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Sample records for nitrogen 20

  1. Ab initio study of nitrogen-multisubstituted neutral and positively charged C{sub 20} fullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Anita; Kumar, Ranjan

    2014-04-24

    Ab initio investigation of structural and electronic properties of Nitrogen doped fullerenes, obtained from C{sub 20} by replacing up to 10 C atoms with N atoms, are studied by means of first principals density functional theory calculations using numerical orbitals as basis sets. We have obtained the ground state structures for C{sub 20−n}N{sub n} for n=1-10. While substituting nitrogen atoms, we cannot substitute more than 9 nitrogen atoms. Nitrogen doping in C20 shows a significant change in density of states. For a better comparison with experimental measurements, we have also considered some positively charged ions and report the differences between properties of these ions and the corresponding neutral molecules.

  2. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  3. DSMC simulations of Mach 20 nitrogen flows about a 70 degree blunted cone and its wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, James N.; Dogra, Virendra K.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1993-08-01

    Numerical results obtained with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method are presented for Mach 20 nitrogen flow about a 70-deg blunted cone. The flow conditions simulated are those that can be obtained in existing low-density hypersonic wind tunnels. Three sets of flow conditions are simulated with freestream Knudsen numbers ranging from 0.03 to 0.001. The focus is to characterize the wake flow under rarefied conditions. This is accomplished by calculating the influence of rarefaction on wake structure along with the impact that an afterbody has on flow features. This data report presents extensive information concerning flowfield features and surface quantities.

  4. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  5. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 12 companies at 27 plants in 15 states in the United States during 2011. Sixty-one percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2011, U.S. producers operated at about 84 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Four companies — CF Industries Holdings Inc.; Koch Nitrogen Co.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 77 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity.

  6. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  7. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  8. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  9. Nitrogen isotopes of coral skeleton-bound organic matter and a 20-year record from Central Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Sigman, D. M.; Sinclair, D.; Sherrell, R. M.; Rafter, P. A.; Ren, H.; Cobb, K.; Weigand, A.; Oleynik, S.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a sensitive method for measuring nitrogen isotopes of coral skeleton-bound organic matter, requiring 5 mg of chemically cleaned coral skeleton powder and yielding a standard deviation for measured d15N of ~0.3%. This method allows for the generation of high-resolution d15N records of coral skeleton-bound organic matter, which we seek to advance as a proxy for the ocean nitrogen cycle in the past. A 20-year coral d15N record (1977-1997) from the Central Equatorial Pacific (Line Islands, Kiribati (2°N, 157°W)) yields an average d15N of 13%, which is similar to the d15N of mixed layer nitrate in this region but 6% higher than the subsurface nitrate being upwelled in this region. The 21 samples over this 20 year period yield a range of only 1.5% (12.5-14.0%), suggesting no substantial change of the mixed layer nitrogen pool over this period. There is some evidence for a lower d15N during El Nino events, but this requires testing by extension of the record and higher resolution sampling. If robust, this d15N decrease may reflect an increased reliance of corals on particulate organic nitrogen and recycled forms of nitrogen relative to nitrate during El Nino events, when mixed layer nitrate concentration declines in the Central Equatorial Pacific.

  10. Changes in nitrogen budget and potential risk to the environment over 20years (1990-2010) in the agroecosystems of the Haihe Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mengmeng; Zheng, Hua; Wu, Yingxia; Xiao, Yi; Du, Yihua; Xu, Weihua; Lu, Fei; Wang, Xiaoke; Ouyang, Zhiyun

    2015-02-01

    The nitrogen balance can serve as an indicator of the risk to the environment of nitrogen loss from agricultural land. To investigate the temporal and spatial changes in agricultural nitrogen application and its potential threat to the environment of the Haihe Basin in China, we used a database of county-level agricultural statistics to calculate agricultural nitrogen input, output, surplus intensity, and use efficiency. Chemical fertilizer nitrogen input increased by 51.7% from 1990 to 2000 and by 37.2% from 2000 to 2010, concomitant with increasing crop yields. Simultaneously, the nitrogen surplus intensity increased by 53.5% from 1990 to 2000 and by 16.5% from 2000 to 2010, presenting a continuously increased environmental risk. Nitrogen use efficiency decreased from 0.46 in 1990 to 0.42 in 2000 and remained constant at 0.42 in 2010, partly due to fertilizer composition and type improvement. This level indicates that more than half of nitrogen inputs are lost in agroecosystems. Our results suggest that although the improvement in fertilizer composition and types has partially offset the decrease in nitrogen use efficiency, the environmental risk has still increased gradually over the past 20 years, along with the increase in crop yields and nitrogen application. It is important to achieve a better nitrogen balance through more effective management to significantly reduce the environmental risk, decrease nitrogen surplus intensity, and increase nitrogen use efficiency without sacrificing crop yields.

  11. Vertical patterns of ecoenzyme activities in forest soils after 20 years of simulated nitrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstner, Stefan J.; Kloss, Stefanie; Keiblinger, Katharina M.; Schleppi, Patrick; Hagedorn, Frank; Gundersen, Per; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gerzabek, Martin H.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    The below-ground part of terrestrial carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles are controlled by soil microorganisms. In order to meet their energy and nutrient requirements, soil microbes produce enzymes which catalyze the release of smaller molecules from decomposing organic matter. Recent work has shown that the potential activities of commonly measured enzymes for C-, N-, and P-acquisition can be related to microbial demand of these elements and link stoichiometry of soil microbes and their resources. Regulation of enzyme production might therefore be an important mechanism for microbes to adapt to different resource regimes. To investigate links between ecoenzyme activities, soil depth and N availability we make use of two long-term experiments where N has been added to two temperate forest stands for over 20 years. At both sites Norway spruce is the dominating tree whereas other site characteristics like soil type, climate, parent material and morphology differ. Increased N deposition was simulated by regularly applying NH4NO3 in the range of 35 kg N ha-1 y-1 (Klosterhede, Denmark; since 1992) and 25 kg N ha-1 y-1 (Alptal, Switzerland; since 1995), respectively. We hypothesize that ecoenzyme activities will decline exponentially with depth reflecting well-established similar trends in organic matter and microbial biomass. However, when normalized to microbial biomass we further hypothesize that activities will not change or even increase down the soil profile. Concerning microbial nutrient limitation, we expect to see a shift from N- to C-limitation with depth which should be reflected in increasing ratios of C- to N-acquiring enzymes. Preliminary results suggest that activity of hydrolytic enzymes generally decreases with depth, although this drop in activity is not so pronounced when normalized to microbial biomass. Oxidative enzymes, on the other hand, do not follow this pattern, often showing increased activities with depth. We further see site

  12. ENHANCED NITROGEN IN MORPHOLOGICALLY DISTURBED BLUE COMPACT GALAXIES AT 0.20 < z < 0.35: PROBING GALAXY MERGING FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Jiwon; Rey, Soo-Chang; Yeom, Bum-Suk; Yi, Wonhyeong; Sung, Eon-Chang; Kyeong, Jaemann; Humphrey, Andrew E-mail: screy@cnu.ac.kr

    2013-04-10

    We present a study of correlations between the elemental abundances and galaxy morphologies of 91 blue compact galaxies (BCGs) at z = 0.20-0.35 with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 data. We classify the morphologies of the galaxies as either ''disturbed'' or ''undisturbed'' by visual inspection of the SDSS images, and using the Gini coefficient and M{sub 20}. We derive oxygen and nitrogen abundances using the T{sub e} method. We find that a substantial fraction of BCGs with disturbed morphologies, indicative of merger remnants, show relatively high N/O and low O/H abundance ratios. The majority of the disturbed BCGs exhibit higher N/O values at a given O/H value compared to the morphologically undisturbed galaxies, implying more efficient nitrogen enrichment in disturbed BCGs. We detect Wolf-Rayet (WR) features in only a handful of the disturbed BCGs, which appears to contradict the idea that WR stars are responsible for high nitrogen abundance. Combining these results with Galaxy Evolution Explorer GR6 ultraviolet (UV) data, we find that the majority of the disturbed BCGs show systematically lower values of the H{alpha} to near-UV star formation rate ratio. The equivalent width of the H{beta} emission line is also systematically lower in the disturbed BCGs. Based on these results, we infer that disturbed BCGs have undergone star formation over relatively longer timescales, resulting in a more continuous enrichment of nitrogen. We suggest that this correlation between morphology and chemical abundances in BCGs is due to a difference in their recent star formation histories.

  13. Shifts in microbial biomass indicators track changes in carbon and nitrogen cycles during tree plantation development to 20 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, A. D.; Maillard, E.; Paré, D.

    2010-12-01

    In the context increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration, there is a growing interest for using afforestation and reforestation to claim emissions reductions. Establishment of plantations necessarily involves silvicultural treatments that affect environmental conditions and hence soil microbial communities, influencing carbon and nitrogen cycles and potential soil carbon sequestration. We have monitored soil microbial indicators during a twenty year period of ecosystem recovery from disturbance at the Petawawa Research Forest (Ontario, Canada), in plantations of white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and white spruce (Picea glauca). The first ten years was marked by important changes in Cmic:Corg and Cmic:Nmic, related to vegetation control that provoked modification of bacteria:fungi ratios, accelerated N cycling and loss, as well as shifts in vegetation composition that are still quite marked after twenty years. After another 10 years (at 20 yrs) we note a closing of the N cycle and again important shifts in microbial indicators. In the humus, biomass C has recovered over time, but the Cmic:Nmic is decreasing constantly from 4 to 20 years, with increases in the Nmic pool; in the surface mineral soil, this increase in the Nmic pool is even more striking. Plots treated to control vegetation are dominated by conifers versus deciduous vegetation after twenty years, provoking a higher Cmic:Nmic in the humus layer. We attempt to interpret differences in the labile carbon fraction in the humus and mineral soil at twenty years in light of these observed dynamics.

  14. Technical note: Effect of determining baseline plasma urea nitrogen concentrations on subsequent posttreatment plasma urea nitrogen concentrations in 20- to 50-kilogram pigs.

    PubMed

    Waguespack, A M; Powell, S; Roux, M L; Frugé, E D; Bidner, T D; Payne, R L; Southern, L L

    2011-12-01

    Plasma urea N (PUN) has been used as an indicator of AA requirements and efficiency of AA utilization in swine. However, PUN concentrations vary among a population of pigs, even a population with a close range of BW and fed the same diet. Thus, pretreatment or baseline PUN concentrations are used as a covariate to reduce variation of posttreatment PUN. However, this procedure increases experimental costs and stress to the pigs. Data from 14 experiments (26 to 28 d in duration) conducted using PUN as a response variable were compiled into 1 data set. Each experiment had 4 to 6 treatments. The purpose of this technical report was to summarize the effect of determining pretreatment baseline PUN concentrations on subsequent posttreatment PUN concentrations in 20- to 50-kg pigs. In all experiments, pigs were fed corn- and soybean meal-based diets and low-CP diets with various AA additions; pigs were assigned to dietary treatments in a randomized complete block design with a minimum of 4 replicates of 3 to 5 pigs each. Before the start of each experiment, all pigs were fed a common diet for a minimum of 3 d. Blood samples were collected from each pig before allotment to dietary treatments (d 0) and at the end of each experiment. The baseline (d 0) PUN was analyzed as a covariate for posttreatment PUN. Data from each experiment were analyzed without and with baseline PUN in the statistical model. In all experiments combined, there were 768 possible treatment comparisons. The covariate baseline PUN was statistically significant (P < 0.10) in 9 of 14 experiments. However, only 8 treatment differences changed statistical significance as a result of analyzing the data with baseline PUN as a covariate. These 8 treatment differences were in 3 experiments. These results indicate that it is not always necessary to determine baseline PUN concentrations when feeding diets with large differences in AA content.

  15. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 107 erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25–30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 1017/cm2.

  16. Evidence from firn air for recent decreases in non-methane hydrocarbons and a 20th century increase in nitrogen oxides in the northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worton, David R.; Sturges, William T.; Reeves, Claire E.; Newland, Mike J.; Penkett, Stuart A.; Atlas, Elliot; Stroud, Verity; Johnson, Kristen; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Solberg, Sverre; Schwander, Jakob; Barnola, Jean-Marc

    2012-07-01

    The atmospheric evolution of eight non-methane hydrocarbons (ethane, acetylene, propane, n-butane, isobutane, n-pentane, isopentane and benzene) and five alkyl nitrates (2-propyl, 2-butyl, 3-methyl-2-butyl and the sum of 2+3-pentyl nitrates) are reconstructed for the latter half of the 20th century based on Arctic firn air measurements. The reconstructed trends of the non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) show increasing concentrations from 1950 to a maximum in 1980 before declining towards the end of last century. These observations provide direct evidence that NMHCs in the northern hemisphere have declined substantially during the period 1980-2001. Benzene concentrations show a smaller increase between 1950 and 1980 than the other NMHCs indicating that additional sources of benzene, other than fossil fuel combustion, were likely important contributors to the benzene budget prior to and during this period. The declining benzene concentrations from 1980 to 2001 would suggest that biomass burning is unlikely to be important in the benzene budget as biomass burning emissions were reportedly increasing over the same period. Methyl and ethyl nitrate show growth patterns in the firn that suggested perturbation by in-situ production from an unidentified mechanism. However, the higher alkyl nitrates show evidence for increasing concentrations from 1950 to maxima in the mid 1990s before decreasing slightly toward the end of the last century. The differing atmospheric evolution of the alkyl nitrates relative to their parent hydrocarbons indicate an increase in their production efficiency per hydrocarbon molecule. Using a steady state analysis of hydrocarbon oxidation and alkyl nitrate production and loss we show that reactive nitrogen oxide (NOx) concentrations in the northern hemisphere have likely increased considerably between 1950 and 2001.

  17. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-05-05

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 10(7) erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25-30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 10(17)/cm(2).

  18. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F.; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 107 erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25–30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 1017/cm2. PMID:27145983

  19. Synthesis of Fe16N2 compound Free-Standing Foils with 20 MGOe Magnetic Energy Product by Nitrogen Ion-Implantation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Mehedi, Md Al; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Allard, Lawrence F; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Rare-earth-free magnets are highly demanded by clean and renewable energy industries because of the supply constraints and environmental issues. A promising permanent magnet should possess high remanent magnetic flux density (Br), large coercivity (Hc) and hence large maximum magnetic energy product ((BH)max). Fe16N2 has been emerging as one of promising candidates because of the redundancy of Fe and N on the earth, its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (Ku > 1.0 × 10(7) erg/cc), and large saturation magnetization (4πMs > 2.4 T). However, there is no report on the formation of Fe16N2 magnet with high Br and large Hc in bulk format before. In this paper, we successfully synthesize free-standing Fe16N2 foils with a coercivity of up to 1910 Oe and a magnetic energy product of up to 20 MGOe at room temperature. Nitrogen ion implantation is used as an alternative nitriding approach with the benefit of tunable implantation energy and fluence. An integrated synthesis technique is developed, including a direct foil-substrate bonding step, an ion implantation step and a two-step post-annealing process. With the tunable capability of the ion implantation fluence and energy, a microstructure with grain size 25-30 nm is constructed on the FeN foil sample with the implantation fluence of 5 × 10(17)/cm(2). PMID:27145983

  20. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions and stocks of soil carbon and nitrogen from a 20-year fertilised wheat-maize intercropping system: A model approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xubo; Xu, Minggang; Liu, Jian; Sun, Nan; Wang, Boren; Wu, Lianhai

    2016-02-01

    Accurate modelling of agricultural management impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and the cycling of carbon and nitrogen is complicated due to interactions between various processes and the disturbance caused by field management. In this study, a process-based model, the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum System (SPACSYS), was used to simulate the effects of different fertilisation regimes on crop yields, the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (SN) stocks from 1990 to 2010, and soil CO2 (2007-2010) and N2O (2007-2008) emissions based on a long-term fertilisation experiment with a winter-wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) and summer-maize (Zea mays L.) intercropping system in Eutric Cambisol (FAO) soil in southern China. Three fertilisation treatments were 1) unfertilised (Control), 2) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and 3) NPK plus pig manure (NPKM). Statistical analyses indicated that the SPACSYS model can reasonably simulate the yields of wheat and maize, the evolution of SOC and SN stocks and soil CO2 and N2O emissions. The simulations showed that the NPKM treatment had the highest values of crop yields, SOC and SN stocks, and soil CO2 and N2O emissions were the lowest from the Control treatment. Furthermore, the simulated results showed that manure amendment along with chemical fertiliser applications led to both C (1017 ± 470 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1)) and N gains (91.7 ± 15.1 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) in the plant-soil system, while the Control treatment caused a slight loss in C and N. In conclusion, the SPACSYS model can accurately simulate the processes of C and N as affected by various fertilisation treatments in the red soil. Furthermore, application of chemical fertilisers plus manure could be a suitable management for ensuring crop yield and sustaining soil fertility in the red soil region, but the ratio of chemical fertilisers to manure should be optimized to reduce C and N losses to the environment. PMID:26615226

  2. Greenhouse gas emissions and stocks of soil carbon and nitrogen from a 20-year fertilised wheat-maize intercropping system: A model approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xubo; Xu, Minggang; Liu, Jian; Sun, Nan; Wang, Boren; Wu, Lianhai

    2016-02-01

    Accurate modelling of agricultural management impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and the cycling of carbon and nitrogen is complicated due to interactions between various processes and the disturbance caused by field management. In this study, a process-based model, the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum System (SPACSYS), was used to simulate the effects of different fertilisation regimes on crop yields, the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (SN) stocks from 1990 to 2010, and soil CO2 (2007-2010) and N2O (2007-2008) emissions based on a long-term fertilisation experiment with a winter-wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) and summer-maize (Zea mays L.) intercropping system in Eutric Cambisol (FAO) soil in southern China. Three fertilisation treatments were 1) unfertilised (Control), 2) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and 3) NPK plus pig manure (NPKM). Statistical analyses indicated that the SPACSYS model can reasonably simulate the yields of wheat and maize, the evolution of SOC and SN stocks and soil CO2 and N2O emissions. The simulations showed that the NPKM treatment had the highest values of crop yields, SOC and SN stocks, and soil CO2 and N2O emissions were the lowest from the Control treatment. Furthermore, the simulated results showed that manure amendment along with chemical fertiliser applications led to both C (1017 ± 470 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1)) and N gains (91.7 ± 15.1 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) in the plant-soil system, while the Control treatment caused a slight loss in C and N. In conclusion, the SPACSYS model can accurately simulate the processes of C and N as affected by various fertilisation treatments in the red soil. Furthermore, application of chemical fertilisers plus manure could be a suitable management for ensuring crop yield and sustaining soil fertility in the red soil region, but the ratio of chemical fertilisers to manure should be optimized to reduce C and N losses to the environment.

  3. Ammonium stability and nitrogen isotope fractionations for NH4+-NH3(aq)-NH3(gas) systems at 20-70 °C and pH of 2-13: Applications to habitability and nitrogen cycling in low-temperature hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Li, Hong; Wortmann, Ulrich G.; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges

    2012-05-01

    Ammonium/ammonia is an essential nutrient and energy source to support life in oceanic and terrestrial hydrothermal systems. Thus the stability of ammonium is crucial to determine the habitability or ecological structure in hydrothermal environments, but still not well understood. To date, the lack of constraints on nitrogen isotope fractionations between ammonium and ammonia has limited the application of nitrogen isotopes to trace (bio)geochemical processes in such environments. In this study, we carried out laboratory experiments to (1) examine the stability of ammonium in an ammonium sulfate solution under temperature conditions from 20 to 70 °C and pH from 2.1 to 12.6 and (2) determine nitrogen isotope fractionation between ammonium and ammonia. Our experimental results show that ammonium is stable under the experimental temperatures when pH is less than 6. In experiments with starting pH greater than 8, significant ammonium was lost as a result of dissociation of ammonium and degassing of ammonia product. Nitrogen concentrations in the fluids decreased by more than 50% in the first two hours, indicating extremely fast effusion rates of ammonia. This implies that ammonium at high pH fluids (e.g., Lost City Hydrothermal Vents, Oman ophiolite hyperalkaline springs) may not be stable. Habitable environments may be more favorable at the leading edge of a pH gradient toward more acidic conditions, where the fluid can efficiently trap any ammonia transferred from a high pH vent. Although modeling shows that high temperature, low pH hydrothermal vents (e.g., Rainbow hydrothermal vent) may have the capability to retain ammonium, their high temperatures may limit habitability. The habitable zone associated with such a hydrothermal vent is likely at the lower front of a temperature gradient. In contrast, modeling of ammonium in deep terrestrial systems, suggests that saline fracture waters in crystalline rocks such as described in the Canadian Shield and in the

  4. [Fe(III)(F(20)-tpp)Cl] is an effective catalyst for nitrene transfer reactions and amination of saturated hydrocarbons with sulfonyl and aryl azides as nitrogen source under thermal and microwave-assisted conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yungen; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-09-10

    [Fe(III)(F(20)-tpp)Cl] (F(20)-tpp=meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrinato dianion) is an effective catalyst for imido/nitrene insertion reactions using sulfonyl and aryl azides as nitrogen source. Under thermal conditions, aziridination of aryl and alkyl alkenes (16 examples, 60-95 % yields), sulfimidation of sulfides (11 examples, 76-96 % yields), allylic amidation/amination of α-methylstyrenes (15 examples, 68-83 % yields), and amination of saturated C--H bonds including that of cycloalkanes and adamantane (eight examples, 64-80 % yields) can be accomplished by using 2 mol % [Fe(III)(F(20)-tpp)Cl] as catalyst. Under microwave irradiation conditions, the reaction time of aziridination (four examples), allylic amination (five examples), sulfimidation (two examples), and amination of saturated C--H bonds (three examples) can be reduced by up to 16-fold (24-48 versus 1.5-6 h) without significantly affecting the product yield and substrate conversion.

  5. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  6. Development of cooling system for 66/6.9kV-20MVA REBCO superconducting transformers with Ne turbo-Brayton refrigerator and subcooled liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwakuma, M.; Adachi, K.; Yun, K.; Yoshida, K.; Sato, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Umeno, T.; Konno, M.; Hayashi, H.; Eguchi, T.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We developed a turbo-Brayton refrigerator with Ne gas as a working fluid for a 3 ϕ- 66/6.9kV-2MVA superconducting transformer with coated conductors which was bath-cooled with subcooled LN2. The two-stage compressor and expansion turbine had non-contact magnetic bearings for a long maintenance interval. In the future, we intend to directly install a heat exchanger into the Glass-Fiber-Reinforced-Plastics cryostat of a transformer and make a heat exchange between the working fluid gas and subcooled LN2. In this paper we investigate the behaviour of subcooled LN2 in a test cryostat, in which heater coils were arranged side by side with a flat plate finned-tube heat exchanger. Here a He turbo-Brayton refrigerator was used as a substitute for a Ne turbo-Brayton one. The pressure at the surface of LN2 in the cryostat was one atmosphere. Just under the LN2 surface, a stationary layer of LN2 was created over the depth of 20 cm and temperature dropped from 77 K to 65 K with depth while, in the lower level than that, a natural convection flow of LN2 was formed and temperature was almost uniform over 1 m depth. The boundary plane between the stationary layer and the natural convection region was visible.

  7. Nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; Mccormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  8. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  9. Preprototype nitrogen supply subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Fort, J. H.; Schubert, F. H.

    1982-01-01

    The design and development of a test stand for the Nitrogen Generation Module (NGM) and a series of tests which verified its operation and performance capability are described. Over 900 hours of parametric testing were achieved. The results from this testing were then used to design an advanced NGM and a self contained, preprototype Nitrogen Supply Subsystem. The NGM consists of three major components: nitrogen generation module, pressure controller and hydrazine storage tank and ancillary components. The most important improvement is the elimination of all sealing surfaces, achieved with a total welded or brazed construction. Additionally, performance was improved by increasing hydrogen separating capability by 20% with no increase in overall packaging size.

  10. Nitrogen metabolism in haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Pire, Carmen; Zafrilla, Basilio; Richardson, David J

    2008-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle (N-cycle), principally supported by prokaryotes, involves different redox reactions mainly focused on assimilatory purposes or respiratory processes for energy conservation. As the N-cycle has important environmental implications, this biogeochemical cycle has become a major research topic during the last few years. However, although N-cycle metabolic pathways have been studied extensively in Bacteria or Eukarya, relatively little is known in the Archaea. Halophilic Archaea are the predominant microorganisms in hot and hypersaline environments such as salted lakes, hot springs or salted ponds. Consequently, the denitrifying haloarchaea that sustain the nitrogen cycle under these conditions have emerged as an important target for research aimed at understanding microbial life in these extreme environments. The haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei was isolated 20 years ago from Santa Pola salted ponds (Alicante, Spain). It was described as a denitrifier and it is also able to grow using NO3-, NO2- or NH4+ as inorganic nitrogen sources. This review summarizes the advances that have been made in understanding the N-cycle in halophilic archaea using Hfx mediterranei as a haloarchaeal model. The results obtained show that this microorganism could be very attractive for bioremediation applications in those areas where high salt, nitrate and nitrite concentrations are found in ground waters and soils. PMID:18593475

  11. Ice sheets and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Eric W

    2013-07-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2-3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas.

  12. Ice sheets and nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land–atmosphere and ocean–atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2–3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas. PMID:23713125

  13. Potato Nitrogen and Water Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tuber yields and quality are extremely sensitive to adequate availability of water and nitrogen, particularly at some growth stages. Irrigation to replenish 70% of evapotranspiration (ET) as compared to that of full ET, resulted in about 18% reduction in tuber yield. However, 20% deficit irri...

  14. Virtual Nitrogen Losses from Organic Food Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattell Noll, L.; Galloway, J. N.; Leach, A. M.; Seufert, V.; Atwell, B.; Shade, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) is necessary for crop and animal production, but when it is lost to the environment, it creates a cascade of detrimental environmental impacts. The nitrogen challenge is to maximize the food production benefits of Nr, while minimizing losses to the environment. The first nitrogen footprint tool was created in 2012 to help consumers learn about the Nr losses to the environment that result from an individual's lifestyle choices. The nitrogen lost during food production was estimated with virtual nitrogen factors (VNFs) that quantify the amount of nitrogen lost to the environment per unit nitrogen consumed. Alternative agricultural systems, such as USDA certified organic farms, utilize practices that diverge from conventional production. In order to evaluate the potential sustainability of these alternative agricultural systems, our team calculated VNFs that reflect organic production. Initial data indicate that VNFs for organic grains and organic starchy roots are comparable to, but slightly higher than conventional (+10% and +20% respectively). In contrast, the VNF for organic vegetables is significantly higher (+90%) and the VNF for organic legumes is significantly lower (-90%). Initial data on organic meat production shows that organic poultry and organic pigmeat are comparable to conventional production (both <5% difference), but that the organic beef VNF is significantly higher (+30%). These data show that in some cases organic and conventional production are comparable in terms of nitrogen efficiency. However, since conventional production relies heavily on the creation of new reactive nitrogen (Haber-Bosch, biological nitrogen fixation) and organic production primarily utilizes already existing reactive nitrogen (manure, crop residue, compost), the data also show that organic production contributes less new reactive nitrogen to the environment than conventional production (approximately 70% less). Therefore, we conclude that on a local

  15. Nitrogen removal from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

  16. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    synthesis of ammonia, NH{sub 3}, from its elements, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, via the venerable Haber-Bosch process is one of the most significant technological achievements of the past century. Our research program seeks to discover new transition metal reagents and catalysts to disrupt the strong N {triple_bond} N bond in N{sub 2} and create new, fundamental chemical linkages for the construction of molecules with application as fuels, fertilizers and fine chemicals. With DOE support, our group has discovered a mild method for ammonia synthesis in solution as well as new methods for the construction of nitrogen-carbon bonds directly from N{sub 2}. Ideally these achievements will evolve into more efficient nitrogen fixation schemes that circumvent the high energy demands of industrial ammonia synthesis. Industrially, atmospheric nitrogen enters the synthetic cycle by the well-established Haber-Bosch process whereby N{sub 2} is hydrogenated to ammonia at high temperature and pressure. The commercialization of this reaction represents one of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century as Haber-Bosch ammonia is responsible for supporting approximately 50% of the world's population and serves as the source of half of the nitrogen in the human body. The extreme reaction conditions required for an economical process have significant energy consequences, consuming 1% of the world's energy supply mostly in the form of pollution-intensive coal. Moreover, industrial H{sub 2} synthesis via the water gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of methane is fossil fuel intensive and produces CO{sub 2} as a byproduct. New synthetic methods that promote this thermodynamically favored transformation ({Delta}G{sup o} = -4.1 kcal/mol) under milder conditions or completely obviate it are therefore desirable. Most nitrogen-containing organic molecules are derived from ammonia (and hence rely on the Haber-Bosch and H{sub 2} synthesis processes) and direct synthesis from

  17. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Agnew, Stephen F.; Christensen, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  18. [Influence of water deficit and supplemental irrigation on nitrogen uptake by winter wheat and nitrogen residual in soil].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Wang, Bing; Li, Shengxiu

    2004-08-01

    Pot experiment in greenhouse showed that water deficit at all growth stages and supplemental irrigation at tillering stage significantly decreased the nitrogen uptake by winter wheat and increased the mineral N residual (79.8-113.7 mg x kg(-1)) in soil. Supplemental irrigation at over-wintering, jointing or filling stage significantly increased the nitrogen uptake by plant and decreased the nitrogen residual (47.2-60.3 mg x kg(-1)) in soil. But, the increase of nitrogen uptake caused by supplemental irrigation did not always mean a high magnitude of efficient use of nitrogen by plants. Supplemental irrigation at over-wintering stage didn't induce any significant change in nitrogen content of grain, irrigation at filling stage increased the nitrogen content by 20.9%, and doing this at jointing stage decreased the nitrogen content by 19.6%, as compared to the control.

  19. Nitrogen spark denoxer

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Henry K.; Novick, Vincent J.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.

    1997-01-01

    A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

  20. Flameless nitrogen skid unit

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, S.B.; John, J.C.; Mints, D.K.

    1984-03-27

    A flameless nitrogen vaporizing unit includes a first internal combustion engine driving a nitrogen pump through a transmission. A second internal combustion engine drives three hydraulic oil pumps against a variable back pressure so that a variable load may be imposed upon the second engine. Liquid nitrogen is pumped from the nitrogen pump driven by the first engine into a first heat exchanger where heat is transferred from exhaust gases from the first and second internal combustion engines to the liquid nitrogen to cause the nitrogen to be transformed into a gaseous state. The gaseous nitrogen then flows into a second heat exchanger where it is superheated by an engine coolant fluid to heat the gaseous nitrogen to essentially an ambient temperature. The superheated nitrogen is then injected into the well. The engine coolant fluid flows in a coolant circulation system. Heat is transferred to the coolant fluid directly from the internal combustion engine. Heat is also provided to the coolant fluid from lubrication oil pumped by the three pumps attached to the second internal combustion engine. The coolant fluid circulating system includes a comingling chamber for comingling warmer coolant fluid flowing from the internal combustion engines to the second heat exchanger with cooler coolant fluids flowing from the second heat exchanger to the internal combustion engines. Methods of vaporizing nitrogen are also disclosed.

  1. Albert Behnke: nitrogen narcosis.

    PubMed

    Grover, Casey A; Grover, David H

    2014-02-01

    As early as 1826, divers diving to great depths noted that descent often resulted in a phenomenon of intoxication and euphoria. In 1935, Albert Behnke discovered nitrogen as the cause of this clinical syndrome, a condition now known as nitrogen narcosis. Nitrogen narcosis consists of the development of euphoria, a false sense of security, and impaired judgment upon underwater descent using compressed air below 3-4 atmospheres (99 to 132 feet). At greater depths, symptoms can progress to loss of consciousness. The syndrome remains relatively unchanged in modern diving when compressed air is used. Behnke's use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures subsequent to his discovery during the 1939 rescue of the wrecked submarine USS Squalus pioneered the use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures, which are used by modern divers when working at great depth to avoid the effects of nitrogen narcosis.

  2. Nitrogen In Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M. D.; Baragiola, R.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Crary, F.; Young, D. T.

    2004-12-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions in the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to our models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  3. Climate change impacts of US reactive nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Robert W; Davidson, Eric A; Goodale, Christine L; Greaver, Tara L; Herrick, Jeffrey D; Liu, Lingli

    2012-05-15

    Fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer application in the United States have substantially altered the nitrogen cycle, with serious effects on climate change. The climate effects can be short-lived, by impacting the chemistry of the atmosphere, or long-lived, by altering ecosystem greenhouse gas fluxes. Here we develop a coherent framework for assessing the climate change impacts of US reactive nitrogen emissions, including oxides of nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide (N(2)O). We use the global temperature potential (GTP), calculated at 20 and 100 y, in units of CO(2) equivalents (CO(2)e), as a common metric. The largest cooling effects are due to combustion sources of oxides of nitrogen altering tropospheric ozone and methane concentrations and enhancing carbon sequestration in forests. The combined cooling effects are estimated at -290 to -510 Tg CO(2)e on a GTP(20) basis. However, these effects are largely short-lived. On a GTP(100) basis, combustion contributes just -16 to -95 Tg CO(2)e. Agriculture contributes to warming on both the 20-y and 100-y timescales, primarily through N(2)O emissions from soils. Under current conditions, these warming and cooling effects partially offset each other. However, recent trends show decreasing emissions from combustion sources. To prevent warming from US reactive nitrogen, reductions in agricultural N(2)O emissions are needed. Substantial progress toward this goal is possible using current technology. Without such actions, even greater CO(2) emission reductions will be required to avoid dangerous climate change.

  4. [Purification effects on nitrogen under different concentration and nitrogen conformation transform principles by Vallisneria spiraslis L].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-fang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Xiao-rong; Xue, Yan; Yang, Ai

    2008-04-01

    Wet vegetation performed different physiological actions under different pollution loads, thus inducing different purification effects on pollutants. Since water of various rivers, lakes and ponds are polluted at different extents and purification levels currently in China, a typical submerged vegetation, Vallisneria spiraslis L. is selected to study the purification effects on total nitrogen(TN) under different purification levels, which is widely distributed in rivers and lakes of Yangtz middle and down stream. The targets of this paper are to determine the nitrogen degradation impacts of Vallisneria spiraslis L., and nitrogen accumulation and distribution in leaf and root rules, and inorganic nitrogen conformation transformation characters under 7 nitrogen loads during 7 to 22 Sept., 2006. The 7 nitrogen loads are 1.0 mg/L, 5.0 mg/L, 10.0 mg/L, 20.0 mg/L, 40.0 mg/L, 60.0 mg/L and 80.0 mg/L. The experiment data show that Vallisneria spiraslis L. have significant effects on nitrogen purification while the TN concentration equal to and less than 60 mg/L, and the contribution principles of vegetation are similar among the 6 loads. Whereas, when the TN load bigger than 80.0 mg/L, Vallisneria spiraslis L. have no obvious contribution on nitrogen purification. Meanwhile, the nitrogen accumulation principles in the leaf and root of Vallisneria spiraslis L. is interrelated to the TN load. However, its distribution ratio in leaf to root is unrelated with TN load. Furthermore, the conformation of inorganic nitrogen transform characters changed with the TN load increasing. It is concluded that ammonia concentration decreased rapidly while the nitrogen load less than 20.0 mg/L, and the ammonia concentration ratio in the inorganic nitrogen increased remarkably with the nitrogen load increasing. Results indicate Vallisneria spiraslis L. have different purification contribution extents which can be benefit for nitrogen removal in different eutrophicated water and wet vegetation

  5. Nitrogen trading tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  6. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  7. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  8. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  9. 40 CFR 91.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... check, and calibration test procedures specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subparts C and D, may be used in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... Provisions § 91.318 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the chemiluminescent oxides...

  10. 40 CFR 89.321 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... periodic interference, system check, and calibration test procedures specified in 40 CFR part 1065 may be... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.321 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. (a) The...

  11. 40 CFR 90.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and calibration test procedures specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart D, may be used in lieu of the... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.318 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate...

  12. 40 CFR 90.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and calibration test procedures specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart D, may be used in lieu of the... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.318 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate...

  13. 40 CFR 90.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and calibration test procedures specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart D, may be used in lieu of the... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.318 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate...

  14. 40 CFR 91.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... check, and calibration test procedures specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subparts C and D, may be used in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... Provisions § 91.318 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the chemiluminescent oxides...

  15. 40 CFR 89.321 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... periodic interference, system check, and calibration test procedures specified in 40 CFR part 1065 may be... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.321 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. (a) The...

  16. 40 CFR 91.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... check, and calibration test procedures specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subparts C and D, may be used in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration... Provisions § 91.318 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the chemiluminescent oxides...

  17. 40 CFR 89.321 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... periodic interference, system check, and calibration test procedures specified in 40 CFR part 1065 may be... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.321 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. (a) The...

  18. NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Lokhandwala; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; Z. He; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans; A. Morisato; K. Amo; A. DaCosta; R.W. Baker; R. Olsen; H. Hassani; T. Rathkamp

    1999-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process for the denitrogenation of natural gas. Large proven reserves in the Lower-48 states cannot be produced because of the presence of nitrogen. To exploit these reserves, cost-effective, simple technology able to reduce the nitrogen content of the gas to 4-5% is required. Technology applicable to treatment of small gas streams (below 10 MMscfd) is particularly needed. In this project membranes that selectively permeate methane and reject nitrogen in the gas were developed. Preliminary calculations show that a membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 3 to 5 is required to make the process economically viable. A number of polymer materials likely to have the required selectivities were evaluated as composite membranes. Polyacetylenes such as poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) [PTMSP] and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] had high selectivities and fluxes, but membranes prepared from these polymers were not stable, showing decreasing flux and selectivity during tests lasting only a few hours. Parel, a poly(propylene oxide allyl glycidyl ether) had a selectivity of 3 at ambient temperatures and 4 or more at temperatures of {minus}20 C. However, Parel is no longer commercially available, and we were unable to find an equivalent material in the time available. Therefore, most of our experimental work focused on silicone rubber membranes, which have a selectivity of 2.5 at ambient temperatures, increasing to 3-4 at low temperatures. Silicone rubber composite membranes were evaluated in bench-scale module tests and with commercial-scale, 4-inch-diameter modules in a small pilot plant. Over six days of continuous operation at a feed gas temperature of {minus}5 to {minus}10 C, the membrane maintained a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 3.3. Based on the pilot plant performance data, an analysis of the economic potential of the process was prepared. We conclude that a stand-alone membrane process is the lowest

  19. Nitrogen in Chinese coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, D.; Lei, J.; Zheng, B.; Tang, X.; Wang, M.; Hu, Jiawen; Li, S.; Wang, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and six coal samples were taken from main coal mines of twenty-six provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China, according to the resource distribution and coal-forming periods as well as the coal ranks and coal yields. Nitrogen was determined by using the Kjeldahl method at U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), which exhibit a normal frequency distribution. The nitrogen contents of over 90% Chinese coal vary from 0.52% to 1.41% and the average nitrogen content is recommended to be 0.98%. Nitrogen in coal exists primarily in organic form. There is a slight positive relationship between nitrogen content and coal ranking. ?? 2011 Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

  20. The microbial nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Mike S M

    2008-11-01

    This special issue highlights several recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle including the diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in special habitats, distribution and contribution of aerobic ammonium oxidation by bacteria and crenarchaea in various aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, regulation of metabolism in nitrifying bacteria, the molecular diversity of denitrifying microorganisms and their enzymes, the functional diversity of freshwater and marine anammox bacteria, the physiology of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation and the degradation of recalcitrant organic nitrogen compounds. Simultaneously the articles in this issue show that many questions still need to be addressed, and that the microbes involved in catalyzing the nitrogen conversions still harbour many secrets that need to be disclosed to fully understand the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, and make future predictions and global modelling possible.

  1. Demonstrating Paramagnetism Using Liquid Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Ray; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how liquid nitrogen is attracted to the poles of neodymium magnets. Nitrogen is not paramagnetic, so the attraction suggests that the liquid nitrogen contains a small amount of oxygen, which causes the paramagnetism. (MVL)

  2. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  3. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on cotton biomass, nitrogen utilization and soil urease activity].

    PubMed

    Lyu, Ning; Yin, Fei-hu; Chen, Yun; Gao, Zhi-jian; Liu, Yu; Shi, Lei

    2015-11-01

    under the ambient CO2- (360 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment. The order of nitrogen accumulation content in organs was bud > leaf > stem > root. Soil urease activity of both layers increased significantly with the elevation of CO2 concentration in all the nitrogen treatments. Under each CO2 concentration treatment, the soil urease activity in the upper layer (0-20 cm) increased significantly with nitrogen application, while the urease activity under the application of 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen was highest in the lower layer (20- 40 cm). The average soil urease activity in the upper layer (0-20 cm) was significantly higher than that in the lower layer (20-40 cm). This study suggested that the cotton dry matter accumulation and nitrogen absorption content were significantly increased in response to the elevated CO2 concentration (540 µmol · mol(-1)) and higher nitrogen addition (300 kg · hm(-2)).

  4. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on cotton biomass, nitrogen utilization and soil urease activity].

    PubMed

    Lyu, Ning; Yin, Fei-hu; Chen, Yun; Gao, Zhi-jian; Liu, Yu; Shi, Lei

    2015-11-01

    under the ambient CO2- (360 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment. The order of nitrogen accumulation content in organs was bud > leaf > stem > root. Soil urease activity of both layers increased significantly with the elevation of CO2 concentration in all the nitrogen treatments. Under each CO2 concentration treatment, the soil urease activity in the upper layer (0-20 cm) increased significantly with nitrogen application, while the urease activity under the application of 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen was highest in the lower layer (20- 40 cm). The average soil urease activity in the upper layer (0-20 cm) was significantly higher than that in the lower layer (20-40 cm). This study suggested that the cotton dry matter accumulation and nitrogen absorption content were significantly increased in response to the elevated CO2 concentration (540 µmol · mol(-1)) and higher nitrogen addition (300 kg · hm(-2)). PMID:26915188

  5. Heat transport of nitrogen in helium atmospheric pressure microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.

    2013-07-01

    Stable DC atmospheric pressure normal glow discharges in ambient air were produced between the water surface and the metallic capillary coupled with influx of helium gas. Multiple independent repeated trials indicated that vibrational temperature of nitrogen rises from 3200 to 4622 K, and rotational temperature of nitrogen decreases from 1270 to 570 K as gas flux increasing from 20 to 80 sccm and discharge current decreasing from 11 to 3 mA. Furthermore, it was found that the vibrational degree of the nitrogen molecule has priority to gain energy than the rotational degree of nitrogen molecule in nonequilibrium helium microplasma.

  6. The nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation.

  7. Nitrogen control in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Merrick, M J; Edwards, R A

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in prokaryotes involves the coordinated expression of a large number of enzymes concerned with both utilization of extracellular nitrogen sources and intracellular biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds. The control of this expression is determined by the availability of fixed nitrogen to the cell and is effected by complex regulatory networks involving regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. While the most detailed studies to date have been carried out with enteric bacteria, there is a considerable body of evidence to show that the nitrogen regulation (ntr) systems described in the enterics extend to many other genera. Furthermore, as the range of bacteria in which the phenomenon of nitrogen control is examined is being extended, new regulatory mechanisms are also being discovered. In this review, we have attempted to summarize recent research in prokaryotic nitrogen control; to show the ubiquity of the ntr system, at least in gram-negative organisms; and to identify those areas and groups of organisms about which there is much still to learn. PMID:8531888

  8. The nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation. PMID:26859274

  9. Nitrogen control in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, M J; Edwards, R A

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in prokaryotes involves the coordinated expression of a large number of enzymes concerned with both utilization of extracellular nitrogen sources and intracellular biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds. The control of this expression is determined by the availability of fixed nitrogen to the cell and is effected by complex regulatory networks involving regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. While the most detailed studies to date have been carried out with enteric bacteria, there is a considerable body of evidence to show that the nitrogen regulation (ntr) systems described in the enterics extend to many other genera. Furthermore, as the range of bacteria in which the phenomenon of nitrogen control is examined is being extended, new regulatory mechanisms are also being discovered. In this review, we have attempted to summarize recent research in prokaryotic nitrogen control; to show the ubiquity of the ntr system, at least in gram-negative organisms; and to identify those areas and groups of organisms about which there is much still to learn. PMID:8531888

  10. PVT gauging with liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dresar, Neil T.

    2006-02-01

    Experimental results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) liquid quantity gauging of a 0.17 m 3 liquid nitrogen tank pressured with ambient temperature helium in the normal gravity environment. A previously reported PVT measurement procedure has been improved to include helium solubility in liquid nitrogen. Gauging data was collected at nominal tank fill levels of 80%, 50% and 20% and at nominal tank pressures of 0.3, 1.0, and 1.7 MPa. The test tank was equipped with a liquid pump and spray manifold to circulate and mix the fluid contents and therefore create near-isothermal conditions throughout the tank. Silicon diode sensors were distributed throughout the tank to monitor temperatures. Close-spaced arrays of silicon diode point sensors were utilized to precisely detect the liquid level at the nominal 80%, 50%, and 20% fill levels. The tests simulated the cryogenic tank-side conditions only; helium mass added to the tank was measured by gas flowmeters rather than using pressure and temperature measurements from a dedicated helium supply bottle. Equilibrium data for cryogenic nitrogen and helium mixtures from numerous sources was correlated to predict soluble helium mole fractions. Results show that solubility should be accounted for in the PVT gauging calculations. Mole fractions predicted by Dalton's Law were found to be in good agreement with the compiled equilibrium data within the temperature-pressure range of interest. Therefore, Dalton's Law was deemed suitable for calculating ullage composition. Gauging results from the PVT method agreed with the reference liquid level measurements to within 3%.

  11. Thermal stability study of nitrogen functionalities in a graphene network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2012-06-01

    Catalyst-free vertically aligned graphene nanoflakes possessing a large amount of high density edge planes were functionalized using nitrogen species in a low energy N+ ion bombardment process to achieve pyridinic, cyanide and nitrogen substitution in hexagonal graphitic coordinated units. The evolution of the electronic structure of the functionalized graphene nanoflakes over the temperature range 20-800 °C was investigated in situ, using high resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate that low energy irradiation is a useful tool for achieving nitrogen doping levels up to 9.6 at.%. Pyridinic configurations are found to be predominant at room temperature, while at 800 °C graphitic nitrogen configurations become the dominant ones. The findings have helped to provide an understanding of the thermal stability of nitrogen functionalities in graphene, and offer prospects for controllable tuning of nitrogen doping in device applications.

  12. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for... September 20, 1994 Pt. 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart Cb of Part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Before April 28, 2009,nitrogen...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for... September 20, 1994 Pt. 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart Cb of part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Before April 28, 2009,nitrogen...

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Fff of... - Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for... Before September 20, 1994 Pt. 62, Subpt. FFF, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart FFF of Part 62—Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Nitrogen oxides emission limit...

  16. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for... September 20, 1994 Pt. 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart Cb of Part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Before April 28, 2009,nitrogen...

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Fff of... - Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for... Before September 20, 1994 Pt. 62, Subpt. FFF, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart FFF of Part 62—Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Nitrogen oxides emission limit...

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Fff of... - Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for... Before September 20, 1994 Pt. 62, Subpt. FFF, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart FFF of Part 62—Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Nitrogen oxides emission limit...

  19. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for... September 20, 1994 Pt. 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart Cb of part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Before April 28, 2009,nitrogen...

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Cb of... - Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for... September 20, 1994 Pt. 60, Subpt. Cb, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart Cb of part 60—Nitrogen Oxides Guidelines for Designated Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Before April 28, 2009,nitrogen...

  1. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Fff of... - Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for... Before September 20, 1994 Pt. 62, Subpt. FFF, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart FFF of Part 62—Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Nitrogen oxides emission limit...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Fff of... - Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for... Before September 20, 1994 Pt. 62, Subpt. FFF, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart FFF of Part 62—Nitrogen Oxides Requirements for Affected Facilities Municipal waste combustor technology Nitrogen oxides emission limit...

  3. Nitrogen recycling from fuel-extracted algal biomass: residuals as the sole nitrogen source for culturing Scenedesmus acutus.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huiya; Nagle, Nick; Pienkos, Philip T; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the reuse of nitrogen from fuel-extracted algal residues was investigated. The alga Scenedesmus acutus was found to be able to assimilate nitrogen contained in amino acids, yeast extracts, and proteinaceous alga residuals. Moreover, these alternative nitrogen resources could replace nitrate in culturing media. The ability of S. acutus to utilize the nitrogen remaining in processed algal biomass was unique among the promising biofuel strains tested. This alga was leveraged in a recycling approach where nitrogen is recovered from algal biomass residuals that remain after lipids are extracted and carbohydrates are fermented to ethanol. The protein-rich residuals not only provided an effective nitrogen resource, but also contributed to a carbon "heterotrophic boost" in subsequent culturing, improving overall biomass and lipid yields relative to the control medium with only nitrate. Prior treatment of the algal residues with Diaion HP20 resin was required to remove compounds inhibitory to algal growth.

  4. Relationship between site-specific nitrogen concentrations in mosses and measured wet bulk atmospheric nitrogen deposition across Europe.

    PubMed

    Harmens, Harry; Schnyder, Elvira; Thöni, Lotti; Cooper, David M; Mills, Gina; Leblond, Sébastien; Mohr, Karsten; Poikolainen, Jarmo; Santamaria, Jesus; Skudnik, Mitja; Zechmeister, Harald G; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Hanus-Illnar, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    To assess the relationship between nitrogen concentrations in mosses and wet bulk nitrogen deposition or concentrations in precipitation, moss tissue and deposition were sampled within a distance of 1 km of each other in seven European countries. Relationships for various forms of nitrogen appeared to be asymptotic, with data for different countries being positioned at different locations along the asymptotic relationship and saturation occurring at a wet bulk nitrogen deposition of ca. 20 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). The asymptotic behaviour was more pronounced for ammonium-N than nitrate-N, with high ammonium deposition at German sites being most influential in providing evidence of the asymptotic behaviour. Within countries, relationships were only significant for Finland and Switzerland and were more or less linear. The results confirm previous relationships described for modelled total deposition. Nitrogen concentration in mosses can be applied to identify areas at risk of high nitrogen deposition at European scale.

  5. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  6. Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 2: Comparisons between different liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, K.; Nikkanen, S. ); Hupa, M. . Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-08-01

    This continuation of earlier work reports fuel nitrogen release for black liquors at two temperatures during pyrolysis of single droplets in an oxygen-free environment. Approximately half of the 20--60% fuel nitrogen released was ammonia and half was molecular nitrogen. The total amount of fixed nitrogen released during pyrolysis was almost linearly proportional to the liquor nitrogen content. The yield of fixed nitrogen for birch liquors was significantly higher than for pine liquors, and the yield for bagasse liquor was extremely high.

  7. Nitrogen Uptake in Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J.; VanBenthem, P.

    2013-12-01

    A plant's absorption of nitrogen can be encouraged by a variety of environmental factors, especially the application of fertilizers. As a common limiting factor in plant growth, not up taking enough nitrogen can be a result of an unhealthy plant. Moreover, as farmers seek out methods to increase growth of plants, fertilizers are used as a solution to the issue of nitrogen deficiency to incorporate additional nitrogen from chemical or organic sources, by not using the right fertilizer can greatly affect the plats. The point of this research project is to determine the effect of various fertilizers on the plant growth, and to correlate the measured nitrogen, water and chlorophyll content in spinach leaves. Spinach leaves were used because they are known to quickly uptake chemicals in the environment. The spinach plants were exposed to four different growing parameters, which are referred to as control, ammonium nitrate, MiracleGro , and organic. The spinach was originally placed in nitrogen deficient soil with only 2.2x10 4 weight percent (wt. %) nitrogen. The leaves in the control group were grown in this nitrogen deficient soil without any fertilizer added. Ammomium nitrate and MiracleGro were added to the spinach in the A and MG groups, respectively, and organic chicken stool was used for the O group. By using a spectral imaging system and flame combustion techniques, the chlorophyll content can be related to the nitrogen content in the spinach leaves. In these spinach leaves, nitrogen and chlorophyll content were measured, chlorophyll is a green pigment that plays a crucial role in producing nutrients for green plants. The lack of chlorophyll will allow the plant to become susceptible to diseases, so it is extremely important that the plants have a high content of chlorophyll. The role of nitrogen in chlorophyll is very important and helps in the creation of chlorophyll; therefore it is necessary that an appropriate amount of nitrogen is added for optimal growth

  8. Delta nitrogen tetroxide fueling operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, R. B.; Cross, T. M.; Rucci, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the Delta second stage nitrogen tetroxide fueling system is briefly summarized. The nitrogen tetroxide fueling system and the equipment used to protect the spacecraft environment from the toxic nitrogen tetroxide fumes are described. Topics covered include: the nitrogen tetroxide transfer system; loading operations; safety precautions; and chemical treatment of all toxic vapors.

  9. Seasonal Nitrogen Dynamics in Chesapeake Bay: a Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, D.; Ulanowicz, R. E.; Boynton, W. R.

    1995-08-01

    The input, exchange, recycling and export of nitrogen in the mesohaline region of Chesapeake Bay have been assessed in this study. The seasonal rate of exchanges between the 36 most important components and the roles of these in the recycling process of nitrogen in the ecosystem have been quantified. Results show that the demand for nitrogen by phytoplankton, bacteria and benthic algae is the highest in summer (418 mg N m -2day -1) and lowest in winter (90 mg N m -2day -1). The supply of dissolved nitrogen however, is highest in spring (289 mg N m -2day -1), with the lowest exogenous supply of 'new' nitrogen during summer (53 mg N m -2day -1). The seasonal variations in supply and demand suggest that spring nitrogen loadings continue to sustain the high nitrogen demand in summer when this nutrient appears to be in short supply. Results also show that the efflux of nitrogen from the sediments to the overlying water dominates the recycling process and is abetted by water column regeneration, mostly by the smaller biota (<200 μm). Mesozooplankton, suspension-feeders and fish as a whole contribute relatively little on a seasonal or annual basis to the total amount of regenerated nitrogen. Network analysis of the seasonal dynamics of nitrogen indicates that the pathways over which nitrogen is recycled are considerably more complicated and numerous than those which retain carbon in the system. The Finn Cycling Index (FCI) reveals that the rate of nitrogen recycling during summer approximates 70% of the total system activity compared with the 34-46% range during other seasons. In contrast, the FCI for carbon was almost a constant 20% over all seasons. As regards the pelagic microbiota, which functionated more as a shunt to convey excess carbon out of the system, analysis indicates they comprise very significant pathways for the retention of nitrogen in the system.

  10. The 20-20-20 Airship Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Alina; Diaz, Ernesto; Miller, Sarah; Rhodes, Jason

    2014-06-01

    A NASA Centennial Challenge; (http://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/centennial_challenges/index.html) is in development to spur innovation in stratospheric airships as a science platform. We anticipate a million dollar class prize for the first organization to fly a powered airship that remains stationary at 20km (65,000 ft) altitude for over 20 hours with a 20kg payload. The design must be scalable to longer flights with more massive payloads.In NASA’s constrained budget environment, there are few opportunities for space missions in astronomy and Earth science, and these have very long lead times. We believe that airships (powered, maneuverable, lighter-than-air vehicles) could offer significant gains in observing time, sky and ground coverage, data downlink capability, and continuity of observations over existing suborbital options at competitive prices. We seek to spur private industry (or non-profit institutions, including FFRDCs and Universities) to demonstrate the capability for sustained airship flights as astronomy and Earth science platforms. This poster will introduce the challenge in development and provide details of who to contact for more information.

  11. Trichodesmium and nitrogen fixation in the Kuroshio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, T.; Takeda, S.; Itoh, S.; Kodama, T.; Liu, X.; Hashihama, F.; Furuya, K.

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen fixation in the Kuroshio influences nitrogen balance in the North Pacific Ocean. The genus Trichodesmium is recognized as a major diazotroph in the Kuroshio. Although its abundance is higher in the Kuroshio than in adjacent waters, the reason for this difference remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and nitrogen fixation together with concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate, whose availabilities potentially control diazotrophy, in the Kuroshio and its marginal seas. We performed the observations near the Miyako Islands, which form part of the Ryukyu Islands, situated along the Kuroshio, since satellite analysis suggested that material transport could occur from the islands to the Kuroshio. Trichodesmium spp. bloomed (> 20 000 filaments L-1) near the Miyako Islands, and the abundance was high in the Kuroshio and the Kuroshio bifurcation region of the East China Sea, but was low in the Philippine Sea. The abundance of Trichodesmium spp. was significantly correlated with the total nitrogen fixation activity. The surface concentrations of dissolved iron (0.19-0.89 nM) and phosphate (< 3-36 nM) were similar for all of the study areas, indicating that the nutrient distribution could not explain the spatial differences in Trichodesmium spp. abundance and nitrogen fixation. We used a numerical model to simulate the transportation of water around the Ryukyu Islands to the Kuroshio. Our results indicate that Trichodesmium growing around the islands situated along the Kuroshio is potentially important for determining diazotrophy in this region.

  12. Nitrogen Inputs via Nitrogen Fixation in Northern Plants and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dominated by cold and often acidic water logged environments, mineralization of organic matter is slow in the majority of northern ecosystems. Measures of extractable ammonium and nitrate are generally low and can be undetectable in peat pore waters. Despite this apparent nitrogen limitation, many of these environments produce deep deposits of soil organic matter. Biological nitrogen fixation carried out by autotrophic and heterotrophic diazotrophs associated with cryptograms provides the majority of known nitrogen inputs in these northern ecosystems. Nitrogen fixation was assessed in a variety of northern soils within rhizospheres of dominant plant communities. We investigated the availability of this newly fixed nitrogen to the vascular plant community in nitrogen limited northern plant communities. We tracked nitrogen flow from 15N2 gas fixed in Sphagnum mosses into tissues of two native vascular plant species, boreal cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and black spruce (Picea mariana). 15N-labeled Sphagnum microcosms were grown within variable mesh size exclusion/inclusion fabrics in a nitrogen addition experiment in situ in order to investigate the role of mycorrhizal fungi in the uptake of newly fixed nitrogen. Up to 24% of daily fixed 15N label was transferred to vascular plant tissues during 2 months. Nitrogen addition resulted in decreased N2 fixation rates; however, with higher nitrogen availability there was a higher rate of 15N label uptake into the vascular plants, likely the result of increased production of dissolved organic nitrogen. Reliance on mycorrhizal networks for nitrogen acquisition was indicated by nitrogen isotope fractionation patterns. Moreover, N2 fixation activities in mosses were stimulated when vascular plants were grown in moss microcosms versus "moss only" treatments. Results indicate that bog vascular plants may derive considerable nitrogen from atmospheric N2 biologically fixed within Sphagnum mosses. This work demonstrates that

  13. Contribution of dairy ration components to nitrogen in milk, manure, crops, and environmental nitrogen loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of the total nitrogen (N) consumed by dairy cows, a general range of 20 to 35% is secreted in milk, and the remaining N is excreted in manure, which is subject to environmental loss. For many dairy herds, improved feed management, including feeding rations balanced in energy and crude protein, can e...

  14. The nitrogen index as a tool to reduce nitrogen loss to the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continued population growth creates a need for increased productivity of agricultural systems around the world. Increased agricultural productivity will be needed to support a population that is anticipated to have an additional 2.5 billion people by the year 2050. Nitrogen was part of the 20th cent...

  15. Climate change impacts of US reactive nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Robert W.; Davidson, Eric A.; Goodale, Christine L.; Greaver, Tara L.; Herrick, Jeffrey D.; Liu, Lingli

    2012-01-01

    Fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer application in the United States have substantially altered the nitrogen cycle, with serious effects on climate change. The climate effects can be short-lived, by impacting the chemistry of the atmosphere, or long-lived, by altering ecosystem greenhouse gas fluxes. Here we develop a coherent framework for assessing the climate change impacts of US reactive nitrogen emissions, including oxides of nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide (N2O). We use the global temperature potential (GTP), calculated at 20 and 100 y, in units of CO2 equivalents (CO2e), as a common metric. The largest cooling effects are due to combustion sources of oxides of nitrogen altering tropospheric ozone and methane concentrations and enhancing carbon sequestration in forests. The combined cooling effects are estimated at −290 to −510 Tg CO2e on a GTP20 basis. However, these effects are largely short-lived. On a GTP100 basis, combustion contributes just −16 to −95 Tg CO2e. Agriculture contributes to warming on both the 20-y and 100-y timescales, primarily through N2O emissions from soils. Under current conditions, these warming and cooling effects partially offset each other. However, recent trends show decreasing emissions from combustion sources. To prevent warming from US reactive nitrogen, reductions in agricultural N2O emissions are needed. Substantial progress toward this goal is possible using current technology. Without such actions, even greater CO2 emission reductions will be required to avoid dangerous climate change. PMID:22547815

  16. Biodegradation of the nitramine explosive CL-20.

    PubMed

    Trott, Sandra; Nishino, Shirley F; Hawari, Jalal; Spain, Jim C

    2003-03-01

    The cyclic nitramine explosive CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) was examined in soil microcosms to determine whether it is biodegradable. CL-20 was incubated with a variety of soils. The explosive disappeared in all microcosms except the controls in which microbial activity had been inhibited. CL-20 was degraded most rapidly in garden soil. After 2 days of incubation, about 80% of the initial CL-20 had disappeared. A CL-20-degrading bacterial strain, Agrobacterium sp. strain JS71, was isolated from enrichment cultures containing garden soil as an inoculum, succinate as a carbon source, and CL-20 as a nitrogen source. Growth experiments revealed that strain JS71 used 3 mol of nitrogen per mol of CL-20. PMID:12620886

  17. Biodegradation of the Nitramine Explosive CL-20

    PubMed Central

    Trott, Sandra; Nishino, Shirley F.; Hawari, Jalal; Spain, Jim C.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic nitramine explosive CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) was examined in soil microcosms to determine whether it is biodegradable. CL-20 was incubated with a variety of soils. The explosive disappeared in all microcosms except the controls in which microbial activity had been inhibited. CL-20 was degraded most rapidly in garden soil. After 2 days of incubation, about 80% of the initial CL-20 had disappeared. A CL-20-degrading bacterial strain, Agrobacterium sp. strain JS71, was isolated from enrichment cultures containing garden soil as an inoculum, succinate as a carbon source, and CL-20 as a nitrogen source. Growth experiments revealed that strain JS71 used 3 mol of nitrogen per mol of CL-20. PMID:12620886

  18. Nitrogen release from rock and soil under simulated field conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Dahlgren, R.A.; Casey, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory study was performed to simulate field weathering and nitrogen release from bedrock in a setting where geologic nitrogen has been suspected to be a large local source of nitrate. Two rock types containing nitrogen, slate (1370 mg N kg-1) and greenstone (480 mg N kg-1), were used along with saprolite and BC horizon sand from soils derived from these rock types. The fresh rock and weathered material were used in batch reactors that were leached every 30 days over 6 months to simulate a single wet season. Nitrogen was released from rock and soil materials at rates between 10-20 and 10-19 mo1 N cm-2 s-1. Results from the laboratory dissolution experiments were compared to in situ soil solutions and available mineral nitrogen pools from the BC horizon of both soils. Concentrations of mineral nitrogen (NO3- + NH4+) in soil solutions reached the highest levels at the beginning of the rainy season and progressively decreased with increased leaching. This seasonal pattern was repeated for the available mineral nitrogen pool that was extracted using a KCl solution. Estimates based on these laboratory release rates bracket stream water NO3-N fluxes and changes in the available mineral nitrogen pool over the active leaching period. These results confirm that geologic nitrogen, when present, may be a large and reactive pool that may contribute as a non-point source of nitrate contamination to surface and ground waters. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  20. Plasticity of nitrogen allocation in the leaves of the invasive wetland grass, Phalaris arundinacea and co-occurring Carex species determines the photosynthetic sensitivity to nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Holaday, A Scott; Schwilk, Dylan W; Waring, Elizabeth F; Guvvala, Hasitha; Griffin, Chelsea M; Lewis, O Milo

    2015-04-01

    Phalaris arundinacea displaces the slower-growing, native sedge, Carex stricta, where nitrogen availability is high. Our aim was to address whether morphological and physiological traits associated with carbon gain for P. arundinacea and C. stricta responded to nitrogen supply differently and if the species exhibited different degrees of plasticity in these traits. The plants were grown in gravel and provided modified Hoagland's solution containing four nitrogen concentrations from 0.15 to 15 mM for 6 to 7 weeks. Supplied nitrogen affected the leaf nitrogen content to the same degree for both species. Increasing supplied nitrogen strongly increased CO2 assimilation (A), photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE), and respiration for P. arundinacea but had only a small effect on these parameters for C. stricta. Relative to growth at 15 mM nitrogen, growth at 0.15 mM for young leaves decreased carboxylation capacity and efficiency and the capacity for electron transport for P. arundinacea and a larger, stouter Carex species, Carex lacustris, by 53 to 70% but only 20 to 24% for C. stricta. Leaf nitrogen decreased approximately 50% for all species, but vacuolar nitrate did not decrease for P. arundinacea and C. stricta, suggesting that it does not serve as a nitrogen reserve for use during nitrogen deprivation in these species. After 4 months of nitrogen deprivation, P. arundinacea doubled A in 12 days after being supplied 15 mM nitrogen, whereas A for C. stricta increased only 22%. We propose that one factor linking P. arundinacea abundance to nitrogen availability involves this species' plastic response of carbon gain to nitrogen supply. C. stricta appears to be adapted to tolerate low nitrogen availability but cannot respond as rapidly and extensively as P. arundinacea when nitrogen supply is high.

  1. Plasticity of nitrogen allocation in the leaves of the invasive wetland grass, Phalaris arundinacea and co-occurring Carex species determines the photosynthetic sensitivity to nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Holaday, A Scott; Schwilk, Dylan W; Waring, Elizabeth F; Guvvala, Hasitha; Griffin, Chelsea M; Lewis, O Milo

    2015-04-01

    Phalaris arundinacea displaces the slower-growing, native sedge, Carex stricta, where nitrogen availability is high. Our aim was to address whether morphological and physiological traits associated with carbon gain for P. arundinacea and C. stricta responded to nitrogen supply differently and if the species exhibited different degrees of plasticity in these traits. The plants were grown in gravel and provided modified Hoagland's solution containing four nitrogen concentrations from 0.15 to 15 mM for 6 to 7 weeks. Supplied nitrogen affected the leaf nitrogen content to the same degree for both species. Increasing supplied nitrogen strongly increased CO2 assimilation (A), photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE), and respiration for P. arundinacea but had only a small effect on these parameters for C. stricta. Relative to growth at 15 mM nitrogen, growth at 0.15 mM for young leaves decreased carboxylation capacity and efficiency and the capacity for electron transport for P. arundinacea and a larger, stouter Carex species, Carex lacustris, by 53 to 70% but only 20 to 24% for C. stricta. Leaf nitrogen decreased approximately 50% for all species, but vacuolar nitrate did not decrease for P. arundinacea and C. stricta, suggesting that it does not serve as a nitrogen reserve for use during nitrogen deprivation in these species. After 4 months of nitrogen deprivation, P. arundinacea doubled A in 12 days after being supplied 15 mM nitrogen, whereas A for C. stricta increased only 22%. We propose that one factor linking P. arundinacea abundance to nitrogen availability involves this species' plastic response of carbon gain to nitrogen supply. C. stricta appears to be adapted to tolerate low nitrogen availability but cannot respond as rapidly and extensively as P. arundinacea when nitrogen supply is high. PMID:25659333

  2. Nitrogen Trading Tool (NTT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) recently developed a prototype web-based nitrogen trading tool to facilitate water quality credit trading. The development team has worked closely with the Agriculture Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit (ARS-SPNR) and the Environmenta...

  3. Nitrogen catch crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High costs of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and the potential for N losses to ground and surface water have resulted in increased interest in using catch crops to recover this N. Research on potatoes has shown that the amount of N lost to leaching can be as much as the amount of N removed from the field ...

  4. Nitrogen recommendation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen fertilization for corn production is complicated by soil and weather variability, yet has far-reaching economic and environmental implications. To address this challenge, alternative N management strategies have been explored extensively in recent years by both public and private groups for...

  5. ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Harold S.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter is in three parts. The first concerns interpretations that can be made from atmospheric observations regarding nitrogen compounds and ozone, the second reviews some predictions made by atmospheric models, and the third compares between certain model results and atmospheric measurements with an emphasis on detecting evidence of significant disagreements.

  6. Ruminant nitrogen usage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book brings together the latest research on protein absorption by ruminants and takes a look at the calculation of optimum nutrient requirements, including bacterial digestion, in the calculations. It also describes the parameters of nitrogen conversion in the ruminant and examines the different kinds of protein found in animal feedstuffs.

  7. The nitrogen cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway J.N.; Aber J.D.; Erisman J.W.; Seitzinger S.P.; Howarth R.W.; Cowling E.B.; Cosby B.J.

    2003-04-01

    Human production of food and energy is the dominant continental process that breaks the triple bond in molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and creates reactive nitrogen (Nr) species. Circulation of anthropogenic Nr in Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere has a wide variety of consequences, which are magnified with time as Nr moves along its biogeochemical pathway. The same atom of Nr can cause multiple effects in the atmosphere, in terrestrial ecosystems, in freshwater and marine systems, and on human health. We call this sequence of effects the nitrogen cascade. As the cascade progresses, the origin of Nr becomes unimportant. Reactive nitrogen does not cascade at the same rate through all environmental systems; some systems have the ability to accumulate Nr, which leads to lag times in the continuation of the cascade. These lags slow the cascade and result in Nr accumulation in certain reservoirs, which in turn can enhance the effects of Nr on that environment. The only way to eliminate Nr accumulation and stop the cascade is to convert Nr back to nonreactive N{sub 2}.

  8. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    Once upon a time nitrogen did not exist. Today it does. In the intervening time the universe was formed, nitrogen was created, the Earth came into existence, and its atmosphere and oceans were formed! In this analysis of the Earth's nitrogen cycle, I start with an overview of these important events relative to nitrogen and then move on to the more traditional analysis of the nitrogen cycle itself and the role of humans in its alteration.The universe is ˜15 Gyr old. Even after its formation, there was still a period when nitrogen did not exist. It took ˜300 thousand years after the big bang for the Universe to cool enough to create atoms; hydrogen and helium formed first. Nitrogen was formed in the stars through the process of nucleosynthesis. When a star's helium mass becomes great enough to reach the necessary pressure and temperature, helium begins to fuse into still heavier elements, including nitrogen.Approximately 10 Gyr elapsed before Earth was formed (˜4.5 Ga (billion years ago)) by the accumulation of pre-assembled materials in a multistage process. Assuming that N2 was the predominate nitrogen species in these materials and given that the temperature of space is -270 °C, N2 was probably a solid when the Earth was formed since its boiling point (b.p.) and melting point (m.p.) are -196 °C and -210 °C, respectively. Towards the end of the accumulation period, temperatures were probably high enough for significant melting of some of the accumulated material. The volcanic gases emitted by the resulting volcanism strongly influenced the surface environment. Nitrogen was converted from a solid to a gas and emitted as N2. Carbon and sulfur were probably emitted as CO and H2S (Holland, 1984). N2 is still the most common nitrogen volcanic gas emitted today at a rate of ˜2 TgN yr-1 (Jaffee, 1992).Once emitted, the gases either remained in the atmosphere or were deposited to the Earth's surface, thus continuing the process of biogeochemical cycling. The rate of

  9. Nitrogen-incorporation induced changes in the microstructure of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vemuri, Venkata Rama Sesha R.; Noor-A-Alam, M.; Gullapalli, Satya K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Ramana, C.V.

    2011-12-30

    Nitrogen doped tungsten oxide (WO3) films were grown by reactive magnetron sputter-deposition by varying the nitrogen content in the reactive gas mixture keeping the deposition temperature fixed at 400 C. The crystal structure, surface morphology, chemical composition, and electrical resistivity of nitrogen doped WO3 films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical conductivity measurements. The results indicate that the nitrogen-doping induced changes in the microstructure and electrical properties of WO3 films are significant. XRD measurements coupled with SEM analysis indicates that the increasing nitrogen content decreases the grain size and crystal quality. The nitrogen concentration increases from 0 at.% to 1.35 at.% with increasing nitrogen flow rate from 0 to 20 sccm. The corresponding dc electrical conductivity of the films had shown a decreasing trend with increasing nitrogen content.

  10. Apollo 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Apollo 20 project was launched during the 2010-2011 school year to accelerate Houston Independent School District's (HISD's) efforts to improve student performance in every school and close the achievement gap districtwide. This partnership with EdLabs at Harvard University incorporates best practices from successful public and charter schools…

  11. M20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    M20 is a diffuse nebula in Sagittarius known as the `TRIFID NEBULA' because of its three-lobed appearance. It is situated roughly 2 degrees northwest of M8. Messier described a `cluster of stars', William Herschel assigned different numbers to different parts of the object and John Herschel was the first to use the term `trifid'....

  12. Aqueous phase removal of nitrogen from nitrogen compounds

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alex G.

    1993-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of compounds containing nitrogen present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the types of nitrogen compounds present in a waste stream, (2) determining the concentrations of nitrogen compounds, (3) balancing oxidized and reduced form of nitrogen by adding a reactant, and (4) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 300.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., thereby resulting in less harmful nitrogen and oxygen gas, hydroxides, alcohols, and hydrocarbons.

  13. Bacteria and the Nitrogen Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayanaba, A.

    1982-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation accounts for almost 70 percent of nitrogen for plant growth. If food is to keep abreast of population growth, even more nitrogen must be fixed. For this international research institutes continue the search for natural variants in the bacterial population while also pursuing novel genetic engineering methods. (Author)

  14. The nitrogen and sulphur cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.A.; Ferguson, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic regulation of nitrogen fixation; On the analysis of symbiotic genes of Rhizobium; Regulation of nitrogen assimilation by bacteria; Alternative and conventional nitrogenases; and The role of oxygen and hydrogen in nitrogen fixation.

  15. Nitrogen cycling and nitrogen saturation in temperate forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Aber, J D

    1992-07-01

    The last decade has seen a dramatic shift in the focus of nitrogen cycling research in forest ecosystems. Concerns over nitrogen deficiencies and effects of removal in harvest have given way to concerns over excess nitrogen availability and the potential for forest decline and surface water pollution. Driving this paradigm shift is the increase in atmospheric deposition of nitrogen to forests due to industrial and agricultural activity. At the core of the new paradigm is the concept of 'nitrogen saturation' of forest ecosystems. The purpose of this review is to synthesize recent advances in research relating to nitrogen deposition effects on temperate zone forest ecosystems, and the further effects of nitrogen saturation on environmental quality. PMID:21236013

  16. Solar nitrogen - Evidence for a secular increase in the ratio of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Solar wind nitrogen, implanted in lunar soil samples, exhibits isotopic variations that are related to the time, although not to the duration, of implantation, with earlier samples characterized by lower ratios of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14. An increase in the solar nitrogen-15 content during the lifetime of the lunar regolith is probably caused by spallation of oxygen-16 in the surface regions of the sun.-

  17. Influence of nitrogen-induced grain refinement on mechanical properties of nitrogen alloyed type 316LN stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Whan

    2012-01-01

    Tensile, fatigue, and creep tests were conducted to investigate the effect of grain refinement by the addition of nitrogen on mechanical properties of nitrogen alloyed type 316LN stainless steel. Grain size was reduced from 100 μm to 47 μm as nitrogen concentration was increased from 0.04% (N04) to 0.10% (N10). When nitrogen concentration was increased, there was a 20% increase in yield stress and a 14% increase in UTS, respectively. Elongation was not significantly changed with increasing nitrogen concentration. As nitrogen concentration was increased, there was a 41% increase in fatigue life and an approximately sixfold increase in the time to rupture. As grain size was reduced from 100 μm to 47 μm, there was an 8% increase in yield stress and a 3% increase in UTS, respectively. Elongation was little changed with decreasing grain size. As grain size was reduced from 100 μm to 47 μm, there was a 9% increase in fatigue life and a 23% increase in the time to rupture. The grain refinement achieved by the addition of nitrogen improved the high temperature mechanical properties of nitrogen alloyed type 316LN stainless steel but was not the main mechanism for improvement of mechanical properties.

  18. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  19. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Pinnau, Ingo; Segelke, Scott

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  20. Homogeneous nucleation of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iland, Kristina; Wedekind, Jan; Wölk, Judith; Strey, Reinhard

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the homogeneous nucleation of nitrogen in a cryogenic expansion chamber [A. Fladerer and R. Strey, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 164710 (2006)]. Gas mixtures of nitrogen and helium as carrier gas were adiabatically expanded and cooled down from an initial temperature of 83 K until nucleation occurred. This onset was detected by constant angle light scattering at nitrogen vapor pressures of 1.3-14.2 kPa and temperatures of 42-54 K. An analytical fit function well describes the experimental onset pressures with an error of ±15%. We estimate the size of the critical nucleus with the Gibbs-Thomson equation yielding critical sizes of about 50 molecules at the lowest and 70 molecules at the highest temperature. In addition, we estimate the nucleation rate and compare it with nucleation theories. The predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT) are 9 to 19 orders of magnitude below the experimental results and show a stronger temperature dependence. The Reguera-Reiss theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165701 (2004)] predicts the correct temperature dependence at low temperatures and decreases the absolute deviation to 7-13 orders of magnitude. We present an empirical correction function to CNT describing our experimental results. These correction parameters are remarkably close to the ones of argon [Iland et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154506 (2007)] and even those of water [J. Wölk and R. Strey, J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11683 (2001)].

  1. 40 CFR 89.112 - Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter exhaust emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide....112 Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter exhaust emission... emissions of oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nonmethane hydrocarbon are measured...

  2. 40 CFR 89.112 - Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter exhaust emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide....112 Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter exhaust emission... emissions of oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nonmethane hydrocarbon are measured...

  3. 40 CFR 89.112 - Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter exhaust emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide....112 Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and particulate matter exhaust emission... emissions of oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nonmethane hydrocarbon are measured...

  4. Influence of nitrogen loading and plant nitrogen assimilation on nitrogen leaching and N₂O emission in forage rice paddy fields fertilized with liquid cattle waste.

    PubMed

    Riya, Shohei; Zhou, Sheng; Kobara, Yuso; Sagehashi, Masaki; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    Livestock wastewater disposal onto rice paddy fields is a cost- and labor-effective way to treat wastewater and cultivate rice crops. We evaluated the influence of nitrogen loading rates on nitrogen assimilation by rice plants and on nitrogen losses (leaching and N2O emission) in forage rice fields receiving liquid cattle waste (LCW). Four forage rice fields were subjected to nitrogen loads of 107, 258, 522, and 786 kg N ha(-1) (N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively) using basal fertilizer (chemical fertilizer) (50 kg N ha(-1)) and three LCW topdressings (each 57-284 kg N ha(-1)). Nitrogen assimilated by rice plants increased over time. However, after the third topdressing, the nitrogen content of the biomass did not increase in any treatment. Harvested aboveground biomass contained 93, 60, 33, and 31 % of applied nitrogen in N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively. The NH4 (+) concentration in the pore water at a depth of 20 cm was less than 1 mg N L(-1) in N100, N250, and N500 throughout the cultivation period, while the NH4 (+) concentration in N750 increased to 3 mg N L(-1) after the third topdressing. Cumulative N2O emissions ranged from -0.042 to 2.39 kg N ha(-1); the highest value was observed in N750, followed by N500. In N750, N2O emitted during the final drainage accounted for 80 % of cumulative N2O emissions. This study suggested that 100-258 kg N ha(-1) is a recommended nitrogen loading rate for nitrogen recovery by rice plants without negative environmental impacts such as groundwater pollution and N2O emission.

  5. Biotic Nitrogen Enrichment Regulates Calcium Sources to Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Perakis, S. S.; Hynicka, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient in forest ecosystems that is susceptible to leaching loss and depletion. Calcium depletion can affect plant and animal productivity, soil acid buffering capacity, and fluxes of carbon and water. Excess nitrogen supply and associated soil acidification are often implicated in short-term calcium loss from soils, but the long-term role of nitrogen enrichment on calcium sources and resupply is unknown. Here we use strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) as a proxy for calcium to investigate how soil nitrogen enrichment from biological nitrogen fixation interacts with bedrock calcium to regulate both short-term available supplies and the long-term sources of calcium in montane conifer forests. Our study examines 22 sites in western Oregon, spanning a 20-fold range of bedrock calcium on sedimentary and basaltic lithologies. In contrast to previous studies emphasizing abiotic control of weathering as a determinant of long-term ecosystem calcium dynamics and sources (via bedrock fertility, climate, or topographic/tectonic controls) we find instead that that biotic nitrogen enrichment of soil can strongly regulate calcium sources and supplies in forest ecosystems. For forests on calcium-rich basaltic bedrock, increasing nitrogen enrichment causes calcium sources to shift from rock-weathering to atmospheric dominance, with minimal influence from other major soil forming factors, despite regionally high rates of tectonic uplift and erosion that can rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. For forests on calcium-poor sedimentary bedrock, we find that atmospheric inputs dominate regardless of degree of nitrogen enrichment. Short-term measures of soil and ecosystem calcium fertility are decoupled from calcium source sustainability, with fundamental implications for understanding nitrogen impacts, both in natural ecosystems and in the context of global change. Our finding that long-term nitrogen enrichment increases forest reliance on atmospheric

  6. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  7. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  8. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status. PMID:26747521

  9. Controls over nitrogen cycling in California chaparral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, E. J.; Schimel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Chaparral landscapes of southern California and other Mediterranean-type ecosystems are structured by fire. They exist in environments that typically do not receive rain for 6 months or more at a time, making combustion inevitable. The heavy winter rains following fire can erode soil and leach nutrients such as nitrogen into streams and reservoirs, particularly along slopes that have been denuded. The extent to which nitrogen is cycled and redistributed following fire is a function of the rate at which soil microbes metabolize nitrogen into mobile forms such as nitrate. However, the specific mechanisms controlling nitrogen metabolism in chaparral are not fully understood. We measured mineralization and nitrification rates in ecosystems dominated by species typical of southern and central California chaparral, and conducted a laboratory incubation to experimentally examine the influence of pH, charcoal, and ammonium supply on nitrogen dynamics. Nitrate production was significantly enhanced in recently burned chaparral, which correlated with elevated soil pH. Enhanced pH can both raise the solubility of soil organic matter, and stimulate nitrification, while fires simultaneously release nitrifying bacteria from competition with vegetation for ammonium. To further explore these processes, we applied ammonium, pH, and charcoal treatments to samples from 4 chaparral stands, which burned 1, 4, 20 and 40 years ago, using a factorial design. Treated soils were incubated in mason jars at 50% water holding capacity for 8 weeks. Soil respiration, substrate induced respiration, mineralization, nitrification, and nitrification potential were measured periodically to evaluate whether ammonium addition, pH and the presence of charcoal influence substrate production and nitrification. The threat nitrate of leaching following fire grows with climate change, because fire and precipitation regimes are expected to become both increasingly variable and punctuated by more intense events

  10. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  11. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  12. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  13. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  14. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  15. Nitrogen fixation and nitrogen transformations in marine symbioses.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cara L; Jarett, Jessica K; Olson, Nathan D; Lesser, Michael P

    2010-10-01

    Many marine organisms have coevolved symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria in nitrogen limited environments such as coral reefs. In addition, some of these organisms also harbor microbes that carry out nitrification and denitrification. Prokaryotes involved in nitrogen fixation and other nitrogen transformations are symbionts in a range of eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment including shipworms, diatoms, corals and sponges. Molecular genetic approaches, and other analytical techniques, have provided exciting new insights into symbiont diversity and the relationship between host and symbiont. We review the current state of knowledge of these symbioses and highlight important avenues for future studies.

  16. Nitrogen fixation and nitrogen transformations in marine symbioses.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cara L; Jarett, Jessica K; Olson, Nathan D; Lesser, Michael P

    2010-10-01

    Many marine organisms have coevolved symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria in nitrogen limited environments such as coral reefs. In addition, some of these organisms also harbor microbes that carry out nitrification and denitrification. Prokaryotes involved in nitrogen fixation and other nitrogen transformations are symbionts in a range of eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment including shipworms, diatoms, corals and sponges. Molecular genetic approaches, and other analytical techniques, have provided exciting new insights into symbiont diversity and the relationship between host and symbiont. We review the current state of knowledge of these symbioses and highlight important avenues for future studies. PMID:20674366

  17. Nitrogen fixation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  18. Nitrogen loss in normal and obese subjects during total fast.

    PubMed

    Göschke, H; Stahl, M; Thölen, H

    1975-07-01

    Healthy volunteers of ideal weight (12 men and 12 women) were fasted for 6 days, and obese but otherwise healthy subjects (20 men, 28 women) for 6--28 days. In all groups studied a significant increase in urinary nitrogen loss from day 1 to day 3 of fasting was followed by a steady decrease. The early rise in urinary nitrogen excretion coincided with a rise in plasma glucagon levels, suggesting a relation of the latter to increased gluconeogenesis from amino acids. At equal weight greater nitrogen losses were found in men than in women, in both normal and obese subjects. In spite of much higher weight and larger energy expenditure and nitrogen loss in obese subjects however was not higher than in normal ones. Mean daily nitrogen losses varied from 14.5 g (normal and obese men early in starvation) to 3.0 g (obese women after a 4-weeks fast). Calculating the amount of calories derived from body protien (urinary nitrogen X 6.25 X 4.1)and taking total energy expenditure from tabular metabolic values, the contribution of protein to total calorie output was found to vary from 15% (normal men 6 day fast) to 5(obese women, 4th week of fasting). The clinical significance of nitrogen loss during therapeutic fasting is discussed.

  19. Inorganic nitrogen reduction and stability under simulated hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Jay A; Hazen, Robert M; Yoder, Hatten S

    2008-12-01

    Availability of reduced nitrogen is considered a prerequisite for the genesis of life from prebiotic precursors. Most atmospheric and oceanic models for the Hadean Earth predict a mildly oxidizing environment that is conducive to the formation and stability of only oxidized forms of nitrogen. A possible environment where reduction of oxidized nitrogen to ammonium has been speculated to occur is aqueous hydrothermal systems. We examined a suite of transition metal oxides and sulfides for their ability to reduce nitrate and nitrite, as well as oxidize ammonia, under hot (300 degrees C) high-pressure (50-500 MPa) aqueous conditions. In general, iron sulfides exhibited the most rapid and complete conversion noted, followed by nickel and copper sulfides to a much lower degree. Of the oxides examined, only magnetite exhibited any ability to reduce NO(3)(-) or NO(2)(-). Ammonium was stable or exhibited small losses (<20%) in contact with all the mineral phases and conditions tested. The results support the idea that hydrothermal systems could have provided significant amounts of reduced nitrogen to their immediate environments. The enhanced availability of reduced nitrogen in hydrothermal systems also has important implications for prebiotic metabolic pathways where nitrogen availability is critical to the production of amino acids and other nitrogenous compounds. PMID:19191539

  20. Nitrogen Attenuation of Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Response to Global Environmental Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Yang, X.; Kheshgi, H.; McGuire, A. D.; Post, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    The magnitude of worldwide terrestrial carbon sinks driven by CO2 fertilization are found to be attenuated by nitrogen dynamics. However, the terrestrial nitrogen cycle also has the potential to interact with carbon cycle responses to changes in climate, nitrogen inputs, and land use. In this study, a terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycle model was used to evaluate how the nitrogen cycle influences the terrestrial carbon sinks in the 20th Century in response to changes in atmospheric CO2, climate, nitrogen inputs, and land use. Two series of simulations were performed. First, the model of the nitrogen cycle was fixed at the 1765 levels. Next, nitrogen availability was allowed to vary dynamically according to plant nitrogen supply and demand. These simulations were driven by a single driving variable. Comparisons of these applications of the model with a fully dynamic nitrogen cycle to applications in which nitrogen availability was fixed at 1765 levels revealed that in 1990s there was (1) a decreased sink associated with increasing atmospheric CO2, (2) a decreased source associated with changes in climate, (3) an increased sink associated with nitrogen inputs, and (4) an increased source associated with changes in land use. While the analysis for individual driving variables indicates that during the 1990s the role of the nitrogen cycle in changing atmospheric CO2, climate, nitrogen and land use counterbalance each other to some extent, model applications that simultaneously considered all of these effects indicate that the nitrogen and carbon cycles are in fact currently playing an important role in changing the terrestrial CO2 sinks at the global scale. Results indicate the importance of including the nitrogen cycle in coupled carbon-climate system models.

  1. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  2. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion.

  3. Nitrogen In Saturn's Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Baragiola, R. A.; Crary, F.; Young, D.

    2004-11-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions to the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to the models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and the CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  4. A test of the nitrogen-limitation hypothesis for retarded eukaryote radiation: Nitrogen isotopes across a Mesoproterozoic basinal profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüeken, Eva E.

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen limitation caused by trace metal scarcity under euxinic ocean conditions has been proposed as an explanation for the delayed radiation of eukaryotes until at least the late Mesoproterozoic. However, evidence for how the nitrogen cycle was operating during the middle Precambrian is, so far, rare. More specifically, it is unknown which steps in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, e.g. nitrogen fixation, nitrification or ammonification, were rate-limiting and thus controlling microbial community structures. The Mesoproterozoic Belt Supergroup in western Montana hosts a variety of facies ranging from shallow to deep water and thus offers the opportunity to address this issue. Bulk δ15N values show a clear trend from -1‰ in the deepest part of the basin to +5‰ along basin margins, which suggests that coastal areas were sufficiently oxygenated for aerobic nitrogen cycling. The total fractionation of carbon isotopes between carbonate and organic carbon (Δ13C) increases from 20‰ to 32‰ in the same direction, possibly indicating an ecological response to redox stratification and nitrogen speciation. Evidence from the Belt Supergroup is thus consistent with the idea that nutrient availability may have restricted early eukaryotic organisms to a narrow range of habitats, which thus prevented a global rise to ecological dominance until concentrations of fixed nitrogen increased in the global open ocean.

  5. Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores with supercritical steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ken Oglesby

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores at various depths and with various hole sizes, tubing, fluids and rates showed theoretical feasibility. WELLFLO SIMULATIONS REPORT STEP 4: DRILLING 10,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 5: DRILLING 20,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 6: DRILLING 30,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE Mehmet Karaaslan, MSI

  6. An Expanded Analysis of Nitrogen Ice Convection in Sputnik Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umurhan, Orkan M.; Lyra, Wladimir; Wong, Teresa; McKinnon, William B.; Nimmo, Francis; Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Binzel, Richard; White, Oliver; Stern, S. Alan; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B.; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie; New Horizons Geology and Geophysics Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The New Horizons close-encounter flyby of Pluto revealed 20-35 km scale ovoid patterns on the informally named Sputnik Planum. These features have been recently interpreted and shown to arise from the action of solid-state convection of (predominantly) nitrogen ice driven by Pluto's geothermal gradient. One of the major uncertainties in the convection physics centers on the temperature and grain-size dependency of nitrogen ice rheology, which has strong implications for the overturn times of the convecting ice. Assuming nitrogen ice in Sputnik Planum rests on a passive water ice bedrock that conducts Pluto's interior heat flux, and, given the uncertainty of the grain-size distribution of the nitrogen ice in Sputnik Planum, we examine a suite of two-dimensional convection models that take into account the thermal contact between the nitrogen ice layer and the conducting water-ice bedrock for a given emergent geothermal flux. We find for nitrogen ice layers several km deep, the emerging convection efficiently cools the nitrogen-ice water-ice bedrock interface resulting in temperature differences across the convecting layer of 10-20 K (at most) regardless of layer depth. For grain sizes ranging from 0.01 mm to 5 mm the resulting horizontal size to depth ratios of the emerging convection patterns go from 4:1 up to 6:1, suggesting that the nitrogen ice layer in Sputnik Planum may be anywhere between 3.5 and 8 km deep. Such depths are consistent with Sputnik Planum being a large impact basin (in a relative sense) analogous to Hellas on Mars. In this grain-size range we also find, (i) the calculated cell overturn times are anywhere from 1e4 to 5e5 yrs and, (ii) there is a distinct transition from steady state to time dependent convection.

  7. Orchard nitrogen management: Which nitrogen source is best?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suboptimal management of nitrogen fertility in pecan orchards leads to a loss of nutmeat yield and quality, but also a waste of natural resources and money. This article reviews several basic guiding principles useful to orchard managers when developing nitrogen management strategies, and determini...

  8. [Effect of temperature on stability of nitrogen removal in the ANAMMOX reactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Huang, Yong; Zheng, Yu-Hui; Yuan, Yi; Li, Da-Peng; Pan, Yang; Zhang, Chun-Lei

    2012-04-01

    The effect of temperature on stability of nitrogen removal efficiency was investigated in an ANANMMOX reactor by measuring the nitrogen removal rate. The results showed that the nitrogen removal rate changed between 1.51 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) and 1.84 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) when the temperature was between 26 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Compared with gradually degrading temperature (nitrogen removal rate variation of amplitude 9.03%), the ladder degrading temperature was more advantageous on the stability of nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrogen removal rate variation of amplitude was 4.35%. The nitrogen removal rate dropped quickly, when the temperature was below 20 degrees C. Moreover, a large number of NO2(-) -N accumulated in the ANAMMOX process, when temperature is below 15 degrees C in the reactor. A strong relationship between temperature and nitrogen removal rate was found, when the temperature was below 20 degrees C. Based on the effect of temperature on nitrogen removal rate, the strategy about temperature control was proposed to achieve the fast start-up and high efficiency of nitrogen removal under low temperature for the ANANMMOX reactors.

  9. Nitrogen and phosphorus intake by phytoplankton in the Xiamen Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cai; Li, Hui; He, Qing; Xu, Kuncan; Wu, Shengsan; Zhang, Yuanbiao; Chen, Jinmin; Chen, Baohong; Lin, Libin; Lu, Meiluan; Chen, Weifen; Tang, Rongkun; Ji, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a time series experiment examining the nitrogen and phosphorus intake of natural phytoplankton communities by a microcosms approach. Seawater samples containing natural phytoplankton communities were collected from waters around Baozhu Islet in inner Xiamen Bay and around Qingyu Islet in the outer bay. The goal was to elucidate the relationship between phytoplankton population enhancement, the biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the seawater, and the phytoplankton nitrogen and phosphorus intake ratio based on nitrogen and phosphorus removal from seawater by phytoplankton, to provide a basis for detecting prewarning conditions for red tide and the assessment of red tide events. Two key results were obtained: 1. During the experiment, the nitrogen and phosphorus seawater concentrations in samples from these two sites were negatively and closely correlated to the logarithm of the phytoplankton cell concentration and to the value of the apparent oxygen increment. The ratio of the intake coefficients was 3.5:1 for phosphorus and 1.1:1 for nitrogen for the phytoplankton between these samples from around Baozhu Islet and Qingyu Islet, respectively. This indicates that the intake capabilities of phytoplankton for nitrogen in the two waters are essentially identical. However, for phosphorus, the capability was much higher in the Baozhu Islet waters than the Qingyu Islet waters. In other words, the phytoplankton in Qingyu Islet waters produced more biomass while consuming the same amount of phosphorus as the other waters; 2. The phytoplankton nitrogen and phosphorus intake ratio from the Baozhu Islet and Qingyu Islet waters was 20:1 and 36:1, respectively. The latter waters had a significantly higher ratio than the former and both were higher than the Redfield Ratio. These results indicate that nitrogen and phosphorus intake ratios by phytoplankton can vary significantly from region to region.

  10. The terrestrial nitrogen budget of the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, M.; Worrall, F.; Burt, T. P.; Howden, N. J.

    2009-12-01

    The fluvial flux of reactive nitrogen from the UK terrestrial biosphere is increasing. This is significant as the UK is already a known “hotspot” of reactive nitrogen flux because of its high population density, intensive agriculture and relative short, unimpeded rivers. . Given this context we ask the question: is the UK a net source or net sink of reactive nitrogen but, is it a net source of sink of total nitrogen? Long term records of fluvial nitrogen have been calculated back to 1974 and these have been coupled with long term records of inorganic fertiliser; atmospheric emissions and deposition; industrial and sewage effluent; biological nitrogen fixation; aquatic and terrestrial denitrification; and food/feed imports. The results show : i) The total dissolved nitrogen flux over the study period, after flow correction, varied from 470 to 980 ktonnes N yr-1, which, on average, comprised: 69% nitrate-N; 26% dissolved organic-N; 4% ammoniacal-N; and 1% nitrite-N. ii) The inputs of inorganic fertilizer declined significantly over the study period while atmospheric deposition showed no change and food and feed transfers significantly increased. iii) The outputs of fluvial nitrogen rose significantly but atmospheric emissions of N20 and NH3 declined dramatically while dentrification to N2 stayed steady. iv) The UK is net source of total nitrogen in 1990 of 527 (±40%) ktonnes N/yr which had declined to net source of 121 (±110%) ktonnes N/yr in 2005. The study predicts that the UK will become a net sink of total N before 2020 largely driven by declines in atmospheric emissions.

  11. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  12. Investigating Nitrogen Pollution: Activities and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green Teacher, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Introduces activities on nitrogen, nitrogen pollution from school commuters, nitrogen response in native and introduced species, and nutrient loading models. These activities help students determine the nitrogen contribution from their parents' cars, test native plant responses to nitrogen, and experiment with the results of removing water from…

  13. 20 CFR 625.20 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false 625.20 Section 625.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DISASTER UNEMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE § 625.20...

  14. 20 CFR 625.20 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 625.20 Section 625.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DISASTER UNEMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE § 625.20...

  15. Exploring the Sensitivity of Terrestrial Carbon Sources and Sinks to Nitrogen Cycle Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, H. S.; Yang, X.; Jain, A.

    2009-12-01

    The sensitivity of terrestrial carbon sources and sinks to modeled nitrogen-cycle processes is explored and observational constraints considered to advance understanding of model differences and the uncertainty of CO2 projections. The magnitude of worldwide terrestrial carbon sources and sinks driven by changing climate and CO2 fertilization have been found to be attenuated by the dynamics of the nitrogen cycle, with the strength of this attenuation effect differing between coupled nitrogen-carbon-cycle models (Jain et al., GBC in press, 2009; Sokolov et al., J. of Climate, 2008; Thornton et al., GBC, 2007). In this study, a terrestrial nitrogen-carbon-cycle model (Yang et al., GBC in press, 2009) was used to evaluate how the nitrogen cycle influences terrestrial carbon sinks and sources in response to observation-based changes in atmospheric CO2, climate, nitrogen inputs, and land use over the 20th century and scenarios for these drivers over the 21st century. Modeled global carbon uptake by the terrestrial biosphere is found to be sensitive to, for example, the extent of nitrogen limitation in the tropics, the extent plant C/N ratio increase under nitrogen limitation and its consequent effects on productivity, and the change of rates of nitrogen inputs (e.g. biological nitrogen fixation and nitrogen deposition) and outputs (e.g. leaching and denitrification). Greater nitrogen limitation in tropical regions, reduced ability of plants to grow with increased C/N ratio, and decreased rates of nitrogen inputs and outputs (equal in equilibrium) each strengthen the nitrogen cycle’s effect of reducing carbon sinks and sources. Application of observation-based constraints to these nitrogen-cycle processes gives an estimate of the contribution of uncertainty in these processes to the uncertainty of CO2 projections.

  16. Biodegradation of the high explosive hexanitrohexaazaiso-wurtzitane (CL-20).

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Pelin; Christodoulatos, Christos; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Balas, Wendy; Nicolich, Steve; Sidhoum, Mohammed

    2009-04-01

    The aerobic biodegradability of the high explosive CL-20 by activated sludge and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been investigated. Although activated sludge is not effective in degrading CL-20 directly, it can mineralize the alkaline hydrolysis products. Phanerochaete chrysosporium degrades CL-20 in the presence of supplementary carbon and nitrogen sources. Biodegradation studies were conducted using various nutrient media under diverse conditions. Variables included the CL-20 concentration; levels of carbon (as glycerol) and ammonium sulfate and yeast extract as sources of nitrogen. Cultures that received CL-20 at the time of inoculation transformed CL-20 completely under all nutrient conditions studied. When CL-20 was added to pre-grown cultures, degradation was limited. The extent of mineralization was monitored by the (14)CO(2) time evolution; up to 51% mineralization was achieved when the fungus was incubated with [(14)C]-CL-20. The kinetics of CL-20 biodegradation by Phanerochaete chrysosporium follows the logistic kinetic growth model.

  17. Swivel Joint For Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Swivel joint allows liquid-nitrogen pipe to rotate through angle of 100 degree with respect to mating pipe. Functions without cracking hard foam insulation on lines. Pipe joint rotates on disks so mechanical stress not transmitted to thick insulation on pipes. Inner disks ride on fixed outer disks. Disks help to seal pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through joint.

  18. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Paige, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    A thermal model, developed to predict seasonal nitrogen cycles on Triton, has been modified and applied to Pluto. The model is used to calculate the partitioning of nitrogen between surface frost deposits and the atmosphere, as a function of time for various sets of input parameters.

  19. Shelf life study of fresh celery (Apium graveolens L.) grown under different nitrogen fertilization treatments.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Valeria; Muratore, Giuseppe; Russo, Marco Antonio; Belligno, Adalgisa

    2011-05-01

    Nitrogen fertilization is useful for obtaining higher growth and quality of productions, and the use of nitrogen fertilization is widespread. To evaluate the influence of nitrogen-rich fertilizers on quality characteristics of celery, shelf life tests of celery grown with 2 levels of nitrogen and 2 different nitrogen fertilizers were performed. The treatments of the celery samples were identified as follows: T1, mineral nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1)); T2, mineral nitrogen (120 kg ha(-1)); T3, organic nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1)); T4, organic nitrogen (120 kg ha(-1)); R4, residual organic nitrogen (120 kg ha(-1)); and C, untreated control. Celery plants were selected and packaged in either of the following 2 plastic films: antifog polyolefin (AFP) film or microperforated polypropylene (MPP) film. The nitrate contents, weight loss, hardness, changes in color parameters, and total phenols were studied for both packaging types during storage. The results demonstrated that celery fertilized with organic nitrogen and packaged in AFP film reached a shelf life of 37 d. The control sample packaged in MPP film was not marketable after 20 d, but the same untreated sample packaged in AFP film reached a shelf life of 30 d.

  20. 40 CFR 86.1323-84 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1323-84 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. The chemiluminescent...

  1. 40 CFR 86.1323-84 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1323-84 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. The chemiluminescent...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1323-2007 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1323-2007 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. This section describes...

  3. 40 CFR 86.1323-2007 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen analyzer... (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1323-2007 Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration. This section describes...

  4. Bounding salt marsh nitrogen fluxes: development of an ecohydrological salt marsh model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass-balance approach to characterize nitrogen flux in a 2-hectare, meso-haline saltmarsh yielded extensive flow and water chemistry data. However, a significant, unevenly distributed population of the nitrogen fixer Alnus rubra (red alder) in the 20-hectare upland catchment l...

  5. Do foliar endophytic bacteria fix nitrogen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, L. M.; Moyes, A. B.; Frank, C.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Carper, D.; Vandehey, N.; O'Neil, J.; Dekas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic microorganisms - bacteria and fungi that live inside healthy plant tissue - are a relatively unexplored source of functional diversity in natural ecosystems. Prior to modern sequencing technology, detecting uncultured endophytic bacteria and assessing their putative functions was challenging. However, recent work has revealed a remarkable diversity of as yet non-culturable endophytic taxa and is beginning to identify functional roles within plant microbiomes. We recently examined bacterial communities in the foliage of a long-lived, high-elevation conifer species, limber pine (Pinus flexilis), and discovered a community strongly dominated by acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacteraceae), with several taxa closely related to known nitrogen fixers. Given limber pine's status as a pioneer species that is able to grow in low fertility soils, we hypothesized that this bacterial community has a potential functional role in fixing atmospheric nitrogen, providing a source of this limiting nutrient to the host tree. We used the radioisotope 13N2 to confirm that N2 rapidly diffuses into pine needles, where it could potentially be fixed. With an acetylene reduction assay we confirmed nitrogenase enzyme activity inside excised twigs 4 times over a growing season, and estimate potential rates of N2 fixation at 0.1 nmol N2 g needle-1 hr-1. Scaled to the stand level, this N input could be on the order of ~20 mg N m-2 d-1 over a growing season. While these rates are low, the long lifespan of individual trees (~1000 years) makes them biologically meaningful. Still, measured rates of acetylene reduction and bulk 15N2 incorporation are quite variable in space and time. Much work remains to better characterize the plant-microbial interactions in this system, including the rates of nitrogen fixation and their variability over the growing season, across edaphic conditions, among host species, and through plant development; and to determine which community members are responsible

  6. Wort free amino nitrogen analysis adapted to a microplate format

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The standard method for determining wort free amino nitrogen content calls for the use of test tubes and glass marbles, as well as boiling and 20°C water baths. In this paper we describe how the standard method can be updated and streamlined by replacing water baths, test tubes and marbles with a th...

  7. 40 CFR 90.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chemiluminescent oxides of nitrogen analyzer as described in this section. (b) Initial and Periodic Interference... and periodic calibration. Prior to its initial use and monthly thereafter, or within one month prior... following table). Example calibration points (%) Acceptable for calibration? 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70...

  8. 40 CFR 90.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chemiluminescent oxides of nitrogen analyzer as described in this section. (b) Initial and Periodic Interference... and periodic calibration. Prior to its initial use and monthly thereafter, or within one month prior... following table). Example calibration points (%) Acceptable for calibration? 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70...

  9. Soluble carbohydrate allocation to roots, photosynthetic rate of leaves, and nitrate assimilation as affected by nitrogen stress and irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr

    1991-01-01

    Upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen to nitrogen-stressed plants, uptake rate of nitrogen is enhanced relative to nonstressed plants. Absorption of nitrogen presumably is dependent on availability of carbohydrates in the roots. A buildup in soluble carbohydrates thus should occur in roots of nitrogen-stressed plants, and upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen the increased uptake rate should be accompanied by a rapid decline in carbohydrates to prestress levels. To evaluate this relationship, three sets of tobacco plants growing in a complete hydroponic solution containing 1.0 mM NO3- were either continued in the complete solution for 21 d, transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 21 d, or transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 8-9 d and then returned to the 1.0 mM NO3- solution. These nitrogen treatments were imposed upon plants growing at photosynthetic photon flux densities of 700 and 350 micromoles m-2 s-1. Soluble carbohydrate levels in roots increased during onset of nitrogen stress to levels that were fourfold greater than in roots of non-stressed plants. Following resupply of external nitrogen, a rapid resumption of nitrogen uptake was accompanied by a decline in soluble carbohydrates in roots to levels characteristic of nonstressed plants. This pattern of soluble carbohydrate levels in roots during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress occurred at both irradiance levels. The response of net photosynthetic rate to nitrogen stress could be expressed as a nonlinear function of concentration of reduced nitrogen in leaves. The net photosynthetic rate at a given concentration of reduced nitrogen, however, averaged 10% less at the lower than at the higher irradiance. The decline in net photosynthetic rate per unit of reduced nitrogen in leaves at the lower irradiance was accompanied by an increase in the nitrate fraction of total nitrogen in leaves from 20% at the higher irradiance to 38% at the lower irradiance.

  10. Soluble carbohydrate allocation to roots, photosynthetic rate of leaves, and nitrate assimilation as affected by nitrogen stress and irradiance.

    PubMed

    Henry, L T; Raper, C D

    1991-03-01

    Upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen to nitrogen-stressed plants, uptake rate of nitrogen is enhanced relative to nonstressed plants. Absorption of nitrogen presumably is dependent on availability of carbohydrates in the roots. A buildup in soluble carbohydrates thus should occur in roots of nitrogen-stressed plants, and upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen the increased uptake rate should be accompanied by a rapid decline in carbohydrates to prestress levels. To evaluate this relationship, three sets of tobacco plants growing in a complete hydroponic solution containing 1.0 mM NO3- were either continued in the complete solution for 21 d, transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 21 d, or transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 8-9 d and then returned to the 1.0 mM NO3- solution. These nitrogen treatments were imposed upon plants growing at photosynthetic photon flux densities of 700 and 350 micromoles m-2 s-1. Soluble carbohydrate levels in roots increased during onset of nitrogen stress to levels that were fourfold greater than in roots of non-stressed plants. Following resupply of external nitrogen, a rapid resumption of nitrogen uptake was accompanied by a decline in soluble carbohydrates in roots to levels characteristic of nonstressed plants. This pattern of soluble carbohydrate levels in roots during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress occurred at both irradiance levels. The response of net photosynthetic rate to nitrogen stress could be expressed as a nonlinear function of concentration of reduced nitrogen in leaves. The net photosynthetic rate at a given concentration of reduced nitrogen, however, averaged 10% less at the lower than at the higher irradiance. The decline in net photosynthetic rate per unit of reduced nitrogen in leaves at the lower irradiance was accompanied by an increase in the nitrate fraction of total nitrogen in leaves from 20% at the higher irradiance to 38% at the lower irradiance.

  11. Nitrogen isotope effects on glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-05-03

    The nitrogen isotope effect on the decarboxylation of glutamic acid by glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli has been measured by comparison of the isotopic composition of the amino nitrogen of the product ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid isolated after 10-20% reaction with that of the starting glutamic acid. At pH 4.7, 37 /sup 0/C, the isotope effect is k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9855 +/- 0.0006 when compared to unprotonated glutamic acid. Interpretation of this result requires knowledge of the equilibrium nitrogen isotope effect for Schiff base formation. This equilibrium isotope effect is K/sup 14//K/sup 15/ - 0.9824 for the formation of the unprotonated Schiff base between unprotonated valine and salicylaldehyde. Analysis of the nitrogen isotope effect on decarboxylation of glutamic acid and of the previously measured carbon isotope effect on this same reaction shows that decarboxylation and Schiff base formation are jointly rate limiting. The enzyme-bound Schiff base between glutamate and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate partitions approximately 2:1 between decarboxylation and return to the starting state. The nitrogen isotope effect also reveals that the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated in this intermediate.

  12. Climate Change Impacts of US Reactive Nitrogen Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinder, R. W.; Davidson, E. A.; Goodale, C. L.; Greaver, T.; Herrick, J.; Liu, L.

    2011-12-01

    By fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer application, the US has substantially altered the nitrogen cycle, with serious effects on climate change. The climate effects can be short-lived, by impacting the chemistry of the atmosphere, or long-lived, by altering ecosystem greenhouse gas fluxes. Here, we develop a coherent framework for assessing the climate change impacts of US reactive nitrogen emissions. We use the global temperature potential (GTP) as a common metric, and we calculate the GTP at 20 and 100 years in units of CO2 equivalents. At both time-scales, nitrogen enhancement of CO2 uptake has the largest impact, because in the eastern US, areas of high nitrogen deposition are co-located with forests. In the short-term, the effect due to NOx altering ozone and methane concentrations is also substantial, but are not important on the 100 year time scale. Finally, the GTP of N2O emissions is substantial at both time scales. We have also attributed these impacts to combustion and agricultural sources, and quantified the uncertainty. Reactive nitrogen from combustion sources contribute more to cooling than warming. The impacts of agricultural sources tend to cancel each other out, and the net effect is uncertain. Recent trends show decreasing reactive nitrogen from US combustion sources, while agricultural sources are increasing. Fortunately, there are many mitigation strategies currently available to reduce the climate change impacts of US agricultural sources.

  13. Nitrogen isotope systematics of two Apollo 12 soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Clayton, R. N.

    1978-01-01

    Soils 12023 and 12037 were analyzed for nitrogen by step-wise heating. Helium contents, Ar-40/Ar-36 ratios and spallation N-15 ages were determined in addition to nitrogen contents and isotopic compositions. The results for 12023 show it to be a typical lunar soil similar to many Apollo 16 and 17 soils in its nitrogen content and delta N-15 value, with a complex history. Soil 12037 appears to have had a simple, two-stage surface exposure history; one exposure occurring recently for about 10-20 m.y. and the other between about 3 to 4 b.y. ago. The delta N-15 value of nitrogen implanted in the earlier exposure was -125%. This nitrogen may reside in the minor components of 12037 such as the KREEP. If it should reside in the basaltic component of 12037, however, then the variation in the delta N-15 of implanted nitrogen with time probably has been more complex than previously considered.

  14. Nitrogen in rock: Occurrences and biogeochemical implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Dahlgren, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of bedrock in global nitrogen cycling and potential for increased ecosystem sensitivity to human impacts in terrains with elevated background nitrogen concentrations. Nitrogen-bearing rocks are globally distributed and comprise a potentially large pool of nitrogen in nutrient cycling that is frequently neglected because of a lack of routine analytical methods for quantification. Nitrogen in rock originates as organically bound nitrogen associated with sediment, or in thermal waters representing a mixture of sedimentary, mantle, and meteoric sources of nitrogen. Rock nitrogen concentrations range from trace levels (>200 mg N kg -1) in granites to ecologically significant concentrations exceeding 1000 mg N kg -1 in some sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks. Nitrate deposits accumulated in arid and semi-arid regions are also a large potential pool. Nitrogen in rock has a potentially significant impact on localized nitrogen cycles. Elevated nitrogen concentrations in water and soil have been attributed to weathering of bedrock nitrogen. In some environments, nitrogen released from bedrock may contribute to nitrogen saturation of terrestrial ecosystems (more nitrogen available than required by biota). Nitrogen saturation results in leaching of nitrate to surface and groundwaters, and, where soils are formed from ammonium-rich bedrock, the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate may result in soil acidification, inhibiting revegetation in certain ecosystems. Collectively, studies presented in this article reveal that geologic nitrogen may be a large and reactive pool with potential for amplification of human impacts on nitrogen cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

  15. High-nitrogen explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Naud, D.; Hiskey, M. A.; Kramer, J. F.; Bishop, R. L.; Harry, H. H.; Son, S. F.; Sullivan, G. K.

    2002-01-01

    The syntheses and characterization of various tetrazine and furazan compounds offer a different approach to explosives development. Traditional explosives - such as TNT or RDX - rely on the oxidation of the carbon and hydrogen atoms by the oxygen carrying nitro group to produce the explosive energy. High-nitrogen compounds rely instead on large positive heats of formation for that energy. Some of these high-nitrogen compounds have been shown to be less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine (BDT), several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. The compound, 3,3{prime}-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, detonates as a half inch rate stick despite having no oxygen in the molecule. Using perfluoroacetic acid, DAAT can be oxidized to give mixtures of N-oxide isomers (DAAT03.5) with an average oxygen content of about 3.5. This energetic mixture burns at extremely high rates and with low dependency on pressure. Another tetrazine compound of interest is 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine(DGT) and its dinitrate and diperchlorate salts. DGT is easily synthesized by reacting BDT with guanidine in methanol. Using Caro's acid, DGT can be further oxidized to give 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine-1,4-di-N-oxide (DGT-DO). Like DGT, the di-N-oxide can react with nitric acid or perchloric acid to give the dinitrate and the diperchlorate salts. The compounds, 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB - the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is

  16. Quantifying atmospheric nitrogen outflow from the Front Range of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, J. A.; Eilerman, S. J.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Dube, W. P.; Herndon, S. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Nowak, J. B.; Roscioli, J. R.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Thompson, C. R.; Trainer, M.; Veres, P. R.; Wild, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive nitrogen emitted to the atmosphere from urban, industrial, and agricultural sources can be transported and deposited far from the source regions, affecting vegetation, soils, and water of sensitive ecosystems. Mitigation of atmospheric nitrogen deposition requires emissions characterization and quantification. Ammonia (NH3), a full suite of gas-phase oxidized nitrogen compounds, and particulate matter were measured from an aircraft that flew downwind from concentrated animal feeding operations, oil and gas extraction facilities, and urban areas along the Colorado Front Range in March and April 2015, as part of the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field study. Additionally, NH3 measurements from a fully instrumented aircraft that flew over the same region in July and August 2014 as part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) are used to examine atmospheric nitrogen emission and transport. Cross-wind plume transects and altitude profiles were performed over the source regions and 60-240 km downwind. Plumes were transported in the boundary layer with large NH3 mixing ratios (typically 20-100 ppbv) and were tens of km wide. The NH3 in these plumes provided an atmospheric nitrogen burden greater than 0.2 kg N/ha. Nitrogen oxides and their oxidation products and particulate matter were also enhanced in the plumes, but with concentrations substantially less than NH3. With efficient transport followed by wet deposition, these plumes have the potential to provide a large nitrogen input to the neighboring Rocky Mountain National Park, where nitrogen deposition currently exceeds the ecological critical load of 1.5 kg N/ha/yr.

  17. Helium tube separates nitrogen gas from liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.

    1964-01-01

    To prevent a boiloff problem, liquid nitrogen flowing from a storage tank to a container, is separated into liquid and gaseous components. This is accomplished by centrifugal and venting action, using a section of perforated helical aluminum tubing.

  18. Relationship between site-specific nitrogen concentrations in mosses and measured wet bulk atmospheric nitrogen deposition across Europe.

    PubMed

    Harmens, Harry; Schnyder, Elvira; Thöni, Lotti; Cooper, David M; Mills, Gina; Leblond, Sébastien; Mohr, Karsten; Poikolainen, Jarmo; Santamaria, Jesus; Skudnik, Mitja; Zechmeister, Harald G; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Hanus-Illnar, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    To assess the relationship between nitrogen concentrations in mosses and wet bulk nitrogen deposition or concentrations in precipitation, moss tissue and deposition were sampled within a distance of 1 km of each other in seven European countries. Relationships for various forms of nitrogen appeared to be asymptotic, with data for different countries being positioned at different locations along the asymptotic relationship and saturation occurring at a wet bulk nitrogen deposition of ca. 20 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). The asymptotic behaviour was more pronounced for ammonium-N than nitrate-N, with high ammonium deposition at German sites being most influential in providing evidence of the asymptotic behaviour. Within countries, relationships were only significant for Finland and Switzerland and were more or less linear. The results confirm previous relationships described for modelled total deposition. Nitrogen concentration in mosses can be applied to identify areas at risk of high nitrogen deposition at European scale. PMID:25094057

  19. Molybdenum Trafficking for Nitrogen Fixation†

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Jose A.; George, Simon J.; Rubio, Luis M.

    2009-01-01

    The molybdenum nitrogenase is responsible for most biological nitrogen fixation, a prokaryotic metabolic process that determines the global biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and carbon. Here we describe the trafficking of molybdenum for nitrogen fixation in the model diazotrophic bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii. The genes and proteins involved in molybdenum uptake, homeostasis, storage, regulation, and nitrogenase cofactor biosynthesis are reviewed. Molybdenum biochemistry in A. vinelandii reveals unexpected mechanisms and a new role for iron-sulfur clusters in the sequestration and delivery of molybdenum. PMID:19772354

  20. Basic nitrogen in hydrocracked resids

    SciTech Connect

    Somogyvari, A.; Zanzotto, L. ); Jeffries, R. )

    1990-07-01

    No direct link has been established between the basic nitrogen components of hydrocracked residues and the increase in anti-stripping properties of distillation residues containing them. Thus, it is the intent of this report to show that a correlation exists between the basic nitrogen components of hydrocracked residues and the anti-stripping properties of asphalts containing them and that it is not only the quantity but also the type of basic nitrogen compounds found in the hydrocracked residues that account for the enhanced anti-stripping properties of these bitumens and blends containing them.

  1. Environmental friendly nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi

    2005-09-01

    With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental friendly N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production. The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species. They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well. PMID:20549448

  2. Environmental friendly nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi

    2005-09-01

    With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental friendly N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production. The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species. They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well.

  3. Environmental friendly nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi

    2005-12-01

    With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental friendly N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production. The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species. They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well.

  4. An analytical study of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions in hydrocarbon combustion with added nitrogen - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of ground-based gas turbine combustor operating conditions and fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) found in coal-derived liquid fuels on the formation of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide is investigated. Analytical predictions of NOx and CO concentrations are obtained for a two-stage, adiabatic, perfectly-stirred reactor operating on a propane-air mixture, with primary equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.7, secondary equivalence ratios of 0.5 or 0.7, primary stage residence times from 12 to 20 msec, secondary stage residence times of 1, 2 and 3 msec and fuel nitrogen contents of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 wt %. Minimum nitrogen oxide but maximum carbon monoxide formation is obtained at primary zone equivalence ratios between 1.4 and 1.5, with percentage conversion of FBN to NOx decreasing with increased fuel nitrogen content. Additional secondary dilution is observed to reduce final pollutant concentrations, with NOx concentration independent of secondary residence time and CO decreasing with secondary residence time; primary zone residence time is not observed to affect final NOx and CO concentrations significantly. Finally, comparison of computed results with experimental values shows a good semiquantitative agreement.

  5. Energy, industry and nitrogen: strategies for decreasing reactive nitrogen emissions.

    PubMed

    Moomaw, William R

    2002-03-01

    Nitrogen oxides are released during atmospheric combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, and during the production of certain chemicals and products. They can react with natural or man-made volatile organic compounds to produce smog, or else can be further oxidized to produce particulate haze, or acid rain that can eutrophy land and water. The reactive nitrogen that begins in the energy sector thus cascades through the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and soils before being eventually partially denitrifed to the global warming and stratospheric ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide or molecular nitrogen. This paper will suggest how an economic analysis of the nitrogen cycle can identify the most cost-effective places to intervene. Nitrogen oxides released during fossil-fuel combustion in vehicles, power plants and heating boilers can either be controlled by add-on emission control technology, or can be eliminated by many of the same technical options that lead to carbon dioxide reduction. These integrated strategies also address sustainability, economic development and national security issues. Similarly in industrial production, it is more effective to focus on redesigning industrial processes rather than on nitrogen oxide pollution elimination from the current system. This paper will suggest which strategies might be utilized to address multiple benefits rather than focusing on single pollutants. PMID:12078008

  6. Energy, industry and nitrogen: strategies for decreasing reactive nitrogen emissions.

    PubMed

    Moomaw, William R

    2002-03-01

    Nitrogen oxides are released during atmospheric combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, and during the production of certain chemicals and products. They can react with natural or man-made volatile organic compounds to produce smog, or else can be further oxidized to produce particulate haze, or acid rain that can eutrophy land and water. The reactive nitrogen that begins in the energy sector thus cascades through the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and soils before being eventually partially denitrifed to the global warming and stratospheric ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide or molecular nitrogen. This paper will suggest how an economic analysis of the nitrogen cycle can identify the most cost-effective places to intervene. Nitrogen oxides released during fossil-fuel combustion in vehicles, power plants and heating boilers can either be controlled by add-on emission control technology, or can be eliminated by many of the same technical options that lead to carbon dioxide reduction. These integrated strategies also address sustainability, economic development and national security issues. Similarly in industrial production, it is more effective to focus on redesigning industrial processes rather than on nitrogen oxide pollution elimination from the current system. This paper will suggest which strategies might be utilized to address multiple benefits rather than focusing on single pollutants.

  7. [Nitrogen balance in dairy farm: research progress].

    PubMed

    Lü, Chao; Qin, Wen-Xiao; Gao, Teng-Yun; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Han, Zhi-Guo; Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Large dairy farm with intensive management has high stocking density, but generally does not have enough space and normative feces disposal system, resulting in the discharged nitrogen surpassed the environmental carrying capacity of unit area land. Dairy farm is one of the major emission sources of nitrogen discharges in agriculture, where the nitrogen balance has being aroused attention by the experts abroad. The research on the nitrogen flow and nitrogen balance in dairy farm is the basis of the dairy farm nitrogen cycling and management study, as well as the basis for the construction of environmental laws, regulations and policies. The most reliable indicators to evaluate the nitrogen flow and nitrogen balance in dairy farm are nitrogen surplus and nitrogen use efficiency. This paper introduced the concept of nitrogen balance on farm-scale and the nitrogen flow within farm, compared the application scope of nitrogen surplus and nitrogen use efficiency, analyzed the factors affecting the nitrogen balance in dairy farm, and summarized the effective strategies to reduce the nitrogen discharges from dairy farm, aimed to provide references for the nitrogen management of dairy farm in China.

  8. Intensified nitrogen removal in immobilized nitrifier enhanced constructed wetlands with external carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Ambrose, Richard F; Ullman, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen removal performance response of twelve constructed wetlands (CWs) to immobilized nitrifier pellets and different influent COD/N ratios (chemical oxygen demand: total nitrogen in influent) were investigated via 7-month experiments. Nitrifier was immobilized on a carrier pellet containing 10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), 2.0% sodium alginate (SA) and 2.0% calcium chloride (CaCl2). A batch experiment demonstrated that 73% COD and 85% ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) were degraded using the pellets with immobilized nitrifier cells. In addition, different carbon source supplement strategies were applied to remove the nitrate (NO3-N) transformed from NH4-N. An increase in COD/N ratio led to increasing reduction in NO3-N. Efficient nitrification and denitrification promoted total nitrogen (TN) removal in immobilized nitrifier biofortified constructed wetlands (INB-CWs). The results suggested that immobilized nitrifier pellets combined with high influent COD/N ratios could effectively improve the nitrogen removal performance in CWs.

  9. Structure-dependent response of a chemiluminescence nitrogen detector for organic compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a single bond.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Zhao, Jiang; Leopold, Kyle; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Guibin

    2007-01-15

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical libraries is indispensable for drug discovery research. However, the HTS data quality for lead discovery, lead optimization, and quantitative structure activity relationship studies has been severely compromised due to the uncertain compound concentrations in screening plates. In order to address this issue, we compared various high-throughput technologies for quantification of compounds in microtiter plate format without the need for authentic compounds as standards and identified the chemiluminescence nitrogen detector (CLND) as the method of choice at the present time. However, the structure dependence of this detector has not been well studied. A proposed rule suggested that the only exception to equimolar response is for compounds that contain adjacent nitrogen atoms. The response should be zero when the adjacent nitrogen atoms are connected by a double bond and 0.5 when they are connected by a single bond. In this investigation, we studied a broad range of compounds with isolated and adjacent nitrogen atoms. We confirmed that compounds with isolated nitrogen atoms produce an equimolar response with a 15-20% variation depending on structures and compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a double bond giving nearly zero response. We discovered that the CLND response for compounds containing adjacent nitrogen atoms that are connected with a single bond is highly structure dependent. Substitutions on the nitrogen atoms or nearby in the molecule can increase the CLND response to approach a value higher than the predicted value 0.5 (maximal value 0.82/nitrogen atom). Without substitution, much lower values than predicted (minimal value 0.0-0.08/nitrogen atom) are obtained. Therefore, the prediction of response of 0.5/nitrogen atom for compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a single bond should be abandoned. Compounds with similar structures should be used to generate calibration curves for

  10. Effect of salinity on the critical nitrogen concentration of Spartina alterniflora Loisel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Morris, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Nitrogen was withheld from the salt marsh grass Spartina alterniflora Loisel., in order to determine the effect of salinity (sea salts) on critical tissue nitrogen concentrations (defined here as the minimum tissue concentration required to sustain biomass accumulation). The critical nitrogen concentration per kilogram dry weight of above-ground tissue increased non-linearly from a mean of 8.2 g kg-1 at 5 g l-1 and 20 g l-1 salinity to 13.6 g kg-1 and 22.9 g kg-1 at salinities of 40 g l-1 and 50 g l-1, respectively. Below-ground tissue nitrogen concentrations averaged 62% of the above-ground values irrespective of salinity treatment. These results suggest that the critical nitrogen concentration is a function of salinity and indicate that the internal nitrogen supply required in support of growth increases with salinity. Above-ground tissue nitrogen concentrations reported in the literature and the relationship between salinity and critical nitrogen concentration observed in this study were used to evaluate the nitrogen status of S. alterniflora over a wide range of geographical locations. Comparisons suggest that both short and tall forms of S. alterniflora are nitrogen limited in the majority of marshes along the Gulf and Atlantic Coasts of the US. ?? 1992.

  11. Increasing importance of deposition of reduced nitrogen in the United States.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Schichtel, Bret A; Walker, John T; Schwede, Donna B; Chen, Xi; Lehmann, Christopher M B; Puchalski, Melissa A; Gay, David A; Collett, Jeffrey L

    2016-05-24

    Rapid development of agriculture and fossil fuel combustion greatly increased US reactive nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere in the second half of the 20th century, resulting in excess nitrogen deposition to natural ecosystems. Recent efforts to lower nitrogen oxides emissions have substantially decreased nitrate wet deposition. Levels of wet ammonium deposition, by contrast, have increased in many regions. Together these changes have altered the balance between oxidized and reduced nitrogen deposition. Across most of the United States, wet deposition has transitioned from being nitrate-dominated in the 1980s to ammonium-dominated in recent years. Ammonia has historically not been routinely measured because there are no specific regulatory requirements for its measurement. Recent expansion in ammonia observations, however, along with ongoing measurements of nitric acid and fine particle ammonium and nitrate, permit new insight into the balance of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the total (wet + dry) US nitrogen deposition budget. Observations from 37 sites reveal that reduced nitrogen contributes, on average, ∼65% of the total inorganic nitrogen deposition budget. Dry deposition of ammonia plays an especially key role in nitrogen deposition, contributing from 19% to 65% in different regions. Future progress toward reducing US nitrogen deposition will be increasingly difficult without a reduction in ammonia emissions.

  12. Nitrogen fixation and respiratory electron transport in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece under different light/dark cycles.

    PubMed

    Rabouille, Sophie; Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Matthijs, Hans C P; Huisman, Jef

    2014-03-01

    Incompatibility of nitrogen fixation and oxygen production compels unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria to perform photosynthesis during daytime and restrict nitrogen fixation to nighttime. The marine diazotroph Cyanothece BG 043511 was grown in continuous culture under three light/dark regimes (16L : 8D, 12L : 12D, and 8L : 16D h); we monitored nitrogen fixation and potential photosynthetic efficiency simultaneously online to reveal how their temporal separation is affected by different LD regimes. An increase in nitrogen fixation rate at night coincided with a rise in pulse-amplitude modulated fluorescence, indicating that the enhanced respiratory electron transport to fuel diazotrophy affects the oxidation state of the plastoquinone pool. This may offer an alternative approach to assess instantaneous nitrogen fixation activity. Regardless of photoperiod, the maximum rate of nitrogen fixation was conserved at about 20 h after the onset of the light. Consequently, nitrogen fixation rates peaked at different moments in the dark: relatively early in the 16L : 8D cycle, at midnight in 12L : 12D, and relatively late in 8L : 16D. Under 16L : 8D, nitrogen fixation extended into the light, demonstrating the functional plasticity of nitrogen fixation in Cyanothece. Highest daily amounts of nitrogen fixed were obtained in 12L : 12D, which is consistent with the natural LD cycle of subtropical latitudes in which Cyanothece thrives.

  13. Increasing importance of deposition of reduced nitrogen in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Schichtel, Bret A.; Walker, John T.; Schwede, Donna B.; Chen, Xi; Lehmann, Christopher M. B.; Puchalski, Melissa A.; Gay, David A.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of agriculture and fossil fuel combustion greatly increased US reactive nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere in the second half of the 20th century, resulting in excess nitrogen deposition to natural ecosystems. Recent efforts to lower nitrogen oxides emissions have substantially decreased nitrate wet deposition. Levels of wet ammonium deposition, by contrast, have increased in many regions. Together these changes have altered the balance between oxidized and reduced nitrogen deposition. Across most of the United States, wet deposition has transitioned from being nitrate-dominated in the 1980s to ammonium-dominated in recent years. Ammonia has historically not been routinely measured because there are no specific regulatory requirements for its measurement. Recent expansion in ammonia observations, however, along with ongoing measurements of nitric acid and fine particle ammonium and nitrate, permit new insight into the balance of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the total (wet + dry) US nitrogen deposition budget. Observations from 37 sites reveal that reduced nitrogen contributes, on average, ∼65% of the total inorganic nitrogen deposition budget. Dry deposition of ammonia plays an especially key role in nitrogen deposition, contributing from 19% to 65% in different regions. Future progress toward reducing US nitrogen deposition will be increasingly difficult without a reduction in ammonia emissions. PMID:27162336

  14. Increasing importance of deposition of reduced nitrogen in the United States.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Schichtel, Bret A; Walker, John T; Schwede, Donna B; Chen, Xi; Lehmann, Christopher M B; Puchalski, Melissa A; Gay, David A; Collett, Jeffrey L

    2016-05-24

    Rapid development of agriculture and fossil fuel combustion greatly increased US reactive nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere in the second half of the 20th century, resulting in excess nitrogen deposition to natural ecosystems. Recent efforts to lower nitrogen oxides emissions have substantially decreased nitrate wet deposition. Levels of wet ammonium deposition, by contrast, have increased in many regions. Together these changes have altered the balance between oxidized and reduced nitrogen deposition. Across most of the United States, wet deposition has transitioned from being nitrate-dominated in the 1980s to ammonium-dominated in recent years. Ammonia has historically not been routinely measured because there are no specific regulatory requirements for its measurement. Recent expansion in ammonia observations, however, along with ongoing measurements of nitric acid and fine particle ammonium and nitrate, permit new insight into the balance of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the total (wet + dry) US nitrogen deposition budget. Observations from 37 sites reveal that reduced nitrogen contributes, on average, ∼65% of the total inorganic nitrogen deposition budget. Dry deposition of ammonia plays an especially key role in nitrogen deposition, contributing from 19% to 65% in different regions. Future progress toward reducing US nitrogen deposition will be increasingly difficult without a reduction in ammonia emissions. PMID:27162336

  15. Management to reduce nitrogen losses in animal production.

    PubMed

    Rotz, C A

    2004-01-01

    Reduction of nitrogen loss in animal production requires whole-farm management. Reduced loss from one farm component is easily negated in another if all components are not equally well managed. Animal excretion of manure N can be decreased by improving the balance of protein or amino acids fed to that required by individual animals or animal groups or by improving production efficiency. Management to increase milk, meat, or egg production normally improves efficiency by reducing the maintenance protein required per unit of production. Large losses of manure nitrogen occur through the ammonia and nitrous oxide that are emitted into the atmosphere and the nitrate leached into groundwater. Up to half of the excreted nitrogen is lost from the housing facility, but this loss can be decreased through frequent manure removal and by avoiding deep litter systems and feedlots. Techniques such as acid treatment of manure, scrubbing of ventilation air, and floor designs for separating feces and urine substantially reduce ammonia emissions, but these practices are often impractical or uneconomical for general use. Manure storage units improve nutrient utilization by allowing better timing of nutrient application with crop needs. At least 70% of the nitrogen entering anaerobic lagoons is typically lost, but a less than 10% loss can be maintained using slurry storage with a natural crust or other cover, or by drying poultry manure to at least 50% dry matter. Irrigation and surface spreading of manure without soil incorporation often ensures the loss of all remaining nonorganic nitrogen (typically, 20 to 40% of remaining nitrogen). Rapid incorporation and shallow injection methods decrease this loss by at least 50%, and deep injection into the soil essentially eliminates this loss. For grazing animals, excessive loss can be avoided by not overstocking pastures and avoiding late fall and winter grazing. Reducing emissions between the animal and the soil can lead to greater leaching

  16. Effect of sole nitrogen sources and temperature on activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Mines, R.O. Jr.; Sherrard, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    The effects of temperature on biokinetic coefficients used to design aerobic biological systems treating nitrogen deficient wastewaters at a COD: TKN ratio of 13.7:1 are presented. The impact of temperature on substrate removal, waste biosolids production, and oxygen requirements with the effects of nitrification is delineated at temperatures of 5 C, 10 C, 20 C, and 30 C for two nitrogen sources; ammonia and nitrate. Temperature correction coefficients ({theta}) are presented and the implications for the design and operation of suspended growth biological systems are discussed.

  17. Rapid coulometric method for the Kjeldahl determination of nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Boström, C A; Cedergren, A; Johansson, G; Pettersson, I

    1974-11-01

    A rapid coulometric method for the Kjeldahl determination of nitrogen is described. The samples are digested by means of the Tecator AB digestion system which permits forty samples to be digested at the same time. The digestion products are diluted to 75 ml and 1 ml is coulometrically titrated in 1-2 min: 20-30 determinations can be performed per hour. For substances containing nitrogen in the per cent range the relative standard deviations for eight different substances were 0.1-1%.

  18. Spatial pattern of nitrogen deposition flux over Czech forests: a novel approach accounting for unmeasured nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hůnová, Iva; Stoklasová, Petra; Kurfürst, Pavel; Vlček, Ondřej; Schovánková, Jana; Stráník, Vojtěch

    2015-04-01

    atmospheric nitrogen deposition flux over the Czech forests collating all available data and model results. The aim of the presented study is to provide an improved, more reliable and more realistic estimate of spatial pattern of nitrogen deposition flux over one country. This has so far been based standardly on measurements of ambient N/NOx concentrations as dry deposition proxy, and N/NH4+ and N/NO3- as wet deposition proxy. For estimate of unmeasured species contributing to dry deposition, we used an Eulerian photochemical dispersion model CAMx, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (ESSS, 2011), coupled with a high resolution regional numeric weather prediction model Aladin (Vlček, Corbet, 2011). Contribution of fog was estimated using a geostatistical data driven model. Final maps accounting for unmeasured species clearly indicate, that so far used approach results in substantial underestimation of nitrogen deposition flux. Substitution of unmeasured nitrogen species by modeled values seems to be a plausible way for approximation of total nitrogen deposition, and getting more realistic spatial pattern as input for further studies of likely nitrogen impacts on ecosystems. Acknowledgements: We would like to acknowledge the grants GA14-12262S - Effects of changing growth conditions on tree increment, stand production and vitality - danger or opportunity for the Central-European forestry?, and NAZV QI112A168 (ForSoil) of the Czech Ministry for Agriculture for support of this contribution. The input data used for the analysis were provided by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute. References: Bobbink, R., Hicks, K., Galloway, J., Spranger, T., Alkemade, R. et al. (2010): Global Assessment of Nitrogen Deposition Effects on Terrestrial Plant Diversity: a Synthesis. Ecological Applications 20 (1), 30-59. Fowler D., O'Donoghue M., Muller J.B.A, et al. (2005): A chronology of nitrogen deposition in the UK between 1900 and 2000. Watter, Air & Soil Pollution: Focus

  19. The nitrogen cycle on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1989-01-01

    Nirtogen is an essential element for the evolution of life, because it is found in a variety of biologically important molecules. Therefore, N is an important element to study from a exobiological perspective. In particular, fixed nitrogen is the biologically useful form of nitrogen. Fixed nitrogen is generally defines as NH3, NH4(+), NO(x), or N that is chemically bound to either inorganic or organic molecules, and releasable by hydrolysis to NH3 or NH4(+). On Earth, the vast majority of nitrogen exists as N2 in the atmosphere, and not in the fixes form. On early Mars the same situations probably existed. The partial pressure of N2 on early Mars was thought to be 18 mb, significantly less than that of Earth. Dinitrogen can be fixed abiotically by several mechanisms. These mechanisms include thernal shock from meteoritic infall and lightning, as well as the interaction of light and sand containing TiO2 which produces NH3 that would be rapidly destroyed by photolysis and reaction with OH radicals. These mechanisms could have been operative on primitive Mars.The chemical processes effecting these compounds and possible ways of fixing or burying N in the Martian environment are described. Data gathered in this laboratory suggest that the low abundance of nitrogen along (compared to primitive Earth) may not significantly deter the origin and early evolution of a nitrogen utilizing organisms. However, the conditions on current Mars with respect to nitrogen are quite different, and organisms may not be able to utilize all of the available nitrogen.

  20. Enhanced nitrogen deposition over China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Ying; Han, Wenxuan; Tang, Aohan; Shen, Jianlin; Cui, Zhenling; Vitousek, Peter; Erisman, Jan Willem; Goulding, Keith; Christie, Peter; Fangmeier, Andreas; Zhang, Fusuo

    2013-02-28

    China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen. These emissions result in the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with implications for human and ecosystem health, greenhouse gas balances and biological diversity. However, information on the magnitude and environmental impact of N deposition in China is limited. Here we use nationwide data sets on bulk N deposition, plant foliar N and crop N uptake (from long-term unfertilized soils) to evaluate N deposition dynamics and their effect on ecosystems across China between 1980 and 2010. We find that the average annual bulk deposition of N increased by approximately 8 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare (P < 0.001) between the 1980s (13.2 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare) and the 2000s (21.1 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare). Nitrogen deposition rates in the industrialized and agriculturally intensified regions of China are as high as the peak levels of deposition in northwestern Europe in the 1980s, before the introduction of mitigation measures. Nitrogen from ammonium (NH4(+)) is the dominant form of N in bulk deposition, but the rate of increase is largest for deposition of N from nitrate (NO3(-)), in agreement with decreased ratios of NH3 to NOx emissions since 1980. We also find that the impact of N deposition on Chinese ecosystems includes significantly increased plant foliar N concentrations in natural and semi-natural (that is, non-agricultural) ecosystems and increased crop N uptake from long-term-unfertilized croplands. China and other economies are facing a continuing challenge to reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen, N deposition and their negative effects on human health and the environment. PMID:23426264

  1. Enhanced nitrogen deposition over China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Ying; Han, Wenxuan; Tang, Aohan; Shen, Jianlin; Cui, Zhenling; Vitousek, Peter; Erisman, Jan Willem; Goulding, Keith; Christie, Peter; Fangmeier, Andreas; Zhang, Fusuo

    2013-02-28

    China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen. These emissions result in the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with implications for human and ecosystem health, greenhouse gas balances and biological diversity. However, information on the magnitude and environmental impact of N deposition in China is limited. Here we use nationwide data sets on bulk N deposition, plant foliar N and crop N uptake (from long-term unfertilized soils) to evaluate N deposition dynamics and their effect on ecosystems across China between 1980 and 2010. We find that the average annual bulk deposition of N increased by approximately 8 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare (P < 0.001) between the 1980s (13.2 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare) and the 2000s (21.1 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare). Nitrogen deposition rates in the industrialized and agriculturally intensified regions of China are as high as the peak levels of deposition in northwestern Europe in the 1980s, before the introduction of mitigation measures. Nitrogen from ammonium (NH4(+)) is the dominant form of N in bulk deposition, but the rate of increase is largest for deposition of N from nitrate (NO3(-)), in agreement with decreased ratios of NH3 to NOx emissions since 1980. We also find that the impact of N deposition on Chinese ecosystems includes significantly increased plant foliar N concentrations in natural and semi-natural (that is, non-agricultural) ecosystems and increased crop N uptake from long-term-unfertilized croplands. China and other economies are facing a continuing challenge to reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen, N deposition and their negative effects on human health and the environment.

  2. [Effects of plant density and nitrogen level on nitrogen uptake and utilization of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Wu, Tong-hua; Dai, Xing-long; Wang, Xi-zhi; Li, Hong-mei; Jiang, Ming-yang; He, Ming-rong

    2015-06-01

    A two-year (2011-2012 and 2012-2013) field experiment was conducted on one winter wheat cultivar supplied with two levels, of nitrogen (180 and 240 kg N · hm(-2)) under three plant densities (135 x 10(4), 270 x 10(4), and 405 x 10(4) plants · hm(-2)) . The 15N-labeled urea was injected into 20, 60 and 100 cm soil depths, respectively, aiming to investigate the effect of nitrogen and plant density and their interaction on the N uptake, utilization and nitrate nitrogen contents at different soil depths. The results showed that increasing the plant density from 135 x 10(4) to 405 x 10(4) plants · hm(-2) significantly increased the 15N uptake at depths of 20, 60 and 100 cm averagely by 1.86, 2.28 and 2.51 kg · hm(-2), respectively, and increased the above ground N uptake (AGN) , N uptake efficiency (UPE) averagely by 12.6% and 12.6%, respectively, but decreased the N utilization efficiency (UTE) by 5.4%. Compared to the N input of 240 kg N · hm(-2) the 180 kg N · hm(-2) significantly reduced the 15N uptake at depths of 20 and 60 cm averagely by 4. 11 and 1.21 kg · hm(-2), respectively, and significantly increased the 15N uptake at depths of 100 cm averagely by 1.02 kg · hm(-2). Reducing the N input decreased the AGN averagely by 13.5%, but significantly increased the UPE and UTE by 9.4% and 12.2%, respectively. Equivalent grain yield was observed among N input of 180 kg N · hm(-2) with plant density of 405 x 10(4) plants · hm(-2) and N input of 240 kg N · hm(-2) with plant densities of 270 x 10(4) and 405 x 10(4) plants · hm(-2). Increasing the plant density or reducing the N input could encourage the N uptake at deep soil profile and increased UPE and UTE by 13.4% and 11.9%, respectively. Meanwhile, both the nitrate nitrogen contents in 0-200 cm soil layers at maturity and the ratio of the nitrate nitrogen in 100-200 cm soil layers to that in -200 cm were significantly decreased. Therefore, properly decreasing the N input with increasing the plant density

  3. Odd nitrogen production by meteoroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Menees, G. P.

    1978-01-01

    The process by which odd nitrogen species (atomic nitrogen and nitric oxide) are formed during atmospheric entry of meteoroids is analyzed theoretically. An ablating meteoroid is assumed to be a point source of mass with a continuum regime evolving in its wake. The amounts of odd nitrogen species, produced by high-temperature reactions of air in the continuum wake, are calculated by numerical integration of chemical rate equations. Flow properties are assumed to be uniform across the wake, and 29 reactions involving five neutral species and five singly ionized species are considered, as well as vibrational and electron temperature nonequilibrium phenomena. The results, when they are summed over the observed mass, velocity, and entry-angle distribution of meteoroids, provide odd-nitrogen-species annual global production rates as functions of altitude. The peak production of nitric oxide is found to occur at an altitude of about 85 km; atomic nitrogen production peaks at about 95 km. The total annual rate for nitric oxide is 40 million kg; for atomic nitrogen it is 170 million kg.

  4. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  5. 20 CFR 656.20 - Audit procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Audit procedures. 656.20 Section 656.20... FOR PERMANENT EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Labor Certification Process § 656.20 Audit procedures. (a) Review of the labor certification application may lead to an audit of the...

  6. 20 CFR 602.20 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Organization. 602.20 Section 602.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR QUALITY CONTROL IN THE FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE SYSTEM State Responsibilities § 602.20 Organization. Each State shall establish a...

  7. 20 CFR 602.20 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Organization. 602.20 Section 602.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR QUALITY CONTROL IN THE FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE SYSTEM State Responsibilities § 602.20 Organization. Each State shall establish a...

  8. 20 CFR 602.20 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Organization. 602.20 Section 602.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR QUALITY CONTROL IN THE FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE SYSTEM State Responsibilities § 602.20 Organization. Each State shall establish a...

  9. 20 CFR 602.20 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Organization. 602.20 Section 602.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR QUALITY CONTROL IN THE FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE SYSTEM State Responsibilities § 602.20 Organization. Each State shall establish a...

  10. 20 CFR 602.20 - Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Organization. 602.20 Section 602.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR QUALITY CONTROL IN THE FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE SYSTEM State Responsibilities § 602.20 Organization. Each State shall establish a...

  11. 20 CFR 656.20 - Audit procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Additionally, certain applications may be selected randomly for audit and quality control purposes. If an... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Audit procedures. 656.20 Section 656.20... FOR PERMANENT EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Labor Certification Process § 656.20...

  12. Evaluation of a spacecraft nitrogen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Powell, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    A method is discussed of generating nitrogen for cabin leakage makeup aboard space vehicles having longer duration missions. The nitrogen generation concept is based on using liquid hydrazine as the stored form of nitrogen to reduce the higher tankage and expendables weight associated with high pressure gaseous or cryogenic liquid nitrogen storage. The hydrazine is catalytically dissociated to yield a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen. The nitrogen/hydrogen mixture is then separated to yield the makeup nitrogen. The excess supply of hydrogen would be available for use in the reduction of metabolic carbon dioxide. A detailed comparison was completed of Palladium/Silver and Polymer Electrochemical-based Nitrogen Generation Systems. The palladium/silver-based system was judged better than the Polymer Electrochemical Nitrogen Generation System because of lower expendable weight and palladium/silver nitrogen/hydrogen separation represents 'off-the-shelf' technology.

  13. Reactive nitrogen and the world: 200 years of change.

    PubMed

    Galloway, James N; Cowling, Ellis B

    2002-03-01

    This paper examines the impact of food and energy production on the global N cycle by contrasting N flows in the late-19th century with those of the late-20th century. We have a good understanding of the amounts of reactive N created by humans, and the primary points of loss to the environment. However, we have a poor understanding of nitrogen's rate of accumulation in environmental reservoirs, which is problematic because of the cascading effects of accumulated N in the environment. The substantial regional variability in reactive nitrogen creation, its degree of distribution, and the likelihood of increased rates of reactive-N formation (especially in Asia) in the future creates a situation that calls for the development of a Total Reactive Nitrogen Approach that will optimize food and energy production and protect environmental systems.

  14. Predominantly non-solar origin of nitrogen in lunar soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Anand, M.

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous static-mode mass spectrometric measurements of nitrogen, carbon, helium, neon, and argon, extracted from the same aliquot of sample by high-resolution stepped combustion, have been made for a suite of five lunar soils. Noble gas isotope ratios show that the majority of noble gases are derived from a solar wind source; for example, at peak release temperatures of 500-600 °C, 21Ne/22Ne = 0.0313 ± 0.0007 to 0.0333 ± 0.0007, and 20Ne/22Ne = 11.48 ± 0.05 to 12.43 ± 0.07, with values at the lowest temperature steps less fractionated during implantation from, and therefore even closer to, solar values (21Ne/22NeSW = 0.03361 ± 0.00018 and 20Ne/22NeSW = 14.001 ± 0.042 (Pepin et al., 2012)). Despite the co-release of nitrogen and solar wind argon, measured nitrogen isotopic signatures at each temperature step, whilst variable, are significantly more enriched in 15N compared to the measured solar wind nitrogen value from the Genesis mission. Therefore, mixing between a 15N-enriched non-solar planetary nitrogen source with solar wind nitrogen is required to explain the measured isotopic values from the stepped combustion analysis of lunar soils. Binary mixing calculations, made under different assumptions about the degree of loss of solar wind 36Ar, reveal that the majority (up to 98%) of the nitrogen released is derived from a non-solar source. The range of modelled non-solar end-member nitrogen compositions required to satisfy the measured δ15N values varies between samples and temperature steps from +5‰ up to +300‰, or between +87‰ and +160‰ for bulk samples. This range of modelled isotopic compositions for the non-solar source of nitrogen encompasses measured values for several different groups of carbonaceous chondrite, as well as IDPs.

  15. The terrestrial nitrogen budget of the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Burt, T. P.; Howden, N. K.; Whelan, M.

    2010-12-01

    This study estimates the total annual nitrogen budget of the UK from 1990 to 2020. The following inputs of nitrogen are considered: inorganic fertilizer, atmospheric deposition; food and feed imports; and biological nitrogen fixation. The outputs considered include: atmospheric emissions; direct losses of sewage and industrial effluent to the sea; fluvial losses at source; food and feed exports; and terrestrial and aquatic denitrification to N2. The study is the first to include in-stream losses and terrestrial denitrification to N2 into a national nitrogen budget: in so doing it does not have to assume the total budget is in balance following inter-annual changes. Unlike previous studies, this study is not limited to reactive nitrogen species. It is shown here that: i) Inputs of inorganic fertilizer declined significantly over the study period; atmospheric deposition showed no change and food and feed imports significantly increased. ii) Outputs of fluvial nitrogen rose significantly, but atmospheric emissions of N20 and NH3 declined dramatically, while dentrification to N2 remained steady. iii) The UK was a net source of total nitrogen in 1990 of 527 (±40%) ktonnes N/yr (22 kg N/ha/yr). By 2005, it was a net source of 172 (±106%) ktonnes N/yr (7 kg N/ha/yr). iv) The prognosis for the N budget of the UK to 2020 is critically dependent upon the future trends and trade-offs between atmospheric emissions and applications of inorganic fertilisers. If atmospheric emissions follow current trends then by 2020 the net sink of total N in the UK will be 44 ktonnes N/yr, if atmospheric emissions are restricted to current UK government emissions targets, then the UK will be a net source of Total N of 151 ktonnes N/yr as reductions in the application of inorganic fertiliser outstrip declines in atmospheric emissions.

  16. Insulating geothermal well casings from thermal stress with nitrogen gas or nitrogen foam

    SciTech Connect

    Dreesen, D.S.; Murphy, H.D.; Zyvoloski, G.; McEligot, D.M.; Dash, Z.; Nicholson, R.N.

    1984-08-26

    Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Site Well EE-3 was designed and completed to function as a completion of the reservoirs with the injection well, EE-2, progressed it become evident that it would be desirable to fracture in EE-3 as well to obtain a flow connection between the wells. Unfortunately, the 9-5/8'' od production casing in EE-3 had been pretensioned to 885,000 lbs to accommodate its intended service as a hot water production well. Cool-down of the casing was thus limited to only 11/sup 0/C (20/sup 0/F) to keep the stress in the top joints of the casing below the minimum yield stress, or else the pretension had to be released. Before incurring the risk and expense required to release the tension, fracturing experiments were performed to evaluate the use gaseous nitrogen and 75% quality nitrogen-gel foam as insulating media in an annular wellbore configuration, i.e., the nitrogen gas or foam was placed in the annular gap between the tubing string and the casing.

  17. Connecting the dots: linking nitrogen cycle gene expression to nitrogen fluxes in marine sediment mesocosms

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Jennifer L.; Babbin, Andrew R.; Kearns, Patrick J.; Ward, Bess B.

    2014-01-01

    Connecting molecular information directly to microbial transformation rates remains a challenge, despite the availability of molecular methods to investigate microbial biogeochemistry. By combining information on gene abundance and expression for key genes with quantitative modeling of nitrogen fluxes, we can begin to understand the scales on which genetic signals vary and how they relate to key functions. We used quantitative PCR of DNA and cDNA, along with biogeochemical modeling to assess how the abundance and expression of microbes responsible for two steps in the nitrogen cycle changed over time in estuarine sediment mesocosms. Sediments and water were collected from coastal Massachusetts and maintained in replicated 20 L mesocosms for 45 days. Concentrations of all major inorganic nitrogen species were measured daily and used to derive rates of nitrification and denitrification from a Monte Carlo-based non-negative least-squares analysis of finite difference equations. The mesocosms followed a classic regeneration sequence in which ammonium released from the decomposition of organic matter was subsequently oxidized to nitrite and then further to nitrate, some portion of which was ultimately denitrified. Normalized abundances of ammonia oxidizing archaeal ammonia monoxoygenase (amoA) transcripts closely tracked rates of ammonia oxidation throughout the experiment. No such relationship, however, was evident between denitrification rates and the normalized abundance of nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) transcripts. These findings underscore the complexity of directly linking the structure of the microbial community to rates of biogeochemical processes. PMID:25191309

  18. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lambert, W E; Samet, J M; Hunt, W C; Skipper, B J; Schwab, M; Spengler, J D

    1993-06-01

    Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone. The agreement of the time-weighted nitrogen dioxide exposure estimates with the bedroom concentrations is attributed to limited amounts of cooking stove use (the

  19. Regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chemotaxis by the nitrogen source.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, R; Montie, T C

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of amino acid chemotaxis by nitrogen was investigated in the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The quantitative capillary tube technique was used to measure chemotactic responses of bacteria to spatial gradients of amino acids and other attractants. Chemotaxis toward serine, arginine, and alpha-aminoisobutyrate was sharply dependent on the form in which nitrogen was presented to the bacteria. Bacteria grown on mineral salts-succinate with potassium nitrate gave responses to amino acids that were 2 to 3 times those of cells grown on ammonium sulfate and 10 to 20 times those of cells grown in mineral salts-succinate with Casamino Acids as the nitrogen source. A combination of ammonium sulfate and glutamate was as effective as Casamino Acids in depressing serine taxis. The threshold concentration for alpha-aminoisobutyrate taxis was consistently lower in nitrate-grown bacteria than in ammonia-grown bacteria. Responsiveness to sodium succinate, however, was not subject to regulation by nitrogen, and glucose chemotaxis was inhibited, rather than enhanced, in nitrate-grown bacteria. These results indicate that chemotaxis of P. aeruginosa toward amino acids is subject to regulation by nitrogen and that this regulation probably is expressed at the level of the chemoreceptors or transducers. PMID:3932326

  20. Membrane rejection of nitrogen compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Rejection characteristics of nitrogen compounds were examined for reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and low-pressure reverse osmosis membranes. The rejection of nitrogen compounds is explained by integrating experimental results with calculations using the extended Nernst-Planck model coupled with a steric hindrance model. The molecular weight and chemical structure of nitrogen compounds appear to be less important in determining rejection than electrostatic properties. The rejection is greatest when the Donnan potential exceeds 0.05 V or when the ratio of the solute radius to the pore radius is greater than 0.8. The transport of solute in the pore is dominated by diffusion, although convective transport is significant for organic nitrogen compounds. Electromigration contributes negligibly to the overall solute transport in the membrane. Urea, a small organic compound, has lower rejection than ionic compounds such as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite, indicating the critical role of electrostatic interaction in rejection. This suggests that better treatment efficiency for organic nitrogen compounds can be obtained after ammonification of urea.

  1. Estimating the social costs of nitrogen pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourevitch, J.; Keeler, B.; Polasky, S.

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural expansion can degrade water quality and related ecosystem services through increased export of nutrients. Such damages to water quality can negatively affect recreation, property values, and human health. While the relationship between agricultural production and nitrogen export is well-studied, the economic costs of nitrogen loss are less well understood. We present a comprehensive assessment of the full costs associated with nitrate pollution from agricultural sources in Minnesota. We found that the most significant economic costs are likely from groundwater contamination of nitrate in public and private wells. For example, we estimated that loss of grassland to corn cultivation in Minnesota between 2007 and 2012 is expected to increase the future number of domestic wells exceeding nitrate concentrations of 10 ppm by 31%. This increase in contamination is estimated to cost well owners $1.4 to 19 million (present values over a 20 year horizon) through remediation, avoidance, and replacement. Our findings demonstrate linkages between changes in land use, water quality, and human well-being.

  2. Modelling the nitrogen loadings from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) cage aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huiwen; Ross, Lindsay G; Telfer, Trevor C; Wu, Changwen; Zhu, Aiyi; Zhao, Sheng; Xu, Meiying

    2016-04-01

    Large yellow croaker (LYC) cage farming is a rapidly developing industry in the coastal areas of the East China Sea. However, little is known about the environmental nutrient loadings resulting from the current aquaculture practices for this species. In this study, a nitrogenous waste model was developed for LYC based on thermal growth and bioenergetic theories. The growth model produced a good fit with the measured data of the growth trajectory of the fish. The total, dissolved and particulate nitrogen outputs were estimated to be 133, 51 and 82 kg N tonne(-1) of fish production, respectively, with daily dissolved and particulate nitrogen outputs varying from 69 to 104 and 106 to 181 mg N fish(-1), respectively, during the 2012 operational cycle. Greater than 80 % of the nitrogen input from feed was predicted to be lost to the environment, resulting in low nitrogen retention (<20 %) in the fish tissues. Ammonia contributed the greatest proportion (>85 %) of the dissolved nitrogen generated from cage farming. This nitrogen loading assessment model is the first to address nitrogenous output from LYC farming and could be a valuable tool to examine the effects of management and feeding practices on waste from cage farming. The application of this model could help improve the scientific understanding of offshore fish farming systems. Furthermore, the model predicts that a 63 % reduction in nitrogenous waste production could be achieved by switching from the use of trash fish for feed to the use of pelleted feed.

  3. NITROGEN OUTPUTS OF SMALL MAMMALS FROM FECAL AND URINE DEPOSITION: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of small mammals in nitrogen cycling is poorly understood and could have reverberations back to the producer community by maintaining or even magnifying increased nitrogen availability. Our objective was to model nitrogen outputs (deposition of feces and urine) ...

  4. Characteristics of Nitrogen Balances of Large-scale Stock Farms and Reduction of Environmental Nitrogen Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Toshihiro; Takamatsu, Rieko

    We calculated nitrogen balances on farm gate and soil surface on large-scale stock farms and discussed methods for reducing environmental nitrogen loads. Four different types of public stock farms (organic beef, calf supply and daily cows) were surveyed in Aomori Prefecture. (1) Farm gate and soil surface nitrogen inflows were both larger than the respective outflows on all types of farms. Farm gate nitrogen balance for beef farms were worse than that for dairy farms. (2) Soil surface nitrogen outflows and soil nitrogen retention were in proportion to soil surface nitrogen inflows. (3) Reductions in soil surface nitrogen retention were influenced by soil surface nitrogen inflows. (4) In order to reduce farm gate nitrogen retention, inflows of formula feed and chemical fertilizer need to be reduced. (5) In order to reduce soil surface nitrogen retention, inflows of fertilizer need to be reduced and nitrogen balance needs to be controlled.

  5. Managing nitrogen for sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Davidson, Eric A; Mauzerall, Denise L; Searchinger, Timothy D; Dumas, Patrice; Shen, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them. PMID:26595273

  6. Managing nitrogen for sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Davidson, Eric A.; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Searchinger, Timothy D.; Dumas, Patrice; Shen, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them.

  7. Managing nitrogen for sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Davidson, Eric A; Mauzerall, Denise L; Searchinger, Timothy D; Dumas, Patrice; Shen, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them.

  8. Missing nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasmund, Norbert; Struck, Ulrich; Hansen, Anja; Flohr, Anita; Nausch, Günther; Grüttmüller, Annett; Voss, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Opposing opinions on the importance of nitrogen fixation in the northern Benguela upwelling region provoked us to investigate the magnitude of nitrogen fixation in front of northern Namibia and southern Angola. Measurements of nitrogen fixation rates using the 15N method at 66 stations during seven cruises from 2008 to 2014 showed that, in general, the 15N content in the biomass did not increase after tracer incubation with 15N2, indicating that no nitrogen fixation occurred. Correspondingly, the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium was almost not present. The abundant picocyanobacteria did obviously not perform nitrogen fixation to a significant degree. The artificial improvement of conditions for nitrogen fixation in mesocosm experiments, including phosphate and iron additions and a warmer temperature, failed to induce nitrogen fixation. A plausible explanation of these findings is a lack of conditioned cells for nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region.

  9. Terrestrial nitrogen cycles: Some unanswered questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitousek, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen is generally considered to be the element which most often limits the growth of plants in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. It regulates plant growth because photosynthetic rates are strongly dependent on the concentration of nitrogen in leaves, and because relatively large mounts of protein are required for cell division and growth. Yet nitrogen is abundant in the biosphere - the well-mixed pool in the atmosphere is considered inexhaustible compared to biotic demand, and the amount of already fixed organic nitrogen in soils far exceeds annual plant uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. In regions where natural vegetation is not nitrogen limited, continuous cultivation induces nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen loss from cultivated lands is more rapid than that of other elements, and nitrogen fertilization is generally required to maintain crop yield under any continuous system. The pervasiveness of nitrogen deficiency in many natural and most managed sites is discussed.

  10. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants

    PubMed Central

    Behie, Scott W.; Bidochka, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively) are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF) provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates. PMID:26462427

  11. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants.

    PubMed

    Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively) are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF) provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates. PMID:26462427

  12. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants.

    PubMed

    Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2013-07-31

    Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively) are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF) provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  13. Nitrogen in plasmas and steel weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Todd Allen

    Nitrogen concentrations, well above those predicted by Sieverts' Law, are observed during the arc welding of iron and steel. Several models, which take into account the absorption of monatomic nitrogen and a competition between nitrogen absorption and desorption, have been developed. None, though, provides a means for accurately calculating the nitrogen concentration in a steel weldment, as a function of the welding variables. The aim of this work is therefore to develop a comprehensive model to accurately predict the nitrogen concentration in the weld pool and validate the model with experimental data. Transport phenomena, plasma physics, and thermodynamic calculations have been combined to produce realistic calculations of the nitrogen concentration in the weld metal. The computed residual nitrogen concentrations are affected by complex factors, including the amount of nitrogen in the feed gas, the electron temperature distribution above the weld pool, and the nature of the fluid flow in the weld pool. Each of these factors has been taken into consideration here. Of primary importance in the calculation of the nitrogen concentration is the effect of desorption of dissolved nitrogen from the weld pool via bubble formation. Based on a comparison of modeling and experimental results, it is found that a supersaturation of nitrogen in the liquid metal 50 to 100% greater than the equilibrium nitrogen solubility with one atmosphere of diatomic nitrogen at the weld pool surface is required for bubbles to nucleate. These calculated values have been compared with residual nitrogen concentrations measured for various welding conditions. Experimental nitrogen concentrations fall between 400 and 650 ppm, and the manner in which the nitrogen concentration changes with the nitrogen partial pressure in the feed gas is affected by the changes in the welding speed. Model calculations compare favorably with these experimental results. In total, therefore, this work represents the

  14. Membrane Separation Of Nitrogen Tetroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, R. C.; Kaschemekat, J.; Helm, V. D.; Shrock, P. H.; Wijmans, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Pilot plant reduces N2O4 content to one-hundredth of inlet value. Permeable-membrane process removes nitrogen tetroxide from stream of nitrogen or helium gas. Operates in conjunction with scrubbing process removing N2O4 from He or N2 after He or N2 used as gas blanket in N2O4-storage tank. First stage of separator divided into two steps for efficiency. Permeate from second step of first stage and residue from second stage returned to inlet of first stage. Each module contains spiral-wound interleaved permeable membranes and spacer sheets.

  15. METHOD OF FIXING NITROGEN FOR PRODUCING OXIDES OF NITROGEN

    DOEpatents

    Harteck, P.; Dondes, S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for fixing nitrogen from air by compressing the air, irradiating the compressed air in a nuclear reactor, cooling to remove NO/ sub 2/, compressing the cooled gas, further cooling to remove N/sub 2/O and recirculating the cooled compressed air to the reactor.

  16. Nitrogen Isotopes - Tracers for Nitrogen Transformations in Small Constructed Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, M.; Gaechter, R.; Mueller, B.; Wehrli, B.

    2005-05-01

    Small artificial wetlands are increasingly applied to reduce non-point source pollution and to contribute to the restoration of eutrophicated freshwaters and coastal marine ecosystems. In the agricultural catchment area of Lake Sempach in Central Switzerland, several wetlands were constructed at the interface between subsurface drainage system and receiving waters. In order to evaluate nitrogen retention efficiency of the systems and to identify major processes controlling their performance, nitrate, ammonium, particulate and dissolved organic nitrogen in the inflowing and outflowing water as well as δ15N of nitrate, ammonium and sediment were analyzed in a three pond system. During the studied 26 months the wetland retained 27% of the nitrogen load corresponding to a surface related retention of 51g N m-2 yr-1. Nitrate in the inlet contributed 48% to the total nitrogen load and was characterized by high δ15N-NO3(>13‰) typical for intensively manured grassland soils. Increasing δ15N-NO3 in the wetland compared to the inlet was attributed to denitrification whereas decreasing δ15N-NO3 during stagnant periods was due to anoxic mineralization of particulate organic matter and subsequent nitrification.

  17. Evaluation of a spacecraft nitrogen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Lee, M. K.; Schubert, F. H.

    1978-01-01

    A research and development program was successfully completed towards the development of a method of generating nitrogen for cabin leakage makeup aboard space vehicles. The nitrogen generation concept used liquid hydrazine as the stored form of nitrogen. This reduced tankage and expendables weight associated with high pressure gaseous and cryogenic liquid nitrogen storage. The hydrazine was catalytically dissociated to yield a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen. The latter was separated to provide the makeup nitrogen. The hydrogen will be used in the reduction of metabolic carbon dioxide.

  18. TiO2 doped with nitrogen: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Abazović, Nadica D; Montone, Amelia; Mirenghi, Luciana; Janković, Ivana A; Comor, Mirjana I

    2008-02-01

    In this study, nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2) powders were synthesized in two ways: by heating of titanium hydroxide with urea and by direct hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) with ammonium hydroxide. The samples were characterized by structural (XRD), analytical (XPS), optical (UV/Vis absorption/reflection and Raman spectroscopy) and morphological (SEM, TEM) techniques. The characterization suggested that the doped materials have anatase crystalline form without any detectable peaks that correspond to dopants. The absorption threshold of titanium dioxide was moved in the visible range of optical spectrum from 3.2 eV to 2.20 eV. Particle sizes of synthesized powders were obtained from XRD measurements and from TEM data ranging from 6-20 nm. XPS and Raman spectroscopy were used for detection of nitrogen in doped samples. PMID:18464379

  19. Sequestration of Carbon in Mycorrhizal Fungi Under Nitrogen Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treseder, K. K.; Turner, K. M.

    2005-12-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are root symbionts that facilitate plant uptake of soil nutrients in exchange for plant carbohydrates. They grow in almost every terrestrial ecosystem on earth, form relationships with about 80% of plant species, and receive 10 to 20% of the carbon fixed by their host plants. As such, they could potentially sequester a significant amount of carbon in ecosystems. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would decrease carbon storage in mycorrhizal fungi, because plants should reduce investment of carbon in mycorrhizal fungi when nitrogen availability is high. We measured the abundance of two major groups of mycorrhizal fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, in control and nitrogen-fertilized plots within three boreal ecosystems of inland Alaska. The ecosystems represented different recovery stages following severe fire, and comprised a young site dominated by AM fungi, an old site dominated by ECM fungi, and an intermediate site co-dominated by both groups. Pools of mycorrhizal carbon included root-associated AM and ECM structures, soil-associated AM hyphae, and soil-associated glomalin. Glomalin is a glycoprotein produced only by AM fungi. It is present in the cell walls of AM hyphae, and then is deposited in the soil as the hyphae senesce. Nitrogen significantly altered total mycorrhizal carbon pools, but its effect varied by site (site * N interaction, P = 0.05). Under nitrogen fertilization, mycorrhizal carbon was reduced from 99 to 50 g C m2 in the youngest site, was increased from 124 to 203 g C m2 in the intermediate-aged site, and remained at 35 g C m2 in the oldest site. The changes in total mycorrhizal carbon stocks were driven mostly by changes in glomalin (site * N interaction, P = 0.05), and glomalin stocks were strongly correlated with AM hyphal abundance (P < 0.01). Nevertheless, it is not clear why AM hyphae responded differently to nitrogen fertilization in the different sites. Carbon stocks within

  20. Woody encroachment by nitrogen-fixing species: impacts on nitrogen biogeochemistry expressed through nitrogen trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, J. P.; West, J. B.; Boutton, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment is a globally important vegetation change that continues to transform former grasslands or savannas into woodlands. This dramatic and geographically widespread phenomenon appears to be driven primarily by human land use changes, including reduced fire frequency and heavy livestock grazing. Observed effects of increased woody plant abundance in grasslands generally include alterations of above- and belowground productivity, changes in the chemistry of litter inputs, modifications to rooting depths and distributions, altered biogeochemical and hydrologic processes, and changes in microclimate and energy balance. These changes to fundamental ecosystem characteristics have strong, but relatively poorly understood, potential to modify biogeochemical processes that can themselves influence regional and global climate through biogeochemistry-climate feedbacks. In addition, in South Texas woody encroachment has occurred across a complex landscape differing in soil type and water retention. This work tests the hypothesis that woody encroachment, in addition to increasing total nitrogen stocks in the system, has increased nitrogen losses due to increased rates of nitrogen soil gas efflux. Under dry soil conditions and in contrast to this hypothesis, reactive nitrogen soil efflux (NO + NOy + NH3) was 21.53 ± 3.4 ng N m-2 s-1 in intact grasslands compared to 6.23 ± 1.6 ng N m-2 s-1 in woodlands on the same soil type. The non-reactive nitrogen gas, nitrous oxide, was similar in magnitude between the grassland and encroached sites (~ 7 ng N m-2 s-1). Under moist soil conditions, the magnitude of flux increased and order of magnitude, but did not change the relative ranking. Measurements of soil respiration rate and microbial biomass suggest higher microbial activity in the encroached environment and potentially higher rates of immobilization by plants and microbes. Landscape position had a large overall effect on soil nitrogen trace gas efflux with

  1. Effect of MeV nitrogen ion implantation on the resistivity transition in Czochralski silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byeong-Sam; Lee, In-Ji; Park, Jea-Gun

    2012-12-01

    We investigated how MeV nitrogen ion implantation affects the resistivity transition in Czochralski (CZ) silicon wafers. After annealing at 800 °C for 20 h and again at 1000 °C for 10 h, the implanted nitrogen atoms accumulated in the projected range (R P ) for ion doses less than 5 × 1014 cm-2 whereas they accumulated at both R P /2 and R P at ion doses above 3 × 1015 cm-2. These results indicate that no resistivity transition was found at nitrogen ion doses less than 5 × 1013 cm-2 whereas n-/p or n+/p resistivity transition was shown at ion doses higher than 5 × 1014 cm-2. Many fewer than 1% of the implanted nitrogen atoms were ionized after the heat treatment. Thus, the resistivity of nitrogen-doped silicon wafers is more than 100 times higher than that of phosphorous-doped silicon wafers.

  2. Spectroscopic determination of the phase composition and temperature of nitrogen ice on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryka, K. A.; Brown, R. H.; Anicich, V.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Owen, T. C.

    1993-08-01

    Laboratory spectra of the first overtone band (2.1480 microns, 4655.4 reciprocal cm) of solid nitrogen show additional structure at 2.1618 microns (4625.8 reciprocal cm) over a limited temperature range. The spectrum of Neptune's satellite Triton shows the nitrogen overtone band as well as the temperature-sensitive component. The temperature dependence of this band may be used in conjunction with ground-based observations of Triton as an independent means of determining the temperature of surface deposits of nitrogen ice. The surface temperature of Triton is found to be 38.0 +2.0 or -1.0 K, in agreement with previous temperature estimates and measurements. There is no spectral evidence for the presence of alpha-nitrogen on Triton's surface, indicating that there is less than 10 percent carbon monoxide in solid solution with the nitrogen on the surface.

  3. Spectroscopic determination of the phase composition and temperature of nitrogen ice on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryka, Kimberly A.; Brown, Robert H.; Anicich, Vincent; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Owen, Tobias C.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory spectra of the first overtone band (2.1480 microns, 4655.4 reciprocal cm) of solid nitrogen show additional structure at 2.1618 microns (4625.8 reciprocal cm) over a limited temperature range. The spectrum of Neptune's satellite Triton shows the nitrogen overtone band as well as the temperature-sensitive component. The temperature dependence of this band may be used in conjunction with ground-based observations of Triton as an independent means of determining the temperature of surface deposits of nitrogen ice. The surface temperature of Triton is found to be 38.0 +2.0 or -1.0 K, in agreement with previous temperature estimates and measurements. There is no spectral evidence for the presence of alpha-nitrogen on Triton's surface, indicating that there is less than 10 percent carbon monoxide in solid solution with the nitrogen on the surface.

  4. Nitrogen line spectroscopy of O-stars. II. Surface nitrogen abundances for O-stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero González, J. G.; Puls, J.; Najarro, F.; Brott, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Nitrogen is a key element for testing the impact of rotational mixing on evolutionary models of massive stars. Recent studies of the nitrogen surface abundance in B-type stars within the VLT-FLAMES survey of massive stars have challenged part of the corresponding predictions. To obtain a more complete picture of massive star evolution, and to allow for additional constraints, these studies need to be extended to O-stars. Aims: This is the second paper in a series aiming at the analysis of nitrogen abundances in O-type stars, to establish tighter constraints on the early evolution of massive stars. In this paper, we investigate the N ivλ4058 emission line formation, provide nitrogen abundances for a substantial O-star sample in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and compare our (preliminary) findings with recent predictions from stellar evolutionary models. Methods: Stellar and wind parameters of our sample stars were determined by line profile fitting of hydrogen, helium and nitrogen lines, exploiting the corresponding ionization equilibria. Synthetic spectra were calculated by means of the NLTE atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code fastwind, using a new nitrogen model atom. We derived nitrogen abundances for 20 O- and 5 B-stars by analyzing all nitrogen lines (from different ionization stages) present in the available optical spectra. Results: The dominating process responsible for emission at N ivλ4058 in O-stars is the strong depopulation of the lower level of the transition, which increases as a function of Ṁ. Unlike the N iii triplet emission, resonance lines do not play a role for typical mass-loss rates and below. We find (almost) no problem in fitting the nitrogen lines, in particular the "f" features. Only for some objects, where lines from N iii/N iv/N v are visible in parallel, we need to opt for a compromise solution. For five objects in the early B-/late O-star domain that have been previously analyzed by different methods and model atmospheres, we

  5. Adaptive Management Tools for Nitrogen: Nitrogen Index, Nitrogen Trading Tool and Nitrogen Losses Environmental Assessment Package (NLEAP-GIS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Average nitrogen (N) use efficiencies are approximately fifty percent and can be even lower for shallower rooted systems grown on irrigated sandy soils. These low N use efficiencies need to be increased if reactive N losses to the environmental are to be reduced. Recently, USDA-NRCS identified Adapt...

  6. The Origin of Planetary Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Niemann, H.; Mahaffy, P.; Atreya, S.

    2006-01-01

    The nitrogen found today in planetary atmospheres appears to come from two sources: N2 and condensed, nitrogen-containing compounds. On Jupiter and thus presumably on the other giant planets, the nitrogen is present mainly as ammonia but was apparently delivered primarily in the form of N2, whereas on the inner planets and Titan, the nitrogen is present as N2 but was delivered as condensed compounds, dominated by ammonia. This analysis is consistent with abundance data from the Interstellar Medium and models for the solar nebula. For Jupiter and the inner planets, it is substantiated by measurements of N-l5/N-14 and is supported by investigations of comets and meteorites, soon to be supplemented by solar wind data from the Genesis Mission. The Cassini-Huygens Mission may be able to constrain models for Saturn s ammonia abundance that could test the proportion of N2 captured by the planet. The Titan story is less direct, depending on studies of noble gases. These studies in turn suggest an evolutionary stage of the early Earth s atmosphere that included the ammonia and methane postulated by S. L. Miller (1953) in his classical experiments on the production of biogenic compounds.

  7. Nitrogen Availability in Proterozoic Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, M.; Stüeken, E. E.; Buick, R.

    2014-12-01

    Recent bulk δ15N measurements transecting the Mesoproterozoic Belt Supergroup basin by Stüeken (2013) showed a trend of heavier δ15N values in shallow and peritidal environments to lighter δ15N values in deep water environments. This indicates a gradient in nitrogen metabolisms from quantitative nitrification, partial denitrification, and assimilation of the residual NO3- onshore (with most δ15N values greater than 2‰), to nitrogen fixation offshore (δ15N values less than 2‰). Here we present nitrogen isotope data from the roughly contemporaneous Bangemall Group in northwestern Australia and the Roper Group in northern Australia, both showing an average ~1‰ enrichment from deep to shallow facies. A maximum range from 0.9‰ (deep) to 5.8‰ (shallow) and 1.4‰ (deep) to 4.8‰ (shallow) is observed in the Bangemall and Roper Groups respectively. Viewed together with the maximum 7‰ basinal trend of the Belt Supergroup, these results suggest (a) that bioavailable nitrate limitation offshore may have been widespread in the Mesoproterozoic, and (b) that there was significant variability between basins in the degree of onshore-offshore nitrogen speciation. Prolonged nitrate limitation in offshore environments may have globally prevented the radiation of eukaryotes into deeper waters. Differences between the isotope profiles of the Belt Supergroup and the Bangemall Group may be attributed to varying degrees of restriction of each basin to the ocean.

  8. The Joys of Liquid Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, William T.; Gish, Thaddeus J.

    1996-01-01

    Presents 6 short experiments with liquid nitrogen that 12- and 13-year-old students can safely perform under close supervision. Helps the students in learning a number of basic chemical principles while spurring their curiosity and showing them how much fun chemistry can be. (JRH)

  9. Artificial wetlands performance: nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Durán-de-Bazúa, Carmen; Guido-Zárate, Alejandro; Huanosta, Thalía; Padrón-López, Rosa Martha; Rodríguez-Monroy, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Artificial wetlands (AW) are a promising option for wastewater treatment in small communities due to their high performance in nutrients removal and low operation and maintenance costs. Nitrogen can favour the growth of algae in water bodies causing eutrophication when present at high concentrations. Nitrogen can be removed through different mechanisms (e.g. nitrification-denitrification, adsorption and plant uptake). Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity can play an important role in the performance of these systems by promoting the growth of macrophytes such as reeds and cattails (e.g. Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia respectively). In this paper, two AW systems were compared, one located in Mexico City, Mexico at an altitude higher than 2,000 m above the sea level, and the second one located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico at an a altitude near the sea level (27 m). Both systems comprised five reactors (147-L plastic boxes) filled with volcanic slag and gravel and intermittently fed with synthetic water. The removal nitrogen efficiency found for the system located in Mexico City was higher than that of the Tabasco system (90 and 80% as TKN respectively). The higher temperatures in the Tabasco system did not enhanced the nitrogen removal as expected.

  10. Nitrogen Fixation: An Interdisciplinary Frontier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneller, Stewart W.

    1972-01-01

    Research has progressed from three major directions--biological, chemical, and non-enzymatic. Hopefully all three will converge and will explain not only the process, but also introduce new means for modifying the molecule to meet the nutritional needs of man in areas now incapable of self support without fixed nitrogen. (DF)

  11. Replenishment and mobilization of intracellular nitrogen pools decouples wine yeast nitrogen uptake from growth.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alicia; Sancho, Marta; Beltran, Gemma; Guillamon, José Manuel; Warringer, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    Wine yeast capacity to take up nitrogen from the environment and catabolize it to support population growth, fermentation, and aroma production is critical to wine production. Under nitrogen restriction, yeast nitrogen uptake is believed to be intimately coupled to reproduction with nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) suggested mediating this link. We provide a time- and strain-resolved view of nitrogen uptake, population growth, and NCR activity in wine yeasts. Nitrogen uptake was found to be decoupled from growth due to early assimilated nitrogen being used to replenish intracellular nitrogen pools rather than being channeled directly into reproduction. Internally accumulated nitrogen was later mobilized to support substantial population expansion after external nitrogen was depleted. On good nitrogen sources, the decoupling between nitrogen uptake and growth correlated well with relaxation of NCR repression, raising the potential that the latter may be triggered by intracellular build-up of nitrogen. No link between NCR activity and nitrogen assimilation or growth on poor nitrogen sources was found. The decoupling between nitrogen uptake and growth and its influence on NCR activity is of relevance for both wine production and our general understanding of nitrogen use.

  12. [Characteristics of dry matter production and nitrogen accumulation in barley genotypes with high nitrogen utilization efficiency].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Li, Ting-Xuan; Zhang, Xi-Zhou; Ji, Lin

    2014-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted under low (125 mg x kg-1) and normal (250 mg x kg(-1)) nitrogen treatments. The nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency of 22 barley cultivars were investigated, and the characteristics of dry matter production and nitrogen accumulation in barley were analyzed. The results showed that nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency were different for barley under two nitrogen levels. The maximal values of grain yield, nitrogen utilization efficiency for grain and nitrogen harvest index were 2.87, 2.91 and 2.47 times as those of the lowest under the low nitrogen treatment. Grain yield and nitrogen utilization efficiency for grain and nitrogen harvest index of barley genotype with high nitrogen utilization efficiency were significantly greater than low nitrogen utilization efficiency, and the parameters of high nitrogen utilization efficiency genotype were 82.1%, 61.5% and 50.5% higher than low nitrogen utilization efficiency genotype under the low nitrogen treatment. Dry matter mass and nitrogen utilization of high nitrogen utilization efficiency was significantly higher than those of low nitrogen utilization efficiency. A peak of dry matter mass of high nitrogen utilization efficiency occurred during jointing to heading stage, while that of nitrogen accumulation appeared before jointing. Under the low nitrogen treatment, dry matter mass of DH61 and DH121+ was 34.4% and 38.3%, and nitrogen accumulation was 54. 8% and 58.0% higher than DH80, respectively. Dry matter mass and nitrogen accumulation seriously affected yield before jointing stage, and the contribution rates were 47.9% and 54.7% respectively under the low nitrogen treatment. The effect of dry matter and nitrogen accumulation on nitrogen utilization efficiency for grain was the largest during heading to mature stages, followed by sowing to jointing stages, with the contribution rate being 29.5% and 48.7%, 29.0% and 15.8%, respectively. In conclusion, barley genotype with high

  13. [Effects of reduced nitrogen application and soybean intercropping on nitrogen balance of sugarcane field].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Wen-ting; Li, Zhi-xian; Guan, Ao-mei

    2015-03-01

    A four-year (2010-2013) field experiment was carried out to explore the effects of three planting patterns (sugarcane, soybean monoculture and sugarcane-soybean 1:2 intercropping) with two nitrogen input levels (300 and 525 kg . hm-2) on soybean nitrogen fixation, sugarcane and soybean nitrogen accumulation, and ammonia volatilization and nitrogen leaching in sugarcane field. The results showed that the soybean nitrogen fixation efficiency (NFE) of sugarcane-soybean inter-cropping was lower than that of soybean monoculture. There was no significant difference in NFE among the treatments with the two nitrogen application rates. The nitrogen application rate and inter-cropping did not remarkably affect nitrogen accumulation of sugarcane and soybean. The ammonia volatilization of the reduced nitrogen input treatment was significantly lower than that of the conventional nitrogen input treatment. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in nitrogen leaching at different nitrogen input levels and among different planting patterns. The sugarcane field nitrogen balance analysis indicated that the nitrogen application rate dominated the nitrogen budget of sugarcane field. During the four-year experiment, all treatments leaved a nitrogen surplus (from 73.10 to 400.03 kg . hm-2) , except a nitrogen deficit of 66.22 kg . hm-2 in 2011 in the treatment of sugarcane monoculture with the reduced nitrogen application. The excessive nitrogen surplus might increase the risk of nitrogen pollution in the field. In conclusion, sugarcane-soybean intercropping with reduced nitrogen application is feasible to practice in consideration of enriching the soil fertility, reducing nitrogen pollution and saving production cost in sugarcane field.

  14. The 20-20-20 Airships NASA Centennial Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Alina; Diaz, Ernesto; Rhodes, Jason; Ortega, Sam; Eberly, Eric

    2015-08-01

    A 2013 Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) study examined airships as a possible platform for Earth and space science. Airships, lighter than air, powered, maneuverable vehicles, could offer significant gains in observing time, sky and ground coverage, data downlink capability, and continuity of observations over existing suborbital options at competitive prices. The KISS study recommended three courses of action to spur the development and use of airships as a science platform. One of those recommendations was that a prize competition be developed to demonstrate a stratospheric airship. Consequently, we have been developing a NASA Centennial Challenge; (www.nasa.gov/challenges) to spur innovation in stratospheric airships as a science platform. We anticipate a multi-million dollar class prize for the first organization to fly a powered airship that remains stationary at 20km (65,000 ft) altitude for over 20 hours with a 20kg payload. The design must be scalable to longer flights with more massive payloads. A second prize tier, for a 20km flight lasting 200 hours with a 200kg payload would incentivize a further step toward a scientifically compelling and viable new platform. This technology would also have broad commercial applications including communications, asset tracking, and surveillance. Via the 20-20-20 Centennial Challenge, we are seeking to spur private industry (or non-profit institutions, including Universities) to demonstrate the capability for sustained airship flights as astronomy and Earth science platforms.

  15. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  16. Regional inventory of soil surface nitrogen balances in Indian agriculture (2000-2001).

    PubMed

    Prasad, V Krishna; Badarinath, K V S; Yonemura, S; Tsuruta, H

    2004-11-01

    Nitrogen regulates several ecological and biogeochemical processes and excess reactive nitrogen in the environment can lead to pollution problems, including the deterioration of air quality, disruption of forest processes, acidification of lakes and streams, and degradation of coastal waters. Much of the excess nitrogen inputs are related to food and energy production. An important step to understanding the sources of nitrogen and ultimately defining solutions to excess nitrogen is to describe the geographic distribution of agricultural nitrogen contributions from different regions. In this study, soil surface nitrogen loads were quantified for different states of India for the period 2000-2001. Nearly 35.4 Tg of nitrogen has been estimated as inputs from different sources, with output nitrogen from harvested crops of about 21.20 Tg. The soil surface nitrogen balance, estimated as inputs minus outputs, is found to be about 14.4 Tg surplus from the agricultural land of India. Livestock manure constituted a major percentage of total inputs (44.06%), followed by inorganic fertilizer (32.48%), atmospheric deposition (11.86%) and nitrogen fixation (11.58%). Nitrogen balance varied from deficit to surplus for different states. The highest nitrogen surplus was found in Uttar Pradesh (2.50 Tg) followed by Madhya Pradesh (1.83 Tg), Andhra Pradesh (1.79 Tg), etc. A negative nitrogen balance was found in Orissa (-0.01 Tg), Andaman Nicobar Islands (-0.32 Tg) and for some of the northeastern states. Major fertilizer consumption states were found to be Tamilnadu (204 kg/ha), Haryana (132 kg/ha), Punjab (148 kg/ha), followed by others. Similarly, nitrogen inputs from total livestock excretions were found to be high for Kerala (616 kg/ha), Jammu and Kashmir (389 kg/ha), Tamil Nadu (338 kg/ha), etc. The average nitrogen surplus of about 54 kg/ha observed for the agricultural land of the entire country of India is comparatively higher than the average surplus of about 31 kg

  17. Method of preparing nitrogen containing semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Barber, Greg D.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2004-09-07

    A method of combining group III elements with group V elements that incorporates at least nitrogen from a nitrogen halide for use in semiconductors and in particular semiconductors in photovoltaic cells.

  18. Determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Tetzlaff, J. E.

    1970-01-01

    Quantitative determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride involves dissolution of TiN in 10M hydrofluoric acid containing an oxidant. Released nitrogen is determined as ammonia. Best oxidizers are ferric chloride, potassium iodate, and potassium dichromate.

  19. Cagelike diamondoid nitrogen at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yanchao; Miao, Maosheng; Zhong, Xin; Lv, Jian; Cui, Tian; Li, Jianfu; Chen, Li; Pickard, Chris J; Ma, Yanming

    2012-10-26

    Under high pressure, triply bonded molecular nitrogen dissociates into singly bonded polymeric nitrogen, a potential high-energy-density material. The discovery of stable high-pressure forms of polymeric nitrogen is of great interest. We report the striking stabilization of cagelike diamondoid nitrogen at high pressures predicted by first-principles structural searches. The diamondoid structure of polymeric nitrogen has not been seen in any other elements, and it adopts a highly symmetric body-centered cubic structure with lattice sites occupied by diamondoids, each of which consists of ten nitrogen atoms, forming a N(10) tetracyclic cage. Diamondoid nitrogen possesses a wide energy gap and is energetically most stable among all known polymeric structures above 263 GPa, a pressure that is accessible to a high-pressure experiment. Our findings represent a significant step toward the understanding of the behavior of solid nitrogen at extreme conditions.

  20. Recent studies of the ocean nitrogen cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppley, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle in the ocean is dominated by the activities of organisms. External nitrogen inputs from land and from the atmosphere are small compared with rates of consumption and production by organisms and with rates of internal rearrangements of nitrogen pools within the ocean. The chief reservoirs of nitrogen are, in decreasing order of size: nitrogen in sediments, dissolved N2, nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), particulate organic nitrogen (PON) (mostly organisms and their by-products). The biogenic fluxes of nitrogen were reviewed. The rate of PON decomposition in the surface layer must be comparable to the rate of ammonium consumption; and at the same time the nitrate consumption rate will be similar to the rates of: (1) sinking of PON out of the surface layer and its decompositon at depth, (2) the rate of nitrification at depth, and (3) the rate of nitrate return to the surface layer by upwelling.

  1. Cagelike diamondoid nitrogen at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yanchao; Miao, Maosheng; Zhong, Xin; Lv, Jian; Cui, Tian; Li, Jianfu; Chen, Li; Pickard, Chris J; Ma, Yanming

    2012-10-26

    Under high pressure, triply bonded molecular nitrogen dissociates into singly bonded polymeric nitrogen, a potential high-energy-density material. The discovery of stable high-pressure forms of polymeric nitrogen is of great interest. We report the striking stabilization of cagelike diamondoid nitrogen at high pressures predicted by first-principles structural searches. The diamondoid structure of polymeric nitrogen has not been seen in any other elements, and it adopts a highly symmetric body-centered cubic structure with lattice sites occupied by diamondoids, each of which consists of ten nitrogen atoms, forming a N(10) tetracyclic cage. Diamondoid nitrogen possesses a wide energy gap and is energetically most stable among all known polymeric structures above 263 GPa, a pressure that is accessible to a high-pressure experiment. Our findings represent a significant step toward the understanding of the behavior of solid nitrogen at extreme conditions. PMID:23215200

  2. Utilization of urea nitrogen in Papua New Guinea highlanders.

    PubMed

    Rikimaru, T; Fujita, Y; Okuda, T; Kajiwara, N; Date, C; Heywood, P F; Alpers, M P; Koishi, H

    1985-06-01

    The utilization of urea nitrogen was examined in 10 healthy adult men from a village near Lufa, in the Eastern Highlands Province of Papua New Guinea. The staple diet of these men was sweet potatoes. [15N]urea was used as tracer for urea released into their intestinal tracts and the utilization of the urea-N was estimated from the trend of 15N. The men were orally given [15N]urea at the beginning of the study and then their daily protein intake, serum protein levels, 15N excretion in the feces and urine, 15N retention in the whole body and 15N incorporation into serum protein were examined. Their daily protein intake (32.2 +/- 8.6 g/day) was low, but their serum protein level (8.05 +/- 0.41 g/100 ml) was within the normal range. 15N retention in the whole body on day 3 was estimated to be 35.4 +/- 20.2% of the total amount administered, calculated from the recoveries in the feces (1.64 +/- 0.85%) and urine (63.0 +/- 20.5%) on days 1-3. The utilization of urea nitrogen in Papua New Guinea highlanders was confirmed from the finding of 15N incorporation into serum proteins on day 3 (0.008 +/- 0.005 atom% excess). This incorporation was negatively correlated with the urinary nitrogen excretion and serum protein level. This correlation suggests that Papua New Guinea highlanders with low urinary nitrogen excretion or a low level in serum protein, who are in a poor state of protein nutrition, tend to utilize more urea nitrogen for the synthesis of serum protein.

  3. Modeling nitrogen fluxes in Germany - where does the nitrogen go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, Laura; Bach, Martin; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    According to the latest inventory of the EU Water Framework Directive, 26.3% of German groundwater bodies are in a poor chemical state regarding nitrate. Additionally, the EU initiated infringement proceedings against Germany for not meeting the quality standards of the EU Nitrate Directive. Agriculture has been determined as the main source of nitrate pollution due to over-fertilization and regionally high density of livestock farming. The nitrogen balance surplus is commonly used as an indicator characterizing the potential of nitrate leaching into groundwater bodies and thus also serves as a foundation to introduce legislative restrictions or to monitor the success of mitigation measures. Currently, there is an ongoing discussion which measures are suitable for reducing the risk of nitrate leaching and also to what extent. However, there is still uncertainty about just how much the nitrogen surplus has to be reduced to meet the groundwater quality standards nationwide. Therefore, the aims of our study were firstly to determine the level of the nitrogen surplus that would be acceptable at the utmost and secondly whether the currently discussed target value of 30 kg N per hectare agricultural land for the soil surface nitrogen balance would be sufficient. The models MONERIS (Modeling Nutrient Emissions in River System) and MoRE (Modelling of Regionalized Emissions), the latter based on the first, are commonly used for estimating nitrogen loads into the river system in Germany at the mesoscale, as well as the effect of mitigation measures in the context of the EU directive 2008/105/EC (Environmental quality standards applicable to surface water). We used MoRE to calculate nitrate concentration for 2759 analytical units in Germany. Main factors are the surplus of the soil surface nitrogen balance, the percolation rate and an exponent representing the denitrification in the vadose zone. The modeled groundwater nitrate concentrations did not correspond to the regional

  4. 21 CFR 582.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen. 582.1540 Section 582.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Nitrogen. (a) Product. Nitrogen. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrogen. 582.1540 Section 582.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Nitrogen. (a) Product. Nitrogen. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  6. 46 CFR 154.1755 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nitrogen. 154.1755 Section 154.1755 Shipping COAST GUARD... Nitrogen. Except for deck tanks and their piping systems, cargo containment systems and piping systems carrying nitrogen must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-OES)....

  7. 46 CFR 154.1755 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nitrogen. 154.1755 Section 154.1755 Shipping COAST GUARD... Nitrogen. Except for deck tanks and their piping systems, cargo containment systems and piping systems carrying nitrogen must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-522)....

  8. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No....

  9. 46 CFR 154.1755 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitrogen. 154.1755 Section 154.1755 Shipping COAST GUARD... Nitrogen. Except for deck tanks and their piping systems, cargo containment systems and piping systems carrying nitrogen must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-522)....

  10. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No....

  11. 21 CFR 582.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrogen. 582.1540 Section 582.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Nitrogen. (a) Product. Nitrogen. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No. 7727-37-9) is a colorless,...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1755 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nitrogen. 154.1755 Section 154.1755 Shipping COAST GUARD... Nitrogen. Except for deck tanks and their piping systems, cargo containment systems and piping systems carrying nitrogen must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-OES)....

  14. 21 CFR 582.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrogen. 582.1540 Section 582.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Nitrogen. (a) Product. Nitrogen. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen. 582.1540 Section 582.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Nitrogen. (a) Product. Nitrogen. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1755 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nitrogen. 154.1755 Section 154.1755 Shipping COAST GUARD... Nitrogen. Except for deck tanks and their piping systems, cargo containment systems and piping systems carrying nitrogen must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-OES)....

  17. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No....

  18. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No....

  19. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  20. Growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in chemostat cultures under carbon-, nitrogen-, or carbon- and nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Larsson, C; von Stockar, U; Marison, I; Gustafsson, L

    1993-08-01

    Aerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed under carbon-, nitrogen-, and dual carbon- and nitrogen-limiting conditions. The glucose concentration was kept constant, whereas the ammonium concentration was varied among different experiments and different dilution rates. It was found that both glucose and ammonium were consumed at the maximal possible rate, i.e., the feed rate, over a range of medium C/N ratios and dilution rates. To a small extent, this was due to a changing biomass composition, but much more important was the ability of uncoupling between anabolic biomass formation and catabolic energy substrate consumption. When ammonium started to limit the amount of biomass formed and hence the anabolic flow of glucose, this was totally or at least partly compensated for by an increased catabolic glucose consumption. The primary response when glucose was present in excess of the minimum requirements for biomass production was an increased rate of respiration. The calculated specific oxygen consumption rate, at D = 0.07 h-1, was more than doubled when an additional nitrogen limitation was imposed on the cells compared with that during single glucose limitation. However, the maximum respiratory capacity decreased with decreasing nitrogen concentration. The saturation level of the specific oxygen consumption rate decreased from 5.5 to 6.0 mmol/g/h under single glucose limitation to about 4.0 mmol/g/h at the lowest nitrogen concentration tested. The combined result of this was that the critical dilution rate, i.e., onset of fermentation, was as low as 0.10 h-1 during growth in a medium with a low nitrogen concentration compared with 0.20 h-1 obtained under single glucose limitation.

  1. NITROGEN CONCENTRATION OF STOMACH CONTENTS AS AN INDEX OF DIETARY NITROGEN FOR HISPID COTTON RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the reliability of using nitrogen concentration of stomach contents from hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) as an index of diet nitrogen. Stomach contents of cotton rats fed diets varying in nitrogen concentration were analyzed for stomach nitrogen. Regression a...

  2. Can the anaerobic potentially mineralizable nitrogen test improve predictions of fertilizer nitrogen rates in the Cornbelt?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Correctly estimating the amount of mineralizable nitrogen (N) can enhance nitrogen use efficiency. The anaerobic potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMNAn) test is a tool that may help improve predictions of N uptake, grain yield, and the economical optimum nitrogen rate (EONR) of corn (Zea mays L...

  3. Nitrogenous dispersants, lubricants and concentrates containing said nitrogenous dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Pindar, J.F.; Bryant, C.P.; Cohen, J.M.

    1984-06-12

    Compositions useful as lubricant and fuel dispersants are prepared by reacting an intermediate (A) of the formulae, wherein each R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon-based group, Ar is an aromatic moiety having at least one aliphatic substituent of at least 6 carbon atoms and x is 1 to about 10, with an amino compound (B) which contains one or more amino groups having hydrogen bonded directly to an amino nitrogen.

  4. 2005 AG20/20 Annual Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton W.; McKellip, Rodney D.

    2005-01-01

    Topics covered include: Implementation and Validation of Sensor-Based Site-Specific Crop Management; Enhanced Management of Agricultural Perennial Systems (EMAPS) Using GIS and Remote Sensing; Validation and Application of Geospatial Information for Early Identification of Stress in Wheat; Adapting and Validating Precision Technologies for Cotton Production in the Mid-Southern United States - 2004 Progress Report; Development of a System to Automatically Geo-Rectify Images; Economics of Precision Agriculture Technologies in Cotton Production-AG 2020 Prescription Farming Automation Algorithms; Field Testing a Sensor-Based Applicator for Nitrogen and Phosphorus Application; Early Detection of Citrus Diseases Using Machine Vision and DGPS; Remote Sensing of Citrus Tree Stress Levels and Factors; Spectral-based Nitrogen Sensing for Citrus; Characterization of Tree Canopies; In-field Sensing of Shallow Water Tables and Hydromorphic Soils with an Electromagnetic Induction Profiler; Maintaining the Competitiveness of Tree Fruit Production Through Precision Agriculture; Modeling and Visualizing Terrain and Remote Sensing Data for Research and Education in Precision Agriculture; Thematic Soil Mapping and Crop-Based Strategies for Site-Specific Management; and Crop-Based Strategies for Site-Specific Management.

  5. 28 CFR 20.20 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... History Record Information Systems § 20.20 Applicability. (a) The regulations in this subpart apply to all State and local agencies and individuals collecting, storing, or disseminating criminal history record... subpart C. (b) The regulations in this subpart shall not apply to criminal history record...

  6. Imaging carbon and nitrogen concentrations for narcotics and explosives screening

    SciTech Connect

    Trower, W.P.

    1993-12-31

    The author describes a nuclear technique for imaging carbon and nitrogen concentrations with surface densities characteristics of bulk narcotics and concealed explosives, the Carbon and the Nitrogen Camera. The physics is rooted in the tightly bound carbon-12 nucleus to which its neighboring isobars, nitrogen-12 and boron-12, decay rapidly (11 and 20 ms), mostly to its ground state, by emitting energetic beta particles (E{sub {beta}}{sup max} {approximately} 13 and 17 MeV) all of which produce bremsstrahlung and some yield annihilate radiation. The signal, photons detected in the multiscalar mode, results from the reactions {sup 13}C({gamma},p){sup 12}{Beta} for the bulk narcotics application and {sup 14}N({gamma},2n){sup 12}N and 14N({gamma},2p){sup 12}{Beta} for explosives detection and are initiated by a stepped pulsed electron beam with energy of {approximately} 30 and {approximately} 50 MeV, respectively. Images of 180 {approximately} 5 cm{sup 2} pixels taken in {approximately} 7 seconds will be presented of the carbon in a kilo of cocaine and the nitrogen in 125 grams of SEMTEX.

  7. Nitrogen fluxes in a high elevation Colorado Rocky Mountain basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, J.S.; Campbell, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Measured, calculated and simulated values were combined to develop an annual nitrogen budget for Loch Vale Watershed (LVWS) in the Colorado Front Range. Nine-year average wet nitrogen deposition values were 1??6 (s = 0??36) kg NO3-N ha-1, and 1??0 (s = 0??3) kg NH4-N ha-1. Assuming dry nitrogen deposition to be half that of measured wet deposition, this high elevation watershed receives 3??9 kg N ha-1. Although deposition values fluctuated with precipitation, measured stream nitrogen outputs were less variable. Of the total N input to the watershed (3??9 kg N ha-1 wet plus dry deposition), 49% of the total N input was immobilized. Stream losses were 2??0 kg N ha-1 (1125 kg measured dissolved inorganic N in 1992, 1-2 kg calculated dissolved organic N, plus an average of 203 kg algal N from the entire 660 ha watershed). Tundra and aquatic algae were the largest reservoirs for incoming N, at approximately 18% and 15% of the total 2574 kg N deposition, respectively. Rocky areas and forest stored the remaining 11% and 5%, respectively. Fully 80% of N losses from the watershed came from the 68% of LVWS that is alpine. ?? 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Mineralization of atrazine in agricultural soil: inhibition by nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Guillén Garcés, Rosa Angélica; Hansen, Anne M; van Afferden, Manfred

    2007-05-01

    Microbial mineralization of atrazine was characterized in soils and liquid media in the presence of nitrogen fertilizer concentrations representing typical field applications. The mineralization of atrazine in soils varied between 6 and 99% after 18 d of incubation. Half-lives of between 0.99 and more than 18 d were obtained. Mineralization kinetics and degree are related by a reciprocal trend to concentrations of available nitrogen in the soil. In liquid media, half-lives were calculated as 0.12 d in the absence of fertilizer nitrogen and as 79 d in the presence of 1,000 mg/L of KNO3-N. Only 20% of atrazine was mineralized after 18 d of incubation in the presence of this concentration of KNO3-N, whereas greater than 90% mineralization occurred after 2 d of incubation in liquid medium without KNO3-N. The results demonstrate that the mineralization of atrazine is inhibited even at fertilizer nitrogen levels lower than typical field applications. Inhibition in soil is lower than that in liquid medium, possibly because of the higher complexity of the soil system. This may explain why atrazine that infiltrates to the groundwater is persistent. The microbial consortium of the soils was characterized, and seven species were identified. The degrading capacity of these species suggests that only three species are involved in the degradation of atrazine.

  9. Characterization of lunar nitrogen components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    Rocks of known and disparate cosmic-ray ages are analyzed to find the spallation production rate of N-15. A soil breccia of known formation age was analyzed for its bearing on the antiquity of the isotopically light component. Further stepwise heating analysis of soils shed further light on occurrences of the components. Lunar soil samples were etched slightly by fluorine, revealing significant differences in isotopic ratios between carbon on grain surfaces and bulk carbon; the surface carbon is not retained during agglutinate formation. Etching revealed that about 25% of the total nitrogen resides on the surface of grains; the nitrogen is isotopically heavy. Etching also revealed about 50% of helium in soils residing below the readily etched outermost 1% of soil grain surfaces.

  10. Enzymology and ecology of the nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Cole, Jeffrey A; Richardson, David J; Watmough, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle describes the processes through which nitrogen is converted between its various chemical forms. These transformations involve both biological and abiotic redox processes. The principal processes involved in the nitrogen cycle are nitrogen fixation, nitrification, nitrate assimilation, respiratory reduction of nitrate to ammonia, anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) and denitrification. All of these are carried out by micro-organisms, including bacteria, archaea and some specialized fungi. In the present article, we provide a brief introduction to both the biochemical and ecological aspects of these processes and consider how human activity over the last 100 years has changed the historic balance of the global nitrogen cycle.

  11. The effect of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on marine nitrogen cycling throughout the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somes, Christopher; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The rapidly increasing rate of anthropogenic nitrogen deposition has the potential to perturb marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles because nitrogen is one of the major limiting nutrients in the ocean. We use an Earth System Climate Model that includes ocean biogeochemistry to assess the impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Experiments are conducted where we artificially add nitrogen to nearly all locations individually throughout the global surface ocean using a nitrogen deposition rate of 700 mg N m-2 yr-1, which is consistent with modern estimates near industrial areas. We identify oceanic "biomes" that respond differently to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. (1) When nitrogen is deposited near oxygen minimum zones where water column denitrification occurs, locally increased primary production stimulates additional denitrification. Since water column denitrification removes 7 mol N for every mol N of newly formed organic matter respired, the global oceanic nitrogen inventory declines in response to nitrogen deposition in these areas. This slow, but steady decline persists for at least 1,000 years. (2) When nitrogen is deposited above shallow continental shelves where benthic denitrification occurs, our benthic denitrification model predicts an increase that is nearly equal to the nitrogen deposited and thus no net change in the global nitrogen inventory. (3) When nitrogen is deposited into the high latitude open ocean far removed from nitrogen fixation and denitrification, all of this deposited nitrogen initially accumulates in the ocean. This nitrogen eventually circulates into the tropical oxygen minimum zones where it fuels additional primary production and denitrification, which removes nitrogen at a rate equal to the deposition after 1,000 years and leads to a stable, but increased nitrogen inventory in our model. (4) When nitrogen is deposited into the open ocean where nitrogen fixation occurs, nitrogen fixation decreases due to less nitrogen

  12. Ecology of the nitrogen cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sprent, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of two parts, approximately equal in size. The first part covers the general features of the nitrogen cycle, while the second part consists of case histories from particular environments. These include arid and semi-arid areas, tundras, peat soils, lakes, marshes, and such saline systems as salt marshes, coral reefs, intertidal zones, and the open sea. The last chapter discusses the human impact on the cycle through agriculture, forestry, and acidification.

  13. Human influences on nitrogen removal in lakes.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Jacques C; Small, Gaston E; Sterner, Robert W

    2013-10-11

    Human activities have increased the availability of reactive nitrogen in many ecosystems, leading to negative impacts on human health, biodiversity, and water quality. Freshwater ecosystems, including lakes, streams, and wetlands, are a large global sink for reactive nitrogen, but factors that determine the efficacy of freshwater nitrogen removal rates are poorly known. Using a global lake data set, we show that the availability of phosphorus, a limiting nutrient, affects both annual nitrogen removal rate and efficiency. This result indicates that increased phosphorus inputs from human activities have stimulated nitrogen removal processes in many lakes. Recent management-driven reductions in phosphorus availability promote water column accumulation and export of nitrogen from large lakes, an unintended consequence of single-element management that argues for greater control of nitrogen as well as phosphorus sources.

  14. Pelagic nitrogen cycle in an Arctic lake

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, S.C.

    1986-01-01

    A mass balance for nitrogen was developed for the water column of Toolik Lake and the isotope tracers /sup 15/N and /sup 14/C were used to examine the phytoplankton ecology with respect to dissolved inorganic nitrogen (ammonium and nitrate). The nutrient budget showed an oligotrophic ecosystem with important flux terms few and small in magnitude. Nitrogen input was primarily from inflowing rivers and was dominated by the dissolved organic fraction. Ammonium release from sediment provided the only other major source of nitrogen to the lake water. Toolik acted as a nitrogen sink, trapping 18% of the annual input. Retention was almost exclusively (98%) as dissolved organic nitrogen. Tracer experiments suggested chronic nitrogen deficiency in the phytoplankton, but indigenous populations were well-adapted for utilizing characteristically low levels of nutrient.

  15. [Effects of water stress and nitrogen fertilization on peanut root morphological development and leaf physiological activities].

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Zhang, Zhi-meng; Dai, Liang-xiang; Ci, Dun-wei; Qin, Fei-fei; Song, Wen-wu; Liu, Meng-juan; Fu, Xiao

    2015-02-01

    Taking 'Huayu 22' peanut as test material, effect of soil water content and nitrogen fertilization on the leaf physiological activities and root morphological characteristics of peanut plants were analyzed. Two levels of soil water condition were: (1) well-watered condition and (2) moderate water stress, and three levels of nitrogen were: (1) none nitrogen (N0), (2) moderate nitrogen (N1, 90 kg · hm(-2)) and (3) high nitrogen (N2, 180 kg · hm(-2)). The results showed that N1 significantly increased the peanut yield under two water conditions, but showed no significant effect on harvest index compared with N0. Under water stress condition, N1 had no significant effects on total root biomass and total root length, but the total root surface area was remarkably increased. The nitrogen fertilization significantly increased the root length and root surface area in 20-40 cm soil layer, and N2 significantly increased the root biomass and root surface area in the soil layer below 40 cm. The application of nitrogen remarkably increased CAT and POD activities in leaf, while MDA content was decreased with the increase of nitrogen level. Under well-watered condition, the root biomass, root length and root surface area in the soil layer below 40 cm and total root surface area were significantly reduced by nitrogen application, however, only N1 could increase leaf protective enzyme activities. Correlation analysis showed that the root length in 20-40 cm soil layer and SOD, CAT, POD activities in leaf were highly significantly related with peanut yield. PMID:26094460

  16. [Effects of water stress and nitrogen fertilization on peanut root morphological development and leaf physiological activities].

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Zhang, Zhi-meng; Dai, Liang-xiang; Ci, Dun-wei; Qin, Fei-fei; Song, Wen-wu; Liu, Meng-juan; Fu, Xiao

    2015-02-01

    Taking 'Huayu 22' peanut as test material, effect of soil water content and nitrogen fertilization on the leaf physiological activities and root morphological characteristics of peanut plants were analyzed. Two levels of soil water condition were: (1) well-watered condition and (2) moderate water stress, and three levels of nitrogen were: (1) none nitrogen (N0), (2) moderate nitrogen (N1, 90 kg · hm(-2)) and (3) high nitrogen (N2, 180 kg · hm(-2)). The results showed that N1 significantly increased the peanut yield under two water conditions, but showed no significant effect on harvest index compared with N0. Under water stress condition, N1 had no significant effects on total root biomass and total root length, but the total root surface area was remarkably increased. The nitrogen fertilization significantly increased the root length and root surface area in 20-40 cm soil layer, and N2 significantly increased the root biomass and root surface area in the soil layer below 40 cm. The application of nitrogen remarkably increased CAT and POD activities in leaf, while MDA content was decreased with the increase of nitrogen level. Under well-watered condition, the root biomass, root length and root surface area in the soil layer below 40 cm and total root surface area were significantly reduced by nitrogen application, however, only N1 could increase leaf protective enzyme activities. Correlation analysis showed that the root length in 20-40 cm soil layer and SOD, CAT, POD activities in leaf were highly significantly related with peanut yield.

  17. Pre- and post-impoundment nitrogen in the lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blevins, Dale W.; Wilkison, Donald H.; Niesen, Shelley L.

    2013-01-01

    Large water-sample sets collected from 1899 through 1902, 1907, and in the early 1950s allow comparisons of pre-impoundment and post-impoundment (1969 through 2008) nitrogen concentrations in the lower Missouri River. Although urban wastes were not large enough to detectably increase annual loads of total nitrogen at the beginning of the 20th century, carcass waste, stock-yard manure, and untreated human wastes measurably increased ammonia and organic-nitrogen concentrations during low flows. Average total-nitrogen concentrations in both periods were about 2.5 mg/l, but much of the particulate-organic nitrogen, which was the dominant form of nitrogen around 1900, has been replaced by nitrate. This change in speciation was caused by the nearly 80% decrease in suspended-sediment concentrations that occurred after impoundment, modern agriculture, drainage of riparian wetlands, and sewage treatment. Nevertheless, bioavailable nitrogen has not been low enough to limit primary production in the Missouri River since the beginning of the 20th century. Nitrate concentrations have increased more rapidly from 2000 through 2008 (5 to 12% per year), thus increasing bioavailable nitrogen delivered to the Mississippi River and affecting Gulf Coast hypoxia. The increase in nitrate concentrations with distance downstream is much greater during the post-impoundment period. If strategies to decrease total-nitrogen loads focus on particulate N, substantial decreases will be difficult because particulate nitrogen is now only 23% of total nitrogen in the Missouri River. A strategy aimed at decreasing particulates also could further exacerbate land loss along the Gulf of Mexico, which has been sediment starved since Missouri River impoundment. In contrast, strategies or benchmarks aimed at decreasing nitrate loads could substantially decrease nitrogen loadings because nitrates now constitute over half of the Missouri's nitrogen input to the Mississippi. Ongoing restoration and creation

  18. Nitrogen deposition and exceedance of critical loads for nutrient nitrogen in Irish grasslands.

    PubMed

    Henry, Jason; Aherne, Julian

    2014-02-01

    High resolution nitrogen (N) deposition maps were developed to assess the exceedance of empirical critical loads of nutrient N for grasslands in Ireland. Nitrogen emissions have remained relatively constant during the past 20 yrs and are projected to remain constant under current legislation. Total N deposition (estimated as wet nitrate [NO3(-)] and ammonium [NH4(+)] plus dry NO× and NH3) ranged from 2 to 22 kg Nha(-1)yr(-1) (mean=12 kg Nha(-1)yr(-1)) to grasslands. Empirical critical loads for nutrient N were set at 15 kg Nha(-1)yr(-1) for both acid and calcareous grasslands; exceedance was observed for ~35% (~2,311 km(2)) of mapped acid grasslands. In contrast, only ~9% of calcareous grasslands (~35 km(2)) received N deposition in excess of the critical load. Reduced N deposition (primarily dry NH3) represented the dominant form to grasslands (range 55-90%) owing to significant emissions associated with livestock (primarily cattle). The extent of exceedance in acid grasslands suggests that N deposition to this habitat type may lead to adverse impacts such as a decline in plant species diversity and soil acidification. Further, given that elevated N deposition was dominated by NH3 associated with agricultural emissions rather than long-range transboundary sources, future improvements in air quality need to be driven by national policies.

  19. Responses to simulated nitrogen deposition by the neotropical epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto; de la Barrera, Erick

    2015-01-01

    Potential ecophysiological responses to nitrogen deposition, which is considered to be one of the leading causes for global biodiversity loss, were studied for the endangered endemic Mexican epiphytic orchid, Laelia speciosa, via a shadehouse dose-response experiment (doses were 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) in order to assess the potential risk facing this orchid given impending scenarios of nitrogen deposition. Lower doses of nitrogen of up to 20 kg N ha yr(-1), the dose that led to optimal plant performance, acted as fertilizer. For instance, the production of leaves and pseudobulbs were respectively 35% and 36% greater for plants receiving 20 kg N ha yr(-1) than under any other dose. Also, the chlorophyll content and quantum yield peaked at 0.66 ± 0.03 g m(-2) and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively, for plants growing under the optimum dose. In contrast, toxic effects were observed at the higher doses of 40 and 80 kg N ha yr(-1). The δ (13)C for leaves averaged -14.7 ± 0.2‰ regardless of the nitrogen dose. In turn, δ (15)N decreased as the nitrogen dose increased from 0.9 ± 0.1‰ under 2.5 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1) to -3.1 ± 0.2‰ under 80 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1), indicating that orchids preferentially assimilate NH4 (+) rather than NO3 (-) of the solution under higher doses of nitrogen. Laelia speciosa showed a clear response to inputs of nitrogen, thus, increasing rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition can pose an important threat for this species.

  20. Responses to simulated nitrogen deposition by the neotropical epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A.; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Potential ecophysiological responses to nitrogen deposition, which is considered to be one of the leading causes for global biodiversity loss, were studied for the endangered endemic Mexican epiphytic orchid, Laelia speciosa, via a shadehouse dose-response experiment (doses were 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha−1 yr−1) in order to assess the potential risk facing this orchid given impending scenarios of nitrogen deposition. Lower doses of nitrogen of up to 20 kg N ha yr−1, the dose that led to optimal plant performance, acted as fertilizer. For instance, the production of leaves and pseudobulbs were respectively 35% and 36% greater for plants receiving 20 kg N ha yr−1 than under any other dose. Also, the chlorophyll content and quantum yield peaked at 0.66 ± 0.03 g m−2 and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively, for plants growing under the optimum dose. In contrast, toxic effects were observed at the higher doses of 40 and 80 kg N ha yr−1. The δ13C for leaves averaged −14.7 ± 0.2‰ regardless of the nitrogen dose. In turn, δ15N decreased as the nitrogen dose increased from 0.9 ± 0.1‰ under 2.5 kg N ha−1yr−1 to −3.1 ± 0.2‰ under 80 kg N ha−1yr−1, indicating that orchids preferentially assimilate NH4+ rather than NO3− of the solution under higher doses of nitrogen. Laelia speciosa showed a clear response to inputs of nitrogen, thus, increasing rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition can pose an important threat for this species. PMID:26131375

  1. Responses to simulated nitrogen deposition by the neotropical epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto; de la Barrera, Erick

    2015-01-01

    Potential ecophysiological responses to nitrogen deposition, which is considered to be one of the leading causes for global biodiversity loss, were studied for the endangered endemic Mexican epiphytic orchid, Laelia speciosa, via a shadehouse dose-response experiment (doses were 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) in order to assess the potential risk facing this orchid given impending scenarios of nitrogen deposition. Lower doses of nitrogen of up to 20 kg N ha yr(-1), the dose that led to optimal plant performance, acted as fertilizer. For instance, the production of leaves and pseudobulbs were respectively 35% and 36% greater for plants receiving 20 kg N ha yr(-1) than under any other dose. Also, the chlorophyll content and quantum yield peaked at 0.66 ± 0.03 g m(-2) and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively, for plants growing under the optimum dose. In contrast, toxic effects were observed at the higher doses of 40 and 80 kg N ha yr(-1). The δ (13)C for leaves averaged -14.7 ± 0.2‰ regardless of the nitrogen dose. In turn, δ (15)N decreased as the nitrogen dose increased from 0.9 ± 0.1‰ under 2.5 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1) to -3.1 ± 0.2‰ under 80 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1), indicating that orchids preferentially assimilate NH4 (+) rather than NO3 (-) of the solution under higher doses of nitrogen. Laelia speciosa showed a clear response to inputs of nitrogen, thus, increasing rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition can pose an important threat for this species. PMID:26131375

  2. ECONOMIC GROWTH ANALYSIS SYSTEM: REFERENCE MANUAL VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume report describes the development of and provides information needed to operate, the Economic Growth Analysis System (E-GAS) Version 2.0 model. The model will be used to project emissions inventories of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), a...

  3. ECONOMIC GROWTH ANALYSIS SYSTEM: USER'S GUIDE VERSION 2.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume report describes the development of and provides information needed to operate, the Economic Growth Analysis System (E-GAS) Version 2.0 model. The model will be used to project emissions inventories of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), a...

  4. Carbon Accumulation and Nitrogen Pool Recovery during Transitions from Savanna to Forest in Central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, A.; Hoffmann, W. A.; Franco, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    The expansion of tropical forest into savanna may potentially be a large carbon sink, but little is known about the patterns of carbon sequestration during transitional forest formation. Moreover, it is unclear how nutrient limitation, due to extended exposure to firedriven nutrient losses, may constrain carbon accumulation. Here, we sampled plots that spanned a woody biomass gradient from savanna to transitional forest in response to differential fire protection in central Brazil. These plots were used to investigate how the process of transitional forest formation affects the size and distribution of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools. This was paired with a detailed analysis of the nitrogen cycle to explore possible connections between carbon accumulation and nitrogen limitation. An analysis of carbon pools in the vegetation, upper soil, and litter shows that the transition from savanna to transitional forest can result in a fourfold increase in total carbon (from 43 to 179 Mg C/ha) with a doubling of carbon stocks in the litter and soil layers. Total nitrogen in the litter and soil layers increased with forest development in both the bulk (+68%) and plant-available (+150%) pools, with the most pronounced changes occurring in the upper layers. However, the analyses of nitrate concentrations, nitrate : ammonium ratios, plant stoichiometry of carbon and nitrogen, and soil and foliar nitrogen isotope ratios suggest that a conservative nitrogen cycle persists throughout forest development, indicating that nitrogen remains in low supply relative to demand. Furthermore, the lack of variation in underlying soil type (>20 cm depth) suggests that the biogeochemical trends across the gradient are driven by vegetation. Our results provide evidence for high carbon sequestration potential with forest encroachment on savanna, but nitrogen limitation may play a large and persistent role in governing carbon sequestration in savannas or other equally fire-disturbed tropical

  5. Nitrogen incorporation in carbon nitride films produced by direct and dual ion-beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Abrasonis, G.; Gago, R.; Jimenez, I.; Kreissig, U.; Kolitsch, A.; Moeller, W.

    2005-10-01

    Carbon (C) and carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) films were grown on Si(100) substrates by direct ion-beam sputtering (IBS) of a carbon target at different substrate temperatures (room temperature-450 deg. C) and Ar/N{sub 2} sputtering gas mixtures. Additionally, the effect of concurrent nitrogen-ion assistance during the growth of CN{sub x} films by IBS was also investigated. The samples were analyzed by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). The ERDA results showed that significant nitrogen amount (up to 20 at. %) was incorporated in the films, without any other nitrogen source but the N{sub 2}-containing sputtering gas. The nitrogen concentration is proportional to the N{sub 2} content in the sputtering beam and no saturation limit is reached under the present working conditions. The film areal density derived from ERDA revealed a decrease in the amount of deposited material at increasing growth temperature, with a correlation between the C and N losses. The XANES results indicate that N atoms are efficiently incorporated into the carbon network and can be found in different bonding environments, such as pyridinelike, nitrilelike, graphitelike, and embedded N{sub 2} molecules. The contribution of molecular and pyridinelike nitrogen decreases when the temperature increases while the contribution of the nitrilelike nitrogen increases. The concurrent nitrogen ion assistance resulted in the significant increase of the nitrogen content in the film but it induced a further reduction of the deposited material. Additionally, the assisting ions inhibited the formation of the nitrilelike configurations while promoting nitrogen environments in graphitelike positions. The nitrogen incorporation and release mechanisms are discussed in terms of film growth precursors, ion bombardment effects, and chemical sputtering.

  6. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 12 companies at 24 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2010. Sixty percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  7. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.

    2003-01-01

    The ammonia industry partially recovered from the effects of high natural gas prices that had closed a significant portion of the industry in 2001. Ammonia production capacity in the United States in 2002 was about 17.1 Mt (18.8 million st). About 53 percent of this capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas where there are large reserves of natural gas.

  8. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 25 plants in 16 states during 2012. Sixty-one percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states’ large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  9. [Dynamic simulation of nitrogen application level effects on rice yield and optimization analysis of fertilizer supply in paddy field].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingping; Jiang, Ning; Chen, Jie

    2003-10-01

    Field and water tank plot experiments were conducted in Zhejiang Province in 1999 to determine the effects of nitrogen application amount and times on rice growth and yield, and rice growth simulation model ORYZA-0 and nitrogen management module were used to establish a modified nitrogen effect-rice growth model. The simulated results presented a higher positive relationship with the measured results. According to the simulated and measured results, 160 kg.hm-2 was the economic nitrogen application amount for two rice varieties production, and the nitrogen application strategies were: 1) < 100 kg.hm-2 nitrogen fertilizer should be applied within 35 days after transplanting; 2) when the nitrogen application level was between 100-200 kg.hm-2, it should be applied within 45 days after transplanting; 3) if the nitrogen application amount exceeded 200 kg.hm-2, it should be put into paddy field within 60 days after transplanting; 4) as the nitrogen application amount increased, the nitrogen supply at the later rice growth stage should be increased. As for the second cropping rice, the more times the nitrogen applied in the field, the more closeness the rice yield reached the APCUM curve(optimized nitrogen curve) suggested. But in real rice production, it is impossible for farmers to adopt more times of N applying, since labor and cost will increase. Based on the experimental parameters and real rice production situation, the reasonable nitrogen application under 160 kg.hm-2 levels for high yielding second cropping rice was split into 4 times with fraction 0.2:0.3:0.3:0.2 at 5, 20, 30, 40 days after transplanting. The rice yield could reach 5,916 kg.hm-2, resulted in a 3.12% increase as compared with the yield under actual fertilizer application amount and timing.

  10. Spatial pattern of nitrogen deposition flux over Czech forests: a novel approach accounting for unmeasured nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hůnová, Iva; Stoklasová, Petra; Kurfürst, Pavel; Vlček, Ondřej; Schovánková, Jana; Stráník, Vojtěch

    2015-04-01

    atmospheric nitrogen deposition flux over the Czech forests collating all available data and model results. The aim of the presented study is to provide an improved, more reliable and more realistic estimate of spatial pattern of nitrogen deposition flux over one country. This has so far been based standardly on measurements of ambient N/NOx concentrations as dry deposition proxy, and N/NH4+ and N/NO3- as wet deposition proxy. For estimate of unmeasured species contributing to dry deposition, we used an Eulerian photochemical dispersion model CAMx, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (ESSS, 2011), coupled with a high resolution regional numeric weather prediction model Aladin (Vlček, Corbet, 2011). Contribution of fog was estimated using a geostatistical data driven model. Final maps accounting for unmeasured species clearly indicate, that so far used approach results in substantial underestimation of nitrogen deposition flux. Substitution of unmeasured nitrogen species by modeled values seems to be a plausible way for approximation of total nitrogen deposition, and getting more realistic spatial pattern as input for further studies of likely nitrogen impacts on ecosystems. Acknowledgements: We would like to acknowledge the grants GA14-12262S - Effects of changing growth conditions on tree increment, stand production and vitality - danger or opportunity for the Central-European forestry?, and NAZV QI112A168 (ForSoil) of the Czech Ministry for Agriculture for support of this contribution. The input data used for the analysis were provided by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute. References: Bobbink, R., Hicks, K., Galloway, J., Spranger, T., Alkemade, R. et al. (2010): Global Assessment of Nitrogen Deposition Effects on Terrestrial Plant Diversity: a Synthesis. Ecological Applications 20 (1), 30-59. Fowler D., O'Donoghue M., Muller J.B.A, et al. (2005): A chronology of nitrogen deposition in the UK between 1900 and 2000. Watter, Air & Soil Pollution: Focus

  11. Rapid decline of dissolved nitrogen in Finnish lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekolainen, Seppo; Mitikka, Sari; Vuorenmaa, Jussi; Johansson, Matti

    2005-03-01

    Since 1960s, phosphorus (P) has been considered to be most often the limiting factor for algal growth in freshwater lakes. Due to that, pollution control measures have been targeted to reduce P loading to lakes. In many countries these efforts have been successful: the P loadings, particularly through municipal waste waters have been reduced substantially, which has resulted in reduced P concentration of lake waters, and improvements in ecological quality of numerous lakes. Nitrogen reductions in wastewater treatment plants have started only in very recent years, and usually only in cities along the seashore. Analysis of the long-term lake monitoring data in Finland show a sharp decline of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, expressed as a sum of NO 2-N, NO 3-N and NH 4-N) during the 1990s. Most of these lakes are oligotrophic lakes with low human impact. Due to this, the relative contribution of air-borne nitrogen loading (deposition directly to the lake surface) is often higher than in lakes located in densely populated or in intensive agricultural regions. The DIN deposition monitoring results show approximately a 40% reduction during the same period as the decreasing DIN trend is observed in lakes. These trends in deposition can probably be explained by reductions in nitrogen emissions in Europe, in connection to air pollution control conventions, and in Eastern Europe also in connection to economical collapse at the beginning of 1990s. In many of the lakes with a significant decreasing trend, DIN concentrations in late summer are approaching very low levels (<20 μg l -1), indicating that nitrogen is possibly limiting algal growth at least seasonally. The observed trends are an example of how pollution control measures may result in a quick response, in this case unexpected, though not necessarily undesirable.

  12. Nitrogen in Ancient Mud: A Biosignature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüeken, Eva E.

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for all life on Earth and possibly elsewhere. Burial of nitrogen bound to organic matter constitutes the major flux of nitrogen into sediments today, which has led to the inference that nitrogen enrichments in sedimentary rocks may be a biosignature. However, abiotic processes such as lightning or volcanism can fix atmospheric N2 and contribute to sedimentary nitrogen burial in the absence of life. It is therefore uncertain whether observed nitrogen enrichments of up to 430 ppm in Paleoarchean metasedimentary biotite grains are indeed biogenic. This study seeks to address that problem with a numerical model. The NH4+ concentration of an abiotic ocean is modeled as a function of source fluxes, pH-dependent NH3 volatilization, and equilibrated adsorption of NH4+ onto clay particles. The results suggest that the observed nitrogen concentrations in Paleoarchean biotite can only be reconciled with purely abiotic processes if the ocean was more acidic (pH <6) and/or if the source fluxes from lightning and volcanism were at least an order of magnitude higher (≥1012 mol/yr) than previously thought. The bulk of the nitrogen is thus most likely of biological origin. While this does not necessitate a particular metabolism such as biological N2 fixation, the data provide evidence of nitrogen utilization back to 3.8 Gyr. Nitrogen abundances could thus provide useful information in extraterrestrial missions.

  13. Nitrogen mineralization in a tussock tundra soil

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, G.M.; Miller, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of substrate quality, temperature, and moisture on nitrogen mineralization from a tussock tundra soil were examined with laboratory soil incubations utilizing both air-dried samples and field-moist intact cores. The potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN) was highly correlated to both total soil nitrogen (positively) and the carbon/nitrogen ratio (negatively). All soil horizons exhibited a net nitrogen mineralization even at a high carbon/nitrogen ratio of 92. It was concluded that field-moist intact soil cores provide a more reliable estimate than the air-dried samples of both PMN and the mineralization rate under standard laboratory conditions. There was no significant effect of moisture tension (0.0 to 0.4 bars) on net nitrogen mineralization. The average Q/sub 10/ (temperature effect) for net nitrogen mineralization was 2.5. Based on this study and others, it was concluded that temperature through its effect on nitrogen mineralization plays an important role in controlling plant productivity in these naturally nitrogen-deficient tundra ecosystems.

  14. Current to Pressure Transducers for the Argon & Nitrogen Dewars

    SciTech Connect

    Serges, T.J.; /Fermilab

    1988-08-25

    A current to pressure (I/P) transducer will be used in the D-Zero piping system. The transducer is necessary to precisely control the control valve positioners located at the argon and nitrogen dewars. A 4-20 rnA signal will come from the PLC function of the TI565. This electric signal must be converted by the transducer to a pneumatic signal of 3-15 psi which will position the actuator. By doing this, the valve can be opened or closed to any adjusted amount from the control room or a remote I/P controller. A total of 9 transducers will be used at the dewars. The nitrogen dewar will have 3 that are located outside and will have to be weatherproof. The argon dewar will have 6, located inside, that will have to be explosion proof or intrinsically safe.

  15. Reaction between nitric oxide and ozone in solid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, D.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, NO2, is produced when nitric oxide, NO, and ozone, O3, are suspended in a nitrogen matrix at 11-20 K. The NO2 is formed with first-order kinetics, a 12 K rate constant of (1.4 + or - 0.2) x 0.00001/sec, and an apparent activation energy of 106 + or - 10 cal/mol. Isotopic labeling, variation of concentrations, and cold shield experiments show that the growth of NO2 is due to reaction between ozone molecules and NO monomers, and that the reaction is neither infrared-induced nor does it seem to be a heavy atom tunneling process. Reaction is attributed to nearest-neighbor NO.O3 pairs probably held in a specific orientational relationship that affects the kinetic behavior. When the temperature is raised, more such reactive pairs are generated, presumably by local diffusion. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Mitigating ammonia nitrogen deficiency in dairy wastewaters for algae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Ma, Xiaochen; Ma, Yiwei; Chen, Paul; Zheng, Hongli; Doan, Yen T T; Liu, Hui; Chen, Chi; Urriola, Pedro E; Shurson, Gerald C; Ruan, Roger

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrated that the limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewater was the ammonia nitrogen deficiency. Dairy wastewaters were mixed with a slaughterhouse wastewater that has much higher ammonia nitrogen content. The results showed the mixing wastewaters improved the nutrient profiles and biomass yield at low cost. Algae grown on mixed wastewaters contained high protein (55.98-66.91%) and oil content (19.10-20.81%) and can be exploited to produce animal feed and biofuel. Furthermore, algae grown on mixed wastewater significantly reduced nutrient contents remained in the wastewater after treatment. By mitigating limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewaters, the key issue of low biomass yield of algae grown on dairy wastewaters was resolved and the wastewater nutrient removal efficiency was significantly improved by this study.

  17. Nitrogen oxides under pressure: stability, ionization, polymerization, and superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongxu; Oganov, Artem R; Dong, Xiao; Zhou, Xiang-Feng; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guangrui; Dong, Huafeng

    2015-11-17

    Nitrogen oxides are textbook class of molecular compounds, with extensive industrial applications. Nitrogen and oxygen are also among the most abundant elements in the universe. We explore the N-O system at 0 K and up to 500 GPa though ab initio evolutionary simulations. Results show that two phase transformations of stable molecular NO2 occur at 7 and 64 GPa, and followed by decomposition of NO2 at 91 GPa. All of the NO(+)NO3(-) structures are found to be metastable at T = 0 K, so experimentally reported ionic NO(+)NO3(-) is either metastable or stabilized by temperature. N2O5 becomes stable at 9 GPa, and transforms from P-1 to C2/c structure at 51 GPa. NO becomes thermodynamically stable at 198 GPa. This polymeric phase is superconducting (Tc = 2.0 K) and contains a -N-N- backbone.

  18. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Reszka, Alfred A; Rodan, Gideon A

    2004-09-01

    The current paradigm for drug discovery requires the identification of a target involved in the disease process (e.g. enzyme or receptor) and the development of an appropriate ligand (activator, inhibitor or selective modulator). Selection of ligands for clinical development is based on the therapeutic window between efficacy vs. safety and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) considerations. For bisphosphonates (BPs) the process has not followed that paradigm. BPs have very low absorption and are retained in bone, their target tissue. A few have been used on a limited basis for over 20 years in diseases of rapid bone destruction (e.g. post-menopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease, bone metastases, etc.), without understanding their molecular mechanism of action. The nitrogen-containing BPs (N-BPs) are the latest and most potent addition to this family of compounds and have the widest use. They have high potency, are specifically targeted to the osteoclast on bone and are used at very low doses (5-10 mg clinically). Over the last four years, there was significant progress in elucidating the mechanism of action of BPs, both lacking and containing nitrogen. This review will focus on the mechanism of action of the N-BPs, specifically alendronate (ALN) and risedronate (RIS), the two agents most widely used. For these and all other N-BPs, the molecular target is the isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Although inhibition of this enzyme by N-BPs results in the suppression of sterol biosynthesis, it is actually disruption of a branch pathway, isoprenylation, that is responsible for N-BP pharmacological activity. Isoprenylation involves covalent linkage of the 15 or 20 carbon isoprene moiety farnesyl diphosphate or geranylgeranyl diphosphate, respectively, to the carboxy-terminus of regulatory proteins, including the small GTPases Ras, Rac, Rho and Cdc42. The latter three, as well as

  19. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold. PMID:26731691

  20. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input

    PubMed Central

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha-1 yr-1) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha-1 yr-1, and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold. PMID:26731691

  1. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold.

  2. Cereal area and nitrogen use efficiency are drivers of future nitrogen fertilizer consumption.

    PubMed

    Dobermann, Achim; Cassman, Kenneth G

    2005-12-01

    At a global scale, cereal yields and fertilizer N consumption have increased in a near-linear fashion during the past 40 years and are highly correlated with one another. However, large differences exist in historical trends of N fertilizer usage and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) among regions, countries, and crops. The reasons for these differences must be understood to estimate future N fertilizer requirements. Global nitrogen needs will depend on: (i) changes in cropped cereal area and the associated yield increases required to meet increasing cereal demand from population and income growth, and (ii) changes in NUE at the farm level. Our analysis indicates that the anticipated 38% increase in global cereal demand by 2025 can be met by a 30% increase in N use on cereals, provided that the steady decline in cereal harvest area is halted and the yield response to applied N can be increased by 20%. If losses of cereal cropping area continue at the rate of the past 20 years (-0.33% per year) and NUE cannot be increased substantially, a 60% increase in global N use on cereals would be required to meet cereal demand. Interventions to increase NUE and reduce N losses to the environment must be accomplished at the farm- or field-scale through a combination of improved technologies and carefully crafted local policies that contribute to the adoption of improved N management; uniform regional or national directives are unlikey to be effective at both sustaining yield increases and improving NUE. Examples from several countries show that increases in NUE at rates of 1% per year or more can be achieved if adequate investments are made in research and extension. Failure to arrest the decrease in cereal crop area and to improve NUE in the world's most important agricultural systems will likely cause severe damage to environmental services at local, regional, and global scales due to a large increase in reactive N load in the environment.

  3. Cereal area and nitrogen use efficiency are drivers of future nitrogen fertilizer consumption.

    PubMed

    Dobermann, Achim; Cassman, Kenneth G

    2005-09-01

    At a global scale, cereal yields and fertilizer N consumption have increased in a near-linear fashion during the past 40 years and are highly correlated with one another. However, large differences exist in historical trends of N fertilizer usage and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) among regions, countries, and crops. The reasons for these differences must be understood to estimate future N fertilizer requirements. Global nitrogen needs will depend on: (i) changes in cropped cereal area and the associated yield increases required to meet increasing cereal demand from population and income growth, and (ii) changes in NUE at the farm level. Our analysis indicates that the anticipated 38% increase in global cereal demand by 2025 can be met by a 30% increase in N use on cereals, provided that the steady decline in cereal harvest area is halted and the yield response to applied N can be increased by 20%. If losses of cereal cropping area continue at the rate of the past 20 years (-0.33% per year) and NUE cannot be increased substantially, a 60% increase in global N use on cereals would be required to meet cereal demand. Interventions to increase NUE and reduce N losses to the environment must be accomplished at the farm-or field-scale through a combination of improved technologies and carefully crafted local policies that contribute to the adoption of improved N management; uniform regional or national directives are unlikely to be effective at both sustaining yield increases and improving NUE. Examples from several countries show that increases in NUE at rates of 1% per year or more can be achieved if adequate investments are made in research and extension. Failure to arrest the decrease in cereal crop area and to improve NUE in the world's most important agricultural systems will likely cause severe damage to environmental services at local, regional, and global scales due to a large increase in reactive N load in the environment.

  4. The 20-20-20 Airships NASA Centennial Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Alina; Diaz, Ernesto; Miller, Sarah; Rhodes, Jason; Ortega, Sam; Hall, Jeffrey L.; Friedl, Randy; Booth, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    A NASA Centennial Challenge; (www.nasa.gov/challenges) is in development to spur innovation in stratospheric airships as a science platform. We anticipate a multi-million dollar class prize for the first organization to fly a powered airship that remains stationary at 20km (65,000 ft) altitude for over 20 hours with a 20kg payload. The design must be scalable to longer flights with more massive payloads.In NASA's constrained budget environment, there are few opportunities for space missions in astronomy and Earth science, and these have very long lead times. We believe that airships (powered, maneuverable, lighter-than-air vehicles) could offer significant gains in observing time, sky and ground coverage, data downlink capability, and continuity of observations over existing suborbital options at competitive prices. This technology would also have broad commercial applications including communications and asset tracking. We seek to spur private industry (or non-profit institutions, including Universities) to demonstrate the capability for sustained airship flights as astronomy and Earth science platforms. This poster will introduce the challenge in development and provide details of who to contact for more information.

  5. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Paige, David A.

    1996-01-01

    A thermal model, developed to predict seasonal nitrogen cycles on Triton, has been modified and applied to Pluto. The model was used to calculate the partitioning of nitrogen between surface frost deposits and the atmosphere, as a function of time for various sets of input parameters. Volatile transport was confirmed to have a significant effect on Pluto's climate as nitrogen moved around on a seasonal time scale between hemispheres, and sublimed into and condensed out of the atmosphere. Pluto's high obliquity was found to have a significant effect on the distribution of frost on its surface. Conditions that would lead to permanent polar caps on Triton were found to lead to permanent zonal frost bands on Pluto. In some instances, frost sublimed from the middle of a seasonal cap outward, resulting in a "polar bald spot". Frost which was darker than the substrate did not satisfy observables on Pluto, in contrast to our findings for Triton. Bright frost (brighter than the substrate) came closer to matching observables. Atmospheric pressure varied seasonally. The amplitudes, and to a lesser extent the phase, of the variation depended significantly on frost and substrate properties. Atmospheric pressure was found to be determined both by Pluto's distance from the sun and by the subsolar latitude. In most cases two peaks in atmospheric pressure were observed annually: a greater one associated with the sublimation of the north polar cap just as Pluto receded from perihelion, and a lesser one associated with the sublimation of the south polar cap as Pluto approached perihelion. Our model predicted frost-free dark substrate surface temperatures in the 50 to 60 K range, while frost temperatures typically ranged between 30 to 40 K. Temporal changes in frost coverage illustrated by our results, and changes in the viewing geometry of Pluto from the Earth, may be important for interpretation of ground-based measurements of Pluto's thermal emission.

  6. Superior nitrogen balance after laparoscopic-assisted colectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Senagore, A J; Kilbride, M J; Luchtefeld, M A; MacKeigan, J M; Davis, A T; Moore, J D

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although early resumption of enteral feeding after gastrointestinal surgery results in improved nitrogen balance and lower infectious complications, no postoperative nutritional data after laparoscopic-assisted colectomy exists. OBJECTIVE: The authors prospectively compared nitrogen balance after laparoscopic-assisted colectomy versus open colectomy. METHODS: This is a series of colon resections (open, N = 10; laparoscopic-assisted, N = 9) at the Ferguson-Blodgett Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan, between January and March 1993. Nitrogen intake and 24-hour urine collections were performed on postoperative days 1, 3, and 7 for the analysis of total urinary nitrogen and urinary 3 methylhistidine-(3mH). RESULTS: The time to passage of flatus (4.7 +/- 0.6; 2.0 +/- 0.2), resumption of oral intake (6.1 +/- 0.7; 1.4 +/- 0.2; p < 0.05, Student's test), first bowel movement (5.2 +/- 1.0; 3.0 +/- 0.3; p < 0.05, Student;s t test), and discharge (10.3 +/- 1.3; 4.1 +/- 1.8; p < 0.05, Student's t test) occurred significantly earlier in the laparoscopic-assisted colectomy group. Overall hospital charges were lower in the laparoscopic-assisted colectomy group ($11,572 +/- $823 vs. $13,961 +/- $1050). The operative time was higher in the laparoscopic-assisted colectomy group (176 +/- 12 hours vs. 105 +/- 17 hours, p < 0.05,Student's test). Blood loss was higher in the open group (805 +/- 264 mL vs 217 +/- 32 mL, p < 0.05, Student's test). Urinary nitrogen losses were similar between the two groups; however, significantly more patients in the laparoscopic-assisted colectomy group achieved net positive nitrogen on day 3 (6/9; 0/10; p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test), and day 7 (9/9; 4/10; p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Infectious complications occurred less frequently in the laparoscopic-assisted colectomy group (0/9 vs. 4/10; p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing laparoscopic-assisted colectomy can achieve early resumption of enteral nutrition

  7. Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, H.L.

    1983-08-16

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O[sub 2]/cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N[sub 2]. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N[sub 2] at a much quicker rate than unexcited N[sub 2], greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed. 1 fig.

  8. Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  9. Charcoal/Nitrogen Adsorption Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Refrigerator with no wear-related moving parts produces 0.5 W of cooling at 118 K. When fully developed, refrigerator needs no electrical power, and life expectancy of more than 10 yr, operates unattended to cool sensitive infrared detectors for long periods. Only moving parts in adsorption cryocooler are check valves. As charcoal is cooled in canister, gas pressure drops, allowing inlet check valve to open and admit more nitrogen. When canister is heated, pressure rises, closing inlet valve and eventually opening outlet valve.

  10. Indirect and direct determination of the casein content of milk by Kjeldahl nitrogen analysis: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J M; Barbano, D M; Fleming, J R

    1998-01-01

    The classic method for determination of milk casein is based on precipitation of casein at pH 4.6. Precipitated milk casein is removed by filtration and the nitrogen content of either the precipitate (direct casein method) or filtrate (noncasein nitrogen; NCN) is determined by Kjeldahl analysis. For the indirect casein method, milk total nitrogen (TN; Method 991.20) is also determined and casein is calculated as TN minus NCN. Ten laboratories tested 9 pairs of blind duplicate raw milk materials with a casein range of 2.42-3.05% by both the direct and indirect casein methods. Statistical performance expressed in protein equivalents (nitrogen x 6.38) with invalid and outlier data removed was as follows: NCN method (wt%), mean = 0.762, sr = 0.010, sR = 0.016, repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) = 1.287%, reproducibility relative standard deviation (RSDr) = 2.146%; indirect casein method (wt%), mean = 2.585, repeatability = 0.015, reproducibility = 0.022, RSDr = 0.560%, RSDR = 0.841; direct casein method (wt%), mean = 2.575, sr = 0.015, sR = 0.025, RSDr = 0.597%, RSDR = 0.988%. Method performance was acceptable and comparable to similar Kjeldahl methods for determining nitrogen content of milk (Methods 991.20, 991.21, 991.22, 991.23). The direct casein, indirect casein, and noncasein nitrogen methods have been adopted by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  11. Temperature, plant species and residence time effects on nitrogen removal in model treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Allen, C R; Stein, O R; Hook, P B; Burr, M D; Parker, A E; Hafla, E C

    2013-01-01

    Total nitrogen (TN) removal in treatment wetlands (TWs) is challenging due to nitrogen cycle complexity and the variation of influent nitrogen species. Plant species, season, temperature and hydraulic loading most likely influence root zone oxygenation and appurtenant nitrogen removal, especially for ammonium-rich wastewater. Nitrogen data were collected from two experiments utilizing batch-loaded (3-, 6-, 9- and 20-day residence times), sub-surface TWs monitored for at least one year during which temperature was varied between 4 and 24 °C. Synthetic wastewater containing 17 mg/l N as NH4 and 27 mg/l amino-N, 450 mg/l chemical oxygen demand (COD), and 13 mg/l SO4-S was applied to four replicates of Carex utriculata, Schoenoplectus acutus and Typha latifolia and unplanted controls. Plant presence and species had a greater effect on TN removal than temperature or residence time. Planted columns achieved approximately twice the nitrogen removal of unplanted controls (40-95% versus 20-50% removal) regardless of season and temperature. TWs planted with Carex outperformed both Typha and Schoenoplectus and demonstrated less temperature dependency. TN removal with Carex was excellent at all temperatures and residence times; Schoenoplectus and Typha TN removal improved at longer residence times. Reductions in TN were not accompanied by increases in NO3, which was consistently below 1 mg/l N.

  12. Characterization of La/Fe/TiO₂ and Its Photocatalytic Performance in Ammonia Nitrogen Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xianping; Chen, Chunfei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Junyu; Yan, Qun; Shi, Huquan; Wang, Chunying

    2015-11-17

    La/Fe/TiO₂ composite photocatalysts were synthesized by Sol-Gel method and well characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen-physical adsorption, and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-Vis DRS). It is interesting that the doped catalysts were in anatase phase while the pure TiO₂ was in rutile phase. In addition, the composites possessed better physical chemical properties in photocatalytic activity than pure TiO₂: stronger visible-light-response ability, larger specific surface area, and more regular shape in morphology. The photodegradation results of ammonia nitrogen indicate that: the La/Fe/TiO₂ had higher catalytic activity to ammonia nitrogen waste water compared pure TiO₂ and the other single metal-doped TiO₂. pH 10 and 2 mmol/L H₂O₂ were all beneficial to the removal of ammonia nitrogen by La/Fe/TiO₂. However, the common inorganic ions of Cl(-), NO₃(-), SO₄(2-), HCO₃(-)/CO₃²(-), Na⁺, K⁺, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in water all inhibited the degradation of ammonia nitrogen. By balance calculation, at least 20% of ammonia nitrogen was converted to N₂ during the 64.6% removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen.

  13. Characterization of La/Fe/TiO2 and Its Photocatalytic Performance in Ammonia Nitrogen Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xianping; Chen, Chunfei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Junyu; Yan, Qun; Shi, Huquan; Wang, Chunying

    2015-01-01

    La/Fe/TiO2 composite photocatalysts were synthesized by Sol-Gel method and well characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen-physical adsorption, and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-Vis DRS). It is interesting that the doped catalysts were in anatase phase while the pure TiO2 was in rutile phase. In addition, the composites possessed better physical chemical properties in photocatalytic activity than pure TiO2: stronger visible-light-response ability, larger specific surface area, and more regular shape in morphology. The photodegradation results of ammonia nitrogen indicate that: the La/Fe/TiO2 had higher catalytic activity to ammonia nitrogen waste water compared pure TiO2 and the other single metal-doped TiO2. pH 10 and 2 mmol/L H2O2 were all beneficial to the removal of ammonia nitrogen by La/Fe/TiO2. However, the common inorganic ions of Cl−, NO3−, SO42−, HCO3−/CO32−, Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ in water all inhibited the degradation of ammonia nitrogen. By balance calculation, at least 20% of ammonia nitrogen was converted to N2 during the 64.6% removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen. PMID:26593929

  14. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation and its contribution to nitrogen removal in China’s coastal wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lijun; Zheng, Yanling; Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Deng, Fengyu; Chen, Fei; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several decades, human activities have caused substantial enrichment of reactive nitrogen in China’s coastal wetlands. Although anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), the process of oxidizing ammonium into dinitrogen gas through the reduction of nitrite, is identified as an important process for removing reactive nitrogen, little is known about the dynamics of anammox and its contribution to nitrogen removal in nitrogen-enriched environments. Here, we examine potential rates of anammox and associate them with bacterial diversity and abundance across the coastal wetlands of China using molecular and isotope tracing techniques. High anammox bacterial diversity was detected in China’s coastal wetlands and included Candidatus Scalindua, Kuenenia, Brocadia, and Jettenia. Potential anammox rates were more closely associated with the abundance of anammox bacteria than to their diversity. Among all measured environmental variables, temperature was a key environmental factor, causing a latitudinal distribution of the anammox bacterial community composition, biodiversity and activity along the coastal wetlands of China. Based on nitrogen isotope tracing experiments, anammox was estimated to account for approximately 3.8–10.7% of the total reactive nitrogen removal in the study area. Combined with denitrification, anammox can remove 20.7% of the total external terrigenous inorganic nitrogen annually transported into China’s coastal wetland ecosystems. PMID:26494435

  15. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation and its contribution to nitrogen removal in China's coastal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lijun; Zheng, Yanling; Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Deng, Fengyu; Chen, Fei; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2015-10-23

    Over the past several decades, human activities have caused substantial enrichment of reactive nitrogen in China's coastal wetlands. Although anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), the process of oxidizing ammonium into dinitrogen gas through the reduction of nitrite, is identified as an important process for removing reactive nitrogen, little is known about the dynamics of anammox and its contribution to nitrogen removal in nitrogen-enriched environments. Here, we examine potential rates of anammox and associate them with bacterial diversity and abundance across the coastal wetlands of China using molecular and isotope tracing techniques. High anammox bacterial diversity was detected in China's coastal wetlands and included Candidatus Scalindua, Kuenenia, Brocadia, and Jettenia. Potential anammox rates were more closely associated with the abundance of anammox bacteria than to their diversity. Among all measured environmental variables, temperature was a key environmental factor, causing a latitudinal distribution of the anammox bacterial community composition, biodiversity and activity along the coastal wetlands of China. Based on nitrogen isotope tracing experiments, anammox was estimated to account for approximately 3.8-10.7% of the total reactive nitrogen removal in the study area. Combined with denitrification, anammox can remove 20.7% of the total external terrigenous inorganic nitrogen annually transported into China's coastal wetland ecosystems.

  16. Soil biochemical properties of grassland ecosystems under anthropogenic emission of nitrogen compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrevatykh, Irina; Ivashchenko, Kristina; Ananyeva, Nadezhda

    2016-04-01

    Inflow of pollutants in terrestrial ecosystems nowadays increases dramatically, that might be led to disturbance of natural biogeochemical cycles and landscapes structure. Production of nitrogen fertilizers is one of the air pollution sources, namely by nitrogen compounds (NH4+, NO3-, NO2-). Air pollution by nitrogen compounds of terrestrial ecosystems might be affected on soil biochemical properties, which results increasing mineral nitrogen content in soil, changing soil P/N and Al/Ca ratios, and, finally, the deterioration of soil microbial community functioning. The research is focused on the assessment of anthropogenic emission of nitrogen compounds on soil properties of grassland ecosystems in European Russia. Soil samples (Voronic Chernozem Pachic, upper 10 cm mineral layer, totally 10) were taken from grassland ecosystem: near (5-10 m) nitrogen fertilizer factory (NFF), and far from it (20-30 km, served as a control) in Tula region. In soil samples the NH4+ and NO3- (Kudeyarov's photocolorimetric method), P, Ca, Al (X-ray fluorescence method) contents were measured. Soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) was analyzed by substrate-induced respiration method. Soil microbial respiration (MR) was assessed by CO2 rate production. Soil microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) was calculated as MR/Cmic ratio. Near NFF the soil ammonium and nitrate nitrogen contents were a strongly varied, variation coefficient (CV) was 42 and 86This study was supported by Russian Foundation of Basic Research Grant No. 14-04-00098, 15-44-03220, 15-04-00915.

  17. Effects of soil warming and nitrogen addition on soil respiration in a New Zealand tussock grassland.

    PubMed

    Graham, Scott L; Hunt, John E; Millard, Peter; McSeveny, Tony; Tylianakis, Jason M; Whitehead, David

    2014-01-01

    Soil respiration (RS) represents a large terrestrial source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Global change drivers such as climate warming and nitrogen deposition are expected to alter the terrestrial carbon cycle with likely consequences for RS and its components, autotrophic (RA) and heterotrophic respiration (RH). Here we investigate the impacts of a 3°C soil warming treatment and a 50 kg ha(-1) y(-1) nitrogen addition treatment on RS, RH and their respective seasonal temperature responses in an experimental tussock grassland. Average respiration in untreated soils was 0.96±0.09 μmol m(-2) s(-1) over the course of the experiment. Soil warming and nitrogen addition increased RS by 41% and 12% respectively. These treatment effects were additive under combined warming and nitrogen addition. Warming increased RH by 37% while nitrogen addition had no effect. Warming and nitrogen addition affected the seasonal temperature response of RS by increasing the basal rate of respiration (R10) by 14% and 20% respectively. There was no significant interaction between treatments for R10. The treatments had no impact on activation energy (E0). The seasonal temperature response of RH was not affected by either warming or nitrogen addition. These results suggest that the additional CO2 emissions from New Zealand tussock grassland soils as a result of warming-enhanced RS constitute a potential positive feedback to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  18. Characterization of La/Fe/TiO₂ and Its Photocatalytic Performance in Ammonia Nitrogen Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xianping; Chen, Chunfei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Junyu; Yan, Qun; Shi, Huquan; Wang, Chunying

    2015-11-01

    La/Fe/TiO₂ composite photocatalysts were synthesized by Sol-Gel method and well characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen-physical adsorption, and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-Vis DRS). It is interesting that the doped catalysts were in anatase phase while the pure TiO₂ was in rutile phase. In addition, the composites possessed better physical chemical properties in photocatalytic activity than pure TiO₂: stronger visible-light-response ability, larger specific surface area, and more regular shape in morphology. The photodegradation results of ammonia nitrogen indicate that: the La/Fe/TiO₂ had higher catalytic activity to ammonia nitrogen waste water compared pure TiO₂ and the other single metal-doped TiO₂. pH 10 and 2 mmol/L H₂O₂ were all beneficial to the removal of ammonia nitrogen by La/Fe/TiO₂. However, the common inorganic ions of Cl(-), NO₃(-), SO₄(2-), HCO₃(-)/CO₃²(-), Na⁺, K⁺, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in water all inhibited the degradation of ammonia nitrogen. By balance calculation, at least 20% of ammonia nitrogen was converted to N₂ during the 64.6% removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen. PMID:26593929

  19. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation and its contribution to nitrogen removal in China’s coastal wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lijun; Zheng, Yanling; Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Deng, Fengyu; Chen, Fei; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2015-10-01

    Over the past several decades, human activities have caused substantial enrichment of reactive nitrogen in China’s coastal wetlands. Although anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), the process of oxidizing ammonium into dinitrogen gas through the reduction of nitrite, is identified as an important process for removing reactive nitrogen, little is known about the dynamics of anammox and its contribution to nitrogen removal in nitrogen-enriched environments. Here, we examine potential rates of anammox and associate them with bacterial diversity and abundance across the coastal wetlands of China using molecular and isotope tracing techniques. High anammox bacterial diversity was detected in China’s coastal wetlands and included Candidatus Scalindua, Kuenenia, Brocadia, and Jettenia. Potential anammox rates were more closely associated with the abundance of anammox bacteria than to their diversity. Among all measured environmental variables, temperature was a key environmental factor, causing a latitudinal distribution of the anammox bacterial community composition, biodiversity and activity along the coastal wetlands of China. Based on nitrogen isotope tracing experiments, anammox was estimated to account for approximately 3.8-10.7% of the total reactive nitrogen removal in the study area. Combined with denitrification, anammox can remove 20.7% of the total external terrigenous inorganic nitrogen annually transported into China’s coastal wetland ecosystems.

  20. Description of Liquid Nitrogen Experimental Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.; Jacobs, Richard E.; Saiyed, Naseem H.

    1991-01-01

    The Liquid Nitrogen Test Facility is a unique test facility for ground-based liquid nitrogen experimentation. The test rig consists of an insulated tank of approximately 12.5 cubic ft in volume, which is supplied with liquid nitrogen from a 300 gal dewar via a vacuum jacketed piping system. The test tank is fitted with pressure and temperature measuring instrumentation, and with two view ports which allow visual observation of test conditions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility, the initial test program is briefly described. The objective of the test program is to measure the condensation rate by injecting liquid nitrogen as a subcooled spray into the ullage of a tank 50 percent full of liquid nitrogen at saturated conditions. The condensation rate of the nitrogen vapor on the subcooled spray can be analytically modeled, and results validated and corrected by experimentally measuring the vapor condensation on liquid sprays.

  1. Nitrogen uptake and utilization by intact plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D., Jr.; Tolley-Henry, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of experiments support the proposed conceptual model that relates nitrogen uptake activity by plants as a balanced interdependence between the carbon-supplying function of the shoot and the nitrogen-supplying function of the roots. The data are being used to modify a dynamic simulation of plant growth, which presently describes carbon flows through the plant, to describe nitrogen uptake and assimilation within the plant system. Although several models have been proposed to predict nitrogen uptake and partitioning, they emphasize root characteristics affecting nutrient uptake and relay on empirical methods to describe the relationship between nitrogen and carbon flows within the plant. Researchers, on the other hand, propose to continue to attempt a mechanistic solution in which the effects of environment on nitrogen (as well as carbon) assimilation are incorporated through their direct effects on photosynthesis, respiration, and aging processes.

  2. Description of liquid nitrogen experimental test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, J. M.; Jacobs, R. E.; Saiyed, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    The Liquid Nitrogen Test Facility is a unique test facility for ground-based liquid nitrogen experimentation. The test rig consists of an insulated tank of approximately 12.5 cubic ft in volume, which is supplied with liquid nitrogen from a 300 gal dewar via a vacuum jacketed piping system. The test tank is fitted with pressure and temperature measuring instrumentation, and with two view ports which allow visual observation of test conditions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility, the initial test program is briefly described. The objective of the test program is to measure the condensation rate by injecting liquid nitrogen as a subcooled spray into the ullage of a tank 50 percent full of liquid nitrogen at saturated conditions. The condensation rate of the nitrogen vapor on the subcooled spray can be analytically modeled, and results validated and corrected by experimentally measuring the vapor condensation on liquid sprays.

  3. Total nitrogen content of deep sea basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, T. L.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1982-01-01

    An estimate of the total nitrogen content of the earth's mantle, aimed at furnishing a further constraint for earth atmosphere origin and evolution models, was attempted through thermal neutron activation analysis via N-14(n,p)C-14 for the case of deep sea basalt glasses from the East Pacific Rise, the Mid-Atlantic Rift, and the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The increased nitrogen abundance of matrix material from the same samples as the glasses may be due to the incorporation of chemically-bound nitrogen from sea water, rather than dissolved molecular nitrogen. A discussion is presented of factors affecting observed basalt nitrogen content and its interpretation in terms of mantle nitrogen abundance. A 2 ppm N lower limit is estimated for the mantle.

  4. Proteins as nitrogen source for plants

    PubMed Central

    Smolander, Aino; Kitunen, Veikko; Godlewski, Mirosław

    2010-01-01

    Interest in the problem of plant nitrogen nutrition is increasing. Certain plants can use not only inorganic nitrogen but also intact amino acids and short peptides. According to our studies, the roots of several agricultural and wild-living plants are able to exude proteases and use them to create a pool of accessible N. This mini-review offers an overview of the problem of protease exudation by plant roots and its potential role in plant nitrogen nutrition. PMID:20505350

  5. Liquid nitrogen ingestion followed by gastric perforation.

    PubMed

    Berrizbeitia, Luis D; Calello, Diane P; Dhir, Nisha; O'Reilly, Colin; Marcus, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Ingestion of liquid nitrogen is rare but carries catastrophic complications related to barotrauma to the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of ingestion of liquid nitrogen followed by gastric perforation and respiratory insufficiency and discuss the mechanism of injury and management of this condition. Liquid nitrogen is widely available and is frequently used in classroom settings, in gastronomy, and for recreational purposes. Given the potentially lethal complications of ingestion, regulation of its use, acquisition, and storage may be appropriate.

  6. Evaluation of a spacecraft nitrogen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Knebel, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment was completed to demonstrate that low ammonia concentrations in the product nitrogen stream are possible using the staging concept. Mixtures of nitrogen, hydrogen and ammonia were fed into a temperature controlled packed bed ammonia dissociator. An ammonia concentration of 1.03% in the feed stream was reduced to less than 50 ppm at temperatures greater than or equal to 777K. The actual inlet ammonia concentration to the final nitrogen generation module ammonia dissociation stage was only 0.09%.

  7. Experimental thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat values for mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, R. A.; Cieszkiewicz, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity obtained with a transient hot-wire apparatus are reported for three mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon. Values of the specific heat, Cp, are calculated from these measured values and the density calculated with an equation of state. The measurements were made at temperatures between 65 and 303 K with pressures between 0.1 and 70 MPa. The data cover the vapor, liquid, and supercritical gas phases for the three mixtures. The total reported points are 1066 for the air mixture (78.11 percent nitrogen, 20.97 percent oxygen, and 0.92 percent argon), 1058 for the 50 percent nitrogen, 50 percent oxygen mixture, and 864 for the 25 percent nitrogen, 75 oxygen mixture. Empirical thermal conductivity correlations are provided for the three mixtures.

  8. Modifications of Superconducting Properties of Niobium Caused by Nitrogen Doping Recipes for High Q Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Vostrikov, Alexander; Checchin, Mattia; Grassellino, Anna; Kim, Young-Kee; Romanenko, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    A study is presented on the superconducting properties of niobium used for the fabrication of the SRF cavities after treating by recently discovered nitrogen doping methods. Cylindrical niobium samples have been subjected to the standard surface treatments applied to the cavities (electro-polishing, l 20°C bake) and compared with samples treated by additional nitrogen doping recipes routinely used to reach ultra-high quality factor values (>3· 1010 at 2 K, 16 MV/m). The DC magnetization curves and the complex magnetic AC susceptibility have been measured. Evidence for the lowered field of first flux penetration after nitrogen doping is found suggesting a correlation with the lowered quench fields. Superconducting critical temperatures Tc = 9.25 K are found to be in agreement with previous measurements, and no strong effect on the critical surface field (Bd) from nitrogen doping was found.

  9. Peak exposures to nitrogen dioxide and study design to detect their acute health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, I.F.; Andrews, L.R.

    1986-04-01

    Findings on continuous exposure to nitrogen dioxide by persons cooking a meal on a gas stove are presented. In addition, peak levels of NO/sub 2/ at different heights above the floor and at various distances from the stove while the range and oven are in operation are reported for 24 homes. A study design to detect the health effects of short-term exposures to high levels of nitrogen dioxide ranging from 0.20 ppm to over 1.5 ppm on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in asthmatic and non-asthmatic subjects is described. The continuous exposure to nitrogen dioxide of the study subjects before, during and after cooking a dinner on a gas stove is determined using a continuous nitrogen dioxide monitoring instrument. Lung-function tests are performed and symptom questionnaires are administered throughout the study period to assess both health effects and changes in pulmonary function associated with the above exposures.

  10. Corrosion behavior and mechanical properties of a new nitrogen strengthened Fe-Mn-Cr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, U.; Agarwal, D.C.

    1999-07-01

    Nitrogen alloyed, Ni-free, austenitic stainless steels with more than 1 wt.% nitrogen are a new group of alloys with promising properties. They exhibit a very interesting combination of high strength and toughness with a high corrosion resistance in various environments. This work shows the influence of chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen on the corrosion resistance of Fe25Mn-alloys. According to these results Fe25Mn-alloys with approximately 20 wt.% chromium about 3 wt.% molybdenum and approximately 1.3 wt.% nitrogen have an excellent corrosion resistance. The critical pitting temperature (CPT) of 61 C and the critical crevice temperature (CCT) of 37 C when tested according to ASTM G-48 A were significantly higher than the well established AISI 316 L stainless steel.

  11. Occurrence and transport of nitrogen in the Big Sunflower River, northwestern Mississippi, October 2009-June 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Jeannie R.B.; Coupe, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    ammonia and nitrate plus nitrite; conversely, at sites farther downstream (that is, at Sunflower and Anguilla), nitrate plus nitrite concentrations were generally higher than concentrations of organic nitrogen and ammonia. In addition to the routinely collected samples, water samples from the Big Sunflower River Basin were collected using a Lagrangian sampling scheme, which attempts to follow a single mass of water through time in order to determine how it changes through processing or other pathways as the water moves downstream. Lagrangian sampling was conducted five times during the study period: (1) April 8–21, 2010, (2) May 12–June 3, 2010, (3) June 15–July 1, 2010, (4) August 23–30, 2010, and (5) May 16–20, 2011. Streamflow conditions were variable for each sampling event because of input from local precipitation and irrigation return flow, and streamflow losses through the streambed. Streamflow and total nitrogen flux increased with drainage area, and the dominant form of nitrogen varied with drainage area size and temporally across sampling events. Results from each method indicate relatively conservative transport of nitrogen within the 160 miles between Clarksdale and Anguilla, providing further validation of the SPARROW models. Furthermore, these results suggest relatively conservative transport of nitrogen from the Big Sunflower River to the Gulf of Mexico and, therefore, imply a fairly close association of nutrient application and export from the Big Sunflower River Basin to the Mississippi River. However, within the Big Sunflower River Basin, two potential nitrogen sinks were identified and include the transport and potential transformation of nitrogen through the streambed and the sequestration and potential transformation of nitrogen above the drainage control structures downstream of Anguilla. By coupling these potential loss mechanisms with nitrogen transport dynamics, it may be possible to further reduce the amount of nitrogen leaving the Big

  12. Biodegradation of the high explosive hexanitrohexaazaiso-wurtzitane (CL-20).

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Pelin; Christodoulatos, Christos; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Balas, Wendy; Nicolich, Steve; Sidhoum, Mohammed

    2009-04-01

    The aerobic biodegradability of the high explosive CL-20 by activated sludge and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been investigated. Although activated sludge is not effective in degrading CL-20 directly, it can mineralize the alkaline hydrolysis products. Phanerochaete chrysosporium degrades CL-20 in the presence of supplementary carbon and nitrogen sources. Biodegradation studies were conducted using various nutrient media under diverse conditions. Variables included the CL-20 concentration; levels of carbon (as glycerol) and ammonium sulfate and yeast extract as sources of nitrogen. Cultures that received CL-20 at the time of inoculation transformed CL-20 completely under all nutrient conditions studied. When CL-20 was added to pre-grown cultures, degradation was limited. The extent of mineralization was monitored by the (14)CO(2) time evolution; up to 51% mineralization was achieved when the fungus was incubated with [(14)C]-CL-20. The kinetics of CL-20 biodegradation by Phanerochaete chrysosporium follows the logistic kinetic growth model. PMID:19440524

  13. Biodegradation of the High Explosive Hexanitrohexaazaiso-wurtzitane (CL-20)

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Pelin; Christodoulatos, Christos; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Balas, Wendy; Nicolich, Steve; Sidhoum, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    The aerobic biodegradability of the high explosive CL-20 by activated sludge and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been investigated. Although activated sludge is not effective in degrading CL-20 directly, it can mineralize the alkaline hydrolysis products. Phanerochaete chrysosporium degrades CL-20 in the presence of supplementary carbon and nitrogen sources. Biodegradation studies were conducted using various nutrient media under diverse conditions. Variables included the CL-20 concentration; levels of carbon (as glycerol) and ammonium sulfate and yeast extract as sources of nitrogen. Cultures that received CL-20 at the time of inoculation transformed CL-20 completely under all nutrient conditions studied. When CL-20 was added to pre-grown cultures, degradation was limited. The extent of mineralization was monitored by the 14CO2 time evolution; up to 51% mineralization was achieved when the fungus was incubated with [14C]-CL-20. The kinetics of CL-20 biodegradation by Phanerochaete chrysosporium follows the logistic kinetic growth model. PMID:19440524

  14. The social costs of nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Keeler, Bonnie L.; Gourevitch, Jesse D.; Polasky, Stephen; Isbell, Forest; Tessum, Chris W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing recognition of the negative externalities associated with reactive nitrogen (N), the damage costs of N to air, water, and climate remain largely unquantified. We propose a comprehensive approach for estimating the social cost of nitrogen (SCN), defined as the present value of the monetary damages caused by an incremental increase in N. This framework advances N accounting by considering how each form of N causes damages at specific locations as it cascades through the environment. We apply the approach to an empirical example that estimates the SCN for N applied as fertilizer. We track impacts of N through its transformation into atmospheric and aquatic pools and estimate the distribution of associated costs to affected populations. Our results confirm that there is no uniform SCN. Instead, changes in N management will result in different N-related costs depending on where N moves and the location, vulnerability, and preferences of populations affected by N. For example, we found that the SCN per kilogram of N fertilizer applied in Minnesota ranges over several orders of magnitude, from less than $0.001/kg N to greater than $10/kg N, illustrating the importance of considering the site, the form of N, and end points of interest rather than assuming a uniform cost for damages. Our approach for estimating the SCN demonstrates the potential of integrated biophysical and economic models to illuminate the costs and benefits of N and inform more strategic and efficient N management. PMID:27713926

  15. Nitrogen management in bioreactor landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Price, G. Alexander; Barlaz, Morton A.; Hater, Gary R

    2003-07-01

    One scenario for long-term nitrogen management in landfills is ex situ nitrification followed by denitrification in the landfill. The objective of this research was to measure the denitrification potential of actively decomposing and well decomposed refuse. A series of 10-l reactors that were actively producing methane were fed 400 mg NO{sub 3}-N /l every 48 h for periods of 19-59 days. Up to 29 nitrate additions were either completely or largely depleted within 48 h of addition and the denitrification reactions did not adversely affect the leachate pH. Nitrate did inhibit methane production, but the reactors recovered their methane-producing activity with the termination of nitrate addition. In well decomposed refuse, the nitrate consumption rate was reduced but was easily stimulated by the addition of either acetate or an overlayer of fresh refuse. Addition of acetate at five times the amount required to reduce nitrate did not lead to the production of NH{sub 4}{sup +} by dissimilatory nitrate reduction. The most probable number of denitrifying bacteria decreased by about five orders of magnitude during refuse decomposition in a reactor that did not receive nitrate. However, rapid denitrification commenced immediately with nitrate addition. This study shows that the use of a landfill as a bioreactor for the conversion of nitrate to a harmless byproduct, nitrogen gas, is technically viable.

  16. The Bevatron liquid nitrogen circulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D.; Stover, G.

    1987-03-01

    A nitrogen liquefier and computer controlled valving system have been added to the Bevatron cryoliner vacuum system to cut operating costs by reducing liquid nitrogen consumption. The computer and interface electronic systems, which control the temperatures of twenty-eight liquid nitrogen circuits, have been chosen and designed to operate in the Bevatron's pulsating magnetic field. The nitrogen exhaust is routed back to a liquefier, of about five kilowatt capacity, liquefied, and rerouted through the cooling circuits. A description of the system and operating results are presented.

  17. Characterization of organic nitrogen in IBCSP coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kruge, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to determine the content and distribution of organic nitrogen in a series of IBCSP coals and their isolated macerals. The specific objectives were: to determine the bulk nitrogen contents for coals, isolated macerals, oxidation products and residues, solvent extracts and their liquid chromatographic fractions, and pyrolyzates; to determine the distribution of organic nitrogen in all coal derivatives enumerated in Objective 1 which are Gas Chromatography (GC)-amenable. This will be accomplished by GC-Thermionic Specific Detectors; to determine the molecular structure of the major nitrogen compounds detected in Objective 2, using mass spectrometry.

  18. Nitrogen control in electric arc furnace steelmaking

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Scheid, C.; Geiger, G.; Czarnik, C.; Teall, D. )

    1992-12-01

    Electric arc furnace produced steels are usually characterized by relatively high nitrogen content. This restricts their use in applications requiring controlled nitrogen content, such as deep drawing quality products. This report presents the results of an EPRI Center for Materials Production and steel industry study of methods for controlling or reducing the nitrogen content of EAF steels. The study involved a series of trials performed by North Star Steel at its Michigan Division plant. A major conclusion of the study is that nitrogen content can be reduced through an increase in carbon monoxide evolution sustained by oxygen injection and carbon additions.

  19. Substantial nitrogen pollution embedded in international trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oita, Azusa; Malik, Arunima; Kanemoto, Keiichiro; Geschke, Arne; Nishijima, Shota; Lenzen, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen to the atmosphere and water bodies can damage human health and ecosystems. As a measure of a nation’s contribution to this potential damage, a country’s nitrogen footprint has been defined as the quantity of reactive nitrogen emitted during the production, consumption and transportation of commodities consumed within that country, whether those commodities are produced domestically or internationally. Here we use global emissions databases, a global nitrogen cycle model, and a global input-output database of domestic and international trade to calculate the nitrogen footprints for 188 countries as the sum of emissions of ammonia, nitrogen oxides and nitrous oxide to the atmosphere, and of nitrogen potentially exportable to water bodies. Per-capita footprints range from under 7 kg N yr-1 in some developing countries to over 100 kg N yr-1 in some wealthy nations. Consumption in China, India, the United States and Brazil is responsible for 46% of global emissions. Roughly a quarter of the global nitrogen footprint is from commodities that were traded across country borders. The main net exporters have significant agricultural, food and textile exports, and are often developing countries, whereas important net importers are almost exclusively developed economies. We conclude that substantial local nitrogen pollution is driven by demand from consumers in other countries.

  20. Wet and dry atmospheric depositions of inorganic nitrogen during plant growing season in the coastal zone of Yellow River Delta.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junbao; Ning, Kai; Li, Yunzhao; Du, Siyao; Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Guangmei; Gao, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO4 (2-) and Na(+) were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m(-2), in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3 (-)-N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4 (+)-N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N in 0-10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD.

  1. Wet and Dry Atmospheric Depositions of Inorganic Nitrogen during Plant Growing Season in the Coastal Zone of Yellow River Delta

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunzhao; Du, Siyao; Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Guangmei

    2014-01-01

    The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO42− and Na+ were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m−2, in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3−–N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4+–N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3−–N and NH4+–N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3−–N and NH4+–N in 0–10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD. PMID:24977238

  2. Nitrogen concentrations in mosses indicate the spatial distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe.

    PubMed

    Harmens, H; Norris, D A; Cooper, D M; Mills, G; Steinnes, E; Kubin, E; Thöni, L; Aboal, J R; Alber, R; Carballeira, A; Coşkun, M; De Temmerman, L; Frolova, M; González-Miqueo, L; Jeran, Z; Leblond, S; Liiv, S; Maňkovská, B; Pesch, R; Poikolainen, J; Rühling, A; Santamaria, J M; Simonèiè, P; Schröder, W; Suchara, I; Yurukova, L; Zechmeister, H G

    2011-10-01

    In 2005/6, nearly 3000 moss samples from (semi-)natural location across 16 European countries were collected for nitrogen analysis. The lowest total nitrogen concentrations in mosses (<0.8%) were observed in northern Finland and northern UK. The highest concentrations (≥ 1.6%) were found in parts of Belgium, France, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia and Bulgaria. The asymptotic relationship between the nitrogen concentrations in mosses and EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition (averaged per 50 km × 50 km grid) across Europe showed less scatter when there were at least five moss sampling sites per grid. Factors potentially contributing to the scatter are discussed. In Switzerland, a strong (r(2) = 0.91) linear relationship was found between the total nitrogen concentration in mosses and measured site-specific bulk nitrogen deposition rates. The total nitrogen concentrations in mosses complement deposition measurements, helping to identify areas in Europe at risk from high nitrogen deposition at a high spatial resolution.

  3. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bettina; Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-12-15

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth's nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a(-1) of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a(-1) of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate.

  4. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bettina; Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-12-15

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth's nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a(-1) of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a(-1) of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate. PMID:26621714

  5. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J.; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth’s nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a−1 of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a−1 of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate. PMID:26621714

  6. The nitrogen requirements and dietary nitrogen utilization for the gecarcinid land crab Gecarcoidea natalis.

    PubMed

    Linton, S M; Greenaway, P

    2000-01-01

    The nitrogen requirements for tissue maintenance, moulting, and oogenesis were determined experimentally for the herbivorous land crab Gecarcoidea natalis. The maintenance nitrogen requirements for intermoult animals was very low (4.83+/-1.68 mmol N kg-1 dry body wt d-1), but during oogenesis the total requirement was much higher (8. 6 mmol N kg-1 dry body wt d-1). Gecarcoidea natalis could potentially assimilate enough nitrogen from rain forest leaf litter or leaves of Ficus or Erythrina to satisfy not only the maintenance nitrogen requirements but the observed rate of incorporation of nitrogen into the ovaries during oogenesis. The ovaries developed slowly over a period of 2 mo (mid-July to late September) and had a final nitrogen content of 359+/-15.9 (n=18) mmol kg-1 dry body wt. This was equivalent to 9.3%+/-0.4% of the total body nitrogen. A substantial nitrogen debt was incurred during ecdysis (658+/-126 mmol kg-1 dry body wt). This nitrogen debt could be satisfied slowly, from leaf litter, over a period of 1-3 mo. After ecdysis, the majority of the nitrogen and urate within the animal prior to moulting was retained within the soft crab (85.0%+/-1.2% total nitrogen, 82.0%+/-1.2% nonurate nitrogen and 99.56% urate), while only a minority was lost with the exuviae (18.0%+/-1.2% total nitrogen, 14.7%+/-1.2% nonurate nitrogen, and 0.4%+/-0.4% urate). The urate deposits in G. natalis were not mobilized as a source of nitrogen in animals maintained on a nitrogen-free diet.

  7. Optical Detection of Anomalous Nitrogen in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    . Introducing instead the terrestrial ratio for nitrogen-15 (1/272) significantly degrades the fit and thus that ratio can clearly be ruled out in Comet LINEAR. At the time of the VLT observations, the comet was of 9th magnitude, i.e. about 15 times fainter than what can be perceived with the unaided eye. The distance from the Sun was about 180 million km; the distance from the Earth was 186 million km. The observations included calibration spectra of sunlight reflected from the lunar surface; they were used to "subtract" the solar signatures in the comet's spectrum, caused by reflection of sunlight from the dust particles around the comet. As expected, in addition to emission from "normal" CN-molecules ( 12 C 14 N), the UVES data also show emission lines of the 13 C 14 N-molecule that contains the rare isotope carbon-13. The derived 12 C/ 13 C isotopic ratio is 115 ± 20, quite similar to the "standard" solar system value of 89. However, there is also a series of weak features that are positioned exactly at the theoretical wavelengths of emission lines from 12 C 15 N-molecules, cf. PR Photo 28c/03 . The excellent fit that is evident in this diagram proves beyond any doubt the presence of nitrogen-15 in Comet LINEAR and allows a quite accurate determination of the isotopic ratio. The "anomalous" nitrogen isotope ratio in comets In 1997, the same group of astronomers obtained spectra of the (at that time) much brighter Comet Hale-Bopp with the 2.6-m NOT telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain) in order to investigate the isotopic ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13. Claude Arpigny remembers: " Interestingly, our spectra of Hale-Bopp showed a number of weak and unidentified emission lines. We later realised that they were positioned close to the theoretical wavelengths of some lines from the 12 C 15 N-molecule. This was a pleasant surprise, as lines from that molecular species were previously believed to be so faint that they would not be

  8. Farmer driven national monitoring of nitrogen concentrations in drainage water in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piil, Kristoffer; Lemming, Camilla; Kolind Hvid, Søren; Knudsen, Leif

    2014-05-01

    Field drains are often considered to short circuit the hydrological cycle in agricultural catchments and lead to an increased risk of nitrogen loss to the environment. Because of increased regulation of agricultural practices due to catchment management plans, resulting from the implementation of the water frame directive, Danish farmers pushed for a large scale monitoring of nitrogen loss from field drains. Therefore, the knowledge centre for agriculture, Denmark, organized a three year campaign where farmers and local agricultural advisory centres collected water samples from field drains three to five times during the winter season. Samples were analysed for nitrate and total nitrogen. Combined, more than 600 drains were monitored over the three years. During the first two years of monitoring, average winter concentrations of total nitrogen ranged from 0.1 mg N L-1 to 31.1 mg N L-1, and the fraction of total nitrogen present as nitrate ranged from 0% to 100%. This variation is much larger than what is observed in the Danish national monitoring and assessment programme, which monitors only a few drains in selected catchments. Statistical analysis revealed that drainage water nitrogen concentrations were significantly correlated to the cropping system and the landscape type (high ground/lowlands/raised seabed) in which the monitored fields were situated. The average total nitrogen concentration was more than 2 mg N L-1 lower on raised seabed than on high ground, and the average fraction of total nitrogen present as nitrate was more than 20% lower. This indicates that substantial nitrate reduction occurs at or above the drain depth on raised sea flats, in particular in the north of Denmark. This inherent nitrogen retention on raised seabed is not taken into account in the current environmental regulation, nor in the first generation catchment management plans. The monitoring program demonstrated large variation in nitrogen concentrations in drainage water, in

  9. Investigating in-stream nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions using new optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Michael; Knoeller, Kay; Kiwel, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Most experimental studies on in-stream nitrogen removal concentrate on low flow conditions. Considerable knowledge gaps exist on nitrogen removal during high flow stages, especially for mid- sized streams. The objective of the study is quantify nitrogen removal during low and high flow conditions in the 4th order Bode river, which is part of the TERENO Hydrological Observatory of UFZ, Germany. To measure nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions we used new optical and conventional water quality multi-parameter sensors for continues measurements (10-15 min frequency) on electric conductivity, temperature, pH-value, nitrate-N, soluble oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll a and SAC 254 (specific absorption coefficient) at two river stations. Additional automatic samplers were installed to conduct four low flow campaigns and to measure four high flow events at a 30km river reach from 2010 to 2012. Several nitrogen and phosphorus compounds as well as δ18O and δ15N isotopes at nitrate have been analyzed using a two hour sampling interval. The study river reach is an ideal system to investigate the impact of flow conditions on nitrogen removal by mass balances and natural abundance of nitrogen isotopes because upstream inflow is equal with downstream outflow with less the 3% deviation on a yearly basis. Continues sensor measurements show that nitrate removal is occurring throughout the year depending on primary production, temperature and nitrate concentrations. During low flow conditions in the vegetation period a clear diurnal variation of nitrate concentrations is observable. Nitrate-N concentrations, which range between 2 and 8 mgN l-1, can vary by 10% between day and night time during periods with high algae concentration. The nitrogen balance calculations for the four low flow sampling campaigns suggest a loss of nitrogen between 10 and 20 % in the 30km reach. Losses were highest in August 2011 and lowest in October 2010. Surprisingly also during high flow events

  10. Investigating in-stream nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions using new optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, M.; Knoeller, K.; Kiwel, U.

    2012-12-01

    Most experimental studies on in-stream nitrogen removal concentrate on low flow conditions. Considerable knowledge gaps exist on nitrogen removal during high flow stages, especially for mid- sized streams. The objective of the study is quantify nitrogen removal during low and high flow conditions in the 4th order Bode river, which is part of the TERENO Hydrological Observatory of UFZ, Germany. To measure nitrogen removal at variable flow conditions we used new optical and conventional water quality multi-parameter sensors for continues measurements (10-15 min frequency) on electric conductivity, temperature, pH-value, nitrate-N, soluble oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll a and SAC 254 (specific absorption coefficient) at two river stations. Additional automatic samplers were installed to conduct four low flow campaigns and to measure four high flow events at a 30km river reach from 2010 to 2012. Several nitrogen and phosphorus compounds as well as δ18O and δ15N isotopes at nitrate have been analysed using a two hour sampling interval. The study river reach is an ideal system to investigate the impact of flow conditions on nitrogen removal by mass balances and natural abundance of nitrogen isotops because upstream inflow is equal with downstream outflow with less the 3% deviation on a yearly basis. Continues sensor measurements show that nitrate removal if occurring throughout the year depending on primary production, temperature and nitrate concentrations. During low flow conditions in the vegetation period a clear diurnal variation of nitrate concentrations is observable. Nitrate-N concentrations, which range between 2 and 8 mgN l-1, can vary by 10% between day and night time during periods with high algae concentration. The nitrogen balance calculations for the four low flow sampling campaigns suggest a loss of nitrogen between 10 and 20 % in the 30km reach. Losses were highest in August 2011 and lowest in October 2010. Surprisingly also during high flow events

  11. Contributions of secondary forest and nitrogen dynamics to terrestrial carbon uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Richardson, T. K.; Jain, A. K.

    2010-10-01

    We use a terrestrial carbon-nitrogen cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) to investigate the impacts of nitrogen dynamics on regrowing secondary forests over the 20th century. We further examine what the impacts of nitrogen deposition and land use change history are on terrestrial carbon uptake since preindustrial time. Our results suggest that global total net land use emissions for the 1990s associated with changes in cropland, pastureland, and wood harvest are 1.22 GtC/yr. Without considering the secondary forest regrowth, the estimated net global total land use emissions are 1.58 GtC/yr or about 0.36 GtC/yr higher than if secondary forest regrowth is considered. Results also show that without considering the nitrogen dynamics and deposition, the estimated global total secondary forest sink for the 1990s is 0.90 GtC/yr or about 0.54 GtC/yr higher than estimates that include the impacts of nitrogen dynamics and deposition. Nitrogen deposition alone is responsible for about 0.13 GtC/yr of the total secondary forest sink. While nitrogen is not a limiting nutrient in the intact primary forests in tropical regions, our study suggests that nitrogen becomes a limiting nutrient for regrowing secondary forests of the tropical regions, in particular Latin America and Tropical Africa. This is because land use change activities, especially wood harvest, removes large amounts of nitrogen from the system when slash is burnt or wood is removed for harvest. However, our model results show that carbon uptake is enhanced in the tropical secondary forests of the Indian region. We argue that this may be due to enhanced nitrogen mineralization and increased nitrogen availability following land use change in the Indian tropical forest ecosystems. Results also demonstrate that there is a significant amount of carbon accumulating in the Northern Hemisphere where most land use changes and forest regrowth has occurred in recent decades. This study indicates

  12. Contributions of secondary forest and nitrogen dynamics to terrestrial carbon uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Richardson, T. K.; Jain, A. K.

    2010-04-01

    We use a terrestrial carbon-nitrogen cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) to investigate the impacts of nitrogen dynamics on regrowing secondary forests over the 20th century. We further examine what the impacts of nitrogen deposition and land use change history are on terrestrial carbon uptake since preindustrial time. Our results suggest that global total net land use emissions for the 1990s associated with changes in cropland, pastureland, and wood harvest are 1.22 GtC/yr. Without considering the secondary forest regrowth, the estimated net global total land use emissions are 1.58 GtC/yr or about 0.36 GtC/yr higher than if secondary forest regrowth is considered. Results also show that without considering the nitrogen dynamics and deposition, the estimated global total secondary forest sink for the 1990s is 0.90 GtC/yr or about 0.54 GtC/yr higher than estimates that include the impacts of nitrogen dynamics and deposition. Nitrogen deposition alone is responsible for about 0.13 GtC/yr of the total secondary forest sink. While nitrogen is not a limiting nutrient in the intact primary forests in tropical regions, our study suggests that nitrogen becomes a limiting nutrient for regrowing secondary forests of the tropical regions, in particular Latin America and Tropical Africa. This is because land use change activities, especially wood harvest, removes large amounts of nitrogen from the system when slash is burnt or wood is removed for harvest. However, our model results show that carbon uptake is enhanced in the tropical secondary forests of the Indian region. We argue that this may be due to enhanced nitrogen mineralization and increased nitrogen availability following land use change in the Indian tropical forest ecosystems. Results also demonstrate that there is a significant amount of carbon accumulating in the Northern Hemisphere where most land use changes and forest regrowth has occurred in recent decades. This study indicates

  13. Intercropping enhances soil carbon and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wen-Feng; Hoffland, Ellis; Li, Long; Six, Johan; Sun, Jian-Hao; Bao, Xing-Guo; Zhang, Fu-Suo; Van Der Werf, Wopke

    2015-04-01

    Intercropping, the simultaneous cultivation of multiple crop species in a single field, increases aboveground productivity due to species complementarity. We hypothesized that intercrops may have greater belowground productivity than sole crops, and sequester more soil carbon over time due to greater input of root litter. Here, we demonstrate a divergence in soil organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content over 7 years in a field experiment that compared rotational strip intercrop systems and ordinary crop rotations. Soil organic C content in the top 20 cm was 4% ± 1% greater in intercrops than in sole crops, indicating a difference in C sequestration rate between intercrop and sole crop systems of 184 ± 86 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1). Soil organic N content in the top 20 cm was 11% ± 1% greater in intercrops than in sole crops, indicating a difference in N sequestration rate between intercrop and sole crop systems of 45 ± 10 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Total root biomass in intercrops was on average 23% greater than the average root biomass in sole crops, providing a possible mechanism for the observed divergence in soil C sequestration between sole crop and intercrop systems. A lowering of the soil δ(15) N signature suggested that increased biological N fixation and/or reduced gaseous N losses contributed to the increases in soil N in intercrop rotations with faba bean. Increases in soil N in wheat/maize intercrop pointed to contributions from a broader suite of mechanisms for N retention, e.g., complementary N uptake strategies of the intercropped plant species. Our results indicate that soil C sequestration potential of strip intercropping is similar in magnitude to that of currently recommended management practises to conserve organic matter in soil. Intercropping can contribute to multiple agroecosystem services by increased yield, better soil quality and soil C sequestration.

  14. Intercropping enhances soil carbon and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wen-Feng; Hoffland, Ellis; Li, Long; Six, Johan; Sun, Jian-Hao; Bao, Xing-Guo; Zhang, Fu-Suo; Van Der Werf, Wopke

    2015-04-01

    Intercropping, the simultaneous cultivation of multiple crop species in a single field, increases aboveground productivity due to species complementarity. We hypothesized that intercrops may have greater belowground productivity than sole crops, and sequester more soil carbon over time due to greater input of root litter. Here, we demonstrate a divergence in soil organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content over 7 years in a field experiment that compared rotational strip intercrop systems and ordinary crop rotations. Soil organic C content in the top 20 cm was 4% ± 1% greater in intercrops than in sole crops, indicating a difference in C sequestration rate between intercrop and sole crop systems of 184 ± 86 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1). Soil organic N content in the top 20 cm was 11% ± 1% greater in intercrops than in sole crops, indicating a difference in N sequestration rate between intercrop and sole crop systems of 45 ± 10 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Total root biomass in intercrops was on average 23% greater than the average root biomass in sole crops, providing a possible mechanism for the observed divergence in soil C sequestration between sole crop and intercrop systems. A lowering of the soil δ(15) N signature suggested that increased biological N fixation and/or reduced gaseous N losses contributed to the increases in soil N in intercrop rotations with faba bean. Increases in soil N in wheat/maize intercrop pointed to contributions from a broader suite of mechanisms for N retention, e.g., complementary N uptake strategies of the intercropped plant species. Our results indicate that soil C sequestration potential of strip intercropping is similar in magnitude to that of currently recommended management practises to conserve organic matter in soil. Intercropping can contribute to multiple agroecosystem services by increased yield, better soil quality and soil C sequestration. PMID:25216023

  15. Assessment of nitrogen losses to the environment with a Nitrogen Trading Tool (NTT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delta (or reduced) nitrogen losses (DNL) refer to potential downstream reductions in nonpoint source nitrogen (N) loading of streams or other water bodies and/or in reduced loading of the atmosphere with N-associated greenhouse gases from agriculture. Nitrogen credits as traded on the Communities Ma...

  16. NITROGEN OUTPUTS FROM FECAL AND URINE DEPOSITION OF SMALL MAMMALS: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of small mammals to nitrogen cycling is poorly understood, but it could have reverberations back to the producer community by maintaining or perhaps magnifying nitrogen availability. Our objective was to model nitrogen outputs (deposition of feces and urine) of ...

  17. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEEN NITROGEN LOADING AND CONCENTRATIONS OF NITROGEN AND CHLOROPHYLL IN COASTAL EMBAYMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe results obtained with a simple model that uses loading rates of total nitrogen (TN), defined as dissolved inorganic nitrogen plus dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen, to calculate annually and spatially averaged concentrations of TN in coastal embayments. We al...

  18. Removal efficiency and balance of nitrogen in a recirculating aquaculture system integrated with constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Fei; Liang, Wei; Yu, Tao; Cheng, Shui P; He, Feng; Wu, Zhen B

    2011-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) balance for aquaculture is an important aspect, especially in China, and it is attributed to the eutrophication in many freshwater bodies. In recent years, constructed wetlands (CWs) have been widely used in wastewater treatment and ecosystem restoration. A recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) consisting of CWs and 4 fish ponds was set up in Wuhan, China. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fingerlings were fed for satiation daily for 168 days with 2 diets containing 5.49 % and 6.53 % nitrogen, respectively. The objectives of this study were to investigate the N budget in the RAS, and try to find out the feasibility of controlling N accumulation in the fish pond. It is expected that the study can provide a mass balance for the fate of N in the eco-friendly treatment system to avoid eutrophication. The results showed that the removal rates of ammonia (NH(+)(4)-N), sum of nitrate & nitrite (NO(-)(X)-N), and total nitrogen (TN) by the CWs were 20-55%, 38-84 % and 39-57 %, respectively. Denitrification in the CWs was the main pathway of nitrogen loss (41.67 %). Nitrogen accumulation in pond water and sediment accounted for 3.39 % and 12.65 % of total nitrogen loss, respectively. The nitrogen removal efficiency and budget showed that the CW could be used to control excessive nitrogen accumulation in fish ponds. From the viewpoint of the nitrogen pollution control, the RAS combined with the constructed wetland can be applied to ensure the sustainable development for aquaculture.

  19. Nitrogen Out of the Bottle: The Challenge of Managing the Genie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    Human activity converts more N2 to reactive nitrogen (Nr; all nitrogen species other than N2) than do natural terrestrial processes (mostly biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in unmanaged ecosystems). Most of the Nr is created as a consequence of food production, fossil fuel combustion and industry. The Haber-Bosch process, invented in the early 20th century, now provides a virtually inexhaustible supply of nitrogen fertilizer. This one invention is responsible for the existence of about half of the world's population. That's the good news. The other news is that most of this nitrogen (and additional amounts from fossil fuel combustion and industry) is lost to the environment where it has exceeded the ability of the environment to convert it back to unreactive N2. The accumulating Nr contributes to smog, greenhouse effect, ecosystem eutrophication, acid rain and loss of stratospheric ozone in a sequential manner—the nitrogen cascade. Collectively these changes alter climate, decrease air quality, and diminish ecosystem sustainability. The challenge is how do we manage the genie—make sure we get the benefits of nitrogen, while minimizing the problems it causes. The paper will layout the possible, the probable and the improbable (but if it occurred, would be transformative) options for nitrogen management. Included will be the role that a nation vs. a person should play. The paper will also give examples of success stories, where nitrogen losses to the environment have been decreased, without impacting the service being provided—food and energy production. The paper will conclude with a forecast to the future, based upon the RCP scenarios for 2100.

  20. Modelling the nitrogen loadings from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) cage aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huiwen; Ross, Lindsay G; Telfer, Trevor C; Wu, Changwen; Zhu, Aiyi; Zhao, Sheng; Xu, Meiying

    2016-04-01

    Large yellow croaker (LYC) cage farming is a rapidly developing industry in the coastal areas of the East China Sea. However, little is known about the environmental nutrient loadings resulting from the current aquaculture practices for this species. In this study, a nitrogenous waste model was developed for LYC based on thermal growth and bioenergetic theories. The growth model produced a good fit with the measured data of the growth trajectory of the fish. The total, dissolved and particulate nitrogen outputs were estimated to be 133, 51 and 82 kg N tonne(-1) of fish production, respectively, with daily dissolved and particulate nitrogen outputs varying from 69 to 104 and 106 to 181 mg N fish(-1), respectively, during the 2012 operational cycle. Greater than 80 % of the nitrogen input from feed was predicted to be lost to the environment, resulting in low nitrogen retention (<20 %) in the fish tissues. Ammonia contributed the greatest proportion (>85 %) of the dissolved nitrogen generated from cage farming. This nitrogen loading assessment model is the first to address nitrogenous output from LYC farming and could be a valuable tool to examine the effects of management and feeding practices on waste from cage farming. The application of this model could help improve the scientific understanding of offshore fish farming systems. Furthermore, the model predicts that a 63 % reduction in nitrogenous waste production could be achieved by switching from the use of trash fish for feed to the use of pelleted feed. PMID:26728289

  1. Impacts of reactive nitrogen on climate change in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yalan; Cui, Shenghui; Ju, Xiaotang; Cai, Zucong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-01-01

    China is mobilizing the largest anthropogenic reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the world due to agricultural, industrial and urban development. However, the climate effects related to Nr in China remain largely unclear. Here we comprehensively estimate that the net climate effects of Nr are -100 +/- 414 and 322 +/- 163 Tg CO2e on a GTP20 and a GTP100 basis, respectively. Agriculture contributes to warming at 187 +/- 108 and 186 +/- 56 Tg CO2e on a 20-y and 100-y basis, respectively, dominated by long-lived nitrous oxide (N2O) from fertilized soils. On a 20-y basis, industry contributes to cooling at -287 +/- 306 Tg CO2e, largely owing to emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) altering tropospheric ozone, methane and aerosol concentrations. However, these effects are short-lived. The effect of industry converts to warming at 136 +/- 107 Tg CO2e on a 100-y basis, mainly as a result of the reduced carbon (C) sink from the NOx-induced ozone effect on plant damage. On balance, the warming effects of gaseous Nr are partly offset by the cooling effects of N-induced carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. The large mitigation potentials through reductions in agricultural N2O and industrial NOx will accompany by a certain mitigation pressure from limited N-induced C sequestration in the future.

  2. An introduction to the nitrogen dynamics in controlled systems workshop. Life support and nitrogen: NASA's interest in nitrogen cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacElroy, R. D.; Smernoff, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    A Workshop on "Nitrogen Dynamics in Controlled Systems" was held September 26-28, 1995 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The meetings were sponsored by the NASA Advanced Life Support program and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and hosted by Prof. Lester Packer of the University of California at Berkeley, and of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Workshop participants were asked to: 1. summarize current knowledge on the cycling of nitrogen in closed systems; 2. identify the needs that closed systems may have for specific forms of nitrogen; 3. identify possible ways of generating and maintaining (or avoiding) specific forms and concentrations of nitrogen; 4. compare biological and physical/chemical methods of transforming nitrogen.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  7. Mechanisms of nitrogen retention in forest ecosystems - A field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitousek, P. M.; Matson, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Intensive forest management led to elevated losses of nitrogen from a recently harvested loblolly pine plantation in North Carolina. Measurements of nitrogen-15 retention in the field demonstrated that microbial uptake of nitrogen during the decomposition of residual organic material was the most important process retaining nitrogen. Management practices that remove this material cause increased losses of nitrogen to aquatic ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  8. INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be

  9. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    SciTech Connect

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  10. Nitrogen fractionation in Titan's aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Kuga, Maia; Marty, Bernard; Fleury, Benjamin; Marrocchi, Yves

    2016-06-01

    A strong nitrogen fractionation is found by Cassini in Titan's atmosphere with the detection of 15N-rich HCN relative to N2. Photodissociation of N2 associated or not to self-shielding might involve 15N-rich radicals prone to incorporation into forming organics. However the isotopic composition is only available for very simple gaseous N-bearing compounds, and the propagation and conservation of such a large N-isotopic fractionation upon polymerization is actually out of reach with the instruments onboard Cassini. We will therefore present a first laboratory investigation of the possible enrichment in the solid organic aerosols. We will also discuss the space instrumention required in the future to answer this pending issue on Titan.

  11. Toward nitrogen neutral biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yi-Xin; Wernick, David G; Liao, James C

    2012-06-01

    Environmental concerns and an increasing global energy demand have spurred scientific research and political action to deliver large-scale production of liquid biofuels. Current biofuel processes and developing approaches have focused on closing the carbon cycle by biological fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and conversion of biomass to fuels. To date, these processes have relied on fertilizer produced by the energy-intensive Haber-Bosch process, and have not addressed the global nitrogen cycle and its environmental implications. Recent developments to convert protein to fuel and ammonia may begin to address these problems. In this scheme, recycling ammonia to either plant or algal feedstocks reduces the demand for synthetic fertilizer supplementation. Further development of this technology will realize its advantages of high carbon fixation rates, inexpensive and simple feedstock processing, in addition to reduced fertilizer requirements.

  12. Combuster. [low nitrogen oxide formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A combuster is provided for utilizing a combustible mixture containing fuel and air, to heat a load fluid such as water or air, in a manner that minimizes the formation of nitrogen oxide. The combustible mixture passes through a small diameter tube where the mixture is heated to its combustion temperature, while the load fluid flows past the outside of the tube to receive heat. The tube is of a diameter small enough that the combustible mixture cannot form a flame, and yet is not subject to wall quench, so that combustion occurs, but at a temperature less than under free flame conditions. Most of the heat required for heating the combustible mixture to its combustion temperature, is obtained from heat flow through the walls of the pipe to the mixture.

  13. Nitrogen tetroxide scrubber data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, E. D.

    1978-01-01

    A major difficulty in the analysis of scrubber data is that of separating the physical effects, such as mass transfer, from the physico-chemical effects, such as reaction rates. This is especially true for the absorbtion of nitrogen tetroxide in the various liquids that were tested in the NASA-Kennedy Space Center Hypergolic Toxic Scrubber Program. A fruitful approach to correlating the data for outlet concentrations was to treat the overall absorbtion as a pseudo first-order absorbtion equation. This approach provided a method for normalizing the data to constant inlet concentration, constant sump liquor condition, and constant scrubbing time, and permitted evaluation of the test and fluid parameters that affected both absorbtion rate and scrubbing time. The analysis indicated that scrubber performance may be improved by optimizing liquor concentrations and liquor flowrate distributions.

  14. NITROGEN K-SHELL PHOTOABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    GarcIa, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Witthoeft, M.; Behar, E.; Mendoza, C.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Bautista, M.A.; Klapisch, M. E-mail: michael.c.witthoeft@nasa.gov E-mail: behar@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov E-mail: palmeri@umons.ac.be E-mail: bautista@vt.edu

    2009-12-01

    Reliable atomic data have been computed for the spectral modeling of the nitrogen K lines, which may lead to useful astrophysical diagnostics. Data sets comprise valence and K-vacancy level energies, wavelengths, Einstein A-coefficients, radiative and Auger widths, and K-edge photoionization cross sections. An important issue is the lack of measurements that are usually employed to fine-tune calculations so as to attain spectroscopic accuracy. In order to estimate data quality, several atomic structure codes are used and extensive comparisons with previous theoretical data have been carried out. In the calculation of K photoabsorption with the Breit-Pauli R-matrix method, both radiation and Auger dampings, which cause the smearing of the K edge, are taken into account. This work is part of a wider project to compute atomic data in the X-ray regime to be included in the database of the popular XSTAR modeling code.

  15. Controlled release of alendronate from nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Saha, Dipendu; Spurri, Amanda; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.

    2016-04-13

    With this study, we have synthesized a nitrogen doped mesoporous carbon with the BET surface area of 1066 m2/g, total pore volume 0.6 cm3/g and nitrogen content of 0.5%. Total alendronate adsorption in this carbon was ~5%. The release experiments were designed in four different media with sequential pH values of 1.2, 4.5, 6.8 and 7.4 for 3, 1, 3 and 5 h, respectively and at 37 °C to imitate the physiological conditions of stomach, duodenum, small intestine and colon, respectively. Release of the drug demonstrated a controlled fashion; only 20% of the drug was released in the media withmore » pH = 1.2, whereas 64% of the drug was released in pH = 7.4. This is in contrary to pure alendronate that was completely dissolved within 30 min in the first release media (pH = 1.2) only. The relatively larger uptake of alendronate in this carbon and its sustained fashion of release can be attributed to the hydrogen bonding between the drug and the nitrogen functionalities on carbon surface. Based on this result, it can be inferred that this formulation may lower the side effects of oral delivery of alendronate.« less

  16. Thermal degradation of cereal straws in air and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ergundenler, A.

    1991-12-31

    The termogravimetric behavior of four cereal straws (wheat, barley, oats, and rye) was examined at three heating rates (10, 20, and 50{degrees}C/min) in air and nitrogen atmospheres. The thermal degradation rate in active and passive pyrolysis zones, the initial degradation temperature, and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were determined for these straws in both atmospheres. Increasing the heating rate increased the thermal degradation rate, and decreased both the initial degradation temperature and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The higher the cellulosic content of the straw, the higher the thermal degradation rate and the initial degradation temperature. Also, higher ash content in the straw resulted in higher residual weight at 600{degrees}C. The thermal degradation rate in active pyrolysis zone was lower in air atmosphere than in nitrogen atmosphere, whereas the thermal degradation rate in passive pyrolysis zone and the residual weight at 600{degrees}C were higher in nitrogen atmosphere than in air atmosphere.

  17. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  18. How to Calculate Your Institution's Nitrogen Footprint

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nitrogen Footprint Tool (NFT) allows institutions to estimate and manage their nitrogen footprint, and EPA’s Sustainable and Healthy Communities program is supporting an effort to test and expand this approach at multiple colleges, universities and institutions across t...

  19. Histiocytosis X: treatment with topical nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed

    Berman, B; Chang, D L; Shupack, J L

    1980-07-01

    The case histories of two elderly patients with cutaneous histiocytosis X treated topically with nitrogen mustard are presented. The cutaneous lesions cleared within 2 to 3 weeks, and remission was maintained with daily topical administration of nitrogen mustard. The clinical impression of improvement was substantiated by light and electron microscopic studies prior to and after therapy.

  20. Disruption of cultured cells by nitrogen cavitation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard J

    2010-11-01

    Cell disruption by nitrogen decompression from a pressurized vessel is a rapid and effective way to homogenize cells and tissues, to release intact organelles, and to prepare cell membranes. Cells are placed in a pressure vessel and large quantities of oxygen-free nitrogen are dissolved in the cells under high pressure (~5500 kilopascals [kPa], equivalent to 800 pounds per square inch [psi]). When the pressure is released suddenly, the nitrogen bubbles out of solution, rupturing the cell membrane and releasing the cell contents. Nitrogen cavitation is well suited for mammalian and plant cells and fragile bacteria, but is less effective with yeast, fungi, spores, or other cell types with tough cell walls. The chemical and physical stresses imposed by nitrogen cavitation on enzymes and subcellular compartments are minimized compared with ultrasonic and mechanical homogenizing methods. Unlike lysis methods relying on shear stresses and friction, there is no heat damage to proteins and organelles during nitrogen cavitation. Indeed, the method is accompanied by an adiabatic expansion that cools the sample instead. Also, labile cell components are protected from oxidation by the inert nitrogen gas. Furthermore, nitrogen does not alter the pH of the suspending medium. The process is fast and uniform because the same disruptive forces are applied within each cell and throughout the sample, ensuring reproducible cell-free homogenates. Finally, variable sample sizes (e.g., from ~1 mL to 1 L or more) can be accommodated with most commercial systems.

  1. AEROBIC DENITRIFICATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN FATE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Mississippi, as well as most nitrogen-degraded rivers and streams, NO3- is the dominant N species and therefore understanding its biogeochemical behavior is critical for accurate nitrogen fate modeling. To our knowledge this is the first work to report aerobic denitrificat...

  2. EMERGY ANALYSIS OF THE PREHISTORIC NITROGEN CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several relationships between the specific emergy or the emergy per unit mass and the mass concentration of nitrogen were shown to exist through an analysis of the global nitrogen cycle. These observed relationships were interpreted by examining the nature of the underlying ener...

  3. Specific cooling capacity of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Adcock, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    The assumed cooling process and the method used to calculate the specific cooling capacity of liquid nitrogen are described, and the simple equation fitted to the calculated specific cooling capacity data, together with the graphical form calculated values of the specific cooling capacity of nitrogen for stagnation temperatures from saturation to 350 K and stagnation pressures from 1 to 10 atmospheres, are given.

  4. A reactive nitrogen budget for Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reactive nitrogen budget for Lake Michigan was reviewed and updated, making use of recent estimates of watershed and atmospheric nitrogen loads. The updated total N load to Lake Michigan was approximately double the previous estimate from the Lake Michigan Mass Balance study ...

  5. Advances in Nitrogen Management for Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient for crops and other plants, and is needed for many plant physiological functions. Nitrogen is critically important for global sustainability of food, and has been key to the success of the green revolution. Due to its importance as a crop nutrient, N fertilizer...

  6. Cascading costs: an economic nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Moomaw, William R; Birch, Melissa B L

    2005-09-01

    The chemical nitrogen cycle is becoming better characterized in terms of fluxes and reservoirs on a variety of scales. Galloway has demonstrated that reactive nitrogen can cascade through multiple ecosystems causing environmental damage at each stage before being denitrified to N(2). We propose to construct a parallel economic nitrogen cascade (ENC) in which economic impacts of nitrogen fluxes can be estimated by the costs associated with each stage of the chemical cascade. Using economic data for the benefits of damage avoided and costs of mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay basin, we have constructed an economic nitrogen cascade for the region. Since a single ton of nitrogen can cascade through the system, the costs also cascade. Therefore evaluating the benefits of mitigating a ton of reactive nitrogen released needs to consider the damage avoided in all of the ecosystems through which that ton would cascade. The analysis reveals that it is most cost effective to remove a ton of nitrogen coming from combustion since it has the greatest impact on human health and creates cascading damage through the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We will discuss the implications of this analysis for determining the most cost effective policy option for achieving environmental quality goals.

  7. Cascading costs: an economic nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Moomaw, William R; Birch, Melissa B L

    2005-12-01

    The chemical nitrogen cycle is becoming better characterized in terms of fluxes and reservoirs on a variety of scales. Galloway has demonstrated that reactive nitrogen can cascade through multiple ecosystems causing environmental damage at each stage before being denitrified to N2. We propose to construct a parallel economic nitrogen cascade (ENC) in which economic impacts of nitrogen fluxes can be estimated by the costs associated with each stage of the chemical cascade. Using economic data for the benefits of damage avoided and costs of mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay basin, we have constructed an economic nitrogen cascade for the region. Since a single tonne of nitrogen can cascade through the system, the costs also cascade. Therefore evaluating the benefits of mitigating a tonne of reactive nitrogen released needs to consider the damage avoided in all of the ecosystems through which that tonne would cascade. The analysis reveals that it is most cost effective to remove a tonne of nitrogen coming from combustion since it has the greatest impact on human health and creates cascading damage through the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We will discuss the implications of this analysis for determining the most cost effective policy option for achieving environmental quality goals.

  8. Methanotrophs Contribute to Peatland Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M.; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N2) fixation is potentially an important N input mechanism to peatland ecosystems, but the extent of this process may have been underestimated because of the methods traditionally used inhibit the activity of methanothrophs. We examined the linkage of methane (CH4) oxidation and N2 fixation using 15N2 technique. Dominant flark and hummock Sphagnum species were collected from twelve pristine peatlands in Siikajoki, Finland, which varied in age from 200 to 2,500 y due to the postglacial rebound. The mosses were incubated in a two-day field 15N2 and 13CH4 pulse labelling experiment and the incorporation of 15N2 and 13CH4 in biomass was measured with Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. The rates of Sphagnum-associated N2 fixation (0.1-2.9 g N m-2 y-1) were up to 10 times the current N deposition rates. Methane-induced N2 fixation contributed to over 1/3 of moss-associated N2 fixation in younger stages, but was switched off in old successional stages, despite active CH4 oxidation in these stages. Both the N2 fixation rates and the methanotrophic contribution to N2 fixation during peatland succession were primarily constrained by phosphorus availability. Previously overlooked methanotrophic N contribution may explain rapid peat and N accumulation during fen stages of peatland development. Reference. Larmola T., Leppänen S.M., Tuittila E.-S, Aarva M., Merilä P., Fritze H., Tiirola M. (2014) Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 111 (2): 734-739.

  9. Friction wear and auger analysis of iron implanted with 1.5-MeV nitrogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of implantation of 1.5-MeV nitrogen ions on the friction and wear characteristics of pure iron sliding against steel was studied in a pin-on disk apparatus. An implantation dose of 5 x 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm was used. Small reductions in initial and steady-state wear rates were observed for nitrogen-implanted iron riders as compared with unimplanted controls. Auger electron spectroscopy revealed a subsurface Gaussian nitrogen distribution with a maximum concentration of 15 at. % at a depth of 8 x 10 to the -7th m. A similar analysis within the wear scar of an implanted rider after 20 microns of wear yielded only background nitrogen concentration, thus giving no evidence for diffusion of nitrogen beyond the implanted range.

  10. Nitrogen attenuation of terrestrial carbon cycle response to global environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Atul; Yang, Xiaojuan; Kheshgi, Haroon; McGuire, A. David; Post, Wilfred; Kicklighter, David

    2009-12-01

    Nitrogen cycle dynamics have the capacity to attenuate the magnitude of global terrestrial carbon sinks and sources driven by CO2 fertilization and changes in climate. In this study, two versions of the terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycle components of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) are used to evaluate how variation in nitrogen availability influences terrestrial carbon sinks and sources in response to changes over the 20th century in global environmental factors including atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen inputs, temperature, precipitation and land use. The two versions of ISAM vary in their treatment of nitrogen availability: ISAM-NC has a terrestrial carbon cycle model coupled to a fully dynamic nitrogen cycle while ISAM-C has an identical carbon cycle model but nitrogen availability is always in sufficient supply. Overall, the two versions of the model estimate approximately the same amount of global mean carbon uptake over the 20th century. However, comparisons of results of ISAM-NC relative to ISAM-C reveal that nitrogen dynamics: (1) reduced the 1990s carbon sink associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 by 0.53 PgC yr-1 (1 Pg = 1015g), (2) reduced the 1990s carbon source associated with changes in temperature and precipitation of 0.34 PgC yr-1 in the 1990s, (3) an enhanced sink associated with nitrogen inputs by 0.26 PgC yr-1, and (4) enhanced the 1990s carbon source associated with changes in land use by 0.08 PgC yr-1 in the 1990s. These effects of nitrogen limitation influenced the spatial distribution of the estimated exchange of CO2 with greater sink activity in high latitudes associated with climate effects and a smaller sink of CO2 in the southeastern United States caused by N limitation associated with both CO2 fertilization and forest regrowth. These results indicate that the dynamics of nitrogen availability are important to consider in assessing the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of terrestrial carbon sources

  11. Nitrogen attenuation of terrestrial carbon cycle response to global environmental factors

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Atul; Yang, Xiaojuan; Kheshgi, Haroon; Mcguire, David; Post, Wilfred M

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen cycle dynamics have the capacity to attenuate the magnitude of global terrestrial carbon sinks and sources driven by CO2 fertilization and changes in climate. In this study, two versions of the terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycle components of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) are used to evaluate how variation in nitrogen availability influences terrestrial carbon sinks and sources in response to changes over the 20th century in global environmental factors including atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen inputs, temperature, precipitation and land use. The two versions of ISAM vary in their treatment of nitrogen availability: ISAM-NC has a terrestrial carbon cycle model coupled to a fully dynamic nitrogen cycle while ISAM-C has an identical carbon cycle model but nitrogen availability is always in sufficient supply. Overall, the two versions of the model estimate approximately the same amount of global mean carbon uptake over the 20th century. However, comparisons of results of ISAM-NC relative to ISAM-C reveal that nitrogen dynamics: (1) reduced the 1990s carbon sink associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 by 0.53 PgC yr1 (1 Pg = 1015g), (2) reduced the 1990s carbon source associated with changes in temperature and precipitation of 0.34 PgC yr1 in the 1990s, (3) an enhanced sink associated with nitrogen inputs by 0.26 PgC yr1, and (4) enhanced the 1990s carbon source associated with changes in land use by 0.08 PgC yr1 in the 1990s. These effects of nitrogen limitation influenced the spatial distribution of the estimated exchange of CO2 with greater sink activity in high latitudes associated with climate effects and a smaller sink of CO2 in the southeastern United States caused by N limitation associated with both CO2 fertilization and forest regrowth. These results indicate that the dynamics of nitrogen availability are important to consider in assessing the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of terrestrial carbon sources and

  12. Nitrogen attenuation of terrestrial carbon cycle response to global environmental factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jain, A.A.; Yang, Xiaojuan; Kheshgi, H.; McGuire, Anthony; Post, W.; Kicklighter, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen cycle dynamics have the capacity to attenuate the magnitude of global terrestrial carbon sinks and sources driven by CO2 fertilization and changes in climate. In this study, two versions of the terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycle components of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) are used to evaluate how variation in nitrogen availability influences terrestrial carbon sinks and sources in response to changes over the 20th century in global environmental factors including atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen inputs, temperature, precipitation and land use. The two versions of ISAM vary in their treatment of nitrogen availability: ISAM-NC has a terrestrial carbon cycle model coupled to a fully dynamic nitrogen cycle while ISAM-C has an identical carbon cycle model but nitrogen availability is always in sufficient supply. Overall, the two versions of the model estimate approximately the same amount of global mean carbon uptake over the 20th century. However, comparisons of results of ISAM-NC relative to ISAM-C reveal that nitrogen dynamics: (1) reduced the 1990s carbon sink associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 by 0.53 PgC yr−1 (1 Pg = 1015g), (2) reduced the 1990s carbon source associated with changes in temperature and precipitation of 0.34 PgC yr−1 in the 1990s, (3) an enhanced sink associated with nitrogen inputs by 0.26 PgC yr−1, and (4) enhanced the 1990s carbon source associated with changes in land use by 0.08 PgC yr−1 in the 1990s. These effects of nitrogen limitation influenced the spatial distribution of the estimated exchange of CO2 with greater sink activity in high latitudes associated with climate effects and a smaller sink of CO2 in the southeastern United States caused by N limitation associated with both CO2 fertilization and forest regrowth. These results indicate that the dynamics of nitrogen availability are important to consider in assessing the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of terrestrial carbon

  13. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific: seasonal variation and source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, L.; Pan, Y.; Wang, Y.; Paulot, F.; Henze, D. K.

    2015-09-01

    Rapid Asian industrialization has led to increased downwind atmospheric nitrogen deposition threatening the marine environment. We present an analysis of the sources and processes controlling atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific, using the GEOS-Chem global chemistry model and its adjoint model at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution over East Asia and its adjacent oceans. We focus our analyses on the marginal seas: the Yellow Sea and the South China Sea. Asian nitrogen emissions in the model are 28.6 Tg N a-1 as NH3 and 15.7 Tg N a-1 as NOx. China has the largest sources with 12.8 Tg N a-1 as NH3 and 7.9 Tg N a-1 as NOx; the high-NH3 emissions reflect its intensive agricultural activities. We find Asian NH3 emissions are a factor of 3 higher in summer than winter. The model simulation for 2008-2010 is evaluated with NH3 and NO2 column observations from satellite instruments, and wet deposition flux measurements from surface monitoring sites. Simulated atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific ranges 0.8-20 kg N ha-1 a-1, decreasing rapidly downwind of the Asian continent. Deposition fluxes average 11.9 kg N ha-1 a-1 (5.0 as reduced nitrogen NHx and 6.9 as oxidized nitrogen NOy) to the Yellow Sea, and 5.6 kg N ha-1 a-1 (2.5 as NHx and 3.1 as NOy) to the South China Sea. Nitrogen sources over the ocean (ship NOx and oceanic NH3) have little contribution to deposition over the Yellow Sea, about 7 % over the South China Sea, and become important (greater than 30 %) further downwind. We find that the seasonality of nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific is determined by variations in meteorology largely controlled by the East Asian monsoon and in nitrogen emissions. The model adjoint further estimates that nitrogen deposition to the Yellow Sea originates from sources over China (92 % contribution) and the Korean peninsula (7 %), and by sectors from fertilizer use (24 %), power plants (22 %), and transportation (18

  14. High Energy Cutting and Stripping Utilizing Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hume, Howard; Noah, Donald E.; Hayes, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry has endeavored for decades to develop hybrid materials that withstand the rigors of mechanized flight both within our atmosphere and beyond. The development of these high performance materials has led to the need for environmentally friendly technologies for material re-work and removal. The NitroJet(TM) is a fluid jet technology that represents an evolution of the widely used, large-scale water jet fluid jet technology. It involves the amalgamation of fluid jet technology and cryogenics technology to create a new capability that is applicable where water jet or abrasive jet (water jet plus entrained abrasive) are not suitable or acceptable because of technical constraints such as process or materials compatibility, environmental concerns and aesthetic or legal requirements. The NitroJet(TM) uses ultra high-pressure nitrogen to cut materials, strip numerous types of coatings such as paint or powder coating, clean surfaces and profile metals. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) is used as the feed stream and is pressurized in two stages. The first stage pressurizes sub cooled LN2 to an intermediate pressure of between 15,000 and 20,000 psi at which point the temperature of the LN2 is about -250 F. The discharge from this stage is then introduced as feed to a dual intensifier system, which boosts the pressure from 15,000 - 20,000 psi up to the maximum operating pressure of 55,000 psi. A temperature of about -220 F is achieved at which point the nitrogen is supercritical. In this condition the nitrogen cuts, strips and abrades much like ultra high-pressure water would but without any residual liquid to collect, remove or be contaminated. Once the nitrogen has performed its function it harmlessly flashes back into the atmosphere as pure nitrogen gas. The system uses heat exchangers to control and modify the temperature of the various intake and discharge nitrogen streams. Since the system is hydraulically operated, discharge pressures can be easily varied over

  15. Nitrogen isotope anomalies in primitive ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Naoji; Hashizume, Ko

    1992-07-01

    Large anomalies in nitrogen isotopic composition were found in two type-L3 ordinary chondrites. One of them is isotopically heavy, and the other is isotopically light. The carriers of anomalous nitrogen are partly soluble in HCl. Thus, the anomalies are probably due to new types of presolar grains, although they have not been identified yet. Trapped Ar-36 in these chondrites seems to be associated with this anomalous nitrogen, and may be presolar in origin. The presence of two different nitrogen isotopic anomalies suggests that the parent body of L chondrites, and also the primitive solar nebula, were not homogeneous. Nitrogen isotope anomalies seem to be useful in detecting subdivisions of chemical groups of chondrites.

  16. Reactive nitrogen species in cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Levi; Franco, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    The transduction of cellular signals occurs through the modification of target molecules. Most of these modifications are transitory, thus the signal transduction pathways can be tightly regulated. Reactive nitrogen species are a group of compounds with different properties and reactivity. Some reactive nitrogen species are highly reactive and their interaction with macromolecules can lead to permanent modifications, which suggested they were lacking the specificity needed to participate in cell signaling events. However, the perception of reactive nitrogen species as oxidizers of macromolecules leading to general oxidative damage has recently evolved. The concept of redox signaling is now well established for a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In this context, the post-translational modifications introduced by reactive nitrogen species can be very specific and are active participants in signal transduction pathways. This review addresses the role of these oxidative modifications in the regulation of cell signaling events. PMID:25888647

  17. Alfalfa Root Flavonoid Production Is Nitrogen Regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, C.; Zuanazzi, JAS.; Sallaud, C.; Quirion, J. C.; Esnault, R.; Husson, H. P.; Kondorosi, A.; Ratet, P.

    1995-01-01

    Flavonoids produced by legume roots are signal molecules acting both as chemoattractants and nod gene inducers for the symbiotic Rhizobium partner. Combined nitrogen inhibits the establishment of the symbiosis. To know whether nitrogen nutrition could act at the level of signal production, we have studied the expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes as well as the production of flavonoids in the roots of plants grown under nitrogen-limiting or nonlimiting conditions. We show here that growth of the plant under nitrogen-limiting conditions results in the enhancement of expression of the flavonoid biosynthesis genes chalcone synthase and isoflavone reductase and in an increase of root flavonoid and isoflavonoid production as well as in the Rhizobium meliloti nod gene-inducing activity of the root extract. These results indicate that in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) roots, the production of flavonoids can be influenced by the nitrogen nutrition of the plant. PMID:12228491

  18. Nitrogen isotopes in lunar highlands breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fourcade, S.; Clayton, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    Lunar highlands breccias from Apollo 14 and 16 which may have trapped solar wind gases at a very early epoch in the history of the moon, as implied by their high content of parentless fissiogenic xenon and sometimes of parentless radiogenic Xe-129, are analyzed for nitrogen content and isotopic composition using stepwise heating techniques. The results show that the nitrogen is not particularly light and was not acquired in very ancient times. The conflicting presence of both parentless xenon and nitrogen of relatively recent isotopic signature can be explained if the hypothetical light nitrogen is diluted by more abundant, heavier nitrogen. Accordingly, the very ancient soil components implied in these breccias by the presence of excess fission xenon were reexposed at a much later epoch, or mixed with younger soil components, before the compaction event.

  19. Nitrogen balance as a tool to assess nitrogen mineralized from winery wastes under different irrigation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requejo, Maria Isabel; Castellanos, Maria Teresa; Villena, Raquel; Ribas, Francisco; Jesús Cabello, Maria; Arce, Augusto; Cartagena, Maria Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Grape marc is a by-product coming from the winery industry, composed of skins, seeds and stalks generated during the crushing process. In Spain, large quantities of wine are produced every year (3,610,000 tonnes in 2010 (FAO, 2010)) with the consequent waste generation. With an adequate composting treatment, this waste can be applied to soils as a source of nutrients and organic matter. Compost N forms added to soil are mostly organic N forms, so organic N can be mineralized during the crop period and thus be taken up by the plants, immobilised, or leached. Compost N mineralization depends on factors such as compost C/N ratio but also on climate conditions. Estimation of N mineralization is necessary to optimise crop yield and minimize the risk of N losses to the environment, especially in zones vulnerable to nitrate pollution. The aim of this work was to assess mineralized N during the crop season when applying grape marc compost as fertilizer in a melon crop cultivated under different drip irrigation rates. A nitrogen balance in field conditions was carried out with three different doses of compost: 0 (D0), 6.7 (D1), 13.3 (D2) and 20 T/ha (D3); and two irrigation rates (100% ETc and 120% ETc). The field experiment was carried out in Ciudad Real, designated "vulnerable zone" by the "Nitrates Directive" 91/676/CEE. The soil was a shallow sandy-loam (Petrocalcic Palexeralfs), with 0.6 depth and a discontinuous petrocalcic horizon between 0.6 and 0.7 m. Nitrogen plant uptake and nitrate losses were measured weekly; mineral N in soil was determined before compost addition and at the end of the crop cycle. An estimation of soil mineralized N during the crop season using nitrogen balance is presented. Results are compared with data obtained in laboratory conditions. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03-01.

  20. Chemical determination of particulate nitrogen in San Francisco Bay. Nitrogen: chlorophyll a ratios in plankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hager, S.W.; Harmon, D.D.; Alpine, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Particulate nitrogen (PN) and chlorophyll a (Chla) were measured in the northern reach of San Francisco Bay throughout 1980. The PN values were calculated as the differences between unfiltered and filtered (0??4 ??m) samples analyzed using the UV-catalyzed peroxide digestion method. The Chla values were measured spectrophotometrically, with corrections made for phaeopigments. The plot of all PN Chla data was found to be non-linear, and the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM) was found to be the best selector for linear subsets of the data. The best-fit slopes of PN Chla plots, as determined by linear regression (model II), were interpreted to be the N: Chla ratios of phytoplankton. The Y-intercepts of the regression lines were considered to represent easily-oxidizable detrital nitrogen (EDN). In clear water ( < 10 mg l-1 SPM), the N: Chla ratio was 1??07 ??g-at N per ??g Chla. It decreased to 0??60 in the 10-18 mg l-1 range and averaged 0??31 in the remaining four ranges (18-35, 35-65, 65-155, and 155-470 mg l-1). The EDN values were less than 1 ??g-at N l-1 in the clear water and increased monotonically to almost 12 ??g-at N l-1 in the highest SPM range. The N: Chla ratios for the four highest SPM ranges agree well with data for phytoplankton in light-limited cultures. In these ranges, phytoplankton-N averaged only 20% of the PN, while EDN averaged 39% and refractory-N 41%. ?? 1984.

  1. Chemical determination of particulate nitrogen in San Francisco Bay. Nitrogen: chlorophyll a rations in plankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hager, S.W.; Harmon, D.D.; Alpine, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Particulate nitrogen (PN) and chlorophyll a (Chla) were measured in the northern reach of San Francisco Bay throughout 1980. The PN values were calculated as the differences between unfiltered and filtered (0·4 μm) samples analyzed using the UV-catalyzed peroxide digestion method. The Chla values were measured spectrophotometrically, with corrections made for phaeopigments. The plot of all PNChla data was found to be non-linear, and the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM) was found to be the best selector for linear subsets of the data. The best-fit slopes of PNChla plots, as determined by linear regression (model II), were interpreted to be the N: Chla ratios of phytoplankton. The Y-intercepts of the regression lines were considered to represent easily-oxidizable detrital nitrogen (EDN). In clear water ( < 10 mg l−1 SPM), the N: Chla ratio was 1·07 μg-at N per μg Chla. It decreased to 0·60 in the 10–18 mg l−1 range and averaged 0·31 in the remaining four ranges (18–35, 35–65, 65–155, and 155–470 mg l−1). The EDN values were less than 1 μg-at N l−1 in the clear water and increased monotonically to almost 12 μg-at N l−1 in the highest SPM range. The N: Chla ratios for the four highest SPM ranges agree well with data for phytoplankton in light-limited cultures. In these ranges, phytoplankton-N averaged only 20% of the PN, while EDN averaged 39% and refractory-N 41%.

  2. Global assessment of nitrogen fertilizer: the SCOPE/IGBP nitrogen fertilizer rapid assessment project.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Arvin R; Syers, J Keith; Freney, John R

    2005-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability is a key role in food and fiber production. Providing plant-available N through synthetic fertilizer in the 20th and early 21st century has been a major contributor to the increased production required to feed and clothe the growing human population. To continue to meet the global demands and to minimize environmental problems, significant improvements are needed in the efficiency with which fertilizer N is utilized within production systems. There are still major uncertainties regarding the fate of fertilizer N added to agricultural soils and the potential for reducing losses to the environment. Enhancing the technical and economic efficiency of fertilizer N is seen to promote a favorable situation for both agricultural production and the environment, and this has provided much of the impetus for a new N fertilizer project. To address this important issue, a rapid assessment project on N fertilizer (NFRAP) was conducted by SCOPE (the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment) during late 2003 and early 2004. This was the first formal project of the International Nitrogen Initiative (INI). As part of this assessment, a successful international workshop was held in Kampala, Uganda on 12 -16 January, 2004. This workshop brought together scientists from around the world to assess the fate of synthetic fertilizer N in the context of overall N inputs to agricultural systems, with a view to enhancing the efficiency of N use and reducing negative impacts on the environment. Regionalization of the assessment highlighted the problems of too little N for crop production to meet the nutrient requirements of sub-Saharan Africa and the oversupply of N in the major rice-growing areas of China. The results of the assessment are presented in a book (SCOPE 65) which is now available to provide a basis for further discussions on N fertilizer.

  3. Sulfur and nitrogen uptake by loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by nitrogen and sulfur addition

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    The influence of increasing levels of nitrogen addition at several levels of sulfur input on nitrogen and sulfur uptake by loblolly pine seedlings was evaluated in a greenhouse study. All possible combinations on nitrogen and sulfur were incorporated into soil collected from the A horizon of a southeastern forest soil at rates of 0, 200, 500, and 1,000 ..mu..g/g of N, and 0, 14, 35, and 70 ..mu..g/g of S. Soil samples collected at the end of the study indicated that a similar amount of soil SO/sub 4/-S had been mineralized in all treatment combinations, compared to a general pattern of increasing soil nitrogen mineralization with increasing nitrogen input. Most mineralized sulfate appeared to come from nonprotein organic compounds as there was not a significant concomitant release of nitrogen. Both shoot and root biomass responded significantly to nitrogen addition, but there was no sulfur or nitrogen-sulfur interaction response. Nitrogen treatment generally increased shoot nitrogen concentration compared to a general decrease in shoot total-, sulfate-, and organically bound-sulfur. Organically bound-sulfur concentrations were 26 to 60 percent below sulfur values calculated from an S/N ratio of 0.03 on a gram atom basis. The results show that increased nitrogen addition affected both growth and sulfur status of loblolly pine seedlings, but not entirely in the manner predicted by theoretical considerations.

  4. Sulfur and nitrogen uptake by loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by nitrogen and sulfur addition

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    The influence of increasing levels of nitrogen addition at several levels of sulfur input on nitrogen and sulfur uptake by loblolly pine seedlings was evaluated in a greenhouse study. All possible combinations of nitrogen and sulfur were incorporated into soil collected from the A horizon of a southeastern forest soil at rates of 0, 200, 500, and 1,000 ..mu..g/g of N, and 0, 14, 35, and 70 ..mu..g/g of S. Soil samples collected at the end of the study indicated that a similar amount of soil SO/sub 4/-S had been mineralized in all treatment combinations, compared to a general pattern of increasing soil nitrogen mineralization with increasing nitrogen input. Most mineralized sulfate appeared to come from nonprotein organic compounds as there was not a significant concomitant release of nitrogen. Both shoot and root biomass responded significantly to nitrogen addition, but there was no sulfur or nitrogen-sulfur interaction response. Nitrogen treatment generally increased shoot nitrogen concentration compared to a general decrease in shoot total-, sulfate-, and organically bound-sulfur. Organically bound-sulfur concentrations were 26 to 60 percent below sulfur values calculated from an S/N ratio of 0.03 on a gram atom basis. The results show that increased nitrogen addition affected both growth and sulfur status of loblolly pine seedlings, but not entirely in the manner predicted by theoretical considerations.

  5. [Effects of water deficit and nitrogen fertilization on winter wheat growth and nitrogen uptake].

    PubMed

    Qi, You-Ling; Zhang, Fu-Cang; Li, Kai-Feng

    2009-10-01

    Winter wheat plants were cultured in vitro tubes to study their growth and nitrogen uptake under effects of water deficit at different growth stages and nitrogen fertilization. Water deficit at any growth stages could obviously affect the plant height, leaf area, dry matter accumulation, and nitrogen uptake. Jointing stage was the most sensitive stage of winter wheat growth to water deficit, followed by flowering stage, grain-filling stage, and seedling stages. Rewatering after the water deficit at seedling stage had a significant compensation effect on winter wheat growth, and definite compensation effect was observed on the biomass accumulation and nitrogen absorption when rewatering was made after the water deficit at flowering stage. Under the same nitrogen fertilization levels, the nitrogen accumulation in root with water deficit at seedling, jointing, flowering, and grain-filling stages was reduced by 25.82%, 55.68%, 46.14%, and 16.34%, and the nitrogen accumulation in aboveground part was reduced by 33.37%, 51.71%, 27.01%, and 2.60%, respectively, compared with no water deficit. Under the same water deficit stages, the nitrogen content and accumulation of winter wheat decreased with decreasing nitrogen fertilization level, i. e., 0.3 g N x kg(-1) FM > 0.2 g N x kg(-1) FM > 0.1 g N x kg(-1) FM. Nitrogen fertilization had obvious regulation effect on winter wheat plant growth, dry matter accumulation, and nitrogen uptake under water stress.

  6. Scale and space dependencies of Nitrogen variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Castellanos, M. T.; Cartagena, M. C.; Ribas, F.; Cabello, M. J.; Arce, A.; Bird, N. R. A.

    2012-04-01

    In this study we use the relative entropy (E(δ)) to investigate residual effects on wheat and grain, biomass and nitrogen content, of fertigation treatments applied to a previous crop. The wheat crop covered nine subplots from a previous experiment on melon response to fertigation. Each subplot had previously received a different level of applied nitrogen and plants from the previous melon crop had already taken up the applied nitrogen. Many factors affect these variables, causing it to vary at different scales creating a non uniform distribution. E(δ), and their increments between scales, were used to identify the scale at which the variable had a maximum structure and compare with the scaling behavior of the nitrogen applied. The E(δ)is particularly appropriate for this because of does not require any prior assumptions to the structure of the data and it is easy to calculate. The results showed that the applied nitrogen through fertirrigation dominated the wheat and grain biomass response as well as nitrogen content of the whole plant; surprisingly grain nitrogen content didn't show the same structure than the applied nitrogen. At the same time, there was a noticeable structure variation in the biomass and nitrogen content at the smaller scales that correspond to the melon cropping due to uptake of the applied nitrogen by the previous crop. The E(δ) and the increments in E(δ) help us to detect changes in the scaling behavior of all the variables studied, showing at which scale there is a maximum structure. These results are in agreement with previous studies.

  7. 'Everest' Panorama; 20-20 Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 'Everest' Panorama 20-20 Vision (QTVR)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 'Everest' Panorama Animation

    If a human with perfect vision donned a spacesuit and stepped onto the martian surface, the view would be as clear as this sweeping panorama taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. That's because the rover's panoramic camera has the equivalent of 20-20 vision. Earthlings can take a virtual tour of the scenery by zooming in on their computer screens many times to get a closer look at, say, a rock outcrop or a sand drift, without losing any detail. This level of clarity is unequaled in the history of Mars exploration.

    It took Spirit three days, sols 620 to 622 (Oct. 1 to Oct. 3, 2005), to acquire all the images combined into this mosaic, called the 'Everest Panorama,' looking outward in every direction from the true summit of 'Husband Hill.' During that period, the sky changed in color and brightness due to atmospheric dust variations, as shown in contrasting sections of this mosaic. Haze occasionally obscured the view of the hills on the distant rim of Gusev Crater 80 kilometers (50 miles) away. As dust devils swooped across the horizon in the upper right portion of the panorama, the robotic explorer changed the filters on the camera from red to green to blue, making the dust devils appear red, green, and blue. In reality, the dust devils are similar in color to the reddish-brown soils of Mars. No attempt was made to 'smooth' the sky in this mosaic, as has been done in other panoramic-camera mosaics to simulate the view one would get by taking in the landscape all at once. The result is a sweeping vista that allows viewers to observe weather changes on Mars.

    The summit of Husband Hill is a broad plateau of rock outcrops and windblown drifts about 100 meters (300 feet) higher than the surrounding plains of Gusev Crater. In the distance, near the center of the mosaic, is

  8. Nitrogen retention in natural Mediterranean wetlands affected by agricultural runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García García, V.; Gómez, R.; Vidal-Abarca, M. R.; Suárez, M. L.

    2009-08-01

    Nitrogen retention efficiency in natural Mediterranean wetlands affected by agricultural runoff was quantified and the effect of season and hydrological/chemical loading was examined from March 2007 to June 2008 in two wetland-streams located in Southeast Spain. Nitrate-N (NO3--N), ammonium-N (NH4+-N), total organic nitrogen-N (TON-N) and chloride (Cl-) concentrations were analyzed to calculate nitrogen retention efficiencies. These wetlands consistently reduced water nitrogen concentration throughout the year with higher values for NO3--N (72.3%), even though the mean values of inflow NO3--N concentrations were above 20 mg l-1. Additionally, they usually acted as sinks for TON-N (45.4%), but as sources for NH4+-N. Over the entire study period, the Taray and Parra wetlands were capable of removing a mean value of 1.6 and 0.8 kg NO3--N a day-1, respectively. Retention efficiencies were not affected by temperature variation and did not follow a seasonal pattern. The temporal variability for NO3--N retention efficiency was positively and negatively explained by the net hydrologic retention and the inflow NO3--N concentration (R2adj=0.832, p<0.001), respectively. TON-N retention efficiency was only positively explained by the net hydrologic retention (R2adj=0.1997, p<0.05). No significant regression model was found for NH4+-N. Finally, the conservation of these Mediterranean wetland-streams may act as a tool to not only improves the surface water quality in agricultural catchments, but to also achieve a good ecological status for surface waters, this being the Water Framework Directive's ultimate purpose.

  9. The mechansims by which solute nitrogen affects phase transformations and mechanical properties of automotive dual-phase sheet steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tyson W.

    Dual-phase steels have seen increased use in automotive applications in recent years, in order to meet the goals of weight reduction and occupant safety. Variations in nitrogen content that may be encountered in steel sourced from a basic oxygen furnace process compared to an electric arc furnace process require that dual-phase steel producers understand the ways that nitrogen affects processing and properties. In the current work, the distribution of nitrogen was investigated in a dual-phase steel with a base chemistry of 0.1 C, 2.0 Mn, 0.2 Cr, 0.2 Mo (wt pct) across a range of nitrogen contents (30-159 ppm) with Al (0.2 and 0.08 wt pct), and Ti (0.02 wt pct) additions used for precipitation control of nitrogen amounts. The distribution of nitrogen amongst trapping sites, including precipitates, grain boundaries, dislocations, and interstitial sites (away from other types of defects) was determined from a combination of electrolytic dissolution, internal friction, and three-dimensional atom probe tomography experiments. Various mechanisms by which different amounts and locations of nitrogen affect phase transformations and mechanical properties were identified from quantitative metallography, dilatometric measurement of phase transformations, tensile testing, and nanoindentation hardness testing. Results indicate nitrogen that is not precipitated with Ti or Al (free nitrogen) partitions to austenite (and thus martensite) during typical intercritical annealing treatments, and is mostly contained in Cottrell atmospheres in martensite. Due to the austenite stabilizing effect of nitrogen, the presence of free nitrogen during intercritical annealing leads to a higher austenite fraction in certain conditions. Thus, the presence of free nitrogen in a dual-phase microstructure will lead to an increase in tensile and yield strengths from both an increase in martensite fraction, and an increase in martensite hardness due to solid solution strengthening. Despite the presence

  10. 20 Years and Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzyk, Raya

    2008-01-01

    In commemoration of the Librarian of the Year Award's 20th anniversary, this article presents brief vignettes on all 19 of the title holders. When "Library Journal" named them Librarians of the Year, these inimitable 19 (for the 20th, Norma Blake, see EJ788676) had singled themselves out as risk takers, visionaries, bulldogs, pragmatists,…

  11. Improvements to the Characterization of Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  12. Deposition of fixed atmospheric nitrogen and foliar nitrogen content of bryophytes and Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull.

    PubMed

    Pitcairn, C E; Fowler, D; Grace, J

    1995-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of fixed nitrogen as nitrate and ammonium in rain and by dry deposition of nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid and ammonia has increased throughout Europe during the last two decades, from 2-6 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) to 15-60 kg N ha(-1) year(-1). The nitrogen contents of bryophytes and the ericaceous shrub Calluna vulgaris have been measured at a range of sites, with the objective of showing the degree to which nitrogen deposition is reflected in foliar plant nitrogen. Tissue nitrogen concentrations of herbarium bryophyte samples and current samples of the same species collected from the same sites were compared. No significant change in tissue nitrogen was recorded at a remote site in north-west Scotland where nitrogen inputs are small (< 6 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)). Significant increases in tissue N occurred at four sites ranging from 38% in central Scotland to 63% in Cumbria where nitrogen inputs range from 15 to 30 kg N ha(-1) year(-1). The relationships found between the estimated input of atmospheric nitrogen and the tissue nitrogen content of the selected bryophytes and Calluna at the sites investigated were found to be generally linear and fitted the form N(tissue) = 0.62 + 0.022 N(dep) for bryophytes and N(tissue) = 0.83 + 0.045 N(dep) for Calluna. There was thus an increase in total tissue nitrogen of 0.02 mg g(-1) dry weight for bryophytes and 0.045 mg g(-1) dry weight for Calluna for an increase in atmospheric nitrogen deposition of 1 kg ha(-1) year(-1). The lowest concentrations were found in north-west Scotland and the highest in Cumbria and the Breckland heaths of East Anglia, both areas of high atmospheric nitrogen deposition (30-40 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)). The implications of increased tissue nitrogen content in terms of vegetation change are discussed. Changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition with time were also examined using measured values and values inferred from tissue nitrogen content of mosses. The rate of increase in nitrogen

  13. Nitrogen availability from residues-based biochar at two pyrolisis temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscione, Aline Renee; Silveira Bibar, Maria Paula; de Andrade, Cristiano Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Biochar has been studied for several applications, such as soil quality improvement, heavy metals remediation and N2O mitigation. Considering the soil quality improvement aspect it is desirable to evaluate if the nitrogen content in biochar samples obtained from several residues used as the biomass sources could be available for plants. Samples of sewage sludge (SS), coffee grounds (CG), chicken manure (CM) and fungi mycelia (FM) were pyrolyzed at two temperatures, 400 and 700 oC (indicated by the number 4 and 7 in this abstract, respectively), in order to obtain the biochar samples. The Kjeldahl nitrogen of biochar was (% m/m): 3.0 (CM4, CG7, FM7 and CG4); 2.0 (CM7 e SS4); 3.4 (FM7); 1.4 (SS7), with organic carbon (potassium dichromate method) ranging from 2.0 to 3.0% for all but CG4 (6%). The C/N ratio of biochar samples was: 9 (CM4, SS4 and CG7); 11 (CM7); 15 (SS7); 7 (FM4 and FM7); 21 (CG4). The eight soil + biochar resulting mixtures, prepared using the equivalent to 60 t/ha of biochar (about 3% w/w), and one additional control treatment (no biochar added) were incubated for 90 days, with four replications of each treatment per time evaluated. Inorganic nitrogen and soil pH measurements were performed for all treatments at 0, 5, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days of incubation. Soil moisture was kept at 40% soil water holding capacity, by weighting, during the experiment. The data was submitted to ANOVA with Tukey's average comparison test (p < 0.05). No significative pH changes were observed during the incubation of biochar samples. At the initial incubation time (zero days) no statistical difference was observed among biochar sources or pyrolisis temperatures. After five days of incubation SS4 and CM4 showed significant inorganic nitrogen release compared to all other treatments, behavior repeated at all the following times evaluated. For CM7, FM4 and FM7 maximum nitrogen availability was observed after 15 days, while it occurred after 90 days for SS4. After 90 days

  14. Nitrogen isotopes link mycorrhizal fungi and plants to nitrogen dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, Erik A; Högberg, Peter

    2012-10-01

    In this review, we synthesize field and culture studies of the 15N/14N (expressed as δ15N) of autotrophic plants, mycoheterotrophic plants, parasitic plants, soil, and mycorrhizal fungi to assess the major controls of isotopic patterns. One major control for plants and fungi is the partitioning of nitrogen (N) into either 15N-depleted chitin, ammonia, or transfer compounds or 15N-enriched proteinaceous N. For example, parasitic plants and autotrophic hosts are similar in δ15N (with no partitioning between chitin and protein), mycoheterotrophic plants are higher in δ15 N than their fungal hosts, presumably with preferential assimilation of fungal protein, and autotrophic, mycorrhizal plants are lower in 15N than their fungal symbionts, with saprotrophic fungi intermediate, because mycorrhizal fungi transfer 15N-depleted ammonia or amino acids to plants. Similarly, nodules of N2-fixing bacteria transferring ammonia are often higher in δ15N than their plant hosts. N losses via denitrification greatly influence bulk soil δ15N, whereas δ15N patterns within soil profiles are influenced both by vertical patterns of N losses and by N transfers within the soil-plant system. Climate correlates poorly with soil δ15N; climate may primarily influence δ15N patterns in soils and plants by determining the primary loss mechanisms and which types of mycorrhizal fungi and associated vegetation dominate across climatic gradients.

  15. Aerobic granulation of protein-rich granules from nitrogen-lean wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-You; Ju, Sheau-Pyng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Proteins (PN)-rich granules are stable in structure in long-term reactor operations. This study proposed to cultivate PN-rich granules with PN/polysaccharides (PS) >20 from nitrogen lean wastewater, with ammonia-nitrogen as sole nitrogen source at chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N of 153.8. The yielded granules can sustain their structural stability in sequencing batch reactor mode for sufficient treatment of wastewaters up to 7000mg/L COD and with COD/N<500 and in continuous-flow reactor for successful 216-d treatment of wastewaters up to organic loading rate (OLR) of 39kg/m(3)-d. The produced granules were enriched with Firmicutes and β-proteobacteria as dominating strains. More than 58% of the nitrogen fed in the nitrogen-lean wastewater is converted to the PN in the granules. The replacement of ammonia by nitrate as sole nitrogen source led to granules enriched with γ-proteobacteria which are easily deteriorated at low OLR. PMID:27394992

  16. [Accumulation of soil inorganic nitrogen in mono-harvesting farmlands in northeast China in late autumn].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Qingzhong; Lu, Caiyan; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Lu

    2004-10-01

    The study showed that in northeast China, the farmlands with a mono-harvesting agricultural system had a low accumulation of soil inorganic nitrogen after harvest. In late autumn, there was an interval of about 20-30 days when the temperature and humidity were appropriate to soil N mineralization, but the mineralized nitrogen could not be used by crops in this non-growing season. The accumulation of inorganic nitrogen in upland soil reached a high level before freezing. Its inorganic nitrogen content in 1 m depth soil was 99.9 kg x hm(-2) in the treatment of commercial fertilizers (N 150 kg x hm(-2); P 16.4 kg x hm(-2); K 62.3 kg x hm(-2))and 145.4 kg x hm(-2) in the treatment of commercial fertilizers plus manure (pig manure by a reutilization of 80% product). While in rice field, its inorganic nitrogen content was relatively low before freezing. The reason might be that the soil permeability was not as good as that in upland for its long-term water-logging, and its insufficient aeration would be favorable to denitrification which induces the inorganic nitrogen loss via N2O emission.

  17. Concentration dependent nitrogen diffusion coefficient in expanded austenite formed by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, S.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2002-06-01

    Expanded austenite, formed after nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation or low energy nitriding of austenitic stainless, is characterized by a high nitrogen content CN of up to 20 at. % and an unusual fast diffusion, which in general cannot be described using a single diffusion coefficient. Here, the concentration dependent diffusivity is calculated for several experimental parameters and steel alloys. Two mathematical simplifications of the general diffusion theory, well justified for physical reasons, helped in solving the equations. First, a constant surface concentration was assumed, despite a constant nitrogen flux into the surface, and, second, only mobile nitrogen atoms in a stationary steel matrix were considered. Thus, it was possible to solve the Boltzmann-Matano equation and obtain the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient D(CN). In all cases, a step-like behavior, with a high value for high nitrogen contents and a low value for low ones, is found, with the transition point between a nitrogen concentration of 5 and 17 at. %, depending on the sample.

  18. Pesticides reduce symbiotic efficiency of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and host plants.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jennifer E; Gulledge, Jay; Engelhaupt, Erika; Burow, Matthew E; McLachlan, John A

    2007-06-12

    Unprecedented agricultural intensification and increased crop yield will be necessary to feed the burgeoning world population, whose global food demand is projected to double in the next 50 years. Although grain production has doubled in the past four decades, largely because of the widespread use of synthetic nitrogenous fertilizers, pesticides, and irrigation promoted by the "Green Revolution," this rate of increased agricultural output is unsustainable because of declining crop yields and environmental impacts of modern agricultural practices. The last 20 years have seen diminishing returns in crop yield in response to increased application of fertilizers, which cannot be completely explained by current ecological models. A common strategy to reduce dependence on nitrogenous fertilizers is the production of leguminous crops, which fix atmospheric nitrogen via symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria, in rotation with nonleguminous crops. Here we show previously undescribed in vivo evidence that a subset of organochlorine pesticides, agrichemicals, and environmental contaminants induces a symbiotic phenotype of inhibited or delayed recruitment of rhizobia bacteria to host plant roots, fewer root nodules produced, lower rates of nitrogenase activity, and a reduction in overall plant yield at time of harvest. The environmental consequences of synthetic chemicals compromising symbiotic nitrogen fixation are increased dependence on synthetic nitrogenous fertilizer, reduced soil fertility, and unsustainable long-term crop yields.

  19. Proteomic analysis of mycelial proteins from Magnaporthe oryzae under nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X-G; Yu2, P; Yao, C-X; Ding, Y-M; Tao, N; Zhao, Z-W

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is an important model system in studies of plant pathogenic fungi, and nitrogen is a key nutrient source affecting microbial growth and development. In order to understand how nitrogen stress causes changes in mycelial proteins, we analyzed differentially expressed mycelial proteins from the M. oryzae virulent strain CH-63 using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry in complete medium or under nitrogen starvation conditions. A total of 975 ± 70 and 1169 ± 90 protein spots were detected in complete medium and under nitrogen starvation conditions, respectively. Forty-nine protein spots exhibited at least 2-fold up-regulation or down-regulation at the protein level according to PDQuest7.4. Moreover, 43 protein spots were successfully identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among these spots, 6 proteins were functionally unknown and 37 proteins were categorized into 5 groups according to their functions, including development, metabolism, biosynthesis, and biological process. These 37 proteins were further analyzed for their enriched metabolic pathways by KOBAS2.0, and 14 proteins were found to be involved in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and nitrogen metabolism. Taken together, the regulation of M. oryzae growth under the nitrogen starvation conditions appears to be complex because of the various proteins and enzymes involved. PMID:27323032

  20. The effect of nitrogen on biogas flame propagation characteristic in premix combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, Willyanto; Suprianto, Fandi D.; Hartanto, Tan Ivan; Purnomo, Kenny; Wijaya, Tubagus P.

    2016-03-01

    Biogas is one of alternative energy and categorized as renewable energy. The main sources of biogas come from animal waste, garbage, and household waste that are organic waste. Primarily, over 50% of this energy contains methane (CH4). The other substances or inhibitors are nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Previously, carbon dioxide effect on biogas combustion is already experimented. The result shows that carbon dioxide reduces the flame propagation speed of biogas combustion. Then, nitrogen as an inhibitor obviously also brings some effects to the biogas combustion, flame propagation speed, and flame characteristics. Spark ignited cylinder is used for the premixed biogas combustion research. An acrylic glass is used as the material of this transparent cylinder chamber. The cylinder is filled with methane (CH4), oxygen (O2), and nitrogen (N2) with particular percentage. In this experiment, the nitrogen composition are set to 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50%. The result shows that the flame propagation speed is reduced in regard to the increased level of nitrogen. It can also be implied that nitrogen can decrease the biogas combustion rate.

  1. First approach to the Japanese nitrogen footprint model to predict the loss of nitrogen to the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hideaki; Cattaneo, Lia R.; Leach, Allison M.; Galloway, James N.

    2014-11-01

    Humans increase the amount of reactive nitrogen (all N species except N2) in the environment through a number of processes, primarily food and energy production. Once in the environment, excess reactive nitrogen may cause a host of various environmental problems. Understanding and controlling individual nitrogen footprints is important for preserving environmental and human health. In this paper we present the per capita nitrogen footprint of Japan. We considered the effect of the international trade of food and feed, and the impact of dietary preferences among different consumer age groups. Our results indicate that the current average per capita N footprint in Japan considering trade is 28.1 kg N capita-1 yr-1. This footprint is dominated by food (25.6 kg N capita-1 yr-1), with the remainder coming from the housing, transportation, and goods and services sectors. The difference in food choices and intake between age groups strongly affected the food N footprint. Younger age groups tend to consume more meat and less fish, which leads to a larger food N footprint (e.g., 27.5 kg N capita-1 yr-1 for ages 20 to 29) than for older age groups (e.g., 23.0 kg N capita-1 yr-1 for ages over 70). The consideration of food and feed imports to Japan reduced the per capita N footprint from 37.0 kg N capita-1 yr-1 to 28.1 kg N capita-1 yr-1. The majority of the imported food had lower virtual N factors (i.e., Nr loss factors for food production), indicating that less N is released to the environment during the respective food production processes. Since Japan relies on imported food (ca. 61%) more than food produced domestically, much of the N losses associated with the food products is released in exporting countries.

  2. [Dynamics of carbon and nitrogen storage of Cupressus chengiana plantations in the arid valley of Minjiang River, Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Luo, Da; Feng, Qiu-hong; Shi, Zuo-min; Li, Dong-sheng; Yang, Chang-xu; Liu, Qian-li; He, Jian-she

    2015-04-01

    The carbon and nitrogen storage and distribution patterns of Cupressus chengiana plantation ecosystems with different stand ages in the arid valley of Minjiang River were studied. The results showed that carbon contents in different organs of C. chengiana were relatively stable, while nitrogen contents were closely related to different organs, and soil organic carbon and nitrogen contents increased with the stand age. Carbon and nitrogen storage in vegetation layer, soil layer, and the whole ecosystem of the plantation increased with the stand age. The values of total carbon storage in the 13-, 11-, 8-, 6- and 4-year-old C. chengiana plantation ecosystems were 190.90, 165.91, 144.57, 119.44, and 113.49 t x hm(-2), and the values of total nitrogen storage were 19.09, 17.97, 13.82, 13.42, and 12.26 t x hm(-2), respectively. Most of carbon and nitrogen were stored in the 0-60 cm soil layer in the plantation ecosystems and occupied 92.8% and 98.8%, respectively, and the amounts of carbon and nitrogen stored in the top 0-20 cm soil layer, accounted for 54.4% and 48.9% of those in the 0-60 cm soil layer, respectively. Difference in distribution of carbon and nitrogen storage was observed in the vegetation layer. The percentage of carbon storage in tree layer (3.7%) were higher than that in understory vegetation (3.5%), while the percentage of nitrogen storage in tree layer (0.5%) was lower than that in understory (0.7%). The carbon and nitrogen storage and distribution patterns in the plantations varied obviously with the stand age, and the plantation ecosystems at these age stages could accumulate organic carbon and nitrogen continuously.

  3. Stocks of carbon and nitrogen and partitioning between above- and belowground pools in the Brazilian coastal Atlantic Forest elevation range

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Simone A; Alves, Luciana F; Duarte-Neto, Paulo J; Martins, Susian C; Veiga, Larissa G; Scaranello, Marcos A; Picollo, Marisa C; Camargo, Plinio B; do Carmo, Janaina B; Neto, Eráclito Sousa; Santos, Flavio A M; Joly, Carlos A; Martinelli, Luiz A

    2011-01-01

    We estimated carbon and nitrogen stocks in aboveground biomass (AGB) and belowground biomass (BGB) along an elevation range in forest sites located on the steep slopes of the Serra do Mar on the north coast of the State of São Paulo, southeast Brazil. In elevations of 100 m (lowland), 400 m (submontane), and 1000 m (montane) four 1-ha plots were established, and above- (live and dead) and belowground (live and dead) biomass were determined. Carbon and nitrogen concentrations in each compartment were determined and used to convert biomass into carbon and nitrogen stocks. The carbon aboveground stock (CAGB) varied along the elevation range from approximately 110 to 150 Mg·ha−1, and nitrogen aboveground stock (NAGB), varied from approximately 1.0 to 1.9 Mg·ha−1. The carbon belowground stock (CBGB) and the nitrogen belowground stock (NBGB) were significantly higher than the AGB and varied along the elevation range from approximately 200–300 Mg·ha−1, and from 14 to 20 Mg·ha−1, respectively. Finally, the total carbon stock (CTOTAL) varied from approximately 320 to 460 Mg·ha−1, and the nitrogen total stock (NTOTAL) from approximately 15 to 22 Mg·ha−1. Most of the carbon and nitrogen stocks were found belowground and not aboveground as normally found in lowland tropical forests. The above- and belowground stocks, and consequently, the total stocks of carbon and nitrogen increased significantly with elevation. As the soil and air temperature also decreased significantly with elevation, we found a significantly inverse relationship between carbon and nitrogen stocks and temperature. Using this inverse relationship, we made a first approach estimate that an increase of 1°C in soil temperature would decrease the carbon and nitrogen stocks in approximately 17 Mg·ha−1 and 1 Mg·ha−1 of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. PMID:22393511

  4. Light Nitrogen in Lahrauli Ureilite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, S. V. S.; Bhandari, N.

    1992-07-01

    Ureilites are an enigmatic group of achondritic meteorites, mainly made up of olivine, pigeonite, and elemental carbon. While multistage igneous processes have been advocated, based on trace element data (Goodrich et al., 1987) oxygen isotopes clearly speak of heterogenous accretion for ureilites (Clayton and Mayeda, 1988). Main group ureilites revealed nitrogen components with delta^15N ranging from +19.7 to -83.1o/oo (Grady et al., 1985; Grady and Pillinger, 1986) while polymict ureilites have a ^15N-enriched component with delta^15N >= 540o/oo (Grady and Pillinger, 1988). Here we present the nitrogen results for Lahrauli ureilite which fell in 1955 (Bhandari et al., 1981). N and noble gases have been extracted by a stepwise pyrolysis at temperatures (degrees C) of 800, 1000, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500 and 1700 and analysed by standard procedures (Murty and Goswami, 1991). An initial combustion step was carried out at 400 degrees C in 100 m Torr O2 to get rid of surficial contaminants. We discuss only the N results here. The total N in Lahrauli amounts to 11.3 ppm with delta^15N = - 72o/oo. The delta^15N of the 800 degrees C fraction is 5.5o/oo and progressively decreases to -107o/oo in the 1400 degrees C fraction and subsequently increases to -89o/oo in the 1700 degrees C fraction. This delta^15N trend is most likely due to mixing between a heavy N component (delta^15N>=5.5o/oo) that has a low temperature release and a light N component (delta^15N<=-107o/oo) that is more retentively sited. Increase in the delta^15N, beyond 1400 degrees C is most likely due to release of spallation nitrogen. The spallogenic ^15N needed to cause such an increase is consistant with the spallation ^21Ne present in Lahrauli. This is the lightest N-component yet observed in a bulk ureilite as well as in a bulk stony meteorite. The unusual stony meteorite Acapulco also exhibits a similar N isotopic pattern (Sturgeon and Marti, 1991). The light N-component cannot be accounted for, if

  5. SOURCES AND ESTIMATED LOAD OF BIOAVAILABLE NITROGEN ATTRIBUTABLE TO CHRONIC NITROGEN EXPOSURE AND CHANGED ECOSYSTEM STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioavailable nitrogen is a limiting nutrient throughout the Eastern United States. Research demonstrates that exposure to large doses of nitrogen leads to deleterious environmental impacts. However, effects of chronic exposure to lower doses of nitrogen are not well known. Since...

  6. SOURCES AND ESTIMATED LOAD OF BIOAVAILABLE NITROGEN ATTRIBUTED TO CHRONIC NITROGEN EXPOSURE AND CHANGED ECOSYSTEM STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioavailable nitrogen is a limiting nutrient throughout the Eastern United States. Research demonstrates that exposure to large doses of nitrogen leads to deleterious environmental impacts. However, effects of chronic exposure to lower doses of nitrogen are under-appreciated. ...

  7. Feeding the city: food consumption and flow of nitrogen, Paris, 1801-1914.

    PubMed

    Barles, Sabine

    2007-04-01

    The flows of foodstuffs (and the nitrogen they contain) through the city of Paris in the 19th and early 20th century were evaluated. Between 1801 and 1914, the fivefold increase in the population of Paris, as well as the threefold increase in the number of horses used in urban transport, gave rise to increased needs for food and feed. The corresponding inputs of nitrogen increased from 6000 tN/year in 1817 to 25,000 tN/year from the rural hinterland to the city. The corresponding per capita inflows were relatively stable throughout the period and may be divided into four more or less equal parts (flour, meat, other human foodstuffs, forage), each representing about 6 gN per inhabitant per day. In total, the demand for foodstuffs was of the order of 24 gN per inhabitant per day, one quarter of which was for transport. The fate of this dietary nitrogen after consumption changed a lot with the techniques used for exploiting urban excreta of all kinds, particularly of nitrogen, which was in great demand until the development of synthetic fertilizers. Dietary nitrogen flow diagrams are established for the years 1817, 1869 and 1913, and reveal an increasing improvement of the agricultural reuse (from 20 to 40% of the inflowing N).

  8. Intensified nitrogen removal in immobilized nitrifier enhanced constructed wetlands with external carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Ambrose, Richard F; Ullman, Jeffrey L

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen removal performance response of twelve constructed wetlands (CWs) to immobilized nitrifier pellets and different influent COD/N ratios (chemical oxygen demand: total nitrogen in influent) were investigated via 7-month experiments. Nitrifier was immobilized on a carrier pellet containing 10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), 2.0% sodium alginate (SA) and 2.0% calcium chloride (CaCl2). A batch experiment demonstrated that 73% COD and 85% ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N) were degraded using the pellets with immobilized nitrifier cells. In addition, different carbon source supplement strategies were applied to remove the nitrate (NO3-N) transformed from NH4-N. An increase in COD/N ratio led to increasing reduction in NO3-N. Efficient nitrification and denitrification promoted total nitrogen (TN) removal in immobilized nitrifier biofortified constructed wetlands (INB-CWs). The results suggested that immobilized nitrifier pellets combined with high influent COD/N ratios could effectively improve the nitrogen removal performance in CWs. PMID:27396293

  9. Nitrogen fixation and CO/sub 2/ metabolism: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ludden, P.W.; Burris, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation are key metabolic processes which lead to the production of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds. These compounds are essential for the maintenance and continuation of life on earth. In this volume many recent advances in the study of nitrogen fixation and photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation are presented. The papers were presented in seven sessions. These sessions were the biochemistry of the legume nodule, genetics and molecular biology of nitrogen fixation, enzymes and cofactors involved in inorganic nitrogen reductions, aspects of nitrogen fixation by associations and symbioses, physiology of free-living nitrogen fixers, interactions between carbon metabolism and nitrogen fixation, photorespiration in plants, and photosynthetic carbon fixation. (DT)

  10. A nitrogen mass balance for California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liptzin, D.; Dahlgren, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Human activities have greatly altered the global nitrogen cycle and these changes are apparent in water quality, air quality, ecosystem and human health. However, the relative magnitude of the sources of new reactive nitrogen and the fate of this nitrogen is not well established. Further, the biogeochemical aspects of the nitrogen cycle are often studied in isolation from the economic and social implications of all the transformations of nitrogen. The California Nitrogen Assessment is an interdisciplinary project whose aim is evaluating the current state of nitrogen science, practice, and policy in the state of California. Because of the close proximity of large population centers, highly productive and diverse agricultural lands and significant acreage of undeveloped land, California is a particularly interesting place for this analysis. One component of this assessment is developing a mass balance of nitrogen as well as identifying gaps in knowledge and quantifying uncertainty. The main inputs of new reactive nitrogen to the state are 1) synthetic nitrogen fertilizer, 2) biological nitrogen fixation, and 3) atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Permanent losses of nitrogen include 1) gaseous losses (N2, N2O, NHx, NOy), 2) riverine discharge, 3) wastewater discharge to the ocean, and 4) net groundwater recharge. A final term is the balance of food, feed, and fiber to support the human and animal populations. The largest input of new reactive nitrogen to California is nitrogen fertilizer, but both nitrogen fixation and atmospheric deposition contribute significantly. Non-fertilizer uses, such as the production of nylon and polyurethane, constitutes about 5% of the synthetic N synthesized production. The total nitrogen fixation in California is roughly equivalent on the 400,000 ha of alfalfa and the approximately 40 million ha of natural lands. In addition, even with highly productive agricultural lands, the large population of livestock, in particular dairy cows

  11. Dynamics of Litter Decomposition, Microbiota Populations, and Nutrient Movement Following Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions to a Deciduous Forest Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.

    2002-10-29

    The objective of this study was quantification of the dynamics of litter decomposition, microbiota populations, and nutrient movement in response to nitrogen and phosphorus additions to a deciduous forest stand. Nitrogen (urea) was applied at rates of 0, 550, and 1100 kg/ha in combination with phosphorus (concentrated superphosphate) at rates of 0, 275, and 550 kg/ha. Total loss of organic material from white oak, red maple, and black gum litter bags over a 16-month period was 34, 35, and 45%, respectively. Phosphorus treatment retarded weight loss from litter bags of all species. Weight loss for the 0-, 275-, and 55-kg/ha levels of phosphorus averaged 23, 20, and 19% for white oak; 26, 25, and 25% for red maple; 29, 27 and 26% for black gum. Weight losses were increased by a small amount (1 to 2%) or not at all by nitrogen treatment. The NP interfaction weight loss means were intermediate to the main treatment means. The increase in decomposition associated with nitrogen was offset by the decrease associated with phosphorus. Litter and soil bacterial populations were significantly increased by nitrogen additions, while litter and soil fungi did not respond to nitrogen. Soil fungal populations were increased by phosphorus addition, while litter bacterial populations were reduced. Litter fungi and soil bacteria did not respond to phosphorus. Combined additions of nitrogen and phosphorus increased bacterial populations, though not as much as nitrogen alone. There was a good correlation (r = 0.70) between bacterial population and litter weight loss.

  12. Estimating Nitrogen Load Resulting from Biofuel Mandates.

    PubMed

    Alshawaf, Mohammad; Douglas, Ellen; Ricciardi, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 were enacted to reduce the U.S. dependency on foreign oil by increasing the use of biofuels. The increased demand for biofuels from corn and soybeans could result in an increase of nitrogen flux if not managed properly. The objectives of this study are to estimate nitrogen flux from energy crop production and to identify the catchment areas with high nitrogen flux. The results show that biofuel production can result in an increase of nitrogen flux to the northern Gulf of Mexico from 270 to 1742 thousand metric tons. Using all cellulosic (hay) ethanol or biodiesel to meet the 2022 mandate is expected to reduce nitrogen flux; however, it requires approximately 25% more land when compared to other scenarios. Producing ethanol from switchgrass rather than hay results in three-times more nitrogen flux, but requires 43% less land. Using corn ethanol for 2022 mandates is expected to have double the nitrogen flux when compared to the EISA-specified 2022 scenario; however, it will require less land area. Shifting the U.S. energy supply from foreign oil to the Midwest cannot occur without economic and environmental impacts, which could potentially lead to more eutrophication and hypoxia. PMID:27171101

  13. Estimating Nitrogen Load Resulting from Biofuel Mandates

    PubMed Central

    Alshawaf, Mohammad; Douglas, Ellen; Ricciardi, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 were enacted to reduce the U.S. dependency on foreign oil by increasing the use of biofuels. The increased demand for biofuels from corn and soybeans could result in an increase of nitrogen flux if not managed properly. The objectives of this study are to estimate nitrogen flux from energy crop production and to identify the catchment areas with high nitrogen flux. The results show that biofuel production can result in an increase of nitrogen flux to the northern Gulf of Mexico from 270 to 1742 thousand metric tons. Using all cellulosic (hay) ethanol or biodiesel to meet the 2022 mandate is expected to reduce nitrogen flux; however, it requires approximately 25% more land when compared to other scenarios. Producing ethanol from switchgrass rather than hay results in three-times more nitrogen flux, but requires 43% less land. Using corn ethanol for 2022 mandates is expected to have double the nitrogen flux when compared to the EISA-specified 2022 scenario; however, it will require less land area. Shifting the U.S. energy supply from foreign oil to the Midwest cannot occur without economic and environmental impacts, which could potentially lead to more eutrophication and hypoxia. PMID:27171101

  14. Phylogenetic perspectives of nitrogen-fixing actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gtari, Maher; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Nouioui, Imen; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Tisa, Louis S

    2012-01-01

    It was assumed for a long time that the ability to catalyze atmospheric nitrogen (diazotrophy) has a narrow distribution among actinobacteria being limited to the genus Frankia. Recently, the number of nitrogen fixation (nifH) genes identified in other non-Frankia actinobacteria has dramatically increased and has opened investigation on the origin and emergence of diazotrophy among actinobacteria. During the last decade, Mycobacterium flavum, Corynebacterium autotrophicum and a fluorescent Arthrobacter sp. have been reported to have nitrogenase activity, but these studies have not been further verified. Additional reports of nitrogen fixation by Agromyces, Microbacterium, Corynebacterium and Micromonospora isolated from root nodules of leguminous and actinorhizal plants have increased. For several actinobacteria, nitrogen fixation was demonstrated by the ability to grow on nitrogen-free medium, acetylene reduction activity, 15N isotope dilution analysis and identification of a nifH gene via PCR amplification. Moreover, the analyses of draft genome sequences of actinobacteria including Slackia exigua, Rothia mucilaginosa and Gordonibacter pamelaeae have also revealed the presence of nifH-like sequences. Whether these nifH sequences are associated with effective nitrogen fixation in these actinobacteria taxa has not yet been demonstrated. These genes may be vertically or horizontally transferred and be silent sequences. These ideas merit further investigation. This minireview presents a phylogenetic comparison of nitrogen fixation gene (nifH) with the aim of elucidating the processes underlying the evolutionary history of this catalytic ability among actinobacteria.

  15. Assessing nitrogen pressures on European surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grizzetti, B.; Bouraoui, F.; de Marsily, G.

    2008-12-01

    The European environmental legislation on water, in particular the 2000 Water Framework Directive, requires the evaluation of nutrient pressures and the assessment of mitigation measures at the river basin scale. Models have been identified as tools that can contribute to fulfill these requirements. The objective of this research was the implementation of a modeling approach (Geospatial Regression Equation for European Nutrient losses (GREEN)) to assess the actual nitrogen pressures on surface water quality at medium and large basin scale (European scale) using readily available data. In particular the aim was to estimate diffuse nitrogen emissions into surface waters, contributions by different sources (point and diffuse) to the nitrate load in rivers, and nitrogen retention in river systems. A comprehensive database including nutrient sources and physical watershed characteristics was built at the European scale. The modeling partially or entirely covered some of the larger and more populated European river basins, including the Danube, Rhine, Elbe, Weser, and Ems in Germany, the Seine and Rhone in France, and the Meuse basin shared by France and Belgium. The model calibration was satisfactory for all basins. The source contribution to the in-stream nitrogen load, together with the diffuse nitrogen emissions and river nitrogen retention were estimated and were found to be in the range of values reported in the literature. Finally, the model results were extrapolated to estimate the diffuse nitrogen emission and source apportionment at the European scale.

  16. Glutamine nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen supplied as a nitrogen source is not converted into nitrate nitrogen of plant tissues of hydroponically grown pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, H-J; Wu, L-H; Tao, Q-N; Miller, D D; Welch, R M

    2009-03-01

    Many vegetables, especially leafy vegetables, accumulate NO(-) (3)-N in their edible portions. High nitrate levels in vegetables constitute a health hazard, such as cancers and blue baby syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine if (1) ammonium nitrogen (NH(+) (4)-N) and glutamine-nitrogen (Gln-N) absorbed by plant roots is converted into nitrate-nitrogen of pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.) tissues, and (2) if nitrate-nitrogen (NO(-) (3)-N) accumulation and concentration of pak-choi tissues linearly increase with increasing NO(-) (3)-N supply when grown in nutrient solution. In experiment 1, 4 different nitrogen treatments (no nitrogen, NH(+) (4)-N, Gln-N, and NO(-) (3)-N) with equal total N concentrations in treatments with added N were applied under sterile nutrient medium culture conditions. In experiment 2, 5 concentrations of N (from 0 to 48 mM), supplied as NO(-) (3)-N in the nutrient solution, were tested. The results showed that Gln-N and NH(+) (4)-N added to the nutrient media were not converted into nitrate-nitrogen of plant tissues. Also, NO(-) (3)-N accumulation in the pak-choi tissues was the highest when plants were supplied 24 mM NO(-) (3)-N in the media. The NO(-) (3)-N concentration in plant tissues was quadratically correlated to the NO(-) (3)-N concentration supplied in the nutrient solution.

  17. Where is the nitrogen on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Banin, Amos

    2003-07-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life. Specifically, fixed nitrogen (i.e. NH3, NH4+, NOx or N that is chemically bound to either inorganic or organic molecules and can be released by hydrolysis to form NH3 or NH4+) is useful to living organisms. Nitrogen on present-day Mars has been analysed only in the atmosphere. The inventory is a small fraction of the amount of nitrogen presumed to have been received by the planet during its accretion. Where is the missing nitrogen? Answering this question is crucial for understanding the probability of the origin and evolution of life on Mars, and for its future astrobiological exploration. The two main processes that could have removed nitrogen from the atmosphere include: (1) non-thermal escape of N atoms to space and (2) burial within the regolith as nitrates and ammonium salts. Nitrate would probably be stable in the highly oxidized surface soil of Mars and could have served as an NO3[minus sign] sink. Such accumulations are observed in certain desert environments on Earth. Some NH4+ nitrogen may also be fixed and stabilized in the soil by inclusion as a structural cation in the crystal lattices of certain phyllosilicates replacing K+. Analysis of the Martian soil for traces of NO3[minus sign] and NH4+ during future missions will provide important information regarding the nitrogen abundance on Mars. We hypothesize that Mars soil, as typical of extremely dry desert soils on Earth, is likely to contain at least some of the missing nitrogen as nitrate salts and some fixed ammonium bound to aluminosilicate minerals.

  18. Dissociation and excitation coefficients of nitrogen molecules and nitrogen monoxide generation

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Na, Young H.; Choi, Eun H.; Cho, Guangsup

    2013-08-15

    The excitation coefficient α{sub N2} is calculated for the excited metastable level of N{sub 2}(A{sub 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +}) in nitrogen molecules. In addition, the dissociation coefficient of nitrogen molecules is investigated by making use of the Boltzmann distribution of the electrons in atmospheric plasmas. The excitation and electron-impact dissociation coefficients of nitrogen molecules are analytically expressed in terms of the electron temperature T{sub e} for evaluations of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in atmospheric plasmas. As an application example of these coefficients, the nitrogen monoxide generation through a microwave torch is carried out for a development of medical tool. The nitrogen monoxide concentration from a microwave plasma-torch can be easily controlled by the nitrogen flow rate, mole fraction of the oxygen gas, and the microwave power. A simple analytic expression of the nitrogen monoxide concentration is obtained in terms of the oxygen molecular density and gas flow rate. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical results from the analytical expression. A microwave nitrogen-torch can easily provide an appropriate nitrogen monoxide concentration for the wound healings.

  19. A possible nitrogen crisis for Archaean life due to reduced nitrogen fixation by lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-González, Rafael; McKay, Christopher P.; Mvondo, Delphine Nna

    2001-07-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life and is often the limiting nutrient for terrestrial ecosystems. As most nitrogen is locked in the kinetically stable form, N2, in the Earth's atmosphere, processes that can fix N2 into biologically available forms-such as nitrate and ammonia-control the supply of nitrogen for organisms. On the early Earth, nitrogen is thought to have been fixed abiotically, as nitric oxide formed during lightning discharge. The advent of biological nitrogen fixation suggests that at some point the demand for fixed nitrogen exceeded the supply from abiotic sources, but the timing and causes of the onset of biological nitrogen fixation remain unclear. Here we report an experimental simulation of nitrogen fixation by lightning over a range of Hadean (4.5-3.8Gyr ago) and Archaean (3.8-2.5Gyr ago) atmospheric compositions, from predominantly carbon dioxide to predominantly dinitrogen (but always without oxygen). We infer that, as atmospheric CO2 decreased over the Archaean period, the production of nitric oxide from lightning discharge decreased by two orders of magnitude until about 2.2Gyr. After this time, the rise in oxygen (or methane) concentrations probably initiated other abiotic sources of nitrogen. Although the temporary reduction in nitric oxide production may have lasted for only 100Myr or less, this was potentially long enough to cause an ecological crisis that triggered the development of biological nitrogen fixation.

  20. Regional nitrogen budgets and riverine N & P fluxes for the drainages to the North Atlantic Ocean: Natural and human influences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howarth, R.W.; Billen, G.; Swaney, D.; Townsend, A.; Jaworski, N.; Lajtha, K.; Downing, J.A.; Elmgren, Ragnar; Caraco, N.; Jordan, T.; Berendse, F.; Freney, J.; Kudeyarov, V.; Murdoch, P.; Zhu, Z.-L.

    1996-01-01

    major control over river nitrogen export in some regions such as the northeastern U.S. Using data from relatively pristine areas as an index of change, we estimate that riverine nitrogen fluxes in many of the temperate regions have increased from pre-industrial times by 2 to 20 fold, although some regions such as northern Canada are relatively unchanged. Fluxes from the most disturbed region, the North Sea drainages, have increased by 6 to 20 fold. Fluxes from the Amazon basin are also at least 2 to 5 fold greater than estimated fluxes from undisturbed temperate-zone regions, despite low population density and low inputs of anthropogenic nitrogen to the region. This suggests that natural riverine nitrogen fluxes in the tropics may be significantly greater than in the temperate zone. However, deforestation may be contributing to the tropical fluxes. In either case, projected increases in fertilizer use and atmospheric deposition in the coming decades are likely to cause dramatic increases in nitrogen loading to many tropical river systems. ?? 1996 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  1. Pygmy and giant dipole resonances in the nitrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Yan, Yu-Liang; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Xi-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The configuration-interaction shell model with the WBP10 effective interaction has been used to investigate the pygmy and giant dipole resonances in the nitrogen isotopes. Large enhancement of low-lying dipole strength, i.e., pygmy dipole resonances (PDRs), is predicted in the neutron-rich 17,18,19,20N. The nature of the PDRs is analyzed via the transition densities and transition matrix elements. It turns out these PDRs involve a larger amount of excitations between the 2 s 1 d and loosely bound 1 f 2 p shells. Combining with the transition densities, it is concluded that the PDRs in 17,18,19,20N are collective and due to the oscillation between the excess neutrons and the isospin saturated core. The isospin dependence of energy splitting and sum rule of isospin doublets is discussed. The theoretical energy splitting of isospin doublets can significantly deviate from the systematic values when nucleus is far away from the β -stability line. The ratios of T< and T> energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR) are consistently larger than the systematic values, and it is noticed that the calculated EWSR ratio over the systematic ratio increases with increasing isospin almost linearly. We also calculated the photoabsorption cross sections for the nitrogen isotopes. We proposed the normalization factors for 0 -1 ℏ ω and 2 -3 ℏ ω calculations. After the normalization, the shell model has well reproduced the experimental photoabsorption cross sections in N,1514, especially the detailed structure of resonances.

  2. How inhibiting nitrification affects nitrogen cycle and reduces environmental impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen input.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunlian; Liu, Lingli; Hu, Shuijin; Compton, Jana E; Greaver, Tara L; Li, Quanlin

    2015-03-01

    Anthropogenic activities, and in particular the use of synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer, have doubled global annual reactive N inputs in the past 50-100 years, causing deleterious effects on the environment through increased N leaching and nitrous oxide (N2 O) and ammonia (NH3 ) emissions. Leaching and gaseous losses of N are greatly controlled by the net rate of microbial nitrification. Extensive experiments have been conducted to develop ways to inhibit this process through use of nitrification inhibitors (NI) in combination with fertilizers. Yet, no study has comprehensively assessed how inhibiting nitrification affects both hydrologic and gaseous losses of N and plant nitrogen use efficiency. We synthesized the results of 62 NI field studies and evaluated how NI application altered N cycle and ecosystem services in N-enriched systems. Our results showed that inhibiting nitrification by NI application increased NH3 emission (mean: 20%, 95% confidential interval: 33-67%), but reduced dissolved inorganic N leaching (-48%, -56% to -38%), N2 O emission (-44%, -48% to -39%) and NO emission (-24%, -38% to -8%). This amounted to a net reduction of 16.5% in the total N release to the environment. Inhibiting nitrification also increased plant N recovery (58%, 34-93%) and productivity of grain (9%, 6-13%), straw (15%, 12-18%), vegetable (5%, 0-10%) and pasture hay (14%, 8-20%). The cost and benefit analysis showed that the economic benefit of reducing N's environmental impacts offsets the cost of NI application. Applying NI along with N fertilizer could bring additional revenues of $163 ha(-1)  yr(-1) for a maize farm, equivalent to 8.95% increase in revenues. Our findings showed that NIs could create a win-win scenario that reduces the negative impact of N leaching and greenhouse gas production, while increases the agricultural output. However, NI's potential negative impacts, such as increase in NH3 emission and the risk of NI contamination, should be fully

  3. How inhibiting nitrification affects nitrogen cycle and reduces environmental impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen input.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunlian; Liu, Lingli; Hu, Shuijin; Compton, Jana E; Greaver, Tara L; Li, Quanlin

    2015-03-01

    Anthropogenic activities, and in particular the use of synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer, have doubled global annual reactive N inputs in the past 50-100 years, causing deleterious effects on the environment through increased N leaching and nitrous oxide (N2 O) and ammonia (NH3 ) emissions. Leaching and gaseous losses of N are greatly controlled by the net rate of microbial nitrification. Extensive experiments have been conducted to develop ways to inhibit this process through use of nitrification inhibitors (NI) in combination with fertilizers. Yet, no study has comprehensively assessed how inhibiting nitrification affects both hydrologic and gaseous losses of N and plant nitrogen use efficiency. We synthesized the results of 62 NI field studies and evaluated how NI application altered N cycle and ecosystem services in N-enriched systems. Our results showed that inhibiting nitrification by NI application increased NH3 emission (mean: 20%, 95% confidential interval: 33-67%), but reduced dissolved inorganic N leaching (-48%, -56% to -38%), N2 O emission (-44%, -48% to -39%) and NO emission (-24%, -38% to -8%). This amounted to a net reduction of 16.5% in the total N release to the environment. Inhibiting nitrification also increased plant N recovery (58%, 34-93%) and productivity of grain (9%, 6-13%), straw (15%, 12-18%), vegetable (5%, 0-10%) and pasture hay (14%, 8-20%). The cost and benefit analysis showed that the economic benefit of reducing N's environmental impacts offsets the cost of NI application. Applying NI along with N fertilizer could bring additional revenues of $163 ha(-1)  yr(-1) for a maize farm, equivalent to 8.95% increase in revenues. Our findings showed that NIs could create a win-win scenario that reduces the negative impact of N leaching and greenhouse gas production, while increases the agricultural output. However, NI's potential negative impacts, such as increase in NH3 emission and the risk of NI contamination, should be fully

  4. Small recirculating filters for nitrogen reduction.

    PubMed

    Piluk, R J; Byers, B R

    2001-09-01

    Concerned about the negative impacts of nitrogen loading from septic systems on the Chesapeake Bay watershed, Maryland's Anne Arundel County Health Department has pioneered the use of small recirculating sand filters to reduce nitrogen in effluent from residential septic systems. Recirculating sand filters can reduce the total nitrogen in septic-tank effluent by up to 70 percent. Years of experience and the county's participation in the National Onsite Demonstration Project have led to modifications that make the filters more acceptable to homeowners. Use of alternative media, changes in flow patterns, and homeowner education have increased acceptance by homeowners.

  5. Nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon and population.

    PubMed

    Gilland, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Population growth makes food production increase necessary; economic growth increases demand for animal products and livestock feed. As further increase of the cropland area is ecologically undesirable, it is necessary to increase crop yields; this requires, inter alia, more nitrogen and phosphorus fertiliser despite the environmental problems which this will exacerbate. It is probable that a satisfactory food supply and an environmentally benign agriculture worldwide cannot be achieved without reducing population to approximately three billion. The reduction could be achieved by 2200 if the total fertility rate--currently 2.5--declined to 1.5 as a world average by 2050, and remained at that level until 2200, but the probability of such a global fertility trajectory is close to zero. It will also be necessary to replace fossil energy by nuclear and renewable energy in order to stabilise atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, but the phase-out cannot be completed until the 22nd century, when the atmospheric concentration will be approximately 50% above the 2015 level of 400 ppm. PMID:26790176

  6. Spacecraft nitrogen generation. [liquid hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Carlson, J. N.; Powell, J. D.; Kacholia, K. K.

    1974-01-01

    Two spacecraft nitrogen (N2) generation systems based on the catalytic dissociation of hydrazine (N2H4) were evaluated. In the first system, liquid N2H4 is catalytically dissociated to yield an N2 and hydrogen (H2) gas mixture. Separation of the N2/H2 gas mixture to yield N2 and a supply of H2 is accomplished using a polymer-electrochemical N2/H2 separator. In the second system, the N2/H2 gas mixture is separated in a two-stage palladium/silver (Pd/Ag) N2/H2 separator. The program culminated in the successful design, fabrication, and testing of a N2H4 catalytic dissociator, a polymer-electrochemical N2/H2 separator, and a two-stage Pd/Ag N2/H2 separator. The hardware developed was sized for an N2 delivery rate of 6.81 kg/d (15lb/day). Experimental results demonstrated that both spacecraft N2 generation systems are capable of producing 6.81 kg/d (15lb/day) of 99.9% pure N2 at a pressure greater than or equal to 1035 kN/m(2) (150 psia).

  7. Response of potatoes to nitrogen concentrations differ with nitrogen forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1998-01-01

    Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate plant growth and mineral composition of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) at varied solution concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Each experiment evaluated five nitrogen (N) concentrations of 0.5, 2, 4, 8, and 12 mM, which were maintained with a non-recirculating nutrient film system in controlled environment. Plants were harvested on day 42 with NO3-; and day 35 with NH4+ after transplanting of tissue culture plantlets, and growth measurements were taken as leaf area, tuber number, and dry weights of different parts. With NO3-, plant growth was greatest and similar at 2, 4, and 8 mM of N whereas with NH4+, plant growth was best only at 2 and 4 mM of N. At 12 mM of N, plants exhibited interveinal ammonium toxicity with NH4+ nutrition, but healthy growth appearance with NO3- nutrition. With either N form, total N concentrations in tissues tended to increase with increased N concentrations, and tissue phosphorus (P) concentrations were reduced at 0.5 and 2 mM of N. Tissue concentrations of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S) changed only slightly at particular N concentrations, yet changed substantially with different N forms. The data indicate that the optimal ranges of N concentrations in both solution and tissues are wider and higher with NO3- than with NH4+ nutrition, and thus a careful control of NH4+ concentrations is necessary to minimize possible ammonium toxicity to potato plants.

  8. Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs to the Ocean and their Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jickells, Tim D.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs to the Ocean and their Impact T Jickells (1), K. Altieri (2), D. Capone (3), E. Buitenhuis (1), R. Duce (4), F. Dentener (5), K. Fennel (6), J. Galloway (7), M. Kanakidou (8), J. LaRoche (9), K. Lee (10), P. Liss (1), J. Middleburg (11), K. Moore (12), S. Nickovic (13), G. Okin (14), A. Oschilies (15), J. Prospero (16), M. Sarin (17), S. Seitzinger (18), J. Scharples (19), P. Suntharalingram (1), M. Uematsu (20), L. Zamora (21) Atmospheric nitrogen inputs to the ocean have been identified as an important source of nitrogen to the oceans which has increased greatly as a result of human activity. The significance of atmospheric inputs for ocean biogeochemistry were evaluated in a seminal paper by Duce et al., 2008 (Science 320, 893-7). In this presentation we will update the Duce et al 2008 study estimating the impact of atmospheric deposition on the oceans. We will summarise the latest model estimates of total atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the ocean, their chemical form (nitrate, ammonium and organic nitrogen) and spatial distribution from the TM4 model. The model estimates are somewhat smaller than the Duce et al estimate, but with similar spatial distributions. We will compare these flux estimates with a new estimate of the impact of fluvial nitrogen inputs on the open ocean (Sharples submitted) which estimates some transfer of fluvial nitrogen to the open ocean, particularly at low latitudes, compared to the complete trapping of fluvial inputs on the continental shelf assumed by Duce et al. We will then estimate the impact of atmospheric deposition on ocean primary productivity and N2O emissions from the oceans using the PlankTOM10 model. The impacts of atmospheric deposition we estimate on ocean productivity here are smaller than those predicted by Duce et al impacts, consistent with the smaller atmospheric deposition estimates. However, the atmospheric input is still larger than the estimated fluvial inputs to the open ocean

  9. HL-20 at Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center lifting body, called the HL-20, is shown here in front of the hangar. The HL-20 was one of two concepts considered by NASA as a type of Personnel Launch System (PLS). In essence, it would serve as a space taxi to and from the space station. The full scale engineering model is 29.5 feet long, and 23.5 feet across the wingspan.

  10. Formation of unidentified nitrogen in plants: an implication for a novel nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Misa; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Matsubara, Toshiyuki; Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Fukunaga, Kazunari; Fujita, Kounosuke; Sakurai, Naoki; Hirata, Toshifumi; Ide, Hiroshi; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Suzuki, Hitomi

    2004-05-01

    Plants take up inorganic nitrogen and store it unchanged or convert it to organic forms. The nitrogen in such organic compounds is stoichiometrically recoverable by the Kjeldahl method. The sum of inorganic nitrogen and Kjeldahl nitrogen has long been known to equal the total nitrogen in plants. However, in our attempt to study the mechanism of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) metabolism, we unexpectedly discovered that about one-third of the total nitrogen derived from (15)N-labeled NO(2) taken up by Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants was converted to neither inorganic nor Kjeldahl nitrogen, but instead to an as yet unknown nitrogen compound(s). We here refer to this nitrogen as unidentified nitrogen ( UN). The generality of the formation of UN across species, nitrogen sources and cultivation environments for plants has been shown as follows. Firstly, all of the other 11 plant species studied were found to form the UN in response to fumigation with (15)NO(2). Secondly, tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants fed with (15)N-nitrate appeared to form the UN. And lastly, the leaves of naturally fed vegetables, grass and roadside trees were found to possess the UN. In addition, the UN appeared to comprise a substantial proportion of total nitrogen in these plant species. Collectively, all of our present findings imply that there is a novel nitrogen mechanism for the formation of UN in plants. Based on the analyses of the exhaust gas and residue fractions of the Kjeldahl digestion of a plant sample containing the UN, probable candidates for compounds that bear the UN were deduced to be those containing the heat-labile nitrogen-oxygen functions and those recalcitrant to Kjeldahl digestion, including organic nitro and nitroso compounds. We propose UN-bearing compounds may provide a chemical basis for the mechanism of the reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and thus that cross-talk may occur between UN and RNS metabolisms in plants. A mechanism for the formation of UN

  11. Nitrogen leaching losses from a wastewater land application system.

    PubMed

    Duan, Runbin; Fedler, Clifford B; Sheppard, Christopher D

    2010-03-01

    Potential contamination of groundwater because of nitrogen leaching has been an important concern in municipal wastewater land application systems; however, few efforts have made to measure nitrogen leaching (total N, NO(3-)-N, and NH(4+)-N) under field conditions. This research successfully developed a conceptual nitrogen mass balance model and quantified its components at a wastewater land application system located at the City of Littlefield, Texas, from October 2005 to September 2007. The concentrations of total nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen in the leachate were significantly less than 10 mg/L, therefore, there was no potential nitrogen contamination to groundwater found at this site during the research period. Linear regression models were analyzed and resulted in R2 values of 0.918, 0.966, and 0.833 between cumulative applied total nitrogen mass and cumulative leached total nitrogen mass, cumulative applied nitrate-nitrogen mass and cumulative leached nitrate-nitrogen mass, and cumulative applied ammonia-nitrogen mass and cumulative leached ammonia-nitrogen mass, respectively. The nitrogen mass balance design approach for this site resulted in significant nitrogen removal. Organic nitrogen may leach with other forms of nitrogen, and denitrification plays an important role in nitrogen removal during the winter and spring seasons when the grass is dry.

  12. Nitrogen-activated bowing of dilute InyGa1-yAs1-xNx based on photoreflectance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, M. M. E.; Khan, Arif; Griffin, J. A.; Harris, G. L.; Robins, Lawrence H.; Birdwell, A. G.; Kang, Youn-Seon; Smith, David J.; Steiner, Todd; Mohammad, S. Noor

    2003-12-01

    The dependence of the fundamental band gap and higher-lying critical-point energies of dilute-nitrogen Ga1-yInyAs1-xNx epilayers on nitrogen mole fraction (x), for x⩽0.0125, and temperature, from 20 to 300 K, was investigated by photoreflectance spectroscopy. The band gap, EG, was found to decrease with increasing x in a highly nonlinear manner. The bowing parameter (the second-order parameter b in a quadratic expression for the dependence of EG on x) was found to become less negative with increasing x; the value of b changed from -50 eV, at very low nitrogen fraction, to -20 eV, at x>0.01. These results strongly suggest that nitrogen-related impurity levels arise within the band gap of dilute-nitrogen Ga1-yInyAs1-xNx alloys.

  13. Nitrogen utilization pathways of soil microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinggera, J.; Geisseler, D.; Merbach, I.; Ludwig, B.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient for all organisms. In terrestrial ecosystems N occurs predominantly in the form of organic matter. Here, soil microorganisms can use two possible mechanisms for the uptake of organic N: the direct route and the mobilization-immobilization-turnover (MIT) route. In the direct route simple organic molecules are taken up directly into the cell. The deamination occurs inside the cell and only the surplus N is released into the soil solution. In the second route, the deamination occurs outside the cell and all N is mineralized before assimilation. To determine the importance of the different N uptake pathways of soil microorganisms an incubation experiment (21 days, 20°C) is currently being carried out. Corn leaves with different C to N ratios (20, 40) and (NH4)2SO4 have been added to three soils (Haplic Chernozem, FAO) with different fertilization histories (300dt/ha farmyard manure every second year, mineral NPK fertilizer, no fertilization) from the long-term experiment at Bad Lauchstädt. Contents of NH4+, NO3- and microbial biomass C (Cmic) and N (Nmic), CO2 production, potential protease activity, gross N mineralization and mineralization of added amino acids will be determined after 3, 7 and 21 days. Preliminary results show that the protease activity (without addition of corn residues) decreased in the order manure-fertilized soil (18.26 mg tyrosine kg-1 soil h-1) > Soil with mineral NPK fertilizer (17.45 mg tyrosine kg-1 soil h-1) > unfertilized soil (11.34 mg tyrosine kg-1 oven dry soil h-1). The turnover of amino acids after 24h was higher for the manure-fertilized soil (99.5% of the added amino acids were consumed) than for the NPK- fertilized and unfertilized soils (76%). The effects of the fertilization histories on the temporal dynamics of the different biological properties (Cmic, Nmic), CO2 production, protease activity and N mineralization rates will be presented.

  14. In vivo Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility for Total Body Nitrogen and Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Munive, Marco; Revilla, Angel; Solis, Jose L.

    2007-10-26

    A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO{sub 3} was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl{sub 2}Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm.

  15. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Brears, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  16. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Brears, Timothy

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  17. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Brears, Timothy

    2005-03-08

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  18. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  19. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Coruzzi, G.M.; Brears, T.

    1999-09-21

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed.

  20. Reactive Nitrogen in Atmospheric Emission Inventories

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess reactive Nitrogen (NT) has become one of the most pressing environmental problems leading to air pollution, acidification and eutrophication of ecosystems, biodiversity impacts, leaching of nitrates into groundwater and global warming. This paper investigates how current i...

  1. Nitrogenous wastewater treatment by activated algae

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.K.

    1985-02-01

    A biological treatability study by activated algae process was performed with synthetic wastewater containing a high concentration of nitrogen. It was found that the wastewater could be processed at all nitrogen removal rates. The yield coefficient and decay coefficient for heterotrophic bacteria were 0.06 (COD basis) and 0.019 day/sup -1/ (COD bases) respectively. The yield coefficient and decay coefficient for nitrifiers were 0.06 and 0.02 day/sup -1/ respectively. NH/sup +//sub 4/-N seemed to inhibit bacteriological growth as the yield coefficients values were significantly lower. Nitrification was observed at all the nitrogen loadings. Diffusion of NH/sub 3/ into the atmosphere was the dominant mechanism of nitrogen removal. The results demonstrated a symbiotic relationship between algae and bacteria.

  2. The Kinetics of Nitrogen Atom Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, G. Ronald; Winkler, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a study of the kinetics of the recombination of nitrogen atoms in which concentration-time relations are determined directly by utilizing visual observations of emissions to make gas phase titrations of N atoms with NO. (MLH)

  3. Bioretention Design to Improve Nitrogen Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioretention has been shown to effectively remove a variety of stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate and total nitrogen removal performance is highly variable. The media typically used in bioretention install...

  4. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus transport by world rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Meybeck, M.

    1982-04-01

    The various forms (dissolved and particulate, organic and inorganic) of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in world rivers are reviewed from literature data. Natural levels are based mainly on major rivers for the subarctic and tropical zones which are still unpolluted and on smaller streams for the temperate zone. Atmospheric fallout is also reviewed. Natural contents of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are mainly dependent on environmental conditions: DOC varies from 1 mg 1/sup -1/ in the mountainous alpine environments to 20 mg 1/sup -1/ in some taiga rivers. The world DOC average is 5.75 mg l/sup -1/. Nitrogen forms include dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = N - NH/sub 4//sup +/ + N - NO/sub 3//sup -/ + N - NO/sub 2//sup -/), and particulate organic nitrogen (PON). Natural levels are very low: DIN = 120 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/ of which only 15 percent is present as ammonia, and 1 percent as nitrite. Phosphorus is naturally present in very low amounts: around 10 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/ for P-PO/sub 4//sup 3/ and 25 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/ for total dissolved phosphorus (TDP which includes the organic form). The average nutrient content of rains has been estimated with a set of unpolluted stations: P - PO/sub 4/ = 5 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/, TDP = 10, N - NO/sub 2/ = 5, N - NH/sub 4/ = 225, DON = 225, and N - NO/sub 3/ = 175 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/. TOC levels are probably around several mg 1/sup -1/. These contents are very similar to those found in unpolluted rivers. Man's influence on surface waters has now greatly increased natural nutrient levels. Total dissolved P and N have globally increased by a factor of two and locally (Western Europe, North America) by factors of 10 to 50. These increases were found to be directly proportional to the watershed population and to its energy consumption.

  5. Isotopic evidence for nitrogen mobility in peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Martin; Stepanova, Marketa; Jackova, Ivana; Vile, Melanie A.; Wieder, R. Kelman; Buzek, Frantisek; Adamova, Marie; Erbanova, Lucie; Fottova, Daniela; Komarek, Arnost

    2014-05-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) input may reduce carbon (C) storage in peat. Under low atmospheric deposition, most N is bound in the moss layer. Under high N inputs, Sphagnum is not able to prevent penetration of dissolved N to deeper peat. Nitrogen may become available to the roots of invading vascular plants. The concurrent oxygenation of deeper peat layers, along with higher supply of labile organic C, may enhance microbial decomposition and lead to peat thinning. The resulting higher emissions of greenhouse gases may accelerate global warming. Seepage of N to deeper peat has never been quantified. Here we present evidence for post-depositional mobility of atmogenic N in peat, based on natural-abundance N isotope ratios. We conducted a reciprocal peat transplant experiment between two Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs in the Czech Republic (Central Europe), differing in anthropogenic N inputs. The northern site VJ received as much as 33 kg N ha-1 yr-1 via spruce canopy throughfall. The southern site was less polluted (17.6 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Isotope signatures of living moss differed between the two sites (δ15N of -3‰ and -7‰ at VJ and CB, respectively). After 18 months, an isotope mass balance was constructed. In the CB-to-VJ transplant, a significant portion of original CB nitrogen (98-31%) was removed and replaced by nitrogen of the host site throughout the top 10 cm of the profile. Nitrogen, deposited at VJ, was immobilized in imported CB peat that was up to 20 years old. Additionally, we compared N concentration and N accumulation rates in 210Pb-dated peat profiles with well-constrained data on historical atmospheric N pollution. Nationwide N emissions peaked in 1990, while VJ exhibited the highest N content in peat that formed in 1930. This de-coupling of N inputs and N retention in peat might be interpreted as a result of translocation of dissolved pollutant N downcore, corroborating our δ15N results at VJ and CB. Data from a variety of peat bogs along pollution

  6. Biome-scale nitrogen fixation strategies selected by climatic constraints on nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, Efrat; Batterman, Sarah A; Levin, Simon A; Hedin, Lars O

    2015-11-23

    Dinitrogen fixation by plants (in symbiosis with root bacteria) is a major source of new nitrogen for land ecosystems(1). A long-standing puzzle(2) is that trees capable of nitrogen fixation are abundant in nitrogen-rich tropical forests, but absent or restricted to early successional stages in nitrogen-poor extra-tropical forests. This biome-scale pattern presents an evolutionary paradox(3), given that the physiological cost(4) of nitrogen fixation predicts the opposite pattern: fixers should be out-competed by non-fixers in nitrogen-rich conditions, but competitively superior in nitrogen-poor soils. Here we evaluate whether this paradox can be explained by the existence of different fixation strategies in tropical versus extra-tropical trees: facultative fixers (capable of downregulating fixation(5,6) by sanctioning mutualistic bacteria(7)) are common in the tropics, whereas obligate fixers (less able to downregulate fixation) dominate at higher latitudes. Using a game-theoretic approach, we assess the ecological and evolutionary conditions under which these fixation strategies emerge, and examine their dependence on climate-driven differences in the nitrogen cycle. We show that in the tropics, transient soil nitrogen deficits following disturbance and rapid tree growth favour a facultative strategy and the coexistence of fixers and non-fixers. In contrast, sustained nitrogen deficits following disturbance in extra-tropical forests favour an obligate fixation strategy, and cause fixers to be excluded in late successional stages. We conclude that biome-scale differences in the abundance of nitrogen fixers can be explained by the interaction between individual plant strategies and climatic constraints on the nitrogen cycle over evolutionary time.

  7. Increased influence of nitrogen limitation on CO2 emissions from future land use and land use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiyappan, Prasanth; Jain, Atul K.; House, Joanna I.

    2015-09-01

    In the latest projections of future greenhouse gas emissions for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), few Earth System Models included the effect of nitrogen limitation, a key process limiting forest regrowth. Few included forest management (wood harvest). We estimate the impacts of nitrogen limitation on the CO2 emissions from land use and land use change (LULUC), including wood harvest, for the period 1900-2100. We use a land surface model that includes a fully coupled carbon and nitrogen cycle and accounts for forest regrowth processes following agricultural abandonment and wood harvest. Future projections are based on the four Representation Concentration Pathways used in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report, and we account for uncertainty in future climate for each scenario based on ensembles of climate model outputs. Results show that excluding nitrogen limitation will underestimate global LULUC emissions by 34-52 PgC (20-30%) during the 20th century (range across three different historical LULUC reconstructions) and by 128-187 PgC (90-150%) during the 21st century (range across the four IPCC scenarios). The full range for estimated LULUC emissions during the 21st century including climate model uncertainty is 91 to 227 PgC (with nitrogen limitation included). The underestimation increases with time because (1) projected annual wood harvest rates from forests summed over the 21st century are 380-1080% higher compared to those of the 20th century, resulting in more regrowing secondary forests; (2) nitrogen limitation reduces the CO2 fertilization effect on net primary production of regrowing secondary forests following wood harvest and agricultural abandonment; and (3) nitrogen limitation effect is aggravated by the gradual loss of soil nitrogen from LULUC disturbance. Our study implies that (1) nitrogen limitation of CO2 uptake is substantial and sensitive to nitrogen inputs; (2) if LULUC emissions are larger than previously estimated in studies

  8. Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

    1997-10-01

    Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity

  9. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII genes

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Lam, Hon-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the

  10. Preparation of nitrogen-doped carbon tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-12-22

    A method for synthesizing nitrogen-doped carbon tubes involves preparing a solution of cyanamide and a suitable transition metal-containing salt in a solvent, evaporating the solvent to form a solid, and pyrolyzing the solid under an inert atmosphere under conditions suitable for the production of nitrogen-doped carbon tubes from the solid. Pyrolyzing for a shorter period of time followed by rapid cooling resulted in a tubes with a narrower average diameter.

  11. Fluidized-bed biological nitrogen removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hosaka, Yukihisa; Minami, Takeshi; Nasuno, Sai )

    1991-08-01

    This article describes a compact process for nitrogen removal developed in Japan. It does not require the large amounts of land of current denitrification processes. The process uses a three-phase fluidized bed of granular anthracite to which the nitrifying bacteria adhere and are fluidized by the activated sludge in the reactor. The process was developed in response to the need for nitrogen and phosphorus removal from waste water to prevent the eutrophication of Tokyo Bay, Japan.

  12. 46 CFR 92.20-20 - Sleeping accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sleeping accommodations. 92.20-20 Section 92.20-20... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 92.20-20 Sleeping accommodations. (a) Where practicable, each licensed officer must be provided with a separate stateroom. (b) Sleeping accommodations...

  13. 46 CFR 92.20-20 - Sleeping accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sleeping accommodations. 92.20-20 Section 92.20-20... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 92.20-20 Sleeping accommodations. (a) Where practicable, each licensed officer must be provided with a separate stateroom. (b) Sleeping accommodations...

  14. 46 CFR 92.20-20 - Sleeping accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sleeping accommodations. 92.20-20 Section 92.20-20... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 92.20-20 Sleeping accommodations. (a) Where practicable, each licensed officer must be provided with a separate stateroom. (b) Sleeping accommodations...

  15. 46 CFR 92.20-20 - Sleeping accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sleeping accommodations. 92.20-20 Section 92.20-20... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 92.20-20 Sleeping accommodations. (a) Where practicable, each licensed officer must be provided with a separate stateroom. (b) Sleeping accommodations...

  16. 46 CFR 190.20-20 - Sleeping accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sleeping accommodations. 190.20-20 Section 190.20-20... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accomodations for Officers, Crew, and Scientific Personnel § 190.20-20 Sleeping...) Sleeping accommodations for the crew must be divided into rooms, no one of which must berth more than...

  17. 46 CFR 92.20-20 - Sleeping accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sleeping accommodations. 92.20-20 Section 92.20-20... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 92.20-20 Sleeping accommodations. (a) Where practicable, each licensed officer must be provided with a separate stateroom. (b) Sleeping accommodations...

  18. 46 CFR 190.20-20 - Sleeping accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sleeping accommodations. 190.20-20 Section 190.20-20... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accomodations for Officers, Crew, and Scientific Personnel § 190.20-20 Sleeping...) Sleeping accommodations for the crew must be divided into rooms, no one of which must berth more than...

  19. 46 CFR 190.20-20 - Sleeping accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sleeping accommodations. 190.20-20 Section 190.20-20... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accomodations for Officers, Crew, and Scientific Personnel § 190.20-20 Sleeping...) Sleeping accommodations for the crew must be divided into rooms, no one of which must berth more than...

  20. 46 CFR 72.20-20 - Sleeping accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sleeping accommodations. 72.20-20 Section 72.20-20... ARRANGEMENT Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 72.20-20 Sleeping accommodations. (a) Where practicable, each licensed officer shall be provided with a separate stateroom. (b) Sleeping accommodations for...