm and the maximum density 1.5 million/cu cm. In contrast to the response of N2 to geomagnetic activity, atomic N shows no appreciable effect.

  5. A novel, broad spectrum therapeutic HPV vaccine targeting the E7 proteins of HPV16, 18, 31, 45 and 52 that elicits potent E7-specific CD8T cell immunity and regression of large, established, E7-expressing TC-1 tumors.

    PubMed

    Wick, Darin A; Webb, John R

    2011-10-13

    Persistent infection by high risk genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of cervical cancer, which remains one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. In addition, there is a growing appreciation that high risk HPVs are associated with a number of other cancers including anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck cancers. Recently, prophylactic HPV vaccines targeting the two most prevalent high risk HPVs (HPV16 and HPV18) have been deployed in large-scale vaccination campaigns. However, the extent to which these prophylactic vaccines confer protection against other high risk HPV genotypes is largely unknown and prophylactic vaccines have been shown to be ineffective against pre-existing infection. Thus there continues to be an urgent need for effective therapeutic vaccines against HPV. The E7 protein of HPV16 has been widely studied as a target for therapeutic vaccines in HPV-associated cancer settings because HPV16 is the most prevalent of the high risk HPV genotypes. However, HPV16 accounts for only about 50% of cervical cancers and there are at least 15 other high risk HPVs that are known to be oncogenic. We have developed a novel, broad-spectrum, therapeutic vaccine (Pentarix) directed at the E7 proteins from five of the most prevalent high-risk genotypes of HPV worldwide (HPV16, 18, 31, 45 and 52) that together account for more than 80% of all HPV-associated cancers. Pentarix is a recombinant protein-based vaccine that elicits strong, multi-genotype specific CD8 T cell immunity when administered to mice in combination with adjuvants comprised of agonists of the TLR3 or TLR9 family of innate immune receptors. Furthermore, large, established E7-expressing TC-1 tumors undergo rapid and complete regression after therapeutic vaccination of mice with Pentarix. Together, these data suggest that Pentarix may be of clinical value for patients with E7-positive, HPV-associated precancerous lesions or malignant disease.

  6. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    Once upon a time nitrogen did not exist. Today it does. In the intervening time the universe was formed, nitrogen was created, the Earth came into existence, and its atmosphere and oceans were formed! In this analysis of the Earth's nitrogen cycle, I start with an overview of these important events relative to nitrogen and then move on to the more traditional analysis of the nitrogen cycle itself and the role of humans in its alteration.The universe is ˜15 Gyr old. Even after its formation, there was still a period when nitrogen did not exist. It took ˜300 thousand years after the big bang for the Universe to cool enough to create atoms; hydrogen and helium formed first. Nitrogen was formed in the stars through the process of nucleosynthesis. When a star's helium mass becomes great enough to reach the necessary pressure and temperature, helium begins to fuse into still heavier elements, including nitrogen.Approximately 10 Gyr elapsed before Earth was formed (˜4.5 Ga (billion years ago)) by the accumulation of pre-assembled materials in a multistage process. Assuming that N2 was the predominate nitrogen species in these materials and given that the temperature of space is -270 °C, N2 was probably a solid when the Earth was formed since its boiling point (b.p.) and melting point (m.p.) are -196 °C and -210 °C, respectively. Towards the end of the accumulation period, temperatures were probably high enough for significant melting of some of the accumulated material. The volcanic gases emitted by the resulting volcanism strongly influenced the surface environment. Nitrogen was converted from a solid to a gas and emitted as N2. Carbon and sulfur were probably emitted as CO and H2S (Holland, 1984). N2 is still the most common nitrogen volcanic gas emitted today at a rate of ˜2 TgN yr-1 (Jaffee, 1992).Once emitted, the gases either remained in the atmosphere or were deposited to the Earth's surface, thus continuing the process of biogeochemical cycling. The rate of

  7. Redistribution of nitrogen implanted in the crystals of synthetic diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepov, E. I.; Tishkovsky, E. G.; Obodnikov, V. I.; Pal'yanov, Ju. N.; Sokol, A. G.; Sobolev, N. V.

    2001-10-01

    The redistribution of nitrogen atoms implanted in synthetic diamond crystals was investigated by secondary ion mass-spectrometry in course of an isothermal annealing program at 1400°C during 1, 5 and 20 h. It was shown that the nitrogen profiles spread at a macroscopic scale, and the broadening is well described in terms of the diffusion movement of impurity atoms. The preliminary estimates of diffusion coefficients were obtained: 2.3×10 -15 cm2/ s for 1 h annealing, 8.5×10 -16 cm2/ s for 5 h annealing and 3.7×10 -16 cm2/ s for 20 h annealing.

  8. Aqueous phase removal of nitrogen from nitrogen compounds

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alex G.

    1993-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of compounds containing nitrogen present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the types of nitrogen compounds present in a waste stream, (2) determining the concentrations of nitrogen compounds, (3) balancing oxidized and reduced form of nitrogen by adding a reactant, and (4) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 300.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., thereby resulting in less harmful nitrogen and oxygen gas, hydroxides, alcohols, and hydrocarbons.

  9. Bacteria and the Nitrogen Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayanaba, A.

    1982-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation accounts for almost 70 percent of nitrogen for plant growth. If food is to keep abreast of population growth, even more nitrogen must be fixed. For this international research institutes continue the search for natural variants in the bacterial population while also pursuing novel genetic engineering methods. (Author)

  10. Bacteria and the Nitrogen Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayanaba, A.

    1982-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation accounts for almost 70 percent of nitrogen for plant growth. If food is to keep abreast of population growth, even more nitrogen must be fixed. For this international research institutes continue the search for natural variants in the bacterial population while also pursuing novel genetic engineering methods. (Author)

  11. The nitrogen and sulphur cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.A.; Ferguson, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic regulation of nitrogen fixation; On the analysis of symbiotic genes of Rhizobium; Regulation of nitrogen assimilation by bacteria; Alternative and conventional nitrogenases; and The role of oxygen and hydrogen in nitrogen fixation.

  12. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  13. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Pinnau, Ingo; Segelke, Scott

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  14. Sealing Nitrogen Tetroxide Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, George G.; Houston, Donald W.; Scott, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    Use of Furmanite FSC-N-6B sealant in clam-shell sealing device makes it possible to stop leaks of nitrogen tetroxide through defective or improperly-seated plumbing fittings. Devised to stop leaks in vent line of small rocket motor on Space Shuttle. Also used on plumbing containing hydrazine and other hazardous fluids, and repair withstands severe temperature, vibration, and shock. Leaks stopped in place, without draining or replacement of leaking parts.

  15. Ice sheets and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Eric W

    2013-07-05

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2-3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas.

  16. Ice sheets and nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land–atmosphere and ocean–atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2–3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas. PMID:23713125

  17. 16 CFR 1025.16 - Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Pleadings, Form, Execution, Service of Documents § 1025.16 Service. (a) Mandatory service. Every document... be served by any of the methods already described in this section may be served by publication in the...

  18. A regional classification of the effectiveness of depressional wetlands at mitigating nitrogen transport to surface waters in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott W.; Denver, Judith M.; LaMotte, Andrew E.; Sekellick, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen from nonpoint sources contributes to eutrophication, hypoxia, and related ecological degradation in Atlantic Coastal Plain streams and adjacent coastal estuaries such as Chesapeake Bay and Pamlico Sound. Although denitrification in depressional (non-riparian) wetlands common to the Coastal Plain can be a significant landscape sink for nitrogen, the effectiveness of individual wetlands at removing nitrogen varies substantially due to varying hydrogeologic, geochemical, and other landscape conditions, which are often poorly or inconsistently mapped over large areas. A geographic model describing the spatial variability in the likely effectiveness of depressional wetlands in watershed uplands at mitigating nitrogen transport from nonpoint sources to surface waters was constructed for the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain (NACP), from North Carolina through New Jersey. Geographic and statistical techniques were used to develop the model. Available medium-resolution (1:100,000-scale) stream hydrography was used to define 33,799 individual watershed catchments in the study area. Sixteen landscape metrics relevant to the occurrence of depressional wetlands and their effectiveness as nitrogen sinks were defined for each catchment, based primarily on available topographic and soils data. Cluster analysis was used to aggregate the 33,799 catchments into eight wetland landscape regions (WLRs) based on the value of three principal components computed for the 16 original landscape metrics. Significant differences in topography, soil, and land cover among the eight WLRs demonstrate the effectiveness of the clustering technique. Results were used to interpret the relative likelihood of depressional wetlands in each WLR and their likely effectiveness at mitigating nitrogen transport from upland source areas to surface waters. The potential effectiveness of depressional wetlands at mitigating nitrogen transport varies substantially over different parts of the NACP

  19. Impacts of atmospheric anthropogenic nitrogen on the open ocean.

    PubMed

    Duce, R A; LaRoche, J; Altieri, K; Arrigo, K R; Baker, A R; Capone, D G; Cornell, S; Dentener, F; Galloway, J; Ganeshram, R S; Geider, R J; Jickells, T; Kuypers, M M; Langlois, R; Liss, P S; Liu, S M; Middelburg, J J; Moore, C M; Nickovic, S; Oschlies, A; Pedersen, T; Prospero, J; Schlitzer, R; Seitzinger, S; Sorensen, L L; Uematsu, M; Ulloa, O; Voss, M; Ward, B; Zamora, L

    2008-05-16

    Increasing quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about a third of the ocean's external (nonrecycled) nitrogen supply and up to approximately 3% of the annual new marine biological production, approximately 0.3 petagram of carbon per year. This input could account for the production of up to approximately 1.6 teragrams of nitrous oxide (N2O) per year. Although approximately 10% of the ocean's drawdown of atmospheric anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decrease in radiative forcing, up to about two-thirds of this amount may be offset by the increase in N2O emissions. The effects of increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition are expected to continue to grow in the future.

  20. Regulatory Drivers of Multimedia Reactive Nitrogen Research (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E.; Kumar, N.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of nitrogenous compounds can impact biogeochemical processes in the atmosphere, oceans and freshwater, and land surfaces. As a result, a number of regulations exist that are intended to control the amount and forms of nitrogen present in the environment. These range from the newly proposed Transport Rule, both the primary and secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for nitrogen oxide targeted at ozone and particulate matter formation and nitrogen deposition, and waterbody requirements such as the Total Maximum Daily Load. This talk will cover a subset of research activities at EPRI that inform environmental nitrogen concerns. A multimedia modeling framework has facilitated effect studies of atmospheric loadings on ecosystems. Improvements in emissions estimates, such as for mobile sources, suggest large current underestimates that will substantially impact air quality modeling of nitrogen oxides. Analyses of wintertime nitrate formation in the northern U.S. are demonstrating the roles of NH3 and NOx in particle formation there. Novel measurements of power plant stack emissions suggest operating configurations can influence the isotopic composition of emitted NOx. Novel instruments for ambient measurements of nitrogen, and suggestions for improved deposition estimates, are being developed. EPRI results suggest that multimedia solutions across multiple economic sectors, such as electrification of a wide variety of engines and water quality treatment and trading, have the potential to improve environmental quality effectively.

  1. Nitrogen Regulates AMPK to Control TORC1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Davie, Elizabeth; Forte, Gabriella M.A.; Petersen, Janni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cell growth and cell-cycle progression are tightly coordinated to enable cells to adjust their size (timing of division) to the demands of proliferation in varying nutritional environments. In fission yeast, nitrogen stress results in sustained proliferation at a reduced size. Results Here, we show that cells can sense nitrogen stress to reduce target of rapamycin complex-1 (TORC1) activity. Nitrogen-stress-induced TORC1 inhibition differs from amino-acid-dependent control of TORC1 and requires the Ssp2 (AMPKα) kinase, the Tsc1/2 complex, and Rhb1 GTPase. Importantly, the β and γ regulatory subunits of AMPK are not required to control cell division in response to nitrogen stress, providing evidence for a nitrogen-sensing mechanism that is independent of changes in intracellular ATP/AMP levels. The CaMKK homolog Ssp1 is constitutively required for phosphorylation of the AMPKαSsp2 T loop. However, we find that a second homolog CaMKKPpk34 is specifically required to stimulate AMPKαSsp2 activation in response to nitrogen stress. Finally, ammonia also controls mTORC1 activity in human cells; mTORC1 is activated upon the addition of ammonium to glutamine-starved Hep3B cancer cells. Conclusions The alternative nitrogen source ammonia can simulate TORC1 activity to support growth and division under challenging nutrient settings, a situation often seen in cancer. PMID:25639242

  2. Growth Inhibition of Re-Challenge B16 Melanoma Transplant by Conjugates of Melanogenesis Substrate and Magnetite Nanoparticles as the Basis for Developing Melanoma-Targeted Chemo-Thermo-Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Sato, Makito; Sato, Akiko; Ono, Ichiro; Tamura, Yasuaki; Sato, Noriyuki; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Ito, Akira; Honda, Hiroyuki; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Jimbow, Kowichi

    2009-01-01

    Melanogenesis substrate, N-propionyl-cysteaminylphenol (NPrCAP), is selectively incorporated into melanoma cells and inhibits their growth by producing cytotoxic free radicals. Magnetite nanoparticles also disintegrate cancer cells and generate heat shock protein (HSP) upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). This study tested if a chemo-thermo-immunotherapy (CTI therapy) strategy can be developed for better management of melanoma by conjugating NPrCAP on the surface of magnetite nanoparticles (NPrCAP/M). We examined the feasibility of this approach in B16 mouse melanoma and evaluated the impact of exposure temperature, frequency, and interval on the inhibition of re-challenged melanoma growth. The therapeutic protocol against the primary transplanted tumor with or without AMF exposure once a day every other day for a total of three treatments not only inhibited the growth of the primary transplant but also prevented the growth of the secondary, re-challenge transplant. The heat-generated therapeutic effect was more significant at a temperature of 43°C than either 41°C or 46°C. NPrCAP/M with AMF exposure, instead of control magnetite alone or without AMF exposure, resulted in the most significant growth inhibition of the re-challenge tumor and increased the life span of the mice. HSP70 production was greatest at 43°C compared to that with 41°C or 46°C. CD8+T cells were infiltrated at the site of the re-challenge melanoma transplant. PMID:19830247

  3. Identifying opportunities to reduce excess nitrogen in croplands while maintaining current crop yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, P. C.; Mueller, N. D.; Foley, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Use of synthetic nitrogen fertilizer has greatly contributed to the increased crop yields brought about by the Green Revolution. Unfortunately, it also has also contributed to substantial excess nitrogen in the environment. Application of excess nitrogen not only is a waste of energy and other resources used to produce, transport and apply it, it also pollutes aquatic ecosystems and has led to the development of more than 200 hypoxic-or "dead"-zones in coastal areas around the world. How can we decrease use of excess nitrogen without compromising crop yields? To help address this challenge, our study (1) quantified hot spots of excess nitrogen, and (2) estimated how much nitrogen reduction is possible in these areas while still maintaining yields. We estimated excess nitrogen for major crops using a mass balance approach and global spatial data sets of crop area and yield, fertilizer application rates, and nitrogen deposition. Hot spots of excess nitrogen were identified by quantifying the smallest area within large river basins that contributed 25% and 50% of the total load within each basin. Nitrogen reduction scenarios were developed using a yield response model to estimate nitrogen application rates needed to maintain current yields. Our research indicated that excess nitrogen is concentrated in very small portions of croplands within river basins, with 25% of the total nitrogen load in each basin from ~10% of the cropland, and 50% of the total nitrogen load in each basin from ~25% of the cropland. Targeting reductions in application rates in these hot spots can allow us to maintain current crop yields while greatly reducing nitrogen loading to coastal areas and creating the opportunity to reallocate resources to boost yields on nitrogen-limited croplands elsewhere.

  4. Polarized Solid State Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Meyer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The polarized solid state target is an indispensable experimental tool to study single and double polarization observables at low intensity particle beams like tagged photons. It was one of the major components of the Crystal-Barrel experiment at ELSA. Besides the operation of the 'CB frozen spin target' within the experimental program of the Crystal-Barrel collaboration both collaborative groups of the D1 project, the polarized target group of the Ruhr Universität Bochum and the Bonn polarized target group, have made significant developments in the field of polarized targets within the CRC16. The Bonn polarized target group has focused its work on the development of technically challenging polarized solid target systems towards the so called '4π continuous mode polarized target' to operate them in combination with 4π-particle detection systems. In parallel, the Bochum group has developed various highly polarized deuterated target materials and high precision NMR-systems, in the meantime used for polarization experiments at CERN, JLAB and MAMI, too.

  5. F-16 AFTI in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This 27-second movie clip shows the F-16 Advanced Fighter Technology Integration aircraft in formation flight with another F-16. Note the lower forward-mounted canards just behind the engine intake, which in a dogfight, would be used for 'selective fuselage pointing' to quickly acquire and target the opponent. The AFTI (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration) /F-16 program has been a joint NASA/USAF effort evaluating advanced digital flight controls, automated maneuvering, voice-activated controls, sensors, and close-air support attack systems on a modified F-16. Research and test results could be applied to existing or future aircraft. Originally conceived as a program to explore flight control technology as well as various maneuvering concepts, this program has flown at Edwards Air Force Base continuously from 1982 through the late 1990s (as of this writing). This flight research aircraft was one of the original six F-16A airplanes that since has been modified extensively and repeatedly to study the feasibility of advanced technologies. For instance, it has demonstrated the operational value of voice command and automated ground collision avoidance systems, an automated maneuvering system for all aspects of air and ground combat, an automated threat avoidance and terrain following system, and a night vision helmet with a dual forward-looking infrared capability that was pointed by movement of the pilot's head. All of these systems served to reduce the pilot's workload in the demanding and dangerous role of close-air support. These systems would help ensure that a pilot was more effective in his first pass over a low-level target in a battle area. One of the most important technology spinoffs from the AFTI program has been the incorporation of an Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (EGPWS) on all commercial airliner traffic. This system has been accepted industry, as well as world-wide, and is currently being installed on all commercial aircraft.

  6. F-16 AFTI in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This 27-second movie clip shows the F-16 Advanced Fighter Technology Integration aircraft in formation flight with another F-16. Note the lower forward-mounted canards just behind the engine intake, which in a dogfight, would be used for 'selective fuselage pointing' to quickly acquire and target the opponent. The AFTI (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration) /F-16 program has been a joint NASA/USAF effort evaluating advanced digital flight controls, automated maneuvering, voice-activated controls, sensors, and close-air support attack systems on a modified F-16. Research and test results could be applied to existing or future aircraft. Originally conceived as a program to explore flight control technology as well as various maneuvering concepts, this program has flown at Edwards Air Force Base continuously from 1982 through the late 1990s (as of this writing). This flight research aircraft was one of the original six F-16A airplanes that since has been modified extensively and repeatedly to study the feasibility of advanced technologies. For instance, it has demonstrated the operational value of voice command and automated ground collision avoidance systems, an automated maneuvering system for all aspects of air and ground combat, an automated threat avoidance and terrain following system, and a night vision helmet with a dual forward-looking infrared capability that was pointed by movement of the pilot's head. All of these systems served to reduce the pilot's workload in the demanding and dangerous role of close-air support. These systems would help ensure that a pilot was more effective in his first pass over a low-level target in a battle area. One of the most important technology spinoffs from the AFTI program has been the incorporation of an Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (EGPWS) on all commercial airliner traffic. This system has been accepted industry, as well as world-wide, and is currently being installed on all commercial aircraft.

  7. Sputter target

    DOEpatents

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  8. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  9. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  10. Effect of ruthenium on nitrogen fixation by some nitrogen fixers.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, K; Gaur, N

    1979-01-01

    The effect of ruthenium chloride in the culture media on the nitrogen-fixing ability of the three nitrogen fixers (unidentified species of Azotobacter, designated here as D3, B3, and B), isolated from Allahabad soil, was studied. It was observed that the nitrogen-fixing ability of the organisms is much increased in presence of 25-75 micro M concentration of ruthenium chloride in the culture media, while sugar consumption remains more or less steady. Also, if mg nitrogen fixed/g carbon consumed in two culture media with successive increasing concentrations of ruthenium chloride is compared by calculating the difference in increase of the amount of nitrogen fixed and carbon consumed in these two culture media, it was observed that high amounts of nitrogen are fixed by B3 and B between 25-50 micro M, and between 50-75 micro M concentration of ruthenium chloride by D3.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. 862.1515...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. 862.1515...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. 862.1515...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. 862.1515...

  15. Reliable reference genes for normalization of gene expression in cucumber grown under different nitrogen nutrition.

    PubMed

    Warzybok, Anna; Migocka, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In plants, nitrogen is the most important nutritional factor limiting the yield of cultivated crops. Since nitrogen is essential for synthesis of nucleotides, amino acids and proteins, studies on gene expression in plants cultivated under different nitrogen availability require particularly careful selection of suitable reference genes which are not affected by nitrogen limitation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to select the most reliable reference genes for qPCR analysis of target cucumber genes under varying nitrogen source and availability. Among twelve candidate cucumber genes used in this study, five are highly homologous to the commonly used internal controls, whereas seven novel candidates were previously identified through the query of the cucumber genome. The expression of putative reference genes and the target CsNRT1.1 gene was analyzed in roots, stems and leaves of cucumbers grown under nitrogen deprivation, varying nitrate availability or different sources of nitrogen (glutamate, glutamine or NH3). The stability of candidate genes expression significantly varied depending on the tissue type and nitrogen supply. However, in most of the outputs genes encoding CACS, TIP41, F-box protein and EFα proved to be the most suitable for normalization of CsNRT1.1 expression. In addition, our results suggest the inclusion of 3 or 4 references to obtain highly reliable results of target genes expression in all cucumber organs under nitrogen-related stress.

  16. Efficient mRNA-Based Genetic Engineering of Human NK Cells with High-Affinity CD16 and CCR7 Augments Rituximab-Induced ADCC against Lymphoma and Targets NK Cell Migration toward the Lymph Node-Associated Chemokine CCL19

    PubMed Central

    Carlsten, Mattias; Levy, Emily; Karambelkar, Amrita; Li, Linhong; Reger, Robert; Berg, Maria; Peshwa, Madhusudan V.; Childs, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, investigators have pursued methods to genetically engineer natural killer (NK) cells for use in clinical therapy against cancer. Despite considerable advances in viral transduction of hematopoietic stem cells and T cells, transduction efficiencies for NK cells have remained disappointingly low. Here, we show that NK cells can be genetically reprogramed efficiently using a cGMP-compliant mRNA electroporation method that induces rapid and reproducible transgene expression in nearly all transfected cells, without negatively influencing their viability, phenotype, and cytotoxic function. To study its potential therapeutic application, we used this approach to improve key aspects involved in efficient lymphoma targeting by adoptively infused ex vivo-expanded NK cells. Electroporation of NK cells with mRNA coding for the chemokine receptor CCR7 significantly promoted migration toward the lymph node-associated chemokine CCL19. Further, introduction of mRNA coding for the high-affinity antibody-binding receptor CD16 (CD16-158V) substantially augmented NK cell cytotoxicity against rituximab-coated lymphoma cells. Based on these data, we conclude that this approach can be utilized to genetically modify multiple modalities of NK cells in a highly efficient manner with the potential to improve multiple facets of their in vivo tumor targeting, thus, opening a new arena for the development of more efficacious adoptive NK cell-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:27047492

  17. Efficient mRNA-Based Genetic Engineering of Human NK Cells with High-Affinity CD16 and CCR7 Augments Rituximab-Induced ADCC against Lymphoma and Targets NK Cell Migration toward the Lymph Node-Associated Chemokine CCL19.

    PubMed

    Carlsten, Mattias; Levy, Emily; Karambelkar, Amrita; Li, Linhong; Reger, Robert; Berg, Maria; Peshwa, Madhusudan V; Childs, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, investigators have pursued methods to genetically engineer natural killer (NK) cells for use in clinical therapy against cancer. Despite considerable advances in viral transduction of hematopoietic stem cells and T cells, transduction efficiencies for NK cells have remained disappointingly low. Here, we show that NK cells can be genetically reprogramed efficiently using a cGMP-compliant mRNA electroporation method that induces rapid and reproducible transgene expression in nearly all transfected cells, without negatively influencing their viability, phenotype, and cytotoxic function. To study its potential therapeutic application, we used this approach to improve key aspects involved in efficient lymphoma targeting by adoptively infused ex vivo-expanded NK cells. Electroporation of NK cells with mRNA coding for the chemokine receptor CCR7 significantly promoted migration toward the lymph node-associated chemokine CCL19. Further, introduction of mRNA coding for the high-affinity antibody-binding receptor CD16 (CD16-158V) substantially augmented NK cell cytotoxicity against rituximab-coated lymphoma cells. Based on these data, we conclude that this approach can be utilized to genetically modify multiple modalities of NK cells in a highly efficient manner with the potential to improve multiple facets of their in vivo tumor targeting, thus, opening a new arena for the development of more efficacious adoptive NK cell-based cancer immunotherapies.

  18. Nitrogen fixation and nitrogen transformations in marine symbioses.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cara L; Jarett, Jessica K; Olson, Nathan D; Lesser, Michael P

    2010-10-01

    Many marine organisms have coevolved symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria in nitrogen limited environments such as coral reefs. In addition, some of these organisms also harbor microbes that carry out nitrification and denitrification. Prokaryotes involved in nitrogen fixation and other nitrogen transformations are symbionts in a range of eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment including shipworms, diatoms, corals and sponges. Molecular genetic approaches, and other analytical techniques, have provided exciting new insights into symbiont diversity and the relationship between host and symbiont. We review the current state of knowledge of these symbioses and highlight important avenues for future studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of aeration rate on nitrogen dynamics during composting.

    PubMed

    de Guardia, A; Petiot, C; Rogeau, D; Druilhe, C

    2008-01-01

    The paper aimed to study the influence of aeration rate on nitrogen dynamics during composting of wastewater sludge with wood chips. Wastewater sludge was sampled at a pig slaughterhouse 24h before each composting experiment, and mixtures were made at the same mass ratio. Six composting experiments were performed in a lab reactor (300 L) under forced aeration. Aeration flow was constant throughout the experiment and aeration rates applied ranged between 1.69 and 16.63 L/h/kg DM of mixture. Material temperature and oxygen consumption were monitored continuously. Nitrogen losses in leachates as organic and total ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate, and losses in exhaust gases as ammonia were measured daily. Concentrations of total carbon and nitrogen i.e., organic nitrogen, total ammoniacal nitrogen, and nitrite and nitrate were measured in the initial substrates and in the composted materials. The results showed that organic nitrogen, which was released as NH4+/NH3 by ammonification, was closely correlated to the ratio of carbon removed from the material to TC/N(org) of the initial substrates. The increase of aeration was responsible for the increase in ammonia emissions and for the decrease in nitrogen losses through leaching. At high aeration rates, losses of nitrogen in leachates and as ammonia in exhaust gases accounted for 90-99% of the nitrogen removed from the material. At low aeration rates, those accounted for 47-85% of the nitrogen removed from the material. The highest concentrations of total ammoniacal nitrogen in composts occurred at the lowest aeration rate. Due to the correlation of ammonification with biodegradation and to the measurements of losses in leachates and in exhaust gases, the pool NH4+/NH3 in the composting material was calculated as a function of time. The nitrification rate was found to be proportional to the mean content of NH4+/NH3 in the material, i.e., initial NH4+/NH3 plus NH4+/NH3 released by ammonification minus losses in

  20. Device for detection and identification of carbon- and nitrogen-containing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Karev, Alexander Ivanovich; Raevsky, Valery Georgievich; Dzhilavyan, Leonid Zavenovich; Laptev, Valery Dmitrievich; Pakhomov, Nikolay Ivanovich; Shvedunov, Vasily Ivanovich; Rykalin, Vladimir Ivanovich; Brothers, Louis Joseph; Wilhide, Larry K

    2014-03-25

    A device for detection and identification of carbon- and nitrogen-containing materials is described. In particular, the device performs the detection and identification of carbon- and nitrogen-containing materials by photo-nuclear detection. The device may comprise a race-track microtron, a breaking target, and a water-filled Cherenkov radiation counter.

  1. Identification of Nitrogen-Incorporating Bacteria in Petroleum-Contaminated Arctic Soils by Using [15N]DNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing and Pyrosequencing ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Terrence H.; Yergeau, Etienne; Martineau, Christine; Juck, David; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Arctic soils are increasingly susceptible to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, as exploration and exploitation of the Arctic increase. Bioremediation in these soils is challenging due to logistical constraints and because soil temperatures only rise above 0°C for ∼2 months each year. Nitrogen is often added to contaminated soil in situ to stimulate the existing microbial community, but little is known about how the added nutrients are used by these microorganisms. Microbes vary widely in their ability to metabolize petroleum hydrocarbons, so the question becomes: which hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms most effectively use this added nitrogen for growth? Using [15N]DNA-based stable isotope probing, we determined which taxonomic groups most readily incorporated nitrogen from the monoammonium phosphate added to contaminated and uncontaminated soil in Canadian Forces Station-Alert, Nunavut, Canada. Fractions from each sample were amplified with bacterial 16S rRNA and alkane monooxygenase B (alkB) gene-specific primers and then sequenced using lage-scale parallel-pyrosequencing. Sequence data was combined with 16S rRNA and alkB gene C quantitative PCR data to measure the presence of various phylogenetic groups in fractions at different buoyant densities. Several families of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria that are directly involved in petroleum degradation incorporated the added nitrogen in contaminated soils, but it was the DNA of Sphingomonadaceae that was most enriched in 15N. Bacterial growth in uncontaminated soils was not stimulated by nutrient amendment. Our results suggest that nitrogen uptake efficiency differs between bacterial groups in contaminated soils. A better understanding of how groups of hydrocarbon-degraders contribute to the catabolism of petroleum will facilitate the design of more targeted bioremediation treatments. PMID:21498745

  2. Identification of nitrogen-incorporating bacteria in petroleum-contaminated arctic soils by using [15N]DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Bell, Terrence H; Yergeau, Etienne; Martineau, Christine; Juck, David; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2011-06-01

    Arctic soils are increasingly susceptible to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, as exploration and exploitation of the Arctic increase. Bioremediation in these soils is challenging due to logistical constraints and because soil temperatures only rise above 0°C for ∼2 months each year. Nitrogen is often added to contaminated soil in situ to stimulate the existing microbial community, but little is known about how the added nutrients are used by these microorganisms. Microbes vary widely in their ability to metabolize petroleum hydrocarbons, so the question becomes: which hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms most effectively use this added nitrogen for growth? Using [(15)N]DNA-based stable isotope probing, we determined which taxonomic groups most readily incorporated nitrogen from the monoammonium phosphate added to contaminated and uncontaminated soil in Canadian Forces Station-Alert, Nunavut, Canada. Fractions from each sample were amplified with bacterial 16S rRNA and alkane monooxygenase B (alkB) gene-specific primers and then sequenced using large-scale parallel-pyrosequencing. Sequence data was combined with 16S rRNA and alkB gene C quantitative PCR data to measure the presence of various phylogenetic groups in fractions at different buoyant densities. Several families of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria that are directly involved in petroleum degradation incorporated the added nitrogen in contaminated soils, but it was the DNA of Sphingomonadaceae that was most enriched in (15)N. Bacterial growth in uncontaminated soils was not stimulated by nutrient amendment. Our results suggest that nitrogen uptake efficiency differs between bacterial groups in contaminated soils. A better understanding of how groups of hydrocarbon-degraders contribute to the catabolism of petroleum will facilitate the design of more targeted bioremediation treatments.

  3. Nitrogen fixation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  4. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The

  5. Nitrogen Control in VIM Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, P. D.; Hawk, J. A.

    NETL has developed a design and control philosophy for the addition of nitrogen to austenitic and ferritic steels. The design approach uses CALPHAD as the centerpiece to predict the level to which nitrogen is soluble in both the melt and the solid. Applications of this technique have revealed regions of "exclusion" in which the alloy, while within specification limits of prescribed, cannot be made by conventional melt processing. Furthermore, other investigations have found that substantial retrograde solubility of nitrogen exists, which can become problematic during subsequent melt processing and/or other finishing operations such as welding. Additionally, the CALPHAD method has been used to adjust primary melt conditions. To that end, nitrogen additions have been made using chrome nitride, silicon nitride, high-nitrogen ferrochrome as well as nitrogen gas. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach will be discussed and NETL experience in this area will be summarized with respect to steel structure.

  6. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  7. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion.

  8. Preprototype nitrogen supply subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Hallick, T. M.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nitrogen supply subsystem based on the dissociation of hydrazine into a mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen is developed. The latter is separated to provide makeup nitrogen to control the composition of spacecraft atmospheres. Specific hardware developments resulted in the design and fabrication of a nominal 3.6 kg/d nitrogen generation module. The design integrates a hydrazine catalytic dissociator, three ammonia dissociation stages and four hydrogen separation stages into a 33 kg, 14 cu dm module. A technique was devised to alternate the ammonia dissociation and hydrogen separation stages to give high nitrogen purity in the end product stream. Tests show the product stream to contain less than 0.5 percent hydrogen and 10 parts per million ammonia. The design and development of a test stand for the nitrogen generation module and a series of tests which verified its operation and performance capability are described.

  9. Apollo 16 Press Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 spacecraft is scheduled for launch on Apr. 16, 1972 from Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida by the Saturn V launch vehicle. Crewmen are mission commander John W. Young, command module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II and lunar module pilot Charles M. Duke Jr. Objectives of the mission, to last up to 12 days, as outlined by NASA: to perform selenological inspection, survey and sampling of materials in a preselected region of Descartes using a lunar roving' vehicle; deploy and activate Apollo surface experiments; develop man's capability to work in the lunar environment; obtain photographs of candidate exploration sites; and toconduct inflight experiments and photographic tasks in lunar orbit. Following launch, the spacecraft will reach Earth Parking Orbit and remain in orbit for about two and one-half revolutions prior to Translunar Injection. Next, the Command and Service Module docks with the Lunar Module and the spacecraft "coasts" to the moon. In orbit around the moon, the Command and Service Module/Lunar Module combination will descend to within 50,000 feet of the lunar surface before undocking. The Lunar Module will continue to descend while the Command and Service Module returns to an orbit approximately 60 miles high. Stay time on the lunar surface is scheduled for approximately 73 hours. The ascent stage of the Lunar Module then lifts the astronauts back into lunar orbit where they will dock with the Command/Service Module. The Lunar Module is jettisoned and Transearth Injection follows. Just prior to reentry into the earth's atmosphere, the Service Module is jettisoned, and the astronauts in the Command Module splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The target point for end-of-mission splashdown is at 05 degrees 0 minutes north latitude and 158 degrees 40 minutes west longitude or approximately 985 nautical miles south of Honolulu, Hawaii. Splashdown is scheduled for Apr. 28, 1972 at 10:30 a.m. Hawaiian Standard Time (2:30 p.m. CST

  10. Nitrogen In Saturn's Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Baragiola, R. A.; Crary, F.; Young, D.

    2004-11-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions to the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to the models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and the CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  11. 16 CFR 1018.16 - Membership selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT... volunteer, that bear any relationship to the subject area of product safety or to membership on the advisory... qualified, staff members of the Commission, including the Advisory Committee Management Officer. (d)...

  12. 16 CFR 2.16 - Custodians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.16 Custodians. (a) Designation. The Commission shall... process in an investigation, a purpose of which is to determine whether any person may have violated...

  13. 16 CFR 2.16 - Custodians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.16 Custodians. (a) Designation. The Commission shall... process in an investigation, a purpose of which is to determine whether any person may have violated...

  14. 16 CFR 2.16 - Custodians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.16 Custodians. (a) Designation. The Commission shall... process in an investigation, a purpose of which is to determine whether any person may have violated...

  15. 16 CFR 2.16 - Custodians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.16 Custodians. (a) Designation. The Commission shall... process in an investigation, a purpose of which is to determine whether any person may have violated...

  16. 16 CFR 16.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... (1) Where a group provides some advice to the Commission but the group's advisory function is incidental and inseparable from other (e.g., operational or management) functions, the provisions of this... MANAGEMENT § 16.2 Definitions. For purposes of this part: (a) Administrator means the Administrator of the...

  17. Soil Nitrogen Response to Coupling Cover Crops with Manure Injection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Coupling winter small grain cover crops (CC) with manure (M) application may increase retention of manure nitrogen (N) in corn-soybean cropping systems. The objective of this research was to quantify soil N changes after application of liquid swine M (Sus scrofa L.) at target N rates of 112, 224, an...

  18. Elevated CO2 and Soil Nitrogen Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmockel, K.; Schlesinger, W.

    2002-12-01

    Although forests can be large terrestrial carbon sinks, soil fertility can limit carbon sequestration in response to increased atmospheric CO2. During five years of CO2 fertilization (ambient + 200ppm) at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, net primary production increased significantly by an average of 25% in treatment plots. Total nitrogen in the foliar canopy increased by 16%, requiring an additional 1.3 g N m-2yr-1 to be taken up from soils under elevated CO2. Mechanisms supporting increased nitrogen acquisition have not been identified. Here we report on biological N-fixation rates, using the acetylene reduction assay, in litter and mineral soil during three years of the CO2 enrichment experiment. Lack of a significant CO2 treatment effect on acetylene reduction indicates that carbon is not directly limiting biological N fixation. Nutrient addition experiments using a complete block design with glucose, Fe, Mo and P indicate biological N fixation is co-limited by molybdenum and carbon. These results suggest even if elevated atmospheric CO2 enhances below-ground carbon availability via root exudation, biological nitrogen fixation may not be stimulated due to micronutrient limitations. Assessment of future carbon sequestration by forest stands must consider limitations imposed by site fertility, including micronutrients.

  19. Estimating Nitrogen Loads, BMPs, and Target Loads Exceedance Risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wabash River (WR) watershed, IN, drains two-thirds of the state’s 92 counties and has primarily agricultural land use. The nutrient and sediment loads of the WR significantly increase loads of the Ohio River ultimately polluting the Gulf of Mexico. The objective of this study...

  20. Estimating Nitrogen Loads, BMPs, and Target Loads Exceedance Risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wabash River (WR) watershed, IN, drains two-thirds of the state’s 92 counties and has primarily agricultural land use. The nutrient and sediment loads of the WR significantly increase loads of the Ohio River ultimately polluting the Gulf of Mexico. The objective of this study...

  1. Effect of 21 different nitrogen sources on global gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Godard, Patrice; Urrestarazu, Antonio; Vissers, Stéphan; Kontos, Kevin; Bontempi, Gianluca; van Helden, Jacques; André, Bruno

    2007-04-01

    We compared the transcriptomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells growing under steady-state conditions on 21 unique sources of nitrogen. We found 506 genes differentially regulated by nitrogen and estimated the activation degrees of all identified nitrogen-responding transcriptional controls according to the nitrogen source. One main group of nitrogenous compounds supports fast growth and a highly active nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) control. Catabolism of these compounds typically yields carbon derivatives directly assimilable by a cell's metabolism. Another group of nitrogen compounds supports slower growth, is associated with excretion by cells of nonmetabolizable carbon compounds such as fusel oils, and is characterized by activation of the general control of amino acid biosynthesis (GAAC). Furthermore, NCR and GAAC appear interlinked, since expression of the GCN4 gene encoding the transcription factor that mediates GAAC is subject to NCR. We also observed that several transcriptional-regulation systems are active under a wider range of nitrogen supply conditions than anticipated. Other transcriptional-regulation systems acting on genes not involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., the pleiotropic-drug resistance and the unfolded-protein response systems, also respond to nitrogen. We have completed the lists of target genes of several nitrogen-sensitive regulons and have used sequence comparison tools to propose functions for about 20 orphan genes. Similar studies conducted for other nutrients should provide a more complete view of alternative metabolic pathways in yeast and contribute to the attribution of functions to many other orphan genes.

  2. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr−1 in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr−1 will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment. PMID:27445108

  3. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-07-22

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr(-1) in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr(-1) will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment.

  4. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr-1 in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr-1 will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment.

  5. Orchard nitrogen management: Which nitrogen source is best?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Suboptimal management of nitrogen fertility in pecan orchards leads to a loss of nutmeat yield and quality, but also a waste of natural resources and money. This article reviews several basic guiding principles useful to orchard managers when developing nitrogen management strategies, and determini...

  6. [Nitrogen non-point source pollution identification based on ArcSWAT in Changle River].

    PubMed

    Deng, Ou-Ping; Sun, Si-Yang; Lü, Jun

    2013-04-01

    The ArcSWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model was adopted for Non-point source (NPS) nitrogen pollution modeling and nitrogen source apportionment for the Changle River watershed, a typical agricultural watershed in Southeast China. Water quality and hydrological parameters were monitored, and the watershed natural conditions (including soil, climate, land use, etc) and pollution sources information were also investigated and collected for SWAT database. The ArcSWAT model was established in the Changle River after the calibrating and validating procedures of the model parameters. Based on the validated SWAT model, the contributions of different nitrogen sources to river TN loading were quantified, and spatial-temporal distributions of NPS nitrogen export to rivers were addressed. The results showed that in the Changle River watershed, Nitrogen fertilizer, nitrogen air deposition and nitrogen soil pool were the prominent pollution sources, which contributed 35%, 32% and 25% to the river TN loading, respectively. There were spatial-temporal variations in the critical sources for NPS TN export to the river. Natural sources, such as soil nitrogen pool and atmospheric nitrogen deposition, should be targeted as the critical sources for river TN pollution during the rainy seasons. Chemical nitrogen fertilizer application should be targeted as the critical sources for river TN pollution during the crop growing season. Chemical nitrogen fertilizer application, soil nitrogen pool and atmospheric nitrogen deposition were the main sources for TN exported from the garden plot, forest and residential land, respectively. However, they were the main sources for TN exported both from the upland and paddy field. These results revealed that NPS pollution controlling rules should focus on the spatio-temporal distribution of NPS pollution sources.

  7. Nitrogen dioxide exposure and urinary excretion of hydroxyproline and desmosine.

    PubMed

    Adgate, J L; Reid, H F; Morris, R; Helms, R W; Berg, R A; Hu, P C; Cheng, P W; Wang, O L; Muelenaer, P A; Collier, A M

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between average and peak personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide and urinary excretion of hydroxyproline and desmosine was investigated in a population of preschool children and their mothers. Weekly average personal nitrogen dioxide exposures for subjects who resided in homes with one or more potential nitrogen dioxide source (e.g., a kerosene space heater, gas stove, or tobacco smoke) ranged between 16.3 and 50.6 ppb (30.6 and 95.1 micrograms/m3) for children and between 16.9 and 44.1 ppb (12.8 and 82.9 micrograms/m3) for mothers. In these individuals, the hydroxyproline-to-creatinine and desmosine-to-creatinine ratios were unrelated to personal nitrogen dioxide exposure--even though continuous monitoring documented home nitrogen dioxide concentration peaks of 100-475 ppb lasting up to 100 h in duration. Significantly higher hydroxyproline-to-creatinine and desmosine-to-creatinine ratios were observed in children, compared with mothers (p < .001 and .003, respectively).

  8. Nitrogen dioxide exposure and urinary excretion of hydroxyproline and desmosine

    SciTech Connect

    Adgate, J.L.; Reid, H.F.; Morris, R.; Helms, R.W.; Berg, R.A.; Hu, P.C.; Cheng, P.W.; Wang, O.L.; Muelenaer, P.A.; Collier, A.M. )

    1992-09-01

    The relationship between average and peak personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide and urinary excretion of hydroxyproline and desmosine was investigated in a population of preschool children and their mothers. Weekly average personal nitrogen dioxide exposures for subjects who resided in homes with one or more potential nitrogen dioxide source (e.g., a kerosene space heater, gas stove, or tobacco smoke) ranged between 16.3 and 50.6 ppb (30.6 and 95.1 micrograms/m3) for children and between 16.9 and 44.1 ppb (12.8 and 82.9 micrograms/m3) for mothers. In these individuals, the hydroxyproline-to-creatinine and desmosine-to-creatinine ratios were unrelated to personal nitrogen dioxide exposure--even though continuous monitoring documented home nitrogen dioxide concentration peaks of 100-475 ppb lasting up to 100 h in duration. Significantly higher hydroxyproline-to-creatinine and desmosine-to-creatinine ratios were observed in children, compared with mothers (p < .001 and .003, respectively).

  9. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O.

    1991-05-01

    The radiative lifetimes of gaseous nitrogen dioxide excited by pulsed, tunable dye laser radiation are determined for excitation wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm. When the data are expressed in the form of zero-pressure radiative rate constants (k{sub 0}/s{sup {minus}1}), they fit a linear equation with respect to excitation energy. This fit predicts a radiative lifetime of 64 {mu}s for 400 nm excitation and 102 {mu}s at 750 nm. The effects of pressure, observation delay time, and wavelength range of the fluorescence detection apparatus are determined for both radiative lifetime and quenching constant. Dispersed fluorescence spectra from excited nitrogen dioxide are analyzed into three-parameter functions that approximate the corresponding excited state population distributions. Energy transfer from nitrogen dioxide excited at 532 nm and colliding with thirteen buffer gases is studied by this population deconvolution method. The energy removal rate constants increase in the order Ne < Ar < Kr < Xe < He < CO < N{sub 2} < O{sub 2} < NO < NO{sub 2} < CO{sub 2} < SF{sub 6} < SO{sub 2}. The energy transfer rate constant is strongly correlated with the number of degrees of freedom of the buffer molecule and with low vibrational frequencies of the buffer molecule. Population deconvolution from excited nitrogen dioxide fluorescence spectra is again employed to find energy removal rate constants for the NO {sub 2}{sup *}-NO{sub 2} collisions, excited by dye laser at 475.34, 435.04, and 400.00 nm. The energy transfer rate constant increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The energy removal rate constant between 400 and 532 nm excitation increases as the (3.6 {plus minus} 0.4) power of the excitation photon energy. 76 refs., 67 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  11. Investigating Nitrogen Pollution: Activities and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green Teacher, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Introduces activities on nitrogen, nitrogen pollution from school commuters, nitrogen response in native and introduced species, and nutrient loading models. These activities help students determine the nitrogen contribution from their parents' cars, test native plant responses to nitrogen, and experiment with the results of removing water from…

  12. Investigating Nitrogen Pollution: Activities and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green Teacher, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Introduces activities on nitrogen, nitrogen pollution from school commuters, nitrogen response in native and introduced species, and nutrient loading models. These activities help students determine the nitrogen contribution from their parents' cars, test native plant responses to nitrogen, and experiment with the results of removing water from…

  13. Institutional Nitrogen Footprint: A Case Study at Oregon State ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many institutions of higher education are measuring and consciously managing their impact on the environment, using metrics of energy use, recycling, alternative transportation or local foods. While the carbon footprint is a more widely known metric of sustainability, the nitrogen footprint is also an important measure of human environmental impact that comes from food, energy, transportation and waste demands of a university. Oregon State University is a large, western land-grant university that has supported a Sustainability Office for more than 10 years, and joined the institutional Nitrogen Footprint Network in 2015. This poster presentation will demonstrate the Nitrogen Footprint Tool calculations for a large land-grant institution using existing data. Goals to reduce nitrogen will be explored in relation to existing efforts within the university that aim to reduce their carbon footprint, support alternative transportation, reduce waste and increase local foods. EPA's Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program has been working with the University of Virginia to grow the Nitrogen Footprint Tool (NFT) network from one institution to over 16 institutions since 2014. This poster will present the nitrogen footprint results from Oregon State University. The university has been actively involved in sustainability efforts for many years, and this presentation will share how much of the data that OSU collects for their existing sustainability metrics

  14. Population dynamics of hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) across a nitrogen-amended landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.E.; Hellgren, E.C.; Jorgensen, E.E.; Tunnell, S.J.; Engle, David M.; Leslie, David M.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a mark-recapture experiment to examine the population dynamics of hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) in response to low-level nitrogen amendments (16.4 kg nitrogen/ha per year) and exclosure fencing in an old-field grassland. The experimental design consisted of sixteen 0.16-ha plots with 4 replicates of each treatment combination. We predicted that densities, reproductive success, movement probabilities, and survival rates of cotton rats would be greater on nitrogen-amended plots because of greater aboveground biomass and canopy cover. Population densities of cotton rats tended to be highest on fenced nitrogen plots, but densities on unfenced nitrogen plots were similar to those on control and fenced plots. We observed no distinct patterns in survival rates, reproductive success, or movement probabilities with regard to nitrogen treatments. However, survival rates and reproductive success tended to be higher for cotton rats on fenced plots than for those on unfenced plots and this was likely attributable to decreased predation on fenced plots. As low-level nitrogen amendments continue to be applied, we predict that survival, reproduction, and population-growth rates of cotton rats on control plots, especially fenced plots with no nitrogen amendment, will eventually exceed those on nitrogen-amended plots as a result of higher plant-species diversity, greater food availability, and better quality cover.

  15. Production and characterization of a nitrogen-implanted Fe standard to calibrate PIGE measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, C. L.; Silva, T. F.; Added, N.; Santos, H. C.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    Three calibration standard was produced by ion implantation of nitrogen in samples of Armco iron (99.7% iron). The samples was irradiated with nitrogen ion beams at several different energies (between 4 keV and 40 keV), and the ion doses were adjusted to obtain an uniform depth profile, using simulations with SRIM code. Two standards, one thick and other a foil (1.62mg/cm2), was irradiated at same time with total nominal dose of 6.6×10-16 atoms/cm2 distributed in a region of 100 nm in depth, with an average concentration of 9.0% nitrogen in iron. The third sample uses the same profile, but with a small dose, 1.1×10-16 atoms/cm2 and average concentration of 1.5% nitrogen. The characterization of the implanted samples was done using RBS and NRA techniques to quantification of nitrogen.

  16. Nitrogen Metabolism Genes from Temperate Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carolina; Schneider, Dominik; Lipka, Marko; Thürmer, Andrea; Böttcher, Michael E; Friedrich, Michael W

    2017-03-10

    In this study, we analysed metagenomes along with biogeochemical profiles from Skagerrak (SK) and Bothnian Bay (BB) sediments, to trace the prevailing nitrogen pathways. NO3(-) was present in the top 5 cm below the sediment-water interface at both sites. NH4(+) increased with depth below 5 cm where it overlapped with the NO3(-) zone. Steady-state modelling of NO3(-) and NH4(+) porewater profiles indicates zones of net nitrogen species transformations. Bacterial protease and hydratase genes appeared to make up the bulk of total ammonification genes. Genes involved in ammonia oxidation (amo, hao), denitrification (nir, nor), dissimilatory NO3(-) reduction to NH4(+) (nfr and otr) and in both of the latter two pathways (nar, nap) were also present. Results show ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are similarly abundant in both sediments. Also, denitrification genes appeared more abundant than DNRA genes. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the relative abundance of the nitrifying group Nitrosopumilales and other groups involved in nitrification and denitrification (Nitrobacter, Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Nitrosococcus and Nitrosomonas) appeared less abundant in SK sediments compared to BB sediments. Beggiatoa and Thiothrix 16S rRNA genes were also present, suggesting chemolithoautotrophic NO3(-) reduction to NO2(-) or NH4(+) as a possible pathway. Our results show the metabolic potential for ammonification, nitrification, DNRA and denitrification activities in North Sea and Baltic Sea sediments.

  17. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTION OF NITROGEN-CONTAINING STEROIDS.

    PubMed

    SMITH, R F; SHAY, D E; DOORENBOS, N J

    1963-06-01

    Smith, Rodney F. (University of Maryland, Baltimore), Donald E. Shay, and Norman J. Doorenbos. Antimicrobial action of nitrogen-containing steroids. J. Bacteriol. 85:1295-1299. 1963.-A new group of 16 synthetic nitrogen-containing steroids have been tested against a variety of microorganisms for antimicrobial properties. The gradient plate screening method, serial dilution, and dry weight techniques were used in the studies. The organisms tested consisted of 14 gram-negative bacteria, 10 gram-positive bacteria, 2 actinomycetes, 7 yeasts, and 8 molds. Inhibitory properties were found to be specific and potent in four compounds, with inhibitory concentrations as low as 0.37 mug/ml. Three of the active steroids are 4-aza cholestanes and one is a 4-nor-3,5-secocholestane amide. Sensitivity to the compounds was greatest in the gram-positive bacteria, followed by the yeasts and molds. The gram-negative bacteria were not inhibited. All 16 steroids interfered to some extent with pigmentation in Serratia marcescens but not with pigment production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a few instances, some of the molds were stimulated by the steroids at a concentration of 250 mug/ml.

  18. Coupling autotrophic denitrification with partial nitritation-anammox (PNA) for efficient total inorganic nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Sunayna; Wu, Sha; Goel, Ramesh

    2017-06-27

    The performance of and the microbial ecology in an integrated lab scale set up comprising of a PN/A bioreactor and an elemental sulfur-supported packed bed autotrophic denitrification (ESSAD) are reported. The PN/A reactor exhibited an average removal rate of 0.56±0.103kgNm(-3)d(-1), whereas the ESSAD reactor removed an average of 0.0018kg NO3(-)-Nm(-3)d(-1). The combined average removal rate was 0.6kgNm(-3)d(-1), yielding an overall total inorganic nitrogen efficiency of 97%. Based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the ESSAD reactor, the extracted Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) formed a clade with Thiobacillus denitrificans sp. indicating a common ancestral relationship. High throughput amplicon sequencing targeting V3 region of 16S rRNA gene for the biofilm in the ESSAD also revealed an abundance of the Thiobacillus genus. Additionally, 16s rRNA amplicon sequencing of the genomic DNA from the PN/A reactor reflected a dominance of the Planctomycetes phylum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Future trends in worldwide river nitrogen transport and related nitrous oxide emissions: a scenario analysis.

    PubMed

    Kroeze, C; Seitzinger, S P; Domingues, R

    2001-11-02

    We analyze possible future trends in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export by world rivers and associated emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O). Our scenarios either assume that current trends continue or that nitrogen (N) inputs to aquatic systems are reduced as a result of changes in agriculture practices and fuel combustion technologies. The results indicate that moderate changes in the human diet in North America and Europe, reducing worldwide fertilizer use by only 16%, relative to Business-as-Usual (BAU) levels, may reduce DIN export rates to the North Atlantic and European Seas by about one third and associated N2O emissions by 36 to 77%. We furthermore calculate that relatively large reductions in NOy deposition rates in Europe (of about 80%) may reduce DIN export by rivers by a moderate 8% or less, relative to BAU levels. The potential effect of reduced NOy deposition on riverine DIN export is moderate, because most N in European rivers stems from agriculture, and not from fuel combustion. Nevertheless, the calculated 9% reduction (relative to BAU) in DIN inputs to the North Sea as a potential side effect of air pollution control may help achieve the international policy targets for reduced N inputs to the North Sea.

  20. Supercritical Nitrogen Processing for the Purification of Reactive Porous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Stadie, Nicholas P.; Callini, Elsa; Mauron, Philippe; Borgschulte, Andreas; Züttel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction and drying methods are well established in numerous applications for the synthesis and processing of porous materials. Herein, nitrogen is presented as a novel supercritical drying fluid for specialized applications such as in the processing of reactive porous materials, where carbon dioxide and other fluids are not appropriate due to their higher chemical reactivity. Nitrogen exhibits similar physical properties in the near-critical region of its phase diagram as compared to carbon dioxide: a widely tunable density up to ~1 g ml-1, modest critical pressure (3.4 MPa), and small molecular diameter of ~3.6 Å. The key to achieving a high solvation power of nitrogen is to apply a processing temperature in the range of 80-150 K, where the density of nitrogen is an order of magnitude higher than at similar pressures near ambient temperature. The detailed solvation properties of nitrogen, and especially its selectivity, across a wide range of common target species of extraction still require further investigation. Herein we describe a protocol for the supercritical nitrogen processing of porous magnesium borohydride. PMID:26066492