Science.gov

Sample records for nitrogen fixation studies

  1. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  2. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  3. Nitrogen fixation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  4. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  5. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    synthesis of ammonia, NH{sub 3}, from its elements, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, via the venerable Haber-Bosch process is one of the most significant technological achievements of the past century. Our research program seeks to discover new transition metal reagents and catalysts to disrupt the strong N {triple_bond} N bond in N{sub 2} and create new, fundamental chemical linkages for the construction of molecules with application as fuels, fertilizers and fine chemicals. With DOE support, our group has discovered a mild method for ammonia synthesis in solution as well as new methods for the construction of nitrogen-carbon bonds directly from N{sub 2}. Ideally these achievements will evolve into more efficient nitrogen fixation schemes that circumvent the high energy demands of industrial ammonia synthesis. Industrially, atmospheric nitrogen enters the synthetic cycle by the well-established Haber-Bosch process whereby N{sub 2} is hydrogenated to ammonia at high temperature and pressure. The commercialization of this reaction represents one of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century as Haber-Bosch ammonia is responsible for supporting approximately 50% of the world's population and serves as the source of half of the nitrogen in the human body. The extreme reaction conditions required for an economical process have significant energy consequences, consuming 1% of the world's energy supply mostly in the form of pollution-intensive coal. Moreover, industrial H{sub 2} synthesis via the water gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of methane is fossil fuel intensive and produces CO{sub 2} as a byproduct. New synthetic methods that promote this thermodynamically favored transformation ({Delta}G{sup o} = -4.1 kcal/mol) under milder conditions or completely obviate it are therefore desirable. Most nitrogen-containing organic molecules are derived from ammonia (and hence rely on the Haber-Bosch and H{sub 2} synthesis processes) and direct synthesis from

  6. Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development.

    PubMed

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2014-01-14

    Nitrogen (N) accumulation rates in peatland ecosystems indicate significant biological atmospheric N2 fixation associated with Sphagnum mosses. Here, we show that the linkage between methanotrophic carbon cycling and N2 fixation may constitute an important mechanism in the rapid accumulation of N during the primary succession of peatlands. In our experimental stable isotope enrichment study, previously overlooked methane-induced N2 fixation explained more than one-third of the new N input in the younger peatland stages, where the highest N2 fixation rates and highest methane oxidation activities co-occurred in the water-submerged moss vegetation.

  7. Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development

    PubMed Central

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M.; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) accumulation rates in peatland ecosystems indicate significant biological atmospheric N2 fixation associated with Sphagnum mosses. Here, we show that the linkage between methanotrophic carbon cycling and N2 fixation may constitute an important mechanism in the rapid accumulation of N during the primary succession of peatlands. In our experimental stable isotope enrichment study, previously overlooked methane-induced N2 fixation explained more than one-third of the new N input in the younger peatland stages, where the highest N2 fixation rates and highest methane oxidation activities co-occurred in the water-submerged moss vegetation. PMID:24379382

  8. Molecular Ecological and Stable Isotopic Studies of Nitrogen Fixation in Modern Microbial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, B. M.; Crumbliss, L. L.; DesMarais, D. J.; Hogan, M. E.; Omoregie, E.; Turk, K. A.; Zehr, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen is usually the element limiting biological productivity in the marine environment. Microbial mats, laminated microbial communities analogous to some of the oldest forms of life on Earth, are often the sites of high rates of N fixation (the energetically expensive conversion of atmospheric dinitrogen into a biologically useful form). The N fixing enzyme nitrogenase is generally considered to be of ancient origin, and is widely distributed throughout the Bacterial and Archaeal domains of life, indicating an important role for this process over evolutionary time. The stable isotopic signature of N fixation is purportedly recognizable in organic matter (ancient kerogens as well as present-day microbial mats) as a delta (15)N(sub organic) near zero. We studied two microbial mats exhibiting different rates of N fixation in order to better understand the impact of N fixation on the delta (15)N (sub organic) of the mats, as well as what organisms are important in this process. Mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes grow in permanently submerged hypersaline salterns, and exhibit low rates of N fixation, whereas mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Lyngbya spp grow in an intertidal area, and exhibit rates of N fixation an order of magnitude higher. To examine successional stages in mat growth, both developing and established mats at each location were sampled. PCR and RT-PCR based approaches were used to identify, respectively, the organisms containing nifH (one of the genes that encode nitrogenase) as well as those expressing nifH in these mats. Both mats exhibited a distinct diel cycle of N fixation, with highest rates occurring at night. The delta (15)N(sub organic) of the subtidal Microcoleus mats is near zero whereas the delta (15)N(sub organic) is slightly more positive (+ 2-3%), in the intertidal Lyngbya mats, an interesting difference in view of the fact that overall rates of activity in the intertidal mats are much higher that those

  9. Missing nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasmund, Norbert; Struck, Ulrich; Hansen, Anja; Flohr, Anita; Nausch, Günther; Grüttmüller, Annett; Voss, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Opposing opinions on the importance of nitrogen fixation in the northern Benguela upwelling region provoked us to investigate the magnitude of nitrogen fixation in front of northern Namibia and southern Angola. Measurements of nitrogen fixation rates using the 15N method at 66 stations during seven cruises from 2008 to 2014 showed that, in general, the 15N content in the biomass did not increase after tracer incubation with 15N2, indicating that no nitrogen fixation occurred. Correspondingly, the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium was almost not present. The abundant picocyanobacteria did obviously not perform nitrogen fixation to a significant degree. The artificial improvement of conditions for nitrogen fixation in mesocosm experiments, including phosphate and iron additions and a warmer temperature, failed to induce nitrogen fixation. A plausible explanation of these findings is a lack of conditioned cells for nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region.

  10. Trichodesmium and nitrogen fixation in the Kuroshio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, T.; Takeda, S.; Itoh, S.; Kodama, T.; Liu, X.; Hashihama, F.; Furuya, K.

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen fixation in the Kuroshio influences nitrogen balance in the North Pacific Ocean. The genus Trichodesmium is recognized as a major diazotroph in the Kuroshio. Although its abundance is higher in the Kuroshio than in adjacent waters, the reason for this difference remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and nitrogen fixation together with concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate, whose availabilities potentially control diazotrophy, in the Kuroshio and its marginal seas. We performed the observations near the Miyako Islands, which form part of the Ryukyu Islands, situated along the Kuroshio, since satellite analysis suggested that material transport could occur from the islands to the Kuroshio. Trichodesmium spp. bloomed (> 20 000 filaments L-1) near the Miyako Islands, and the abundance was high in the Kuroshio and the Kuroshio bifurcation region of the East China Sea, but was low in the Philippine Sea. The abundance of Trichodesmium spp. was significantly correlated with the total nitrogen fixation activity. The surface concentrations of dissolved iron (0.19-0.89 nM) and phosphate (< 3-36 nM) were similar for all of the study areas, indicating that the nutrient distribution could not explain the spatial differences in Trichodesmium spp. abundance and nitrogen fixation. We used a numerical model to simulate the transportation of water around the Ryukyu Islands to the Kuroshio. Our results indicate that Trichodesmium growing around the islands situated along the Kuroshio is potentially important for determining diazotrophy in this region.

  11. Nitrogen fixation by marine cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zehr, Jonathan P

    2011-04-01

    Discrepancies between estimates of oceanic N(2) fixation and nitrogen (N) losses through denitrification have focused research on identifying N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria and quantifying cyanobacterial N(2) fixation. Previously unrecognized cultivated and uncultivated unicellular cyanobacteria have been discovered that are widely distributed, and some have very unusual properties. Uncultivated unicellular N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria (UCYN-A) lack major metabolic pathways including the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxygen-evolving photosystem II. Genomes of the oceanic N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria are highly conserved at the DNA level, and genetic diversity is maintained by genome rearrangements. The major cyanobacterial groups have different physiological and ecological constraints that result in highly variable geographic distributions, with implications for the marine N-cycle budget.

  12. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  13. Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  14. Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, H.L.

    1983-08-16

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O[sub 2]/cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N[sub 2]. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N[sub 2] at a much quicker rate than unexcited N[sub 2], greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed. 1 fig.

  15. Methanotrophy Induces Nitrogen Fixation in Boreal Mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiirola, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Many methanotrophic bacterial groups fix nitrogen in laboratory conditions. Furthermore, nitrogen (N) is a limiting nutrient in many environments where methane concentrations are highest. Despite these facts, methane-induced N fixation has previously been overlooked, possibly due to methodological problems. To study the possible link between methanotrophy and diazotrophy in terrestrial and aquatic habitats, we measured the co-occurrence of these two processes in boreal forest, peatland and stream mosses using a stable isotope labeling approach (15 N2 and 13 CH4 double labeling) and sequencing of the nifH gene marker. N fixation associated with forest mosses was dependent on the annual N deposition, whereas methane stimulate N fixation neither in high (>3 kg N ha -1 yr -1) nor low deposition areas, which was in accordance with the nifH gene sequencing showing that forest mosses (Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens ) carried mainly cyanobacterial N fixers. On the other extreme, in stream mosses (Fontinalis sp.) methane was actively oxidized throughout the year, whereas N fixation showed seasonal fluctuation. The co-occurrence of the two processes in single cell level was proven by co-localizing both N and methane-carbon fixation with the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) approach. Methanotrophy and diazotrophy was also studied in peatlands of different primary successional stages in the land-uplift coast of Bothnian Bay, in the Siikajoki chronosequence, where N accumulation rates in peat profiles indicate significant N fixation. Based on experimental evidence it was counted that methane-induced N fixation explained over one-third of the new N input in the younger peatland successional stages, where the highest N fixation rates and highest methane oxidation activities co-occurred in the water-submerged Sphagnum moss vegetation. The linkage between methanotrophic carbon cycling and N fixation may therefore constitute an important mechanism in the rapid

  16. Variable Nitrogen Fixation in Wild Populus

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Sharon L.; Sher, Andrew W.; Fleck, Neil D.; Khorasani, Mahsa; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Khan, Zareen; Ko, Andrew W. K.; Kim, Soo-Hyung; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome of plants is diverse, and like that of animals, is important for overall health and nutrient acquisition. In legumes and actinorhizal plants, a portion of essential nitrogen (N) is obtained through symbiosis with nodule-inhabiting, N2-fixing microorganisms. However, a variety of non-nodulating plant species can also thrive in natural, low-N settings. Some of these species may rely on endophytes, microorganisms that live within plants, to fix N2 gas into usable forms. Here we report the first direct evidence of N2 fixation in the early successional wild tree, Populus trichocarpa, a non-leguminous tree, from its native riparian habitat. In order to measure N2 fixation, surface-sterilized cuttings of wild poplar were assayed using both 15N2 incorporation and the commonly used acetylene reduction assay. The 15N label was incorporated at high levels in a subset of cuttings, suggesting a high level of N-fixation. Similarly, acetylene was reduced to ethylene in some samples. The microbiota of the cuttings was highly variable, both in numbers of cultured bacteria and in genetic diversity. Our results indicated that associative N2-fixation occurred within wild poplar and that a non-uniformity in the distribution of endophytic bacteria may explain the variability in N-fixation activity. These results point to the need for molecular studies to decipher the required microbial consortia and conditions for effective endophytic N2-fixation in trees. PMID:27196608

  17. Cultivar effects on nitrogen fixation in peas and lentils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing nitrogen fixation in legume crops could increase cropping productivity and reduce nitrogen fertilizer use. Studies have found that crop genotype, rhizobial strain, and occasionally genotype-specific interactions affect N fixation, but this knowledge has not yet been used to evaluate or br...

  18. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  19. Nitrogen fixation associated with grasses in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A D; Barber, L E; Tjepkema, J; Russell, S A; Powelson, R; Evans, H J

    1976-04-01

    Nitrogen fixation associated with both natural grasslands and grain crops of Oregon was studied using the acetylene-reduction assay. A number of the grasses collected has some acetylene-reducing activity. Agrostis tenuis Sibth. had substantially greater activity than any of the other species, with a mean rate estimated at 37 g N2 fixed per hectare per day. Assuming 100 days of activity, about 3 kg of N2 would be fixed per hectare per year. This quantity of nitrogen may be important in the maintenance of this species under natural conditions. Nitrogen-fixing microorganisms were isolated from the root surfaces of some of the grasses. Cultures of Bacillus macerans, Bacillus polymyxa, and Enterobacter cloacoa were isolated from wheat roots as were two cultures which have not been assigned a specific taxonomic classification. Strains of N2-fixing Bacillus species and Gram-negative aerobic bacteria were isolated from Festuca and Agrostis.

  20. Molecular biology and genetic engineering in nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Patricia C

    2011-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is a complex and tightly regulated process limited to a group of prokaryotic species known as diazotrophs. Among well-studied diazotrophs, Azotobacter vinelandii is the best studied for its convenience of aerobic growth, its high levels of nitrogenase expression, and its genetic tractability. This chapter includes protocols and strategies in the molecular biology and genetic engineering of A. vinelandii that have been used as valuable tools for advancing studies on the biosynthesis, mechanism, and regulation of nitrogen fixation.

  1. Biological Nitrogen Fixation In Tropical Dry Forests Of Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gei, M. G.; Powers, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Evidence suggests that tropical dry forests (TDF) are not nitrogen (N) deficient. This evidence includes: high losses of gaseous nitrogen during the rainy season, high ecosystem soil N stocks and high N concentrations in leaves and litterfall. Its been commonly hypothesized that biological nitrogen fixation is responsible for the high availability of N in tropical soils. However, the magnitude of this flux has rarely if ever been measured in tropical dry forests. Because of the high cost of fixing N and the ubiquity of N fixing legume trees in the TDF, at the individual tree level symbiotic fixation should be a strategy down-regulated by the plant. Our main goal was to determine the rates of and controls over symbiotic N fixation. We hypothesized that legume tree species employ a facultative strategy of nitrogen fixation and that this process responds to changes in light availability, soil moisture and nutrient supply. We tested this hypothesis both on naturally established trees in a forest and under controlled conditions in a shade house by estimating the quantities of N fixed annually using the 15N natural abundance method, counting nodules, and quantifying (field) or manipulating (shade house) the variation in important environmental variables (soil nutrients, soil moisture, and light). We found that in both in our shade house experiment and in the forest, nodulation varied among different legume species. For both settings, the 15N natural abundance approach successfully detected differences in nitrogen fixation among species. The legume species that we studied were able to regulate fixation depending on the environmental conditions. They showed to have different strategies of nitrogen fixation that follow a gradient of facultative to obligate fixation. Our data suggest that there exists a continuum of nitrogen fixation strategies among species. Any efforts to define tropical legume trees as a functional group need to incorporate this variation.

  2. Nitrogen Inputs via Nitrogen Fixation in Northern Plants and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dominated by cold and often acidic water logged environments, mineralization of organic matter is slow in the majority of northern ecosystems. Measures of extractable ammonium and nitrate are generally low and can be undetectable in peat pore waters. Despite this apparent nitrogen limitation, many of these environments produce deep deposits of soil organic matter. Biological nitrogen fixation carried out by autotrophic and heterotrophic diazotrophs associated with cryptograms provides the majority of known nitrogen inputs in these northern ecosystems. Nitrogen fixation was assessed in a variety of northern soils within rhizospheres of dominant plant communities. We investigated the availability of this newly fixed nitrogen to the vascular plant community in nitrogen limited northern plant communities. We tracked nitrogen flow from 15N2 gas fixed in Sphagnum mosses into tissues of two native vascular plant species, boreal cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and black spruce (Picea mariana). 15N-labeled Sphagnum microcosms were grown within variable mesh size exclusion/inclusion fabrics in a nitrogen addition experiment in situ in order to investigate the role of mycorrhizal fungi in the uptake of newly fixed nitrogen. Up to 24% of daily fixed 15N label was transferred to vascular plant tissues during 2 months. Nitrogen addition resulted in decreased N2 fixation rates; however, with higher nitrogen availability there was a higher rate of 15N label uptake into the vascular plants, likely the result of increased production of dissolved organic nitrogen. Reliance on mycorrhizal networks for nitrogen acquisition was indicated by nitrogen isotope fractionation patterns. Moreover, N2 fixation activities in mosses were stimulated when vascular plants were grown in moss microcosms versus "moss only" treatments. Results indicate that bog vascular plants may derive considerable nitrogen from atmospheric N2 biologically fixed within Sphagnum mosses. This work demonstrates that

  3. A Mathematic Approach to Nitrogen Fixation Through Earth History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso; Martín-Torres, F. Javier

    Nitrogen is essential for life as we know it. According to phylogenetic studies, all organisms capable of fixing nitrogen are prokaryotes, both bacteria and archaea, suggesting that nitrogen fixation and ammonium assimilation were metabolic features of the Last Universal Common Ancestor of all organisms. At present time the amount of biologically fixed nitrogen is around 2 × 1{0}^{13} g/year (Falkowski 1997), an amount much larger than the corresponding to the nitrogen fixed abiotically (between 2. 6 ×109 and 3 × 1{0}^{11} g/year) (Navarro-González et al. 2001). The current amount of nitrogen fixed is much higher than it was on Earth before the Cambrian explosion, where the symbiotic associations with leguminous plants, the major nitrogen fixer currently, did not exist and nitrogen was fixed only by free-living organisms as cyanobacteria. It has been suggested (Navarro-González et al. 2001) that abiotic sources of nitrogen fixation during Early Earth times could have an important role triggering a selection pressure favoring the evolution of nitrogenase and an increase in the nitrogen fixation rate. In this study we present briefly a method to analyze the amount of fixed nitrogen, both biotic and abiotic, through Earth's history.

  4. QTL analysis of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a black bean RIL population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) acquires nitrogen (N) from the atmosphere through symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) but it has a low efficiency to fix nitrogen. The objective of this study is to map the genes controlling nitrogen fixation in common bean. A mapping population consisting of 122 recomb...

  5. Changes in North Atlantic nitrogen fixation controlled by ocean circulation.

    PubMed

    Straub, Marietta; Sigman, Daniel M; Ren, Haojia; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Meckler, A Nele; Hain, Mathis P; Haug, Gerald H

    2013-09-12

    In the ocean, the chemical forms of nitrogen that are readily available for biological use (known collectively as 'fixed' nitrogen) fuel the global phytoplankton productivity that exports carbon to the deep ocean. Accordingly, variation in the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir has been proposed as a cause of glacial-interglacial changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Marine nitrogen fixation, which produces most of the ocean's fixed nitrogen, is thought to be affected by multiple factors, including ocean temperature and the availability of iron and phosphorus. Here we reconstruct changes in North Atlantic nitrogen fixation over the past 160,000 years from the shell-bound nitrogen isotope ratio ((15)N/(14)N) of planktonic foraminifera in Caribbean Sea sediments. The observed changes cannot be explained by reconstructed changes in temperature, the supply of (iron-bearing) dust or water column denitrification. We identify a strong, roughly 23,000-year cycle in nitrogen fixation and suggest that it is a response to orbitally driven changes in equatorial Atlantic upwelling, which imports 'excess' phosphorus (phosphorus in stoichiometric excess of fixed nitrogen) into the tropical North Atlantic surface. In addition, we find that nitrogen fixation was reduced during glacial stages 6 and 4, when North Atlantic Deep Water had shoaled to become glacial North Atlantic intermediate water, which isolated the Atlantic thermocline from excess phosphorus-rich mid-depth waters that today enter from the Southern Ocean. Although modern studies have yielded diverse views of the controls on nitrogen fixation, our palaeobiogeochemical data suggest that excess phosphorus is the master variable in the North Atlantic Ocean and indicate that the variations in its supply over the most recent glacial cycle were dominated by the response of regional ocean circulation to the orbital cycles.

  6. Nitrogen Fixation: An Interdisciplinary Frontier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneller, Stewart W.

    1972-01-01

    Research has progressed from three major directions--biological, chemical, and non-enzymatic. Hopefully all three will converge and will explain not only the process, but also introduce new means for modifying the molecule to meet the nutritional needs of man in areas now incapable of self support without fixed nitrogen. (DF)

  7. Genetic regulation of nitrogen fixation in rhizobia.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, H M

    1994-01-01

    This review presents a comparison between the complex genetic regulatory networks that control nitrogen fixation in three representative rhizobial species, Rhizobium meliloti, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, and Azorhizobium caulinodans. Transcription of nitrogen fixation genes (nif and fix genes) in these bacteria is induced primarily by low-oxygen conditions. Low-oxygen sensing and transmission of this signal to the level of nif and fix gene expression involve at least five regulatory proteins, FixL, FixJ, FixK, NifA, and RpoN (sigma 54). The characteristic features of these proteins and their functions within species-specific regulatory pathways are described. Oxygen interferes with the activities of two transcriptional activators, FixJ and NifA. FixJ activity is modulated via phosphorylation-dephosphorylation by the cognate sensor hemoprotein FixL. In addition to the oxygen responsiveness of the NifA protein, synthesis of NifA is oxygen regulated at the level of transcription. This type of control includes FixLJ in R. meliloti and FixLJ-FixK in A. caulinodans or is brought about by autoregulation in B. japonicum. NifA, in concert with sigma 54 RNA polymerase, activates transcription from -24/-12-type promoters associated with nif and fix genes and additional genes that are not directly involved in nitrogen fixation. The FixK proteins constitute a subgroup of the Crp-Fnr family of bacterial regulators. Although the involvement of FixLJ and FixK in nifA regulation is remarkably different in the three rhizobial species discussed here, they constitute a regulatory cascade that uniformly controls the expression of genes (fixNOQP) encoding a distinct cytochrome oxidase complex probably required for bacterial respiration under low-oxygen conditions. In B. japonicum, the FixLJ-FixK cascade also controls genes for nitrate respiration and for one of two sigma 54 proteins. Images PMID:7968919

  8. Ecosystem feedbacks and nitrogen fixation in boreal forests.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Thomas H; Zackrisson, Olle; Gundale, Michael J; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte

    2008-05-30

    Biological feedback mechanisms regulate fundamental ecosystem processes and potentially regulate ecosystem productivity. To date, no studies have documented the down-regulation of terrestrial nitrogen (N) fixation via an ecosystem-level feedback mechanism. Herein, we demonstrate such a feedback in boreal forests. Rapid cycling of N in early secondary succession forests yielded greater throughfall N deposition, which in turn decreased N fixation by cyanobacterial associates in feather moss carpets that reside on the forest floor. The forest canopy exerts a tight control on biotic N input at a period of high productivity.

  9. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by epiphytes of freshwater macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Finke, L R; Seeley, H W

    1978-07-01

    The involvement of epiphytic microorganisms in nitrogen fixation was investigated in a shallow freshwater pond near Ithaca, N.Y. The acetylene reduction technique was used to follow diel and seasonal cycles of nitrogen fixation by epiphytes of Myriophyllum spicatum. Acetylene-reducing activity was maximal between noon and 6 p.m., but substantial levels of activity relative to daytime rates continued through the night. Experiments with the seasonal course of activity showed a gradual decline during the autumn months and no activity in January or February. Activity commenced in May, with an abrupt increase to levels between 0.45 and 0.95 nmol of ethylene formed per mg (dry weight) of plant per h. Through most of the summer months, mean rates of acetylene reduction remained between 0.15 and 0.60 nmol/mg (dry weight) per h. It was calculated from diel and seasonal cycles that, in the pond areas studied, epiphytes were capable of adding from 7.5 to 12.5 mug of N per mg of plant per year to the pond. This amount is significant relative to the total amount of nitrogen incorporated into the plant. Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), particularly Gloeotrichia, appeared to bear prime responsibility for nitrogen fixation, but photosynthetic bacteria of the genus Rhodopseudomonas were isolated from M. spicatum and shown to support high rates of acetylene reduction.

  10. Molybdenum limitation of asymbiotic nitrogen fixation in tropical forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Alexander R.; Wurzburger, Nina; Bellenger, Jean Phillipe; Wright, S. Joseph; Kraepiel, Anne M. L.; Hedin, Lars O.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation, the biological conversion of di-nitrogen to plant-available ammonium, is the primary natural input of nitrogen to ecosystems, and influences plant growth and carbon exchange at local to global scales. The role of this process in tropical forests is of particular concern, as these ecosystems harbour abundant nitrogen-fixing organisms and represent one third of terrestrial primary production. Here we show that the micronutrient molybdenum, a cofactor in the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase, limits nitrogen fixation by free-living heterotrophic bacteria in soils of lowland Panamanian forests. We measured the fixation response to long-term nutrient manipulations in intact forests, and to short-term manipulations in soil microcosms. Nitrogen fixation increased sharply in treatments of molybdenum alone, in micronutrient treatments that included molybdenum by design and in treatments with commercial phosphorus fertilizer, in which molybdenum was a `hidden' contaminant. Fixation did not respond to additions of phosphorus that were not contaminated by molybdenum. Our findings show that molybdenum alone can limit asymbiotic nitrogen fixation in tropical forests and raise new questions about the role of molybdenum and phosphorus in the tropical nitrogen cycle. We suggest that molybdenum limitation may be common in highly weathered acidic soils, and may constrain the ability of some forests to acquire new nitrogen in response to CO2 fertilization.

  11. Significant nonsymbiotic nitrogen fixation in Patagonian ombrotrophic bogs.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Horn, Marcus A; Borken, Werner

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) nutrition in pristine peatlands relies on the natural input of inorganic N through atmospheric deposition or biological dinitrogen (N2 ) fixation. However, N2 fixation and its significance for N cycling, plant productivity, and peat buildup are mostly associated with the presence of Sphagnum mosses. Here, we report high nonsymbiotic N2 -fixation rates in two pristine Patagonian bogs with diversified vegetation and natural N deposition. Nonsymbiotic N2 fixation was measured in samples from 0 to 10, 10 to 20, and 40 to 50 cm depth using the (15) N2 assay as well as the acetylene reduction assay (ARA). The ARA considerably underestimated N2 fixation and can thus not be recommended for peatland studies. Based on the (15) N2 assay, high nonsymbiotic N2 -fixation rates of 0.3-1.4 μmol N2  g(-1)  day(-1) were found down to 50 cm under micro-oxic conditions (2 vol.%) in samples from plots covered by Sphagnum magellanicum or by vascular cushion plants, latter characterized by dense and deep aerenchyma roots. Peat N concentrations point to greater potential of nonsymbiotic N2 fixation under cushion plants, likely because of the availability of easily decomposable organic compounds and oxic conditions in the rhizosphere. In the Sphagnum plots, high N2 fixation below 10 cm depth rather reflects the potential during dry periods or low water level when oxygen penetrates the top peat layer and triggers peat mineralization. Natural abundance of the (15) N isotope of live Sphagnum (5.6 δ‰) from 0 to 10 cm points to solely N uptake from atmospheric deposition and nonsymbiotic N2 fixation. A mean (15) N signature of -0.7 δ‰ of peat from the cushion plant plots indicates additional N supply from N mineralization. Our findings suggest that nonsymbiotic N2 fixation overcomes N deficiency in different vegetation communities and has great significance for N cycling and peat accumulation in pristine peatlands.

  12. Evaluation of kidney bean yield and nitrogen fixation under low soil nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    U.S. Kidney bean cultivars as a group have limited genetic diversity. They also require more intensive crop management than most other bean market classes. The objective of this study was to evaluate biological nitrogen fixation and seed yield in a diverse group of kidney lines. A 250 line Andean be...

  13. Solar Water Splitting and Nitrogen Fixation with Layered Bismuth Oxyhalides.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Li, Hao; Zhan, Guangming; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-01-17

    Hydrogen and ammonia are the chemical molecules that are vital to Earth's energy, environmental, and biological processes. Hydrogen with renewable, carbon-free, and high combustion-enthalpy hallmarks lays the foundation of next-generation energy source, while ammonia furnishes the building blocks of fertilizers and proteins to sustain the lives of plants and organisms. Such merits fascinate worldwide scientists in developing viable strategies to produce hydrogen and ammonia. Currently, at the forefronts of hydrogen and ammonia syntheses are solar water splitting and nitrogen fixation, because they go beyond the high temperature and pressure requirements of methane stream reforming and Haber-Bosch reaction, respectively, as the commercialized hydrogen and ammonia production routes, and inherit the natural photosynthesis virtues that are green and sustainable and operate at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The key to propelling such photochemical reactions lies in searching photocatalysts that enable water splitting into hydrogen and nitrogen fixation to make ammonia efficiently. Although the past 40 years have witnessed significant breakthroughs using the most widely studied TiO2, SrTiO3, (Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx), CdS, and g-C3N4 for solar chemical synthesis, two crucial yet still unsolved issues challenge their further progress toward robust solar water splitting and nitrogen fixation, including the inefficient steering of electron transportation from the bulk to the surface and the difficulty of activating the N≡N triple bond of N2. This Account details our endeavors that leverage layered bismuth oxyhalides as photocatalysts for efficient solar water splitting and nitrogen fixation, with a focus on addressing the above two problems. We first demonstrate that the layered structures of bismuth oxyhalides can stimulate an internal electric field (IEF) that is capable of efficiently separating electrons and holes after their formation and of precisely channeling

  14. Uncertainties of Nitrogen Fixation in a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, Joerg; Werner, Christian; Weber, Bettina; Hickler, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for life on earth. However, most of it is in the form of dinitrogen (N2) unutilizable to life and only few organisms are able to break the triple bond, fix the nitrogen and thus make it available for cycling in the biosphere through "fixation". In most state-of-the-art dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) including a nitrogen cycle, N fixation is simulated by the Cleveland et al. (1999) algorithm (O-CN, LPJ-GUESS, CLM), that correlates annual N fixation to evapotranspiration rates or net primary production. Nevertheless, this algorithm has two major uncertainties, which are investigated by us: 1. The algorithm is based on annual fixation rates that are then applied uniformly throughout the year. However, in nature nitrogen fixation is an expensive process, which occurs only under favorable conditions. Here we compare the annual fixation values evenly distributed over the year with daily-derived fixation values based on a modified version of the Cleveland algorithm. We postulate that in higher latitudinal regions with seasonal climate as well as in regions with a distinct dry/wet season, modeled growth is enhanced by daily derived values compared to evenly distributed values, whereas in tropical regions hardly any difference will be visible. 2. One distinguishes between symbiotic and unsymbiotic nitrogen fixation, where the first one is associated with higher plants as symbionts supplying the fixers with carbohydrates, whereas the second, unsymbiotic is performed by so-called cryptogamic covers (CC). We found that the fixation by CC is underrepresented by the Cleveland algorithm, and a correction thus leads to enhanced growth in forested regions of higher latitudes that feature substantial CC fractions. Overall, the improvements of the algorithm proposed by us are expected to better reflect the reality of nitrogen fixation and cause an increased growth of vegetation, especially in higher northern latitudes.

  15. New insights into the evolutionary history of biological nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Peters, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogenase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent reduction of dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia (NH3), accounts for roughly half of the bioavailable nitrogen supporting extant life. The fundamental requirement for fixed forms of nitrogen for life on Earth, both at present and in the past, has led to broad and significant interest in the origin and evolution of biological N2 fixation. One key question is whether the limited availability of fixed nitrogen was a factor in life's origin or whether there were ample sources of fixed nitrogen produced by abiotic processes or delivered through the weathering of bolide impact materials to support this early life. If the latter, the key questions become what were the characteristics of the environment that precipitated the evolution of this oxygen sensitive process, when did this occur, and how was its subsequent evolutionary history impacted by the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis and the rise of oxygen in the Earth's biosphere. Since the availability of fixed sources of nitrogen capable of supporting early life is difficult to glean from the geologic record, there are limited means to get direct insights into these questions. Indirect insights, however, can be gained through phylogenetic studies of nitrogenase structural gene products and additional gene products involved in the biosynthesis of the complex metal-containing prosthetic groups associated with this enzyme complex. Insights gained from such studies, as reviewed herein, challenge traditional models for the evolution of biological nitrogen fixation and provide the basis for the development of new conceptual models that explain the stepwise evolution of this highly complex life sustaining process. PMID:23935594

  16. Novel regulatory cascades controlling expression of nitrogen-fixation genes in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-11-01

    Geobacter species often play an important role in bioremediation of environments contaminated with metals or organics and show promise for harvesting electricity from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. The ability of Geobacter species to fix atmospheric nitrogen is an important metabolic feature for these applications. We identified novel regulatory cascades controlling nitrogen-fixation gene expression in Geobacter sulfurreducens. Unlike the regulatory mechanisms known in other nitrogen-fixing microorganisms, nitrogen-fixation gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens is controlled by two two-component His-Asp phosphorelay systems. One of these systems appears to be the master regulatory system that activates transcription of the majority of nitrogen-fixation genes and represses a gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase during nitrogen fixation. The other system whose expression is directly activated by the master regulatory system appears to control by antitermination the expression of a subset of the nitrogen-fixation genes whose transcription is activated by the master regulatory system and whose promoter contains transcription termination signals. This study provides a new paradigm for nitrogen-fixation gene regulation.

  17. Novel regulatory cascades controlling expression of nitrogen-fixation genes in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    Geobacter species often play an important role in bioremediation of environments contaminated with metals or organics and show promise for harvesting electricity from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. The ability of Geobacter species to fix atmospheric nitrogen is an important metabolic feature for these applications. We identified novel regulatory cascades controlling nitrogen-fixation gene expression in Geobacter sulfurreducens. Unlike the regulatory mechanisms known in other nitrogen-fixing microorganisms, nitrogen-fixation gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens is controlled by two two-component His–Asp phosphorelay systems. One of these systems appears to be the master regulatory system that activates transcription of the majority of nitrogen-fixation genes and represses a gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase during nitrogen fixation. The other system whose expression is directly activated by the master regulatory system appears to control by antitermination the expression of a subset of the nitrogen-fixation genes whose transcription is activated by the master regulatory system and whose promoter contains transcription termination signals. This study provides a new paradigm for nitrogen-fixation gene regulation. PMID:20660485

  18. Oxygen relations of nitrogen fixation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Fay, P

    1992-01-01

    The enigmatic coexistence of O2-sensitive nitrogenase and O2-evolving photosynthesis in diazotrophic cyanobacteria has fascinated researchers for over two decades. Research efforts in the past 10 years have revealed a range of O2 sensitivity of nitrogenase in different strains of cyanobacteria and a variety of adaptations for the protection of nitrogenase from damage by both atmospheric and photosynthetic sources of O2. The most complex and apparently most efficient mechanisms for the protection of nitrogenase are incorporated in the heterocysts, the N2-fixing cells of cyanobacteria. Genetic studies indicate that the controls of heterocyst development and nitrogenase synthesis are closely interrelated and that the expression of N2 fixation (nif) genes is regulated by pO2. Images PMID:1620069

  19. Nitrogen fixation and the diazotroph community in the temperate coastal region of the northwestern North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, T.; Nagata, T.; Ijichi, M.; Furuya, K.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen fixation in temperate oceans is a potentially important, but poorly understood process that may influence the marine nitrogen budget. This study determined seasonal variations in nitrogen fixation and the diazotroph community within the euphotic zone in the temperate coastal region of the northwestern North Pacific. Nitrogen fixation as high as 13.6 nmol N L-1 d-1 was measured from early summer to fall when the surface temperature exceeded 14.2 °C (but was lower than 24.3 °C) and the surface nitrate concentration was low (≤ 0.30 μM), although we also detected nitrogen fixation in subsurface layers (42-62 m) where nitrate concentrations were high (> 1 μM). Clone library analysis results indicated that nifH gene sequences were omnipresent throughout the investigation period. During the period when nitrogen fixation was detected (early summer to fall), the genes affiliated with UCYN-A, Trichodesmium, and γ-proteobacterial phylotype γ-24774A11 were frequently recovered. In contrast, when nitrogen fixation was undetectable (winter to spring), many sequences affiliated with Cluster III diazotrophs (putative anaerobic bacteria) were recovered. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that UCYN-A was relatively abundant from early to late summer compared with Trichodesmium and γ-24774A11, whereas Trichodesmium abundance was the highest among the three groups during fall.

  20. Variability for Biological Nitrogen Fixation Capacity in Beans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As legumes, common beans have the capacity to form a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria called rhizobia and fix nitrogen from the atmosphere. Common beans however are considered to be poor nitrogen fixers as compared to other legumes. Identification of genetic variability for N fixation capac...

  1. Nitrogen fixation potential in global chickpea mini-core collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a sustainable alternative for nitrogen supply to agriculture worldwide. One approach to increasing BNF in agriculture is to breed and use legumes with greater BNF capacity. To assess the capacity for BNF in chickpea (Cicer arietinum) global germplasm, a genetica...

  2. The importance of regulation of nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menge, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    I am not a proponent of including more detail in models simply because it makes them more realistic. More complexity increases the difficulty of model interpretation, so it only makes sense to include complexity if its benefit exceeds its costs. Biological nitrogen (N) fixation (BNF) is one process for which I feel the benefits of including greater complexity far outweigh the costs. I don't think that just because I work on BNF; I work on BNF because I think that. BNF, a microbial process carried out by free-living and symbiotic microbes, is the dominant N input to many ecosystems, the primary mechanism by which N deficiency can feed back to N inputs, and a main mechanism by which N surplus can develop. The dynamics of BNF, therefore, have huge implications for the rate of carbon uptake and the extent of CO2 fertilization, as well as N export to waterways and N2O emissions to the atmosphere. Unfortunately, there are serious deficiencies in our understanding of BNF. One main deficiency in our understanding is the extent to which various symbiotic N fixing organisms respond to imbalanced nutrition. Theory suggests that these responses, which I will call "strategies," have fundamental consequences for N fixer niches and ecosystem-level N and C cycling. Organisms that fix N regardless of whether they need it, a strategy that I will call "obligate," occupy post-disturbance niches and rapidly lead to N surplus. On the contrary, organisms that only fix as much N as they need, a "facultative" strategy, can occupy a wider range of successional niches, do not produce surplus N, and respond more rapidly to increased atmospheric CO2. In this talk I will show new results showing that consideration of these strategies could on its own explain the latitudinal distribution of symbiotic N fixing trees in North America. Specifically, the transition in N-fixing tree abundance from ~10% of basal area south of 35° latitude to ~1% of basal area north of 35° latitude that we observe

  3. Low Carbon Costs of Nitrogen Fixation in Tropical Dry Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gei, M. G.; Powers, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Legume tree species with the ability to fix nitrogen (N) are highly diverse and widespread across tropical forests but in particular in the dry tropics. Their ecological success in lower latitudes has been called a "paradox": soil N in the tropics is thought to be high, while acquiring N through fixation incurs high energetic costs. However, the long held assumptions that N fixation is limited by photosynthate and that N fixation penalizes plant productivity have rarely been tested, particularly in legume tree species. We show results from three different experiments where we grew eleven species of tropical dry forest legumes. We quantified plant biomass and N fixation using nodulation and the 15N natural isotope abundance (Ndfa or nitrogen derived from fixation). These data show little evidence for costs of N fixation in seedlings grown under different soil fertility, light regimes, and with different microbial communities. Seedling productivity did not incur major costs because of N fixation: indeed, the average slope between Ndfa and biomass was positive (range in slopes: -0.03 to 0.3). Moreover, foliar N, which varied among species, was tightly constrained and not correlated with Ndfa. This finding implies that legume species have a target N that does not change depending on N acquisition strategies. The process of N fixation in tropical legumes may be more carbon efficient than previously thought. This view is more consistent with the hyperabundance of members of this family in tropical ecosystems.

  4. Fixation of nitrogen in the presence of water vapor

    DOEpatents

    Harteck, Paul

    1984-01-01

    A process for the fixation of nitrogen is disclosed which comprises combining a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, metal oxide and water vapor, initially heating the combination to initiate a reaction which forms nitrate, but at a temperature and pressure range below the dissociation pressure of the nitrate. With or without the water component, the yield of fixed nitrogen is increased by the use of a Linde Molecular Sieve Catalyst.

  5. Low rates of nitrogen fixation in eastern tropical South Pacific surface waters

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Angela N.; Casciotti, Karen L.; Berelson, William M.; Prokopenko, Maria G.; Capone, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    An extensive region of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) Ocean has surface waters that are nitrate-poor yet phosphate-rich. It has been proposed that this distribution of surface nutrients provides a geochemical niche favorable for N2 fixation, the primary source of nitrogen to the ocean. Here, we present results from two cruises to the ETSP where rates of N2 fixation and its contribution to export production were determined with a suite of geochemical and biological measurements. N2 fixation was only detectable using nitrogen isotopic mass balances at two of six stations, and rates ranged from 0 to 23 µmol N m−2 d−1 based on sediment trap fluxes. Whereas the fractional importance of N2 fixation did not change, the N2-fixation rates at these two stations were several-fold higher when scaled to other productivity metrics. Regardless of the choice of productivity metric these N2-fixation rates are low compared with other oligotrophic locations, and the nitrogen isotope budgets indicate that N2 fixation supports no more than 20% of export production regionally. Although euphotic zone-integrated short-term N2-fixation rates were higher, up to 100 µmol N m−2 d−1, and detected N2 fixation at all six stations, studies of nitrogenase gene abundance and expression from the same cruises align with the geochemical data and together indicate that N2 fixation is a minor source of new nitrogen to surface waters of the ETSP. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that, despite a relative abundance of phosphate, iron may limit N2 fixation in the ETSP. PMID:26976587

  6. Regulation of Development and Nitrogen Fixation in Anabaena

    SciTech Connect

    James W Golden

    2004-08-05

    The nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is being used as a simple model of microbial development and pattern formation in a multicellular prokaryotic organism. Anabaena reduces atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia in highly specialized, terminally differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena is an important model system because of the multicellular growth pattern, the suspected antiquity of heterocyst development, and the contribution of fixed nitrogen to the environment. We are especially interested in understanding the molecular signaling pathways and genetic regulation that control heterocyst development. In the presence of an external source of reduced nitrogen, the differentiation of heterocysts is inhibited. When Anabaena is grown on dinitrogen, a one-dimensional developmental pattern of single heterocysts separated by approximately ten vegetative cells is established to form a multicellular organism composed of two interdependent cell types. The goal of this project is to understand the signaling and regulatory pathways that commit a vegetative cell to terminally differentiate into a nitrogen-fixing heterocyst. Several genes identified by us and by others were chosen as entry points into the regulatory network. Our research, which was initially focused on transcriptional regulation by group 2 sigma factors, was expanded to include group 3 sigma factors and their regulators after the complete Anabaena genome sequence became available. Surprisingly, no individual sigma factor is essential for heterocyst development. We have used the isolation of extragenic suppressors to study genetic interactions between key regulatory genes such as patS, hetR, and hetC in signaling and developmental pathways. We identified a hetR R223W mutation as a bypass suppressor of patS overexpression. Strains containing the hetR R223W allele fail to respond to pattern formation signals and overexpression of this allele results in a lethal phenotype

  7. Biome-scale nitrogen fixation strategies selected by climatic constraints on nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, Efrat; Batterman, Sarah A; Levin, Simon A; Hedin, Lars O

    2015-11-23

    Dinitrogen fixation by plants (in symbiosis with root bacteria) is a major source of new nitrogen for land ecosystems(1). A long-standing puzzle(2) is that trees capable of nitrogen fixation are abundant in nitrogen-rich tropical forests, but absent or restricted to early successional stages in nitrogen-poor extra-tropical forests. This biome-scale pattern presents an evolutionary paradox(3), given that the physiological cost(4) of nitrogen fixation predicts the opposite pattern: fixers should be out-competed by non-fixers in nitrogen-rich conditions, but competitively superior in nitrogen-poor soils. Here we evaluate whether this paradox can be explained by the existence of different fixation strategies in tropical versus extra-tropical trees: facultative fixers (capable of downregulating fixation(5,6) by sanctioning mutualistic bacteria(7)) are common in the tropics, whereas obligate fixers (less able to downregulate fixation) dominate at higher latitudes. Using a game-theoretic approach, we assess the ecological and evolutionary conditions under which these fixation strategies emerge, and examine their dependence on climate-driven differences in the nitrogen cycle. We show that in the tropics, transient soil nitrogen deficits following disturbance and rapid tree growth favour a facultative strategy and the coexistence of fixers and non-fixers. In contrast, sustained nitrogen deficits following disturbance in extra-tropical forests favour an obligate fixation strategy, and cause fixers to be excluded in late successional stages. We conclude that biome-scale differences in the abundance of nitrogen fixers can be explained by the interaction between individual plant strategies and climatic constraints on the nitrogen cycle over evolutionary time.

  8. Microbial community shifts influence patterns in tropical forest nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Reed, Sasha C; Townsend, Alan R; Cleveland, Cory C; Nemergut, Diana R

    2010-10-01

    The role of biodiversity in ecosystem function receives substantial attention, yet despite the diversity and functional relevance of microorganisms, relationships between microbial community structure and ecosystem processes remain largely unknown. We used tropical rain forest fertilization plots to directly compare the relative abundance, composition and diversity of free-living nitrogen (N)-fixer communities to in situ leaf litter N fixation rates. N fixation rates varied greatly within the landscape, and 'hotspots' of high N fixation activity were observed in both control and phosphorus (P)-fertilized plots. Compared with zones of average activity, the N fixation 'hotspots' in unfertilized plots were characterized by marked differences in N-fixer community composition and had substantially higher overall diversity. P additions increased the efficiency of N-fixer communities, resulting in elevated rates of fixation per nifH gene. Furthermore, P fertilization increased N fixation rates and N-fixer abundance, eliminated a highly novel group of N-fixers, and increased N-fixer diversity. Yet the relationships between diversity and function were not simple, and coupling rate measurements to indicators of community structure revealed a biological dynamism not apparent from process measurements alone. Taken together, these data suggest that the rain forest litter layer maintains high N fixation rates and unique N-fixing organisms and that, as observed in plant community ecology, structural shifts in N-fixing communities may partially explain significant differences in system-scale N fixation rates.

  9. Nitrogen fixation in a coral reef community.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, W J; Johannes, R E; Webb, K L

    1975-04-18

    Algal reef flats at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, fix atmospheric nitrogen at rates comparable to those in managed agriculture. The dominant nitrogen fixer appears to be the blue-green alga Calothrix crustacea. Since this nutrient enrichment contributes to the high productivity of adjacent coral reefs and undoubtedly to atoll lagoons, it is recommended that the algal reef flats receive increased conservation priority.

  10. Nitrogen fixation by hydrogen-utilizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    De Bont, J A; Leijten, M W

    1976-04-01

    Seventeen strains of nitrogen-fixing bacteria, isolated from different habitats on hydrogen and carbon dioxide as well as on other substrates, morphologically resembled each other. All strains, including Mycobacterium flavum 301, grew autotrophically with hydrogen. The isolate strain 6 was sensitive to oxygen when dependent on N2 as nitrogen source, a consequence of the sensitivity of its nitrogenase towards oxygen. At the same time, strain 6 was sensitive to hydrogen when growing autotrophically on N2 as nitrogen source, but hydrogen did not affect acetylene reduction by these cells.

  11. Nitrogen fixation by corona discharge on the early precambrian Earth.

    PubMed

    Nna-Mvondo, Delphine; Navarro-González, Rafael; Raulin, François; Coll, Patrice

    2005-10-01

    We report the first experimental study of nitrogen fixation by corona discharge on the anoxic primitive Earth. The energy yields of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) were experimentally determined over a wide range of CO(2)-N(2) mixtures simulating the evolution of the Earth's atmosphere during the Hadean and Archean eras (from 4.5 ba to 2.5 ba). NO, the principal form of fixed nitrogen in lightning and coronal discharge in early Earth, is produced ten times less efficiently in the latter type of electrical discharge with an estimated maximum annual production rate of the order of 10(10) g yr(-1). For N(2)O the maximum production rate was estimated to be approximately 10(9) g yr(-1). These low rates of syntheses indicate that corona discharges as point discharges on the clouds and ground did not play a significant role in the overall pool of reactive nitrogen needed for the emergence and sustainability of life.

  12. Molecular evidence for sediment nitrogen fixation in a temperate New England estuary

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Silvia E.; Pritchard, Kaitlyn R.; Foster, Sarah Q.

    2016-01-01

    Primary production in coastal waters is generally nitrogen (N) limited with denitrification outpacing nitrogen fixation (N2-fixation). However, recent work suggests that we have potentially underestimated the importance of heterotrophic sediment N2-fixation in marine ecosystems. We used clone libraries to examine transcript diversity of nifH (a gene associated with N2-fixation) in sediments at three sites in a temperate New England estuary (Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts, USA) and compared our results to net sediment N2 fluxes previously measured at these sites. We observed nifH expression at all sites, including a site heavily impacted by anthropogenic N. At this N impacted site, we also observed mean net sediment N2-fixation, linking the geochemical rate measurement with nifH expression. This same site also had the lowest diversity (non-parametric Shannon = 2.75). At the two other sites, we also detected nifH transcripts, however, the mean N2 flux indicated net denitrification. These results suggest that N2-fixation and denitrification co-occur in these sediments. Of the unique sequences in this study, 67% were most closely related to uncultured bacteria from various marine environments, 17% to Cluster III, 15% to Cluster I, and only 1% to Cluster II. These data add to the growing body of literature that sediment heterotrophic N2-fixation, even under high inorganic nitrogen concentrations, may be an important yet overlooked source of N in coastal systems. PMID:26977375

  13. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tsoy, Olga V.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis. PMID:27617010

  14. A possible nitrogen crisis for Archaean life due to reduced nitrogen fixation by lightning.

    PubMed

    Navarro-González, R; McKay, C P; Mvondo, D N

    2001-07-05

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life and is often the limiting nutrient for terrestrial ecosystems. As most nitrogen is locked in the kinetically stable form, N2, in the Earth's atmosphere, processes that can fix N2 into biologically available forms-such as nitrate and ammonia-control the supply of nitrogen for organisms. On the early Earth, nitrogen is thought to have been fixed abiotically, as nitric oxide formed during lightning discharge. The advent of biological nitrogen fixation suggests that at some point the demand for fixed nitrogen exceeded the supply from abiotic sources, but the timing and causes of the onset of biological nitrogen fixation remain unclear. Here we report an experimental simulation of nitrogen fixation by lightning over a range of Hadean (4.5-3.8 Gyr ago) and Archaean (3.8-2.5 Gyr ago) atmospheric compositions, from predominantly carbon dioxide to predominantly dinitrogen (but always without oxygen). We infer that, as atmospheric CO2 decreased over the Archaean period, the production of nitric oxide from lightning discharge decreased by two orders of magnitude until about 2.2 Gyr. After this time, the rise in oxygen (or methane) concentrations probably initiated other abiotic sources of nitrogen. Although the temporary reduction in nitric oxide production may have lasted for only 100 Myr or less, this was potentially long enough to cause an ecological crisis that triggered the development of biological nitrogen fixation.

  15. Fixation of nitrogen in the prebiotic atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions between nitrogen and water in the air surrounding lightning discharges can provide an important source of nitric oxide even under conditions where oxygen is a minor atmospheric constituent. Estimates are given for the associated source of soluble nitrite and nitrate. It is shown that lightning and subsequent atmospheric chemistry can provide a source of nitrate for the primitive ocean as large as one million tons of nitrogen per year, sufficient to fill the ocean to its present level of nitrate in less than one million years.

  16. Heterotrophic organisms dominate nitrogen fixation in the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Halm, Hannah; Lam, Phyllis; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Lavik, Gaute; Dittmar, Thorsten; LaRoche, Julie; D'Hondt, Steven; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2012-06-01

    Oceanic subtropical gyres are considered biological deserts because of the extremely low availability of nutrients and thus minimum productivities. The major source of nutrient nitrogen in these ecosystems is N(2)-fixation. The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is the largest ocean gyre in the world, but measurements of N(2)-fixation therein, or identification of microorganisms involved, are scarce. In the 2006/2007 austral summer, we investigated nitrogen and carbon assimilation at 11 stations throughout the SPG. In the ultra-oligotrophic waters of the SPG, the chlorophyll maxima reached as deep as 200 m. Surface primary production seemed limited by nitrogen, as dissolved inorganic carbon uptake was stimulated upon additions of (15)N-labeled ammonium and leucine in our incubation experiments. N(2)-fixation was detectable throughout the upper 200 m at most stations, with rates ranging from 0.001 to 0.19 nM N h(-1). N(2)-fixation in the SPG may account for the production of 8-20% of global oceanic new nitrogen. Interestingly, comparable (15)N(2)-fixation rates were measured under light and dark conditions. Meanwhile, phylogenetic analyses for the functional gene biomarker nifH and its transcripts could not detect any common photoautotrophic diazotrophs, such as, Trichodesmium, but a prevalence of γ-proteobacteria and the unicellular photoheterotrophic Group A cyanobacteria. The dominance of these likely heterotrophic diazotrophs was further verified by quantitative PCR. Hence, our combined results show that the ultra-oligotrophic SPG harbors a hitherto unknown heterotrophic diazotrophic community, clearly distinct from other oceanic gyres previously visited.

  17. Biological nitrogen fixation in non-legume plants

    PubMed Central

    Santi, Carole; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    Background Nitrogen is an essential nutrient in plant growth. The ability of a plant to supply all or part of its requirements from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) thanks to interactions with endosymbiotic, associative and endophytic symbionts, confers a great competitive advantage over non-nitrogen-fixing plants. Scope Because BNF in legumes is well documented, this review focuses on BNF in non-legume plants. Despite the phylogenic and ecological diversity among diazotrophic bacteria and their hosts, tightly regulated communication is always necessary between the microorganisms and the host plant to achieve a successful interaction. Ongoing research efforts to improve knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these original relationships and some common strategies leading to a successful relationship between the nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and their hosts are presented. Conclusions Understanding the molecular mechanism of BNF outside the legume–rhizobium symbiosis could have important agronomic implications and enable the use of N-fertilizers to be reduced or even avoided. Indeed, in the short term, improved understanding could lead to more sustainable exploitation of the biodiversity of nitrogen-fixing organisms and, in the longer term, to the transfer of endosymbiotic nitrogen-fixation capacities to major non-legume crops. PMID:23478942

  18. Nitrogen Fixation (Acetylene Reduction) Associated with Duckweed (Lemnaceae) Mats

    PubMed Central

    Zuberer, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Duckweed (Lemnaceae) mats in Texas and Florida were investigated, using the acetylene reduction assay, to determine whether nitrogen fixation occurred in these floating aquatic macrophyte communities. N2-fixing microorganisms were enumerated by plating or most-probable-number techniques, using appropriate N-free media. Results of the investigations indicated that substantial N2-fixation (C2H2) was associated with duckweed mats in Texas and Florida. Acetylene reduction values ranged from 1 to 18 μmol of C2H4 g (dry weight)−1 day−1 for samples incubated aerobically in light. Dark N2 fixation was always two- to fivefold lower. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (7 to 10 μM) reduced acetylene reduction to levels intermediate between light and dark incubation. Acetylene reduction was generally greatest for samples incubated anaerobically in the light. It was estimated that 15 to 20% of the N requirement of the duckweed could be supplied through biological nitrogen fixation. N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria (105 cells g [wet weight]−1 and cyanobacteria (105 propagules g [wet weight]−1 were associated with the duckweed mats. Azotobacter sp. was not detected in these investigations. One diazotrophic isolate was classified as Klebsiella. PMID:16345992

  19. Enhanced symbiotic nitrogen fixation with P. syringae pv tabaci

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J. New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces ); Sengupta-Gopalan, C. )

    1989-04-01

    Infestation of legumes such as alfalfa and soybeans with the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci is accompanied by increased plant growth, nodulation, overall nitrogen fixation, and total assimilated nitrogen. These effects are observed only in plants infested with Tox{sup +} pathogen; the toxin is tabtoxinine-{beta}-lactam, an active site-directed irreversible inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. The key to the legumes survival of this treatment is the insensitivity of the nodule-specific form of glutamine synthetase to the toxin. As expected, significant changes are observed in ammonia assimilation in these plants. The biochemical and molecular biological consequences of this treatment are being investigated.

  20. EFFECT OF NITROGEN AND METAL ADDITIONS ON NITROGEN FIXATION ACTIVITY IN BIOLOGICAL SOIL CRUSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Lui, D.; Anbar, A. D.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are diverse consortia of microorganisms that live in intimate association with soils in arid environments. Also called cryptogamic or microbiotic crusts, these communities can include cyanobacteria, algae, heterotrophic bacteria, fungi, lichens, and mosses. Together, these organisms provide many services to their surrounding ecosystems, including reduction of water runoff, promotion of water infiltration, and prevention of soil erosion. The cyanobacteria and algae also provide fixed carbon (C) to the soil through photosynthesis, and because atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) in arid environments is low, the major input of biologically available N comes from cyanobacteria capable of converting nitrogen gas (N2) to ammonium (NH4+). Biological soil crusts are easily destroyed by livestock grazing, motor vehicle travel, and many forms of recreational and agricultural land use. Loss of BSC cover can leave the soil vulnerable to intense erosion that can remove the nutrients necessary to sustain plant and animal life, thus accelerating the process of desertification. In order to preserve existing crusts and encourage the development of new crusts, it is crucial to understand the nutrient requirements of metabolism and growth in these microbial communities. This study investigated the affect of nitrogen and metal additions on N2-fixation activity in cyanobacterially-dominated crusts from the Colorado Plateau near Moab, Utah. Although N2-fixation has been studied in this system before, the affect of nutrient additions on N2-fixation activity has not been documented. The goal of this work was to understand how N and metal supplementation affects crust N metabolism. Three experiments were conducted to observe how N2-fixation activity changed with the addition of N, molybdenum (Mo), and vanadium (V). Molybdenum and vanadium were chosen because they are most commonly found at the active site of the enzyme nitrogenase, the molecule responsible

  1. Improvement in nitrogen fixation capacity could be part of the domestication process in soybean.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, N; Qi, X; Li, M-W; Xie, M; Gao, Y; Cheung, M-Y; Wong, F-L; Lam, H-M

    2016-08-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in soybeans is a complex process involving the interplay between the plant host and the symbiotic rhizobia. As nitrogen supply has a crucial role in growth and development, higher nitrogen fixation capacity would be important to achieve bigger plants and larger seeds, which were important selection criteria during plant domestication by humans. To test this hypothesis, we monitored the nitrogen fixation-related performance in 31 cultivated and 17 wild soybeans after inoculation with the slow-growing Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens sp. nov. USDA110 and the fast-growing Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii CCBAU45436. Our results showed that, in general, cultivated soybeans gave better performance in BNF. Electron microscopic studies indicated that there was an exceptionally high accumulation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate bodies in bacteroids in the nodules of all wild soybeans tested, suggesting that the C/N balance in wild soybeans may not be optimized for nitrogen fixation. Furthermore, we identified new quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for total ureides and total nodule fresh weight by employing a recombinant inbred population composed of descendants from a cross between a cultivated and a wild parent. Using nucleotide diversity (θπ), divergence index (Fst) and distribution of fixed single-nucleotide polymorphisms as parameters, we found that some regions in the total ureides QTL on chromosome 17 and the total nodule fresh weight QTL on chromosome 12 exhibited very low diversity among cultivated soybeans, suggesting that these were traits specially selected during the domestication and breeding process.

  2. Nitrogen Fixation Tolerance to Soil Water Deficit Among Commercial Cultivars and breeding Lines of Peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut is often grown in the U.S. on sandy soil with limited water holding capacity. Since nitrogen fixation activity of other grain legume species, and some peanut cultivars, has been found to be especially sensitive to soil drying, this study was undertaken to examine a possible limitation in U.S...

  3. Genome-wide association analysis of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to explore the genetic basis of variation for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) and related traits in the Andean diversity panel (ADP) comprised of 259 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotypes. The ADP was evaluated for SNF and related traits in...

  4. Methane-Stimulated Benthic Marine Nitrogen Fixation at Deep-Sea Methane Seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekas, A. E.; Orphan, V.

    2011-12-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (the conversion of N2 to NH3) is a critical process in the oceans, counteracting the production of N2 gas by dissimilatory bacterial metabolisms and providing a source of bioavailable nitrogen to many nitrogen-limited ecosystems. Although current measurements of N2 production and consumption in the oceans indicate that the nitrogen cycle is not balanced, recent findings on the limits of nitrogen fixation suggest that the perceived imbalance is an artifact of an incomplete assessment of marine diazotrophy. One currently poorly studied and potentially underappreciated habitat for diazotrophic organisms is the sediments of the deep-sea. In the present study we investigate the distribution and magnitude of benthic marine diazotrophy at several active deep-sea methane seeps (Mound 12, Costa Rica; Eel River Basin, CA, USA; Hydrate Ridge, OR, USA; and Monterey Canyon, CA, USA). Using 15N2 and 15NH4 sediment incubation experiments followed by single-cell (FISH-NanoSIMS) and bulk isotopic analysis (EA-IRMS), we observed total protein synthesis (15N uptake from 15NH4) and nitrogen fixation (15N update from 15N2). The highest rates of nitrogen fixation observed in the methane seep sediment incubation experiments were over an order of magnitude greater than those previously published from non-seep deep-sea sediments (Hartwig and Stanley, Deep-Sea Research, 1978, 25:411-417). However, methane seep diazotrophy appears to be highly spatially variable, with sediments exhibiting no nitrogen fixation originating only centimeters away from sediments actively incorporating 15N from 15N2. The greatest spatial variability in diazotrophy was observed with depth in the sediment, and corresponded to steep gradients in sulfate and methane. The maximum rates of nitrogen fixation were observed within the methane-sulfate transition zone, where organisms mediating the anaerobic oxidation of methane are typically in high abundance. Additionally, incubation

  5. Screening Prosopis (mesquite) germplasm for biomass production and nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.; Cannell, G.H.; Clark, P.R.; Osborn, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing trees of the genus Prosopis (mesquite or algaroba) are well adapted to the semi-arid and often saline regions of the world. These trees may produce firewood or pods for livestock food, they may stabilize sand dunes and they may enrich the soil by production of leaf litter supported by nitrogen fixation. A collection of nearly 500 Prosopis accessions representing North and South American and African germplasm has been established. Seventy of these accessions representing 14 taxa are being grown under field conditions where a 30-fold range in biomass productivity among accessions has been estimated. In a greehouse experiment, 13 Prosopis taxa grew on nitrogen-free medium nodulated, and had a 10-fold difference in nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction). When Prosopis is propagated by seed the resulting trees are extremely variable in growth rate and presence or absence of thorns. Propagation of 6 Prosopis taxa by stem cuttings has been achieved with low success (1 to 10%) in field-grown plants and with higher success (50 to 100%) with young actively growing greenhouse plants.

  6. Fixating on metals: new insights into the role of metals in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    González-Guerrero, Manuel; Matthiadis, Anna; Sáez, Áez;ngela; Long, Terri A.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is one of the most promising and immediate alternatives to the overuse of polluting nitrogen fertilizers for improving plant nutrition. At the core of this process are a number of metalloproteins that catalyze and provide energy for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia, eliminate free radicals produced by this process, and create the microaerobic conditions required by these reactions. In legumes, metal cofactors are provided to endosymbiotic rhizobia within root nodule cortical cells. However, low metal bioavailability is prevalent in most soils types, resulting in widespread plant metal deficiency and decreased nitrogen fixation capabilities. As a result, renewed efforts have been undertaken to identify the mechanisms governing metal delivery from soil to the rhizobia, and to determine how metals are used in the nodule and how they are recycled once the nodule is no longer functional. This effort is being aided by improved legume molecular biology tools (genome projects, mutant collections, and transformation methods), in addition to state-of-the-art metal visualization systems. PMID:24592271

  7. Engineering Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 for Nitrogen Fixation and its Application to Improve Plant Growth under Nitrogen-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Setten, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Fox, Ana Romina; Lisi, Christian; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Angeletti, Mauro; Pagano, Elba; Díaz-Paleo, Antonio; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen is the second most critical factor for crop production after water. In this study, the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 was genetically modified to fix nitrogen using the genes encoding the nitrogenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 via the X940 cosmid. Pf-5 X940 was able to grow in L medium without nitrogen, displayed high nitrogenase activity and released significant quantities of ammonium to the medium. Pf-5 X940 also showed constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of nitrogenase in ammonium medium or in nitrogen-free medium, suggesting a constitutive nitrogen fixation. Similar to Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas taetrolens but not Pseudomonas balearica and Pseudomonas stutzeri transformed with cosmid X940 showed constitutive nitrogenase activity and high ammonium production, suggesting that this phenotype depends on the genome context and that this technology to obtain nitrogen-fixing bacteria is not restricted to Pf-5. Interestingly, inoculation of Arabidopsis, alfalfa, tall fescue and maize with Pf-5 X940 increased the ammonium concentration in soil and plant productivity under nitrogen-deficient conditions. In conclusion, these results open the way to the production of effective recombinant inoculants for nitrogen fixation on a wide range of crops. PMID:23675499

  8. Local versus basin-scale limitation of marine nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Deutsch, Curtis

    2014-06-17

    Nitrogen (N) fixation by diazotrophic plankton is the primary source of this crucial nutrient to the ocean, but the factors limiting its rate and distribution are controversial. According to one view, the ecological niche of diazotrophs is primarily controlled by the ocean through internally generated N deficits that suppress the growth of their competitors. A second view posits an overriding limit from the atmosphere, which restricts diazotrophs to regions where dust deposition satisfies their high iron (Fe) requirement, thus separating N sources from sinks at a global scale. Here we use multiple geochemical signatures of N2 fixation to show that the Fe limitation of diazotrophs is strong enough to modulate the regional distribution of N2 fixation within ocean basins--particularly the Fe-poor Pacific--but not strong enough to influence its partition between basins, which is instead governed by rates of N loss. This scale-dependent limitation of N2 fixation reconciles local observations of Fe stress in diazotroph communities with an inferred spatial coupling of N sources and sinks. Within this regime of intermediate Fe control, the oceanic N reservoir would respond only weakly to enhanced dust fluxes during glacial climates, but strongly to the reduced fluxes hypothesized under anthropogenic climate warming.

  9. Evolutionary tradeoffs can select against nitrogen fixation and thereby maintain nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Menge, Duncan N L; Levin, Simon A; Hedin, Lars O

    2008-02-05

    Symbiotic nitrogen (N) fixing trees are absent from old-growth temperate and boreal ecosystems, even though many of these are N-limited. To explore mechanisms that could select against N fixation in N-limited, old-growth ecosystems, we developed a simple resource-based evolutionary model of N fixation. When there are no costs of N fixation, increasing amounts of N fixation will be selected for until N no longer limits production. However, tradeoffs between N fixation and plant mortality or turnover, plant uptake of available soil N, or N use efficiency (NUE) can select against N fixation in N-limited ecosystems and can thereby maintain N limitation indefinitely (provided that there are losses of plant-unavailable N). Three key traits influence the threshold that determines how large these tradeoffs must be to select against N fixation. A low NUE, high mortality (or turnover) rate and low losses of plant-unavailable N all increase the likelihood that N fixation will be selected against, and a preliminary examination of published data on these parameters shows that these mechanisms, particularly the tradeoff with NUE, are quite feasible in some systems. Although these results are promising, a better characterization of these parameters in multiple ecosystems is necessary to determine whether these mechanisms explain the lack of symbiotic N fixers-and thus the maintenance of N limitation-in old-growth forests.

  10. Evolutionary tradeoffs can select against nitrogen fixation and thereby maintain nitrogen limitation

    PubMed Central

    Menge, Duncan N. L.; Levin, Simon A.; Hedin, Lars O.

    2008-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen (N) fixing trees are absent from old-growth temperate and boreal ecosystems, even though many of these are N-limited. To explore mechanisms that could select against N fixation in N-limited, old-growth ecosystems, we developed a simple resource-based evolutionary model of N fixation. When there are no costs of N fixation, increasing amounts of N fixation will be selected for until N no longer limits production. However, tradeoffs between N fixation and plant mortality or turnover, plant uptake of available soil N, or N use efficiency (NUE) can select against N fixation in N-limited ecosystems and can thereby maintain N limitation indefinitely (provided that there are losses of plant-unavailable N). Three key traits influence the threshold that determines how large these tradeoffs must be to select against N fixation. A low NUE, high mortality (or turnover) rate and low losses of plant-unavailable N all increase the likelihood that N fixation will be selected against, and a preliminary examination of published data on these parameters shows that these mechanisms, particularly the tradeoff with NUE, are quite feasible in some systems. Although these results are promising, a better characterization of these parameters in multiple ecosystems is necessary to determine whether these mechanisms explain the lack of symbiotic N fixers—and thus the maintenance of N limitation—in old-growth forests. PMID:18223153

  11. Functional ecology of free-living nitrogen fixation: A contemporary perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Sasha C.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Townsend, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability is thought to frequently limit terrestrial ecosystem processes, and explicit consideration of N biogeochemistry, including biological N2 fixation, is central to understanding ecosystem responses to environmental change. Yet, the importance of free-living N2 fixation—a process that occurs on a wide variety of substrates, is nearly ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems, and may often represent the dominant pathway for acquiring newly available N—is often underappreciated. Here, we draw from studies that investigate free-living N2 fixation from functional, physiological, genetic, and ecological perspectives. We show that recent research and analytical advances have generated a wealth of new information that provides novel insight into the ecology of N2 fixation as well as raises new questions and priorities for future work. These priorities include a need to better integrate free-living N2 fixation into conceptual and analytical evaluations of the N cycle's role in a variety of global change scenarios.

  12. Low temperature delays timing and enhances the cost of nitrogen fixation in the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Verena S; Stomp, Maayke; Rosso, Camillo; van Beusekom, Sebastiaan A M; Emmerich, Barbara; Stal, Lucas J; Huisman, Jef

    2013-11-01

    Marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are largely confined to the tropical and subtropical ocean. It has been argued that their global biogeographical distribution reflects the physiologically feasible temperature range at which they can perform nitrogen fixation. In this study we refine this line of argumentation for the globally important group of unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria, and pose the following two hypotheses: (i) nitrogen fixation is limited by nitrogenase activity at low temperature and by oxygen diffusion at high temperature, which is manifested by a shift from strong to weak temperature dependence of nitrogenase activity, and (ii) high respiration rates are required to maintain very low levels of oxygen for nitrogenase, which results in enhanced respiratory cost per molecule of fixed nitrogen at low temperature. We tested these hypotheses in laboratory experiments with the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. BG043511. In line with the first hypothesis, the specific growth rate increased strongly with temperature from 18 to 30 °C, but leveled off at higher temperature under nitrogen-fixing conditions. As predicted by the second hypothesis, the respiratory cost of nitrogen fixation and also the cellular C:N ratio rose sharply at temperatures below 21 °C. In addition, we found that low temperature caused a strong delay in the onset of the nocturnal nitrogenase activity, which shortened the remaining nighttime available for nitrogen fixation. Together, these results point at a lower temperature limit for unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, which offers an explanation for their (sub)tropical distribution and suggests expansion of their biogeographical range by global warming.

  13. Variations in the rhythms of respiration and nitrogen fixation in members of the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterial genus Cyanothece.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Anindita; Elvitigala, Thanura; Liberton, Michelle; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2013-03-01

    In order to accommodate the physiologically incompatible processes of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation within the same cell, unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria have to maintain a dynamic metabolic profile in the light as well as the dark phase of a diel cycle. The transition from the photosynthetic to the nitrogen-fixing phase is marked by the onset of various biochemical and regulatory responses, which prime the intracellular environment for nitrogenase activity. Cellular respiration plays an important role during this transition, quenching the oxygen generated by photosynthesis and by providing energy necessary for the process. Although the underlying principles of nitrogen fixation predict unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria to function in a certain way, significant variations are observed in the diazotrophic behavior of these microbes. In an effort to elucidate the underlying differences and similarities that govern the nitrogen-fixing ability of unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria, we analyzed six members of the genus Cyanothece. Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a member of this genus, has been shown to perform efficient aerobic nitrogen fixation and hydrogen production. Our study revealed significant differences in the patterns of respiration and nitrogen fixation among the Cyanothece spp. strains that were grown under identical culture conditions, suggesting that these processes are not solely controlled by cues from the diurnal cycle but that strain-specific intracellular metabolic signals play a major role. Despite these inherent differences, the ability to perform high rates of aerobic nitrogen fixation and hydrogen production appears to be a characteristic of this genus.

  14. The cyanobacterial nitrogen fixation paradox in natural waters

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation, the enzymatic conversion of atmospheric N (N 2) to ammonia (NH 3), is a microbially mediated process by which “new” N is supplied to N-deficient water bodies. Certain bloom-forming cyanobacterial species are capable of conducting N 2 fixation; hence, they are able to circumvent N limitation in these waters. However, this anaerobic process is highly sensitive to oxygen, and since cyanobacteria produce oxygen in photosynthesis, they are faced with a paradoxical situation, where one critically important (for supporting growth) biochemical process is inhibited by another. N 2-fixing cyanobacterial taxa have developed an array of biochemical, morphological, and ecological adaptations to minimize the “oxygen problem”; however, none of these allows N 2 fixation to function at a high enough efficiency so that it can supply N needs at the ecosystem scale, where N losses via denitrification, burial, and advection often exceed the inputs of “new” N by N 2 fixation. As a result, most marine and freshwater ecosystems exhibit chronic N limitation of primary production. Under conditions of perpetual N limitation, external inputs of N from human sources (agricultural, urban, and industrial) play a central role in determining ecosystem fertility and, in the case of N overenrichment, excessive primary production or eutrophication. This points to the importance of controlling external N inputs (in addition to traditional phosphorus controls) as a means of ensuring acceptable water quality and safe water supplies. Nitrogen fixation, the enzymatic conversion of atmospheric N 2 to ammonia (NH 3) is a  microbially-mediated process by which “new” nitrogen is supplied to N-deficient water bodies.  Certain bloom-forming cyanobacterial species are capable of conducting N 2 fixation; hence they are able to circumvent nitrogen limitation in these waters. However, this anaerobic process is highly sensitive to oxygen, and since cyanobacteria produce oxygen in

  15. Marine oscillatoria (Trichodesmium): explanation for aerobic nitrogen fixation without heterocysts.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, E J; Price, C C

    1976-03-26

    Nitrogen fixation in marine Oscillatoria appears to be associated with differentiated cells located in the center of the colony. These central cells exhibit reduced pigmentation relative to peripherally located cells and do not incorporate 14CO2 in photosynthesis. Central cells apparently do not produce O2 which would deactivate nitrogenase. When central cells are exposed to O2 via disruption of the colonies, N2 fixation (acetylene reduction) decreases sharply even though individual trichomes remain intact. Disruption of colonies in the absence of O2 does not cause reduced nitrogenase activity. In the sea, turbulence from wave action apparently separates trichomes allowing O2 to enter thus decreasing nitrogenase activity. These observations explain how Oscillatoria is able to fix N2 without heterocysts in an aerobic environment and why it blooms virtually always occur in calm seas.

  16. Nitrogen fixation on early Mars and other terrestrial planets: experimental demonstration of abiotic fixation reactions to nitrite and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Summers, David P; Khare, Bishun

    2007-04-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen is critical to understanding planetary evolution and the potential origin of life on terrestrial planets. Nitrogen, an essential biochemical element, is certainly necessary for life as we know it to arise. The loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in an incapacity to sustain liquid water and impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. However, our current understanding of how such fixation may occur is almost entirely theoretical. This work experimentally examines the chemistry, in both gas and aqueous phases, that would occur from the formation of NO and CO by the shock heating of a model carbon dioxide/nitrogen atmosphere such as is currently thought to exist on early terrestrial planets. The results show that two pathways exist for the abiotic fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere into the crust: one via HNO and another via NO(2). Fixation via HNO, which requires liquid water, could represent fixation on a planet with liquid water (and hence would also be a source of nitrogen for the origin of life). The pathway via NO(2) does not require liquid water and shows that fixation could occur even when liquid water has been lost from a planet's surface (for example, continuing to remove nitrogen through NO(2) reaction with ice, adsorbed water, etc.).

  17. Biological nitrogen fixation in the context of global change.

    PubMed

    Olivares, José; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Sanjuán, Juan

    2013-05-01

    The intensive application of fertilizers during agricultural practices has led to an unprecedented perturbation of the nitrogen cycle, illustrated by the growing accumulation of nitrates in soils and waters and of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere. Besides increasing use efficiency of current N fertilizers, priority should be given to value the process of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) through more sustainable technologies that reduce the undesired effects of chemical N fertilization of agricultural crops. Wider legume adoption, supported by coordinated legume breeding and inoculation programs are approaches at hand. Also available are biofertilizers based on microbes that help to reduce the needs of N fertilization in important crops like cereals. Engineering the capacity to fix nitrogen in cereals, either by themselves or in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing microbes, are attractive future options that, nevertheless, require more intensive and internationally coordinated research efforts. Although nitrogen-fixing plants may be less productive, at some point, agriculture must significantly reduce the use of warming (chemically synthesized) N and give priority to BNF if it is to sustain both food production and environmental health for a continuously growing human population.

  18. Assessment of free-living nitrogen fixing microorganisms for commercial nitrogen fixation. [economic analysis of ammonia production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, B. O.; Wallace, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Ammonia production by Klebsiella pneumoniae is not economical with present strains and improving nitrogen fixation to its theoretical limits in this organism is not sufficient to achieve economic viability. Because the value of both the hydrogen produced by this organism and the methane value of the carbon source required greatly exceed the value of the ammonia formed, ammonia (fixed nitrogen) should be considered the by-product. The production of hydrogen by KLEBSIELLA or other anaerobic nitrogen fixers should receive additional study, because the activity of nitrogenase offers a significant improvement in hydrogen production. The production of fixed nitrogen in the form of cell mass by Azotobacter is also uneconomical and the methane value of the carbon substrate exceeds the value of the nitrogen fixed. Parametric studies indicate that as efficiencies approach the theoretical limits the economics may become competitive. The use of nif-derepressed microorganisms, particularly blue-green algae, may have significant potential for in situ fertilization in the environment.

  19. Simulating interactive effects of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, carbon dioxide elevation, and climatic change on legume growth.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mei; Gao, Q; Shaffer, M J

    2002-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of interaction between the symbiotic nitrogen-fixation process and main physiological processes, such as assimilation, nutrient allocation, and structural growth, as well as effects of nitrogen fixation on plant responses to global change, are important and still open to more investigation. Appropriate models have not been adequately developed. A dynamic ecophysiological model was developed in this study for a legume plant [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] growing in northern China. The model synthesized symbiotic nitrogen fixation and the main physiological processes under variable atmospheric CO2 concentration and climatic conditions, and emphasized the interactive effects of these processes on seasonal biomass dynamics of the plant. Experimental measurements of ecophysiological quantities obtained in a CO2 enrichment experiment on soybean plants, were used to parameterize and validate the model. The results indicated that the model simulated the experiments with reasonable accuracy. The R2 values between simulations and observations are 0.94, 0.95, and 0.86 for total biomass, green biomass, and nodule biomass, respectively. The simulations for various combinations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, precipitation, and temperature, with or without nitrogen fixation, showed that increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration, precipitation, and efficiency of nitrogen fixation all have positive effects on biomass accumulation. On the other hand, an increased temperature induced lower rates of biomass accumulation under semi-arid conditions. In general, factors with positive effects on plant growth tended to promote each other in the simulation range, except the relationship between CO2 concentration and climatic factors. Because of the enhanced water use efficiency with a higher CO2 concentration, more significant effects of CO2 concentration were associated with a worse (dryer and warmer in this study) climate.

  20. Nitrogen fixation in distinct microbial niches within a chemoautotrophy-driven cave ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mahesh S; Assig, Karoline; Dattagupta, Sharmishtha

    2013-12-01

    Microbial sulfur and carbon cycles in ecosystems driven by chemoautotrophy-present at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and sulfidic caves-have been studied to some extent, yet little is known about nitrogen fixation in these systems. Using a comprehensive approach comprising of (15)N2 isotope labeling, acetylene reduction assay and nitrogenase gene expression analyses, we investigated nitrogen fixation in the sulfide-rich, chemoautotrophy-based Frasassi cave ecosystem (Italy). Nitrogen fixation was examined in three different microbial niches within the cave waters: (1) symbiotic bacterial community of Niphargus amphipods, (2) Beggiatoa-dominated biofilms, which occur at the sulfide-oxygen interface, and (3) sulfidic sediment. We found evidence for nitrogen fixation in all the three niches, and the nitrogenase gene (homologs of nifH) expression data clearly show niche differentiation of diazotrophic Proteobacteria within the water streams. The nifH transcript originated from the symbiotic community of Niphargus amphipods might belong to the Thiothrix ectosymbionts. Two abundantly expressed nifH genes in the Beggiatoa-dominated biofilms are closely related to those from Beggiatoa- and Desulfovibrio-related bacteria. These two diazotrophs were consistently found in Beggiatoa-dominated biofilms collected at various time points, thus illustrating species-specific associations of the diazotrophs in biofilm formation, and micron-scale niche partitioning of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria driven by steep redox gradients within the biofilm. Finally, putative heterotrophs (Geobacter, Azoarcus and Desulfovibrio related) were the active diazotrophs in the sulfidic sediment. Our study is the first to shed light on nitrogen fixation in permanently dark caves and suggests that diazotrophy may be widespread in chemosynthetic communities.

  1. Nitrogen fixation in distinct microbial niches within a chemoautotrophy-driven cave ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mahesh S; Assig, Karoline; Dattagupta, Sharmishtha

    2013-01-01

    Microbial sulfur and carbon cycles in ecosystems driven by chemoautotrophy—present at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and sulfidic caves—have been studied to some extent, yet little is known about nitrogen fixation in these systems. Using a comprehensive approach comprising of 15N2 isotope labeling, acetylene reduction assay and nitrogenase gene expression analyses, we investigated nitrogen fixation in the sulfide-rich, chemoautotrophy-based Frasassi cave ecosystem (Italy). Nitrogen fixation was examined in three different microbial niches within the cave waters: (1) symbiotic bacterial community of Niphargus amphipods, (2) Beggiatoa-dominated biofilms, which occur at the sulfide–oxygen interface, and (3) sulfidic sediment. We found evidence for nitrogen fixation in all the three niches, and the nitrogenase gene (homologs of nifH) expression data clearly show niche differentiation of diazotrophic Proteobacteria within the water streams. The nifH transcript originated from the symbiotic community of Niphargus amphipods might belong to the Thiothrix ectosymbionts. Two abundantly expressed nifH genes in the Beggiatoa-dominated biofilms are closely related to those from Beggiatoa- and Desulfovibrio-related bacteria. These two diazotrophs were consistently found in Beggiatoa-dominated biofilms collected at various time points, thus illustrating species-specific associations of the diazotrophs in biofilm formation, and micron-scale niche partitioning of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria driven by steep redox gradients within the biofilm. Finally, putative heterotrophs (Geobacter, Azoarcus and Desulfovibrio related) were the active diazotrophs in the sulfidic sediment. Our study is the first to shed light on nitrogen fixation in permanently dark caves and suggests that diazotrophy may be widespread in chemosynthetic communities. PMID:23924780

  2. Transit Fixatives: An Innovative Study

    PubMed Central

    A, Ravi Prakash; G, Sreenath; JK, Sonia Bai; NDVN, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Universally accepted fixative is 10% formalin which has been used for preserving the tissues and their architecture. In certain conditions, formalin might not be readily available for immediate fixation. We here by explore more economical, eco-friendly and easily available solutions that can be used as transit media/ transporting media for tissue specimens. Materials and Methods: The study included commonly available solutions like Spirit, Saline, Betadine solution, Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), Local anesthesia (L.A), Rose water, Coconut oil, Coconut water, Ice cold water, Honey and Milk while keeping formalin as control. The fresh tissue sample was cut into multiple bits and placed in different containers for a period of 8 hours before transferring to formalin solution. Conclusion: Transit fixatives are very important in certain situations where formalin is not readily available. These fixatives can be used to fix the tissues for a period of at least 8 hours without causing any damage or distortion before they are fixed in formalin solution. PMID:25954725

  3. Variation in moss-associated nitrogen fixation in boreal forest stands.

    PubMed

    Markham, John H

    2009-08-01

    Traditionally it has been thought that most boreal forest communities lack a significant input of biologically fixed nitrogen. Recent discoveries of nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria associated with mosses have resulted in a re-evaluation of this view. While it is recognized that rates of nitrogen fixation in mosses can be highly variable, there is little understanding as to why this occurs. I monitored nitrogen fixation, using acetylene reduction, in wet lowland and dry upland boreal forest communities, in central Canada, over a growing season. At the peak of nitrogen fixation in mid summer, Sphagnum capillifolium had an 11 times higher rate of fixation than Pleurozium schreberi. Variation in canopy openness and precipitation had no effect on rates of fixation over the growing season. In P. schreberi fixation rates did not vary between sites. Temperature had a positive effect on fixation rates in both S. capillifolium and P. schreberi, but the effect was 4 times more pronounced in S. capillifolium. Seasonal rates of nitrogen fixation were estimated at 193 mg N m(-2) for S. capillifolium and 23 mg N m(-2) for P. schreberi. With moderate increases in climate warming, predicted increases in nitrogen fixation in S. capillifolium are sufficient to raise its decomposition rate. Increased temperatures may therefore act synergistically to change boreal systems from a sink to a source of carbon.

  4. Influence of sewage discharge on nitrogen fixation and nitrogen flux from coral reefs in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R B; Gundersen, K

    1976-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation was investigated in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, a subtropical eutrophic estuary, by using the acetylene reduction technique on algal samples. No active, planktonic, N2-fixing blue-green algae or bacteria were observed. However, Calothrix and Nostoc capable of fixing N2 were cultured from navigational buoys and dead coral heads. Nitrogen fixation associated with these structures was greater in the middle sector than in the south and north sectors of the estuary. Experiments demonstrated that the fixation was photosynthetically dependent. Examination of the data showed that there was no significant correlation between rates of nitrogen fixation and concentration of combined nitrogen compounds in the Bay water. Fixation was significantly correlated to the inorganic N/P (atomic) ratio in the south and middle sectors but not in the north sector. The nutrient data indicate there was a flux of combined nitrogen, but not phosphate, from the reef flats. PMID:7198

  5. Nitrogen fixation in boreal peatlands: the effects of increased N deposition on N2-fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popma, J. M.; Wieder, R.; Lamers, L.; Vile, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Boreal peatlands are of great importance to global carbon and nitrogen cycling. While covering only 3-4 % of the terrestrial surface, they account for 25-30 % of the world's soil C and 9-15 % of the world's soil N. In Western Canada atmospheric dry deposition rates are extremely low: approximately 1 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Though these systems have been functioning as net sinks over the past 11,000 years, natural and anthropogenic disturbances might compromise the historical balance of C and N. Biological N2-fixation has recently been shown to represent a very significant input of N into these systems, contributing to 62% of total N in Western Canada. Interactions between N deposition and biological N2-fixation are as yet, unknown, but the impact of elevated deposition of N-compounds from increased industrial expansion of oil sands mining to peatlands, is concerning. Given that nitrogenase, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing N2-fixation, is energetically costly when active, enhanced inputs of atmospheric N deposition could be a major determinant for enzyme activity and rates of biological N input to these bogs. Understanding interactions between N deposition and N2 fixation in boreal peatlands can aid in predicting the consequences of increased N deposition and setting critical loads. We conducted a field-fertilization experiment in a poor fen in Alberta, Canada, to determine the effects of enhanced N deposition on a dominant fen species Sphagnum angustifolium. The experiment consisted of seven N treatments: Control, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 kg N ha-1 y1, n=3. N2-fixation was measured during summer 2012 and 2013 using the acetylene reduction assay (ARA). ARA rates were converted to rates of N2-fixation by calibrating ARA with paired 15N2-incubations. In both 2012 and 2013, with increasing N deposition from 0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 to 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1, rates of N2 fixation decreased, with highest rates in the 0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 treatment mosses (54.2 × 1.40; 48.58 × 7.12 kg N ha

  6. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input

    PubMed Central

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha-1 yr-1) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha-1 yr-1, and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold. PMID:26731691

  7. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold.

  8. Nitrogen fixation may enrich phosphorus availability under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Vitousek, P. M.; Field, C. B.; Michael, A.

    2006-12-01

    The ability of N2 fixers to effectively colonize new terrestrial landscapes has major implications for CO2 uptake, storage, and climate change. As part of the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment, we have initiated a manipulation to explore how nutrients, particularly nitrogen N and P, interact with elevated CO2 in controlling rates of N2 fixation and the persistence of symbiotic N2 fixers. Here we report that N2-fixing plants employ an N-rich strategy of P acquisition that enables them to successfully compete for soil P at ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations. Across all treatments (N, P, CO2), the N2 fixer releases large quantities of N-rich phosphatases (organic-P "weathering" enzymes) into the soil, whereas N appears to substantially limit phosphatase production by non-fixers. This investment in phosphatases increases significantly and linearly with biomass N:P ratios, is only slightly affected by elevated CO2, and can explain the very high P contents of N fixing organisms observed. Using a simulation model of C, N, and P cycles to explore this mechanism further, we find that the ability of N fixers to invest N into P liberation can accelerate the P cycle and enrich P availability at the ecosystem level. Consequently, such interactions between N2 fixation and the P cycle may provide a path by which even P-limited terrestrial environments can take up and store additional CO2 in the future. Our findings suggest that P may not represent a constraint on the ability of fixers to colonize new terrestrial environments, though N2 fixation rates are limited by P.

  9. High potential of nitrogen fixation in pristine, ombrotrophic bogs in Southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Horn, Marcus A.; Bahamonde Aguilar, Nelson A.; Borken, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) input in pristine peatlands occurs via natural input of inorganic N through atmospheric deposition or biological dinitrogen (N2) fixation. However, N2 fixation is to date mostly attributed to bacteria and algae associated to Sphagnum and its contribution to plant productivity and peat buildup has been often underestimated in previous studies. Based on net N storage, exceptionally low N deposition, and high abundance of vascular plants at pristine peatlands in Southern Patagonia, we hypothesized that there must be a high potential of non-symbiotic N2 fixation not limited to the occurrence of Sphagnum. To this end, we chose two ombrotrophic bogs with spots that are dominated either by Sphagnum or by vascular, cushion-forming plants and sampled peat from different depths for incubation with 15N2 to determine N2 fixation potentials. Moreover, we analyzed 15N2 fixation by a nodule-forming, endemic conifer inhabiting the peatlands. Results from 15N2 uptake were compared to the conventional approach to study N2 fixation by the acetylene reduction assay (ARA). Using 15N2 as a tracer, high non-symbiotic N2 fixation rates of 0.3-1.4 μmol N g-1 d-1 were found down to 50 cm under micro-oxic conditions (2 vol.%) in samples from both plots either covered by Sphagnum magellanicum or by vascular cushion plants. Peat N concentrations suggested a higher potential of non-symbiotic N2 fixation under cushion plants, likely because of the availability of easily decomposable organic compounds as substrates and oxic conditions in the rhizosphere. In the Sphagnum plots, high N2 fixation below 10 cm depth would rather reflect a potential fixation that may switch on during periods of low water levels when oxygen penetrates deeper into the peat. 15N natural abundance of live Sphagnum from 0-10 cm pointed to N uptake solely from atmospheric deposition and non-symbiotic N2 fixation. 15N signatures of peat from the cushion plant plots indicated additional N supply from N

  10. The importance of nodule CO2 fixation for the efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in pea at vegetative growth and during pod formation

    PubMed Central

    Fischinger, Stephanie Anastasia; Schulze, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Nodule CO2 fixation is of pivotal importance for N2 fixation. The process provides malate for bacteroids and oxaloacetate for nitrogen assimilation. The hypothesis of the present paper was that grain legume nodules would adapt to higher plant N demand and more restricted carbon availability at pod formation through increased nodule CO2 fixation and a more efficient N2 fixation. Growth, N2 fixation, and nodule composition during vegetative growth and at pod formation were studied in pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). In parallel experiments, 15N2 and 13CO2 uptake, as well as nodule hydrogen and CO2 release, was measured. Plants at pod formation showed higher growth rates and N2 fixation per plant when compared with vegetative growth. The specific activity of active nodules was about 25% higher at pod formation. The higher nodule activity was accompanied by higher amino acid concentration in nodules and xylem sap with a higher share of asparagine. Nodule 13CO2 fixation was increased at pod formation, both per plant and per 15N2 fixed unit. However, malate concentration in nodules was only 40% of that during vegetative growth and succinate was no longer detectable. The data indicate that increased N2 fixation at pod formation is connected with strongly increased nodule CO2 fixation. While the sugar concentration in nodules at pod formation was not altered, the concentration of organic acids, namely malate and succinate, was significantly lower. It is concluded that strategies to improve the capability of nodules to fix CO2 and form organic acids might prolong intensive N2 fixation into the later stages of pod formation and pod filling in grain legumes. PMID:20363863

  11. Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation and the Challenges to Its Extension to Nonlegumes

    PubMed Central

    Mus, Florence; Crook, Matthew B.; Garcia, Kevin; Garcia Costas, Amaya; Geddes, Barney A.; Kouri, Evangelia D.; Paramasivan, Ponraj; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Oldroyd, Giles E. D.; Poole, Philip S.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Access to fixed or available forms of nitrogen limits the productivity of crop plants and thus food production. Nitrogenous fertilizer production currently represents a significant expense for the efficient growth of various crops in the developed world. There are significant potential gains to be had from reducing dependence on nitrogenous fertilizers in agriculture in the developed world and in developing countries, and there is significant interest in research on biological nitrogen fixation and prospects for increasing its importance in an agricultural setting. Biological nitrogen fixation is the conversion of atmospheric N2 to NH3, a form that can be used by plants. However, the process is restricted to bacteria and archaea and does not occur in eukaryotes. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is part of a mutualistic relationship in which plants provide a niche and fixed carbon to bacteria in exchange for fixed nitrogen. This process is restricted mainly to legumes in agricultural systems, and there is considerable interest in exploring whether similar symbioses can be developed in nonlegumes, which produce the bulk of human food. We are at a juncture at which the fundamental understanding of biological nitrogen fixation has matured to a level that we can think about engineering symbiotic relationships using synthetic biology approaches. This minireview highlights the fundamental advances in our understanding of biological nitrogen fixation in the context of a blueprint for expanding symbiotic nitrogen fixation to a greater diversity of crop plants through synthetic biology. PMID:27084023

  12. Role of boron nutrient in nodules growth and nitrogen fixation rates in soybean genotypes under water stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although boron has a stimulatory effect on nodule growth and nitrogen fixation, mechanisms of how boron affects nodules growth and nitrogen fixation, especially under water stress, are still unknown. The stimulatory effect of boron (B) on nodules and nitrogen fixation (NF) is influenced by biotic (s...

  13. Irreversibly increased nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium experimentally adapted to elevated carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, David A.; Walworth, Nathan G.; Webb, Eric A.; Saito, Mak A.; Moran, Dawn; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Gale, Jasmine; Fu, Fei-Xue

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen fixation rates of the globally distributed, biogeochemically important marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium increase under high carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in short-term studies due to physiological plasticity. However, its long-term adaptive responses to ongoing anthropogenic CO2 increases are unknown. Here we show that experimental evolution under extended selection at projected future elevated CO2 levels results in irreversible, large increases in nitrogen fixation and growth rates, even after being moved back to lower present day CO2 levels for hundreds of generations. This represents an unprecedented microbial evolutionary response, as reproductive fitness increases acquired in the selection environment are maintained after returning to the ancestral environment. Constitutive rate increases are accompanied by irreversible shifts in diel nitrogen fixation patterns, and increased activity of a potentially regulatory DNA methyltransferase enzyme. High CO2-selected cell lines also exhibit increased phosphorus-limited growth rates, suggesting a potential advantage for this keystone organism in a more nutrient-limited, acidified future ocean.

  14. Irreversibly increased nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium experimentally adapted to elevated carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, David A.; Walworth, Nathan G.; Webb, Eric A.; Saito, Mak A.; Moran, Dawn; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Gale, Jasmine; Fu, Fei-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation rates of the globally distributed, biogeochemically important marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium increase under high carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in short-term studies due to physiological plasticity. However, its long-term adaptive responses to ongoing anthropogenic CO2 increases are unknown. Here we show that experimental evolution under extended selection at projected future elevated CO2 levels results in irreversible, large increases in nitrogen fixation and growth rates, even after being moved back to lower present day CO2 levels for hundreds of generations. This represents an unprecedented microbial evolutionary response, as reproductive fitness increases acquired in the selection environment are maintained after returning to the ancestral environment. Constitutive rate increases are accompanied by irreversible shifts in diel nitrogen fixation patterns, and increased activity of a potentially regulatory DNA methyltransferase enzyme. High CO2-selected cell lines also exhibit increased phosphorus-limited growth rates, suggesting a potential advantage for this keystone organism in a more nutrient-limited, acidified future ocean. PMID:26327191

  15. The significance of nitrogen fixation to new production during early summer in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendieck, U.; Gundersen, K.; Meyerhöfer, M.; Fritsche, P.; Nachtigall, K.; Bergmann, B.

    2006-08-01

    Rates of dinitrogen (N2) fixation and primary production were measured during two 9 day transect cruises in the Baltic proper in June-July of 1998 and 1999. Assuming that the early phase of the bloom of cyanobacteria lasted a month, total rates of N2 fixation contributed 15 mmol N m-2 (1998) and 33 mmol N m-2 (1999) to new production (sensu Dugdale and Goering, 1967). This constitutes 12-26% more new N than other annual estimates (mid July-mid October) from the same region. The between-station variability observed in both total N2 fixation and primary productivity greatly emphasize the need for multiple stations and seasonal sampling strategies in biochemical studies of the Baltic Sea. The majority of new N from N2 fixation was contributed by filamentous cyanobacteria. On average, cyanobacterial cells >20 µm were able to supply a major part of their N requirements for growth by N2 fixation in both 1998 (73%) and 1999 (81%). The between-station variability was high however, and ranged from 28-150% of N needed to meet the rate of C incorporation by primary production. Since the molar C:N rate incorporation ratio (C:NRATE) in filamentous cyanobacterial cells was almost twice as high as the molar C:N mass ratio (C:NMASS) in both years, we suggest that the diazotrophs incorporated excess C on a short term basis (for carbohydrate ballasting and buoyancy regulation), released nitrogen or utilized other regenerated sources of N nutrients. Measured rates of total N2 fixation contributed only a minor fraction of 13% (range 4-24) in 1998 and 18% (range 2-45) in 1999 to the amount of N needed for the community primary production. An average of 9 and 15% of total N2 fixation was found in cells <5 µm. Since cells <5 µm did not show any detectable rates of N2 fixation, the 15N-enrichment could be attributed to regenerated incorporation of dissolved organic N (DON) and ammonium generated from larger diazotroph cyanobacteria. Therefore, N excretion from filamentous cyanobacteria

  16. Microgravity Effects on the Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael

    2012-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species for th legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early biomolecular events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFU's).

  17. Regulation of Development and Nitrogen Fixation in Anabaena

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Golden

    2008-10-17

    The regulation of development and cellular differentiation is important for all multicellular organisms. The nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena (also Nostoc) sp. PCC 7120 (hereafter Anabaena) provides a model of multicellular microbial development and pattern formation. Anabaena reduces N2 to ammonia in specialized terminally differentiated cells called heterocysts. A one-dimensional developmental pattern of single heterocysts regularly spaced along filaments of photosynthetic vegetative cells is established to form a multicellular organism composed of these two interdependent cell types. This multicellular growth pattern, the distinct phylogeny of cyanobacteria, and the suspected antiquity of heterocyst development make this an important model system. Our long-term goal is to understand the regulatory network required for heterocyst development and nitrogen fixation. This project is focused on two key aspects of heterocyst regulation: one, the mechanism by which HetR controls the initiation of differentiation, and two, the cis and trans acting factors required for expression of the nitrogen-fixation (nif) genes. HetR is thought to be a central regulator of heterocyst development but the partners and mechanisms involved in this regulation are unknown. Our recent results indicate that PatS and other signals that regulate heterocyst pattern cannot interact, directly or indirectly, with a R223W mutant of HetR. We plan to use biochemical and genetic approaches to identify proteins that interact with the HetR protein, which will help reveal the mechanisms underlying its regulation of development. Our second goal is to determine how the nif genes are expressed. It is important to understand the mechanisms controlling nif genes since they represent the culmination of the differentiation process and the essence of heterocyst function. The Anabaena genome lacks the genes required for expression of nif genes present in other organisms such as rpoN (sigma 54

  18. Accounting for nitrogen fixation in simple models of lake nitrogen loading/export.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaodan; Schellenger, Frank; Hellweger, Ferdi L

    2014-05-20

    Coastal eutrophication, an important global environmental problem, is primarily caused by excess nitrogen and management efforts consequently focus on lowering watershed N export (e.g., by reducing fertilizer use). Simple quantitative models are needed to evaluate alternative scenarios at the watershed scale. Existing models generally assume that, for a specific lake/reservoir, a constant fraction of N loading is exported downstream. However, N fixation by cyanobacteria may increase when the N loading is reduced, which may change the (effective) fraction of N exported. Here we present a model that incorporates this process. The model (Fixation and Export of Nitrogen from Lakes, FENL) is based on a steady-state mass balance with loading, output, loss/retention, and N fixation, where the amount fixed is a function of the N/P ratio of the loading (i.e., when N/P is less than a threshold value, N is fixed). Three approaches are used to parametrize and evaluate the model, including microcosm lab experiments, lake field observations/budgets and lake ecosystem model applications. Our results suggest that N export will not be reduced proportionally with N loading, which needs to be considered when evaluating management scenarios.

  19. N-nitrosamines formation from secondary amines by nitrogen fixation on the surface of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Padhye, Lokesh P; Hertzberg, Benjamin; Yushin, Gleb; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2011-10-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that many commercial activated carbon (AC) particles may catalyze transformation of secondary amines to yield trace levels of N-nitrosamines under ambient aerobic conditions. Because of the widespread usage of AC materials in numerous analytical and environmental applications, it is imperative to understand the reaction mechanism responsible for formation of nitrosamine on the surface of ACs to minimize their occurrence in water treatment systems and during analytical methods employing ACs. The study results show that the AC-catalyzed nitrosamine formation requires both atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen. AC's surface reactive sites react with molecular oxygen to form reactive oxygen species (ROS), which facilitate fixation of molecular nitrogen on the carbon surfaces to generate reactive nitrogen species (RNS) likely nitrous oxide and hydroxylamine that can react with adsorbed amines to form nitrosamines. AC's properties play a crucial role as more nitrosamine formation is associated with carbon surfaces with higher surface area, more surface defects, reduced surface properties, higher O(2) uptake capacity, and higher carbonyl group content. This study is a first of its kind on the nitrosamine formation mechanism involving nitrogen fixation on AC surfaces, and the information will be useful for minimization of nitrosamines in AC-based processes.

  20. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in an arid ecosystem measured by sup 15 N natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.V. )

    1990-05-01

    Plants dependent on nitrogen fixation have an {sup 15}N abundance similar to the atmosphere, while non-nitrogen fixing plants usually are enriched in {sup 15}N and are similar to soil nitrogen values. The natural abundance of {sup 15}N in leaf tissues and soils was determined to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation by several legumes and actinorhizal species in the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research area in central New Mexico. Comparison of {delta}{sup 15}N values for the legume Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) to adjacent Atriplex canascens (fourwing saltbush) indicated that P. glandulosa obtained 66% of its nitrogen by fixation. The legume Hoffmanseggia jamesii was found to be utilizing soil nitrogen. The {delta}{sup 15}N values for the actinorhizal plants, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Cercocarpus montanus, while below values for soil nitrogen, did not differ from associated non-fixing plants.

  1. Chemosynthetic symbionts of marine invertebrate animals are capable of nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jillian M; Kemper, Anna; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald; Cardini, Ulisse; van der Geest, Matthijs; Kleiner, Manuel; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Mußmann, Marc; Herbold, Craig; Seah, Brandon K B; Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Liu, Dan; Belitz, Alexandra; Weber, Miriam

    2016-10-24

    Chemosynthetic symbioses are partnerships between invertebrate animals and chemosynthetic bacteria. The latter are the primary producers, providing most of the organic carbon needed for the animal host's nutrition. We sequenced genomes of the chemosynthetic symbionts from the lucinid bivalve Loripes lucinalis and the stilbonematid nematode Laxus oneistus. The symbionts of both host species encoded nitrogen fixation genes. This is remarkable as no marine chemosynthetic symbiont was previously known to be capable of nitrogen fixation. We detected nitrogenase expression by the symbionts of lucinid clams at the transcriptomic and proteomic level. Mean stable nitrogen isotope values of Loripes lucinalis were within the range expected for fixed atmospheric nitrogen, further suggesting active nitrogen fixation by the symbionts. The ability to fix nitrogen may be widespread among chemosynthetic symbioses in oligotrophic habitats, where nitrogen availability often limits primary productivity.

  2. Understanding the Red Sea nutrient cycle - a first look into nitrogen fixation in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Roslinda; Arrieta, Jesus; Alam, Intikhab; Duarte, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The Red Sea is an elongated and semi-enclosed system bordered by Africa and Saudi Arabia. Positioned in an arid, tropical zone, the system receives high solar irradiance and heat flux, extensive evaporation, low rainfall and therefore high salinity. These harsh environmental conditions has set the Red Sea to be one of the fastest warming and saltiest ecosystem in the world. Although nutrients are known to be at very low concentrations, the ultimately limiting nutrient in the system is still undefined. Therefore, like most other oligotrophic systems, we regard the Red Sea as being nitrogen-limited and we foresee nitrogen fixation as the most probable bottleneck in the Red Sea nitrogen budget. On the basis of metagenomes from pelagic microbial communities along the Red Sea, we looked into the distribution of nitrogenase, an enzyme involved in nitrogen fixation, in this system and provide a first insight into the microbial community that is involved in the process. The implications of this study will not only help improve our understanding of the Red Sea nutrient regime, but may also hint on future ocean responses to rising climates.

  3. Genome Evolution and Nitrogen Fixation in Bacterial Ectosymbionts of a Protist Inhabiting Wood-Feeding Cockroaches

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Kevin J.; Weber, Peter K.; Nalepa, Christine A.; Perlman, Steve J.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By combining genomics and isotope imaging analysis using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), we examined the function and evolution of Bacteroidales ectosymbionts of the protist Barbulanympha from the hindguts of the wood-eating cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus. In particular, we investigated the structure of ectosymbiont genomes, which, in contrast to those of endosymbionts, has been little studied to date, and tested the hypothesis that these ectosymbionts fix nitrogen. Unlike with most obligate endosymbionts, genome reduction has not played a major role in the evolution of the Barbulanympha ectosymbionts. Instead, interaction with the external environment has remained important for this symbiont as genes for synthesis of transporters, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharides, and lipoproteins have been retained. The ectosymbiont genome carried two complete operons for nitrogen fixation, a urea transporter, and a urease, indicating the availability of nitrogen as a driving force behind the symbiosis. NanoSIMS analysis of C. punctulatus hindgut symbionts exposed in vivo to 15N2 supports the hypothesis that Barbulanympha ectosymbionts are capable of nitrogen fixation. This genomic and in vivo functional investigation of protist ectosymbionts highlights the diversity of evolutionary forces and trajectories that shape symbiotic interactions. IMPORTANCE The ecological and evolutionary importance of symbioses is increasingly clear, but the overall diversity of symbiotic interactions remains poorly explored. In this study, we investigated the evolution and nitrogen fixation capabilities of ectosymbionts attached to the protist Barbulanympha from the hindgut of the wood-eating cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus. In addressing genome evolution of protist ectosymbionts, our data suggest that the ecological pressures influencing the evolution of extracellular symbionts clearly differ from intracellular symbionts and organelles. Using

  4. Genome evolution and nitrogen fixation in bacterial ectosymbionts of a protist inhabiting wood-feeding cockroaches

    DOE PAGES

    Tai, Vera; Carpenter, Kevin J.; Weber, Peter K.; ...

    2016-05-27

    By combining genomics and isotope imaging analysis using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), we examined the function and evolution of Bacteroidales ectosymbionts of the protistBarbulanymphafrom the hindguts of the wood-eating cockroachCryptocercus punctulatus. In particular, we investigated the structure of ectosymbiont genomes, which, in contrast to those of endosymbionts, has been little studied to date, and tested the hypothesis that these ectosymbionts fix nitrogen. Unlike with most obligate endosymbionts, genome reduction has not played a major role in the evolution of the Barbulanympha ectosymbionts. Instead, interaction with the external environment has remained important for this symbiont as genes for synthesismore » of transporters, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharides, and lipoproteins have been retained. The ectosymbiont genome carried two complete operons for nitrogen fixation, a urea transporter, and a urease, indicating the availability of nitrogen as a driving force behind the symbiosis. NanoSIMS analysis ofC. punctulatushindgut symbionts exposedin vivoto15N2 supports the hypothesis thatBarbulanymphaectosymbionts are capable of nitrogen fixation. This genomic andin vivofunctional investigation of protist ectosymbionts highlights the diversity of evolutionary forces and trajectories that shape symbiotic interactions. The ecological and evolutionary importance of symbioses is increasingly clear, but the overall diversity of symbiotic interactions remains poorly explored. Here in this study, we investigated the evolution and nitrogen fixation capabilities of ectosymbionts attached to the protist Barbulanympha from the hindgut of the wood-eating cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus. In addressing genome evolution of protist ectosymbionts, our data suggest that the ecological pressures influencing the evolution of extracellular symbionts clearly differ from intracellular symbionts and organelles. Using NanoSIMS analysis

  5. Genome evolution and nitrogen fixation in bacterial ectosymbionts of a protist inhabiting wood-feeding cockroaches

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Vera; Carpenter, Kevin J.; Weber, Peter K.; Nalepa, Christine A.; Perlman, Steve J.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2016-05-27

    By combining genomics and isotope imaging analysis using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), we examined the function and evolution of Bacteroidales ectosymbionts of the protistBarbulanymphafrom the hindguts of the wood-eating cockroachCryptocercus punctulatus. In particular, we investigated the structure of ectosymbiont genomes, which, in contrast to those of endosymbionts, has been little studied to date, and tested the hypothesis that these ectosymbionts fix nitrogen. Unlike with most obligate endosymbionts, genome reduction has not played a major role in the evolution of the Barbulanympha ectosymbionts. Instead, interaction with the external environment has remained important for this symbiont as genes for synthesis of transporters, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharides, and lipoproteins have been retained. The ectosymbiont genome carried two complete operons for nitrogen fixation, a urea transporter, and a urease, indicating the availability of nitrogen as a driving force behind the symbiosis. NanoSIMS analysis ofC. punctulatushindgut symbionts exposedin vivoto15N2 supports the hypothesis thatBarbulanymphaectosymbionts are capable of nitrogen fixation. This genomic andin vivofunctional investigation of protist ectosymbionts highlights the diversity of evolutionary forces and trajectories that shape symbiotic interactions. The ecological and evolutionary importance of symbioses is increasingly clear, but the overall diversity of symbiotic interactions remains poorly explored. Here in this study, we investigated the

  6. Rhizobium japonicum mutants defective in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Stacey, G; Tandon, S R; Silver, L E; Brill, W J

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum strains 3I1b110 and 61A76 were mutagenized to obtain 25 independently derived mutants that produced soybean nodules defective in nitrogen fixation, as assayed by acetylene reduction. The proteins of both the bacterial and the plant portions of the nodules were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All of the mutants had lower-than-normal levels of the nitrogenase components, and all but four contained a prominent bacteroid protein not observed in wild-type bacteroids. Experiments with bacteria grown ex planta suggested that this protein was derepressed by the absence of ammonia. Nitrogenase component II of one mutant was altered in isoelectric point. The soluble plant fraction of the nodules of seven mutants had very low levels of heme, yet the nodules of five of these seven mutants contained the polypeptide of leghemoglobin. Thus, the synthesis of the globin may not be coupled to the content of available heme in soybean nodules. The nodules of the other two of these seven mutants lacked not only leghemoglobin but most of the other normal plant and bacteroid proteins. Ultrastructural examination of nodules formed by these two mutants indicated normal ramification of infection threads but suggested a problem in subsequent survival of the bacteria and their release from the infection threads. Images PMID:6956566

  7. Responses of soil nitrogen fixation to Spartina alterniflora invasion and nitrogen addition in a Chinese salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingxin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Min; Nie, Ming; Qiu, Shiyun; Wang, Qing; Quan, Zhexue; Xiao, Ming; Li, Bo

    2016-02-12

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the major natural process of nitrogen (N) input to ecosystems. To understand how plant invasion and N enrichment affect BNF, we compared soil N-fixation rates and N-fixing microbes (NFM) of an invasive Spartina alterniflora community and a native Phragmites australis community in the Yangtze River estuary, with and without N addition. Our results indicated that plant invasion relative to N enrichment had a greater influence on BNF. At each N level, the S. alterniflora community had a higher soil N-fixation rate but a lower diversity of the nifH gene in comparison with the native community. The S. alterniflora community with N addition had the highest soil N-fixation rate and the nifH gene abundance across all treatments. Our results suggest that S. alterniflora invasion can increase soil N fixation in the high N-loading estuarine ecosystem, and thus may further mediate soil N availability.

  8. Responses of soil nitrogen fixation to Spartina alterniflora invasion and nitrogen addition in a Chinese salt marsh

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingxin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Min; Nie, Ming; Qiu, Shiyun; Wang, Qing; Quan, Zhexue; Xiao, Ming; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the major natural process of nitrogen (N) input to ecosystems. To understand how plant invasion and N enrichment affect BNF, we compared soil N-fixation rates and N-fixing microbes (NFM) of an invasive Spartina alterniflora community and a native Phragmites australis community in the Yangtze River estuary, with and without N addition. Our results indicated that plant invasion relative to N enrichment had a greater influence on BNF. At each N level, the S. alterniflora community had a higher soil N-fixation rate but a lower diversity of the nifH gene in comparison with the native community. The S. alterniflora community with N addition had the highest soil N-fixation rate and the nifH gene abundance across all treatments. Our results suggest that S. alterniflora invasion can increase soil N fixation in the high N-loading estuarine ecosystem, and thus may further mediate soil N availability. PMID:26869197

  9. Effect of dissolved oxygen on nitrogen fixation by A. vinelandii. II. Ionically adsorbed cells.

    PubMed

    Diluccio, R C; Kirwan, D J

    1984-01-01

    Continuous culture studies of Azotobacter vinelandii cells immobilized by ionic adsorption to Cellex E anion exchange resin were conducted under oxygen-limited conditions for comparison to free-cell cultures. Immobilization had little effect upon the specific respiration and sucrose consumption rates as compared to free cells. However, maxima in specific nitrogen fixation rate and nitrogenase activity as a function of dissolved oxygen occurred at a C(O(2) ) value of approximately 0.005 mM as opposed to 0.02 mM for free cells. Further, in contrast to free-cell culture, most of the fixed nitrogen appeared in the medium rather than within intact cells. There were strong indications that reproduction of bound cells often resulted in cell lysis accounting for the fixed nitrogen content in solution.

  10. Effects of drought on characters related to nitrogen fixation in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve peanut genotypes were tested under three water regimes in two greenhouses to investigate the effects of drought on biomass production and N2 fixation. Drought reduced biomass production from 36.5 to 56.0% and reduced nitrogen fixation from 26.8 to 68.8%. Most genotypes with high biomass produ...

  11. Molybdenum and phosphorus interact to constrain asymbiotic nitrogen fixation in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Wurzburger, Nina; Bellenger, Jean Philippe; Kraepiel, Anne M L; Hedin, Lars O

    2012-01-01

    Biological di-nitrogen fixation (N(2)) is the dominant natural source of new nitrogen to land ecosystems. Phosphorus (P) is thought to limit N(2) fixation in many tropical soils, yet both molybdenum (Mo) and P are crucial for the nitrogenase reaction (which catalyzes N(2) conversion to ammonia) and cell growth. We have limited understanding of how and when fixation is constrained by these nutrients in nature. Here we show in tropical forests of lowland Panama that the limiting element on asymbiotic N(2) fixation shifts along a broad landscape gradient in soil P, where Mo limits fixation in P-rich soils while Mo and P co-limit in P-poor soils. In no circumstance did P alone limit fixation. We provide and experimentally test a mechanism that explains how Mo and P can interact to constrain asymbiotic N(2) fixation. Fixation is uniformly favored in surface organic soil horizons--a niche characterized by exceedingly low levels of available Mo relative to P. We show that soil organic matter acts to reduce molybdate over phosphate bioavailability, which, in turn, promotes Mo limitation in sites where P is sufficient. Our findings show that asymbiotic N(2) fixation is constrained by the relative availability and dynamics of Mo and P in soils. This conceptual framework can explain shifts in limitation status across broad landscape gradients in soil fertility and implies that fixation depends on Mo and P in ways that are more complex than previously thought.

  12. Probing the evolution of biological nitrogen fixation by examining phylogenetic relationships of nitrogen fixation genes related by gene duplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J.; Boyd, E. S.; Hamilton, T.

    2011-12-01

    Mounting evidence indicates the presence of a near complete biological nitrogen cycle in redox stratified oceans during the late Archean to early Proterozoic (~2.5 to 2.0 Ga). It has been suggested that the iron (Fe)-only or vanadium (V)-dependent alternative forms of nitrogenase rather than molybdenum (Mo)-dependent form was responsible for dinitrogen (N2) fixation during this time because oceans were depleted in Mo and rich in Fe. However, the only extant nitrogen fixing organisms that harbor alternative nitrogenases also harbor a Mo-dependent nitrogenase. Furthermore, our recent global gene expression analysis revealed that the alternative enzymes rely on genes encoding biosynthetic machinery to assemble active enzymes that are associated with the Mo-dependent nitrogenase. In our recent work we conducted an in-depth phylogenetic analysis of the proteins required for molybdenum (Mo)-nitrogenase that arose from gene fusion and duplication, expanding on previous analyses of single gene loci and multiple gene loci. The results of this analysis are highly suggestive that Mo-nitrogenase is unlikely to have been associated with the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Rather, the oldest extant organisms harboring Mo-nitrogenase can be traced to hydrogenotrophic methanogens with acquisition in the bacterial domain via lateral gene transfer involving an anaerobic member of the Firmicutes. An origin and ensuing proliferation of Mo-nitrogenase under anoxic conditions would likely have occurred in an environment where anaerobic methanogens and Firmicutes coexisted and where Mo was at least episodically available, such as in a redox stratified Proterozoic ocean basin. In more recent work we have examined the hypothesis that the alternative forms predate the Mo-dependent nitrogenase by examining the phylogenetic relationships of the genetically distinct structural proteins of the Fe-only, V-, and Mo-nitrogenase that are required for activity. As a result, a clear and

  13. Bd oxidase homologue of photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum is co-transcribed with a nitrogen fixation related gene.

    PubMed

    Dincturk, H Benan; Demir, Volkan; Aykanat, Tutku

    2011-02-01

    Purple sulfur bacteria, which are known to be the most ancient among anoxygenic phototrophs, play an important role in the global sulfur cycle. Allochromatium vinosum oxidizes reduced sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide, elemental sulfur and thiosulfide. At low oxygen concentrations, A. vinosum can grow chemotrophically using oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. Being also a nitrogen fixer, A. vinosum is faced with the paradox of co-existence of aerobic metabolism and nitrogen fixation. Due to growth difficulties, only a few studies have dealt with the aerobic metabolism of the organism and, until now, there has been no information about the genes involved in the respiratory metabolism of purple sulfur bacteria. In this article we show the first terminal oxidase gene for A. vinosum. The presence of a Bd type of quinol oxidase is necessary to protect nitrogenases against the inhibitory effects of oxygen. In this case, a nitrogen fixation related gene is part of the cyd operon and this gene is co-transcribed with cydAB genes. Bd oxidase of A. vinosum may be the earliest form of oxidase where the function of the enzyme is to scavenge the contaminant oxygen during nitrogen fixation. This may be an important clue about the early evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, perhaps as a protective mechanism for nitrogen fixation.

  14. Genetic regulation of nitrogen fixation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Cebolla, A; Palomares, A J

    1994-12-01

    The soil bacterium Rhizobium meliloti fixes dinitrogen when associated with root nodules formed on its plant host, Medicago sativa (alfalfa). The expression of most of the known genes required for nitrogen fixation (nif and fix genes), including the structural genes for nitrogenase, is induced in response to a decrease in oxygen concentration. Induction of nif and fix gene expression by low oxygen is physiologically relevant because a low-oxygen environment is maintained in root nodules to prevent inactivation of the highly oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase enzyme. The genes responsible for sensing and transducing the low oxygen signal, fixL and fixJ, encode proteins (FixL and FixJ, respectively) that are homologous to a large family of bacterial proteins involved in signal transduction, the two component regulatory system proteins. The two components consist of a sensor protein, to which FixL is homologous, and a response regulator protein, to which FixJ is homologous. The sensor protein respond to an activating signal by autophosphorylating and then transferring the phosphate to its cognate response regulator protein. The phosphorylated response regulator, which is often a transcriptional activator, is then able to activate its target. A cascade model of nif and fix gene regulation in R. meliloti has been proposed, whereby FixL acts as an oxygen sensor as the initial event in the cascade and transmits this information to FixJ. FixJ, which possesses a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif, then activates transcription of the nifA and fixK genes. The nifA and fixK gene products, are transcriptional activators of at least 14 other nif and fix genes.

  15. Refactoring the nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Klebsiella oxytoca.

    PubMed

    Temme, Karsten; Zhao, Dehua; Voigt, Christopher A

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial genes associated with a single trait are often grouped in a contiguous unit of the genome known as a gene cluster. It is difficult to genetically manipulate many gene clusters because of complex, redundant, and integrated host regulation. We have developed a systematic approach to completely specify the genetics of a gene cluster by rebuilding it from the bottom up using only synthetic, well-characterized parts. This process removes all native regulation, including that which is undiscovered. First, all noncoding DNA, regulatory proteins, and nonessential genes are removed. The codons of essential genes are changed to create a DNA sequence as divergent as possible from the wild-type (WT) gene. Recoded genes are computationally scanned to eliminate internal regulation. They are organized into operons and placed under the control of synthetic parts (promoters, ribosome binding sites, and terminators) that are functionally separated by spacer parts. Finally, a controller consisting of genetic sensors and circuits regulates the conditions and dynamics of gene expression. We applied this approach to an agriculturally relevant gene cluster from Klebsiella oxytoca encoding the nitrogen fixation pathway for converting atmospheric N(2) to ammonia. The native gene cluster consists of 20 genes in seven operons and is encoded in 23.5 kb of DNA. We constructed a "refactored" gene cluster that shares little DNA sequence identity with WT and for which the function of every genetic part is defined. This work demonstrates the potential for synthetic biology tools to rewrite the genetics encoding complex biological functions to facilitate access, engineering, and transferability.

  16. Inferring the evolutionary history of Mo-dependent nitrogen fixation from phylogenetic studies of nifK and nifDK.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Linda S; Barnum, Susan R

    2010-07-01

    The ability to fix nitrogen is widely, but sporadically distributed among the Bacteria and Archaea suggesting either a vertically inherited, ancient function with widespread loss across genera or an adaptive feature transferred laterally between co-inhabitants of nitrogen-poor environments. As previous phylogenetic studies of nifH and nifD have not completely resolved the evolutionary history of nitrogenase, sixty nifD, nifK, and combined nifDK genes were analyzed using Bayesian, maximum likelihood, and parsimony algorithms to determine whether the individual and combined datasets could provide additional information. The results show congruence between the 16S and nifDK phylogenies at the phyla level and generally support vertical descent with loss. However, statistically significant differences between tree topographies suggest a complex evolutionary history with the underlying pattern of vertical descent obscured by recurring lateral transfer events and different patterns of evolution between the genes. Results support inheritance from the Last Common ancestor or an ancient lateral transfer of the nif genes between Bacteria and Archaea, ongoing gene transfer between cohabitants of similar biogeographic regions, acquisition of nitrogen-fixing capability via symbiosis islands, possible xenologous displacement of one gene in the operon, and possible retention of ancestral genes in heterocystous cyanobacteria. Analyses support the monophyly of the Cyanobacteria, alphabetagamma-Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria (Frankia) and provide strong support for the placement of Frankia nif genes at the base of combined the Cyanobacteria/Proteobacteria clades.

  17. Identification and characterization of a novel Bradyrhizobium japonicum gene involved in host-specific nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Chun, J Y; Sexton, G L; Roth, L E; Stacey, G

    1994-01-01

    To understand the genetic mechanism of host specificity in the interaction between rhizobia and their hosts, it is important to identify genes that influence both early and late steps in symbiotic development. This paper focuses on the little-understood genetics of host-specific nitrogen fixation. A deletion mutant of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, strain NAD163, was found to induce effective, nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybean and siratro plants but produced ineffective nodules on cowpea plants. Additional transposon and deletion mutants defined a small region that conferred this phenotype, and this region was sequenced to identify two putative open reading frames (ORFs). Data indicate that only one of these ORFs is detectable in bacteroids. This ORF was termed hsfA, with a predicted protein product of 11 kDa. The transcriptional start site of hsfA was determined and found to coincide with a predicted RpoN-dependent promoter. Microscopic studies of nodules induced by the wild type and hsfA mutants on cowpea and soybean plants indicate that the cowpea mutant nodules are slow to develop. The data indicate that hsfA appears to play a crucial role in bacteroid development on cowpea but does not appear to be essential for nitrogen fixation on the other hosts tested. Images PMID:7961425

  18. Influence of Co and B12 on the growth and nitrogen fixation of Trichodesmium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Irene B.; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of varying cobalt (Co) and B12 concentrations to growth and nitrogen fixation of Trichodesmium, a major diazotroph in the tropical and subtropical oligotrophic ocean. Here we show that sufficient inorganic Co, 20 pmol L-1, sustains the growth of Trichodesmium either with or without an additional B12 supply. We also found that in these culture conditions, nitrogen levels fixed by Trichodesmium were higher in treatments with insufficient B12 than in treatments with higher B12 availability. Under limited inorganic Co availability, ranging from 0.2 to 2 pmol L-1, Trichodesmium growth was significantly compromised in cultures without B12. In these low Co concentrations, addition of 400 pmol L-1 of B12 supported phytoplankton growth indicating that B12 supply augmented for the low Co concentrations. Our study demonstrates that Trichodesmium has an absolute Co requirement, which is not replaceable with Zn, and that B12 supply alleviates stress in cases where Co is limiting. These results show that the interlocking availabilities of Co and B12 may influence the growth and nitrogen fixation of Trichodesmium in the ocean. PMID:26150813

  19. Stimulation of nitrogen fixation in soddy-podzolic soils with fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakov, A. V.; Prokhorov, I. S.; Kostina, N. V.; Makhova, E. G.; Sadykova, V. S.

    2006-09-01

    Stimulation of nitrogen fixation in soddy-podzolic soils is related to the hydrolytic activity of fungi decomposing plant polymers. It was found that the rate of nitrogen fixation upon the simultaneous inoculation of the strains of nitrogen-fixing bacteria Bacillus cereus var. mycoides and the cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma asperellum into a sterile soil enriched with cellulose or Jerusalem artichoke residues is two to four times higher than upon the inoculation of the strains of Bacillus cereus var. mycoides L1 only. The increase in the nitrogen fixation depended on the resistance of the substrates added into the soil to fungal hydrolysis. The biomass of the fungi decomposing plant polymers increased by two-four times. The nitrogen-fixing activity of the soil decreased when the growth of the fungi was inhibited with cycloheximide, which attested to a close correlation between the intensity of the nitrogen fixation and the decomposition of the plant polymers by fungi. The introduction of an antifungal antibiotic, together with starch or with plant residues, significantly (by 60-90%) decreased the rate of nitrogen fixation in the soll.

  20. Nitrogen Fixation by Gliding Arc Plasma: Better Insight by Chemical Kinetics Modelling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizong; Patil, Bhaskar; Heijkers, Stjin; Hessel, Volker; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-03-08

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen into valuable compounds, that is, so-called nitrogen fixation, is gaining increased interest, owing to the essential role in the nitrogen cycle of the biosphere. Plasma technology, and more specifically gliding arc plasma, has great potential in this area, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, we developed a detailed chemical kinetics model for a pulsed-power gliding-arc reactor operating at atmospheric pressure for nitrogen oxide synthesis. Experiments are performed to validate the model and reasonable agreement is reached between the calculated and measured NO and NO2 yields and the corresponding energy efficiency for NOx formation for different N2 /O2 ratios, indicating that the model can provide a realistic picture of the plasma chemistry. Therefore, we can use the model to investigate the reaction pathways for the formation and loss of NOx . The results indicate that vibrational excitation of N2 in the gliding arc contributes significantly to activating the N2 molecules, and leads to an energy efficient way of NOx production, compared to the thermal process. Based on the underlying chemistry, the model allows us to propose solutions on how to further improve the NOx formation by gliding arc technology. Although the energy efficiency of the gliding-arc-based nitrogen fixation process at the present stage is not comparable to the world-scale Haber-Bosch process, we believe our study helps us to come up with more realistic scenarios of entering a cutting-edge innovation in new business cases for the decentralised production of fertilisers for agriculture, in which low-temperature plasma technology might play an important role.

  1. Regional and national significance of biological nitrogen fixation by crops in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Questions/Methods Biological nitrogen fixation by crops (C-BNF) represents one of the largest anthropogenic inputs of reactive nitrogen (N) to land surfaces around the world. In the United States (US), existing estimates of C-BNF are uncertain because of incomplete o...

  2. A minimal nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 enables expression of active nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liying; Zhang, Lihong; Liu, Zhanzhi; Liu, Zhangzhi; Zhao, Dehua; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Jianbo; Hong, Yuanyuan; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Sanfeng; Dixon, Ray; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ(70) (σ(A))-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes.

  3. 15N discrimination and the sensitivity of nitrogen fixation to changes in dietary nitrogen in Reticulitermes flavipes (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Meuti, Megan E; Jones, Susan C; Curtis, Peter S

    2010-12-01

    Xylophagous termites possess symbiotic bacteria that fix atmospheric nitrogen (N(2)). Although symbiotic N(2) fixation is central to termite nutrition and ecologically important, it is energetically costly. Using stable isotopes, we tested the hypothesis that symbiotic N(2) fixation would decrease in workers of the eastern subterranean termite, Reticulitermes flavipes Kollar, which were exposed to high nitrogen diets. To calculate the isotope discrimination factor occurring as a result of digestion, Δ(dig), and which occurs as the result of N(2) fixation, Δ(fix), symbiotic N(2) fixation was inhibited via force feeding termites the antibiotic kanamycin. Antibiotic-treated termites and control (N(2)-fixing) termites were exposed to different concentrations of dietary N (0, 0.21, and 0.94% N), their (15)N signatures were obtained, and the percent nitrogen derived from the atmosphere within termite samples was calculated. As we hypothesized, symbiotic N(2) fixation rates were negatively correlated with dietary N, suggesting that high concentrations of dietary N suppressed symbiotic N(2) fixation in R. flavipes. A comparison of the (15)N isotope signatures of antibiotic-treated termites with their food sources demonstrated that Δ(dig) = 2.284‰, and a comparison of the (15)N isotope signatures of antibiotic-treated termites with control termites indicated that Δ(fix) = -1.238‰. These are the first estimates of Δ(dig) for R. flavipes, and the first estimate of Δ(fix) for any N(2)-fixing termite species.

  4. The Role of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Sustainable Production of Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Bandana; Gresshoff, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    With the ever-increasing population of the world (expected to reach 9.6 billion by 2050), and altered life style, comes an increased demand for food, fuel and fiber. However, scarcity of land, water and energy accompanied by climate change means that to produce enough to meet the demands is getting increasingly challenging. Today we must use every avenue from science and technology available to address these challenges. The natural process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, whereby plants such as legumes fix atmospheric nitrogen gas to ammonia, usable by plants can have a substantial impact as it is found in nature, has low environmental and economic costs and is broadly established. Here we look at the importance of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the production of biofuel feedstocks; how this process can address major challenges, how improving nitrogen fixation is essential, and what we can do about it. PMID:24786096

  5. Direct nitrogen fixation at the edges of graphene nanoplatelets as efficient electrocatalysts for energy conversion

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, In-Yup; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Ju, Myung Jong; Choi, In Taek; Lim, Kimin; Ko, Jaejung; Kim, Hwan Kyu; Kim, Jae Cheon; Lee, Jae-Joon; Shin, Dongbin; Jung, Sun-Min; Seo, Jeong-Min; Kim, Min-Jung; Park, Noejung; Dai, Liming; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation is essential for the synthesis of many important chemicals (e.g., fertilizers, explosives) and basic building blocks for all forms of life (e.g., nucleotides for DNA and RNA, amino acids for proteins). However, direct nitrogen fixation is challenging as nitrogen (N2) does not easily react with other chemicals. By dry ball-milling graphite with N2, we have discovered a simple, but versatile, scalable and eco-friendly, approach to direct fixation of N2 at the edges of graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs). The mechanochemical cracking of graphitic C−C bonds generated active carbon species that react directly with N2 to form five- and six-membered aromatic rings at the broken edges, leading to solution-processable edge-nitrogenated graphene nanoplatelets (NGnPs) with superb catalytic performance in both dye-sensitized solar cells and fuel cells to replace conventional Pt-based catalysts for energy conversion. PMID:23877200

  6. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the fungus gardens of leaf-cutter ants.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Tomás, Adrián A; Anderson, Mark A; Suen, Garret; Stevenson, David M; Chu, Fiona S T; Cleland, W Wallace; Weimer, Paul J; Currie, Cameron R

    2009-11-20

    Bacteria-mediated acquisition of atmospheric N2 serves as a critical source of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we reveal that symbiotic nitrogen fixation facilitates the cultivation of specialized fungal crops by leaf-cutter ants. By using acetylene reduction and stable isotope experiments, we demonstrated that N2 fixation occurred in the fungus gardens of eight leaf-cutter ant species and, further, that this fixed nitrogen was incorporated into ant biomass. Symbiotic N2-fixing bacteria were consistently isolated from the fungus gardens of 80 leaf-cutter ant colonies collected in Argentina, Costa Rica, and Panama. The discovery of N2 fixation within the leaf-cutter ant-microbe symbiosis reveals a previously unrecognized nitrogen source in neotropical ecosystems.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of denitrification and nitrogen fixation using isotope pairing with membrane inlet mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    An, S; Gardner, W S; Kana, T

    2001-03-01

    A method for estimating denitrification and nitrogen fixation simultaneously in coastal sediments was developed. An isotope-pairing technique was applied to dissolved gas measurements with a membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS). The relative fluxes of three N(2) gas species ((28)N(2), (29)N(2), and (30)N(2)) were monitored during incubation experiments after the addition of (15)NO(3)(-). Formulas were developed to estimate the production (denitrification) and consumption (N(2) fixation) of N(2) gas from the fluxes of the different isotopic forms of N(2). Proportions of the three isotopic forms produced from (15)NO(3)(-) and (14)NO(3)(-) agreed with expectations in a sediment slurry incubation experiment designed to optimize conditions for denitrification. Nitrogen fixation rates from an algal mat measured with intact sediment cores ranged from 32 to 390 microg-atoms of N m(-2) h(-1). They were enhanced by light and organic matter enrichment. In this environment of high nitrogen fixation, low N(2) production rates due to denitrification could be separated from high N(2) consumption rates due to nitrogen fixation. Denitrification and nitrogen fixation rates were estimated in April 2000 on sediments from a Texas sea grass bed (Laguna Madre). Denitrification rates (average, 20 microg-atoms of N m(-2) h(-1)) were lower than nitrogen fixation rates (average, 60 microg-atoms of N m(-2) h(-1)). The developed method benefits from simple and accurate dissolved-gas measurement by the MIMS system. By adding the N(2) isotope capability, it was possible to do isotope-pairing experiments with the MIMS system.

  8. The significance of nitrogen fixation to new production during early summer in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendieck, U.; Gundersen, K.; Meyerhöfer, M.; Fritsche, P.; Nachtigall, K.; Bergmann, B.

    2007-01-01

    Rates of dinitrogen (N2) fixation and primary production were measured during two 9 day transect cruises in the Baltic proper in June-July of 1998 and 1999. Assuming that the early phase of the bloom of cyanobacteria lasted a month, total rates of N2 fixation contributed 15 mmol N m-2 (1998) and 33 mmol N m-2 (1999) to new production (sensu Dugdale and Goering, 1967). This constitutes 12-26% more new N than other annual estimates (mid July-mid October) from the same region. The between-station variability observed in both total N2 fixation and primary productivity greatly emphasizes the need for multiple stations and seasonal sampling strategies in biogeochemical studies of the Baltic Sea. The majority of new N from N2 fixation was contributed by filamentous cyanobacteria. On average, cyanobacterial cells >20 µm were able to supply a major part of their N requirements for growth by N2 fixation in both 1998 (73%) and 1999 (81%). The between-station variability was high however, and ranged from 28-150% of N needed to meet the rate of C incorporation by primary production. The molar C:N rate incorporation ratio (C:NRATE) in filamentous cyanobacterial cells was variable (range 7-28) and the average almost twice as high as the Redfield ratio (6.6) in both years. Since the molar C:N mass ratio (C:NMASS) in filamentous cyanobacterial cells was generally lower than C:NRATE at a number of stations, we suggest that the diazotrophs incorporated excess C on a short term basis (carbohydrate ballasting and buoyancy regulation), released nitrogen or utilized other regenerated sources of N nutrients. Measured rates of total N2 fixation contributed only a minor fraction of 13% (range 4-24) in 1998 and 18% (range 2-45) in 1999 to the amount of N needed for the community primary production. An average of 9 and 15% of total N2 fixation was found in cells <5 µm. Since cells <5 µm did not show any detectable rates of N2 fixation, the 15N-enrichment could be attributed to regenerated

  9. Biological nitrogen fixation by alternative nitrogenases in boreal cyanolichens: importance of molybdenum availability and implications for current biological nitrogen fixation estimates.

    PubMed

    Darnajoux, Romain; Zhang, Xinning; McRose, Darcy L; Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Lutzoni, François; Kraepiel, Anne M L; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Cryptogamic species and their associated cyanobacteria have attracted the attention of biogeochemists because of their critical roles in the nitrogen cycle through symbiotic and asymbiotic biological fixation of nitrogen (BNF). BNF is mediated by the nitrogenase enzyme, which, in its most common form, requires molybdenum at its active site. Molybdenum has been reported as a limiting nutrient for BNF in many ecosystems, including tropical and temperate forests. Recent studies have suggested that alternative nitrogenases, which use vanadium or iron in place of molybdenum at their active site, might play a more prominent role in natural ecosystems than previously recognized. Here, we studied the occurrence of vanadium, the role of molybdenum availability on vanadium acquisition and the contribution of alternative nitrogenases to BNF in the ubiquitous cyanolichen Peltigera aphthosa s.l. We confirmed the use of the alternative vanadium-based nitrogenase in the Nostoc cyanobiont of these lichens and its substantial contribution to BNF in this organism. We also showed that the acquisition of vanadium is strongly regulated by the abundance of molybdenum. These findings show that alternative nitrogenase can no longer be neglected in natural ecosystems, particularly in molybdenum-limited habitats.

  10. Nitrogen fixation in the activated sludge treatment of thermomechanical pulping wastewater: effect of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Slade, A H; Anderson, S M; Evans, B G

    2003-01-01

    N-ViroTech, a novel technology which selects for nitrogen-fixing bacteria as the bacteria primarily responsible for carbon removal, has been developed to treat nutrient limited wastewaters to a high quality without the addition of nitrogen, and only minimal addition of phosphorus. Selection of the operating dissolved oxygen level to maximise nitrogen fixation forms a key component of the technology. Pilot scale activated sludge treatment of a thermomechanical pulping wastewater was carried out in nitrogen-fixing mode over a 15 month period. The effect of dissolved oxygen was studied at three levels: 14% (Phase 1), 5% (Phase 2) and 30% (Phase 3). The plant was operated at an organic loading of 0.7-1.1 kg BOD5/m3/d, a solids retention time of approximately 10 d, a hydraulic retention time of 1.4 d and a F:M ratio of 0.17-0.23 mg BOD5/mg VSS/d. Treatment performance was very stable over the three dissolved oxygen operating levels. The plant achieved 94-96% BOD removal, 82-87% total COD removal, 79-87% soluble COD removal, and >99% total extractives removal. The lowest organic carbon removals were observed during operation at 30% DO but were more likely to be due to phosphorus limitation than operation at high dissolved oxygen, as there was a significant decrease in phosphorus entering the plant during Phase 3. Discharge of dissolved nitrogen, ammonium and oxidised nitrogen were consistently low (1.1-1.6 mg/L DKN, 0.1-0.2 mg/L NH4+-N and 0.0 mg/L oxidised nitrogen). Discharge of dissolved phosphorus was 2.8 mg/L, 0.1 mg/L and 0.6 mg/L DRP in Phases 1, 2 and 3 respectively. It was postulated that a population of polyphosphate accumulating bacteria developed during Phase 1. Operation at low dissolved oxygen during Phase 2 appeared to promote biological phosphorus uptake which may have been affected by raising the dissolved oxygen to 30% in Phase 3. Total nitrogen and phosphorus discharge was dependent on efficient secondary clarification, and improved over the course of

  11. Potential for Nitrogen Fixation in the Fungus-Growing Termite Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Sapountzis, Panagiotis; de Verges, Jane; Rousk, Kathrin; Cilliers, Magdeleen; Vorster, Barend J.; Poulsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Termites host a gut microbiota of diverse and essential symbionts that enable specialization on dead plant material; an abundant, but nutritionally imbalanced food source. To supplement the severe shortage of dietary nitrogen (N), some termite species make use of diazotrophic bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N2). Fungus-growing termites (subfamily Macrotermitinae) host a fungal exosymbiont (genus Termitomyces) that provides digestive services and the main food source for the termites. This has been thought to obviate the need for N2-fixation by bacterial symbionts. Here, we challenge this notion by performing acetylene reduction assays of live colony material to show that N2 fixation is present in two major genera (Macrotermes and Odontotermes) of fungus-growing termites. We compare and discuss fixation rates in relation to those obtained from other termites, and suggest avenues of research that may lead to a better understanding of N2 fixation in fungus-growing and other termites. PMID:28018322

  12. Using synthetic biology to distinguish and overcome regulatory and functional barriers related to nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Yang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Li; Wang, Ji-Long; Cheng, Qi; Dixon, Ray; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is a complex process requiring multiple genes working in concert. To date, the Klebsiella pneumoniae nif gene cluster, divided into seven operons, is one of the most studied systems. Its nitrogen fixation capacity is subject to complex cascade regulation and physiological limitations. In this report, the entire K. pneumoniae nif gene cluster was reassembled as operon-based BioBrick parts in Escherichia coli. It provided ~100% activity of native K. pneumoniae system. Based on the expression levels of these BioBrick parts, a T7 RNA polymerase-LacI expression system was used to replace the σ(54)-dependent promoters located upstream of nif operons. Expression patterns of nif operons were critical for the maximum activity of the recombinant system. By mimicking these expression levels with variable-strength T7-dependent promoters, ~42% of the nitrogenase activity of the σ(54)-dependent nif system was achieved in E. coli. When the newly constructed T7-dependent nif system was challenged with different genetic and physiological conditions, it bypassed the original complex regulatory circuits, with minor physiological limitations. Therefore, we have successfully replaced the nif regulatory elements with a simple expression system that may provide the first step for further research of introducing nif genes into eukaryotic organelles, which has considerable potentials in agro-biotechnology.

  13. Using Synthetic Biology to Distinguish and Overcome Regulatory and Functional Barriers Related to Nitrogen Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Yang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Li; Wang, Ji-Long; Cheng, Qi; Dixon, Ray; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is a complex process requiring multiple genes working in concert. To date, the Klebsiella pneumoniae nif gene cluster, divided into seven operons, is one of the most studied systems. Its nitrogen fixation capacity is subject to complex cascade regulation and physiological limitations. In this report, the entire K. pneumoniae nif gene cluster was reassembled as operon-based BioBrick parts in Escherichia coli. It provided ∼100% activity of native K. pneumoniae system. Based on the expression levels of these BioBrick parts, a T7 RNA polymerase–LacI expression system was used to replace the σ54-dependent promoters located upstream of nif operons. Expression patterns of nif operons were critical for the maximum activity of the recombinant system. By mimicking these expression levels with variable-strength T7-dependent promoters, ∼42% of the nitrogenase activity of the σ54-dependent nif system was achieved in E. coli. When the newly constructed T7-dependent nif system was challenged with different genetic and physiological conditions, it bypassed the original complex regulatory circuits, with minor physiological limitations. Therefore, we have successfully replaced the nif regulatory elements with a simple expression system that may provide the first step for further research of introducing nif genes into eukaryotic organelles, which has considerable potentials in agro-biotechnology. PMID:23935879

  14. High cell-specific rates of nitrogen and carbon fixation by the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon sp. at low temperatures in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Svedén, Jennie B; Adam, Birgit; Walve, Jakob; Nahar, Nurun; Musat, Niculina; Lavik, Gaute; Whitehouse, Martin J; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Ploug, Helle

    2015-12-01

    Aphanizomenon is a widespread genus of nitrogen (N2)-fixing cyanobacteria in lakes and estuaries, accounting for a large fraction of the summer N2-fixation in the Baltic Sea. However, information about its cell-specific carbon (C)- and N2-fixation rates in the early growth season has not previously been reported. We combined various methods to study N2-fixation, photosynthesis and respiration in field-sampled Baltic Sea Aphanizomenon sp. during early summer at 10°C. Stable isotope incubations at in situ light intensities during 24 h combined with cell-specific secondary ion mass spectrometry showed an average net N2-fixation rate of 55 fmol N cell(-1) day(-1). Dark net N2-fixation rates over a course of 12 h were 20% of those measured in light. C-fixation, but not N2-fixation, was inhibited by high ambient light intensities during daytime. Consequently, the C:N fixation ratio varied substantially over the diel cycle. C- and N2-fixation rates were comparable to those reported for Aphanizomenon sp. in August at 19°C, using the same methods. High respiration rates (23% of gross photosynthesis) were measured with (14)C-incubations and O2-microsensors, and presumably reflect the energy needed for high N2-fixation rates. Hence, Aphanizomenon sp. is an important contributor to N2-fixation at low in situ temperatures in the early growth season.

  15. Biological nitrogen fixation in acidic high-temperature geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Lange, Rachel K; Boyd, Eric S; Peters, John W

    2011-08-01

    The near ubiquitous distribution of nifH genes in sediments sampled from 14 high-temperature (48.0-89.0°C) and acidic (pH 1.90-5.02) geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park suggested a role for the biological reduction of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia (NH(3)) (e.g. nitrogen fixation or diazotrophy) in these environments. nifH genes from these environments formed three unique phylotypes that were distantly related to acidiphilic, mesophilic diazotrophs. Acetylene reduction assays and (15) N(2) tracer studies in microcosms containing sediments sampled from acidic and high-temperature environments where nifH genes were detected confirmed the potential for biological N(2) reduction in these environments. Rates of acetylene reduction by sediment-associated populations were positively correlated with the concentration of NH(4)(+), suggesting a potential relationship between NH(4)(+) consumption and N(2) fixation activity. Amendment of microcosms with NH(4)(+) resulted in increased lag times in acetylene reduction assays. Manipulation of incubation temperature and pH in acetylene reduction assays indicated that diazotrophic populations are specifically adapted to local conditions. Incubation of sediments in the presence of a N(2) headspace yielded a highly enriched culture containing a single nifH phylotype. This phylotype was detected in all 14 geothermal spring sediments examined and its abundance ranged from ≈ 780 to ≈ 6800 copies (g dry weight sediment)(-1), suggesting that this organism may contribute N to the ecosystems. Collectively, these results for the first time demonstrate thermoacidiphilic N(2) fixation in the natural environment and extend the upper temperature for biological N(2) fixation in terrestrial systems.

  16. Chemical Conversion of PON to Nitrous Oxide for Nitrogen Isotopic Analysis : High- Sensitivity Tracer Assay for Nitrogen Fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunogai, U.; Kido, T.; Hirota, A.; Ohkubo, S.; Komatsu, D. D.; Nakagawa, F.

    2006-12-01

    We present a method for high-sensitivity nitrogen isotopic analysis of particulate organic nitrogen (PON) in seawater and freshwater, for the aim of measuring the rate of nitrogen fixation through 15N2 tracer technique for samples that contain low numeric abundance of organisms. The method composed of the traditional oxidation/reduction methods: such as oxidation of PON to nitrate using persulfate, the reduction of nitrate to nitrite using spongy cadmium, and further reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxide using sodium azide in an acetic acid buffer. Then, Nitrous oxide is purged from the water and trapped cryogenically with subsequent release into a gas chromatography column to analyze stable nitrogen isotopic compositions using a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. A standard deviation less than 0.3 ‰ for nitrogen was found for PON samples containing more than 80 nmolN, with a blank nitrogen of 20 nmolN. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation were consistent within each batch of analysis. Besides, we found that we can also determine nitrogen isotopic compositions of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN, sum of NO3-, NO2-, ammonium, and DON), by applying the method for filtrate samples. Our method may prove to obtain isotopic information for lower quantities of PON and TDN than other methods, so that we can reduce quantities of water samples needed for incubation to determine the nitrogen fixation rate in both seawater and freshwater. Besides, the method is also useful to determine the rate of nitrogen fixation by the small size fraction in ocean. We will also present the results obtained at western subtropical North Pacific to support our conclusions.

  17. Biotic nitrogen fixation in the bryosphere is inhibited more by drought than warming.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Jonathan A; Gonzalez, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The boreal forest is of particular interest to climate change research due to its large circumpolar distribution and accumulated soil carbon pool. Carbon uptake in this ecosystem is nitrogen (N)-limited, therefore factors affecting carbon or nitrogen dynamics in the boreal forest can have consequences for global climate. We used a 2-year field experiment to investigate the response of biotic nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria associated with boreal forest bryophytes, in a factorial experiment combining simulated climate change with habitat fragmentation treatments. We simulated climate change conditions using open-top greenhouse chambers in the field, which increased mean and maximum temperatures, and created a precipitation gradient from ambient levels in the center to extreme drought conditions at the periphery of the chamber. The dry patches near the chamber walls exhibited almost no N-fixation, despite having similar densities of cyanobacteria (predominantly Stigonema sp.) as other patches. Rates of N-fixation were best explained by a model containing moisture, fragmentation, cyanobacteria density and time; warming was not a significant variable affecting N-fixation. There was no significant interaction between warming and fragmentation. These results suggest that cyanobacteria responded physiologically to drought by reducing N-fixation activity long before any changes in density. Ecosystem processes, such as N-fixation, can respond in the short term to environmental change much more rapidly than changes in the underlying community structure. Such rapid physiological responses may occur faster than demographic insurance effects of biodiversity.

  18. Effect of insecticides and phenolics on nitrogen fixation by Nostoc linckia

    SciTech Connect

    Megharaj, M.; Venkateswarlu, K.; Rao, A.S.

    1988-08-01

    The nitrogen-fixing blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) significantly influence the nitrogen economy of temperate and tropical soils. Although the genera Nostoc and Tolypothrix have been particularly implicated in the fixation of significantly large amounts of atmospheric nitrogen, these diazotrophs received little attention in relation to insecticide treatment and the available few reports do not indicate a permanent deleterious effect of insecticides on their nitrogenase activity. As it has been well established that the effect of insecticides on nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria is independent of that on growth, an attempt was, therefore, made to determine the influence of four insecticides (monocrotophos, quinalphos, cypermethrin and fenvalerate) and four phenolics (p-nitrophenol (PNP), m-nitrophenol (MNP), 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and catechol) on nitrogen-fixing capacity of N.linckia, isolated from a black soil.

  19. Enzymology of biological nitrogen fixation. Final report, May 1, 1987--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is of central importance in the earth`s nitrogen economy. Fixation of nitrogen is accomplished by a variety of microorganisms, all of them procaryotic. Some operate independently and some function symbiotically or associatively with photosynthesizing plants. Biological nitrogen fixation is accomplished via the reaction: N{sub 2} + 8H{sup +} + 8e{sup {minus}} {yields} 2NH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}. This reaction requires a minimum of 16 ATP under ideal laboratory conditions, so it is obvious that the energy demand of the reaction is very high. When certain nitrogen-fixing organisms are supplied fixed nitrogen (e.g., ammonium) the organisms use the fixed nitrogen and turn off their nitrogenase system, thus conserving energy. When the fixed nitrogen is exhausted, the organism reactivates its nitrogenase. The system is turned off by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyl transferase (DRAT) and turned back on by dinitrogenase reductase-activating glycohydrolase (DRAG). The authors have investigated the details of how DRAT and DRAG are formed, how they function, and the genetics of their formation and operation.

  20. Do Fixation Cues Ensure Fixation Accuracy in Split-Fovea Studies of Word Recognition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Timothy R.; Paterson, Kevin B.; Kurtev, Stoyan; Xu, Mengyun

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have claimed that hemispheric processing is split precisely at the foveal midline and so place great emphasis on the precise location at which words are fixated. These claims are based on experiments in which a variety of fixation procedures were used to ensure fixation accuracy but the effectiveness of these procedures is unclear. We…

  1. Nitrogen limitation and nitrogen fixation during alkane biodegradation in a sandy soil.

    PubMed Central

    Toccalino, P L; Johnson, R L; Boone, D R

    1993-01-01

    We investigated nutrient limitations during hydrocarbon degradation in a sandy soil and found that fixed nitrogen was initially a limiting nutrient but that N limitation could sometimes be overcome by N2 fixation. Hydrocarbon biodegradation was examined in an unsaturated sandy soil incubated aerobically at 20 degrees C with propane or butane and various added nutrients. Propane and butane degradation proceeded similarly during the first 3 months of incubation. That is, bacteria in soil amended with N oxidized these hydrocarbons more rapidly than in controls without nutrient additions or in soil with added phosphate or trace minerals. Both propane- and butane-amended soil apparently became N limited after the initial available inorganic N was utilized, as indicated by a decrease in the rates of hydrocarbon degradation. After 3 months, propane and butane degradation proceeded differently. Bacteria in propane-degrading soil apparently remained N limited because propane degradation rates stayed low unless more N was added. In contrast, bacteria in butane-degrading soil appeared to overcome their N limitation because butane degradation rates later increased regardless of whether more N was added. Analyses of total N and acetylene reduction assays supported this apparent surplus of N in butane-amended soil. Total N was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in soil incubated with butane and no N amendments than in soil incubated with propane, even when the latter was amended with N. Acetylene reduction occurred only in butane-amended soil. These results indicate that N2 fixation occurred in butane-amended soil but not in propane-amended soil. PMID:8215369

  2. Nitrogen fixation dynamics of two diazotrophic communities in Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Two types of diazotrophic microbial communities were found in the littoral zone of alkaline hypersaline Mono Lake, California. One consisted of anaerobic bacteria inhabiting the flocculent surface layers of sediments. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by flocculent surface layers occurred under anaerobic conditions, was not stimulated by light or by additions of organic substrates, and was inhibited by O2, nitrate, and ammonia. The second community consisted of a ball-shaped association of a filamentous chlorophyte (Ctenocladus circinnatus) with diazotrophic, nonheterocystous cyanobacteria, as well as anaerobic bacteria (Ctenocladus balls). Nitrogen fixation by Ctenocladus balls was usually, but not always, stimulated by light. Rates of anaerobic dark fixation equaled those in the light under air. Fixation in the light was stimulated by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and by propanil [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)propanamide]. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea-elicited nitrogenase activity was inhibited by ammonia (96%) and nitrate (65%). Fixation was greatest when Ctenocladus balls were incubated anaerobically in the light with sulfide. Dark anaerobic fixation was not stimulated by organic substrates in short-term (4-h) incubations, but was in long-term (67-h) ones. Areal estimates of benthic N2 fixation were measured seasonally, using chambers. Highest rates (~29.3 ??mol of C2H4 m-2 h-1) occurred under normal diel regimens of light and dark. These estimates indicate that benthic N2 fixation has the potential to be a significant nitrogen source in Mono Lake.

  3. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by annual winter legumes on a coal surface mine

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The winter annuals, crimson clover, rose clover, subterranean clover and hairy vetch, were evaluated for their ability to fix nitrogen on coal surface mine substrates by measuring their ability to reduce acetylene to ethylene. The effects of fertilizer, Abruzzi ryegrass, Kentucky 31 fescue grass and a phytotoxic plant Chenopodium album on nitrogen fixation was also assessed. Crimson clover was recommended as the best legume to use on topsoil and shale in the South. Hairy vetch gave good results on shale and subterranean clover did well on topsoil. The use of these species for revegetation is discussed. Overall, no correlation between substrate pH and ethylene levels was found and effects of substrate depended upon the legume species. Super phosphate fertilizer supported less nitrogen fixation than 13-13-13. Abruzzi ryegrass in some unknown way inhibited plant density and nitrogen fixation by legumes but not by free living substrate micro-organisms. Shale from under dead Chenopodium plants in both field and greenhouse experiments did not inhibit nitrogen fixation. 11 references, 7 tables.

  4. Nitrogen fixation (Acetylene Reduction) by annual winter legumes on a coal surface mine

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The winter annuals, crimson clover, rose clover, subterranean clover and hairy vetch, were evaluated for nitrogen fixing capacity on coal surface mine substrates by measuring their ability to reduce acetylene to ethylene. The effects of fertilizer, Abruzzi rye, Kentucky 31 fescue grass and a phytotoxic plant Chenopodium album on nitrogen fixation were also assessed. Crimson clover was recommended as the best legume to use on topsoil and shale in the south. Hairy vetch gave good results on shale and subterranean clover did well on topsoil. The use of these species for revegetation is discussed. Overall, no correlation between substrate pH and ethylene levels was found and effects of substrate depended upon the legume species. Super phosphate fertilizer supported less nitrogen fixation than 13-13-13. Abruzzi rye in some unknown way inhibited plant density and nitrogen fixation by legumes but not by free living substrate micro-organisms. Shale from under dead Chenopodium plants in both field and greehouse experiments did not inhibit nitrogen fixation. 7 tables.

  5. Quantitative trait locus analysis of symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Akiyoshi; Gondo, Takahiro; Akashi, Ryo; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Arima, Susumu; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2012-05-01

    Many legumes form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. An elevation of nitrogen fixation in such legumes would have significant implications for plant growth and biomass production in agriculture. To identify the genetic basis for the regulation of nitrogen fixation, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was conducted with recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross Miyakojima MG-20 × Gifu B-129 in the model legume Lotus japonicus. This population was inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 and grown for 14 days in pods containing vermiculite. Phenotypic data were collected for acetylene reduction activity (ARA) per plant (ARA/P), ARA per nodule weight (ARA/NW), ARA per nodule number (ARA/NN), NN per plant, NW per plant, stem length (SL), SL without inoculation (SLbac-), shoot dry weight without inoculation (SWbac-), root length without inoculation (RLbac-), and root dry weight (RWbac-), and finally 34 QTLs were identified. ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL showed strong correlations and QTL co-localization, suggesting that several plant characteristics important for symbiotic nitrogen fixation are controlled by the same locus. QTLs for ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL, co-localized around marker TM0832 on chromosome 4, were also co-localized with previously reported QTLs for seed mass. This is the first report of QTL analysis for symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity traits.

  6. Identifying Regulatory Changes to Facilitate Nitrogen Fixation in the Nondiazotroph Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Thomas J; Welsh, Eric A; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Maranas, Costas D

    2016-03-18

    The incorporation of biological nitrogen fixation into a nondiazotrophic photosynthetic organism provides a promising solution to the increasing fixed nitrogen demand, but is accompanied by a number of challenges for accommodating two incompatible processes within the same organism. Here we present regulatory influence networks for two cyanobacteria, Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Cyanothece ATCC 51142, and evaluate them to co-opt native transcription factors that may be used to control the nif gene cluster once it is transferred to Synechocystis. These networks were further examined to identify candidate transcription factors for other metabolic processes necessary for temporal separation of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, glycogen catabolism and cyanophycin synthesis. Two transcription factors native to Synechocystis, LexA and Rcp1, were identified as promising candidates for the control of the nif gene cluster and other pertinent metabolic processes, respectively. Lessons learned in the incorporation of nitrogen fixation into a nondiazotrophic prokaryote may be leveraged to further progress the incorporation of nitrogen fixation in plants.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of two recombinant inbred lines of common bean contrasting for symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kamfwa, Kelvin; Zhao, Dongyan; Kelly, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) fixes atmospheric nitrogen (N2) through symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) at levels lower than other grain legume crops. An understanding of the genes and molecular mechanisms underlying SNF will enable more effective strategies for the genetic improvement of SNF traits in common bean. In this study, transcriptome profiling was used to identify genes and molecular mechanisms underlying SNF differences between two common bean recombinant inbred lines that differed in their N-fixing abilities. Differential gene expression and functional enrichment analyses were performed on leaves, nodules and roots of the two lines when grown under N-fixing and non-fixing conditions. Receptor kinases, transmembrane transporters, and transcription factors were among the differentially expressed genes identified under N-fixing conditions, but not under non-fixing conditions. Genes up-regulated in the stronger nitrogen fixer, SA36, included those involved in molecular functions such as purine nucleoside binding, oxidoreductase and transmembrane receptor activities in nodules, and transport activity in roots. Transcription factors identified in this study are candidates for future work aimed at understanding the functional role of these genes in SNF. Information generated in this study will support the development of gene-based markers to accelerate genetic improvement of SNF in common bean. PMID:28192540

  8. The efficiency of nitrogen fixation of the model legume Medicago truncatula (Jemalong A17) is low compared to Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, Saad; Schulze, Joachim

    2010-06-15

    Medicago truncatula (Gaertn.) (barrel medic) serves as a model legume in plant biology. Numerous studies have addressed molecular aspects of the biology of M. truncatula, while comparatively little is known about the efficiency of N(2) fixation at the whole plant level. The objective of the present study was to compare the efficiency of N(2) fixation of M. truncatula to the genetically closely related Medicago sativa (L.) (alfalfa). The relative growth of both species relying exclusively on N(2) fixation versus nitrate nutrition, H(2) evolution, nitrogen assimilation, the concentration of amino acids and organic acids in nodules, and (15)N(2) uptake and distribution were studied. M. truncatula showed much lower efficiency of N(2) fixation. Nodule-specific activity was several-fold lower when compared to M. sativa, partially as a result of a lower electron allocation to N(2) versus H(+). M. truncatula or M. sativa plants grown solely on N(2) fixation as a nitrogen source reached about 30% or 80% of growth, respectively, when compared to plants supplied with sufficient nitrate. Moreover, M. truncatula had low %N in shoots and a lower allocation of (15)N to shoots during 1h (15)N(2) labeling period. Amino acid concentration was about 20% higher in M. sativa nodules, largely as a result of more asparagine, while the organic acid concentration was about double in M. sativa, coinciding with a six-fold higher concentration of malate. Total soluble protein in nodules was about three times lower in M. truncatula and the pattern of enzyme activity in that fraction was strongly different. Sucrose cleaving enzymes displayed higher activity in M. truncatula nodules, while the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was much lower. It is concluded that the low efficiency of the M. truncatula symbiotic system is related to a low capacity of organic acid formation and limited nitrogen export from nodules.

  9. Transcriptomic Analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula Symbiosis Using Nitrogen Fixation-Deficient Nodules.

    PubMed

    Lang, Claus; Long, Sharon R

    2015-08-01

    The bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti interacts symbiotically with legume plant hosts such as Medicago truncatula to form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. During symbiosis, plant and bacterial cells differentiate in a coordinated manner, resulting in specialized plant cells that contain nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Both plant and bacterial genes are required at each developmental stage of symbiosis. We analyzed gene expression in nodules formed by wild-type bacteria on six plant mutants with defects in nitrogen fixation. We observed differential expression of 482 S. meliloti genes with functions in cell envelope homeostasis, cell division, stress response, energy metabolism, and nitrogen fixation. We simultaneously analyzed gene expression in M. truncatula and observed differential regulation of host processes that may trigger bacteroid differentiation and control bacterial infection. Our analyses of developmentally arrested plant mutants indicate that plants use distinct means to control bacterial infection during early and late symbiotic stages.

  10. Selection and breeding of corn to enhance associative bacterial nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, S.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Brill, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    We have increased, through screening and breeding, the ability of corn (maize, Zea mays L.) to support bacterial nitrogen fixation in or on corn roots. Isotopic N fixed from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was found on the roots. Even though the nitrogen-fixing association depends on germ plasm from tropical corn, the activity can be bred into corn currently used in midwestern United States agriculture.

  11. Nitrogen fixation and nifH diversity in human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Igai, Katsura; Itakura, Manabu; Nishijima, Suguru; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Suda, Wataru; Tsutaya, Takumi; Tomitsuka, Eriko; Tadokoro, Kiyoshi; Baba, Jun; Odani, Shingo; Natsuhara, Kazumi; Morita, Ayako; Yoneda, Minoru; Greenhill, Andrew R.; Horwood, Paul F.; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hongoh, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Taro; Siba, Peter M.; Hattori, Masahira; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Umezaki, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that nitrogen fixation occurs in the human gut. However, whether the gut microbiota truly has this potential remains unclear. We investigated the nitrogen-fixing activity and diversity of the nitrogenase reductase (NifH) genes in the faecal microbiota of humans, focusing on Papua New Guinean and Japanese individuals with low to high habitual nitrogen intake. A 15N2 incorporation assay showed significant enrichment of 15N in all faecal samples, irrespective of the host nitrogen intake, which was also supported by an acetylene reduction assay. The fixed nitrogen corresponded to 0.01% of the standard nitrogen requirement for humans, although our data implied that the contribution in the gut in vivo might be higher than this value. The nifH genes recovered in cloning and metagenomic analyses were classified in two clusters: one comprising sequences almost identical to Klebsiella sequences and the other related to sequences of Clostridiales members. These results are consistent with an analysis of databases of faecal metagenomes from other human populations. Collectively, the human gut microbiota has a potential for nitrogen fixation, which may be attributable to Klebsiella and Clostridiales strains, although no evidence was found that the nitrogen-fixing activity substantially contributes to the host nitrogen balance. PMID:27554344

  12. [Effect of nitrogen-containing compounds on hydrogen light emission and nitrogen fixation by purple bacteria].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'eva, E N; Gogotov, I N; Gruzinskiĭ, I V

    1979-01-01

    The cells of Rhodospirillum rubrum and Thiocapsa roseopersicina grown in media containing glutamate and arginine, respectively, as well as under conditions of nitrogen fixation evolve H2 in the light. If the cultures were grown in media with NH4+, NO3-, urea, glutamine or asparagine, hydrogen photoevolution by the cells and acetylene reduction started after the lag-phase and proceeded at a low rate. Extracts of such cells did not display the activity of nitrogenase which could be assayed by the ATP-dependent evolution of H2 from dithionite. The data obtained confirm the fact that hydrogen photoevolution by purple bacteria involves nitrogenase whose synthesis is regulated (according to the action of glutamine) with the participation of glutamine synthetase. NH4+, glutamine and asparagine inhibit also hydrogen photoproduction by purple bacteria and acetylene photoreduction. However, they have no effect on hydrogen evolution in the dark by the cells of R. rubrum and T. roseopersicina in the presence of formiate or pyruvate, respectively, whereas carbon monoxide inhibits hydrogen production. Therefore, hydrogen production by purple bacteria in the dark must be catalyzed by hydrogenase.

  13. The interactive effects of temperature and light on biological nitrogen fixation in boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Gundale, Michael J; Nilsson, Madeleine; Bansal, Sheel; Jäderlund, Anders

    2012-04-01

    Plant productivity is predicted to increase in northern latitudes as a result of climate warming; however, this may depend on whether biological nitrogen (N)-fixation also increases. We evaluated how the variation in temperature and light affects N-fixation by two boreal feather mosses, Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens, which are the primary source of N-fixation in most boreal environments. We measured N-fixation rates 2 and 4 wk after exposure to a factorial combination of environments of normal, intermediate and high temperature (16.3, 22.0 and 30.3°C) and light (148.0, 295.7 and 517.3 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Our results showed that P. schreberi achieved higher N-fixation rates relative to H. splendens in response to warming treatments, but that the highest warming treatment eventually caused N-fixation to decline for both species. Light strongly interacted with warming treatments, having positive effects at low or intermediate temperatures and damaging effects at high temperatures. These results suggest that climate warming may increase N-fixation in boreal forests, but that increased shading by the forest canopy or the occurrence of extreme temperature events could limit increases. They also suggest that P. schreberi may become a larger source of N in boreal forests relative to H. splendens as climate warming progresses.

  14. Nitrogen fixation in sediments along a depth transect through the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gier, Jessica; Sommer, Stefan; Löscher, Carolin R.; Dale, Andrew W.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Treude, Tina

    2016-07-01

    The potential coupling of nitrogen (N2) fixation and sulfate reduction (SR) was explored in sediments of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Sediment samples were retrieved by a multiple corer at six stations along a depth transect (70-1025 m water depth) at 12° S, covering anoxic and hypoxic bottom water conditions. Benthic N2 fixation, determined by the acetylene reduction assay, was detected at all sites, with highest rates between 70 and 253 m and lower rates at greater depth. SR rates decreased with increasing water depth. N2 fixation and SR overlapped in sediments, suggesting a potential coupling of both processes. However, a weak positive correlation of their activity distribution was detected by principle component analysis. A potential link between N2 fixation and sulfate-reducing bacteria was indicated by the molecular analysis of nifH genes. Detected nifH sequences clustered with the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfonema limicola at the 253 m station. However, nifH sequences of other stations clustered with uncultured organisms, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes (Clostridia) rather than with known sulfate reducers. The principle component analysis revealed that benthic N2 fixation in the Peruvian OMZ is controlled by organic matter (positive) and free sulfide (negative). No correlation was found between N2 fixation and ammonium concentrations (even at levels > 2022 µM). N2 fixation rates in the Peruvian OMZ sediments were in the same range as those measured in other organic-rich sediments.

  15. Nitrogen Fixation by Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Its Implications for a New Ecological Niche▿

    PubMed Central

    Criminger, J. D.; Hazen, T. H.; Sobecky, P. A.; Lovell, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    A Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain isolated from the rhizosphere of the ecosystem dominant estuarine grass, Spartina alterniflora, was characterized and shown to carry nifH, the gene encoding the nitrogenase iron protein, and to fix N2. Nitrogen fixation may contribute substantially to the adaptability, niche breadth, and ecological significance of V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:17675440

  16. Soil spatial variability and symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, K. )

    1990-09-01

    The isotope dilution method for the estimation of N{sub 2} fixation by legumes is analyzed, comparing the application of {sup 15}N-enriched fertilizer with {sup 15}N-labeled soil. Soil variability of other dynamic processes in the soil are discussed in light of the distribution of the {sup 15}N label in the system. Field data were collected along six transects, 45 m long, with 30 plots (replicates) each. The legume (Vicia faba L.) was used as a fixing crop, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and oil radish (Raphinus sativus L.) as nonfixing standard crops. Isotope methods were also compared with the yield difference method. Results show that isotope methods were very sensitive to the distribution of the label in the soil and that dynamic processes involving N can significantly affect this distribution over a whole field. Best results were obtained with {sup 15}N-labeled soil. The particular site used, having been farmed for more than 20 years with {sup 15}N trials, showed a homogeneous residual {sup 15}N label that made it possible to estimate N{sub 2} fixation without the application of extra label. Estimates of N{sub 2} fixation with the isotope method were well correlated with the yield difference method when fertilizer use efficiency of the fixing and nonfixing crops were similar. Results also indicate that a good reference crop for one method might not be the best for the other method, and one reason for this is the variability of soil parameters and of dynamic processes occurring in the soil.

  17. Pyruvate is synthesized by two pathways in pea bacteroids with different efficiencies for nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Mulley, Geraldine; Lopez-Gomez, Miguel; Zhang, Ye; Terpolilli, Jason; Prell, Jurgen; Finan, Turlough; Poole, Philip

    2010-10-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legume bacteroids is energized by the metabolism of dicarboxylic acids, which requires their oxidation to both oxaloacetate and pyruvate. In alfalfa bacteroids, production of pyruvate requires NAD+ malic enzyme (Dme) but not NADP+ malic enzyme (Tme). However, we show that Rhizobium leguminosarum has two pathways for pyruvate formation from dicarboxylates catalyzed by Dme and by the combined activities of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase (PckA) and pyruvate kinase (PykA). Both pathways enable N2 fixation, but the PckA/PykA pathway supports N2 fixation at only 60% of that for Dme. Double mutants of dme and pckA/pykA did not fix N2. Furthermore, dme pykA double mutants did not grow on dicarboxylates, showing that they are the only pathways for the production of pyruvate from dicarboxylates normally expressed. PckA is not expressed in alfalfa bacteroids, resulting in an obligate requirement for Dme for pyruvate formation and N2 fixation. When PckA was expressed from a constitutive nptII promoter in alfalfa dme bacteroids, acetylene was reduced at 30% of the wild-type rate, although this level was insufficient to prevent nitrogen starvation. Dme has N-terminal, malic enzyme (Me), and C-terminal phosphotransacetylase (Pta) domains. Deleting the Pta domain increased the peak acetylene reduction rate in 4-week-old pea plants to 140 to 150% of the wild-type rate, and this was accompanied by increased nodule mass. Plants infected with Pta deletion mutants did not have increased dry weight, demonstrating that there is not a sustained change in nitrogen fixation throughout growth. This indicates a complex relationship between pyruvate synthesis in bacteroids, nitrogen fixation, and plant growth.

  18. Do fixation cues ensure fixation accuracy in split-fovea studies of word recognition?

    PubMed

    Jordan, Timothy R; Paterson, Kevin B; Kurtev, Stoyan; Xu, Mengyun

    2009-07-01

    Many studies have claimed that hemispheric processing is split precisely at the foveal midline and so place great emphasis on the precise location at which words are fixated. These claims are based on experiments in which a variety of fixation procedures were used to ensure fixation accuracy but the effectiveness of these procedures is unclear. We investigated this issue using procedures matched to the original studies and an eye-tracker to monitor the locations actually fixated. Four common types of fixation cues were used: cross, two vertical gapped lines, two vertical gapped lines plus a secondary task in which a digit was presented at the designated fixation point, and a dot. Accurate fixations occurred on <35% of trials for all fixation conditions. Moreover, despite the usefulness often attributed to a secondary task, no increase in fixation accuracy was produced in this condition. The indications are that split-fovea theory should not assume that fixation of specified locations occurs in experiments without appropriate eye-tracking control or, indeed, that consistent fixation of specified locations is plausible under normal conditions of word recognition.

  19. Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizae on Biomass Production and Nitrogen Fixation of Berseem Clover Plants Subjected to Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Sergio; Amato, Gaetano; Frenda, Alfonso Salvatore; Giambalvo, Dario; Ruisi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several studies, performed mainly in pots, have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of water stress on plant growth. No information is available about the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on berseem clover growth and nitrogen (N) fixation under conditions of water shortage. A field experiment was conducted in a hilly area of inner Sicily, Italy, to determine whether symbiosis with AM fungi can mitigate the detrimental effects of drought stress (which in the Mediterranean often occurs during the late period of the growing season) on forage yield and symbiotic N2 fixation of berseem clover. Soil was either left under water stress (i.e., rain-fed conditions) or the crop was well-watered. Mycorrhization treatments consisted of inoculation of berseem clover seeds with arbuscular mycorrhizal spores or suppression of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by means of fungicide treatments. Nitrogen biological fixation was assessed using the 15N-isotope dilution technique. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was able to mitigate the negative effect of water stress on berseem clover grown in a typical semiarid Mediterranean environment. In fact, under water stress conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis resulted in increases in total biomass, N content, and N fixation, whereas no effect of crop mycorrhization was observed in the well-watered treatment. PMID:24595111

  20. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on biomass production and nitrogen fixation of berseem clover plants subjected to water stress.

    PubMed

    Saia, Sergio; Amato, Gaetano; Frenda, Alfonso Salvatore; Giambalvo, Dario; Ruisi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several studies, performed mainly in pots, have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of water stress on plant growth. No information is available about the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on berseem clover growth and nitrogen (N) fixation under conditions of water shortage. A field experiment was conducted in a hilly area of inner Sicily, Italy, to determine whether symbiosis with AM fungi can mitigate the detrimental effects of drought stress (which in the Mediterranean often occurs during the late period of the growing season) on forage yield and symbiotic N2 fixation of berseem clover. Soil was either left under water stress (i.e., rain-fed conditions) or the crop was well-watered. Mycorrhization treatments consisted of inoculation of berseem clover seeds with arbuscular mycorrhizal spores or suppression of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by means of fungicide treatments. Nitrogen biological fixation was assessed using the 15N-isotope dilution technique. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was able to mitigate the negative effect of water stress on berseem clover grown in a typical semiarid Mediterranean environment. In fact, under water stress conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis resulted in increases in total biomass, N content, and N fixation, whereas no effect of crop mycorrhization was observed in the well-watered treatment.

  1. Ureide Assay for Measuring Nitrogen Fixation by Nodulated Soybean Calibrated by 15N Methods 1

    PubMed Central

    Herridge, David F.; Peoples, Mark B.

    1990-01-01

    We report experiments to quantify the relationships between the relative abundance of ureide-N in root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap, and hot water extracts of stems and petioles of nodulated soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merrill cv Bragg) and the proportion of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation. Additional experiments examined the effects of plant genotype and strain of rhizobia on these relationships. In each of the five experiments reported, plants of cv Bragg (experiment 1), cv Lincoln (experiments 3, 4, 5), or six cultivars/genotypes (experiment 2) were grown in a sand:vermiculite mixture in large pots in a naturally lit, temperature-controlled glasshouse during summer. Pots were inoculated at sowing with effective Bradyrhizobium japonicum CB1809 (USDA 136) or with one of 21 different strains of rhizobia. The proportions of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation were determined using 15N dilution. In one experiment with CB1809, plants were supplied throughout growth with either N-free nutrients or with nutrients supplemented with 1, 2, 4, or 8 millimolar 15N-nitrate and harvested on eight occasions between V6 and R7 for root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap, stems (including petioles), and whole plant dry matter. Analyses of the saps and stem extracts for ureides (allantoin plus allantoic acid), α-amino-N, and nitrate, and of dry matter for N and 15N, indicated a positive effect of nitrate supply on concentrations of nitrate in saps and extracts and a negative effect on ureides and on the proportion of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation. The relative abundance of ureide-N in root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap (100 [ureide-N]/[ureide-N+ α-amino-N + nitrate-N]) and stem extracts (100 [ureide-N]/[ureide-N + nitrate-N]) and the proportion of plant N, derived from nitrogen fixation between successive samplings were highly correlated (r = 0.97-1.00). For each variable, two standard curves were prepared to account for the shifts in the compositions

  2. Ocean acidification impacts on nitrogen fixation in the coastal western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Andrew P.; Turk-Kubo, Kendra A.; Al-Moosawi, Lisa; Alliouane, Samir; Gazeau, Frédéric; Hogan, Mary E.; Zehr, Jonathan P.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of ocean acidification on nitrogen (N2) fixation rates and on the community composition of N2-fixing microbes (diazotrophs) were examined in coastal waters of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea. Nine experimental mesocosm enclosures of ∼50 m3 each were deployed for 20 days during June-July 2012 in the Bay of Calvi, Corsica, France. Three control mesocosms were maintained under ambient conditions of carbonate chemistry. The remainder were manipulated with CO2 saturated seawater to attain target amendments of pCO2 of 550, 650, 750, 850, 1000 and 1250 μatm. Rates of N2 fixation were elevated up to 10 times relative to control rates (2.00 ± 1.21 nmol L-1d-1) when pCO2 concentrations were >1000 μatm and pHT (total scale) < 7.74. Diazotrophic phylotypes commonly found in oligotrophic marine waters, including the Mediterranean, were not present at the onset of the experiment and therefore, the diazotroph community composition was characterised by amplifying partial nifH genes from the mesocosms. The diazotroph community was comprised primarily of cluster III nifH sequences (which include possible anaerobes), and proteobacterial (α and γ) sequences, in addition to small numbers of filamentous (or pseudo-filamentous) cyanobacterial phylotypes. The implication from this study is that there is some potential for elevated N2 fixation rates in the coastal western Mediterranean before the end of this century as a result of increasing ocean acidification. Observations made of variability in the diazotroph community composition could not be correlated with changes in carbon chemistry, which highlights the complexity of the relationship between ocean acidification and these keystone organisms.

  3. Seasonally dependent iron limitation of nitrogen fixation in tropical forests of karst landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winbourne, J. B.; Brewer, S.; Houlton, B. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Limestone tropical forests in karst topography are one of the most poorly studied ecosystems on Earth, and has been substantially cleared by human activities throughout much of Central America. This ecosystem is noted for its high level of plant productivity, biomass, endemism and biological diversity compared to nearby neighboring tropical forests on volcanic rock substrates (Brewer et al. 2002). A question remains as to how limestone tropical forests are able to maintain the high nutrient demands of plant photosynthesis and tree biomass growth. Here, we demonstrate that rates of nitrogen (N) fixation are higher in limestone versus volcanic soil substrates, with direct evidence for the emergence of seasonally dependent iron limitation of N fixation in limestone tropical forest. N fixation rates showed a three-fold increase in response to iron additions, especially during the wet season when N demands of the forest trees are highest. In contrast, adjacent forests growing on the more classical acidic volcanic soils showed no response to iron or other nutrient additions. Biologically available pools of iron were exceedingly low in the limestone forest site, consistent with the complexation of iron under high pH conditions. Biological acquisition of iron, as measured by the concentration of iron chelating compounds (i.e. siderophores), provided additional evidence for iron limitation of microbial processes in limestone tropical forests, where concentrations were six times higher than those at the volcanic site. Our results suggest that the functioning of limestone tropical forest is strongly regulated by interactions between iron, soil pH, and N cycling.

  4. Regional constraints to biological nitrogen fixation in post-fire forest communities.

    PubMed

    Yelenik, Stephanie; Perakis, Steven; Hibbs, David

    2013-03-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a key ecological process that can restore nitrogen (N) lost in wildfire and shape the pace and pattern of post-fire forest recovery. To date, there is limited information on how climate and soil fertility interact to influence different pathways of BNF in early forest succession. We studied asymbiotic (forest floor and soil) and symbiotic (the shrub Ceanothus integerrimus) BNF rates across six sites in the Klamath National Forest, California, USA. We used combined gradient and experimental phosphorus (P) fertilization studies to explore cross-site variation in BNF rates and then related these rates to abiotic and biotic variables. We estimate that our measured BNF rates 22 years after wildfire (6.1-12.1 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) are unlikely to fully replace wildfire N losses. We found that asymbiotic BNF is P limited, although this is not the case for symbiotic BNF in Ceanothus. In contrast, Ceanothus BNF is largely driven by competition from other vegetation: in high-productivity sites with high potential evapotranspiration (Et), shrub biomass is suppressed as tree biomass increases. Because shrub biomass governed cross-site variation in Ceanothus BNF, this competitive interaction led to lower BNF in sites with high productivity and Et. Overall, these results suggest that the effects of nutrients play a larger role in driving asymbiotic than symbiotic fixation across our post-fire sites. However, because symbiotic BNF is 8-90x greater than asymbiotic BNF, it is interspecific plant competition that governs overall BNF inputs in these forests.

  5. Regional constraints to biological nitrogen fixation in post-fire forest communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yelenik, Stephanie; Perakis, Steven S.; Hibbs, David

    2013-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a key ecological process that can restore nitrogen (N) lost in wildfire and shape the pace and pattern of post-fire forest recovery. To date, there is limited information on how climate and soil fertility interact to influence different pathways of BNF in early forest succession. We studied asymbiotic (forest floor and soil) and symbiotic (the shrub Ceanothus integerrimus) BNF rates across six sites in the Klamath National Forest, California, USA. We used combined gradient and experimental phosphorus (P) fertilization studies to explore cross-site variation in BNF rates and then related these rates to abiotic and biotic variables. We estimate that our measured BNF rates 22 years after wildfire (6.1–12.1 kg N·ha-1·yr-1) are unlikely to fully replace wildfire N losses. We found that asymbiotic BNF is P limited, although this is not the case for symbiotic BNF in Ceanothus. In contrast, Ceanothus BNF is largely driven by competition from other vegetation: in high-productivity sites with high potential evapotranspiration (Et), shrub biomass is suppressed as tree biomass increases. Because shrub biomass governed cross-site variation in Ceanothus BNF, this competitive interaction led to lower BNF in sites with high productivity and Et. Overall, these results suggest that the effects of nutrients play a larger role in driving asymbiotic than symbiotic fixation across our post-fire sites. However, because symbiotic BNF is 8–90x greater than asymbiotic BNF, it is interspecific plant competition that governs overall BNF inputs in these forests.

  6. Biological nitrogen fixation in sugar cane: A key to energetically viable biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Boddey, R.M.

    1995-05-01

    The advantages of producing biofuels to replace fossil energy sources are derived from the fact that the energy accumulated in the biomass in captured directly from photosynthesis and is thus renewable, and that the cycle of carbon dioxide fixation by the crop, followed by burning of the fuel makes no overall contribution to atmospheric CO{sub 2} or, consequently, to global warming. However, these advantages are negated if large quantities of fossil fuels need to be used to grow or process the biofuel crop. In this regard, the Brazilian bioethanol program, based on the fermentation/distillation of sugar cane juice, is particularly favorable, not only because the crop is principally hand harvested, but also because of the low nitrogen fertilizer use on sugar cane in Brazil. Recent {sup 15}N and N balance studies have shown that in some Brazilian cane varieties, high yields are possible without N fertilization because the plants are able to obtain large contributions of nitrogen from plant-associated biological N{sub 2} fixation (BNF). The N{sub 2}-fixing acid-tolerant bacterium Acetobacter diazotrophicus was first found to occur within roots, stems, and leaves of sugar cane. Subsequently, two species of Herbaspirillum also have been found to occur within the interior of all sugar cane tissues. The discovery of these, and other N{sub 2}-fixing bacteria that survive poorly in soil but thrive within plant tissue (endophytic bacteria), may account for the high BNF contributions observed in sugar cane. Further study of this system should allow the gradual elimination of N fertilizer use on sugar cane, at least in Brazil, and opens up the possibility of the extension of this efficient N{sub 2}-fixing system to cereal and other crops with consequent immense potential benefits to tropical agriculture. 44 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.

    PubMed

    Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO₂ and N₂O. The NO₂ is then converted to ammonia, while the N₂O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide.

  8. The effect of nutrients on carbon and nitrogen fixation by the UCYN-A-haptophyte symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Krupke, Andreas; Mohr, Wiebke; LaRoche, Julie; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Amann, Rudolf I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-07-01

    Symbiotic relationships between phytoplankton and N2-fixing microorganisms play a crucial role in marine ecosystems. The abundant and widespread unicellular cyanobacteria group A (UCYN-A) has recently been found to live symbiotically with a haptophyte. Here, we investigated the effect of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), iron (Fe) and Saharan dust additions on nitrogen (N2) fixation and primary production by the UCYN-A-haptophyte association in the subtropical eastern North Atlantic Ocean using nifH expression analysis and stable isotope incubations combined with single-cell measurements. N2 fixation by UCYN-A was stimulated by the addition of Fe and Saharan dust, although this was not reflected in the nifH expression. CO2 fixation by the haptophyte was stimulated by the addition of ammonium nitrate as well as Fe and Saharan dust. Intriguingly, the single-cell analysis using nanometer scale secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates that the increased CO2 fixation by the haptophyte in treatments without added fixed N is likely an indirect result of the positive effect of Fe and/or P on UCYN-A N2 fixation and the transfer of N2-derived N to the haptophyte. Our results reveal a direct linkage between the marine carbon and nitrogen cycles that is fuelled by the atmospheric deposition of dust. The comparison of single-cell rates suggests a tight coupling of nitrogen and carbon transfer that stays balanced even under changing nutrient regimes. However, it appears that the transfer of carbon from the haptophyte to UCYN-A requires a transfer of nitrogen from UCYN-A. This tight coupling indicates an obligate symbiosis of this globally important diazotrophic association.

  9. Approaches for enhancement of N₂ fixation efficiency of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) under limiting nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Maryam Nasr; Sulieman, Saad; Schulze, Joachim; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son

    2014-04-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is an important pulse crop in many countries in the world. The symbioses between chickpea and Mesorhizobia, which fix N₂ inside the root nodules, are of particular importance for chickpea's productivity. With the aim of enhancing symbiotic efficiency in chickpea, we compared the symbiotic efficiency of C-15, Ch-191 and CP-36 strains of Mesorhizobium ciceri in association with the local elite chickpea cultivar 'Bivanij' as well as studied the mechanism underlying the improvement of N₂ fixation efficiency. Our data revealed that C-15 strain manifested the most efficient N₂ fixation in comparison with Ch-191 or CP-36. This finding was supported by higher plant productivity and expression levels of the nifHDK genes in C-15 nodules. Nodule specific activity was significantly higher in C-15 combination, partially as a result of higher electron allocation to N₂ versus H⁺. Interestingly, a striking difference in nodule carbon and nitrogen composition was observed. Sucrose cleavage enzymes displayed comparatively lower activity in nodules established by either Ch-191 or CP-36. Organic acid formation, particularly that of malate, was remarkably higher in nodules induced by C-15 strain. As a result, the best symbiotic efficiency observed with C-15-induced nodules was reflected in a higher concentration of the total and several major amino metabolites, namely asparagine, glutamine, glutamate and aspartate. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that the improved efficiency in chickpea symbiotic system, established with C-15, was associated with the enhanced capacity of organic acid formation and the activities of the key enzymes connected to the nodule carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

  10. Nitrogen fixation in biological soil crusts from southeast Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.

    2002-01-01

    Biological soil crusts can be the dominant source of N for arid land ecosystems. We measured potential N fixation rates biweekly for 2 years, using three types of soil crusts: (1) crusts whose directly counted cells were >98% Microcoleus vaginatus (light crusts); (2) crusts dominated by M. vaginatus, but with 20% or more of the directly counted cells represented by Nostoc commune and Scytonema myochrous (dark crusts); and (3) the soil lichen Collema sp. At all observation times, Collema had higher nitrogenase activity (NA) than dark crusts, which had higher NA than light crusts, indicating that species composition is critical when estimating N inputs. In addition, all three types of crusts generally responded in a similar fashion to climate conditions. Without precipitation within a week of collection, no NA was recorded, regardless of other conditions being favorable. Low (26??C) temperatures precluded NA, even if soils were moist. If rain or snow melt had occurred 3 or less days before collection, NA levels were highly correlated with daily average temperatures of the previous 3 days (r2=0.93 for Collema crusts; r2=0.86 for dark crusts and r2=0.83 for light crusts) for temperatures between 1??C and 26??C. If a precipitation event followed a long dry period, NA levels were lower than if collection followed a time when soils were wet for extended periods (e.g., winter). Using a combination of data from a recording weather datalogger, time-domain reflectometry, manual dry-down curves, and N fixation rates at different temperatures, annual N input from the different crust types was estimated. Annual N input from dark crusts found at relatively undisturbed sites was estimated at 9 kg ha-1 year-1. With 20% cover of the N-fixing soil lichen Collema, inputs are estimated at 13 kg ha-1 year-1. N input from light crusts, generally indicating soil surface disturbance, was estimated at 1.4 kg ha-1 year-1. The rates in light crusts are expected to be highly variable, as

  11. Quantifying nitrogen-fixation in feather moss carpets of boreal forests.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Thomas H; Zackrisson, Olle; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Sellstedt, Anita

    2002-10-31

    Biological nitrogen (N) fixation is the primary source of N within natural ecosystems, yet the origin of boreal forest N has remained elusive. The boreal forests of Eurasia and North America lack any significant, widespread symbiotic N-fixing plants. With the exception of scattered stands of alder in early primary successional forests, N-fixation in boreal forests is considered to be extremely limited. Nitrogen-fixation in northern European boreal forests has been estimated at only 0.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1); however, organic N is accumulated in these ecosystems at a rate of 3 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) (ref. 8). Our limited understanding of the origin of boreal N is unacceptable given the extent of the boreal forest region, but predictable given our imperfect knowledge of N-fixation. Herein we report on a N-fixing symbiosis between a cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) and the ubiquitous feather moss, Pleurozium schreberi (Bird) Mitt. that alone fixes between 1.5 and 2.0 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) in mid- to late-successional forests of northern Scandinavia and Finland. Previous efforts have probably underestimated N-fixation potential in boreal forests.

  12. Understanding the Variability in Soybean Nitrogen Fixation across Agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional farming practices have uncoupled carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles through the application of inorganic N fertilizers applied in plant available forms at levels that saturate the system. As a result, extensive N losses via leaching and denitrification are having significant environment...

  13. Increasing subtropical North Pacific Ocean nitrogen fixation since the Little Ice Age.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Owen A; Guilderson, Thomas P; Batista, Fabian C; Schiff, John T; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2014-01-02

    The North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) plays a major part in the export of carbon and other nutrients to the deep ocean. Primary production in the NPSG has increased in recent decades despite a reduction in nutrient supply to surface waters. It is thought that this apparent paradox can be explained by a shift in plankton community structure from mostly eukaryotes to mostly nitrogen-fixing prokaryotes. It remains uncertain, however, whether the plankton community domain shift can be linked to cyclical climate variability or a long-term global warming trend. Here we analyse records of bulk and amino-acid-specific (15)N/(14)N isotopic ratios (δ(15)N) preserved in the skeletons of long-lived deep-sea proteinaceous corals collected from the Hawaiian archipelago; these isotopic records serve as a proxy for the source of nitrogen-supported export production through time. We find that the recent increase in nitrogen fixation is the continuation of a much larger, centennial-scale trend. After a millennium of relatively minor fluctuation, δ(15)N decreases between 1850 and the present. The total shift in δ(15)N of -2 per mil over this period is comparable to the total change in global mean sedimentary δ(15)N across the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, but it is happening an order of magnitude faster. We use a steady-state model and find that the isotopic mass balance between nitrate and nitrogen fixation implies a 17 to 27 per cent increase in nitrogen fixation over this time period. A comparison with independent records suggests that the increase in nitrogen fixation might be linked to Northern Hemisphere climate change since the end of the Little Ice Age.

  14. Increasing subtropical North Pacific Ocean nitrogen fixation since the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Owen A.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Batista, Fabian C.; Schiff, John T.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    The North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) plays a major part in the export of carbon and other nutrients to the deep ocean. Primary production in the NPSG has increased in recent decades despite a reduction in nutrient supply to surface waters. It is thought that this apparent paradox can be explained by a shift in plankton community structure from mostly eukaryotes to mostly nitrogen-fixing prokaryotes. It remains uncertain, however, whether the plankton community domain shift can be linked to cyclical climate variability or a long-term global warming trend. Here we analyse records of bulk and amino-acid-specific 15N/14N isotopic ratios (δ15N) preserved in the skeletons of long-lived deep-sea proteinaceous corals collected from the Hawaiian archipelago; these isotopic records serve as a proxy for the source of nitrogen-supported export production through time. We find that the recent increase in nitrogen fixation is the continuation of a much larger, centennial-scale trend. After a millennium of relatively minor fluctuation, δ15N decreases between 1850 and the present. The total shift in δ15N of -2 per mil over this period is comparable to the total change in global mean sedimentary δ15N across the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, but it is happening an order of magnitude faster. We use a steady-state model and find that the isotopic mass balance between nitrate and nitrogen fixation implies a 17 to 27 per cent increase in nitrogen fixation over this time period. A comparison with independent records suggests that the increase in nitrogen fixation might be linked to Northern Hemisphere climate change since the end of the Little Ice Age.

  15. The Role of Nitrogen Fixation in Cyanobacterial Bloom Toxicity in a Temperate, Eutrophic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Beversdorf, Lucas J.; Miller, Todd R.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms threaten freshwaters worldwide but have proven difficult to predict because the mechanisms of bloom formation and toxin production are unknown, especially on weekly time scales. Water quality management continues to focus on aggregated metrics, such as chlorophyll and total nutrients, which may not be sufficient to explain complex community changes and functions such as toxin production. For example, nitrogen (N) speciation and cycling play an important role, on daily time scales, in shaping cyanobacterial communities because declining N has been shown to select for N fixers. In addition, subsequent N pulses from N2 fixation may stimulate and sustain toxic cyanobacterial growth. Herein, we describe how rapid early summer declines in N followed by bursts of N fixation have shaped cyanobacterial communities in a eutrophic lake (Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, USA), possibly driving toxic Microcystis blooms throughout the growing season. On weekly time scales in 2010 and 2011, we monitored the cyanobacterial community in a eutrophic lake using the phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) region to determine population dynamics. In parallel, we measured microcystin concentrations, N2 fixation rates, and potential environmental drivers that contribute to structuring the community. In both years, cyanobacterial community change was strongly correlated with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations, and Aphanizomenon and Microcystis alternated dominance throughout the pre-toxic, toxic, and post-toxic phases of the lake. Microcystin concentrations increased a few days after the first significant N2 fixation rates were observed. Then, following large early summer N2 fixation events, Microcystis increased and became most abundant. Maximum microcystin concentrations coincided with Microcystis dominance. In both years, DIN concentrations dropped again in late summer, and N2 fixation rates and Aphanizomenon abundance increased before the lake mixed in

  16. Nitrogen fixation in a non-heterocystous cyanobacterial mat from a mountain river

    PubMed Central

    Berrendero, Esther; Valiente, Eduardo Fernández; Perona, Elvira; Gómez, Claudia L.; Loza, Virginia; Muñoz-Martín, M. Ángeles; Mateo, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    In situ nitrogen fixation was investigated in a cyanobacterial mat growing on the bed of rocks of the Muga River, Spain. The filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Schizothrix dominated the mat, showing nitrogenase activity in the light at similar rates to those found in nearby heterocystous Rivularia colonies. N2 fixation in the light was significantly increased by an inhibitor of PSII and oxygen evolution, DCMU (3-[3,4-dichlorophenyl]-1,1-dimethylurea), and anaerobic conditions. However, no nitrogenase activity was found in the dark. Addition of fructose as a respiratory substrate induced nitrogenase activity in samples incubated under aerobic conditions in the dark but not in anaerobic conditions. Microelectrode oxygen profiles showed internal microaerobic microzones where nitrogen fixation might concentrate. Analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed only the presence of sequences belonging to filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacteria. nifH gene diversity showed that the major phylotypes also belonged to this group. One of the three strains isolated from the Schizothrix mat was capable of fixing N2 and growing in the absence of combined N. This was consistent with the nifH gene analysis. These results suggest a relevant contribution of non-heterocystous cyanobacteria to nitrogen fixation in these mats. PMID:27476439

  17. Nitrogen fixation in a non-heterocystous cyanobacterial mat from a mountain river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrendero, Esther; Valiente, Eduardo Fernández; Perona, Elvira; Gómez, Claudia L.; Loza, Virginia; Muñoz-Martín, M. Ángeles; Mateo, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    In situ nitrogen fixation was investigated in a cyanobacterial mat growing on the bed of rocks of the Muga River, Spain. The filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Schizothrix dominated the mat, showing nitrogenase activity in the light at similar rates to those found in nearby heterocystous Rivularia colonies. N2 fixation in the light was significantly increased by an inhibitor of PSII and oxygen evolution, DCMU (3-[3,4-dichlorophenyl]-1,1-dimethylurea), and anaerobic conditions. However, no nitrogenase activity was found in the dark. Addition of fructose as a respiratory substrate induced nitrogenase activity in samples incubated under aerobic conditions in the dark but not in anaerobic conditions. Microelectrode oxygen profiles showed internal microaerobic microzones where nitrogen fixation might concentrate. Analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed only the presence of sequences belonging to filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacteria. nifH gene diversity showed that the major phylotypes also belonged to this group. One of the three strains isolated from the Schizothrix mat was capable of fixing N2 and growing in the absence of combined N. This was consistent with the nifH gene analysis. These results suggest a relevant contribution of non-heterocystous cyanobacteria to nitrogen fixation in these mats.

  18. Tree species control rates of free-living nitrogen fixation in a tropical rain forest.

    PubMed

    Reed, Sasha C; Cleveland, Cory C; Townsend, Alan R

    2008-10-01

    Tropical rain forests represent some of the most diverse ecosystems on earth, yet mechanistic links between tree species identity and ecosystem function in these forests remains poorly understood. Here, using free-living nitrogen (N) fixation as a model, we explore the idea that interspecies variation in canopy nutrient concentrations may drive significant local-scale variation in biogeochemical processes. Biological N fixation is the largest "natural" source of newly available N to terrestrial ecosystems, and estimates suggest the highest such inputs occur in tropical ecosystems. While patterns of and controls over N fixation in these systems remain poorly known, the data we do have suggest that chemical differences among tree species canopies could affect free-living N fixation rates. In a diverse lowland rain forest in Costa Rica, we established a series of vertical, canopy-to-soil profiles for six common canopy tree species, and we measured free-living N fixation rates and multiple aspects of chemistry of live canopy leaves, senesced canopy leaves, bulk leaf litter, and soil for eight individuals of each tree species. Free-living N fixation rates varied significantly among tree species for all four components, and independent of species identity, rates of N fixation ranged by orders of magnitude along the vertical profile. Our data suggest that variations in phosphorus (P) concentration drove a significant fraction of the observed species-specific variation in free-living N fixation rates within each layer of the vertical profile. Furthermore, our data suggest significant links between canopy and forest floor nutrient concentrations; canopy P was correlated with bulk leaf litter P below individual tree crowns. Thus, canopy chemistry may affect a suite of ecosystem processes not only within the canopy itself, but at and beneath the forest floor as well.

  19. Effect of Interactions Among Algae on Nitrogen Fixation by Blue-Green Algae (Cyanobacteria) in Flooded Soils

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John T.; Greene, Sarah; Alexander, Martin

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) by algae in flooded soil was limited by interactions within the algal community. Nitrogen fixation by either indigenous algae or Tolypothrix tenuis was reduced severalfold by a dense suspension of the green alga Nephrocytium sp. Similarly, interactions between the nitrogen-fixing alga (cyanobacterium) Aulosira 68 and natural densities of indigenous algae limited nitrogen-fixing activity in one of two soils examined. This was demonstrated by developing a variant of Aulosira 68 that was resistant to the herbicide simetryne at concentrations that prevented development of indigenous algae. More nitrogen was fixed by the resistant variant in flooded soil containing herbicide than was fixed in herbicide-free soil by either the indigenous algae or indigenous algae plus the parent strain of Aulosira. Interference from indigenous algae may hamper the development of nitrogen-fixing algae introduced into rice fields in attempts to increase biological nitrogen fixation. PMID:16345463

  20. Diazotrophy in the Deep: An analysis of the distribution, magnitude, geochemical controls, and biological mediators of deep-sea benthic nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekas, Anne Elizabeth

    Biological nitrogen fixation (the conversion of N2 to NH3) is a critical process in the oceans, counteracting the production of N2 gas by dissimilatory bacterial metabolisms and providing a source of bioavailable nitrogen to many nitrogen-limited ecosystems. One currently poorly studied and potentially underappreciated habitat for diazotrophic organisms is the sediments of the deep-sea. Although nitrogen fixation was once thought to be negligible in non-photosynthetically driven benthic ecosystems, the present study demonstrates the occurrence and expression of a diversity of nifH genes (those necessary for nitrogen fixation), as well as a widespread ability to fix nitrogen at high rates in these locations. The following research explores the distribution, magnitude, geochemical controls, and biological mediators of nitrogen fixation at several deep-sea sediment habitats, including active methane seeps (Mound 12, Costa Rica; Eel River Basin, CA, USA; Hydrate Ridge, OR, USA; and Monterey Canyon, CA, USA), whale-fall sites (Monterey Canyon, CA), and background deep-sea sediment (off-site Mound 12 Costa Rica, off-site Hydrate Ridge, OR, USA; and Monterey Canyon, CA, USA). The first of the five chapters describes the FISH-NanoSIMS method, which we optimized for the analysis of closely associated microbial symbionts in marine sediments. The second describes an investigation of methane seep sediment from the Eel River Basin, where we recovered nifH sequences from extracted DNA, and used FISH-NanoSIMS to identify methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2) as diazotrophs, when associated with functional sulfate-reducing bacterial symbionts. The third and fourth chapters focus on the distribution and diversity of active diazotrophs (respectively) in methane seep sediment from Mound 12, Costa Rica, using a combination of 15N-labeling experiments, FISH-NanoSIMS, and RNA and DNA analysis. The fifth chapter expands the scope of the investigation by targeting diverse samples from methane

  1. Nitrogen fixation by immobilized NIF derepressed Klebsiella pneumoniae cells

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, K.; Toda, Y.

    1980-01-01

    In vitro production of ammonia through biological means poses a number of challenges. The organisms should be able to accumulate considerable concentrations of ammonia in the medium. Secondly, nonphotosynthetic organisms must be supplied with high-energy substrates to carry out the fixation reaction. Thirdly, the organisms must be kept in a viable state to produce ammonia over long periods of time. In this article, preliminary results on the production of ammonia by a mutant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae in continuous reactor systems are discussed. Continuous production of ammonia becomes feasible through the immobilization of the whole microbial cells and then through the use of the resulting catalyst system in a flow-through reactor. The rationale for immobilizing microbial cells and the advantages of such an approach over traditional fermentation processes are briefly described as they relate to the microbial production of ammonia. The microbial cells can be immobilized in such a way that their viability is still maintained in the immobilized state. This, in turn, obviates addition of cofactors, which is often an expensive step associated with immobilized multi-enzyme systems. Reconstituted bovine-hide collagen as the carrier matrix for fixing the cells was the carrier of choice for our work on immobilized Klebsiella cells. Polyacrylamide gels were examined as an alternate carrier matrix but results from this were found to be inferior to those collagen immobilized cell system.

  2. Nitrogen fixation in sediments along a depth transect through the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems off Peru and Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gier, J.; Sommer, S.; Löscher, C. R.; Dale, A.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of benthic nitrogen (N2) fixation and its relevance for N cycling in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) are still unknown. Recent studies confirm that benthic N2 fixation can be coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) and that several species of sulfate reducing bacteria have the genetic ability to fix N due to the presence of the gene encoding for the nitrogenase enzyme. We investigated benthic N2 fixation and SR in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone at 12°S and in the Mauritanian upwelling system at 18°N along a depth transect. Sediments were retrieved by a multicorer and a benthic lander at six stations in both regions. Benthic N2 fixation occurred throughout the sediment in both EBUS. Off Peru the highest integrated (0-20 cm) N2 fixation rate of 0.4 mmol N/m2/d was measured inside the core of the OMZ at 253 m water depth. Off Mauritania the highest integrated (0-20 cm) N2 fixation rate of 0.15 mmol N/m2/d was measured at 90 m, coinciding with a low bottom water oxygen concentration (30 μM). N2 fixation depth profiles often overlapped with SR activity. Moreover, sequencing data yielded insights into the composition and diversity of the nifH gene pool in EBUS sediments. Interestingly, detected sequences in both EBUS clustered with SR bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris and several of the novel detected clades belonged to uncultured diazotrophs. Our results suggest that N2 fixation and SR were coupled to a large extent in both regions. However, potential environmental factors controlling benthic diazotrophs in the EBUS appear to be the availability of sulfide and organic matter. Additionally, no inhibition of N2 fixation at high ammonium concentrations was found, which highlights gaps in our knowledge regards the interaction between ammonium availability and diazotrophy. Our results contribute to a better understanding of N cycling in EBUS sediments and sources of fixed N.

  3. Growth, nitrogen fixation, yield and kernel quality of peanut in response to lime, organic and inorganic fertilizer levels.

    PubMed

    Basu, Manisha; Bhadoria, P B S; Mahapatra, S C

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the effect of different levels of chemical fertilizers alone and in combination with farmyard manure and lime on growth, nitrogen fixation, yield and kernel quality of peanut in an acid lateritic soil. Five fertilization levels viz., no chemical fertilizer (CF) (F0), CF @ 20:40:30 (F1), CF @ 40:80:60 (F2) kg ha(-1) NPK, F1 +2.5 t ha(-1) FYM (F3) and F2 +5 t ha(-1) FYM (F4) with and without liming (2 t ha(-1)) were tested. Results revealed that integrated application of FYM+CF at F3 level significantly (P0.05) improved the nitrogen content of nodules (12.4%), kernel yield (19.3%), mineral composition, oil content (4.8%), protein content (28.2%) and hydration coefficient (11.6%) of kernels over sole CF at F1 level. Maximum level of CF or FYM+CF though improved the population of symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria in the peanut rhizosphere, however, could not improve nitrogen fixation, yield and kernel quality.

  4. Bedrock nitrogen inputs support litter nitrogen fixation and temperate forest ecosystem fertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dynarski, K. A.; Mitchell, S. A.; Morford, S.; Houlton, B. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is one of the most frequently limiting nutrients to terrestrial ecosystem productivity worldwide. As atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations continue to rise, progressive N limitation is expected to constrain the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store additional C, making an understanding of N inputs to terrestrial ecosystems increasingly important. In temperate forests, rock reservoirs and biological N fixation (BNF) represent two significant, but poorly characterized, inputs of bioavailable N. Recent research has demonstrated that bedrock can provide a substantial amount of ecosystem-available N in moderate-to-high relief areas with N-rich sedimentary bedrock. In these same ecosystems, asymbiotic BNF performed by heterotrophic microbes in plant litter can provide an additional N input of up to ~2 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Here, we tested the hypothesis that rock N inputs support increased litter BNF via enhanced ecosystem N fertility. We measured rates of BNF along with rock, soil, foliage, and litter chemistry across sites varying substantially in rock N concentrations (from 32 to 800 ppm N). The sites are dominated by Douglas fir and share similar climates and landscape positions (eroding slopes), yet display marked increases in foliar and soil N content as a function of rock N concentrations (foliar: R2=0.18, p<0.001, soil: R2=0.50, p=0.001). We found a significant positive correlation between rock N content and litter BNF rates (R2=0.11, p=0.0035), with rates of BNF at sites with greater than 400 ppm N in bedrock more than double rates of BNF at sites with lower than 400 ppm N in bedrock (p<0.001). These patterns could not be explained by increases in other rock-derived nutrients such as phosphorus or molybdenum, as neither of these known BNF controls increased over the rock N gradient. We found declining foliar lignin:N ratios with increased rock N, suggesting that rock N inputs can increase litter quality, supporting greater microbial activity

  5. On the influence of "non-Redfield" dissolved organic nutrient dynamics on the spatial distribution of N2 fixation and the size of the marine fixed nitrogen inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somes, Christopher J.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and phosphorus (DOP) represent the most abundant form of their respective nutrient pool in the surface layer of the oligotrophic oceans and play an important role in nutrient cycling and productivity. Since DOP is generally more labile than DON, it provides additional P that may stimulate growth of nitrogen-fixing diazotrophs that supply fixed nitrogen to balance denitrification in the ocean. In this study, we introduce semirecalcitrant components of DON and DOP as state variables in an existing global ocean-atmosphere-sea ice-biogeochemistry model of intermediate complexity to assess their impact on the spatial distribution of nitrogen fixation and the size of the marine fixed nitrogen inventory. Large-scale surface data sets of global DON and Atlantic Ocean DOP are used to constrain the model. Our simulations suggest that both preferential DOP remineralization and phytoplankton DOP uptake are important "non-Redfield" processes (i.e., deviate from molar N:P = 16) that need to be accounted for to explain the observed patterns of DOP. Additional non-Redfield DOP sensitivity experiments testing dissolved organic matter (DOM) production rate uncertainties that best reproduce the observed spatial patterns of DON and DOP stimulate additional nitrogen fixation that increases the size of the global marine fixed nitrogen inventory by 4.7 ± 1.7% compared to the simulation assuming Redfield DOM stoichiometry that underestimates the observed nitrogen inventory. The extra 8 Tg yr-1 of nitrogen fixation stimulated in the Atlantic Ocean is mainly responsible for this increase due to its large spatial separation from water column denitrification, which buffers any potential nitrogen surplus in the Pacific Ocean. Our study suggests that the marine fixed nitrogen budget is sensitive to non-Redfield DOP dynamics because access to the relatively labile DOP pool expands the ecological niche for nitrogen-fixing diazotrophs.

  6. Interspecies Transfer and Regulation of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 Nitrogen Fixation Island in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunlei; Lu, Na; Chen, Qinghua; Zhan, Yuhua; Liu, Wei; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Baoli; Lin, Min; Yang, Zhirong; Yan, Yongliang

    2015-08-01

    Until now, considerable effort has been made to engineer novel nitrogen-fixing organisms through the transfer of nif genes from various diazotrophs to non-nitrogen fixers; however, regulatory coupling of the heterologous nif genes with the regulatory system of the new host is still not well understood. In this work, a 49 kb nitrogen fixation island from P. stutzeri A1501 was transferred into E. coli using a novel and efficient transformation strategy, and a series of recombinant nitrogen-fixing E. coli strains were obtained. We found that the nitrogenase activity of the recombinant E. coli strain EN-01, similar to the parent strain P. stutzeri A1501, was dependent on external ammonia concentration, oxygen tension, and temperature. We further found that there existed a regulatory coupling between the E. coli general nitrogen regulatory system and the heterologous P. stutzeri nif island in the recombinant E. coli strain. We also provided evidence that the E. coli general nitrogen regulator GlnG protein was involved in the activation of the nif-specific regulator NifA via a direct interaction with the NifA promoter. To the best of our knowledge, this work plays a groundbreaking role in increasing understanding of the regulatory coupling of the heterologous nitrogen fixation system with the regulatory system of the recipient host. Furthermore, it will shed light on the structure and functional integrity of the nif island and will be useful for the construction of novel and more robust nitrogen-fixing organisms through biosynthetic engineering.

  7. Dinitrogen fixation and dissolved organic nitrogen fueled primary production and particulate export during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment (New Caledonia lagoon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelot, H.; Moutin, T.; L'Helguen, S.; Leblanc, K.; Hélias, S.; Grosso, O.; Leblond, N.; Charrière, B.; Bonnet, S.

    2015-07-01

    In the oligotrophic ocean characterized by nitrate (NO3-) depletion in surface waters, dinitrogen (N2) fixation and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can represent significant nitrogen (N) sources for the ecosystem. In this study, we deployed large in situ mesocosms in New Caledonia in order to investigate (1) the contribution of N2 fixation and DON use to primary production (PP) and particle export and (2) the fate of the freshly produced particulate organic N (PON), i.e., whether it is preferentially accumulated and recycled in the water column or exported out of the system. The mesocosms were fertilized with phosphate (PO43-) in order to prevent phosphorus (P) limitation and promote N2 fixation. The diazotrophic community was dominated by diatom-diazotroph associations (DDAs) during the first part of the experiment for 10 days (P1) followed by the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacteria UCYN-C for the last 9 days (P2) of the experiment. N2 fixation rates averaged 9.8 ± 4.0 and 27.7 ± 8.6 nmol L-1 d-1 during P1 and P2, respectively. NO3- concentrations (< 0.04 μmol L-1) in the mesocosms were a negligible source of N, indicating that N2 fixation was the main driver of new production throughout the experiment. The contribution of N2 fixation to PP was not significantly different (p > 0.05) during P1 (9.0 ± 3.3 %) and P2 (12.6 ± 6.1 %). However, the e ratio that quantifies the efficiency of a system to export particulate organic carbon (POCexport) compared to PP (e ratio = POCexport/PP) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) during P2 (39.7 ± 24.9 %) than during P1 (23.9 ± 20.2 %), indicating that the production sustained by UCYN-C was more efficient at promoting C export than the production sustained by DDAs. During P1, PON was stable and the total amount of N provided by N2 fixation (0.10 ± 0.02 μmol L-1) was not significantly different (p > 0.05) from the total amount of PON exported (0.10 ± 0.04 μmol L-1), suggesting a rapid and probably direct export of the

  8. Comparative sequence analysis of nitrogen fixation-related genes in six legumes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Parupalli, Swathi; Azam, Sarwar; Lee, Suk-Ha; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2013-01-01

    Legumes play an important role as food and forage crops in international agriculture especially in developing countries. Legumes have a unique biological process called nitrogen fixation (NF) by which they convert atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. Although legume genomes have undergone polyploidization, duplication and divergence, NF-related genes, because of their essential functional role for legumes, might have remained conserved. To understand the relationship of divergence and evolutionary processes in legumes, this study analyzes orthologs and paralogs for selected 20 NF-related genes by using comparative genomic approaches in six legumes i.e., Medicago truncatula (Mt), Cicer arietinum, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan (Cc), Phaseolus vulgaris (Pv), and Glycine max (Gm). Subsequently, sequence distances, numbers of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks) and non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous site (Ka) between orthologs and paralogs were calculated and compared across legumes. These analyses suggest the closest relationship between Gm and Cc and the highest distance between Mt and Pv in six legumes. Ks proportional plots clearly showed ancient genome duplication in all legumes, whole genome duplication event in Gm and also speciation pattern in different legumes. This study also reports some interesting observations e.g., no peak at Ks 0.4 in Gm-Gm, location of two independent genes next to each other in Mt and low Ks values for outparalogs for three genes as compared to other 12 genes. In summary, this study underlines the importance of NF-related genes and provides important insights in genome organization and evolutionary aspects of six legume species analyzed. PMID:23986765

  9. Potential for Nitrogen Fixation and Nitrification in the Granite-Hosted Subsurface at Henderson Mine, CO

    PubMed Central

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of life in the deep terrestrial subsurface is established, yet few studies have investigated the origin of nitrogen that supports deep life. Previously, 16S rRNA gene surveys cataloged a diverse microbial community in subsurface fluids draining from boreholes 3000 feet deep at Henderson Mine, CO, USA (Sahl et al., 2008). The prior characterization of the fluid chemistry and microbial community forms the basis for the further investigation here of the source of NH4+. The reported fluid chemistry included N2, NH4+ (5–112 μM), NO2− (27–48 μM), and NO3− (17–72 μM). In this study, the correlation between low NH4+ concentrations in dominantly meteoric fluids and higher NH4+ in rock-reacted fluids is used to hypothesize that NH4+ is sourced from NH4+-bearing biotite. However, biotite samples from the host rocks and ore-body minerals were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy and none-contained NH4+. However, the nitrogenase-encoding gene nifH was successfully amplified from DNA of the fluid sample with high NH4+, suggesting that subsurface microbes have the capability to fix N2. If so, unregulated nitrogen fixation may account for the relatively high NH4+ concentrations in the fluids. Additionally, the amoA and nxrB genes for archaeal ammonium monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase, respectively, were amplified from the high NH4+ fluid DNA, while bacterial amoA genes were not. Putative nitrifying organisms are closely related to ammonium-oxidizing Crenarchaeota and nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira detected in other subsurface sites based upon 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Thermodynamic calculations underscore the importance of NH4+ as an energy source in a subsurface nitrification pathway. These results suggest that the subsurface microbial community at Henderson is adapted to the low nutrient and energy environment by their capability of fixing nitrogen, and that fixed nitrogen may support subsurface biomass via

  10. A quantitative analysis of the direct and indirect costs of nitrogen fixation: a model based on Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Inomura, Keisuke; Bragg, Jason; Follows, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation is advantageous in microbial competition when bioavailable nitrogen is scarce, but has substantial costs for growth rate and growth efficiency. To quantify these costs, we have developed a model of a nitrogen-fixing bacterium that constrains mass, electron and energy flow at the scale of the individual. When tested and calibrated with laboratory data for the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii, the model reveals that the direct energetic cost of nitrogen fixation is small relative to the cost of managing intracellular oxygen. It quantifies the costs and benefits of several potential oxygen protection mechanisms present in nature including enhanced respiration (respiratory protection) as well as the production of extracellular polymers as a barrier to O2 diffusion, and increasing cell size. The latter mechanisms lead to higher growth efficiencies relative to respiratory protection alone. This simple, yet mechanistic framework provides a quantitative model of nitrogen fixation, which can be applied in ecological simulations. PMID:27740611

  11. [Recent advances in research and application of associated nitrogen-fixation with graminaceous plants].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limei; Fang, Ping; Zhu, Riqing

    2004-09-01

    The category, characteristic of diazotrophs isolated from inside and/or rhizosphere of graminaceous plants in recent year and the mechanism of the promoting effects on their host plant were reviewed in this paper. The current status of application of associative nitrogen-fixation inoculants and the problems in inoculation were discussed. It was indicated that the main factors influencing the effects of inoculants include the competition of indigenous micro-organism with inoculants for nutritions and energy, difference of host plant genotypes in associative relationship, and variance of environmental conditions such as the concentration of ammonium in soil solution and the oxygen partial pressure in soil air. The trends of future research in this field were prospected, for example, to isolate and identify the high nitrogen fixing efficiency strains with wider environmental adaptability, to create associative nitrogen fixing bacteria strain which is able to bear or endure higher concentration of ammonium by gene engineering technique, to induce graminaceous plant forming root nodule for nitrogen fixation and to exert the predominance of endophytic diazotrophs.

  12. Glutamine synthetase stabilizes the binding of GlnR to nitrogen fixation gene operators.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Gabriela de C; Hauf, Ksenia; Sant'Anna, Fernando H; Forchhammer, Karl; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2017-03-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a high energy demanding process carried out by diazotrophic microorganisms that supply combined nitrogen to the biosphere. The genes related to BNF are strictly regulated, but these mechanisms are poorly understood in gram-positive bacteria. The transcription factor GlnR was proposed to regulate nitrogen fixation-related genes based on Paenibacillus comparative genomics. In order to validate this proposal, we investigated BNF regulatory sequences in Paenibacillus riograndensis SBR5(T) genome. We identified GlnR-binding sites flanking σ(A) -binding sites upstream from BNF-related genes. GlnR binding to these sites was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. GlnR-DNA affinity is greatly enhanced when GlnR is in complex with feedback-inhibited (glutamine-occupied) glutamine synthetase (GS). GlnR-GS complex formation is also modulated by ATP and AMP. Thereby, gene repression exerted by the GlnR-GS complex is coupled with nitrogen (glutamine levels) and energetic status (ATP and AMP). Finally, we propose a DNA-looping model based on multiple operator sites that represents a strong and strict regulation for these genes.

  13. Primary productivity and nitrogen fixation by Trichodesmium spp. in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parab, Sushma G.; Matondkar, S. G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Trichodesmium was studied with the purpose of understanding its distribution, organic production and nitrogen fixation in the Arabian Sea. Out of the 143 stations sampled, a total of 93 stations showed the presence of Trichodesmium filaments. Two species of Trichodesmium namely, T. thiebautii and T. erythraeum were found. These were distributed on the basis of the physico-chemical conditions of the Arabian Sea. This was the first time that we managed to detect and record the presence of Trichodesmium thiebautii bloom in the Arabian Sea at depths as deep as 60-70 m. Total counts of Trichodesmium varied between 0 and 400737 filamentsL- 1. T. thiebautii developed in offshore waters during the fall intermonsoon, when the water temperature was around 28 °C and nitrate content was as low as 0.34 μM. After the northeast monsoon, Trichodesmium erythraeum developed in the offshore area and then spread to coastal waters. Both species of Trichodesmium together produced a total of 0.263 TgCyear- 1 and fixed a total of 0.2976 TgNyear- 1 in the Arabian Sea. The study revealed that Trichodesmium was a major contributor to the organic matter productivity of the Arabian Sea during the period from November to April. The seasonality of the blooms of Trichodesmium is discussed with the help of Ocean Color Monitoring (OCM) data and biogeochemical implication of these findings in the Arabian Sea.

  14. Quantifying the effect of fire disturbance on free-living nitrogen fixation in tropical ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Oliveira Bomfim, B.; Silva, L. C. R.; Marimon-Junior, B. H.; Marimon, B.; Horwath, W. R.; Neves, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forests and savannas are among the most important biomes on Earth, supporting more than half of all plant and animal species on the planet. Despite growing interest in biogeochemical processes that affect tropical forest dynamics, many, including biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), are still poorly understood. Free-living N-fixers are thought to play a key role in tropical ecosystems, alleviating N and P limitation, supporting above and below ground biomass production, as well as carbon storage in plants and soil, but this influence has yet to be quantified. Of particular interest, the spatial distribution and identity of free-living BNF under disturbance regimes that commonly lead to the conversion of forests to savannas is currently unknown. To address this critical gap in knowledge, we measured free-living BNF quantifying rates of N fixation under contrasting fire regimes in the Amazon-Cerrado transition of central Brazil. Samples were collected in 4 ha of floodable forests affected by fire and 1 ha of unburned (seasonally flooded) forest located at the Araguaia State Park, Mato Grosso State, Brazil. Free-living N-fixation rates were measured by both 15N2 (98 atom% 15N) and acethylene reduction assay (ARA). Samples were incubated in the field and left in the dark at room temperature for 12 hours. In the next few weeks we will quantify N fixation rates that will be presented in the upcoming AGU meeting.

  15. Molybdenum and phosphorus limitation of moss-associated nitrogen fixation in boreal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Kathrin; Degboe, Jefferson; Michelsen, Anders; Bradley, Robert; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) performed by moss-associated cyanobacteria is one of the main sources of new nitrogen (N) input in pristine, high-latitude ecosystems. Yet, the nutrients that limit BNF remain elusive. Here, we tested whether this important ecosystem function is limited by the availability of molybdenum (Mo), phosphorus (P), or both. BNF in dominant mosses was measured with the acetylene reduction assay (ARA) at different time intervals following Mo and P additions, in both laboratory microcosms with mosses from a boreal spruce forest and field plots in subarctic tundra. We further used a (15) N2 tracer technique to assess the ARA to N2 fixation conversion ratios at our subarctic site. BNF was up to four-fold higher shortly after the addition of Mo, in both the laboratory and field experiments. A similar positive response to Mo was found in moss colonizing cyanobacterial biomass. As the growing season progressed, nitrogenase activity became progressively more P limited. The ARA : (15) N2 ratios increased with increasing Mo additions. These findings show that N2 fixation activity as well as cyanobacterial biomass in dominant feather mosses from boreal forests and subarctic tundra are limited by Mo availability.

  16. New evidence for nitrogen fixation within the Italian white truffle Tuber magnatum.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Elena; Ceccaroli, Paola; Saltarelli, Roberta; Guidi, Chiara; Potenza, Lucia; Basaglia, Marina; Fontana, Federico; Baldan, Enrico; Casella, Sergio; Ryahi, Ouafae; Zambonelli, Alessandra; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2010-01-01

    Diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria and the nitrogen-fixation activity was investigated in Tuber magnatum, the most well-known prized species of Italian white truffle. Degenerate PCR primers were applied to amplify the nitrogenase gene nifH from T. magnatum ascomata at different stages of maturation. Putative amino acid sequences revealed mainly the presence of Alphaproteobacteria belonging to Bradyrhizobium spp. and expression of nifH genes from Bradyrhizobia was detected. The nitrogenase activity evaluated by acetylene reduction assay was 0.5-7.5μmolC(2)H(4)h(-1)g(-1), comparable with early nodules of legumes associated with specific nitrogen-fixing bacteria. This is the first demonstration of nitrogenase expression gene and activity within truffle.

  17. BMAA inhibits nitrogen fixation in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-08-21

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms.

  18. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms. PMID:23966039

  19. Nitrogen fixation in microbial mat and stromatolite communities from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Falcón, L I; Cerritos, R; Eguiarte, L E; Souza, V

    2007-08-01

    Nitrogen fixation (nitrogenase activity, NA) of a microbial mat and a living stromatolite from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico, was examined over spring, summer, and winter of 2004. The goal of the study was to characterize the diazotrophic community through molecular analysis of the nifH gene and using inhibitors of sulfate reduction and oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis. We also evaluated the role of ultraviolet radiation on the diazotrophic activity of the microbial communities. Both microbial communities showed patterns of NA with maximum rates during the day that decreased significantly with 3-3,4-dichlorophenyl-1',1'-dimethylurea, suggesting the potential importance of heterocystous cyanobacteria. There is also evidence of NA by sulfur-reducing bacteria in both microbial communities suggested by the negative effect exerted by the addition of sodium molybdate. Elimination of infrared and ultraviolet radiation had no effect on NA. Both microbial communities had nifH sequences that related to group I, including cyanobacteria and purple sulfur and nonsulfur bacteria, as well as group II nitrogenases, including sulfur reducing and green sulfur bacteria.

  20. The Genetics of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation: Comparative Genomics of 14 Rhizobia Strains by Resolution of Protein Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Black, Michael; Moolhuijzen, Paula; Chapman, Brett; Barrero, Roberto; Howieson, John; Hungria, Mariangela; Bellgard, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The symbiotic relationship between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria is critical for agriculture, as it may have profound impacts on lowering costs for farmers, on land sustainability, on soil quality, and on mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. However, despite the importance of the symbioses to the global nitrogen cycling balance, very few rhizobial genomes have been sequenced so far, although there are some ongoing efforts in sequencing elite strains. In this study, the genomes of fourteen selected strains of the order Rhizobiales, all previously fully sequenced and annotated, were compared to assess differences between the strains and to investigate the feasibility of defining a core ‘symbiome’—the essential genes required by all rhizobia for nodulation and nitrogen fixation. Comparison of these whole genomes has revealed valuable information, such as several events of lateral gene transfer, particularly in the symbiotic plasmids and genomic islands that have contributed to a better understanding of the evolution of contrasting symbioses. Unique genes were also identified, as well as omissions of symbiotic genes that were expected to be found. Protein comparisons have also allowed the identification of a variety of similarities and differences in several groups of genes, including those involved in nodulation, nitrogen fixation, production of exopolysaccharides, Type I to Type VI secretion systems, among others, and identifying some key genes that could be related to host specificity and/or a better saprophytic ability. However, while several significant differences in the type and number of proteins were observed, the evidence presented suggests no simple core symbiome exists. A more abstract systems biology concept of nitrogen fixing symbiosis may be required. The results have also highlighted that comparative genomics represents a valuable tool for capturing specificities and generalities of each genome. PMID:24704847

  1. The Relationship Between Iron and Nitrogen Fixation in Trichodesmium spp.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    area of the ocean that has been studied (Hunter and Boyd, 2007), including the recent discovery that they are associated with hydrothermal vent ...Fones, G.R., and German, C.R. (2008) The distribution and stabilisation of dissolved Fe in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. Earth Planet Sc Lett 270...Hawaii Ocean Time-series station ALOHA: Temporal variability and an intermediate water hydrothermal plume (vol 69, pg 933, 2005). Geochim Cosmochim

  2. Photosystem-II shutdown evolved with Nitrogen fixation in the unicellular diazotroph Crocosphaera watsonii.

    PubMed

    Rabouille, Sophie; Claquin, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Protection of nitrogenase from oxygen in unicellular Cyanobacteria is obtained by temporal separation of photosynthesis and diazotrophy through transcriptional and translational regulations of nitrogenase. But diazotrophs can face environmental situations in which N2 fixation occurs significantly in the light, and we believe that another control operates to make it possible. The night-time shutdown of PSII activity is a peculiar behaviour that discriminates Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 from any other phototroph, whether prokaryote or eukaryote. This phenomenon is not only due to the plastoquinone pool redox status, and suggests that the sentinel D1 protein, expressed in periods of nitrogen fixation, is inactive. Results demonstrate a tight constraint of oxygen evolution in C. watsonii as additional protection of nitrogenase activity and suggest a possible recycling of cellular components.

  3. Foraminiferal isotope evidence of reduced nitrogen fixation in the ice age Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Ren, H; Sigman, D M; Meckler, A N; Plessen, B; Robinson, R S; Rosenthal, Y; Haug, G H

    2009-01-09

    Fixed nitrogen (N) is a limiting nutrient for algae in the low-latitude ocean, and its oceanic inventory may have been higher during ice ages, thus helping to lower atmospheric CO2 during those intervals. In organic matter within planktonic foraminifera shells in Caribbean Sea sediments, we found that the 15N/14N ratio from the last ice age is higher than that from the current interglacial, indicating a higher nitrate 15N/14N ratio in the Caribbean thermocline. This change and other species-specific differences are best explained by less N fixation in the Atlantic during the last ice age. The fixation decrease was most likely a response to a known ice age reduction in ocean N loss, and it would have worked to balance the ocean N budget and to curb ice age-interglacial change in the N inventory.

  4. Nitrogen fixation and metabolism by groundwater-dependent perennial plants in a hyperarid desert.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Stefan K; Kahmen, Ansgar; Arampatsis, Christina; Popp, Marianne; Adams, Mark

    2004-11-01

    The Central Asian Taklamakan desert is characterized by a hyperarid climate with less than 50 mm annual precipitation but a permanent shallow groundwater table. The perched groundwater (2-16 m) could present a reliable and constant source of nitrogen throughout the growing season and help overcome temporal nitrogen limitations that are common in arid environments. We investigated the importance of groundwater and nitrogen fixation in the nitrogen metabolism of desert plants by assessing the possible forms and availability of soil N and atmospheric N and the seasonal variation in concentration as well as isotopic composition of plant N. Water availability was experimentally modified in the desert foreland through simulated flooding to estimate the contribution of surface water and temporally increased soil moisture for nutrient uptake and plant-water relations. The natural vegetation of the Taklamakan desert is dominated by plants with high foliar nitrogen concentrations (2-3% DM) and leaf nitrate reductase activity (NRA) (0.2-1 micromol NO2- g(-1) FW h(-1)). There is little evidence that nitrogen is a limiting resource as all perennial plants exhibited fast rates of growth. The extremely dry soil conditions preclude all but minor contributions of soil N to total plant N so that groundwater is suggested as the dominant source of N with concentrations of 100 microM NO3-. Flood irrigation had little beneficial effect on nitrogen metabolism and growth, further confirming the dependence on groundwater. Nitrogen fixation was determined by the 15N natural abundance method and was a significant component of the N-requirement of the legume Alhagi, the average contribution of biologically fixed nitrogen in Alhagi was 54.8%. But nitrogen fixing plants had little ecological advantage owing to the more or less constant supply of N available from groundwater. From our data we conclude that the perennial species investigated have adapted to the environmental conditions through

  5. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a tropical rainforest: 15N natural abundance measurements supported by experimental isotopic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pons, Thijs L; Perreijn, Kristel; van Kessel, Chris; Werger, Marinus J A

    2007-01-01

    * Leguminous trees are very common in the tropical rainforests of Guyana. Here, species-specific differences in N(2) fixation capability among nodulating legumes growing on different soils and a possible limitation of N(2) fixation by a relatively high nitrogen (N) and low phosphorus (P) availability in the forest were investigated. * Leaves of 17 nodulating species and 17 non-nodulating reference trees were sampled and their delta(15)N values measured. Estimates of N(2) fixation rates were calculated using the (15)N natural abundance method. Pot experiments were conducted on the effect of N and P availability on N(2) fixation using the (15)N-enriched isotope dilution method. * Nine species showed estimates of > 33% leaf N derived from N(2) fixation, while the others had low or undetectable N(2) fixation rates. High N and low P availability reduced N(2) fixation substantially. * The results suggest that a high N and low P availability in the forest limit N(2) fixation. At the forest ecosystem level, N(2) fixation was estimated at c. 6% of total N uptake by the tree community. We conclude that symbiotic N(2) fixation plays an important role in maintaining high amounts of soil available N in undisturbed forest.

  6. Nitrogen fixation to cyanide at a molybdenum center.

    PubMed

    Curley, John J; Cozzolino, Anthony F; Cummins, Christopher C

    2011-03-21

    Facile methoxymethylation of N(2)-derived nitride NMo(N[(t)Bu]Ar)(3) provided the imido cation [MeOCH(2)NMo(N[(t)Bu]Ar)(3)](+) as its triflate salt in 88% yield. Treatment of the latter with LiN(SiMe(3))(2) provided blue methoxyketimide complex MeO(H)CNMo(N[(t)Bu]Ar)(3) in 95% yield. Conversion of the latter to the terminal cyanide complex NCMo(N[(t)Bu]Ar)(3), which was the subject of a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study, was accomplished in 51% yield upon treatment with a combination of SnCl(2) and Me(2)NSiMe(3).

  7. Nitrogen fixation in the eastern Atlantic reaches similar levels in the Southern and Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca-Batista, Debany; Dehairs, Frank; Riou, Virginie; Fripiat, François; Elskens, Marc; Deman, Florian; Brion, Natacha; Quéroué, Fabien; Bode, Maya; Auel, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Euphotic layer dinitrogen (N2) fixation and primary production (PP) were measured in the eastern Atlantic Ocean (38°N-21°S) using 15N2 and 13C bicarbonate tracer incubations. This region is influenced by Saharan dust deposition and waters with low nitrogen to phosphorus (N/P) ratios originating from the Subantarctic and the Benguela upwelling system. Depth-integrated rates of N2 fixation in the north (0°N-38°N) ranged from 59 to 370 µmol N m-2 d-1, with the maximal value at 19°N under the influence of the northwest African upwelling. Diazotrophic activity in the south (0°S-21°S), though slightly lower, was surprisingly close to observations in the north, with values ranging from 47 to 119 µmol N m-2 d-1. Our North Atlantic N2 fixation rates correlate well with dust deposition, while those in the South Atlantic correlate strongly with excess phosphate relative to nitrate. There, the necessary iron is assumed to be supplied from the Benguela upwelling system. When converting N2 fixation to carbon uptake using a Redfield ratio (6.6), we find that N2 fixation may support up to 9% of PP in the subtropical North Atlantic (20°N-38°N), 5% in the tropical North Atlantic (0°N-20°N), and 1% of PP in the South Atlantic (0°S-21°S). Combining our data with published data sets, we estimate an annual N input of 27.6 ± 10 Tg N yr-1 over the open Atlantic Ocean, 11% of which enters the region between 20°N and 50°N, 71% between 20°N and 10°S, and 18% between 10°N and 45°S.

  8. Variability in nitrogen uptake and fixation in the oligotrophic waters off the south west coast of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twomey, L. J.; Waite, A. M.; Pez, V.; Pattiaratchi, C. B.

    2007-04-01

    The results presented in this study provide the first broad-scale regional characterisation of the phytoplankton-nitrogen dynamics across the continental shelf between the Abrolhos Islands and Cape Leeuwin, Western Australia. We demonstrate key features of N-uptake, including nitrate and ammonium uptake and N fixation, across the dominant current systems of the west coast of Australia during a 2-week period in spring-summer. The surface waters of the region were N impoverished with low phytoplankton biomass. Nitrate and ammonium uptake rates were among the lowest on record, and f-ratios were high compared to other oligotrophic systems ( f-ratio ˜0.5 throughout), indicating an equal preference for nitrate and ammonium uptake. Areas of high phytoplankton biomass were most likely fuelled by nitrate transported into the euphotic zone during temporally short bursts of upwelling on ˜weekly, rather than monthly time scales. When upwelling had relaxed, phytoplankton productivity was largely maintained by microbial regeneration in the euphotic zone. A large proportion (20-60%) of the phytoplankton biomass was comprised of picoplankton and nanoplankton cyanobacteria. However, rates of N 2 fixation were 2 orders of magnitude lower than dissolved inorganic N uptake, indicating that N 2-fixation did not significantly contribute to phytoplankton productivity during the study.

  9. The value of biodiversity in legume symbiotic nitrogen fixation and nodulation for biofuel and food production.

    PubMed

    Gresshoff, Peter M; Hayashi, Satomi; Biswas, Bandana; Mirzaei, Saeid; Indrasumunar, Arief; Reid, Dugald; Samuel, Sharon; Tollenaere, Alina; van Hameren, Bethany; Hastwell, April; Scott, Paul; Ferguson, Brett J

    2015-01-01

    Much of modern agriculture is based on immense populations of genetically identical or near-identical varieties, called cultivars. However, advancement of knowledge, and thus experimental utility, is found through biodiversity, whether naturally-found or induced by the experimenter. Globally we are confronted by ever-growing food and energy challenges. Here we demonstrate how such biodiversity from the food legume crop soybean (Glycine max L. Merr) and the bioenergy legume tree Pongamia (Millettia) pinnata is a great value. Legume plants are diverse and are represented by over 18,000 species on this planet. Some, such as soybean, pea and medics are used as food and animal feed crops. Others serve as ornamental (e.g., wisteria), timber (e.g., acacia/wattle) or biofuel (e.g., Pongamia pinnata) resources. Most legumes develop root organs (nodules) after microsymbiont induction that serve as their habitat for biological nitrogen fixation. Through this, nitrogen fertiliser demand is reduced by the efficient symbiosis between soil Rhizobium-type bacteria and the appropriate legume partner. Mechanistic research into the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of legumes is thus strategically essential for future global agriculture. Here we demonstrate how molecular plant science analysis of the genetics of an established food crop (soybean) and an emerging biofuel P. pinnata feedstock contributes to their utility by sustainable production aided by symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

  10. Multifaceted Investigation of Metabolites During Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago via High Resolution MALDI-MS Imaging and ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemperline, Erin; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have developed the unique ability to establish a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. This interaction results in the formation of root nodules in which rhizobia thrive and reduce atmospheric dinitrogen into plant-usable ammonium through biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Owing to the availability of genetic information for both of the symbiotic partners, the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for examining the BNF process. Although metabolites are important in this symbiotic association, few studies have investigated the array of metabolites that influence this process. Of these studies, most target only a few specific metabolites, the roles of which are either well known or are part of a well-characterized metabolic pathway. Here, we used a multifaceted mass spectrometric (MS) approach to detect and identify the key metabolites that are present during BNF using the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association as the model system. High mass accuracy and high resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) Orbitrap instruments were used in this study and provide complementary results for more in-depth characterization of the nitrogen-fixation process. We used well-characterized plant and bacterial mutants to highlight differences between the metabolites that are present in functional versus nonfunctional nodules. Our study highlights the benefits of using a combination of mass spectrometric techniques to detect differences in metabolite composition and the distributions of these metabolites in plant biology.

  11. Multifaceted Investigation of Metabolites During Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago via High Resolution MALDI-MS Imaging and ESI-MS

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed the unique ability to establish a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. This interaction results in the formation of root nodules in which rhizobia thrive and reduce atmospheric dinitrogen into plant-usable ammonium through biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Due to the availability of genetic information for both of the symbiotic partners, the Medicago truncatula–Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for examining the BNF process. Although metabolites are important in this symbiotic association, few studies have investigated the array of metabolites that influence this process. Of these studies, most target only a few specific metabolites, the roles of which are either well known or are part of a well-characterized metabolic pathway. Here, we used a multifaceted mass spectrometric (MS) approach to detect and identify the key metabolites that are present during BNF using the Medicago truncatula–Sinorhizobium meliloti association as the model system. High mass accuracy and high resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) Orbitrap instruments were used in this study and provide complementary results for more in-depth characterization of the nitrogen-fixation process. We used well-characterized plant and bacterial mutants to highlight differences between the metabolites that are present in functional vs. non-functional nodules. Our study highlights the benefits of using a combination of mass spectrometric techniques to detect differences in metabolite composition and the distributions of these metabolites in plant biology. PMID:25323862

  12. Introduction of the Escherichia coli gdhA gene into Rhizobium phaseoli: effect on nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, A; Becerril, B; Mora, J

    1988-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli lacks glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and assimilates ammonium by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway. A strain of R. phaseoli harboring the Escherichia coli GDH structural gene (gdhA) was constructed. GDH activity was expressed in R. phaseoli in the free-living state and in symbiosis. Nodules with bacteroids that expressed GDH activity had severe impairment of nitrogen fixation. Also, R. phaseoli cells that lost GDH activity and assimilated ammonium by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway preferentially nodulated Phaseolus vulgaris. PMID:2892830

  13. Persistence of biological nitrogen fixation in high latitude grass-clover grasslands under different management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakakis, Vasileios; Sturite, Ievina; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) can substantially contribute to N supply in permanent grasslands, improving N yield and forage quality, while reducing inorganic N inputs. Among the factors critical to the performance of BNF in grass-legume mixtures are selected grass and legume species, proportion of legumes, the soil-climatic conditions, in particular winter conditions, and management practices (e.g. fertilization and compaction). In high latitude grasslands, low temperatures can reduce the performance of BNF by hampering the legumés growth and by suppressing N2 fixation. Estimation of BNF in field experiments is not straightforward. Different methods have been developed providing different results. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of BNF, in a newly established field experiment in North Norway over four years. The grassland consisted of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) sawn in three proportions (0, 15 and 30% in total) together with timothy (Pheum pretense L.) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis L.). Three levels of compaction were applied each year (no tractor, light tractor, heavy tractor) together with two different N rates (110 kg N/ha as cattle slurry or 170 kg N/ha as cattle slurry and inorganic N fertilizer). We applied two different methods, the 15N natural abundance and the difference method, to estimate BNF in the first harvest of each year. Overall, the difference method overestimated BNF relative to the 15N natural abundance method. BNF in the first harvest was compared to winter survival of red and white clover plants, which decreased with increasing age of the grassland. However, winter conditions did not seem to affect the grassland's ability to fix N in spring. The fraction of N derived from the atmosphere (NdfA) in white and red clover was close to 100% in each spring, indicating no suppression of BNF. BNF increased the total N yield of the grasslands by up to 75%, mainly due to high

  14. Discovery of symbiotic nitrogen fixation and chemoautotrophy in cold-water corals

    PubMed Central

    Middelburg, Jack J.; Mueller, Christina E.; Veuger, Bart; Larsson, Ann I.; Form, Armin; Oevelen, Dick van

    2015-01-01

    Cold-water corals (CWC) are widely distributed around the world forming extensive reefs at par with tropical coral reefs. They are hotspots of biodiversity and organic matter processing in the world’s deep oceans. Living in the dark they lack photosynthetic symbionts and are therefore considered to depend entirely on the limited flux of organic resources from the surface ocean. While symbiotic relations in tropical corals are known to be key to their survival in oligotrophic conditions, the full metabolic capacity of CWC has yet to be revealed. Here we report isotope tracer evidence for efficient nitrogen recycling, including nitrogen assimilation, regeneration, nitrification and denitrification. Moreover, we also discovered chemoautotrophy and nitrogen fixation in CWC and transfer of fixed nitrogen and inorganic carbon into bulk coral tissue and tissue compounds (fatty acids and amino acids). This unrecognized yet versatile metabolic machinery of CWC conserves precious limiting resources and provides access to new nitrogen and organic carbon resources that may be essential for CWC to survive in the resource-depleted dark ocean. PMID:26644069

  15. Identification of nitrogenous organic species in Titan aerosols analogs: Nitrogen fixation routes in early atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2013-09-01

    Titan, an icy world surrounded by auburn organic haze, is considered as one of the best targets for studying abiotic planetary organic chemistry. In spite of a great many efforts being made, the chemistry in Titan’s atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of Titan aerosols analogs (tholin) by NMR and identified hexamethylenetetramine as a dominant small molecule in Titan tholin. Here we report a more complete and definitive structural investigation of the small molecule inventory in Titan tholin. We identified several nitrogenous organic molecules including cyanamide, guanidine, 2-cyanoguanidine, melamine, N‧-cyanoformamidine and 1,2,4-triazole in Titan tholin by using NMR and GC-MS and standard sample comparison. The structural characteristics of these molecules suggest a possible formation pathway from the reaction of HCN and NH3, both of which are known to exist in appreciable density in the atmosphere and were tentatively detected by the Huygens probe.

  16. The Effect of NaCl on growth, N2 fixation (acetylene reduction), and percentage total nitrogen in Leucaena leucocephala (Leguminosae) var. K-8.

    PubMed

    Anthraper, Annie; Dubois, John D

    2003-05-01

    Leucaena leucocephala var. K-8 is a fast-growing, tropical leguminous tree that has multiple economic uses. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect(s) of varying NaCl concentrations on growth, N(2) fixation, and percentage of total tissue nitrogen in different organs in L. leucocephala. Seeds were germinated and grown for 10 wk with a nitrogen-free fertilizer applied every 2 wk. At 10 wk, plants were treated for either 0, 7, 14, 21, or 28 wk with either deionized water (control), 0.00625 mol/L, 0.0125 mol/L, 0.025 mol/L, 0.05 mol/L, or 0.1 mol/L NaCl in addition to the fertilizer every 2 wk. Growth was measured as plant height, nodule number and mass, and dry tissue mass. N(2) fixation was measured by the acetylene reduction assay. Percentage of tissue nitrogen was determined using Kjeldahl analysis. In younger plants (7-wk treatment), major fluctuations in NaCl tolerance were observed in the different plant organs. As plants matured (14- and 21-wk treatment) NaCl concentrations of 0.025 mol/L and higher caused the greatest reduction in growth and tissue nitrogen. We conclude that NaCl concentrations of 0.025 mol/L and greater caused a major decrease in growth, N(2) fixation, and percentage of tissue nitrogen in L. leucocephala plants that were less than 1 yr old.

  17. The effect of cutting, mulching and applications of farmyard manure on nitrogen fixation in a red clover/grass sward.

    PubMed

    Hatch, D J; Goodlass, G; Joynes, A; Shepherd, M A

    2007-12-01

    In organic farming, maximising the amount of nitrogen (N) which is fixed and retained within the soil is of paramount importance for the yield of the following crop. The aim of this study was to establish the extent to which increased soil fertility, farmyard manure (FYM) applications and/or mulching, could adversely affect fixation. At two sites, situated in the South West (SW) and North East (NE) of England, N(2) fixation was estimated in 'organically' managed red clover/grass plots, both with and without green manure (i.e. surface mulched) and/or the addition of FYM. The FYM was incorporated into the seedbeds at both sites in autumn 2002 at the rate of 170 kg total Nha(-1), as either well-composted (SW site), or not actively-composted (NE site) manures. The same FYM application rate was repeated as top-dressings to both sites in autumn 2003. The plots were cut three or four times each year over two growing seasons. In the first harvest year (2003), incorporation of FYM had beneficial effects of increasing dry matter and N yields significantly at the first cut, but there were no significant differences in subsequent cuts. The same pattern was found in the second harvest year (2004) after the top dressings of FYM, suggesting that most of the N in both types of FYM was in recalcitrant forms. Over the two growing seasons, mulching did not affect red clover/grass dry matter or N yields, but did reduce the proportion of N(2) fixed, by up to 60 kg Nha(-1) when compared with plots from which the clover/grass herbage was cut and removed. Thus, the gain in N from FYM or green manure tended to be offset by a similar reduction in N(2) fixation. These results demonstrate the close association between the availability of soil N and the feed-back system which operates on N(2) fixation by red clover.

  18. Flavone Limitations to Root Nodulation and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Alfalfa 1

    PubMed Central

    Kapulnik, Yoram; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1987-01-01

    Transcription of the nodABC genes in Rhizobium meliloti is required for root nodule formation in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and occurs when specific compounds, such as the flavone luteolin, are supplied by the host plant. Results reported here indicate how luteolin in the root and rhizosphere can affect subsequent N2 fixation and plant growth. Previous experiments with `Hairy Peruvian 32' (HP32), an alfalfa population produced from `Hairy Peruvian' (HP) by two generations of selection for increased N2 fixation and growth, found that HP32 had more root nodules and fixed more N2 than the parental HP population. In the present study, flavonoid extracts of HP32 seedling roots are shown to contain a 60% higher concentration of compounds that induce transcription of a nodABC-lacZ fusion in R. meliloti than comparable extracts of HP roots. Chromatographic data indicated that HP32 roots had a 77% higher concentration of luteolin than HP roots. Adding 10 micromolar luteolin to the rhizosphere of HP seedlings increased nodulation, N2 fixation, total N, and total dry weight but had no effect on nitrate assimilation. These data show that normal levels of flavone nodulation signals in the rhizosphere of HP alfalfa can limit root nodulation, symbiotic N2 fixation, and seedling growth and suggest that one mechanism for increasing N2 fixation can be the genetic enhancement of specific biochemical signals which induce nodulation genes in Rhizobium. PMID:16665583

  19. Efficient Inactivation of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation Related Genes in Lotus japonicus Using CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Longxiang; Wang, Longlong; Tan, Qian; Fan, Qiuling; Zhu, Hui; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming; Duanmu, Deqiang

    2016-01-01

    The targeted genome editing technique, CRISPR/Cas9 system, has been widely used to modify genes of interest in a predictable and precise manner. In this study, we describe the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated efficient editing of representative SNF (symbiotic nitrogen fixation) related genes in the model legume Lotus japonicus via Agrobacterium-mediated stable or hairy root transformation. We first predicted nine endogenous U6 genes in Lotus and then demonstrated the efficacy of the LjU6-1 gene promoter in driving expression of single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) by using a split yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) reporter system to restore the fluorescence in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Next, we chose a customized sgRNA targeting SYMRK (symbiosis receptor-like kinase) loci and achieved ~35% mutagenic efficiency in 20 T0 transgenic plants, two of them containing biallelic homozygous mutations with a 2-bp deletion near the PAM region. We further designed two sgRNAs targeting three homologous leghemoglobin loci (LjLb1, LjLb2, LjLb3) for testing the possibility of generating multi-gene knockouts. 20 out of 70 hairy root transgenic plants exhibited white nodules, with at least two LjLbs disrupted in each plant. Compared with the constitutively active CaMV 35S promoter, the nodule-specific LjLb2 promoter was also effective in gene editing in nodules by hairy root transformation. Triple mutant knockout of LjLbs was also obtained by stable transformation using two sgRNAs. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system should greatly facilitate functional analyses of SNF related genes in Lotus japonicus. PMID:27630657

  20. Nitrogen fixation and nitrogenase (nifH) expression in tropical waters of the eastern north atlantic.

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, K. A.; Rees, A. P.; Zehr, J. P.; Pereira, N.; Swift, P.; Shelley, R.; Lohan, M.; Woodward, E. M. S.; Gilbert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of nifH in 28 surface water samples collected during fall 2007 from six stations in the vicinity of the Cape Verde Islands (north-east Atlantic) was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based clone libraries and quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of seven diazotrophic phylotypes. Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) rates and nutrient concentrations were determined for these stations, which were selected based on a range in surface chlorophyll concentrations to target a gradient of primary productivity. BNF rates greater than 6 nmolN I{sup -1} h{sup -1} were measured at two of the near-shore stations where high concentrations of Fe and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} were also measured. Six hundred and five nifH transcripts were amplified by RT-PCR, of which 76% are described by six operational taxonomic units, including Trichodesmium and the uncultivated UCYN-A, and four non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs that clustered with uncultivated Proteobacteria. Although all five cyanobacterial phylotypes quantified in RT-qPCR assays were detected at different stations in this study, UCYN-A contributed most significantly to the pool of nifH transcripts in both coastal and oligotrophic waters. A comparison of results from RT-PCR clone libraries and RT-qPCR indicated that a {gamma}-proteobacterial phylotype was preferentially amplified in clone libraries, which underscores the need to use caution interpreting clone-library-based nifH studies, especially when considering the importance of uncultivated proteobacterial diazotrophs.

  1. Iron deficiency increases growth and nitrogen-fixation rates of phosphorus-deficient marine cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nathan S; Fu, Feixue; Sedwick, Peter N; Hutchins, David A

    2015-01-01

    Marine dinitrogen (N2)-fixing cyanobacteria have large impacts on global biogeochemistry as they fix carbon dioxide (CO2) and fertilize oligotrophic ocean waters with new nitrogen. Iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) are the two most important limiting nutrients for marine biological N2 fixation, and their availabilities vary between major ocean basins and regions. A long-standing question concerns the ability of two globally dominant N2-fixing cyanobacteria, unicellular Crocosphaera and filamentous Trichodesmium, to maintain relatively high N2-fixation rates in these regimes where both Fe and P are typically scarce. We show that under P-deficient conditions, cultures of these two cyanobacteria are able to grow and fix N2 faster when Fe deficient than when Fe replete. In addition, growth affinities relative to P increase while minimum concentrations of P that support growth decrease at low Fe concentrations. In Crocosphaera, this effect is accompanied by a reduction in cell sizes and elemental quotas. Relatively high growth rates of these two biogeochemically critical cyanobacteria in low-P, low-Fe environments such as those that characterize much of the oligotrophic ocean challenge the common assumption that low Fe levels can have only negative effects on marine primary producers. The closely interdependent influence of Fe and P on N2-fixing cyanobacteria suggests that even subtle shifts in their supply ratio in the past, present and future oceans could have large consequences for global carbon and nitrogen cycles.

  2. Distribution and evolution of nitrogen fixation genes in the phylum Bacteroidetes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jun-ichi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Iino, Takao; Noda, Satoko; Hongoh, Yuichi; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2015-01-01

    Diazotrophs had not previously been identified among bacterial species in the phylum Bacteroidetes until the rapid expansion of bacterial genome sequences, which revealed the presence of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes in this phylum. We herein determined the draft genome sequences of Bacteroides graminisolvens JCM 15093(T) and Geofilum rubicundum JCM 15548(T). In addition to these and previously reported 'Candidatus Azobacteroides pseudotrichonymphae' and Paludibacter propionicigenes, an extensive survey of the genome sequences of diverse Bacteroidetes members revealed the presence of a set of nif genes (nifHDKENB) in strains of Dysgonomonas gadei, Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides, Saccharicrinis fermentans, and Alkaliflexus imshenetskii. These eight species belonged to and were distributed sporadically within the order Bacteroidales. Acetylene reduction activity was detected in the five species examined, strongly suggesting their diazotrophic nature. Phylogenetic analyses showed monophyletic clustering of the six Nif protein sequences in the eight Bacteroidales species, implying that nitrogen fixation is ancestral to Bacteroidales and has been retained in these species, but lost in many other lineages. The identification of nif genes in Bacteroidales facilitates the prediction of the organismal origins of related sequences directly obtained from various environments.

  3. Aerosol Deposition of Molybdenum: A Control on Nitrogen-Fixation and Tropical Forest Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M.; Howarth, R. W.; Marino, R. M.; Mahowald, N. M.; Williams, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen fixation, the primary source of new nitrogen (N) to tropical forests, is exclusively catalyzed by the nitrogenase enzyme, which almost always requires molybdenum (Mo). Increasing evidence in recent years suggests that Mo availability may be low in highly weathered soils and can constrain N-fixation rates. Mo is generally either present in a highly soluble form (MoO42-) that is susceptible to leaching or tightly bound in minerals unavailable for biological uptake. To address how Mo is retained in highly weathered tropical systems to support N-fixation, atmospheric transport through dust and sea-salt aerosol spray were examined. Using a global atmospheric transport model computed from modeled meteorological fields, extrapolated dust and sea-salt aerosol Mo sources were used to calculate global distribution of Mo deposition. Dust deposition occurs across the entirety of some tropical forests, particularly the world's largest tropical forest in the Amazon Basin. The model indicates that the Amazon Basin receives substantial inputs of dust, especially the entire northern Amazon Basin, while the southern half receives less. Most of the dust reaching the Amazon originates from the Sahara Desert, and about half of this dust originates from one part of the Sahara, the Bodélé Depression. Mo in dust from the Bodélé Depression was measured with an average concentration of 1.14 ± 0.05 μg/g, similar to the crustal abundance. The model predicts Mo inputs from sea-salt aerosols in coastal regions up to 0.002 mg m-2yr-1. Significant sea-salt deposition occurs up to 300 km inland. Mo from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning were also evaluated to determine the potential influence of anthropogenic emissions on releasing Mo into the environment.

  4. Nitrite fixation by humic substances: Nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance evidence for potential intermediates in chemodenitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Studies have suggested that NO2/-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic matter to form trace N gases, including N2O. To gain an understanding of the nitrosation chemistry on a molecular level, soil and aquatic humic substances were reacted with 15N-labeled NaNO2, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) Pahokee peat and peat humic acid were also reacted with Na15NO2 and analyzed by solid-state 15N NMR. In Suwannee River, Armadale, and Laurentian fulvic acids, phenolic rings and activated methylene groups underwent nitrosation to form nitrosophenols (quinone monoximes) and ketoximes, respectively. The oximes underwent Beckmann rearrangements to 2??amides, and Beckmann fragmentations to nitriles. The nitriles in turn underwent hydrolysis to 1??amides. Peaks tentatively identified as imine, indophenol, or azoxybenzene nitrogens were clearly present in spectra of samples nitrosated at pH 6 but diminished at pH 3. The 15N NMR spectrum of the peat humic acid exhibited peaks corresponding with N-nitroso groups in addition to nitrosophenols, ketoximes, and secondary Beckmann reaction products. Formation of N-nitroso groups was more significant in the whole peat compared with the peat humic acid. Carbon-13 NMR analyses also indicated the occurrence of nitrosative demethoxylation in peat and soil humic acids. Reaction of 15N-NH3 fixated fulvic acid with unlabeled NO2/- resulted in nitrosative deamination of aminohydroquinone N, suggesting a previously unrecognized pathway for production of N2 gas in soils fertilized with NH3.Studies have suggested that NO2-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic

  5. The use of nickel to probe the role of hydrogen metabolism in cyanobacterial nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Pederson, D M; Daday, A; Smith, G D

    1986-01-01

    The hydrogenase activities of the heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena cylindrica and Mastigocladus laminosus are nickel dependent, based on their inability to consume hydrogen with various electron acceptors or produce hydrogen with dithionite-reduced methyl viologen, after growth in nickel-depleted medium. Upon addition of nickel ions to nickel-deficient cultures of A. cylindrica, the hydrogenase activity recovered in a manner which was protein synthesis-dependent, the recovery being inhibited by chloramphenicol. We have used the nickel dependence of the hydrogenase as a probe of the possible roles of H2 consumption in enhancing nitrogen fixation, and particularly for protecting nitrogenase against oxygen inhibition. Although at the usual growth temperatures (25 degrees for A. cylindrica and 40 degrees for M. laminosus), the cells consume H2 vigorously in an oxyhydrogen reaction after growth in the presence of nickel ions, we have not found that the reaction confers any significant additional protection of nitrogenase, either at aerobic pO2 (for both organisms) or at elevated pO2 (for A. cylindrica). However, at elevated temperatures (e.g., 40 degrees for A. cylindrica and 48 degrees for M. laminosus) a definite protective effect was observed. At these temperatures both organisms rapidly lost acetylene reduction activity under aerobic conditions. When hydrogen gas (10%) was present, the cells retained approximately 50% of the nitrogenase activity observed under anaerobic conditions (argon gas phase). No such protection by hydrogen gas was observed with nickel-deficient cells. Studies with cell-free extracts of A. cylindrica showed that the predominant effect of temperature was not due to thermal inactivation of nitrogenase.

  6. Hydrogen oxidation and nitrogen fixation in rhizobia, with special attention focused on strain ORS 571.

    PubMed

    de Vries, W; Stam, H; Stouthamer, A H

    1984-01-01

    In this survey we describe the influence of hydrogen oxidation on the physiology of Rhizobium ORS 571. The presence of hydrogen is required for the synthesis of hydrogenase. Carbon substrates do not repress the synthesis of hydrogenase. The respiratory system contains cytrochromes of the b- and c-type. Cytochrome alpha 600 is present after growth at high oxygen tensions. The nature of the terminal oxidases functioning at low oxygen tensions has not been established yet----H+/O values with endogenous substrates are between 6 and 7. The results show the presence of two phosphorylation sites: site 1 (ATP/2e = 1.0) and site 2(ATP/2e = 1.33). By measuring molar growth yields it has been demonstrated that carbon-limited, nitrogen-fixing cultures obtain additional ATP from hydrogen oxidation, and that site 2 of oxidative phosphorylation is passed during hydrogen oxidation. A method is described to calculate ATP/N2 values (the total amount of ATP used by nitrogenase during the fixation of 1 mol N2) and H2/N2 ratios (mol hydrogen formed per mol N2 fixed) in aerobic organisms. For Rhizobium ORS 571 the ATP/N2 value is about 40 and the H2/N2 ratio is between 5 and 7.5. Cells obtained from oxygen-limited nitrogen-fixing cultures contain 30-40% poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, which explains the high molar growth yields found. Hydrogen has not been detected in the effluent gas of these cultures, which may point to reoxidation of the hydrogen formed at nitrogen fixation. Calculations show that the effect of hydrogen reoxidation on the efficiency of nitrogen fixation (g N fixed X mol-1 substrate converted) is not very large and that the actual H2/N2 ratio is of much more importance. After addition of hydrogen to succinate-limited, ammonia-assimilating cultures, an initial increase of the Ysuccinate value (g dry wt X mol-1 succinate) is followed by a gradual decrease. This is accompanied by a large decrease of the YO2 value, and an increased permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane to

  7. Genetic Variability in Nodulation and Root Growth Affects Nitrogen Fixation and Accumulation in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Bourion, Virginie; Laguerre, Gisele; Depret, Geraldine; Voisin, Anne-Sophie; Salon, Christophe; Duc, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Legume nitrogen is derived from two different sources, symbiotically fixed atmospheric N2 and soil N. The effect of genetic variability of root and nodule establishment on N acquisition and seed protein yield was investigated under field conditions in pea (Pisum sativum). In addition, these parameters were related to the variability in preference for rhizobial genotypes. Methods Five different spring pea lines (two hypernodulating mutants and three cultivars), previously identified in artificial conditions as contrasted for both root and nodule development, were characterized under field conditions. Root and nodule establishment was examined from the four-leaf stage up to the beginning of seed filling and was related to the patterns of shoot dry matter and nitrogen accumulation. The genetic structure of rhizobial populations associated with the pea lines was obtained by analysis of nodule samples. The fraction of nitrogen derived from symbiotic fixation was estimated at the beginning of seed filling and at physiological maturity, when seed protein content and yield were determined. Key Results The hypernodulating mutants established nodules earlier and maintained them longer than was the case for the three cultivars, whereas their root development and nitrogen accumulation were lower. The seed protein yield was higher in ‘Athos’ and ‘Austin’, the two cultivars with increased root development, consistent with their higher N absorption during seed filling. Conclusion The hypernodulating mutants did not accumulate more nitrogen, probably due to the C cost for nodulation being higher than for root development. Enhancing exogenous nitrogen supply at the end of the growth cycle, by increasing the potential for root N uptake from soil, seems a good option for improving pea seed filling. PMID:17670753

  8. Dissolved hydrogen and nitrogen fixation in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    PubMed Central

    del Valle, Daniela A.; Robidart, Julie C.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Karl, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen (H2) is an inherent component of biological dinitrogen (N2) fixation, and there have been several studies quantifying H2 production relative to N2 fixation in cultures of diazotrophs. However, conducting the relevant measurements for a field population is more complex as shown by this study of N2 fixation, H2 consumption and dissolved H2 concentrations in the oligotrophic North Pacific Ocean. Measurements of H2 oxidation revealed microbial consumption of H2 was equivalent to 1–7% of ethylene produced during the acetylene reduction assay and 11–63% of 15 N2 assimilation on a molar scale. Varying abundances of Crocosphaera and Trichodesmium as revealed by nifH gene abundances broadly corresponded with diel changes observed in both N2 fixation and H2 oxidation. However, no corresponding changes were observed in the dissolved H2 concentrations which remained consistently supersaturated (147–560%) relative to atmospheric equilibrium. The results from this field study allow the efficiency of H2 cycling by natural populations of diazotrophs to be compared to cultured representatives. The findings indicate that dissolved H2 concentrations may depend not only on the community composition of diazotrophs but also upon relevant environmental parameters such as light intensity or the presence of other H2‐metabolizing microorganisms.

  9. The influence of woody encroachment on the nitrogen cycle: fixation, storage and gas loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Sparks, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Woody encroachment is a pervasive land cover change throughout the tropics and subtropics. Encroachment is frequently catalyzed by nitrogen (N)-fixing trees and the resulting N inputs potentially alter whole-ecosystem N cycling, accumulation and loss. In the southern US, widespread encroachment by legume Prosopis glandulosa is associated with increased soil total N storage, inorganic N concentrations, and net mineralization and nitrification rates. To better understand the effects of this process on ecosystem N cycling, we investigated patterns of symbiotic N fixation, N accrual and soil N trace gas and N2 emissions during Prosopis encroachment into the southern Rio Grande Plains. Analyses of d15N in foliage, xylem sap and plant-available soil N suggested that N fixation rates increase with tree age and are influenced by abiotic conditions. A model of soil N accrual around individual trees, accounting for atmospheric inputs and gas losses, generates lifetimes N fixation estimates of up to 9 kg for a 100-year-old tree and current rates of 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1. However, these N inputs and increased soil cycling rates do not translate into increased N gas losses. Two years of field measurements of a complete suite of N trace gases (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and other oxidized N compounds) found no difference in flux between upland Prosopis groves and adjacent unencroached grasslands. Total emissions for both land cover types average 0.56-0.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, comparable to other southern US grasslands. Additional lab experiments suggested that N2 losses are low and that field oxygen conditions are not usually conducive to denitrification. Taken together, results suggest that this ecosystem is currently experiencing a period of net N accrual under ongoing encroachment.

  10. Evidence for foliar endophytic nitrogen fixation in a widely distributed subalpine conifer.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Andrew B; Kueppers, Lara M; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Carper, Dana L; Vandehey, Nick; O'Neil, James; Frank, A Carolin

    2016-04-01

    Coniferous forest nitrogen (N) budgets indicate unknown sources of N. A consistent association between limber pine (Pinus flexilis) and potential N2 -fixing acetic acid bacteria (AAB) indicates that native foliar endophytes may supply subalpine forests with N. To assess whether the P. flexilis-AAB association is consistent across years, we re-sampled P. flexilis twigs at Niwot Ridge, CO and characterized needle endophyte communities via 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing. To investigate whether endophytes have access to foliar N2 , we incubated twigs with (13) N2 -enriched air and imaged radioisotope distribution in needles, the first experiment of its kind using (13) N. We used the acetylene reduction assay to test for nitrogenase activity within P. flexilis twigs four times from June to September. We found evidence for N2 fixation in P. flexilis foliage. N2 diffused readily into needles and nitrogenase activity was positive across sampling dates. We estimate that this association could provide 6.8-13.6 μg N m(-2)  d(-1) to P. flexilis stands. AAB dominated the P. flexilis needle endophyte community. We propose that foliar endophytes represent a low-cost, evolutionarily stable N2 -fixing strategy for long-lived conifers. This novel source of biological N2 fixation has fundamental implications for understanding forest N budgets.

  11. Effects of salt stress and rhizobial inoculation on growth and nitrogen fixation of three peanut cultivars.

    PubMed

    El-Akhal, M R; Rincón, A; Coba de la Peña, T; Lucas, M M; El Mourabit, N; Barrijal, S; Pueyo, J J

    2013-03-01

    Increasing soil salinity represents a major constraint for agriculture in arid and semi-arid lands, where mineral nitrogen (N) deficiency is also a frequent characteristic of soils. Biological N fixation by legumes may constitute a sustainable alternative to chemical fertilisation in salinity-affected areas, provided that adapted cultivars and inoculants are available. Here, the performance of three peanut cultivars nodulated with two different rhizobial strains that differ in their salt tolerance was evaluated under moderately saline water irrigation and compared with that of N-fertilised plants. Shoot weight was used as an indicator of yield. Under non-saline conditions, higher yields were obtained using N fertilisation rather than inoculation for all the varieties tested. However, under salt stress, the yield of inoculated plants became comparable to that of N-fertilised plants, with minor differences depending on the peanut cultivar and rhizobial strain. Our results indicate that N fixation might represent an economical, competitive and environmentally friendly choice with respect to mineral N fertilisation for peanut cultivation under moderate saline conditions.

  12. Biological nitrogen fixation: rates, patterns and ecological controls in terrestrial ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vitousek, Peter M.; Menge, Duncan N. L.; Reed, Sasha C.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    New techniques have identified a wide range of organisms with the capacity to carry out biological nitrogen fixation (BNF)—greatly expanding our appreciation of the diversity and ubiquity of N fixers—but our understanding of the rates and controls of BNF at ecosystem and global scales has not advanced at the same pace. Nevertheless, determining rates and controls of BNF is crucial to placing anthropogenic changes to the N cycle in context, and to understanding, predicting and managing many aspects of global environmental change. Here, we estimate terrestrial BNF for a pre-industrial world by combining information on N fluxes with 15N relative abundance data for terrestrial ecosystems. Our estimate is that pre-industrial N fixation was 58 (range of 40–100) Tg N fixed yr−1; adding conservative assumptions for geological N reduces our best estimate to 44 Tg N yr−1. This approach yields substantially lower estimates than most recent calculations; it suggests that the magnitude of human alternation of the N cycle is substantially larger than has been assumed. PMID:23713117

  13. Biological nitrogen fixation: rates, patterns and ecological controls in terrestrial ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vitousek, Peter M.; Menge, Duncan N.L.; Reed, Sasha C.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    New techniques have identified a wide range of organisms with the capacity to carry out biological nitrogen fixation (BNF)—greatly expanding our appreciation of the diversity and ubiquity of N fixers—but our understanding of the rates and controls of BNF at ecosystem and global scales has not advanced at the same pace. Nevertheless, determining rates and controls of BNF is crucial to placing anthropogenic changes to the N cycle in context, and to understanding, predicting and managing many aspects of global environmental change. Here, we estimate terrestrial BNF for a pre-industrial world by combining information on N fluxes with 15N relative abundance data for terrestrial ecosystems. Our estimate is that pre-industrial N fixation was 58 (range of 40–100) Tg N fixed yr−1; adding conservative assumptions for geological N reduces our best estimate to 44 Tg N yr−1. This approach yields substantially lower estimates than most recent calculations; it suggests that the magnitude of human alternation of the N cycle is substantially larger than has been assumed.

  14. Bacterial community and nitrogen fixation in the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Morales-Jiménez, Jesús; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2009-11-01

    The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), colonizes all pines species within its native range throughout North and Central America. Recently, this species was accidentally introduced to China, where it has caused severe damage in pine forests. It belongs to a group of beetles that spend most of their lives between the tree bark and sapwood, where it feeds on phloem: a poor substrate with very low nutritional value of nitrogen and toxic properties due to its high content of secondary defensive compounds. The aim of this study was to characterize the bacterial community of the D. valens gut by culture-dependent and -independent methods. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and ribosomal gene library analyses revealed that species diversity in the D. valens gut was relatively low, containing between six and 17 bacterial species. The bacterial community associated with larvae and adults was dominated by members of the following genera: Lactococcus, Acinetobacter, Pantoea, Rahnella, Stenothrophomonas, Erwinia, Enterobacter, Serratia, Janibacter, Leifsonia, Cellulomonas, and Cellulosimicrobium. The members of the last four genera showed cellulolytic activity in vitro and could be involved in cellulose breakdown in the insect gut. Finally, nitrogen fixation was demonstrated in live larvae and adults; however, capacity of nitrogen fixing in vitro was not found among enterobacterial species isolated in nitrogen-free media; neither were nifD nor nifH genes detected. In contrast, nifD gen was detected in metagenomic DNA from insect guts. The identification of bacterial species and their potential physiological capacities will allow exploring the role of gut symbiotic bacteria in the adaptation and survival of D. valens in a harsh chemical habitat poor in nitrogen sources.

  15. Identification of a cis-acting element in nitrogen fixation genes recognized by CnfR in the nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya boryana.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Ryoma; Kamiya, Narumi; Fujita, Yuichi

    2016-08-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya boryana has the ability to fix nitrogen without any heterocysts under microoxic conditions. Previously, we identified the cnfR gene for a master transcriptional activator for nitrogen fixation (nif) genes in a 50-kb gene cluster containing nif and nif-related genes in L. boryana. We showed that CnfR activates the transcription of nif genes in response to low oxygen conditions, which allows the oxygen-vulnerable enzyme nitrogenase to function. However, the regulatory mechanism that underlies regulation by CnfR remains unknown. In this study, we identified a conserved cis-acting element that is recognized by CnfR. We established a reporter system in the non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 using luciferase genes (luxAB). Reporter analysis was performed with a series of truncated and modified upstream regulatory regions of nifB and nifP. The cis-element can be divided into nine motifs I-IX, and it is located 76 bp upstream of the transcriptional start sites of nifB and nifP. Six motifs of them are essential for transcriptional activation by CnfR. This cis-acting element is conserved in the upstream regions of nif genes in all diazotrophic cyanobacteria, including Anabaena and Cyanothece, thereby suggesting that the transcriptional regulation by CnfR is widespread in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria.

  16. Global changes in the transcript and metabolic profiles during symbiotic nitrogen fixation in phosphorus-stressed common bean plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) deficiency is widespread in regions where the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), the most important legume for human consumption, is produced and is perhaps the factor that most limits nitrogen (N) fixation. Global gene expression and metabolome approaches were used to investigate t...

  17. Discrimination against 15N among recombinant inbred lines of Phaseolus vulgaris L. contrasting in phosphorus use efficiency for nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Lazali, Mohamed; Bargaz, Adnane; Carlsson, Georg; Ounane, Sidi Mohamed; Drevon, Jean Jacques

    2014-02-15

    Although isotopic discrimination processes during nitrogen (N) transformations influence the outcome of (15)N based quantification of N2 fixation in legumes, little attention has been given to the effects of genotypic variability and environmental constraints such as phosphorus (P) deficiency, on discrimination against (15)N during N2 fixation. In this study, six Phaseolus vulgaris recombinant inbred lines (RILs), i.e. RILs 115, 104, 34 (P deficiency tolerant) and 147, 83, 70 (P deficiency sensitive), were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT899, and hydroaeroponically grown with P-sufficient (250 μmol P plant(-1) week(-1)) versus P-deficient (75 μmol P plant(-1) week(-1)) supply. Two harvests were done at 15 (before nodule functioning) and 42 (flowering stage) days after transplanting. Nodulation, plant biomass, P and N contents, and the ratios of (15)N over total N content ((15)N/Nt) for shoots, roots and nodules were determined. The results showed lower (15)N/Nt in shoots than in roots, both being much lower than in nodules. P deficiency caused a larger decrease in (15)N/Nt in shoots (-0.18%) than in nodules (-0.11%) for all of the genotypes, and the decrease in shoots was greatest for RILs 34 (-0.33%) and 104 (-0.25%). Nodule (15)N/Nt was significantly related to both the quantity of N2 fixed (R(2)=0.96***) and the P content of nodules (R(2)=0.66*). We conclude that the discrimination against (15)N in the legume N2-fixing symbiosis of common bean with R. tropici CIAT899 is affected by P nutrition and plant genotype, and that the (15)N/Nt in nodules may be used to screen for genotypic variation in P use efficiency for N2 fixation.

  18. Activation of Rhizobium tibeticum with flavonoids enhances nodulation, nitrogen fixation, and growth of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) grown in cobalt-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Bagy, Magdy Khalil; El-enany, Abdel-Wahab El-sadek; Bashandy, Shymaa Ryhan

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the response of activation of Rhizobium tibeticum with mixture of hesperetin and apigenin to improve growth, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation of fenugreek grown under cobalt (Co) stress. The current study showed that high concentrations of Co-induced noxious effects on rhizobial growth, nod gene expression, nodulation, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities, total flavonoid content, and nitrogen fixation. Addition of a mixture of hesperetin and apigenin to growth medium supplemented with different concentrations of Co significantly increased bacterial growth. PAL activity of roots grown hydroponically at 100 mg kg(-1) Co and inoculated with induced R. tibeticum was significantly increased compared with plants receiving uninduced R. tibeticum. Total flavonoid content of root exudates of plants inoculated with activated R. tibeticum was significantly increased compared with inoculated plants with unactivated R. tibeticum or uninoculated plants at variant Co dosages. Application of 50 mg kg(-1) Co significantly increased nodulation, GS, nitrogenase activity, and biomass of plants inoculated with either or uninduced R. tibeticum. The total number and fresh mass of nodules, nitrogenase activity, and biomass of plants inoculated with induced cells grown in soil treated with 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) Co were significantly increased compared with plants inoculated with uninduced cells. Induced R. tibeticum with flavonoids significantly alleviates the adverse effect of Co on nod gene expression and therefore enhances nitrogen fixation. Induction of R. tibeticum with compatible flavonoids could be of practical importance in augmenting growth and nitrogen fixation of fenugreek grown in a Co-contaminated agroecosystem.

  19. Microgravity Effects on the Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-02-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of μg on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species for the legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early biomolecular events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFU’s). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiments were designed to determine if S. meliloti would infect M. truncatula and initiate biomolecular changes associated with nodule formation and if the μg environment altered the host plant and/or bacteria to induce nodule formation upon return to 1g. Initial analysis results demonstrate that the legumes and bacteria cultivated in μg have potential to develop a symbiotic interaction, but suggest that μg alters their ability to form nodules upon return to 1g. (Research supported by NASA ESMD/ Advance Capabilities Division grant NNX10AR09A)

  20. Projections of Biofuel Growth Patterns Reveal the Potential Importance of Nitrogen Fixation for Miscanthus Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. C.; Parton, W. J.; Dohleman, F. G.; Gottel, N. R.; Smith, C. M.; Kent, A. D.; Delucia, E. H.

    2008-12-01

    Demand for liquid biofuels is increasing because of the disparity between fuel demand and supply. Relative to grain crops, the more intensive harvest required for second generation liquid biofuel production leads to the removal of significantly more carbon and nitrogen from the soil. These elements are conventionally litter products of crops that are returned to the soil and can accumulate over time. This loss of organic matter represents a management challenge because the energy cost associated with fertilizers or external sources of organic matter reduce the net energy value of the biofuel crops. Plants that have exceptional strategies for exploiting nutrients may be the most viable options for sustainable biofuel yields because of low management and energy cost. Miscanthus x giganteus has high N retranslocation rates, maintains high photosynthetic rates over a large temperature range, exploits a longer-than-average growing season, and yields at least twice the biomass of other candidate biofuel grass crops (i.e. switchgrass). We employed the DAYCENT model to project potential productivity of Miscanthus, corn, switchgrass, and mixed prairie communities based on our current knowledge of these species. Ecosystem process descriptions that have been validated for many crop species did not accurately predict Miscanthus yields and lead to new hypotheses about unknown N cycling mechanisms for this species. We tested the hypothesis that Miscanthus hosts N-fixing bacteria in several ways. First, we used enrichment culture and molecular methods to detect N-fixing bacteria in Miscanthus. Then, we demonstrated the plant-growth promoting effect of diazotrophs isolated from Miscanthus rhizomes on a model grass. And finally, we applied 15N2 to the soil and rooting zone of field grown Miscanthus plants to determine if atmospheric N2 was incorporated into plant tissue, a process that requires N-fixation. These experiments are the first tests of N-fixation in Miscanthus x

  1. Relative efficacy of different distillery effluents on growth, nitrogen fixation and yield of groundnut.

    PubMed

    Ramana, S; Biswas, A K; Singh, A B; Yadava, R B R

    2002-01-01

    A field experiment with groundnut as test crop was conducted to evaluate the manurial potential of three distillery effluents: raw spent wash (RSW), biomethanated spent wash (BSW) and lagoon sludge (LS) vis-à-vis recommended fertilizers (NPK + farm yard manure (FYM)) and a control (no fertilizer or distillery effluent). It was found that all the three distillery effluents increased total chlorophyll content, crop growth rate (CGR), total dry matter, nutrient uptake (N, P and K) and finally seed yield compared to the control but inhibited nodulation and decreased nitrogen fixation. Among the three distillery effluents, BSW produced the highest seed yield (619 kg ha(-1)) twice that of control (3.10 kg ha(-1)), followed by RSW (557 kg ha(-1)) and LS (472 kg ha(-1)). However, the distillery effluents did not influence protein and oil contents. It was concluded that these distillery effluents because of their high manurial potential could supply nutrients, particularly potassium, nitrogen and sulphur, to the crops and thus reduce the fertilizer requirement of crops. Nevertheless, the crop performance and yield with three distillery effluents were overall less than that produced by recommended NPK + FYM probably on account of failure of the effluents to supply balanced nutrition to the plants for achieving their potential growth capacity.

  2. Iron controls over di-nitrogen fixation in karst tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Winbourne, Joy B; Brewer, Steven W; Houlton, Benjamin Z

    2017-03-01

    Limestone tropical forests represent a meaningful fraction of the land area in Central America (25%) and Southeast Asia (40%). These ecosystems are marked by high biological diversity, CO2 uptake capacity, and high pH soils, the latter making them fundamentally different from the majority of lowland tropical forest areas in the Amazon and Congo basins. Here, we examine the role of bedrock geology in determining biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) rates in volcanic (low pH) vs. limestone (high pH) tropical forests located in the Maya Mountains of Belize. We experimentally test how BNF in the leaf-litter responds to nitrogen, phosphorus, molybdenum, and iron additions across different parent materials. We find evidence for iron limitation of BNF rates in limestone forests during the wet but not dry season (response ratio 3.2 ± 0.2; P = 0.03). In contrast, BNF in low pH volcanic forest soil was stimulated by the trace-metal molybdenum during the dry season. The parent-material induced patterns of limitation track changes in siderophore activity and iron bioavailability among parent materials. These findings point to a new role for iron in regulating BNF in karst tropical soils, consistent with observations for other high pH systems such as the open ocean and calcareous agricultural ecosystems.

  3. Comparative Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Wastewater-Cultured Microalgae: Nitrogen Sensing and Carbon Fixation for Growth and Nutrient Removal in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anil K; Huang, Eric L; Low-Décarie, Etienne; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2015-08-07

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was batch-cultured for 12 days under continuous illumination to investigate nitrogen uptake and metabolic responses to wastewater processing. Our approach compared two conditions: (1) artificial wastewater containing nitrate and ammonia and (2) nutrient-sufficient control containing nitrate as sole form of nitrogen. Treatments did not differ in final biomass; however, comparison of group proteomes revealed significant differences. Label-free shotgun proteomic analysis identified 2358 proteins, of which 92 were significantly differentially abundant. Wastewater cells showed higher relative abundances of photosynthetic antenna proteins, enzymes related to carbon fixation, and biosynthesis of amino acids and secondary metabolites. Control cells showed higher abundances of enzymes and proteins related to nitrogen metabolism and assimilation, synthesis and utilization of starch, amino acid recycling, evidence of oxidative stress, and little lipid biosynthesis. This study of the eukaryotic microalgal proteome response to nitrogen source, availability, and switching highlights tightly controlled pathways essential to the maintenance of culture health and productivity in concert with light absorption and carbon assimilation. Enriched pathways in artificial wastewater, notably, photosynthetic carbon fixation and biosynthesis of plant hormones, and those in nitrate only control, most notably, nitrogen, amino acid, and starch metabolism, represent potential targets for genetic improvement requiring targeted elucidation.

  4. Biological nitrogen fixation and biomass accumulation within poplar clones as a result of inoculations with diazotrophic endophyte consortia.

    PubMed

    Knoth, Jenny L; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Ettl, Gregory J; Doty, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable production of biomass for bioenergy relies on low-input crop production. Inoculation of bioenergy crops with plant growth-promoting endophytes has the potential to reduce fertilizer inputs through the enhancement of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Endophytes isolated from native poplar growing in nutrient-poor conditions were selected for a series of glasshouse and field trials designed to test the overall hypothesis that naturally occurring diazotrophic endophytes impart growth promotion of the host plants. Endophyte inoculations contributed to increased biomass over uninoculated control plants. This growth promotion was more pronounced with multi-strain consortia than with single-strain inocula. Biological nitrogen fixation was estimated through (15)N isotope dilution to be 65% nitrogen derived from air (Ndfa). Phenotypic plasticity in biomass allocation and branch production observed as a result of endophyte inoculations may be useful in bioenergy crop breeding and engineering programs.

  5. Nitrogen fixation in different biogeochemical niches along a 120 000-year chronosequence in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Menge, Duncan N L; Hedin, Lars O

    2009-08-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the major nitrogen (N) input in many terrestrial ecosystems, yet we know little about the mechanisms and feedbacks that control this process in natural ecosystems. We here examine BNF in four taxonomically and ecologically different groups over the course of forest ecosystem development. At nine sites along the Franz Josef soil chronosequence (South Westland, New Zealand) that range in age from 7 to 120000 yr old, we quantified BNF from the symbiotic plant Coriaria arborea, cyanolichens (primarily Pseudocyphellaria spp.), bryophytes (many species), and heterotrophic bacteria in leaf litter. We specifically examined whether these groups could act as "nitrostats" at the ecosystem level, turning BNF on when N is scarce (early in primary succession) and off when N is plentiful (later in succession and retrogression). Coriaria was abundant and actively fixing (approximately 11 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) in the youngest and most N-poor site (7 yr old), consistent with nitrostat dynamics. Coriaria maintained high BNF rates independent of soil N availability, however, until it was excluded from the community after a single generation. We infer that Coriaria is an obligate N fixer and that the nitrostat feedback is mechanistically governed by species replacement at the community level, rather than down-regulation of BNF at the physiological scale. Biological nitrogen fixation inputs from lichens (means of 0-2 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)), bryophytes (0.7-10 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)), and litter (1-2 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) were driven primarily by changes in density, which peaked at intermediate-aged sites (and increased with soil N availability) for both lichens and bryophytes, and grew monotonically with soil age (but did not change with soil N) for litter. This non-nitrostatic link between soil N availability and lichen/bryophyte BNF likely stems from increased tree biomass in more fertile sites, which increases epiphytic moisture conditions

  6. [Use of zinc-containing dehydrating fixatives for neurohistological studies].

    PubMed

    Korzhevskiĭ, D E; Grigor'ev, I P; Otellin, V A

    2006-01-01

    The suitability of zinc-containing dehydrating fixatives for neurohistological study of paraffin sections using Nissl staining and immunocytochemical techniques was examined. It was found that zinc-containing dehydrating fixatives (zinc-ethanol-formaldehyde and zinc-acetone-isopropanol-formaldehyde) had a capacity for good preservation of both structure and antigenic properties of the nervous tissue and could be recommended for application in neurohistological studies.

  7. Oxygen-Poor Microzones as Potential Sites of Microbial N2 Fixation in Nitrogen-Depleted Aerobic Marine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Hans W.; Prufert, Leslie E.

    1987-01-01

    The nitrogen-deficient coastal waters of North Carolina contain suspended bacteria potentially able to fix N2. Bioassays aimed at identifying environmental factors controlling the development and proliferation of N2 fixation showed that dissolved organic carbon (as simple sugars and sugar alcohols) and particulate organic carbon (derived from Spartina alterniflora) additions elicited and enhanced N2 fixation (nitrogenase activity) in these waters. Nitrogenase activity occurred in samples containing flocculent, mucilage-covered bacterial aggregates. Cyanobacterium-bacterium aggregates also revealed N2 fixation. In all cases bacterial N2 fixation occurred in association with surficial microenvironments or microzones. Since nitrogenase is oxygen labile, we hypothesized that the aggregates themselves protected their constituent microbes from O2. Microelectrode O2 profiles revealed that aggregates had lower internal O2 tensions than surrounding waters. Tetrazolium salt (2,3,5-triphenyl-3-tetrazolium chloride) reduction revealed that patchy zones existed both within microbes and extracellularly in the mucilage surrounding microbes where free O2 was excluded. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride reduction also strongly inhibited nitrogenase activity. These findings suggest that N2 fixation is mediated by the availability of the appropriate types of reduced microzones. Organic carbon enrichment appears to serve as an energy and structural source for aggregate formation, both of which were required for eliciting N2 fixation responses of these waters. Images PMID:16347337

  8. Coliform Bacteria and Nitrogen Fixation in Pulp and Paper Mill Effluent Treatment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Francis; Neufeld, Josh D.; Driscoll, Brian T.; Archibald, Frederick S.

    2000-01-01

    The majority of pulp and paper mills now biotreat their combined effluents using activated sludge. On the assumption that their wood-based effluents have negligible fixed N, and that activated-sludge microorganisms will not fix significant N, these mills routinely spend large amounts adding ammonia or urea to their aeration tanks (bioreactors) to permit normal biomass growth. N2 fixation in seven Eastern Canadian pulp and paper mill effluent treatment systems was analyzed using acetylene reduction assays, quantitative nitrogenase (nifH) gene probing, and bacterial isolations. In situ N2 fixation was undetectable in all seven bioreactors but was present in six associated primary clarifiers. One primary clarifier was studied in greater detail. Approximately 50% of all culturable cells in the clarifier contained nifH, of which >90% were Klebsiella strains. All primary-clarifier coliform bacteria growing on MacConkey agar were identified as klebsiellas, and all those probed contained nifH. In contrast, analysis of 48 random coliform isolates from other mill water system locations showed that only 24 (50%) possessed the nifH gene, and only 13 (27%) showed inducible N2-fixing activity. Thus, all the pulp and paper mill primary clarifiers tested appeared to be sites of active N2 fixation (0.87 to 4.90 mg of N liter−1 day−1) and a microbial community strongly biased toward this activity. This may also explain why coliform bacteria, especially klebsiellas, are indigenous in pulp and paper mill water systems. PMID:11097883

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of nitrogen fixation in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hironori; Aoki, Seishiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The stabilization of host-symbiont mutualism against the emergence of parasitic individuals is pivotal to the evolution of cooperation. One of the most famous symbioses occurs between legumes and their colonizing rhizobia, in which rhizobia extract nutrients (or benefits) from legume plants while supplying them with nitrogen resources produced by nitrogen fixation (or costs). Natural environments, however, are widely populated by ineffective rhizobia that extract benefits without paying costs and thus proliferate more efficiently than nitrogen-fixing cooperators. How and why this mutualism becomes stabilized and evolutionarily persists has been extensively discussed. To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of this symbiosis system, we construct a simple model based on the continuous snowdrift game with multiple interacting players. We investigate the model using adaptive dynamics and numerical simulations. We find that symbiotic evolution depends on the cost-benefit balance, and that cheaters widely emerge when the cost and benefit are similar in strength. In this scenario, the persistence of the symbiotic system is compatible with the presence of cheaters. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is robust to the emergence of cheaters, and may explain the prevalence of cheating rhizobia in nature. In addition, various stabilizing mechanisms, such as partner fidelity feedback, partner choice, and host sanction, can reinforce the symbiotic relationship by affecting the fitness of symbionts in various ways. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is cooperatively stabilized by various mechanisms. In addition, mixed nodule populations are thought to encourage cheater emergence, but our model predicts that, in certain situations, cheaters can disappear from such populations. These findings provide a theoretical basis of the evolutionary dynamics of legume-rhizobia symbioses, which is extendable to other single-host, multiple

  10. Randomized Prospective Study of Totally Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair: Fixation Versus No Fixation of Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Cody A.; Greenlee, Susan M.; Larson, Dirk R.; Harrington, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Fixation of the mesh during laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair is thought to be necessary to prevent recurrence. However, mesh fixation may increase postoperative pain and lead to an increased risk of complications. We questioned whether elimination of fixation of the mesh during TEP inguinal hernia repair leads to decreased postoperative pain or complications, or both, without an increased rate of recurrence. Methods: A randomized prospective single-blinded study was carried out in 40 patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair with (Group A=20) or without (Group B=20) fixation of the mesh. Results: Patients in whom the mesh was not fixed had shorter hospital length of stay (8.3 vs 16.0 hours, P=0.01), were less likely to be admitted to the hospital (P=0.001), used less postoperative narcotic analgesia in the PACU (P=0.01), and were less likely to develop urinary retention (P=0.04). No significant differences occurred in the level of pain, time to return to normal activity, or the difficulty of the operation between the 2 groups. No hernia recurrences were observed in either group (follow-up range, 6 to 30 months, median=19). Conclusions: Elimination of tack fixation of mesh during laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair significantly reduces the use of postoperative narcotic analgesia, hospital length of stay, and the development of postoperative urinary retention but does not lead to a significant reduction in postoperative pain. Eliminating tacks does not lead to an increased rate of recurrence. PMID:17575757

  11. Compartmentalized microbial composition, oxygen gradients and nitrogen fixation in the gut of Odontotaenius disjunctus.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Nguyen, Nhu H; Karaoz, Ulas; Gross, Stephanie R; Herman, Donald J; Andersen, Gary L; Bruns, Thomas D; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Blackwell, Meredith; Brodie, Eoin L

    2014-01-01

    Coarse woody debris is an important biomass pool in forest ecosystems that numerous groups of insects have evolved to take advantage of. These insects are ecologically important and represent useful natural analogs for biomass to biofuel conversion. Using a range of molecular approaches combined with microelectrode measurements of oxygen, we have characterized the gut microbiome and physiology of Odontotaenius disjunctus, a wood-feeding beetle native to the eastern United States. We hypothesized that morphological and physiological differences among gut regions would correspond to distinct microbial populations and activities. In fact, significantly different communities were found in the foregut (FG), midgut (MG)/posterior hindgut (PHG) and anterior hindgut (AHG), with Actinobacteria and Rhizobiales being more abundant toward the FG and PHG. Conversely, fermentative bacteria such as Bacteroidetes and Clostridia were more abundant in the AHG, and also the sole region where methanogenic Archaea were detected. Although each gut region possessed an anaerobic core, micron-scale profiling identified radial gradients in oxygen concentration in all regions. Nitrogen fixation was confirmed by (15)N2 incorporation, and nitrogenase gene (nifH) expression was greatest in the AHG. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH identified the most abundant transcript as related to Ni-Fe nitrogenase of a Bacteroidetes species, Paludibacter propionicigenes. Overall, we demonstrate not only a compartmentalized microbiome in this beetle digestive tract but also sharp oxygen gradients that may permit aerobic and anaerobic metabolism to occur within the same regions in close proximity. We provide evidence for the microbial fixation of N2 that is important for this beetle to subsist on woody biomass.

  12. Comparative Assessment of Nitrogen Fixation Methodologies, Conducted in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Böttjer, Daniela; Church, Matthew J.; Karl, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Resolution of the nitrogen (N) cycle in the marine environment requires an accurate assessment of dinitrogen (N2) fixation. We present here an update on progress in conducting field measurements of acetylene reduction (AR) and 15N2 tracer assimilation in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). The AR assay was conducted on discrete seawater samples using a headspace analysis system, followed by quantification of ethylene (C2H4) with a reducing compound photodetector. The rates of C2H4 production were measurable for nonconcentrated seawater samples after an incubation period of 3 to 4 h. The 15N2 tracer measurements compared the addition of 15N2 as a gas bubble and dissolved as 15N2 enriched seawater. On all sampling occasions and at all depths, a 2- to 6-fold increase in the rate of 15N2 assimilation was measured when 15N2-enriched seawater was added to the seawater sample compared to the addition of 15N2 as a gas bubble. In addition, we show that the 15N2-enriched seawater can be prepared prior to its use with no detectable loss (<1.7%) of dissolved 15N2 during 4 weeks of storage, facilitating its use in the field. The ratio of C2H4 production to 15N2 assimilation varied from 7 to 27 when measured simultaneously in surface seawater samples. Collectively, the modifications to the AR assay and the 15N2 assimilation technique present opportunities for more accurate and high frequency measurements (e.g., diel scale) of N2 fixation, providing further insight into the contribution of different groups of diazotrophs to the input of N in the global oceans. PMID:22773638

  13. Compartmentalized microbial composition, oxygen gradients and nitrogen fixation in the gut of Odontotaenius disjunctus

    PubMed Central

    Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Nguyen, Nhu H; Karaoz, Ulas; Gross, Stephanie R; Herman, Donald J; Andersen, Gary L; Bruns, Thomas D; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Blackwell, Meredith; Brodie, Eoin L

    2014-01-01

    Coarse woody debris is an important biomass pool in forest ecosystems that numerous groups of insects have evolved to take advantage of. These insects are ecologically important and represent useful natural analogs for biomass to biofuel conversion. Using a range of molecular approaches combined with microelectrode measurements of oxygen, we have characterized the gut microbiome and physiology of Odontotaenius disjunctus, a wood-feeding beetle native to the eastern United States. We hypothesized that morphological and physiological differences among gut regions would correspond to distinct microbial populations and activities. In fact, significantly different communities were found in the foregut (FG), midgut (MG)/posterior hindgut (PHG) and anterior hindgut (AHG), with Actinobacteria and Rhizobiales being more abundant toward the FG and PHG. Conversely, fermentative bacteria such as Bacteroidetes and Clostridia were more abundant in the AHG, and also the sole region where methanogenic Archaea were detected. Although each gut region possessed an anaerobic core, micron-scale profiling identified radial gradients in oxygen concentration in all regions. Nitrogen fixation was confirmed by 15N2 incorporation, and nitrogenase gene (nifH) expression was greatest in the AHG. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH identified the most abundant transcript as related to Ni–Fe nitrogenase of a Bacteroidetes species, Paludibacter propionicigenes. Overall, we demonstrate not only a compartmentalized microbiome in this beetle digestive tract but also sharp oxygen gradients that may permit aerobic and anaerobic metabolism to occur within the same regions in close proximity. We provide evidence for the microbial fixation of N2 that is important for this beetle to subsist on woody biomass. PMID:23985746

  14. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Feather Moss Associated Nitrogen Fixation in Coniferous and Deciduous Dominated Alaskan Boreal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, M.; Mack, M. C.; Johnstone, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Dominant canopy tree species have strong effects on the composition and function of understory species. In boreal forests, forest floor bryophytes and their associated microbes are a primary source of ecosystem nitrogen (N) inputs, and thus an important process regulating ecosystem productivity. Bryophyte composition and abundance varies with forest composition, yet how such changes can affect ecosystem processes such as N fixation is still poorly understood. Our goal is to investigate how cyanobacteria-based N fixation occurring in the two most common feather mosses in the Alaskan boreal forest (Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens) varies among coniferous and deciduous forest types, over the growing season, and across a nutrient availability gradient. Twelve patches of H. splendens and P. schreberi were identified in three pairs (blocks) of adjacent stands of paper birch (Betula neoalaskana) and black spruce (Picea mariana) near Fairbanks, interior Alaska. Sampling occurred in one block in June, July, August, and September 2014, and in the three blocks once in August 2014. Moss leaf area, moisture and weight, as well as environmental variables such as air temperature and canopy cover were recorded. Fixation rates were consistently higher for P. schreberi than for H. splendens. Overall, N fixation rates were lower in birch than in spruce stands and peaked in August, or July for P. schreberi in birch stands. Moreover, fixation rates varied along the nutrient availability gradient, with fixation rates higher where nutrient availability was lower. This difference was especially clear in spruce stands. Our preliminary results suggest that moss species, canopy type, and environmental factors all influence N fixation rates in Alaskan boreal forests. Our results will enhance the knowledge of the processes that drive N fixation in boreal forests, which is important for predicting ecosystem consequences of changing forest composition.

  15. Relationship between biomass production and nitrogen fixation under drought stress conditions in peanut genoytpes with different levels of drought resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between biomass production and N2 fixation under drought stress conditions in peanut genotypes with different levels of drought resistance is not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of drought on biomass production and N2 fixation by evaluating t...

  16. Prospective application of Leucaena leucocephala for phytoextraction of Cd and Zn and nitrogen fixation in metal polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Shweta; Rai, J P N

    2011-03-01

    The study deals with phytoextraction of Zn and Cd by Leucaena leucocephala grown on effluent fed and low nitrogen soils collected from S1, S2, and S3 sites, representing decreasing metal content with increasing distance from the effluent drain. Plant nitrogen fixation potential and soil micro-biochemical attributes against metal stress were also assessed. Increasing soil metal content and plant growth enhanced metal accumulation. Relatively greater amount of Zn than Cd was accumulated by L. leucocephala, which exceeded in roots with that of other parts. Remediation factor for Cd was maximum (3.6%) in S2 grown plant. Nodule numbers, their biomass, nitrogenase activity, and leghaemoglobin content were maximum in plants grown in S3 and minimum in S1 soil having maximum metals. Maximum soil organic C, total N, C(mic), and N(mic), respiration rate, ATP content, and enzymatic activities in response to phytoremediation was recorded in S3 followed by S2 and S1. Phytoremediation for a year enhanced extractable Zn and Cd by 36% and 45%, and their total removal by 20% and 30%, respectively from S2, which suggests the possible application of L. leucocephala for the remediation of metal contaminated sites and their fertility restoration by improving microbial functionalities and N-pool.

  17. CO2-adapted legumes ameliorate but do not prevent the negative effect of elevated CO2 on nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, P.; Bowatte, S.; Lieffering, M.; Li, F.

    2015-12-01

    The response of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to climate and elevated CO2 (eCO2) is a key uncertainty in modelling C cycle projections. In addition, as BNF provides 50% of the nitrogen (N) input to agricultural production and as ecosystem responses to eCO2 are strongly influenced by N availability then the eCO2 impact on BNF is central to modelling legume-based system responses to climate change. Greater photoassimilate production under eCO2 should lead to enhanced BNF and this response is a feature of ecosystem models thus providing the N inputs necessary to provide continuing stimulation of NPP. FACE experiments provide a 'realistic' environment for eCO2 studies; however, even if run for multiple years, they still may not capture adaptation to eCO2 particularly in ecosystems dominated by perennial species. We tested the effect of eCO2 on BNF and the potential importance of adaption by growing legumes that had been exposed to high or ambient CO2 concentrations at a natural CO2 spring in a long-running (16 year) FACE experiment on grassland. BNF was significantly lower under eCO2 but the reduction was less marked where plants had originated in a high CO2 environment. An ecosystem model run with reduced BNF proved a better fit to the experimental data for the FACE experiment than where BNF was enhanced or unchanged under eCO2.

  18. Isotopic evidence for biological nitrogen fixation by molybdenum-nitrogenase from 3.2 Gyr.

    PubMed

    Stüeken, Eva E; Buick, Roger; Guy, Bradley M; Koehler, Matthew C

    2015-04-30

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for all organisms that must have been available since the origin of life. Abiotic processes including hydrothermal reduction, photochemical reactions, or lightning discharge could have converted atmospheric N2 into assimilable NH4(+), HCN, or NOx species, collectively termed fixed nitrogen. But these sources may have been small on the early Earth, severely limiting the size of the primordial biosphere. The evolution of the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase, which reduces atmospheric N2 to organic NH4(+), thus represented a major breakthrough in the radiation of life, but its timing is uncertain. Here we present nitrogen isotope ratios with a mean of 0.0 ± 1.2‰ from marine and fluvial sedimentary rocks of prehnite-pumpellyite to greenschist metamorphic grade between 3.2 and 2.75 billion years ago. These data cannot readily be explained by abiotic processes and therefore suggest biological nitrogen fixation, most probably using molybdenum-based nitrogenase as opposed to other variants that impart significant negative fractionations. Our data place a minimum age constraint of 3.2 billion years on the origin of biological nitrogen fixation and suggest that molybdenum was bioavailable in the mid-Archaean ocean long before the Great Oxidation Event.

  19. Physiological and isotopic characteristics of nitrogen fixation by hyperthermophilic methanogens: Key insights into nitrogen anabolism of the microbial communities in Archean hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Miyazaki, Junichi; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2014-08-01

    Hyperthermophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogens are considered to be one of the most predominant primary producers in hydrogen (H2)-abundant hydrothermal environments in the present-day ocean and throughout the history of the Earth. However, the nitrogen sources supporting the development of microbial communities in hydrothermal environments remain poorly understood. We have investigated, for the first time, methanogenic archaea commonly found in deep-sea hydrothermal environments to understand their physiological properties (growth kinetics, energetics, and metal requirements) and isotopic characteristics during the fixation of dinitrogen (N2), which is an abundant but less-bioavailable compound in hydrothermal fluids. Culture experiments showed that Methanocaldococcus strain (Mc 1-85N) (Topt = 85 °C) and Methanothermococcus strain (Mt 5-55N) (Topt = 55 °C) assimilated N2 and ammonium, but not nitrate. Previous phylogenetic studies have predicted that the Methanocaldococcus and Methanothermococcus lineages have nitrogenases, key enzymes for N2 fixation, with biochemically uncharacterised active site metal cofactors. We showed that Mt 5-55N required molybdenum for the nitrogenase to function, implying a molybdenum-bearing cofactor in the strain. Molybdenum also stimulated diazotrophic (i.e., N2-fixing) growth of Mc 1-85N, though further experiments are required to test whether the strain contains a molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase. Importantly, Mc 1-85N exhibited an apparently lower requirement of and higher tolerance to molybdenum and iron than Mt 5-55N. Furthermore, both strains produced more 15N-depleted biomass (-4‰ relative to N2) than that previously reported for diazotrophic photosynthetic prokaryotes. These results demonstrate that diazotrophic hyperthermophilic methanogens can be broadly distributed in seafloor and subseafloor hydrothermal environments, where the availability of transition metals is variable and where organic carbon, organic nitrogen

  20. The reallocation of carbon in P deficient lupins affects biological nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, Aleysia; Venter, Mauritz; Kossmann, Jens; Valentine, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    It is not known how phosphate (P) deficiency affects the allocation of carbon (C) to biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in legumes. The alteration of the respiratory and photosynthetic C costs of BNF was investigated under P deficiency. Although BNF can impose considerable sink stimulation on host respiratory and photosynthetic C, it is not known how the change in the C and energy allocation during P deficiency may affect BNF. Nodulated Lupinus luteus plants were grown in sand culture, using a modified Long Ashton nutrient solution containing no nitrogen (N) for ca. four weeks, after which one set was exposed to a P-deficient nutrient medium, while the other set continued growing on a P-sufficient nutrient medium. Phosphorus stress was measured at 20 days after onset of P-starvation. During P stress the decline in nodular P levels was associated with lower BNF and nodule growth. There was also a shift in the balance of photosynthetic and respiratory C toward a loss of C during P stress. Below-ground respiration declined under limiting P conditions. However, during this decline there was also a shift in the proportion of respiratory energy from maintenance toward growth respiration. Under P stress, there was an increased allocation of C toward root growth, thereby decreasing the amount of C available for maintenance respiration. It is therefore possible that the decline in BNF under P deficiency may be due to this change in resource allocation away from respiration associated with direct nutrient uptake, but rather toward a long term nutrient acquisition strategy of increased root growth.

  1. Interaction of root nodule size and oxygen pressure on the rate of nitrogen fixation by cowpea and peanut

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, D.; Weaver, R.W.

    1987-04-01

    Size and anatomical features of nodules influence the rate of O/sub 2/ diffusion into nodules. Availability of oxygen can be a limiting factor in nitrogen fixation. Larger nodules have thicker cortices and low surface to volume ratio leading to lower rates of gaseous diffusion. Increased oxygen pressure in the environment alters the rate of nitrogen fixation but the rate of change may depend on the nodule size. This was investigated by measuring /sup 15/N/sub 2/ incorporation into nodules. Root nodules from 38 day old cowpea and peanut plants were collected and sorted into size groups having diameters of >3 mm, 2-3 mm, and just below 2 mm. Samples of each size group were enclosed in tubes and exposed to various combination of oxygen (8-28%) and /sup 15/N/sub 2/. With higher O/sub 2/ pressure all nodules showed increased N/sub 2/ fixation but the largest nodules showed the maximum increase. Specific activity of larger nodules was higher for N/sub 2/ fixation. For the sizes of nodules examined the largest nodules did not reflect any of the disadvantages of the large size but the benefits of higher rates of O/sub 2/ entry was evident.

  2. Nitrogen fixation in peanut nodules during dark periods and detopped conditions with special reference to lipid bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Siddique, A.M.; Bal, A.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The peanut plant (Arachis hypogaea L.), unlike other known legumes, can sustain nitrogen fixation when prolonged periods of darkness or detopping curtail the supply of photosynthate to the nodule. This ability to withstand photosynthate stress is attributed to the presence of lipid bodies in infected nodule cells. In both dark-treated and detopped plants, the lipid bodies show a gradual decrease in numbers, suggesting their utilization as a source of energy and carbon for nitrogen fixation. Lipolytic activity can be localized in the lipid bodies, and the existence of {beta}-oxidation pathway and glyoxylate cycle is shown by the release of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from {sup 14}C lineoleoyl coenzyme A by the nodule homogenate.

  3. Crystallization of a flavodoxin involved in nitrogen fixation in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2008-05-01

    The flavodoxin NifF from R. capsulatus, a candidate for nitrogenase reduction during nitrogen fixation, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Preliminary X-ray data processing at 2.17 Å resolution allowed determination of the crystal system and unit-cell parameters. Flavodoxins are small electron-transfer proteins that contain one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN). The flavodoxin NifF from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus is reduced by one electron from ferredoxin/flavodoxin:NADP(H) reductase and was postulated to be an electron donor to nitrogenase in vivo. NifF was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and concentrated for crystallization using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture of PEG 3350 and PEG 400 at pH 5.5 and belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.49, c = 121.32 Å. X-ray data sets have been collected to 2.17 Å resolution.

  4. Local inhibition of nitrogen fixation and nodule metabolism in drought-stressed soybean

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Quintana, Erena; Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Seminario, Amaia; Díaz-Leal, Juan Luis; Alamillo, Josefa M.; Pineda, Manuel; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; Wienkoop, Stefanie; González, Esther M.

    2013-01-01

    Drought stress is a major factor limiting symbiotic nitrogen fixation (NF) in soybean crop production. However, the regulatory mechanisms involved in this inhibition are still controversial. Soybean plants were symbiotically grown in a split-root system (SRS), which allowed for half of the root system to be irrigated at field capacity while the other half remained water deprived. NF declined in the water-deprived root system while nitrogenase activity was maintained at control values in the well-watered half. Concomitantly, amino acids and ureides accumulated in the water-deprived belowground organs regardless of transpiration rates. Ureide accumulation was found to be related to the decline in their degradation activities rather than increased biosynthesis. Finally, proteomic analysis suggests that plant carbon metabolism, protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism, and cell growth are among the processes most altered in soybean nodules under drought stress. Results presented here support the hypothesis of a local regulation of NF taking place in soybean and downplay the role of ureides in the inhibition of NF. PMID:23580751

  5. Carbon and nitrogen fixation differ between successional stages of biological soil crusts in the Colorado Plateau and Chihuahuan Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Housman, D.C.; Powers, H.H.; Collins, A.D.; Belnap, J.

    2006-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (cyanobacteria, mosses and lichens collectively) perform essential ecosystem services, including carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fixation. Climate and land-use change are converting later successional soil crusts to early successional soil crusts with lower C and N fixation rates. To quantify the effect of such conversions on C and N dynamics in desert ecosystems we seasonally measured diurnal fixation rates in different biological soil crusts. We classified plots on the Colorado Plateau (Canyonlands) and Chihuahuan Desert (Jornada) as early (Microcoleus) or later successional (Nostoc/Scytonema or Placidium/Collema) and measured photosynthesis (Pn), nitrogenase activity (NA), and chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) on metabolically active (moist) soil crusts. Later successional crusts typically had greater Pn, averaging 1.2-1.3-fold higher daily C fixation in Canyonlands and 2.4-2.8-fold higher in the Jornada. Later successional crusts also had greater NA, averaging 1.3-7.5-fold higher daily N fixation in Canyonlands and 1.3-25.0-fold higher in the Jornada. Mean daily Fv/Fm was also greater in later successional Canyonlands crusts during winter, and Jornada crusts during all seasons except summer. Together these findings indicate conversion of soil crusts back to early successional stages results in large reductions of C and N inputs into these ecosystems.

  6. Nitrogen fixation by phyllosphere bacteria associated with higher plants and their colonizing epiphytes of a tropical lowland rainforest of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Fürnkranz, Michael; Wanek, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas; Abell, Guy; Rasche, Frank; Sessitsch, Angela

    2008-05-01

    Leaf surfaces (phyllospheres) have been shown to provide appropriate conditions for colonization by microorganisms including diazotrophic bacteria that are able to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N(2)). In this study, we determined leaf-associated N(2) fixation of a range of rainforest plants in Costa Rica, under different environmental conditions, by tracing biomass N incorporation from (15)N(2). N(2)-fixing bacterial communities of the plant species Carludovica drudei, Grias cauliflora and Costus laevis were investigated in more detail by analysis of the nifH gene and leaf-associated bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis. N(2) fixation rates varied among plant species, their growth sites (different microclimatic conditions) and light exposure. Leaf-associated diazotrophic bacterial communities detected on C. drudei and C. laevis were mainly composed of cyanobacteria (Nostoc spp.), whereas on the leaves of G. cauliflora gamma-proteobacteria were dominant in addition to cyanobacteria. The complexity of diazotrophic communities on leaves was not correlated with N(2) fixation activity. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis suggested the presence of complex microbial communities in association with leaves, however, cyanobacteria showed only low abundance. Our findings suggest that cyanobacteria as well as gamma-proteobacteria associated with leaf-colonizing epiphytes may provide significant nitrogen input into this rainforest ecosystem.

  7. Ureide assay for measuring nitrogen fixation by nodulated soybean calibrated by sup 15 N methods. [Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Herridge, D.F. ); Peoples, M.B. )

    1990-06-01

    We report experiments to quantify the relationships between the relative abundance of ureide-N in root-bleeding sap, vacuum-extracted sap, and hot water extracts of stems and petioles of nodulated soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv Bragg) and the proportion of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation. Additional experiments examined the effects of plant genotype and strain of rhizobia on these relationships. In each of the five experiments reported, plants of cv Bragg (experiment 1), cv Lincoln (experiments 3, 4, 5), or six cultivars/genotypes (experiment 2) were grown in a sand:vermiculite mixture in large pots in a naturally lit, temperature-controlled glasshouse during summer. Pots were inoculated at sowing with effective Bradyrhizobium japonicum CB 1809 (USDA 136) or with one of 21 different strains of rhizobia. The proportions of plant N derived from nitrogen fixation were determined using {sup 15}N dilution. Results show that assessment of nitrogen fixation by soybean using the ureide technique should now be possible with the standard curves presented, irrespective of genotype or strain of rhizobia occupying the nodules.

  8. Growth-promoting Sphingomonas paucimobilis ZJSH1 associated with Dendrobium officinale through phytohormone production and nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Suijuan; Zhang, Xinghai; Cao, Zhaoyun; Zhao, Kaipeng; Wang, Sai; Chen, Mingxue; Hu, Xiufang

    2014-01-01

    Growth-promoting Sphingomonas paucimobilis ZJSH1, associated with Dendrobium officinale, a traditional Chinese medicinal plant, was characterized. At 90 days post-inoculation, strain ZJSH1 significantly promoted the growth of D. officinale seedlings, with increases of stems by 8.6% and fresh weight by 7.5%. Interestingly, the polysaccharide content extracted from the inoculated seedlings was 0.6% higher than that of the control. Similar growth promotion was observed with the transplants inoculated with strain ZJSH1. The mechanism of growth promotion was attributed to a combination of phytohormones and nitrogen fixation. Strain ZJSH1 was found using the Kjeldahl method to have a nitrogen fixation activity of 1.15 mg l−1, which was confirmed by sequencing of the nifH gene. Using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, strain ZJSH1 was found to produce various phytohormones, including salicylic acid (SA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), Zeatin and abscisic acid (ABA). The growth curve showed that strain ZJSH1 grew well in the seedlings, especially in the roots. Accordingly, much higher contents of SA, ABA, IAA and c-ZR were detected in the inoculated seedlings, which may play roles as both phytohormones and ‘Systemic Acquired Resistance’ drivers. Nitrogen fixation and secretion of plant growth regulators (SA, IAA, Zeatin and ABA) endow S. paucimobilis ZJSH1 with growth-promoting properties, which provides a potential for application in the commercial growth of D. officinale. PMID:25142808

  9. Growth condition study of algae function in ecosystem for CO2 bio-fixation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David Dah-Wei; Ramaraj, Rameshprabu; Chen, Paris Honglay

    2012-02-06

    Algae niche play a crucial role on carbon cycle and have great potential for CO(2) sequestration. This study was to investigate the CO(2) bio-fixation by the high rate pond (HRP) to mimic the algae function of nature. All the reactors can keep CO(2) consumption efficiencies over 100%. The statistical analyses proved HRPs were close to the natural system from all the growth conditions. The HRP could show the "natural optimization as nature" to perform as well as the artificial reactor of continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). In the nutrition study, the carbon mass balance indicated CO(2) was the main carbon source. Accordingly, the HRPs can keep a neutral pH range to provide dissolved oxygen (DO), to promote total nitrogen (TN)/total phosphorous (TP) removal efficiencies and to demonstrate self-purification process. Furthermore, the observations of different nitrogen species in the reactors demonstrated that the major nitrogen source was decided by pH. This finding logically explained the complex nitrogen uptake by algae in nature. Consequently, this study took advantage of HRP to explore the processes of efficient CO(2) uptake with the corresponding growth condition in the ecosystem. Those results contributed the further understanding of the role of CO(2) bio-fixation in nature and demonstrated HRP could be a potential ecological engineering alternative.

  10. Facultative nitrogen fixation by canopy legumes in a lowland tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Barron, Alexander R; Purves, Drew W; Hedin, Lars O

    2011-02-01

    Symbiotic dinitrogen (N(2)) fixation is often invoked to explain the N richness of tropical forests as ostensibly N(2)-fixing trees can be a major component of the community. Such arguments assume N(2) fixers are fixing N when present. However, in laboratory experiments, legumes consistently reduce N(2) fixation in response to increased soil N availability. These contrasting views of N(2) fixation as either obligate or facultative have drastically different implications for the N cycle of tropical forests. We tested these models by directly measuring N(2)-fixing root nodules and nitrogenase activity of individual canopy-dominant legume trees (Inga sp.) across several lowland forest types. Fixation was substantial in disturbed forests and some gaps but near zero in the high N soils of mature forest. Our findings suggest that canopy legumes closely regulate N(2) fixation, leading to large variations in N inputs across the landscape, and low symbiotic fixation in mature forests despite abundant legumes.

  11. Nodulation and nitrogen fixation by Mimosa spp. in the Cerrado and Caatinga biomes of Brazil.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Fábio Bueno; Simon, Marcelo F; Gross, Eduardo; Boddey, Robert M; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Neto, Nicolau E; Loureiro, M de Fatima; de Queiroz, Luciano P; Scotti, Maria Rita; Chen, Wen-Ming; Norén, Agneta; Rubio, Maria C; de Faria, Sergio M; Bontemps, Cyril; Goi, Silvia R; Young, J Peter W; Sprent, Janet I; James, Euan K

    2010-06-01

    *An extensive survey of nodulation in the legume genus Mimosa was undertaken in two major biomes in Brazil, the Cerrado and the Caatinga, in both of which there are high degrees of endemicity of the genus. *Nodules were collected from 67 of the 70 Mimosa spp. found. Thirteen of the species were newly reported as nodulating. Nodules were examined by light and electron microscopy, and all except for M. gatesiae had a structure typical of effective Mimosa nodules. The endosymbiotic bacteria in nodules from all of the Mimosa spp. were identified as Burkholderia via immunolabelling with an antibody against Burkholderia phymatum STM815. *Twenty of the 23 Mimosa nodules tested were shown to contain nitrogenase by immunolabelling with an antibody to the nitrogenase Fe- (nifH) protein, and using the delta(15)N ((15)N natural abundance) technique, contributions by biological N(2) fixation of up to 60% of total plant N were calculated for Caatinga Mimosa spp. *It is concluded that nodulation in Mimosa is a generic character, and that the preferred symbionts of Brazilian species are Burkholderia. This is the first study to demonstrate N(2) fixation by beta-rhizobial symbioses in the field.

  12. Proteome Profiling of the Rhodobacter capsulatus Molybdenum Response Reveals a Role of IscN in Nitrogen Fixation by Fe-Nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Wagner, Eva; Langklotz, Sina; Pfänder, Yvonne; Hött, Sina; Bandow, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodobacter capsulatus is capable of synthesizing two nitrogenases, a molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase and an alternative Mo-free iron-only nitrogenase, enabling this diazotroph to grow with molecular dinitrogen (N2) as the sole nitrogen source. Here, the Mo responses of the wild type and of a mutant lacking ModABC, the high-affinity molybdate transporter, were examined by proteome profiling, Western analysis, epitope tagging, and lacZ reporter fusions. Many Mo-controlled proteins identified in this study have documented or presumed roles in nitrogen fixation, demonstrating the relevance of Mo control in this highly ATP-demanding process. The levels of Mo-nitrogenase, NifHDK, and the Mo storage protein, Mop, increased with increasing Mo concentrations. In contrast, Fe-nitrogenase, AnfHDGK, and ModABC, the Mo transporter, were expressed only under Mo-limiting conditions. IscN was identified as a novel Mo-repressed protein. Mo control of Mop, AnfHDGK, and ModABC corresponded to transcriptional regulation of their genes by the Mo-responsive regulators MopA and MopB. Mo control of NifHDK and IscN appeared to be more complex, involving different posttranscriptional mechanisms. In line with the simultaneous control of IscN and Fe-nitrogenase by Mo, IscN was found to be important for Fe-nitrogenase-dependent diazotrophic growth. The possible role of IscN as an A-type carrier providing Fe-nitrogenase with Fe-S clusters is discussed. IMPORTANCE Biological nitrogen fixation is a central process in the global nitrogen cycle by which the abundant but chemically inert dinitrogen (N2) is reduced to ammonia (NH3), a bioavailable form of nitrogen. Nitrogen reduction is catalyzed by nitrogenases found in diazotrophic bacteria and archaea but not in eukaryotes. All diazotrophs synthesize molybdenum-dependent nitrogenases. In addition, some diazotrophs, including Rhodobacter capsulatus, possess catalytically less efficient alternative Mo-free nitrogenases, whose expression

  13. Origin and Evolution of Nitrogen Fixation Genes on Symbiosis Islands and Plasmid in Bradyrhizobium

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Takashi; Piromyou, Pongdet; Tittabutr, Panlada; Teaumroong, Neung; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2016-01-01

    The nitrogen fixation (nif) genes of nodule-forming Bradyrhizobium strains are generally located on symbiosis islands or symbiosis plasmids, suggesting that these genes have been transferred laterally. The nif genes of rhizobial and non-rhizobial Bradyrhizobium strains were compared in order to infer the evolutionary histories of nif genes. Based on all codon positions, the phylogenetic tree of concatenated nifD and nifK sequences showed that nifDK on symbiosis islands formed a different clade from nifDK on non-symbiotic loci (located outside of symbiosis islands and plasmids) with elongated branches; however, these genes were located in close proximity, when only the 1st and 2nd codon positions were analyzed. The guanine (G) and cytosine (C) content of the 3rd codon position of nifDK on symbiosis islands was lower than that on non-symbiotic loci. These results suggest that nif genes on symbiosis islands were derived from the non-symbiotic loci of Bradyrhizobium or closely related strains and have evolved toward a lower GC content with a higher substitution rate than the ancestral state. Meanwhile, nifDK on symbiosis plasmids clustered with nifDK on non-symbiotic loci in the tree representing all codon positions, and the GC content of symbiotic and non-symbiotic loci were similar. These results suggest that nif genes on symbiosis plasmids were derived from the non-symbiotic loci of Bradyrhizobium and have evolved with a similar evolutionary pattern and rate as the ancestral state. PMID:27431195

  14. Origin and Evolution of Nitrogen Fixation Genes on Symbiosis Islands and Plasmid in Bradyrhizobium.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takashi; Piromyou, Pongdet; Tittabutr, Panlada; Teaumroong, Neung; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2016-09-29

    The nitrogen fixation (nif) genes of nodule-forming Bradyrhizobium strains are generally located on symbiosis islands or symbiosis plasmids, suggesting that these genes have been transferred laterally. The nif genes of rhizobial and non-rhizobial Bradyrhizobium strains were compared in order to infer the evolutionary histories of nif genes. Based on all codon positions, the phylogenetic tree of concatenated nifD and nifK sequences showed that nifDK on symbiosis islands formed a different clade from nifDK on non-symbiotic loci (located outside of symbiosis islands and plasmids) with elongated branches; however, these genes were located in close proximity, when only the 1st and 2nd codon positions were analyzed. The guanine (G) and cytosine (C) content of the 3rd codon position of nifDK on symbiosis islands was lower than that on non-symbiotic loci. These results suggest that nif genes on symbiosis islands were derived from the non-symbiotic loci of Bradyrhizobium or closely related strains and have evolved toward a lower GC content with a higher substitution rate than the ancestral state. Meanwhile, nifDK on symbiosis plasmids clustered with nifDK on non-symbiotic loci in the tree representing all codon positions, and the GC content of symbiotic and non-symbiotic loci were similar. These results suggest that nif genes on symbiosis plasmids were derived from the non-symbiotic loci of Bradyrhizobium and have evolved with a similar evolutionary pattern and rate as the ancestral state.

  15. The interactive effects of temperature and light on biological nitrogen fixation in boreal forests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    • Plant productivity is predicted to increase in northern latitudes due to climate warming; however, this may depend on whether biological N-fixation also increases. We evaluated how variation in temperature and light affect N-fixation by two boreal feather mosses, Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomi...

  16. Tricalcium phosphate solubilization and nitrogen fixation by newly isolated Aneurinibacillus aneurinilyticus CKMV1 from rhizosphere of Valeriana jatamansi and its growth promotional effect.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Anjali; Guleria, Shiwani; Balgir, Praveen P; Walia, Abhishek; Mahajan, Rishi; Mehta, Preeti; Shirkot, Chand Karan

    Aneurinibacillus aneurinilyticus strain CKMV1 was isolated from rhizosphere of Valeriana jatamansi and possessed multiple plant growth promoting traits like production of phosphate solubilization (260mg/L), nitrogen fixation (202.91nmolethylenemL(-1)h(-1)), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) (8.1μg/mL), siderophores (61.60%), HCN (hydrogen cyanide) production and antifungal activity. We investigated the ability of isolate CKMV1 to solubilize insoluble P via mechanism of organic acid production. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) study showed that isolate CKMV1 produced mainly gluconic (1.34%) and oxalic acids. However, genetic evidences for nitrogen fixation and phosphate solubilization by organic acid production have been reported first time for A. aneurinilyticus strain CKMV1. A unique combination of glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene and pyrroloquinoline quinone synthase (pqq) gene, a cofactor of gdh involved in phosphate solubilization has been elucidated. Nitrogenase (nif H) gene for nitrogen fixation was reported from A. aneurinilyticus. It was notable that isolate CKMV1 exhibited highest antifungal against Sclerotium rolfsii (93.58%) followed by Fusarium oxysporum (64.3%), Dematophora necatrix (52.71%), Rhizoctonia solani (91.58%), Alternaria sp. (71.08%) and Phytophthora sp. (71.37%). Remarkable increase was observed in seed germination (27.07%), shoot length (42.33%), root length (52.6%), shoot dry weight (62.01%) and root dry weight (45.7%) along with NPK (0.74, 0.36, 1.82%) content of tomato under net house condition. Isolate CKMV1 possessed traits related to plant growth promotion, therefore, could be a potential candidate for the development of biofertiliser or biocontrol agent and this is the first study to include the Aneurinibacillus as PGPR.

  17. Dinitrogen fixation and dissolved organic nitrogen fueled primary production and particulate export during the VAHINE mesocosms experiment (New Caledonia lagoon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelot, H.; Moutin, T.; L'Helguen, S.; Leblanc, K.; Hélias, S.; Grosso, O.; Leblond, N.; Charrière, B.; Bonnet, S.

    2015-03-01

    In the oligotrophic ocean characterized by nitrate (NO3-) depletion in surface waters, dinitrogen (N2) fixation and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can represent significant nitrogen (N) sources for the ecosystem. Here we deployed in New Caledonia large in situ mesocosms in order to investigate (1) the contribution of N2 fixation and DON use to primary production (PP) and particle export and (2) the fate of the freshly produced particulate organic N (PON) i.e. whether it is preferentially accumulated and recycled in the water column or exported out of the system. The mesocosms were fertilized with phosphate (P) in order to prevent P-limitation and promote N2 fixation. The diazotrophic community was dominated by diatoms-diazotrophs associations (DDAs) during the first part of the experiment for 10 days (P1) followed by the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacteria UCYN-C the 9 last days (P2) of the experiment. N2 fixation rates averaged 9.8 ± 4.0 and 27.7 ± 8.6 nM d-1 during P1 and P2, respectively. NO3- concentrations (< 40 nM) in the mesocosms were a negligible source of N indicating that N2 fixation was the main driver of new production all along the experiment. The contribution of v fixation to PP was not significantly different (p > 0.05) during P1 (9.0 ± 3.3%) and P2 (12.6 ± 6.1%). However, the e ratio that quantifies the efficiency of a system to export particulate organic carbon (POCexport) compared to PP (e ratio = POCexport/PP) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) during P2 (39.7 ± 24.9%) than during P1 (23.9 ± 20.2%) indicating that the production sustained by UCYN-C was more efficient at promoting C export than the production sustained by DDAs. During P1, PON was stable and the total amount of N provided by N2 fixation (0.10 ± 0.02 μM) was not significantly different (p > 0.05) from the total amount of PON exported (0.10 ± 0.04 μM), suggesting a rapid and probably direct export of the recently fixed N2 by the DDAs. During P2, both PON concentrations

  18. A JAZ Protein in Astragalus sinicus Interacts with a Leghemoglobin through the TIFY Domain and Is Involved in Nodule Development and Nitrogen Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yixing; Xu, Meng; Wang, Ning; Li, Youguo

    2015-01-01

    Leghemoglobins (Lbs) play an important role in legumes-rhizobia symbiosis. Lbs bind O2 and protect nitrogenase activity from damage by O2 in nodules, therefore, they are regarded as a marker of active nitrogen fixation in nodules. Additionally, Lbs are involved in the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, acting as a NO scavenger during nodule development and nitrogen fixation. However, regulators responsible for Lb expression and modulation of Lb activity have not been characterized. In our previous work, a Jasmonate-Zim-domain (JAZ) protein interacting with a Lb (AsB2510) in Astragalus sinicus was identified and designated AsJAZ1. In this study, the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 was verified using a yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro Glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays, resulting in identification of the interaction domain as a TIFY (previously known as zinc-finger protein expressed in inflorescence meristem, ZIM) domain. TIFY domain is named after the most conserved amino acids within the domain. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was used to confirm the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 in tobacco cells, demonstrating that AsJAZ1-AsB2510 interaction was localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, the expression patterns and the symbiotic phenotypes of AsJAZ1 were investigated. Knockdown of AsJAZ1 expression via RNA interference led to decreased number of nodules, abnormal development of bacteroids, accumulation of poly-x-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and loss of nitrogenase activity. Taken together, our results suggest that AsJAZ1 interacts with AsB2510 and participates in nodule development and nitrogen fixation. Our results provide novel insights into the functions of Lbs or JAZ proteins during legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:26460857

  19. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Inoculation to Enhance Vegetative Growth, Nitrogen Fixation and Nitrogen Remobilisation of Maize under Greenhouse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Khing Boon; Othman, Radziah; Abdul Rahim, Khairuddin; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H.

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) may provide a biological alternative to fix atmospheric N2 and delay N remobilisation in maize plant to increase crop yield, based on an understanding that plant-N remobilisation is directly correlated to its plant senescence. Thus, four PGPR strains were selected from a series of bacterial strains isolated from maize roots at two locations in Malaysia. The PGPR strains were screened in vitro for their biochemical plant growth-promoting (PGP) abilities and plant growth promotion assays. These strains were identified as Klebsiella sp. Br1, Klebsiella pneumoniae Fr1, Bacillus pumilus S1r1 and Acinetobacter sp. S3r2 and a reference strain used was Bacillus subtilis UPMB10. All the PGPR strains were tested positive for N2 fixation, phosphate solubilisation and auxin production by in vitro tests. In a greenhouse experiment with reduced fertiliser-N input (a third of recommended fertiliser-N rate), the N2 fixation abilities of PGPR in association with maize were determined by 15N isotope dilution technique at two harvests, namely, prior to anthesis (D50) and ear harvest (D65). The results indicated that dry biomass of top, root and ear, total N content and bacterial colonisations in non-rhizosphere, rhizosphere and endosphere of maize roots were influenced by PGPR inoculation. In particular, the plants inoculated with B. pumilus S1r1 generally outperformed those with the other treatments. They produced the highest N2 fixing capacity of 30.5% (262 mg N2 fixed plant−1) and 25.5% (304 mg N2 fixed plant−1) of the total N requirement of maize top at D50 and D65, respectively. N remobilisation and plant senescence in maize were delayed by PGPR inoculation, which is an indicative of greater grain production. This is indicated by significant interactions between PGPR strains and time of harvests for parameters on N uptake and at. % 15Ne of tassel. The phenomenon is also supported by the lower N content in tassels of maize treated

  20. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Inoculation to Enhance Vegetative Growth, Nitrogen Fixation and Nitrogen Remobilisation of Maize under Greenhouse Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Khing Boon; Othman, Radziah; Abdul Rahim, Khairuddin; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) may provide a biological alternative to fix atmospheric N2 and delay N remobilisation in maize plant to increase crop yield, based on an understanding that plant-N remobilisation is directly correlated to its plant senescence. Thus, four PGPR strains were selected from a series of bacterial strains isolated from maize roots at two locations in Malaysia. The PGPR strains were screened in vitro for their biochemical plant growth-promoting (PGP) abilities and plant growth promotion assays. These strains were identified as Klebsiella sp. Br1, Klebsiella pneumoniae Fr1, Bacillus pumilus S1r1 and Acinetobacter sp. S3r2 and a reference strain used was Bacillus subtilis UPMB10. All the PGPR strains were tested positive for N2 fixation, phosphate solubilisation and auxin production by in vitro tests. In a greenhouse experiment with reduced fertiliser-N input (a third of recommended fertiliser-N rate), the N2 fixation abilities of PGPR in association with maize were determined by 15N isotope dilution technique at two harvests, namely, prior to anthesis (D50) and ear harvest (D65). The results indicated that dry biomass of top, root and ear, total N content and bacterial colonisations in non-rhizosphere, rhizosphere and endosphere of maize roots were influenced by PGPR inoculation. In particular, the plants inoculated with B. pumilus S1r1 generally outperformed those with the other treatments. They produced the highest N2 fixing capacity of 30.5% (262 mg N2 fixed plant-1) and 25.5% (304 mg N2 fixed plant-1) of the total N requirement of maize top at D50 and D65, respectively. N remobilisation and plant senescence in maize were delayed by PGPR inoculation, which is an indicative of greater grain production. This is indicated by significant interactions between PGPR strains and time of harvests for parameters on N uptake and at. % 15Ne of tassel. The phenomenon is also supported by the lower N content in tassels of maize treated with

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of Nitrogen Fixation and the Role of NifA in the Diazotrophic Endophyte Azoarcus sp. Strain BH72

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Background The model endophyte Azoarcus sp. strain BH72 is known to contribute fixed nitrogen to its host Kallar grass and also expresses nitrogenase genes endophytically in rice seedlings. Availability of nitrogen is a signal regulating the transcription of nitrogenase genes. Therefore, we analysed global transcription in response to differences in the nitrogen source. Methodology/Principal Findings A DNA microarray, comprising 70-mer oligonucleotides representing 3989 open reading frames of the genome of strain BH72, was used for transcriptome studies. Transcription profiles of cells grown microaerobically on N2 versus ammonium were compared. Expression of 7.2% of the genes was significantly up-regulated, and 5.8% down-regulated upon N2 fixation, respectively. A parallel genome-wide prediction of σ54-type promoter elements mapped to the upstream region of 38 sequences of which 36 were modulated under the N2 response. In addition to modulation of genes related to N2 fixation, the expressions of gene clusters that might be related to plant-microbe interaction and of several transcription factors were significantly enhanced. While comparing under N2-fixation conditions the transcriptome of wild type with a nifLA− insertion mutant, NifA being the essential transcriptional activator for nif genes, 24.5% of the genome was found to be affected in expression. A genome-wide prediction of 29 NifA binding sequences matched to 25 of the target genes whose expression was differential during microarray analysis, some of which were putatively negatively regulated by NifA. For selected genes, differential expression was corroborated by real time RT-PCR studies. Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that life under conditions of nitrogen fixation is an important part of the lifestyle of strain BH72 in roots, as a wide range of genes far beyond the nif regulon is modulated. Moreover, the NifA regulon in strain BH72 appears to encompass a wider range of cellular functions

  2. The innovative safe fixative for histology, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry techniques: "pilot study using shellac alcoholic solution fixative".

    PubMed

    Ali Jamal, Awatif; Abd El-Aziz, Gamal Said; Hamdy, Raid Mahmoud; Al-Hayani, Abdulmonem; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah

    2014-05-01

    The concerns over health and workplace hazards of formalin fixative, joined to its cross-linking of molecular groups that results in suboptimal immunohistochemistry, led us to search for an innovative safe fixative. Shellac is a natural material which is used as a preservative in foods and pharmaceutical industries. This study was undertaken to evaluate the fixation adequacy and staining quality of histopathological specimens fixed in the "shellac alcoholic solution" (SAS), and also to determine the validity of immunohistochemical staining of SAS-fixed material in comparison to those fixed in formalin. Fresh samples from 26 cases from various human tissues were collected at the frozen section room of King Abdulaziz University Hospital, and fixed in SAS fixative or in neutral buffered formaldehyde (NBF) for 12, 18, 24, and 48 h, and processed for paraffin sectioning. Deparaffinized sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunostained for different antigens. The tissues fixed in SAS for >18 h showed best staining quality of H&E comparable to NBF-fixed tissues. Comparison of the immunohistochemical staining of different tissues yielded nearly equivalent readings with good positive nuclear staining quality in both fixatives. These findings support the fixation and preservation adequacy of SAS. Furthermore, it was concluded that the good staining quality obtained with SAS-fixed tissues, which was more or less comparable with the quality obtained with the formalin fixed tissues, supports the validity of this new solution as a good innovative fixative.

  3. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Stimulates Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Medicago spp. through Improved Phosphorus Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Voříšková, Alena; Gryndlerová, Hana; Vosátka, Miroslav; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Legumes establish root symbioses with rhizobia that provide plants with nitrogen (N) through biological N fixation (BNF), as well as with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that mediate improved plant phosphorus (P) uptake. Such complex relationships complicate our understanding of nutrient acquisition by legumes and how they reward their symbiotic partners with carbon along gradients of environmental conditions. In order to disentangle the interplay between BNF and AM symbioses in two Medicago species (Medicago truncatula and M. sativa) along a P-fertilization gradient, we conducted a pot experiment where the rhizobia-treated plants were either inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis ‘PH5’ and grown in two nutrient-poor substrates subjected to one of three different P-supply levels. Throughout the experiment, all plants were fertilized with 15N-enriched liquid N-fertilizer to allow for assessment of BNF efficiency in terms of the fraction of N in the plants derived from the BNF (%NBNF). We hypothesized (1) higher %NBNF coinciding with higher P supply, and (2) higher %NBNF in mycorrhizal as compared to non-mycorrhizal plants under P deficiency due to mycorrhiza-mediated improvement in P nutrition. We found a strongly positive correlation between total plant P content and %NBNF, clearly documenting the importance of plant P nutrition for BNF efficiency. The AM symbiosis generally improved P uptake by plants and considerably stimulated the efficiency of BNF under low P availability (below 10 mg kg-1 water extractable P). Under high P availability (above 10 mg kg-1 water extractable P), the AM symbiosis brought no further benefits to the plants with respect to P nutrition even as the effects of P availability on N acquisition via BNF were further modulated by the environmental context (plant and substrate combinations). As a response to elevated P availability in the substrate, the extent of root length colonization by AM fungi was

  4. Rhythm of carbon and nitrogen fixation in unicellular cyanobacteria under turbulent and highly aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, S; Gaudana, Sandeep B; Viswanathan, Ganesh A; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2013-09-01

    Nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are being increasingly explored for nitrogenase-dependent hydrogen production. Commercial success however will depend on the ability to grow these cultures at high cell densities. Photo-limitation at high cell densities leads to hindered photoautotrophic growth while turbulent conditions, which simulate flashing light effect, can lead to oxygen toxicity to the nitrogenase enzyme. Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142, a known hydrogen producer, is reported to grow and fix nitrogen under moderately oxic conditions in shake flasks. In this study, we explore the growth and nitrogen fixing potential of this organism under turbulent conditions with volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (KL a) values that are up to 20-times greater than in shake flasks. In a stirred vessel, the organism grows well in turbulent regime possibly due to a simulated flashing light effect with optimal growth at Reynolds number of approximately 35,000. A respiratory burst lasting for about 4 h creates anoxic conditions intracellularly with near saturating levels of dissolved oxygen in the extracellular medium. This is concomitant with complete exhaustion of intracellular glycogen storage and upregulation of nifH and nifX, the genes encoding proteins of the nitrogenase complex. Further, the rhythmic oscillations in exhaust gas CO2 and O2 profiles synchronize faithfully with those in biochemical parameters and gene expression thereby serving as an effective online monitoring tool. These results will have important implications in potential commercial success of nitrogenase-dependent hydrogen production by cyanobacteria.

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of N2-fixing and non-N2-fixing Paenibacillus spp.: organization, evolution and expression of the nitrogen fixation genes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian-Bo; Du, Zhenglin; Bai, Lanqing; Tian, Changfu; Zhang, Yunzhi; Xie, Jiu-Yan; Wang, Tianshu; Liu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Xi; Cheng, Qi; Chen, Sanfeng; Li, Jilun

    2014-03-01

    We provide here a comparative genome analysis of 31 strains within the genus Paenibacillus including 11 new genomic sequences of N2-fixing strains. The heterogeneity of the 31 genomes (15 N2-fixing and 16 non-N2-fixing Paenibacillus strains) was reflected in the large size of the shell genome, which makes up approximately 65.2% of the genes in pan genome. Large numbers of transposable elements might be related to the heterogeneity. We discovered that a minimal and compact nif cluster comprising nine genes nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV encoding Mo-nitrogenase is conserved in the 15 N2-fixing strains. The nif cluster is under control of a σ(70)-depedent promoter and possesses a GlnR/TnrA-binding site in the promoter. Suf system encoding [Fe-S] cluster is highly conserved in N2-fixing and non-N2-fixing strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the nif cluster enabled Escherichia coli JM109 to fix nitrogen. Phylogeny of the concatenated NifHDK sequences indicates that Paenibacillus and Frankia are sister groups. Phylogeny of the concatenated 275 single-copy core genes suggests that the ancestral Paenibacillus did not fix nitrogen. The N2-fixing Paenibacillus strains were generated by acquiring the nif cluster via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from a source related to Frankia. During the history of evolution, the nif cluster was lost, producing some non-N2-fixing strains, and vnf encoding V-nitrogenase or anf encoding Fe-nitrogenase was acquired, causing further diversification of some strains. In addition, some N2-fixing strains have additional nif and nif-like genes which may result from gene duplications. The evolution of nitrogen fixation in Paenibacillus involves a mix of gain, loss, HGT and duplication of nif/anf/vnf genes. This study not only reveals the organization and distribution of nitrogen fixation genes in Paenibacillus, but also provides insight into the complex evolutionary history of nitrogen fixation.

  6. Comparative Genomic Analysis of N2-Fixing and Non-N2-Fixing Paenibacillus spp.: Organization, Evolution and Expression of the Nitrogen Fixation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian-Bo; Du, Zhenglin; Bai, Lanqing; Tian, Changfu; Zhang, Yunzhi; Xie, Jiu-Yan; Wang, Tianshu; Liu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Xi; Cheng, Qi; Chen, Sanfeng; Li, Jilun

    2014-01-01

    We provide here a comparative genome analysis of 31 strains within the genus Paenibacillus including 11 new genomic sequences of N2-fixing strains. The heterogeneity of the 31 genomes (15 N2-fixing and 16 non-N2-fixing Paenibacillus strains) was reflected in the large size of the shell genome, which makes up approximately 65.2% of the genes in pan genome. Large numbers of transposable elements might be related to the heterogeneity. We discovered that a minimal and compact nif cluster comprising nine genes nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV encoding Mo-nitrogenase is conserved in the 15 N2-fixing strains. The nif cluster is under control of a σ70-depedent promoter and possesses a GlnR/TnrA-binding site in the promoter. Suf system encoding [Fe–S] cluster is highly conserved in N2-fixing and non-N2-fixing strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the nif cluster enabled Escherichia coli JM109 to fix nitrogen. Phylogeny of the concatenated NifHDK sequences indicates that Paenibacillus and Frankia are sister groups. Phylogeny of the concatenated 275 single-copy core genes suggests that the ancestral Paenibacillus did not fix nitrogen. The N2-fixing Paenibacillus strains were generated by acquiring the nif cluster via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from a source related to Frankia. During the history of evolution, the nif cluster was lost, producing some non-N2-fixing strains, and vnf encoding V-nitrogenase or anf encoding Fe-nitrogenase was acquired, causing further diversification of some strains. In addition, some N2-fixing strains have additional nif and nif-like genes which may result from gene duplications. The evolution of nitrogen fixation in Paenibacillus involves a mix of gain, loss, HGT and duplication of nif/anf/vnf genes. This study not only reveals the organization and distribution of nitrogen fixation genes in Paenibacillus, but also provides insight into the complex evolutionary history of nitrogen fixation. PMID:24651173

  7. The influence of phosphorus deficiency on growth and nitrogen fixation of white clover plants.

    PubMed

    Høgh-Jensen, Henning; Schjoerring, JanK; Soussana, Jean-Francois

    2002-12-01

    The effects of P deficiency on growth, N(2)-fixation and photosynthesis in white clover (Trifolium repens L.) plants were investigated using three contrasting relative addition rates of P, or following abrupt withdrawal of the P supply. Responses to a constant below-optimum P supply rate consisted of a decline in N(2)-fixation per unit root weight and a small reduction in the efficiency with which electrons were allocated to the reduction of N(2) in nodules. Abrupt removal of P arrested nodule growth and caused a substantial decline in nitrogenase activity per unit root weight, but not per unit nodule mass. Similarly, the rate of photosynthesis per unit leaf area was unaffected by abrupt P removal, whereas CO(2) acquisition for the plant as a whole decreased due to a decline in total leaf area, leaf area per unit leaf weight and utilization of incoming radiation. These changes followed the decline in tissue P concentrations. The ratio between CO(2)-fixation and N(2)-fixation was maintained under short-term P deprivation but increased under long-term low P supply, indicating a regulatory inhibition of nodule activity following morphological and growth adjustments. It is concluded that N(2)-fixation did not limit the growth of clover plants experiencing P deficiency. A low P status induced changes in the relative growth of roots, nodules and shoots rather than changes in N and/or C uptake rates per unit mass or area of these organs.

  8. Estimation of biological nitrogen fixation by black locust in short-rotation forests using natural 15N abundance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veste, M.; Böhm, C.; Quinckenstein, A.; Freese, D.

    2012-04-01

    The importance of short rotation forests and agroforestry systems for woody biomass production for bioenergy will increase in Central Europe within the next decades. In this context, black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) has a high growth potential especially at marginal, drought-susceptible sites such as occur in Brandenburg State (Eastern Germany). As a pioneer tree species black locust grows under a wide range of site conditions. The native range of black locust in Northern America is classified by a humid to sub-humid climate with a mean annual precipitation of 1020 to 1830 mm. In Central and Eastern Europe, this species is cultivated in a more continental climate with an annual precipitation often below 600 mm. Therefore, black locust is known to be relatively drought tolerant compared to other temperate, deciduous tree species. Because of its N2-fixation ability black locust plays generally an important role for the improvement of soil fertility. This effect is of particular interest at marginal sites in the post-mining landscapes. In order to estimate the N2-fixation potential of black locust at marginal sites leaf samples were taken from black locust trees in short rotation plantations planted between 1995 and 2007 in post-mining sites south of Cottbus (Brandenburg, NE Germany). The variation of the natural 15N abundance was measured to evaluate the biological nitrogen fixation. The nitrogen derived from the atmosphere can be calculated using a two-pool model from the quotient of the natural 15N abundances of the N2-fixing plant and the plant available soil N. Because representatively determining the plant available soil N is difficult, a non-N2-fixing reference plant growing at the same site with a similar root system and temporal N uptake pattern to the N2-fixing plant is often used. In our case we used red oak (Quercus rubra) as a reference. The average nitrogen content in the leaves of black locust ranged from 3.1% (C/N 14.8) in 15 years old trees to 3

  9. Effect of Microgravity on Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Initial Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species of the legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiment one was designed to determine if S. meliloti infect M. truncatula and initiate physiological changes associated with nodule formation. Roots of five-day-old M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 (Enodll::gus) were inoculated 24 hr before launch with either S. meliloti strain 1021 or strain ABS7 and integrated into BRIC-PDFU hardware placed in a 4 C Cold Bag for launch on Atlantis. Inoculated plants and uninoculated controls were maintained in the dark at ambient temperature in the middeck of STS-135 for 11 days before fixation in RNAlater(tM) by crew activation of the PDFU. Experiment two was designed to determine if microgravity altered the process of bacterial infection and host plant nodule formation. Seeds of two M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 lines, the Enodll::gus used in experiment 1, and SUNN, a super-nodulating mutant of A17, were germinated on orbit for 11 days in the middeck cabin and returned to Earth alive inside of BRIC-PDFU's at 4 C. S. meliloti strains 1021 and ABS7 were cultivated separately in broth culture on orbit and also returned to Earth alive. After landing, flight- and groundgrown plants and bacteria were transferred from BRIC-PDFU's into Nunc(tm) 4-well plates for reciprocity crosses. Rates of plant growth and nodule development on Buffered Nodulation Medium (lacking nitrogen) were measured for 14 days. Preliminary analysis' of Experiment 1 confirms that

  10. sup 15 NO sub 3 assimilation and its inhibitory effect on symbiotic nitrogen fixation in peanut

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfill, S.B.; Wells, R.; Israel, D.W.; Rufty, T.W. )

    1990-05-01

    To assess the inhibitory effect of nitrate on the contribution of symbiotic N fixation to total plant N, cultivars of different nodulation capacity were monitored in a growth chamber study. Plants inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. (Arachis) strain NC 70.1 were grown in a nutrient solution containing 0, 2.5, 5 or 10 mM NO{sub 3} enriched with 2.5 atom % {sup 15}N. Plant harvests at 30 and 60 DAP provided tissue for measurement of growth, total N, NO{sub 3} and {sup 15}N partitioning. Nitrogenase activity was estimated via C{sub 2}H{sub 2} reduction. Data indicates that plant growth was associated to NO{sub 3} concentration. Average nodule weight and N plant{sup {minus}1} decreased in excess of 2.5mM NO{sub 3}. Specific nitrogenase activity diminished markedly with application of NO{sub 3} with a decline from 40.2 to 25.0 {mu}moles C{sub 2}H{sub 2} g hr{sup {minus}1} at 0 and 2.5mM NO{sub 3}, respectively. Nitrate and fixed N assimilation patterns will be elucidated by {sup 15}N analysis.

  11. Investigating patterns of symbiotic nitrogen fixation during vegetation change from grassland to woodland using fine scale δ(15) N measurements.

    PubMed

    Soper, Fiona M; Boutton, Thomas W; Sparks, Jed P

    2015-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in woody plants is often investigated using foliar measurements of δ(15) N and is of particular interest in ecosystems experiencing increases in BNF due to woody plant encroachment. We sampled δ(15) N along the entire N uptake pathway including soil solution, xylem sap and foliage to (1) test assumptions inherent to the use of foliar δ(15) N as a proxy for BNF; (2) determine whether seasonal divergences occur between δ(15) Nxylem sap and δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N that could be used to infer variation in BNF; and (3) assess patterns of δ(15) N with tree age as indicators of shifting BNF or N cycling. Measurements of woody N-fixing Prosopis glandulosa and paired reference non-fixing Zanthoxylum fagara at three seasonal time points showed that δ(15) Nsoil inorganic N varied temporally and spatially between species. Fractionation between xylem and foliar δ(15) N was consistently opposite in direction between species and varied on average by 2.4‰. Accounting for these sources of variation caused percent nitrogen derived from fixation values for Prosopis to vary by up to ∼70%. Soil-xylem δ(15) N separation varied temporally and increased with Prosopis age, suggesting seasonal variation in N cycling and BNF and potential long-term increases in BNF not apparent through foliar sampling alone.

  12. Cyanobacterial symbionts diverged in the late Cretaceous towards lineage-specific nitrogen fixation factories in single-celled phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M.; Cabello, Ana M.; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Hingamp, Pascal; Alberti, Adriana; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Gasol, Josep M.; Massana, Ramon; Acinas, Silvia G.

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium UCYN-A, one of the major contributors to nitrogen fixation in the open ocean, lives in symbiosis with single-celled phytoplankton. UCYN-A includes several closely related lineages whose partner fidelity, genome-wide expression and time of evolutionary divergence remain to be resolved. Here we detect and distinguish UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 lineages in symbiosis with two distinct prymnesiophyte partners in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both symbiotic systems are lineage specific and differ in the number of UCYN-A cells involved. Our analyses infer a streamlined genome expression towards nitrogen fixation in both UCYN-A lineages. Comparative genomics reveal a strong purifying selection in UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 with a diversification process ∼91 Myr ago, in the late Cretaceous, after the low-nutrient regime period occurred during the Jurassic. These findings suggest that UCYN-A diversified in a co-evolutionary process, wherein their prymnesiophyte partners acted as a barrier driving an allopatric speciation of extant UCYN-A lineages. PMID:27002549

  13. Cyanobacterial symbionts diverged in the late Cretaceous towards lineage-specific nitrogen fixation factories in single-celled phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Cabello, Ana M; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Hingamp, Pascal; Alberti, Adriana; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Zehr, Jonathan P; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-03-22

    The unicellular cyanobacterium UCYN-A, one of the major contributors to nitrogen fixation in the open ocean, lives in symbiosis with single-celled phytoplankton. UCYN-A includes several closely related lineages whose partner fidelity, genome-wide expression and time of evolutionary divergence remain to be resolved. Here we detect and distinguish UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 lineages in symbiosis with two distinct prymnesiophyte partners in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both symbiotic systems are lineage specific and differ in the number of UCYN-A cells involved. Our analyses infer a streamlined genome expression towards nitrogen fixation in both UCYN-A lineages. Comparative genomics reveal a strong purifying selection in UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 with a diversification process ∼91 Myr ago, in the late Cretaceous, after the low-nutrient regime period occurred during the Jurassic. These findings suggest that UCYN-A diversified in a co-evolutionary process, wherein their prymnesiophyte partners acted as a barrier driving an allopatric speciation of extant UCYN-A lineages.

  14. Iron limitation in the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium reveals new insights into regulation of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Hendrik; Setlík, Ivan; Seibert, Sven; Prásil, Ondrej; Setlikova, Eva; Strittmatter, Martina; Levitan, Orly; Lohscheider, Jens; Adamska, Iwona; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2008-01-01

    * As iron (Fe) deficiency is a main limiting factor of ocean productivity, its effects were investigated on interactions between photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation in the marine nonheterocystous diazotrophic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium IMS101. * Biophysical methods such as fluorescence kinetic microscopy, fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorimetry, and in vivo and in vitro spectroscopy of pigment composition were used, and nitrogenase activity and the abundance of key proteins were measured. * Fe limitation caused a fast down-regulation of nitrogenase activity and protein levels. By contrast, the abundance of Fe-requiring photosystem I (PSI) components remained constant. Total levels of phycobiliproteins remained unchanged according to single-cell in vivo spectra. However, the regular 16-kDa phycoerythrin band decreased and finally disappeared 16-20 d after initiation of Fe limitation, concomitant with the accumulation of a 20-kDa protein cross-reacting with the phycoerythrin antibody. Concurrently, nitrogenase expression and activity increased. Fe limitation dampened the daily cycle of photosystem II (PSII) activity characteristic of diazotrophic Trichodesmium cells. Further, it increased the number and prolonged the time period of occurrence of cells with elevated basic fluorescence (F(0)). Additionally, it increased the effective cross-section of PSII, probably as a result of enhanced coupling of phycobilisomes to PSII, and led to up-regulation of the Fe stress protein IsiA. * Trichodesmium survives short-term Fe limitation by selectively down-regulating nitrogen fixation while maintaining but re-arranging the photosynthetic apparatus.

  15. Engineering the nifH promoter region and abolishing poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate accumulation in Rhizobium etli enhance nitrogen fixation in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Humberto; Mora, Yolanda; Salazar, Emmanuel; Encarnación, Sergio; Palacios, Rafael; Mora, Jaime

    2004-06-01

    Rhizobium etli, as well as some other rhizobia, presents nitrogenase reductase (nifH) gene reiterations. Several R. etli strains studied in this laboratory showed a unique organization and contained two complete nifHDK operons (copies a and b) and a truncated nifHD operon (copy c). Expression analysis of lacZ fusion demonstrated that copies a and b in strain CFN42 are transcribed at lower levels than copy c, although this copy has no discernible role during nitrogen fixation. To increase nitrogenase production, we constructed a chimeric nifHDK operon regulated by the strong nifHc promoter sequence and expressed it in symbiosis with the common bean plant (Phaseolus vulgaris), either cloned on a stably inherited plasmid or incorporated into the symbiotic plasmid (pSym). Compared with the wild-type strain, strains with the nitrogenase overexpression construction assayed in greenhouse experiments had, increased nitrogenase activity (58% on average), increased plant weight (32% on average), increased nitrogen content in plants (15% at 32 days postinoculation), and most importantly, higher seed yield (36% on average), higher nitrogen content (25%), and higher nitrogen yield (72% on average) in seeds. Additionally, expression of the chimeric nifHDK operon in a poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate-negative R. etli strain produced an additive effect in enhancing symbiosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of increased seed yield and nutritional content in the common bean obtained by using only the genetic material already present in Rhizobium.

  16. Engineering the nifH Promoter Region and Abolishing Poly-β-Hydroxybutyrate Accumulation in Rhizobium etli Enhance Nitrogen Fixation in Symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Humberto; Mora, Yolanda; Salazar, Emmanuel; Encarnación, Sergio; Palacios, Rafael; Mora, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    Rhizobium etli, as well as some other rhizobia, presents nitrogenase reductase (nifH) gene reiterations. Several R. etli strains studied in this laboratory showed a unique organization and contained two complete nifHDK operons (copies a and b) and a truncated nifHD operon (copy c). Expression analysis of lacZ fusion demonstrated that copies a and b in strain CFN42 are transcribed at lower levels than copy c, although this copy has no discernible role during nitrogen fixation. To increase nitrogenase production, we constructed a chimeric nifHDK operon regulated by the strong nifHc promoter sequence and expressed it in symbiosis with the common bean plant (Phaseolus vulgaris), either cloned on a stably inherited plasmid or incorporated into the symbiotic plasmid (pSym). Compared with the wild-type strain, strains with the nitrogenase overexpression construction assayed in greenhouse experiments had, increased nitrogenase activity (58% on average), increased plant weight (32% on average), increased nitrogen content in plants (15% at 32 days postinoculation), and most importantly, higher seed yield (36% on average), higher nitrogen content (25%), and higher nitrogen yield (72% on average) in seeds. Additionally, expression of the chimeric nifHDK operon in a poly-β-hydroxybutyrate-negative R. etli strain produced an additive effect in enhancing symbiosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of increased seed yield and nutritional content in the common bean obtained by using only the genetic material already present in Rhizobium. PMID:15184121

  17. sRNA154 a newly identified regulator of nitrogen fixation in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Daniela; Förstner, Konrad U; Jäger, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2017-03-15

    Trans-encoded sRNA154 is exclusively expressed under nitrogen (N)-deficiency in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1. The sRNA154 deletion strain showed a significant decrease in growth under N-limitation, pointing towards a regulatory role of sRNA154 in N-metabolism. Aiming to elucidate its regulatory function we characterized sRNA154 by means of biochemical and genetic approaches. 24 homologs of sRNA154 were identified in recently reported draft genomes of Methanosarcina strains, demonstrating high conservation in sequence and predicted secondary structure with two highly conserved single stranded loops. Transcriptome studies of sRNA154 deletion mutants by an RNA-seq approach uncovered nifH- and nrpA-mRNA, encoding the α-subunit of nitrogenase and the transcriptional activator of the nitrogen fixation (nif)-operon, as potential targets besides other components of the N-metabolism. Furthermore, results obtained from stability, complementation and western blot analysis, as well as in silico target predictions combined with electrophoretic mobility shift-assays, argue for a stabilizing effect of sRNA154 on the polycistronic nif-mRNA and nrpA-mRNA by binding with both loops. Further identified N-related targets were studied, which demonstrates that translation initiation of glnA2-mRNA, encoding glutamine synthetase2, appears to be affected by sRNA154 masking the ribosome binding site, whereas glnA1-mRNA appears to be stabilized by sRNA154. Overall, we propose that sRNA154 has a crucial regulatory role in N-metabolism in M. mazei by stabilizing the polycistronic mRNA encoding nitrogenase and glnA1-mRNA, as well as allowing a feed forward regulation of nif-gene expression by stabilizing nrpA-mRNA. Consequently, sRNA154 represents the first archaeal sRNA, for which a positive posttranscriptional regulation is demonstrated as well as inhibition of translation initiation.

  18. Association of nitrogen fixation to water use efficiency and yield traits of peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvement of N2 fixation might be an effective strategy in peanut breeding for high yield under drought stress conditions. However, under water limited conditions peanut varieties having high water-use efficiency (WUE) are favorable. A pot experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions at ...

  19. Anoxygenic Photosynthesis and Nitrogen Fixation by a Microbial Mat Community in a Bahamian Hypersaline Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Pinckney, J. L.; Paerl, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of photosynthesis (both oxygenic and anoxygenic) and N(inf2) fixation were conducted to discern the relationships between photosynthesis, N(inf2) fixation, and environmental factors potentially regulating these processes in microbial mats in a tropical hypersaline lagoon (Salt Pond, San Salvador Island, Bahamas). Major photoautotrophs included cyanobacteria, purple phototrophic bacteria, and diatoms. Chemosystematic photopigments were used as indicators of the relative abundance of mat phototrophs. Experimental manipulations consisted of light and dark incubations of intact mat samples exposed to the photosystem II inhibitor DCMU [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea], a dissolved organic carbon source (D-glucose), and normal seawater (37(permil)). Photosynthetic rates were measured by both O(inf2) and (sup14)C methods, and nitrogenase activity (NA) was estimated by the acetylene reduction assay. Moderate reductions in salinity (from 74 to 37(permil)) had no measurable effect on photosynthesis, O(inf2) consumption, or NA. CO(inf2) fixation in DCMU-amended samples was (symbl)25% of that in the control (nonamended) samples and demonstrated photosynthetic activity by anoxygenic phototrophs. NA in DCMU-amended samples, which was consistently higher (by a factor of 2 to 3) than the other (light and dark) treatments, was also attributed to purple phototrophic bacteria. The ecological implication is that N(inf2) fixation by anoxygenic phototrophs (purple phototrophic bacteria and possibly cyanobacteria) may be regulated by the activity of oxygenic phototrophs (cyanobacteria and diatoms). Consortial interactions that enhance the physiological plasticity of the mat community may be a key for optimizing production, N(inf2) fixation, and persistence in these extreme environments. PMID:16535506

  20. Potential of Native Rhizobia in Enhancing Nitrogen Fixation and Yields of Climbing Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Contrasting Environments of Eastern Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Koskey, Gilbert; Mburu, Simon W.; Njeru, Ezekiel M.; Kimiti, Jacinta M.; Ombori, Omwoyo; Maingi, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Climbing bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in Kenya is greatly undermined by low soil fertility, especially in agriculturally prolific areas. The use of effective native rhizobia inoculants to promote nitrogen fixation could be beneficial in climbing bean production. In this study, we carried out greenhouse and field experiments to evaluate symbiotic efficiency, compare the effect of native rhizobia and commercial inoculant on nodulation, growth and yield parameters of mid-altitude climbing bean (MAC 13 and MAC 64) varieties. The greenhouse experiment included nine native rhizobia isolates, a consortium of native isolates, commercial inoculant Biofix, a mixture of native isolates + Biofix, nitrogen treated control and a non-inoculated control. In the field experiments, the treatments included the best effective native rhizobia isolate ELM3, a consortium of native isolates, a commercial inoculant Biofix, a mixture of native isolates + Biofix, and a non-inoculated control. Remarkably, four native rhizobia isolates ELM3, ELM4, ELM5, and ELM8 showed higher symbiotic efficiencies compared to the Biofix. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in symbiotic efficiency between the two climbing bean varieties. Field results demonstrated a significant improvement in nodule dry weight and seed yields of MAC 13 and MAC 64 climbing bean varieties upon rhizobia inoculation when compared to the non-inoculated controls. Inoculation with ELM3 isolate resulted to the highest seed yield of 4,397.75 kg ha−1, indicating 89% increase over non-inoculated control (2,334.81 kg ha−1) and 30% increase over Biofix (3,698.79 kg ha−1). Farm site significantly influenced nodule dry weight and seed yields. This study, therefore, revealed the potential of native rhizobia isolates to enhance delivery of agroecosystem services including nitrogen fixation and bean production. Further characterization and mapping of the native isolates will be imperative in development of

  1. Pinus flexilis and Picea engelmannii share a simple and consistent needle endophyte microbiota with a potential role in nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Carrell, Alyssa A.; Frank, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    Conifers predominantly occur on soils or in climates that are suboptimal for plant growth. This is generally attributed to symbioses with mycorrhizal fungi and to conifer adaptations, but recent experiments suggest that aboveground endophytic bacteria in conifers fix nitrogen (N) and affect host shoot tissue growth. Because most bacteria cannot be grown in the laboratory very little is known about conifer–endophyte associations in the wild. Pinus flexilis (limber pine) and Picea engelmannii (Engelmann spruce) growing in a subalpine, nutrient-limited environment are potential candidates for hosting endophytes with roles in N2 fixation and abiotic stress tolerance. We used 16S rRNA pyrosequencing to ask whether these conifers host a core of bacterial species that are consistently associated with conifer individuals and therefore potential mutualists. We found that while overall the endophyte communities clustered according to host species, both conifers were consistently dominated by the same phylotype, which made up 19–53% and 14–39% of the sequences in P. flexilis and P. engelmannii, respectively. This phylotype is related to Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus and other N2 fixing acetic acid bacterial endophytes. The pattern observed for the P. flexilis and P. engelmannii needle microbiota—a small number of major species that are consistently associated with the host across individuals and species—is unprecedented for an endophyte community, and suggests a specialized beneficial endophyte function. One possibility is endophytic N fixation, which could help explain how conifers can grow in severely nitrogen-limited soil, and why some forest ecosystems accumulate more N than can be accounted for by known nitrogen input pathways. PMID:25071746

  2. Novel labeling technique illustrates transfer of 15N2 from Sphagnum moss to vascular plants via diazotrophic nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Vile, M. A.; Wieder, R.

    2013-12-01

    We used 15N2 gas to trace nitrogen (N) from biological N2-fixation to vascular plant uptake in an Alberta bog in order to determine if neighboring bog plants acquire recently fixed N from diazotrophs associating with Sphagnum mosses. Recent evidence indicates high rates of N2-fixation in Sphagnum mosses of Alberta bogs (Vile et al. 2013). Our previous work has shown that mosses can assimilate fixed N from associated diazotrophs as evidenced by the high N content of mosses despite minimal inputs from atmospheric deposition, retranslocation, and N mineralization. Therefore, the potential exists for vascular plants to obtain N from ';leaky' tissues of live mosses, however, this phenomenon has not been tested previously. Here we document the potential for relatively rapid transfer to vascular plants of N fixed by Sphagnum moss-associated diazotrophs. We utilized the novel approach of incubating mosses in 15N2 to allow the process of diazotrophic N2-fixation to mechanistically provide the 15N label, which is subsequently transferred to Sphagnum mosses. The potential for vascular bog natives to tap this N was assessed by planting the vascular plants in the labeled moss. Sphagnum mosses (upper 3 cm of live plants) were incubated in the presence of 98 atom % 15N2 gas for 48 hours. Two vascular plants common to Alberta bogs; Picea mariana and Vaccinium oxycoccus were then placed in the labeled mosses, where the mosses served as the substrate. Tissue samples from these plants were collected at three time points during the incubation; prior to 15N2 exposure (to determine natural abundance 15N), and at one and two months after 15N2 exposure. Roots and leaves were separated and run separately on a mass spectrometer to determine 15N concentrations. Sphagnum moss capitula obtained N from N2-fixation (δ15N of -2.43 × 0.40, 122.76 × 23.78, 224.92 × 68.37, 143.74 × 54.38 prior to, immediately after, and at 1 and 2 months after exposure to 15N2, respectively). Nitrogen was

  3. Preferential remineralization of dissolved organic phosphorus and non-Redfield DOM dynamics in the global ocean: Impacts on marine productivity, nitrogen fixation, and carbon export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letscher, Robert T.; Moore, J. Keith

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from the marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool has been reported in several regional studies. Because DOM is an important advective/mixing pathway of carbon (C) export from the ocean surface layer and its non-Redfieldian stoichiometry would affect estimates of marine export production per unit N and P, we investigated the stoichiometry of marine DOM and its remineralization globally using a compiled DOM data set. Marine DOM is enriched in C and N compared to Redfield stoichiometry, averaging 317:39:1 and 810:48:1 for C:N:P within the degradable and total bulk pools, respectively. Dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) is found to be preferentially remineralized about twice as rapidly with respect to the enriched C:N stoichiometry of marine DOM. Biogeochemical simulations with the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling model using Redfield and variable DOM stoichiometry corroborate the need for non-Redfield dynamics to match the observed DOM stoichiometry. From our model simulations, preferential DOP remineralization is found to increase the strength of the biological pump by ~9% versus the case of Redfield DOM cycling. Global net primary productivity increases ~10% including an increase in marine nitrogen fixation of ~26% when preferential DOP remineralization and direct utilization of DOP by phytoplankton are included. The largest increases in marine nitrogen fixation, net primary productivity, and carbon export are observed within the western subtropical gyres, suggesting the lateral transfer of P in the form of DOP from the productive eastern and poleward gyre margins may be important for sustaining these processes downstream in the subtropical gyres.

  4. Phenotypic plasticity and its genetic regulation for yield, nitrogen fixation and δ13C in chickpea crops under varying water regimes.

    PubMed

    Sadras, Victor O; Lake, Lachlan; Li, Yongle; Farquharson, Elizabeth A; Sutton, Tim

    2016-07-01

    We measured yield components, nitrogen fixation, soil nitrogen uptake and carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) in a collection of chickpea genotypes grown in environments where water availability was the main source of yield variation. We aimed to quantify the phenotypic plasticity of these traits using variance ratios, and to explore their genetic basis using FST genome scan. Fifty-five genes in three genomic regions were found to be under selection for plasticity of yield; 54 genes in four genomic regions for the plasticity of seeds per m(2); 48 genes in four genomic regions for the plasticity of δ(13)C; 54 genes in two genomic regions for plasticity of flowering time; 48 genes in five genomic regions for plasticity of nitrogen fixation and 49 genes in three genomic regions for plasticity of nitrogen uptake from soil. Plasticity of yield was related to plasticity of nitrogen uptake from soil, and unrelated to plasticity of nitrogen fixation, highlighting the need for closer attention to nitrogen uptake in legumes. Whereas the theoretical link between δ(13)C and transpiration efficiency is strong, the actual link with yield is erratic due to trade-offs and scaling issues. Genes associated with plasticity of δ(13)C were identified that may help to untangle the δ(13)C-yield relationship. Combining a plasticity perspective to deal with complex G×E interactions with FST genome scan may help understand and improve both crop adaptation to stress and yield potential.

  5. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  6. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  7. Nitrogen fixation by Elaeagnus angustifolia in the reclamation of degraded croplands of Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Khamzina, Asia; Lamers, John P A; Vlek, Paul L G

    2009-06-01

    Extensive degradation of irrigated croplands, due to increasing soil salinity and depletion of soil nutrient stocks, is a major problem in Central Asia (CA), one of the largest irrigated areas in the world. To assess the potential for improving the productive capacity of degraded lands by afforestation, we examined N(2) fixation of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. in mixed plantations with non-fixing Populus euphratica Oliv. and Ulmus pumila L. Fixation of N(2) was quantified by the (15)N natural abundance technique based on both foliar and whole-plant sampling during five consecutive growing seasons. Despite elevated root-zone soil salinity (6-10 dS m(-1)) and deficiency in plant-available P (4-15 mg kg(-1)), N(2) fixation (%Ndfa) increased from an initial value of 20% to almost 100% over 5 years. Within each growing season, %Ndfa steadily increased and peaked in the fall. Annual N(2) fixation, determined using foliar delta(15)N, initially averaged 0.02 Mg ha(-1), peaked at 0.5 Mg ha(-1) during the next 2 years and thereafter stabilized at 0.3 Mg ha(-1). Estimates based on whole-plant delta(15)N were <10% lower than those based on foliar delta(15)N. The increase in plant-available soil N was significantly higher in E. angustifolia plots than in P. euphratica and U. pumila plots. Increases in the concentrations of organic C (19%), total N (21%) and plant-available P (74%) in the soil were significant irrespective of tree species. This improvement in soil fertility is further evidence that afforestation with mixed-species plantations can be a sustainable land use option for the degraded irrigated croplands in CA.

  8. Sucrose Synthase in Legume Nodules Is Essential for Nitrogen Fixation1

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Anthony J.; Minchin, Frank R.; James, Caron L.; Komina, Olga

    1999-01-01

    The role of sucrose synthase (SS) in the fixation of N was examined in the rug4 mutant of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants in which SS activity was severely reduced. When dependent on nodules for their N supply, the mutant plants were not viable and appeared to be incapable of effective N fixation, although nodule formation was essentially normal. In fact, N and C resources invested in nodules were much greater in mutant plants than in the wild-type (WT) plants. Low SS activity in nodules (present at only 10% of WT levels) resulted in lower amounts of total soluble protein and leghemoglobin and lower activities of several enzymes compared with WT nodules. Alkaline invertase activity was not increased to compensate for reduced SS activity. Leghemoglobin was present at less than 20% of WT values, so O2 flux may have been compromised. The two components of nitrogenase were present at normal levels in mutant nodules. However, only a trace of nitrogenase activity was detected in intact plants and none was found in isolated bacteroids. The results are discussed in relation to the role of SS in the provision of C substrates for N fixation and in the development of functional nodules. PMID:10398723

  9. Nitrogen Fixation (Acetylene Reduction) Associated with Decaying Leaves of Pond Cypress (Taxodium distichum var. nutans) in a Natural and a Sewage-Enriched Cypress Dome

    PubMed Central

    Dierberg, Forrest E.; Brezonik, Patrick L.

    1981-01-01

    Surface litter from a natural and a sewage-enriched cypress dome in north-central Florida showed a pronounced seasonal pattern of nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activity associated with seasonal leaf fall from deciduous trees in the domes. Samples of peat from cores indicated negligible nitrogenase activity below the surface layer. Integrating the monthly rates of nitrogen fixation (based on the theoretical molar ratio of 3:2 for C2H4/NH3) yielded 0.39 and 0.12 g of N/m2 per year fixed in the litter of the natural and sewage-enriched domes, respectively. The nitrogen fixed in the first 3 months after leaf fall in the natural dome represented about 14% of the nitrogen increment in the decomposing cypress leaves, but fixation contributed a negligible amount of nitrogen (<1%) to decomposing litter in the sewage-enriched dome. PMID:16345796

  10. Lightning - Estimates of the rates of energy dissipation and nitrogen fixation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Chameides, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    The nitrogen needed by plants can normally not be directly obtained from the nitrogen present in molecular form in the atmosphere. The reason for this situation is related to the great energy required to break the N-N bond. Only a few organisms, such as algae and certain bacteria, can 'fix' nitrogen. An abiological process for breaking the N-N bond is provided by lightning. The present investigation is concerned with this possibility. It is found that lightning produces approximately 2.6 x 10 to the 9th kg N per year. There are, however, uncertainties, which are mainly related to the energy of a lightning flash.

  11. A thioredoxin of Sinorhizobium meliloti CE52G is required for melanin production and symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sowinski, Susana; Matan, Ofra; Bonafede, Paula; Okon, Yaacov

    2007-08-01

    A miniTn5-induced mutant of a melanin-producing strain of Sinorhizobium meliloti (CE52G) that does not produce melanin was mapped to a gene identified as a probable thioredoxin gene. It was proved that the thiol-reducing activity of the mutant was affected. Addition to the growth medium of substrates that induce the production of melanin (L-tyrosine, guaiacol, orcinol) increased the thioredoxin-like (trxL) mRNA level in the wild-type strain. The mutant strain was affected in the response to paraquat-induced oxidative stress, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, and both laccase and tyrosinase activities. The importance of thioredoxin in melanin production in bacteria, through the regulation of laccase or tyrosinase activities, or both, by the redox state of structural or catalytic SH groups, is discussed.

  12. Evidence for foliar endophytic nitrogen fixation in a widely distributed subalpine conifer

    DOE PAGES

    Moyes, Andrew B.; Kueppers, Lara M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; ...

    2016-02-01

    Coniferous forest nitrogen (N) budgets indicate unknown sources of N. A consistent association between limber pine (Pinus flexilis) and potential N2-fixing acetic acid bacteria (AAB) indicates that native foliar endophytes may supply subalpine forests with N.

  13. EnviroAtlas - Cultivated biological nitrogen fixation in agricultural lands by 12-digit HUC in the Conterminous United States, 2006

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EnviroAtlas dataset contains data on the mean cultivated biological nitrogen fixation (C-BNF) in cultivated crop and hay/pasture lands per 12-digit Hydrologic Unit (HUC) in 2006. Nitrogen (N) inputs from the cultivation of legumes, which possess a symbiotic relationship with N-fixing bacteria, were calculated with a recently developed model relating county-level yields of various leguminous crops with BNF rates. We accessed county-level data on annual crop yields for soybeans (Glycine max L.), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.), various dry beans (Phaseolus, Cicer, and Lens spp.), and dry peas (Pisum spp.) for 2006 from the USDA Census of Agriculture (http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/index.php). We estimated the yield of the non-alfalfa leguminous component of hay as 32% of the yield of total non-alfalfa hay (http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/index.php). Annual rates of C-BNF by crop type were calculated using a model that relates yield to C-BNF. We assume yield data reflect differences in soil properties, water availability, temperature, and other local and regional factors that can influence root nodulation and rate of N fixation. We distributed county-specific, C-BNF rates to cultivated crop and hay/pasture lands delineated in the 2006 National Land Cover Database (30 x 30 m pixels) within the corresponding county. C-BNF data described here represent an average input to a typical agricultural land type within a county, i.e., they are not

  14. MucR Is Required for Transcriptional Activation of Conserved Ion Transporters to Support Nitrogen Fixation of Sinorhizobium fredii in Soybean Nodules.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Wu, Li Juan; Zhang, Biliang; Hu, Yue; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xing Xing; Guo, Hui Juan; Liu, Li Xue; Chen, Wen Xin; Zhang, Ziding; Tian, Chang Fu

    2016-05-01

    To achieve effective symbiosis with legume, rhizobia should fine-tune their background regulation network in addition to activating key genes involved in nodulation (nod) and nitrogen fixation (nif). Here, we report that an ancestral zinc finger regulator, MucR1, other than its paralog, MucR2, carrying a frameshift mutation, is essential for supporting nitrogen fixation of Sinorhizobium fredii CCBAU45436 within soybean nodules. In contrast to the chromosomal mucR1, mucR2 is located on symbiosis plasmid, indicating its horizontal transfer potential. A MucR2 homolog lacking the frameshift mutation, such as the one from S. fredii NGR234, can complement phenotypic defects of the mucR1 mutant of CCBAU45436. RNA-seq analysis revealed that the MucR1 regulon of CCBAU45436 within nodules exhibits significant difference compared with that of free-living cells. MucR1 is required for active expression of transporters for phosphate, zinc, and elements essential for nitrogenase activity (iron, molybdenum, and sulfur) in nodules but is dispensable for transcription of key genes (nif/fix) involved in nitrogen fixation. Further reverse genetics suggests that S. fredii uses high-affinity transporters to meet the demand for zinc and phosphate within nodules. These findings, together with the horizontal transfer potential of the mucR homolog, imply an intriguing evolutionary role of this ancestral regulator in supporting nitrogen fixation.

  15. Genes involved in the formation and assembly of rhizobial cytochromes and their role in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M J; Bedmar, E J; Downie, J A

    1998-01-01

    Rhizobia fix nitrogen in a symbiotic association with leguminous plants and this occurs in nodules. A low-oxygen environment is needed for nitrogen fixation, which paradoxically has a requirement for rapid respiration to produce ATP. These conflicting demands are met by control of oxygen flux and production of leghaemoglobin (an oxygen carrier) by the plant, coupled with the expression of a high-affinity oxidase by the nodule bacteria (bacteroids). Many of the bacterial genes encoding cytochrome synthesis and assembly have been identified in a variety of rhizobial strains. Nitrogen-fixing bacteroids use a cytochrome cbb3-type oxidase encoded by the fixNOQP operon; electron transfer to this high-affinity oxidase is via the cytochrome bc1 complex. During free-living growth, electron transport from the cytochrome bc1 complex to cytochrome aa3 occurs via a transmembrane cytochrome c (CycM). In some rhizobia (such as Bradyrhizobium japonicum) there is a second cytochrome oxidase that also requires electron transport via the cytochrome bc1 complex. In parallel with these cytochrome c oxidases there are quinol oxidases that are expressed during free-living growth. A cytochrome bb3 quinol oxidase is thought to be present in B. japonicum; in Rhizobium leguminosarum, Rhizobium etli and Azorhizobium caulinodans cytochrome d-type oxidases have been identified. Spectroscopic data suggest the presence of a cytochrome o-type oxidase in several rhizobia, although the absence of haem O in B. japonicum may indicate that the absorption attributed to cytochrome o could be due to a high-spin cytochrome b in a cytochrome bb3-type oxidase. In some rhizobia, mutation of genes involved in cytochrome c assembly does not strongly affect growth, presumably because the bacteria utilize the cytochrome c-independent quinol oxidases. In this review, we outline the work on various rhizobial mutants affected in different components of the electron transport pathways, and the effects of these

  16. Nitrogen Fixation, Nodule Development, and Vegetative Regrowth of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) following Harvest 1

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Carroll P.; Heichel, Gary H.; Barnes, Donald K.; Bryan, Jeff W.; Johnson, Lois E.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogenase-dependent acetylene reduction, nodule function, and nodule regrowth were studied during vegetative regrowth of harvested (detopped) alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seedlings grown in the glasshouse. Compared with controls, harvesting caused an 88% decline in acetylene reduction capacity of detached root systems within 24 hours. Acetylene reduction in harvested plants remained low for 13 days, then increased to a level comparable to the controls by day 18. Protease activity increased in nodules from harvested plants, reached a maximum at day 7 after harvest, and then declined to a level almost equal to the control by day 22 after harvest. Soluble protein and leghemoglobin decreased in nodules from harvested plants in an inverse relationship to protease activity. Nitrate reductase activity of nodules from harvested plants increased significantly within 24 hours and was inversely associated with acetylene reduction. The difference in nitrate reductase between nodules from harvested plants and control plants became less evident as shoot regrowth occurred and as acetylene reduction increased in the harvested plants. No massive loss of nodules occurred after harvest as evidenced by little net change in nodule fresh weight. There was, however, a rapid localized senescence which occurred in nodules of harvested plants. Histology of nodules from harvested plants showed that they degenerated at the proximal end after harvest. Starch in the nodule was depleted by 10 days after harvest. The meristem and vascular bundles of nodules from harvested plants remained intact. The senescent nodules began to regrow and fix nitrogen after shoot growth resumed. Images PMID:16660893

  17. Interactions between Nitrogen Fixation and Osmoregulation in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri 227

    PubMed Central

    Brabban, A. D.; Orcutt, E. N.; Zinder, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    The nitrogenase enzyme complex of Methanosarcina barkeri 227 was found to be more sensitive to NaCl than previously studied molybdenum nitrogenases are, with total inhibition of activity occurring at 190 mM NaCl, compared with >600 mM NaCl for Azotobacter vinelandii and Clostridium pasteurianum nitrogenases. Na+ and K+ had equivalent effects, whereas Mg2+ was more inhibitory than either monovalent cation, even on a per-charge basis. The anion Cl− was more inhibitory than acetate was. Because M. barkeri 227 is a facultative halophile, we examined the effects of external salt on growth and diazotrophy and found that inhibition of growth was not greater with N2 than with NH4+. Cells grown with N2 and cells grown with NH4+ produced equal concentrations of α-glutamate at low salt concentrations and equal concentrations of Nɛ-acetyl-β-lysine at NaCl concentrations greater than 500 mM. Despite the high energetic cost of fixing nitrogen for these osmolytes, we obtained no evidence that there is a shift towards nonnitrogenous osmolytes during diazotrophic growth. In vitro nitrogenase enzyme assays showed that at a low concentration (approximately 100 mM) potassium glutamate enhanced activity but at higher concentrations this compound inhibited activity; 50% inhibition occurred at a potassium glutamate concentration of approximately 400 mM. PMID:10049887

  18. Soil factors exhibit greater influence than bacterial inoculation on alfalfa growth and nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Ute; Kosier, Bob; Jahnke, Joachim; Priefer, Ursula B; Al-Halbouni, Djamila

    2011-09-01

    In order to study the effects of soil factors and bacterial inoculation on alfalfa (Medicago sativa), plants were inoculated with Ensifer meliloti L33 and Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 in pot experiments using two different soils separately as well as in a mixture. One soil was contaminated with chemical waste products; the other was an arable soil. Soil factors, including the availability of macro- and micronutrients as well as carbon and nitrogen contents, were found to exhibit a much greater influence on the growth of alfalfa than any of the inoculations. In contaminated soil, the shoot and root growth of alfalfa was decreased and nodules were diminished and ineffective. Bacterial inoculations did not significantly improve this hostile growth environment. However, in a mixture (44% arable, 22% contaminated soil, 34% vermiculite), growth conditions for alfalfa were improved so that shoot dry weight and nodule numbers increased up to 100- and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the contaminated soil. For the strain L33, its persistence in the rhizosphere was correlated to the presence of its host plant, but its dynamics were influenced by competition with indigenous rhizobia. The strain Sp7, once provided with a suitable soil, was not dependent on the plant's rhizosphere, but it enhanced the performance of L33 and native rhizobia.

  19. Easterly denitrification signal and nitrogen fixation feedback documented in the western Pacific sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guodong; Li, Zhiyang

    2011-12-01

    A sedimentary δ15N record in the equatorial western Pacific (WP) shows glacial-interglacial variability from 6.2 to 11.2‰ during the last two climatic cycles, similar to the denitrification record in the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP). Contrastively, a record in the South China Sea (SCS) exhibits less changes from 4.4 to 6.4‰ and is quite alike previously published results in marginal seas in the WP. By ruling out several possible causes for the δ15N variability, the δ15N record in the equatorial WP is interpreted as the source nitrate δ15N signals advected from the ETP. Comparison of several δ15N records for the last 25 ka distributed in the WP brings out a pattern of northward decrease in δ15N values and variability from the equator to off Mindano and then to marginal seas, supposed to be caused by the northward increase of local N2 fixation. Therefore, the less glacial-interglacial changes in some δ15N records in the WP could imply that the glacial decrease in subsurface δ15N due to less denitrification in source waters from the ETP would have been isotopically compensated by a synchronous decrease in local N2 fixation.

  20. A Medicago truncatula Tobacco Retrotransposon Insertion Mutant Collection with Defects in Nodule Development and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pislariu, Catalina I.; D. Murray, Jeremy; Wen, JiangQi; Cosson, Viviane; Muni, RajaSekhara Reddy Duvvuru; Wang, Mingyi; A. Benedito, Vagner; Andriankaja, Andry; Cheng, Xiaofei; Jerez, Ivone Torres; Mondy, Samuel; Zhang, Shulan; Taylor, Mark E.; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Chen, Rujin; Udvardi, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    A Tnt1-insertion mutant population of Medicago truncatula ecotype R108 was screened for defects in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Primary screening of 9,300 mutant lines yielded 317 lines with putative defects in nodule development and/or nitrogen fixation. Of these, 230 lines were rescreened, and 156 lines were confirmed with defective symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Mutants were sorted into six distinct phenotypic categories: 72 nonnodulating mutants (Nod−), 51 mutants with totally ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix−), 17 mutants with partially ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix+/−), 27 mutants defective in nodule emergence, elongation, and nitrogen fixation (Nod+/− Fix−), one mutant with delayed and reduced nodulation but effective in nitrogen fixation (dNod+/− Fix+), and 11 supernodulating mutants (Nod++Fix+/−). A total of 2,801 flanking sequence tags were generated from the 156 symbiotic mutant lines. Analysis of flanking sequence tags revealed 14 insertion alleles of the following known symbiotic genes: NODULE INCEPTION (NIN), DOESN’T MAKE INFECTIONS3 (DMI3/CCaMK), ERF REQUIRED FOR NODULATION, and SUPERNUMERARY NODULES (SUNN). In parallel, a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy was used to identify Tnt1 insertions in known symbiotic genes, which revealed 25 additional insertion alleles in the following genes: DMI1, DMI2, DMI3, NIN, NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1 (NSP1), NSP2, SUNN, and SICKLE. Thirty-nine Nod− lines were also screened for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis phenotypes, and 30 mutants exhibited defects in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Morphological and developmental features of several new symbiotic mutants are reported. The collection of mutants described here is a source of novel alleles of known symbiotic genes and a resource for cloning novel symbiotic genes via Tnt1 tagging. PMID:22679222

  1. A Comparative Nitrogen Balance and Productivity Analysis of Legume and Non-legume Supported Cropping Systems: The Potential Role of Biological Nitrogen Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Iannetta, Pietro P. M.; Young, Mark; Bachinger, Johann; Bergkvist, Göran; Doltra, Jordi; Lopez-Bellido, Rafael J.; Monti, Michele; Pappa, Valentini A.; Reckling, Moritz; Topp, Cairistiona F. E.; Walker, Robin L.; Rees, Robert M.; Watson, Christine A.; James, Euan K.; Squire, Geoffrey R.; Begg, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to provide sufficient N for production has encouraged re-appraisal of cropping systems that deploy legumes. It has been argued that legume-derived N can maintain productivity as an alternative to the application of mineral fertilizer, although few studies have systematically evaluated the effect of optimizing the balance between legumes and non N-fixing crops to optimize production. In addition, the shortage, or even absence in some regions, of measurements of BNF in crops and forages severely limits the ability to design and evaluate new legume–based agroecosystems. To provide an indication of the magnitude of BNF in European agriculture, a soil-surface N-balance approach was applied to historical data from 8 experimental cropping systems that compared legume and non-legume crop types (e.g., grains, forages and intercrops) across pedoclimatic regions of Europe. Mean BNF for different legume types ranged from 32 to 115 kg ha−1 annually. Output in terms of total biomass (grain, forage, etc.) was 30% greater in non-legumes, which used N to produce dry matter more efficiently than legumes, whereas output of N was greater from legumes. When examined over the crop sequence, the contribution of BNF to the N-balance increased to reach a maximum when the legume fraction was around 0.5 (legume crops were present in half the years). BNF was lower when the legume fraction increased to 0.6–0.8, not because of any feature of the legume, but because the cropping systems in this range were dominated by mixtures of legume and non-legume forages to which inorganic N as fertilizer was normally applied. Forage (e.g., grass and clover), as opposed to grain crops in this range maintained high outputs of biomass and N. In conclusion, BNF through grain and forage legumes has the potential to generate major benefit in terms of reducing or dispensing with the need for mineral N without loss of total output. PMID:27917178

  2. A Comparative Nitrogen Balance and Productivity Analysis of Legume and Non-legume Supported Cropping Systems: The Potential Role of Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    PubMed

    Iannetta, Pietro P M; Young, Mark; Bachinger, Johann; Bergkvist, Göran; Doltra, Jordi; Lopez-Bellido, Rafael J; Monti, Michele; Pappa, Valentini A; Reckling, Moritz; Topp, Cairistiona F E; Walker, Robin L; Rees, Robert M; Watson, Christine A; James, Euan K; Squire, Geoffrey R; Begg, Graham S

    2016-01-01

    The potential of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to provide sufficient N for production has encouraged re-appraisal of cropping systems that deploy legumes. It has been argued that legume-derived N can maintain productivity as an alternative to the application of mineral fertilizer, although few studies have systematically evaluated the effect of optimizing the balance between legumes and non N-fixing crops to optimize production. In addition, the shortage, or even absence in some regions, of measurements of BNF in crops and forages severely limits the ability to design and evaluate new legume-based agroecosystems. To provide an indication of the magnitude of BNF in European agriculture, a soil-surface N-balance approach was applied to historical data from 8 experimental cropping systems that compared legume and non-legume crop types (e.g., grains, forages and intercrops) across pedoclimatic regions of Europe. Mean BNF for different legume types ranged from 32 to 115 kg ha(-1) annually. Output in terms of total biomass (grain, forage, etc.) was 30% greater in non-legumes, which used N to produce dry matter more efficiently than legumes, whereas output of N was greater from legumes. When examined over the crop sequence, the contribution of BNF to the N-balance increased to reach a maximum when the legume fraction was around 0.5 (legume crops were present in half the years). BNF was lower when the legume fraction increased to 0.6-0.8, not because of any feature of the legume, but because the cropping systems in this range were dominated by mixtures of legume and non-legume forages to which inorganic N as fertilizer was normally applied. Forage (e.g., grass and clover), as opposed to grain crops in this range maintained high outputs of biomass and N. In conclusion, BNF through grain and forage legumes has the potential to generate major benefit in terms of reducing or dispensing with the need for mineral N without loss of total output.

  3. Successional changes in soil nitrogen availability, non-symbiotic nitrogen fixation and carbon/nitrogen ratios in southern Chilean forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cecilia A; Carmona, Martín R; Aravena, Juan C; Armesto, Juan J

    2004-08-01

    Vast areas of southern Chile are now covered by second-growth forests because of fire and logging. To study successional patterns after moderate-intensity, anthropogenic fire disturbance, we assessed differences in soil properties and N fluxes across a chronosequence of seven successional stands (2-130 years old). We examined current predictions of successional theory concerning changes in the N cycle in forest ecosystems. Seasonal fluctuations of net N mineralization (N(min)) in surface soil and N availability (N(a); N(a)=NH4+-N+NO3--N) in upper and deep soil horizons were positively correlated with monthly precipitation. In accordance with theoretical predictions, stand age was positively, but weakly related to both N(a) ( r(2)=0.282, P<0.001) and total N (N(tot); r(2)=0.192, P<0.01), and negatively related to soil C/N ratios ( r(2)=0.187, P<0.01) in surface soils. A weak linear increase in soil N(min) (upper plus deep soil horizons) was found across the chronosequence ( r(2)=0.124, P<0.022). N(min) occurred at modest rates in early successional stands, suggesting that soil disturbance did not impair microbial processes. The relationship between N fixation (N(fix)) in the litter layer and stand age best fitted a quadratic model ( r(2)=0.228, P<0.01). In contrast to documented successional trends for most temperate, tropical and Mediterranean forests, non-symbiotic N(fix) in the litter layer is a steady N input to unpolluted southern temperate forests during mid and late succession, which may compensate for hydrological losses of organic N from old-growth ecosystems.

  4. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Mouser, P.J.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, D.E.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-04-01

    The impact of ammonium availability on microbial community structure and the physiological status and activity of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by as much as two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 {micro}M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that ammonium influenced the composition of the microbial community prior to acetate addition with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species at the site with the highest ammonium, and Dechloromonas species dominating at sites with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to the concentration of acetate that was delivered to each location rather than the amount of ammonium available in the groundwater. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium importer gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during in situ uranium reduction, and that the abundance of amtB transcripts was inversely correlated to ammonium levels across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression by subsurface Geobacter species are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of Geobacter species in subsurface environments during bioremediation. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes.

  5. A new Open Top Chamber designed to test in situ effects of climatic and atmospheric changes on nitrogen fixation in boreal forest floor mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringuier, Charline; Bradley, Robert; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Morin, Hubert; Lindo, Zoë

    2014-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) by cyanobacteria dwelling in forest floor moss layers is an important determinant of boreal black spruce forest productivity. Recent studies have suggested that these BNF rates may increase with increasing atmospheric CO2 and increasing temperature, as predicted by current weather models. This potential increase in BNF may be offset, however, by increasing atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, or by increasing demands for phosphorus (i.e. driving nodular ATP content) and for micronutrients such as Mo, Va and Fe (i.e. co-factors of nitrogenase enzyme). In order to study the relative and interactive effects of these factors controlling in situ BNF rates in boreal forest floor moss layers, a new Open Top Chamber (OTC) was developed in summer of 2013. The chambers measure 1.60 cm dia. × 60 cm height, and are equipped with an automated CO2 delivery system designed to maintain atmospheric daytime CO2 concentrations at 800 ppm, as well as buried heating coils that increase soil temperature by 4 ° C for 3 weeks in springtime. These 2 experimental factors are crossed in a full factorial (2 × 2) design that is replicated in 4 complete blocks. Each of the 16 OTCs is divided into 4 compartments, each of which are assigned 1 of 4 sub-plot factors. These include chronic additions of either atmospheric nitrogen, phosphorus, micronutrients or a non-amended control. Staring in summer 2014, a series of measurements will be made to assess the effects of treatments on BNF rates, cyanobacterial colonization and soil nitrogen cycling. Our poster will describe in detail the design and operation of the OTCs, as well as their construction and maintenance costs.

  6. Spatially robust estimates of biological nitrogen (N) fixation imply substantial human alteration of the tropical N cycle.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Benjamin W; Smith, W Kolby; Townsend, Alan R; Nasto, Megan K; Reed, Sasha C; Chazdon, Robin L; Cleveland, Cory C

    2014-06-03

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the largest natural source of exogenous nitrogen (N) to unmanaged ecosystems and also the primary baseline against which anthropogenic changes to the N cycle are measured. Rates of BNF in tropical rainforest are thought to be among the highest on Earth, but they are notoriously difficult to quantify and are based on little empirical data. We adapted a sampling strategy from community ecology to generate spatial estimates of symbiotic and free-living BNF in secondary and primary forest sites that span a typical range of tropical forest legume abundance. Although total BNF was higher in secondary than primary forest, overall rates were roughly five times lower than previous estimates for the tropical forest biome. We found strong correlations between symbiotic BNF and legume abundance, but we also show that spatially free-living BNF often exceeds symbiotic inputs. Our results suggest that BNF in tropical forest has been overestimated, and our data are consistent with a recent top-down estimate of global BNF that implied but did not measure low tropical BNF rates. Finally, comparing tropical BNF within the historical area of tropical rainforest with current anthropogenic N inputs indicates that humans have already at least doubled reactive N inputs to the tropical forest biome, a far greater change than previously thought. Because N inputs are increasing faster in the tropics than anywhere on Earth, both the proportion and the effects of human N enrichment are likely to grow in the future.

  7. The genome of Rhizobiales bacteria in predatory ants reveals urease gene functions but no genes for nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Neuvonen, Minna-Maria; Tamarit, Daniel; Näslund, Kristina; Liebig, Juergen; Feldhaar, Heike; Moran, Nancy A.; Guy, Lionel; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2016-01-01

    Gut-associated microbiota of ants include Rhizobiales bacteria with affiliation to the genus Bartonella. These bacteria may enable the ants to fix atmospheric nitrogen, but no genomes have been sequenced yet to test the hypothesis. Sequence reads from a member of the Rhizobiales were identified in the data collected in a genome project of the ant Harpegnathos saltator. We present an analysis of the closed 1.86 Mb genome of the ant-associated bacterium, for which we suggest the species name Candidatus Tokpelaia hoelldoblerii. A phylogenetic analysis reveals a relationship to Bartonella and Brucella, which infect mammals. Novel gene acquisitions include a gene for a putative extracellular protein of more than 6,000 amino acids secreted by the type I secretion system, which may be involved in attachment to the gut epithelium. No genes for nitrogen fixation could be identified, but genes for a multi-subunit urease protein complex are present in the genome. The urease genes are also present in Brucella, which has a fecal-oral transmission pathway, but not in Bartonella, which use blood-borne transmission pathways. We hypothesize that the gain and loss of the urease function is related to transmission strategies and lifestyle changes in the host-associated members of the Rhizobiales. PMID:27976703

  8. Spatially robust estimates of biological nitrogen (N) fixation imply substantial human alteration of the tropical N cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Benjamin W.; Smith, William K.; Townsend, Alan R.; Nasto, Megan K.; Reed, Sasha C.; Chazdon, Robin L.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the largest natural source of exogenous nitrogen (N) to unmanaged ecosystems and also the primary baseline against which anthropogenic changes to the N cycle are measured. Rates of BNF in tropical rainforest are thought to be among the highest on Earth, but they are notoriously difficult to quantify and are based on little empirical data. We adapted a sampling strategy from community ecology to generate spatial estimates of symbiotic and free-living BNF in secondary and primary forest sites that span a typical range of tropical forest legume abundance. Although total BNF was higher in secondary than primary forest, overall rates were roughly five times lower than previous estimates for the tropical forest biome. We found strong correlations between symbiotic BNF and legume abundance, but we also show that spatially free-living BNF often exceeds symbiotic inputs. Our results suggest that BNF in tropical forest has been overestimated, and our data are consistent with a recent top-down estimate of global BNF that implied but did not measure low tropical BNF rates. Finally, comparing tropical BNF within the historical area of tropical rainforest with current anthropogenic N inputs indicates that humans have already at least doubled reactive N inputs to the tropical forest biome, a far greater change than previously thought. Because N inputs are increasing faster in the tropics than anywhere on Earth, both the proportion and the effects of human N enrichment are likely to grow in the future.

  9. Comparative studies on nitrogen budgets of closed shrimp polyculture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhen-Xiong; Li, De-Shang; Zhang, Man-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2001-09-01

    April to October, 1997 comparative studies on the nitrogen budgets of closed shrimp polyculture systems showed that, in all the studied polyculture systems, nitrogen from feeds and fertilizers were the main input items, which comprised 70.7% 83.9% of the total input nitrogen 3.2% 7.4% of which was provided by nitrogen fixation. It was in monoculture enclosures (Y-4, Y-11 and Y-12) that the percentage reached the maximum value. The output nitrogen in harvested products comprised 10.8% 24.6% of total input nitrogen, and the highest percentage, 24.6%, was found in shrimp-fish-tagelus polyculture systems. In shrimp monoculture and shrimp-fish polyculture systems, they were 19.1% and 21.9% respectively. The nitrogen utilization efficiency was different and varied from 12.2% was found in shrimp-tagelus polyculture systems. The lowest, 12.2%, was found in shrimp monoculture systems. All the nitrogen utilization efficiencies in shrimp-fish systems or shrimp-scallop systems seemed to be higher than that of the monoculture system, but they showed little statistical difference. The main outputs of nitrogen were found in sediment mud, and comprised 48.2% 60.8% of the total, input, the lowest percentage was found in shrimp-fish-tagelus polyculture systems, and the highest percentage in shrimp-scallop systems. During the experiment, nitrogen lost through denitrification and ammonia volatilization comprised 1.9% 6. 2%, averaged 2.8%, of the total input, and the loss through seepage comprised 5.9% 8.9% of the total. The estimated nitrogen attached to the enclosure wall comprised 3.7% 13.3% of the total, and was highest in shrimp monoculture systems. Compared with the classic shrimp farming industry, the closed shrimp polyculture systems may improve the nitrogen utilization efficiency, and hence reduce the environmental impacts on coastal waters. The nitrogen discharging rates for all the studied polyculture systems ranged from 3.0% to 6. 0% of total input nitrogen.

  10. Effect of Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 inoculation on nodulation, nitrogen fixation and yield of soybean (Glycine max) genotypes in gray terrace soil.

    PubMed

    Alam, Faridul; Bhuiyan, M A H; Alam, Sadia Sabrina; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Kim, Pil Joo; Lee, Yong Bok

    2015-01-01

    Soybean plants require high amounts of nitrogen, which are mainly obtained from biological nitrogen fixation. A field experiment was conducted by soybean (Glycine max) genotypes, growing two varieties (Shohag and BARI Soybean6) and two advanced lines (MTD10 and BGM02026) of soybean with or without Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 inoculation. Soybean plants of all genotypes inoculated with Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 produced greater nodule numbers, nodule weight, shoot and root biomass, and plant height than non-inoculated plants. Similarly, inoculated plants showed enhanced activity of nitrogenase (NA) enzyme, contributing to higher nitrogen fixation and assimilation, compared to non-inoculated soybean plants in both years. Plants inoculated with Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 also showed higher pod, stover, and seed yield than non-inoculated plants. Therefore, Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 established an effective symbiotic relationship with a range of soybean genotypes and thus increased the nodulation, growth, and yield of soybean grown in gray terrace soils in Bangladesh.

  11. Facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria driven by arsenite and sulfide with evidence for the support of nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    The rise in atmospheric oxygen (O2) over geologic time is attributed to the evolution and widespread proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. However, cyanobacteria maintain a metabolic flexibility that may not always result in O2 release. In the environment, cyanobacteria may use a variety of alternative electron donors rather than water that are known to be used by other anoxygenic phototrophs (eg. purple sulfur bacteria) including reduced forms of sulfur, iron, nitrogen, and arsenic. Recent evidence suggests cyanobacteria actively take advantage of at least a few of these alternatives. We used a classical Winogradsky approach to enrich for cyanobacteria from the high salinity, elevated pH and arsenic-enriched waters of Mono Lake (CA). Experiments, optimized for cyanobacteria, revealed light-dependent, anaerobic arsenite-oxidation in sub-cultured sediment-free enrichments dominated by a filamentous cyanobacteria. We isolated and identified the dominant member of this enrichment to be a member of the Oscillatoriales by 16S rDNA. Addition of 1 mM arsenite induced facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis under continuous and circadian light. This isolate also oxidized sulfide under the same light-based conditions. Aerobic conditions elicited no arsenite oxidation in the light or dark and the isolate grew as a typical cyanobacterium using oxygenic photosynthesis. Under near-infrared light (700 nm) there was a direct correlation of enhanced growth with an increase in the rate arsenite or sulfide oxidation suggesting the use of photosystem I. Additionally, to test the wide-spread nature of this metabolism in the Oscillatoriales, we followed similar arsenite- and sulfide-driven facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis as well as nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) in the axenic isolate Oscillatoria sp. CCMP 1731. Future characterization includes axenic isolation of the Mono Lake Oscillatoria sp. as well as the arsenite oxidase responsible for electron

  12. Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in the Fungus Gardens of Leaf-Cutter Ants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria-mediated acquisition of atmospheric dinitrogen by plants serves as a critical nitrogen source in terrestrial ecosystems, and through its key role in agriculture, this phenomenon has shaped the development of human civilizations. Here we show that, paralleling human agriculture, cultivation ...

  13. Physiological conditions for nitrogen fixation in a unicellular marine cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. strain SF1.

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, H; Shanmugam, K T

    1987-01-01

    A marine, unicellular, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium was isolated from the blades of a brown alga, Sargassum fluitans. This unicellular cyanobacterium, identified as Synechococcus sp. strain SF1, is capable of photoautotrophic growth with bicarbonate as the sole carbon source and dinitrogen as the sole nitrogen source. Among the organic carbon compounds tested, glucose and sucrose supported growth. Of the nitrogen compounds tested, with bicarbonate serving as the carbon source, both ammonia and nitrate produced the highest growth rates. Most amino acids failed to support growth when present as sole sources of nitrogen. Nitrogenase activity in Synechococcus sp. strain SF1 was induced after depletion of ammonia from the medium. This activity required the photosynthetic utilization of bicarbonate, but pyruvate and hydrogen gas were also effective sources of reductant for nitrogenase activity. Glucose, fructose, and sucrose also supported nitrogenase activity but to a lesser extent. Optimum light intensity for nitrogenase activity was found to be 70 microE/m2 per s, while the optimum oxygen concentration in the gas phase for nitrogenase activity was about 1%. A hydrogenase activity was coinduced with nitrogenase activity. It is proposed that this light- and oxygen-insensitive hydrogenase functions in recycling the hydrogen produced by nitrogenase under microaerobic conditions. PMID:3119563

  14. Evidence for foliar endophytic nitrogen fixation in a widely distributed subalpine conifer

    SciTech Connect

    Moyes, Andrew B.; Kueppers, Lara M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Carper, Dana L.; Vandehey, Nick; O'Neil, James; Frank, A. Carolin

    2016-02-01

    Coniferous forest nitrogen (N) budgets indicate unknown sources of N. A consistent association between limber pine (Pinus flexilis) and potential N2-fixing acetic acid bacteria (AAB) indicates that native foliar endophytes may supply subalpine forests with N.

  15. Multi-Site Evidence for Marine Nitrogen Fixation in Mid-Cretaceous Black Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, J.; Meyers, P. A.; Bernasconi, S.

    2004-12-01

    High concentrations of organic carbon in Cretaceous black shales imply levels of sustained export production of organic matter that are unknown in the modern ocean where marine productivity is usually limited by availability of dissolved nitrate. However, if a mid-water anoxic zone expands upward into the photic zone, then nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria can flourish. These organisms produce organic matter having an isotopic composition close to atmospheric nitrogen (0 per mil). We have compared the carbon and nitrogen isotopic and total organic carbon compositions of Albian to Santonian black shale sequences from the Demerara Rise in the equatorial Atlantic, the Kerguelan Plateau in the southern Indian Ocean, the Hatteras Rise in the western North Atlantic Ocean, the Angola Basin in the eastern South Atlantic Ocean, and the Cape Verde Rise in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean . Nitrogen isotope compositions that become lighter as organic carbon concentrations increase indicate that organic matter production was enhanced by a consortium of primary producers that included nitrogen-fixers. Expansion of an intensified oxygen minimum zone into the photic zone probably permitted coexistence of algae and of cyanobacteria, the latter functioning best under low-oxygen conditions and not being limited by nitrate availability. Improved preservation of the exported organic matter in an intensified near-surface oxygen minimum zone is implied by C/N ratios that increase to 40 as organic carbon concentrations increase. Periods of wetter climate evidently created periods of increased surface stratification of Cretaceous oceans that led to enhanced cyanobacterial primary productivity, magnified organic matter export, and deposition of the organic-carbon-rich black shales. Our multi-site comparison suggests that climate-related gradients in the degree of surface stratification led to associated gradients in export production of organic matter.

  16. Proteomic Phenotyping of Novosphingobium nitrogenifigens Reveals a Robust Capacity for Simultaneous Nitrogen Fixation, Polyhydroxyalkanoate Production, and Resistance to Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Strabala, Timothy J.; Peng, Lifeng; Rawson, Pisana; Lloyd-Jones, Gareth; Jordan, T. William

    2012-01-01

    Novosphingobium nitrogenifigens Y88T (Y88) is a free-living, diazotrophic Alphaproteobacterium, capable of producing 80% of its biomass as the biopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). We explored the potential utility of this species as a polyhydroxybutyrate production strain, correlating the effects of glucose, nitrogen availability, dissolved oxygen concentration, and extracellular pH with polyhydroxybutyrate production and changes in the Y88 proteomic profile. Using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 217 unique proteins from six growth conditions. We observed reproducible, characteristic proteomic signatures for each of the physiological states we examined. We identified proteins that changed in abundance in correlation with either nitrogen fixation, dissolved oxygen concentration, or acidification of the growth medium. The proteins that correlated with nitrogen fixation were identified either as known nitrogen fixation proteins or as novel proteins that we predict play roles in aspects of nitrogen fixation based on their proteomic profiles. In contrast, the proteins involved in central carbon and polyhydroxybutyrate metabolism were constitutively abundant, consistent with the constitutive polyhydroxybutyrate production that we observed in this species. Three proteins with roles in detoxification of reactive oxygen species were identified in this obligate aerobe. The most abundant protein in all experiments was a polyhydroxyalkanoate granule-associated protein, phasin. The full-length isoform of this protein has a long, intrinsically disordered Ala/Pro/Lys-rich N-terminal segment, a feature that appears to be unique to sphingomonad phasins. The data suggest that Y88 has potential as a PHB production strain due to its aerobic tolerance and metabolic orientation toward polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation, even in low-nitrogen growth medium. PMID:22582058

  17. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidation (amoA) and Nitrogen Fixation (nifH) Genes in Lava Caves of Terceira, Azores, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Jennifer J. Marshall; Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Dapkevicius, Maria De Lurdes N. E.; Northup, Diana E.

    2015-01-01

    Lava caves are an understudied ecosystem in the subterranean world, particularly in regard to nitrogen cycling. The diversity of ammonia oxidation (amoA) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) genes in bacterial mats collected from lava cave walls on the island of Terceira (Azores, Portugal) was investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A total of 55 samples were collected from 11 lava caves that were selected with regard to surface land use. Land use types above the lava caves were categorized into pasture, forested, and sea/urban, and used to determine if land use influenced the ammonia oxidizing and nitrogen fixing bacterial communities within the lava caves. The soil and water samples from each lava cave were analyzed for total organic carbon, inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, ammonium, nitrate, phosphate and sulfate, to determine if land use influences either the nutrient content entering the lava cave or the nitrogen cycling bacteria present within the cave. Nitrosospira-like sequences dominated the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community, and the majority of the diversity was found in lava caves under forested land. The nitrogen fixation community was dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae-like sequences, and diversity was evenly distributed between pasture and forested land, but very little overlap in diversity was observed. The results suggest that land use is impacting both the AOB and the nitrogen fixing bacterial communities. PMID:26778867

  18. Occurrence of benthic microbial nitrogen fixation coupled to sulfate reduction in the seasonally hypoxic Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertics, V. J.; Löscher, C. R.; Salonen, I.; Dale, A. W.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2012-06-01

    Despite the worldwide occurrence of marine hypoxic regions, benthic nitrogen (N) cycling within these areas is poorly understood and it is generally assumed that these areas represent zones of intense fixed N loss from the marine system. Sulfate reduction can be an important process for organic matter degradation in sediments beneath hypoxic waters and many sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the genetic potential to fix molecular N (N2). Therefore, SRB may supply fixed N to these systems, countering some of the N lost via microbial processes such as denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate if N2-fixation, possibly by SRB, plays a role in N cycling within the seasonally hypoxic sediments from Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea. Monthly samplings were performed over the course of one year to measure N2-fixation and sulfate reduction rates, to determine the seasonal variations in bioturbation (bioirrigation) activity and important benthic geochemical profiles, such as sulfur and N compounds, and to monitor changes in water column temperature and oxygen concentrations. Additionally, at several time points, rates of benthic denitrification were also measured and the active N-fixing community was examined via molecular tools. Integrated rates of N2-fixation and sulfate reduction showed a similar seasonality pattern, with highest rates occurring in August (approx. 22 and 880 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively) and October (approx. 22 and 1300 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively), and lowest rates occurring in February (approx. 8 and 32 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively). These rate changes were positively correlated with bottom water temperatures and previous reported plankton bloom activities, and negatively correlated with bottom water oxygen concentrations. Other variables that also appeared to play a role in rate determination were bioturbation, bubble irrigation and winter storm events

  19. Comparative Study of Peripheral Rim Fixation Using Jumbo Cup in Revisional Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Woo-Lam; Im, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Seung-Chan; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Kim, Yong-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Purpose It is challenging procedure to revise acetabular component in acetabulum with severe bone defect or deformity. The jumbo cup is good option for revisional arthroplasty in large bone defect. The purpose of this study is to compare the prognosis of revisional total hip arthroplasty using jumbo cup with peripheral rim fixation and no rim fixation. Materials and Methods We included the patients who had performed acetabular revisional total hip arthroplasty from January 2002 to March 2015 in our institute. Total of 51 hips (51 patients) were included. The mean follow up period was 51 months (range, 12 to 154 months) and mean age was 60.7 years (range, 30 to 81 years). We divided into two groups (peripheral rim fixation group and no rim fixation group) by anteroposterior and lateral plain radiograph. We compared survival rate, hip center change and clinical outcomes between two groups. Results There were 37 patients in peripheral rim fixation group and 14 patients in no rim fixation group. There was one patient who had aseptic loosening necessary to re-revision in rim fixation group and 3 patients in no rim fixation group. And one patient had superficial infection in rim fixation group and one patient had periprosthetic fracture in no rim fixation group. Survival rate was higher in the peripheral rim fixation group (97.3%) than no rim fixation group (78.6%, P=0.028) Conclusion Based on our findings, peripheral rim fixation might be recommended to improve short-term outcome after revision total hip arthroplasty using jumbo cup. PMID:28316959

  20. Soil fixative study progress report aerial application test:

    SciTech Connect

    Teter, A.C.

    1988-03-01

    A soil fixative has been developed (a simple wheat flour paste mixture) and tested in the laboratory that appears suitable for the temporary fixation of radioactive dusts in case of an accidental spill. A limited field test was made and the feasibility of aircraft delivery examined. A videotape was made of the operations. 3 figs.

  1. Influence of available nitrogen and rice genotype on associative dinitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Malarvizhi, P.; Ladha, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes with a high ability to support biological N{sub 2} fixation are of interest because they would enhance N gains in the rice-soil system without changing existing cultural practices. Pot experiments were conducted in a greenhouse during the 1994 wet season to determine the amount of N{sub 2} derived from the atmosphere (Ndfa) by 10 rice genotypes grown in three soils with varying levels of initial soil-NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N. Enriched {sup 15}N and natural abundance {delta}{sup 15}N dilution methods were employed. Flooded soils were puddled with and without 99.5 atom {sup 15}N%-labeled urea to minimize spatial variation of the isotope. The integrated {sup 15}N enrichment of plant available N, calculated using a model that accounts for temporal changes in the isotopic composition, was used as a reference to estimate genotypic differences in Ndfa. The {sup 15}N enrichment of soil available N declined exponentially and was half the original level at 122 d. The {delta}{sup 15}N values correlated with atom {sup 15}N% excess of enriched {sup 15}N for the rice genotypes grown in two out of three soils. Percentage Ndfa for the genotypes across three soils ranged from 4.2 to 32.2 when calculated using as a reference plant, and from 10.8 to 35.9 when calculated using {sup 15}N enrichment of soil available N as a reference. Genotypic differences were significant and more pronounced at low soil-NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N than at higher soil-NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N; they ranged from 14.9 to 35.9% at low N and from 10.8 to 23.6% at high N. Some genotypes consistently gave either high or low Ndfa. Because of the low levels and narrow range of genetic differences in associative N{sub 2} fixation, the potential for its improvement through breeding appears to be limited.

  2. Psychosexual fixation and defense mechanisms in a sample of young Japanese women: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Tamiko

    2010-08-01

    The present pilot study examined psychosexual fixations and defense mechanisms in a sample of young Japanese women. The Lexical Rorschach count and the Defense Mechanisms Inventory were administered to 24 female college students. Sadism on the Lexical Rorschach count was positively correlated with Reversal of Affect. Phallic fixation on the Lexical Rorschach count was positively correlated with Projection. Psychoanalytic hypotheses about the associations between psychosexual fixations and defense mechanisms were partially confirmed.

  3. Multispecies methods of testing for toxicity: Use of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis in nitrogen fixation and correlations between responses by algae and terrestrial plants

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Responses of the Rhizobium-legume symbiotic relationship to long-term (5- to 7-week) and short-term (2-week) exposures of copper sulfate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and streptomycin sulfate were examined in bush beans and clover. Toxic effects were evaluated by comparing plant biomass (yield), nodulation success, nitrogen fixation rate as indicated by acetylene reduction, and plant nitrogen content in controls and in plants exposed to various concentrations of the chemicals. Plants with long-term continuous root exposure were affected more than plants with short-term exposure, as indicated by reductions in nitrogen fixation rates and plant growth. Although rates of acetylene reduction (nitrogen fixation) were depressed, plants biomass and the numbers of root nodules produced were simpler, less expensive indices of exposure. In a second test, the responses of algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris) and terrestrial plants (radishes, barley, bush beans, and soybeans) to 21 different herbicides were compared to evaluate the use of a short-term (96-h) algal growth inhibition test for identifying chemicals potentially toxic to terrestrial plants.

  4. Rhizobium-Legume Symbiosis and Nitrogen Fixation under Severe Conditions and in an Arid Climate

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Hamdi Hussein

    1999-01-01

    Biological N2 fixation represents the major source of N input in agricultural soils including those in arid regions. The major N2-fixing systems are the symbiotic systems, which can play a significant role in improving the fertility and productivity of low-N soils. The Rhizobium-legume symbioses have received most attention and have been examined extensively. The behavior of some N2-fixing systems under severe environmental conditions such as salt stress, drought stress, acidity, alkalinity, nutrient deficiency, fertilizers, heavy metals, and pesticides is reviewed. These major stress factors suppress the growth and symbiotic characteristics of most rhizobia; however, several strains, distributed among various species of rhizobia, are tolerant to stress effects. Some strains of rhizobia form effective (N2-fixing) symbioses with their host legumes under salt, heat, and acid stresses, and can sometimes do so under the effect of heavy metals. Reclamation and improvement of the fertility of arid lands by application of organic (manure and sewage sludge) and inorganic (synthetic) fertilizers are expensive and can be a source of pollution. The Rhizobium-legume (herb or tree) symbiosis is suggested to be the ideal solution to the improvement of soil fertility and the rehabilitation of arid lands and is an important direction for future research. PMID:10585971

  5. Ensuring precision in lower limb deformity correction through a combination of temporary external fixation followed by internal fixation: Results of a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ganjwala, Dhiren; Shah, Shrenik; Shah, Snehal

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is important to plan preoperatively when contemplating internal fixation following deformity correction. Surgeons often find it difficult to retain the achieved correction till the end of internal fixation. To maintain precise correction we used hybrid technique which uses both external and internal fixation. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this hybrid technique in achieving and retaining desired correction. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated the magnitude of deformity with radiological parameters. We compared correction which was planned and correction which was achieved. The technique was used during surgery for corrective osteotomies. Before carrying out the osteotomy, rail fixator with two swivel clamps was applied. After osteotomy swivel clamps were loosened. Desired correction was achieved. While fixator held the fragments in corrected position, definitive internal fixation was carried out. External fixator was removed after completion of internal fixation. Position of mechanical axis ratio, mechanical lateral distal femoral angle and mechanical medial proximal tibial angle were measured before and 12 weeks after surgery. Student t-test was used to analyze the difference between correction which was planned and correction which was achieved. Results: There was no statistical difference between the desired correction and the correction achieved. Conclusions: Temporary use of external fixator while correcting angular deformities of lower limb allows to achieve accurate correction. PMID:25298557

  6. Bulk vs. amino acid stable N isotope estimations of metabolic status and contributions of nitrogen fixation to size-fractionated zooplankton biomass in the subtropical N Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mompeán, Carmen; Bode, Antonio; Gier, Elizabeth; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2016-08-01

    A comparative analysis of natural abundance of stable N isotopes (δ15N) in individual amino acids and bulk organic matter of size-fractionated plankton revealed the differential impact of nitrogen fixation through the food web in a transect across the subtropical North Atlantic. All δ15N measurements showed low values in the central region, followed by the western zone, while maximum δ15N values were found in the eastern zone. These results were consistent with the prevalence of nitrogen fixation in the central and western zones, and the influence of the west Africa upwelling in the eastern zone. Use of compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) revealed relatively low variability in the impact of diazotrophic nitrogen within the different plankton size fractions, while δ15N of bulk organic matter showed high variability with size. Explicit CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed a small increase with mean plankton size class and varied in a relatively narrow range 1.8-2.5), with the lowest values in the central zone. High correlations between bulk plankton δ15N and individual amino acids (in particular Phe and Thr), as well as reconstructed total protein δ15N values, suggest a set of new relationships that may be important to tracing direct plankton contributions to nitrogen recycling in the ocean, including detrital organic nitrogen pools. Overall, these new results represent the most detailed investigation of CSI-AA data in plankton size classes to date, and indicated a greater importance of diazotrophic N than suggested by concurrent measurements of bulk δ15N, abundance of large nitrogen fixing organisms or nitrogen fixation rates.

  7. Ecosystem nitrogen fixation throughout the snow-free period in subarctic tundra: effects of willow and birch litter addition and warming.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation in moss-associated cyanobacteria is one of the main sources of available N for N-limited ecosystems such as subarctic tundra. Yet, N2 fixation in mosses is strongly influenced by soil moisture and temperature. Thus, temporal scaling up of low-frequency in situ measurements to several weeks, months or even the entire growing season without taking into account changes in abiotic conditions cannot capture the variation in moss-associated N2 fixation. We therefore aimed to estimate moss-associated N2 fixation throughout the snow-free period in subarctic tundra in field experiments simulating climate change: willow (Salix myrsinifolia) and birch (Betula pubescens spp. tortuosa) litter addition, and warming. To achieve this, we established relationships between measured in situ N2 fixation rates and soil moisture and soil temperature and used high-resolution measurements of soil moisture and soil temperature (hourly from May to October) to model N2 fixation. The modelled N2 fixation rates were highest in the warmed (2.8 ± 0.3 kg N ha(-1) ) and birch litter addition plots (2.8 ± 0.2 kg N ha(-1) ), and lowest in the plots receiving willow litter (1.6 ± 0.2 kg N ha(-1) ). The control plots had intermediate rates (2.2 ± 0.2 kg N ha(-1) ). Further, N2 fixation was highest during the summer in the warmed plots, but was lowest in the litter addition plots during the same period. The temperature and moisture dependence of N2 fixation was different between the climate change treatments, indicating a shift in the N2 fixer community. Our findings, using a combined empirical and modelling approach, suggest that a longer snow-free period and increased temperatures in a future climate will likely lead to higher N2 fixation rates in mosses. Yet, the consequences of increased litter fall on moss-associated N2 fixation due to shrub expansion in the Arctic will depend on the shrub species' litter traits.

  8. Interactions between Nitrogen Fixation and Methane Cycling in Northern Minnesota Peat Bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, M. J.; Gaby, J. C.; Lin, X.; Morton, P. L.; Kostka, J. E.; Glass, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Peatlands cover only 3% of the Earth's surface, yet store a third of soil carbon. Increasing global temperatures have the potential to change peatlands from a net sink to a net source of atmospheric carbon. N is a limiting nutrient in oligotrophic Sphagnum-dominated peatlands and biological N2 fixation likely supplies a significant but unknown fraction of N inputs. Moreover, environmental controls on diazotrophic community composition in N-limited peatlands are poorly constrained. Thus, improved understanding of feedbacks between the CH4 and N cycles is critical for predicting future changes to CH4 flux from peat bogs. We coupled measurements of N2 fixation activity measured by the acetylene (C2H2) reduction assay (ARA) with molecular analyses of expression and diversity of nifH genes encoding the molybdenum (Mo)-containing nitrogenase from two peat bogs in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA. The top 10 cm of peat was sampled from the high CH4 flux S1 bog and the low CH4 flux Zim bog in April and June 2014. Despite similar N concentrations in the top 10 cm of both bogs (0.5-1.0 μM NO2-+NO3- and 2-3 μM NH4+), the S1 bog displayed variable ARA activity (1-100 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1) whereas the Zim bog had consistently low ARA activity (<1 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1). Highest ARA activity was measured in June from S1 bog hollows with higher moisture content incubated without O2 in the light (20-100 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1). Dissolved Fe (1-25 μM) was higher in hollow vs. hummock samples, and at S1 vs. Zim bog, while dissolved V (4-14 nM) was consistently higher than Mo (1-4 nM), suggesting that alternative V or Fe-containing nitrogenases might be present in these bogs. In contrast, Cu, an essential micronutrient for aerobic methanotrophs, was higher in hummocks (25-48 nM) than hollows (6-17 nM). The facultative methanotroph Methylocella was the dominant diazotroph in the S1 bog based on high throughput next generation sequencing of nifH cDNA amplicons. Given previous

  9. Nitrogen-Dependent Carbon Fixation by Picoplankton In Culture and in the Mississippi River

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey Smith; Marguerite W. Coomes; Thomas E. Smith

    2005-04-30

    The pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), of the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002, was isolated and sequenced. PEPC is an anaplerotic enzyme, but it may also contribute to overall CO2 fixation through β-carboxylation reactions. A consensus sequence generated by aligning the pepc genes of Anabaena variabilis, Anacystis nidulans and Synechocystis PCC 6803 was used to design two sets of primers that were used to amplify segments of Synechococcus PCC 7002 pepc. In order to isolate the gene, the sequence of the PCR product was used to search for the pepc nucleotide sequence from the publicly available genome of Synechococcus PCC 7002. At the time, the genome for this organism had not been completed although sequences of a significant number of its fragments are available in public databases. Thus, the major challenge was to find the pepc gene among those fragments and to complete gaps as necessary. Even though the search did not yield the complete gene, PCR primers were designed to amplify a DNA fragment using a high fidelity thermostable DNA polymerase. An open reading frame (ORF) consisting of 2988 base pairs coding for 995 amino acids was found in the 3066 bp PCR product. The pepc gene had a GC content of 52% and the deduced protein had a calculated molecular mass of 114,049 Da. The amino acid sequence was closely related to that of PEPC from other cyanobacteria, exhibiting 59-61% identity. The sequence differed significantly from plant and E. coli PEPC with only 30% homology. However, comparing the Synechococcus PCC 7002 sequence to the recently resolved E. coli PEPC revealed that most of the essential domains and amino acids involved in PEPC activity were shared by both proteins. The recombinant Synechococcus PCC 7002 PEPC was expressed in E. coli.

  10. Estimation of phenotypic variability in symbiotic nitrogen fixation ability of common bean under drought stress using (15)N natural abundance in grain.

    PubMed

    Polania, Jose; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Rao, Idupulapati; Beebe, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume, cultivated by small farmers and is usually exposed to unfavorable conditions with minimum use of inputs. Drought and low soil fertility, especially phosphorus and nitrogen (N) deficiencies, are major limitations to bean yield in smallholder systems. Beans can derive part of their required N from the atmosphere through symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). Drought stress severely limits SNF ability of plants. The main objectives of this study were to: (i) test and validate the use of (15)N natural abundance in grain to quantify phenotypic differences in SNF ability for its implementation in breeding programs of common bean with bush growth habit aiming to improve SNF, and (ii) quantify phenotypic differences in SNF under drought to identify superior genotypes that could serve as parents. Field studies were conducted at CIAT-Palmira, Colombia using a set of 36 bean genotypes belonging to the Middle American gene pool for evaluation in two seasons with two levels of water supply (irrigated and drought stress). We used (15)N natural abundance method to compare SNF ability estimated from shoot tissue sampled at mid-pod filling growth stage vs. grain tissue sampled at harvest. Our results showed positive and significant correlation between nitrogen derived from the atmosphere (%Ndfa) estimated using shoot tissue at mid-pod filling and %Ndfa estimated using grain tissue at harvest. Both methods showed phenotypic variability in SNF ability under both drought and irrigated conditions and a significant reduction in SNF ability was observed under drought stress. We suggest that the method of estimating Ndfa using grain tissue (Ndfa-G) could be applied in bean breeding programs to improve SNF ability. Using this method of Ndfa-G, we identified four bean lines (RCB 593, SEA 15, NCB 226 and BFS 29) that combine greater SNF ability with greater grain yield under drought stress and these could serve as potential

  11. Variability of projected terrestrial biosphere responses to elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 due to uncertainty in biological nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerholt, J.; Zaehle, S.; Smith, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Including a terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycle in Earth system models has led to substantial attenuation of predicted biosphere-climate feedbacks. However, the magnitude of this attenuation remains uncertain. A particularly important, but highly uncertain process is biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), which is the largest natural input of N to land ecosystems globally. In order to quantify this uncertainty, and estimate likely effects on terrestrial biosphere dynamics, we applied six alternative formulations of BNF spanning the range of process formulations in current state-of-the-art biosphere models within a common framework, the O-CN model: a global map of static BNF rates, two empirical relationships between BNF and other ecosystem variables (net primary productivity (NPP) and evapotranspiration), two process-oriented formulations based on plant N status, and an optimality-based approach. We examined the resulting differences in model predictions under ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] and found that the predicted global BNF rates and their spatial distribution for contemporary conditions were broadly comparable, ranging from 95 to 134 Tg N yr-1 (median 119 Tg N yr-1), despite distinct regional patterns associated with the assumptions of each approach. Notwithstanding, model responses in BNF rates to elevated levels of atmospheric [CO2] (+200 ppm) ranged between -4 Tg N yr-1 (-3 %) and 56 Tg N yr-1 (+42 %) (median 7 Tg N yr-1 (+8 %)). As a consequence, future projections of global ecosystem carbon storage (+281 to +353 Pg C, or +13 to +16 %), as well as N2O emission (-1.6 to +0.5 Tg N yr-1, or -19 to +7 %) differed significantly across the different model formulations. Our results emphasize the importance of better understanding the nature and magnitude of BNF responses to change-induced perturbations, particularly through new empirical perturbation experiments and improved model representation.

  12. Variability of projected terrestrial biosphere responses to elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 due to uncertainty in biological nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerholt, Johannes; Zaehle, Sönke; Smith, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    Including a terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycle in Earth system models has led to substantial attenuation of predicted biosphere-climate feedbacks. However, the magnitude of this attenuation remains uncertain. A particularly important but highly uncertain process is biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), which is the largest natural input of N to land ecosystems globally. In order to quantify this uncertainty and estimate likely effects on terrestrial biosphere dynamics, we applied six alternative formulations of BNF spanning the range of process formulations in current state-of-the-art biosphere models within a common framework, the O-CN model: a global map of static BNF rates, two empirical relationships between BNF and other ecosystem variables (net primary productivity and evapotranspiration), two process-oriented formulations based on plant N status, and an optimality-based approach. We examined the resulting differences in model predictions under ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] and found that the predicted global BNF rates and their spatial distribution for contemporary conditions were broadly comparable, ranging from 108 to 148 Tg N yr-1 (median: 128 Tg N yr-1), despite distinct regional patterns associated with the assumptions of each approach. Notwithstanding, model responses in BNF rates to elevated levels of atmospheric [CO2] (+200 ppm) ranged between -4 Tg N yr-1 (-3 %) and 56 Tg N yr-1 (+42 %) (median: 7 Tg N yr-1 (+8 %)). As a consequence, future projections of global ecosystem carbon (C) storage (+281 to +353 Pg C, or +13 to +16 %) as well as N2O emission (-1.6 to +0.5 Tg N yr-1, or -19 to +7 %) differed significantly across the different model formulations. Our results emphasize the importance of better understanding the nature and magnitude of BNF responses to change-induced perturbations, particularly through new empirical perturbation experiments and improved model representation.

  13. The impact of simulated chronic nitrogen deposition on the biomass and N₂-fixation activity of two boreal feather moss-cyanobacteria associations.

    PubMed

    Gundale, Michael J; Bach, Lisbet H; Nordin, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Bryophytes achieve substantial biomass and play several key functional roles in boreal forests that can influence how carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling respond to atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (Nr). They associate with cyanobacteria that fix atmospheric N₂, and downregulation of this process may offset anthropogenic Nr inputs to boreal systems. Bryophytes also promote soil C accumulation by thermally insulating soils, and changes in their biomass influence soil C dynamics. Using a unique large-scale (0.1 ha forested plots), long-term experiment (16 years) in northern Sweden where we simulated anthropogenic Nr deposition, we measured the biomass and N₂-fixation response of two bryophyte species, the feather mosses Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi. Our data show that the biomass declined for both species; however, N₂-fixation rates per unit mass and per unit area declined only for H. splendens. The low and high treatments resulted in a 29% and 54% reduction in total feather moss biomass, and a 58% and 97% reduction in total N₂-fixation rate per unit area, respectively. These results help to quantify the sensitivity of feather moss biomass and N₂ fixation to chronic Nr deposition, which is relevant for modelling ecosystem C and N balances in boreal ecosystems.

  14. Trichodesmium – a widespread marine cyanobacterium with unusual nitrogen fixation properties

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Birgitta; Sandh, Gustaf; Lin, Senjie; Larsson, John; Carpenter, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    The last several decades have witnessed dramatic advances in unfolding the diversity and commonality of oceanic diazotrophs and their N2-fixing potential. More recently, substantial progress in diazotrophic cell biology has provided a wealth of information on processes and mechanisms involved. The substantial contribution by the diazotrophic cyanobacterial genus Trichodesmium to the nitrogen influx of the global marine ecosystem is by now undisputable and of paramount ecological importance, while the underlying cellular and molecular regulatory physiology has only recently started to unfold. Here, we explore and summarize current knowledge, related to the optimization of its diazotrophic capacity, from genomics to ecophysiological processes, via, for example, cellular differentiation (diazocytes) and temporal regulations, and suggest cellular research avenues that now ought to be explored. PMID:22928644

  15. The hybrid ring tubular external fixator: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Stein, H; Mosheiff, R; Baumgart, F; Frigg, R; Perren, S M; Cordey, J

    1997-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure and compare the mechanical properties in bending of the four-ring, and three-ring/one-tube hybrid external fixation frames. DESIGN. IN VITRO: measurements of the mechanical behaviour of ring and ring-tubular external fixation frames. In the latter, one ring of the full circular frame was replaced by one tube and Schanz screws. BACKGROUND: The mechanical properties of the classical Ilizarov four-ring external fixation frames has been compared to those of other external fixation frames by various authors. However, in clinical practice the hybrid fixation frame is being used with increasing frequency. Therefore the mechanical properties of the latter are of immediate interest and clinical value. METHODS: On explanted sheep tibiae with single and double osteotomies, frame stiffness in the four-point bending mode was measured at different K-wire tensions, comparing the values obtained from four-ring frames, to those of three-ring-tubular hybrid frames. These measurements were made under conditions of (a) bone distraction (BD), and (b) segment transport (ST), both at the initial and final stages of this procedure. RESULTS: In circular frames, frame stiffness in bending for increasing K-wire tension showed a Gaussian distribution both in distraction and post-ST with an optimum at 1000 N. In ring tubular hybrid frames, however, frame stiffness showed a more linear relationship to K-wire tension. CONCLUSIONS: In the four-ring Ilizarov external fixation frame, the exchange of one ring with one tube and one Schanz screw both reduced frame stiffness in bending and converted to linear its relationship to K-wire tension. RELEVANCE: Under clinical conditions, the use of a similar ring tubular hybrid external fixator allows the adjustment of frame stiffness in a simple and practical way. This is not the case with the original ring fixation frame.

  16. Nitrogen fixation associated with development and localization of mixed populations of Cellulomonas species and Azospirillium brasilense grown on cellulose or wheat straw

    SciTech Connect

    Halsall, D.M.; Goodchild, D.J.

    1986-04-01

    Mixed cultures of Cellulomonas sp. and Azospirillum brasilense were grown with straw or cellulose as the carbon source under conditions favoring the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. Rapid increases in cell numbers, up to 10/sup 9/ cells per g of substrate, were evident after 4 and 5 days of incubation at 30 degrees C for cellulose and straw, respectively. Nitrogen fixation (detected by acetylene reduction measured on parallel cultures) commenced after 2 and 4 days of incubation for straw and cellulose, respectively, and continued for the duration of the experiment. Pure cultures of Cellulomonas sp. showed an increase in cell numbers, but CO/sub 2/ production was low, and acetylene reduction was not detected on either cellulose or straw. Pure cultures of A. brasilense on cellulose showed an inital increase in cell numbers (10/sup 7/ cells per g of substrate) over 4 days, followed by a decline presumably caused by the exhaustion of available carbon substrate. On straw, A. brasilense increased to 10/sup 9/ cells per g of substrate over 5 days and then declined slowly; this growth was accompanied by acetylene reduction. Scanning electron micrographs of straw incubated with a mixture under the above conditions for 8 days showed cells of both species in close proximity to each other. Evidence was furnished that the close spatial relatioship of cells from the two species facilitated the mutally beneficial association between them and thus increased the efficiency with which the products of straw breakdown were used for nitrogen fixation. 17 references.

  17. Novel European free-living, non-diazotrophic Bradyrhizobium isolates from contrasting soils that lack nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes – a genome comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Frances Patricia; Clark, Ian M.; King, Robert; Shaw, Liz J.; Woodward, Martin J.; Hirsch, Penny R.

    2016-05-01

    The slow-growing genus Bradyrhizobium is biologically important in soils, with different representatives found to perform a range of biochemical functions including photosynthesis, induction of root nodules and symbiotic nitrogen fixation and denitrification. Consequently, the role of the genus in soil ecology and biogeochemical transformations is of agricultural and environmental significance. Some isolates of Bradyrhizobium have been shown to be non-symbiotic and do not possess the ability to form nodules. Here we present the genome and gene annotations of two such free-living Bradyrhizobium isolates, named G22 and BF49, from soils with differing long-term management regimes (grassland and bare fallow respectively) in addition to carbon metabolism analysis. These Bradyrhizobium isolates are the first to be isolated and sequenced from European soil and are the first free-living Bradyrhizobium isolates, lacking both nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes, to have their genomes sequenced and assembled from cultured samples. The G22 and BF49 genomes are distinctly different with respect to size and number of genes; the grassland isolate also contains a plasmid. There are also a number of functional differences between these isolates and other published genomes, suggesting that this ubiquitous genus is extremely heterogeneous and has roles within the community not including symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

  18. Novel European free-living, non-diazotrophic Bradyrhizobium isolates from contrasting soils that lack nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes – a genome comparison

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Frances Patricia; Clark, Ian M.; King, Robert; Shaw, Liz J.; Woodward, Martin J.; Hirsch, Penny R.

    2016-01-01

    The slow-growing genus Bradyrhizobium is biologically important in soils, with different representatives found to perform a range of biochemical functions including photosynthesis, induction of root nodules and symbiotic nitrogen fixation and denitrification. Consequently, the role of the genus in soil ecology and biogeochemical transformations is of agricultural and environmental significance. Some isolates of Bradyrhizobium have been shown to be non-symbiotic and do not possess the ability to form nodules. Here we present the genome and gene annotations of two such free-living Bradyrhizobium isolates, named G22 and BF49, from soils with differing long-term management regimes (grassland and bare fallow respectively) in addition to carbon metabolism analysis. These Bradyrhizobium isolates are the first to be isolated and sequenced from European soil and are the first free-living Bradyrhizobium isolates, lacking both nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes, to have their genomes sequenced and assembled from cultured samples. The G22 and BF49 genomes are distinctly different with respect to size and number of genes; the grassland isolate also contains a plasmid. There are also a number of functional differences between these isolates and other published genomes, suggesting that this ubiquitous genus is extremely heterogeneous and has roles within the community not including symbiotic nitrogen fixation. PMID:27162150

  19. Acetogenesis from H2 plus CO2 and nitrogen fixation by an endosymbiotic spirochete of a termite-gut cellulolytic protist

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuma, Moriya; Noda, Satoko; Hattori, Satoshi; Iida, Toshiya; Yuki, Masahiro; Starns, David; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Darby, Alistair C.; Hongoh, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic associations of cellulolytic eukaryotic protists and diverse bacteria are common in the gut microbial communities of termites. Besides cellulose degradation by the gut protists, reductive acetogenesis from H2 plus CO2 and nitrogen fixation by gut bacteria play crucial roles in the host termites’ nutrition by contributing to the energy demand of termites and supplying nitrogen poor in their diet, respectively. Fractionation of these activities and the identification of key genes from the gut community of the wood-feeding termite Hodotermopsis sjoestedti revealed that substantial activities in the gut—nearly 60% of reductive acetogenesis and almost exclusively for nitrogen fixation—were uniquely attributed to the endosymbiotic bacteria of the cellulolytic protist in the genus Eucomonympha. The rod-shaped endosymbionts were surprisingly identified as a spirochete species in the genus Treponema, which usually exhibits a characteristic spiral morphology. The endosymbionts likely use H2 produced by the protist for these dual functions. Although H2 is known to inhibit nitrogen fixation in some bacteria, it seemed to rather stimulate this important mutualistic process. In addition, the single-cell genome analyses revealed the endosymbiont's potentials of the utilization of sugars for its energy requirement, and of the biosynthesis of valuable nutrients such as amino acids from the fixed nitrogen. These metabolic interactions are suitable for the dual functions of the endosymbiont and reconcile its substantial contributions in the gut. PMID:25979941

  20. Revision of Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fixation: Technical Considerations and Case Studies Using Decortication and Threaded Implant Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Louis C

    2017-01-01

    symptomatic pseudoarthrosis after SIJ fixation surgery can be successfully revised with decortication, grafting and fixation with threaded implants utilizing MI surgical techniques. Implant trajectory is an important consideration for primary or revision MIS SIJ fusion. Studies with longer-term follow-up of both primary and revision procedures are needed to further understand fusion rates for both primary and revision procedures utilizing both triangular and threaded implant systems. PMID:28377866

  1. Enhanced expression of Rhizobium etli cbb₃ oxidase improves drought tolerance of common bean symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Talbi, C; Sánchez, C; Hidalgo-Garcia, A; González, E M; Arrese-Igor, C; Girard, L; Bedmar, E J; Delgado, M J

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the involvement of Rhizobium etli cbb(3) oxidase in the response of Phaseolus vulgaris to drought, common bean plants were inoculated with the R. etli strain, CFNX713, overexpressing this oxidase in bacteroids (cbb(3)(+)) and subjected to drought conditions. The negative effect of drought on plant and nodule dryweight, nitrogen content, and nodule functionality was more pronounced in plants inoculated with the wild-type (WT) strain than in those inoculated with the cbb(3)(+) strain. Regardless of the plant treatment, bacteroids produced by the cbb(3)(+) strain showed higher respiratory capacity than those produced by the WT strain. Inoculation of plants with the cbb(3)(+) strain alleviated the negative effect of a moderate drought on the respiratory capacity of bacteroids and the energy charge of the nodules. Expression of the FixP and FixO components of the cbb(3) oxidase was higher in bacteroids of the cbb(3)(+) strain than in those of the WT strain under all experimental conditions. The decline in sucrose synthase activity and the decrease in dicarboxylic acids provoked by moderate drought stress were more pronounced in nodules from plants inoculated with the WT strain than in those inoculated with the cbb(3)(+) strain. Taken together, these results suggest that inoculation of plants with a R. etli strain having enhanced expression of cbb(3) oxidase in bacteroids reduces the sensitivity of P. vulgaris-R. etli symbiosis to drought and can modulate carbon metabolism in nodules.

  2. Prebiotic Nitrogen Fixation by FeS Reduction of Nitrite Under Acidic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; Mead, Susan C. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Theories for the origin of life require the availability of reduced nitrogen for the formation of such species as amino acid and nucleic acids. In a strongly reducing atmosphere, compounds essential to the chemical evolution of life, such as amino acids, can form by reactions between HCN, NH3, and carbonyl compounds produced in spark discharges. However, under non-reducing atmospheres, electric discharges produced NO rather than HCN or NH3. This raises the questions of; how ammonia can be formed under a neutral atmosphere, and what conditions are needed such formation to occur? On possibility is the conversion of NO into nitric and nitrous acids (through HNO) and rained into the oceans. The reduction of nitrite by aqueous Fe(II) (6 Fe(+2) + 7 H(+) + NO2(-) yields 6 Fe(III) + 2 H2O + NH3) such as was present on the early Earth could then have produced ammonia. However, this reaction does not proceed at pHs less than 7.3. An alternative is reduction by other forms of Fe(II), such as FeS. We will present results that show that FeS can reduce nitrite to ammonia at pHs as low as pH 5 under a variety of conditions.

  3. Nitrogen fixation in forested soils by non-leguminous nitrogen-fixing plants and by non-symbiotic soil organisms. Final report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Studies using mixtures of nitrogen-fixing plants mixed with loblolly pine showed no growth increase on a good site but a growth increase on a poor site. Soil nutrient studies showed that soils beneath alder, eleagnus, wax myrtle and red cedar had a higher nutrient concentration than soils not influenced by the crown. Monthly nutrient concentrations were quite variable.

  4. Fungicide Enhancement of Nitrogen Fixation and Colonization of Phaseolus vulgaris by Rhizobium phaseoli

    PubMed Central

    Lennox, Linda B.; Alexander, Martin

    1981-01-01

    The number and weight of pods and the weight and nitrogen content of the tops of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) derived from seeds inoculated with a thiram-resistant strain of Rhizobium phaseoli were increased if the seeds were treated with thiram before sowing in soil. A greater percentage of the nodules on 21-day-old plants were derived from the resistant strain, more nodules were formed, and these nodules were more effective in the presence of the fungicide than in its absence. These differences in nodule numbers were no longer present in 56-day-old plants, and only a small percentage of the nodules contained the resistant strain. The abundance of the fungicide-tolerant R. phaseoli increased rapidly soon after planting the seed and subsequently fell markedly, but the rate of decline was less if the seeds had been treated with the chemical. Protozoa also proliferated if thiram had not been applied to the seed, but their numbers were deleteriously influenced by thiram. Bdellovibrio, bacteriophages, and lytic micro-organisms acting on R. phaseoli were rare under these conditions. Ciliates and flagellated protozoa were initially suppressed by planting thiram-coated bean seeds in nonsterile soil, but the former were inhibited longer than the latter and the ciliate numbers never fully recovered if the seeds were treated with the fungicide. The resistant strain grew well in sterile soil also inoculated with a protozoa-free mixture of soil microorganisms whether thiram was added or not, but after an initial rise in numbers, its abundance fell if the mixture contained protozoa; the rate of this fall was delayed by the fungicide. The numbers of R. phaseoli were consistently less in sterile soil inoculated with the rhizobium plus a mixture of soil microorganisms containing ciliates and other protozoa than if the inoculum contained other protozoa but no ciliates. These results suggest that a suppression of protozoa, and possibly especially the ciliates, accounts for the

  5. Fixed-angle screws vs standard screws in acetabular prosthesis fixation: a cadaveric biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hugate, Ronald R; Dickey, Ian D; Chen, Qingshan; Wood, Christina M; Sim, Franklin H; Rock, Michael G

    2009-08-01

    Secure fixation of acetabular components in total hip arthroplasty can be challenging. The purpose of this study was to perform biomechanical analysis of cup fixation strength using fixed-angle vs standard screw fixation. Multihole, porous-backed acetabular prostheses were implanted in both acetabuli of 8 cadaveric pelves using standard press-fit techniques. Fixed-angle screws were used on the left side, and standard cancellous screws were used in the right. The use of fixed-angle screws enhanced acetabular fixation substantially under subfailure cyclic loading conditions and load-to-failure. The triradiate screw configuration increases the bending moment required to fail the specimens as well. Fixed-angle screws may be useful for achieving rigid fixation of acetabular prostheses in challenging clinical scenarios.

  6. Salicylic acid improves the salinity tolerance of Medicago sativa in symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti by preventing nitrogen fixation inhibition.

    PubMed

    Palma, F; López-Gómez, M; Tejera, N A; Lluch, C

    2013-07-01

    In this work we have investigated the contribution of pretreatment with 0.1 and 0.5mM salicylic acid (SA) to the protection against salt stress in root nodules of Medicago sativa in symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti. SA alleviated the inhibition induced by salinity in the plant growth and photosynthetic capacity of M. sativa-S. meliloti symbiosis. In addition, SA prevented the inhibition of the nitrogen fixation capacity under salt stress since nodule biomass was not affected by salinity in SA pretreated plants. Antioxidant enzymes peroxidase (POX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehidroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and glutathione reductase (GR), key in the main pathway that scavenges H2O2 in plants, were induced by SA pretreatments which suggest that SA may participate in the redox balance in root nodules under salt stress. Catalase activity (CAT) was inhibited around 40% by SA which could be behind the increase of H2O2 detected in nodules of plants pretreated with SA. The accumulation of polyamines (PAs) synthesized in response to salinity was prevented by SA which together with the induction of 1-aminocyclopropane-l-carboxylic acid (ACC) content suggest the prevalence of the ethylene signaling pathway induced by SA in detriment of the synthesis of PAs. In conclusion, SA alleviated the negative effect of salt stress in the M. sativa-S. meliloti symbiosis through the increased level of nodule biomass and the induction of the nodular antioxidant metabolism under salt stress. The H2O2 accumulation and the PAs inhibition induced by SA in nodules of M. sativa suggest that SA activates a hypersensitive response dependent on ethylene.

  7. Multispecies methods of testing for toxicity: use of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis in nitrogen fixation and correlations between responses by algae and terrestrial plants

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T

    1991-12-01

    Responses of the Rhizobium-legume symbiotic relationship to long-term (5- to 7-week) and short-term (2-week) exposures of copper sulfate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and streptomycin sulfate were examined in bush beans and clover. Toxic effects were evaluated by comparing plant biomass (yield), nodulation success, nitrogen fixation rate as indicated by acetylene reduction, and plant nitrogen content in controls and in plants exposed to various concentrations of the chemicals. Plants with long-term continuous root exposure were affected more than plants with short-term exposure, as indicated by reductions in nitrogen fixation rates and plant growth. Although rates of acetylene reduction (nitrogen fixation) were depressed, plant biomass and the numbers of root nodules produced were simpler, less expensive indices of exposure. In a second test, the responses of algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris) and terrestrial plants (radishes, barley, bush beans, and soybeans) to 21 different herbicides were compared to evaluate the use of a short-term (96-h) algal growth inhibition test for identifying chemicals potentially toxic to terrestrial plants. Two test end points were evaluated: (1) the highest concentration resulting in no statistically significant reduction in the growth rate of algae or terrestrial plants, and (2) the concentration at which algal growth or terrestrial plant biomass was reduced by 50%. Test results were correlated for the two algae and for all pairs of vascular plants. However, results of the algal tests did not correlate with those of the terrestrial plants. Furthermore, according to tests with Selenastrum capricornutum, there was only a 50% chance of successfully identifying herbicide levels that reduced terrestrial plant biomass. For the herbicides and species examined, short-term toxicity tests with algae were not good indicators of toxicity to terrestrial plants.

  8. A Functional myo-Inositol Dehydrogenase Gene Is Required for Efficient Nitrogen Fixation and Competitiveness of Sinorhizobium fredii USDA191 To Nodulate Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guoqiao; Krishnan, Ammulu Hari; Kim, Yong-Woong; Wacek, Thomas J.; Krishnan, Hari B.

    2001-01-01

    Inositol derivative compounds provide a nutrient source for soil bacteria that possess the ability to degrade such compounds. Rhizobium strains that are capable of utilizing certain inositol derivatives are better colonizers of their host plants. We have cloned and determined the nucleotide sequence of the myo-inositol dehydrogenase gene (idhA) of Sinorhizobium fredii USDA191, the first enzyme responsible for inositol catabolism. The deduced IdhA protein has a molecular mass of 34,648 Da and shows significant sequence similarity with protein sequences of Sinorhizobium meliloti IdhA and MocA; Bacillus subtilis IolG, YrbE, and YucG; and Streptomyces griseus StrI. S. fredii USDA191 idhA mutants revealed no detectable myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity and failed to grow on myo-inositol as a sole carbon source. Northern blot analysis and idhA-lacZ fusion expression studies indicate that idhA is inducible by myo-inositol. S. fredii USDA191 idhA mutant was drastically affected in its ability to reduce nitrogen and revealed deteriorating bacteroids inside the nodules. The number of bacteria recovered from such nodules was about threefold lower than the number of bacteria isolated from nodules initiated by S. fredii USDA191. In addition, the idhA mutant was also severely affected in its ability to compete with the wild-type strain in nodulating soybean. Under competitive conditions, nodules induced on soybean roots were predominantly occupied by the parent strain, even when the idhA mutant was applied at a 10-fold numerical advantage. Thus, we conclude that a functional idhA gene is required for efficient nitrogen fixation and for competitive nodulation of soybeans by S. fredii USDA191. PMID:11274120

  9. Monoaxial external fixation of the calcaneus: An anatomical study assessing the safety of monoaxial pin insertion.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Callum M; Esparon, Tom; Rea, Paul M; Jamal, Bilal

    2016-10-01

    The use of external fixation for intra-articular calcaneal fractures is increasing in popularity. Studies have shown fine wire and monoaxial external fixation to be a viable surgical alternative to more invasive methods of open reduction and internal fixation of the calcaneus. However, there is an absence of literature that quantifies the risk of pin insertion for monoaxial fixation. This study aimed to determine the safety of inserting monoaxial pins within the calcaneus to house the Orthofix Calcaneal Mini-Fixator. Five formalin embalmed cadaveric ankle and lower leg specimens were inserted with six monoaxial pins. Careful dissection then revealed the presence of the tendons of peroneus longus and brevis, the sural nerve and the small saphenous vein in relation to these pins. Measurements from each pin to each of these structures were made as the structures transected lines drawn from each pin to two palpable bony landmarks: the inferior tip of the lateral malleolus and the posterosuperior calcaneus. In doing this, the risk posed by each pin could be evaluated. We found that two particular pins, those used to hold the articular surface of the subtalar joint in a reduced position, posed a larger risk of injury to surrounding structures than the remaining pins. These findings therefore suggest that monoaxial fixation of the calcaneus using a six pin approach is a relatively safe method of rectifying calcaneal fractures and thus may serve as a welcome alternative to other methods of calcaneal fixation.

  10. Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft or Cage: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si-Dong; Chen, Qian; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Shen, Yong; Yang, Da-Long

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the clinical efficacy of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (UPSFB) in treating single-segment lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), as compared to bilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (BPSFB) or with cage (BPSFC). Material/Methods Medical records were retrospectively collected between 01/2010 and 02/2015 in Longyao County Hospital. According to surgical methods used, all patients were divided into 3 groups: UPSFB group, BPSFB group, and BPSFC group. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by blood loss, blood transfusion, duration of operation, hospital stay, postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, medical expenses, patient satisfaction survey, and JOA score. Results Ninety-five patients were included and underwent 2.5-year follow-up, with 7 patients lost to regular follow-up. As compared to the BPSFB group and BPSFC group, the UPSFB group had less blood loss and less blood transfusion, as well as shorter hospital stay (p<0.05). Medical expenses were far lower in the UPSFB group (p<0.001). There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, JOA score, and patient satisfaction (all p>0.05). Conclusions As compared to BPSFB and BPSFC, UPSFB has the same reliability and effectiveness in treating single-segment LDD with unilateral radicular symptoms in a single lower extremity, with the additional advantage being less expensive. PMID:26988532

  11. Alfalfa variety selection for maximum fiber content, protein and nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhland, Christopher T.; Knox, John; Ward, Susan; Agarwal, V. J.; Frey, John; Carrow, Duane; Jones, Bruce; Rife, James

    2012-09-01

    The fertile soils of Southern Minnesota are highly productive from both a natural and agricultural standpoint. We chose to examine potential feedstock in both of these settings as a focus for our study. In part one of this report we detail our findings examining potential feedstock in prairie and wetlands in the Mankato, MN area in 2009. We were able to familiarize ourselves with techniques used to isolate and quantify concentrations of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin in both a classroom and laboratory setting. These techniques were then used for our experiments that examined the effects of harvest regime, irrigation and salinity on eight potential-feedstock varieties of alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

  12. Experimental investigation of anaerobic nitrogen fixation rates with varying pressure, temperature and metal concentration with application to the atmospheric evolution of early Earth and Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Prateek

    2012-07-01

    The atmosphere of the early Earth is thought to have been significantly different than the modern composition of 21% O2 and 78% N2, yet the planet has been clearly established as hosting microbial life as far back as 3.8 billion years ago. As such, constraining the atmospheric composition of the early Earth is fundamental to establishing a database of habitable atmospheric compositions. A similar argument can be made for the planet Mars, where nitrates have been hypothesized to exist in the subsurface. During the early period on Mars when liquid water was likely more abundant, life may have developed to take advantage of available nitrates and a biologically-driven Martian nitrogen cycle could have evolved. Early Earth atmospheric composition has been investigated numerically, but only recently has the common assumption of a pN2 different than modern been investigated. Nonetheless, these latest attempts fail to take into account a key atmospheric parameter: life. On modern Earth, nitrogen is cycled vigorously by biology. The nitrogen cycle likely operated on the early Earth, but probably differed in the metabolic processes responsible, dominantly due to the lack of abundant oxygen which stabilizes oxidized forms of N that drive de-nitrification today. Recent advances in evolutionary genomics suggest that microbial pathways that are relatively uncommon today (i.e. vanadium and iron-based nitrogen fixation) probably played important roles in the early N cycle. We quantitatively investigate in the laboratory the effects of variable pressure, temperature and metal concentration on the rates of anoxic nitrogen fixation, as possible inputs for future models investigating atmospheric evolution, and better understand the evolution of the nitrogen cycle on Earth. A common anaerobic methanogenic archaeal species with i) a fully sequenced genome, ii) all three nitrogenases (molybdenum, vanadium and iron-based) and iii) the ability to be genetically manipulated will be used as

  13. The evolutionary events necessary for the emergence of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes may involve a loss of nitrate responsiveness of the NIN transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wataru; Konishi, Mineko; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2013-10-01

    NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) is a key regulator of the symbiotic nitrogen fixation pathway in legumes including Lotus japonicus. NIN-like proteins (NLPs), which are presumably present in all land plants, were recently identified as key transcription factors in nitrate signaling and responses in Arabidopsis thaliana, a non-leguminous plant. Here we show that both NIN and NLP1 of L. japonicus (LjNLP1) can bind to the nitrate-responsive cis-element (NRE) and promote transcription from an NRE-containing promoter as did the NLPs of A. thaliana (AtNLPs). However, differing from LjNLP1 and the AtNLPs that are activated by nitrate signaling through their N-terminal regions, the N-terminal region of NIN did not respond to nitrate. Thus, in the course of the evolution of NIN into a transcription factor that functions in nodulation in legumes, some mutations might arise that converted it to a nitrate-insensitive transcription factor. Because nodule formation is induced under nitrogen-deficient conditions, we speculate that the loss of the nitrate-responsiveness of NIN may be one of the evolutionary events necessary for the emergence of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes.

  14. Dynamics of N2 fixation and fate of diazotroph-derived nitrogen in a low nutrient low chlorophyll ecosystem: results from the VAHINE mesocosm experiment (New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, S.; Berthelot, H.; Turk-Kubo, K.; Fawcett, S.; Rahav, E.; l'Helguen, S.; Berman-Frank, I.

    2015-12-01

    N2 fixation rates were measured daily in large (~ 50 m3) mesocosms deployed in the tropical South West Pacific coastal ocean (New Caledonia) to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of diazotrophy and the fate of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) in a low nutrient, low chlorophyll ecosystem. The mesocosms were intentionally fertilized with ~ 0.8 μM dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate diazotrophy. Bulk N2 fixation rates were replicable between the three mesocosms, averaged 18.5 ± 1.1 nmol N L-1 d-1 over the 23 days, and increased by a factor of two during the second half of the experiment (days 15 to 23) to reach 27.3 ± 1.0 nmol N L-1 d-1. These rates are higher than the upper range reported for the global ocean, indicating that the waters surrounding New Caledonia are particularly favourable for N2 fixation. During the 23 days of the experiment, N2 fixation rates were positively correlated with seawater temperature, primary production, bacterial production, standing stocks of particulate organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase activity, and negatively correlated with DIP concentrations, DIP turnover time, nitrate, and dissolved organic nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The fate of DDN was investigated during the bloom of the unicellular diazotroph, UCYN-C, that occurred during the second half of the experiment. Quantification of diazotrophs in the sediment traps indicates that ~ 10 % of UCYN-C from the water column were exported daily to the traps, representing as much as 22.4 ± 5.5 % of the total POC exported at the height of the UCYN-C bloom. This export was mainly due to the aggregation of small (5.7 ± 0.8 μm) UCYN-C cells into large (100-500 μm) aggregates. During the same time period, a DDN transfer experiment based on high-resolution nanometer scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) coupled with 15N2 isotopic labelling revealed that 16 ± 6 % of the DDN was released to the dissolved pool

  15. Occurrence of benthic microbial nitrogen fixation coupled to sulfate reduction in the seasonally hypoxic Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertics, V. J.; Löscher, C. R.; Salonen, I.; Dale, A. W.; Gier, J.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2013-03-01

    Despite the worldwide occurrence of marine hypoxic regions, benthic nitrogen (N) cycling within these areas is poorly understood and it is generally assumed that these areas represent zones of intense fixed N loss from the marine system. Sulfate reduction can be an important process for organic matter degradation in sediments beneath hypoxic waters and many sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the genetic potential to fix molecular N (N2). Therefore, SRB may supply fixed N to these systems, countering some of the N lost via microbial processes, such as denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate if N2 fixation, possibly by SRB, plays a role in N cycling within the seasonally hypoxic sediments from the Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea. Monthly samplings were performed over the course of one year to measure nitrogenase activity (NA) and sulfate reduction rates, to determine the seasonal variations in bioturbation (bioirrigation) activity and important benthic geochemical profiles, such as sulfur and N compounds, and to monitor changes in water column temperature and oxygen concentrations. Additionally, at several time points, the active N-fixing community was examined via molecular tools. Integrated rates of N2 fixation (approximated from NA) and sulfate reduction showed a similar seasonality pattern, with highest rates occurring in August (approx. 22 and 880 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively) and October (approx. 22 and 1300 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42- respectively), and lowest rates occurring in February (approx. 8 and 32 nmol cm-3 d-1 of N and SO42-, respectively). These rate changes were positively correlated with bottom water temperatures and previous reported plankton bloom activities, and negatively correlated with bottom water oxygen concentrations. Other variables that also appeared to play a role in rate determination were bioturbation, bubble irrigation and winter storm events. Molecular analysis

  16. Dynamics of N2 fixation and fate of diazotroph-derived nitrogen in a low-nutrient, low-chlorophyll ecosystem: results from the VAHINE mesocosm experiment (New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Sophie; Berthelot, Hugo; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Fawcett, Sarah; Rahav, Eyal; L'Helguen, Stéphane; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2016-05-01

    N2 fixation rates were measured daily in large (˜ 50 m3) mesocosms deployed in the tropical southwest Pacific coastal ocean (New Caledonia) to investigate the temporal variability in N2 fixation rates in relation with environmental parameters and study the fate of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) in a low-nutrient, low-chlorophyll ecosystem. The mesocosms were fertilized with ˜ 0.8 µM dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate diazotrophy. Bulk N2 fixation rates were replicable between the three mesocosms, averaged 18.5 ± 1.1 nmol N L-1 d-1 over the 23 days, and increased by a factor of 2 during the second half of the experiment (days 15 to 23) to reach 27.3 ± 1.0 nmol N L-1 d-1. These later rates measured after the DIP fertilization are higher than the upper range reported for the global ocean. During the 23 days of the experiment, N2 fixation rates were positively correlated with seawater temperature, primary production, bacterial production, standing stocks of particulate organic carbon (POC), nitrogen (PON) and phosphorus (POP), and alkaline phosphatase activity, and negatively correlated with DIP concentrations, DIP turnover time, nitrate, and dissolved organic nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The fate of DDN was investigated during a bloom of the unicellular diazotroph UCYN-C that occurred during the second half of the experiment. Quantification of diazotrophs in the sediment traps indicates that ˜ 10 % of UCYN-C from the water column was exported daily to the traps, representing as much as 22.4 ± 5.5 % of the total POC exported at the height of the UCYN-C bloom. This export was mainly due to the aggregation of small (5.7 ± 0.8 µm) UCYN-C cells into large (100-500 µm) aggregates. During the same time period, a DDN transfer experiment based on high-resolution nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) coupled with 15N2 isotopic labeling revealed that 16 ± 6 % of the DDN was released to the dissolved pool and 21 ± 4

  17. Metabolic Adaptation, a Specialized Leaf Organ Structure and Vascular Responses to Diurnal N2 Fixation by Nostoc azollae Sustain the Astonishing Productivity of Azolla Ferns without Nitrogen Fertilizer

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Paul; Bräutigam, Andrea; Buijs, Valerie A.; Tazelaar, Anne O. E.; van der Werf, Adrie; Schlüter, Urte; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bolger, Anthony; Usadel, Björn; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Schluepmann, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture demands reduced input of man-made nitrogen (N) fertilizer, yet N2 fixation limits the productivity of crops with heterotrophic diazotrophic bacterial symbionts. We investigated floating ferns from the genus Azolla that host phototrophic diazotrophic Nostoc azollae in leaf pockets and belong to the fastest growing plants. Experimental production reported here demonstrated N-fertilizer independent production of nitrogen-rich biomass with an annual yield potential per ha of 1200 kg−1 N fixed and 35 t dry biomass. 15N2 fixation peaked at noon, reaching 0.4 mg N g−1 dry weight h−1. Azolla ferns therefore merit consideration as protein crops in spite of the fact that little is known about the fern’s physiology to enable domestication. To gain an understanding of their nitrogen physiology, analyses of fern diel transcript profiles under differing nitrogen fertilizer regimes were combined with microscopic observations. Results established that the ferns adapted to the phototrophic N2-fixing symbionts N. azollae by (1) adjusting metabolically to nightly absence of N supply using responses ancestral to ferns and seed plants; (2) developing a specialized xylem-rich vasculature surrounding the leaf-pocket organ; (3) responding to N-supply by controlling transcripts of genes mediating nutrient transport, allocation and vasculature development. Unlike other non-seed plants, the Azolla fern clock is shown to contain both the morning and evening loops; the evening loop is known to control rhythmic gene expression in the vasculature of seed plants and therefore may have evolved along with the vasculature in the ancestor of ferns and seed plants.

  18. Two ATP phosphoribosyltransferase isozymes of Geobacter sulfurreducens contribute to growth in the presence or absence of histidine and under nitrogen fixation conditions.

    PubMed

    Aklujkar, Muktak

    2011-07-01

    Bacteria of the Geobacter clade possess two distinct ATP phosphoribosyltransferases encoded by hisG(L) and hisG(S)+hisZ to catalyze the first reaction of histidine biosynthesis. This very unusual redundancy was investigated by mutational analysis. The hisG(L), hisG(S), and hisZ genes of Geobacter sulfurreducens were deleted, effects on growth and histidine biosynthesis gene expression were evaluated, and deficiencies were complemented with plasmid-borne genes. Both hisG(L) and hisG(S)+hisZ encode functional ATP phosphoribosyltransferases. However, deletion of hisG(L) resulted in no growth defect, whereas deletion of hisG(S) delayed growth when histidine was not provided. Both deletions increased hisZ transcript abundance, and both ΔhisG(S) and ΔhisZ mutations increased hisG(L) transcript abundance. Growth with HisG(L) alone (due to deletion of either hisG(S) or hisZ) was better under nitrogen fixation conditions than when ammonium was provided. Deletion of hisZ caused growth defects under all conditions tested, with or without exogenous sources of histidine, with different patterns of histidine biosynthesis gene expression under each condition. Taken together, the data indicate that G. sulfurreducens depends primarily on the HisG(S)Z isozyme as an ATP phosphoribosyltransferase in histidine biosynthesis, and for other functions when histidine is available; however, HisG(L) also functions as ATP phosphoribosyltransferase, particularly during nitrogen fixation.

  19. The novel regulatory ncRNA, NfiS, optimizes nitrogen fixation via base pairing with the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yuhua; Yan, Yongliang; Deng, Zhiping; Chen, Ming; Lu, Wei; Lu, Chao; Shang, Liguo; Yang, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun; Ke, Qi; Lu, Jiasi; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Liwen; Xie, Zhihong; Cheng, Qi; Elmerich, Claudine; Lin, Min

    2016-07-26

    Unlike most Pseudomonas, the root-associated bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 fixes nitrogen after the horizontal acquisition of a nitrogen-fixing (nif) island. A genome-wide search for small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in P. stutzeri A1501 identified the novel P. stutzeri-specific ncRNA NfiS in the core genome, whose synthesis was significantly induced under nitrogen fixation or sorbitol stress conditions. The expression of NfiS was RNA chaperone Hfq-dependent and activated by the sigma factor RpoN/global nitrogen activator NtrC/nif-specific activator NifA regulatory cascade. The nfiS-deficient mutant displayed reduced nitrogenase activity, as well as increased sensitivity to multiple stresses, such as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Secondary structure prediction and complementation studies confirmed that a stem-loop structure was essential for NfiS to regulate the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA synthesis and thus nitrogenase activity. Microscale thermophoresis and physiological analysis showed that NfiS directly pairs with nifK mRNA and ultimately enhances nitrogenase activity by increasing the translation efficiency and the half-life of nifK mRNA. Our data also suggest structural and functional divergence of NfiS evolution in diazotrophic and nondiazotrophic backgrounds. It is proposed that NfiS was recruited by nifK mRNA as a novel regulator to integrate the horizontally acquired nif island into host global networks.

  20. Effects of copper on production of periphyton, nitrogen fixation and processing of leaf litter in a Sierra Nevada, California, stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, Harry V.; Carter, James L.

    1985-01-01

    1Production of periphyton, nitrogen fixation and processing of leaf litter were examined in an oligotrophic Sierra Nevada stream and the responses of these processes to copper (2.5, 5 and 10μg 1-1 CuT [total filtrable copper]; approximately 12, 25 and 50 ng 1-1 Cu2+) were determined.2Autotrophic and total production were estimated from 3-week accumulations of biomass on artificial substrates. Mean autotrophic production in the control ranged from 0.22 to 0.58 mg C m-2 h-1 in summer-autumn 1979, but declined to 0.08–0.28 mg C m 2 h-1 after peak discharge in summer 1980, apparently due to phosphorus-limited growth. Total production in the control ranged from 0.30 to 0.82 mg C m-2 h -1 in summer-autumn 1979 and from 0.16 to 0,68 mg C m -2 h -1 in 1980. Mean autotrophic productivity, estimated by l4C-bicarbonate uptake in daylight, ranged from 0.30 to 2.8 mg C m-2 h-1.3Autotrophic productivity was reduced by 57–81% at 2.5μg 1-1 CuT, 55–96% at 5μg 1-1CuT, and 81–100% at 10μg 1-1 CUT, Heterotrophic productivity (based on dark 35S-sulphate uptake) was inhibited to a lesser extent (28–63% at 2.5μg 1-1 CuT, 24–84% at 5μg 1-1 CuT, and 67–92% at 10μg 1-1 CuT), The inhibition of autotrophic and heterotrophic productivity persisted through the year of exposure. Production in stream sections previously exposed to 2.5 and 5μg 1-1CuT increased to control levels within 4 weeks after dosing, but remained depressed for more than 7 weeks after exposure to 10μg 1-1 CuT.4The specific rate of photosynthesis (mg C mg chlorophyll a-1 h-1) of mature periphyton communities declined at all test concentrations of copper, but the rate for periphyton on newly-colonized surfaces did not change. The species composition of benthic algae shifted during exposure to an assemblage more tolerant of copper. Achrtanthes minutissima and Fragilaria crotonensis were the primary replacement species on newly-colonized surfaces.5The nitrogenase activity of blue-green algae was low. with

  1. The micro-RNA72c-APETALA2-1 node as a key regulator of the common bean-Rhizobium etli nitrogen fixation symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Íñiguez, Luis P; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xochitl; Leija, Alfonso; Fuentes, Sara I; Ramírez, Mario; Paul, Sujay; Reyes, José L; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández, Georgina

    2015-05-01

    Micro-RNAs are recognized as important posttranscriptional regulators in plants. The relevance of micro-RNAs as regulators of the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis is emerging. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the role of micro-RNA172 (miR172) and its conserved target APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium etli symbiosis. Our expression analysis revealed that mature miR172c increased upon rhizobial infection and continued increasing during nodule development, reaching its maximum in mature nodules and decaying in senescent nodules. The expression of AP2-1 target showed a negative correlation with miR172c expression. A drastic decrease in miR172c and high AP2-1 mRNA levels were observed in ineffective nodules. Phenotypic analysis of composite bean plants with transgenic roots overexpressing miR172c or a mutated AP2-1 insensitive to miR172c cleavage demonstrated the pivotal regulatory role of the miR172 node in the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. Increased miR172 resulted in improved root growth, increased rhizobial infection, increased expression of early nodulation and autoregulation of nodulation genes, and improved nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In addition, these plants showed decreased sensitivity to nitrate inhibition of nodulation. Through transcriptome analysis, we identified 114 common bean genes that coexpressed with AP2-1 and proposed these as being targets for transcriptional activation by AP2-1. Several of these genes are related to nodule senescence, and we propose that they have to be silenced, through miR172c-induced AP2-1 cleavage, in active mature nodules. Our work sets the basis for exploring the miR172-mediated improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean, the most important grain legume for human consumption.

  2. The Micro-RNA172c-APETALA2-1 Node as a Key Regulator of the Common Bean-Rhizobium etli Nitrogen Fixation Symbiosis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Íñiguez, Luis P.; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Leija, Alfonso; Fuentes, Sara I.; Ramírez, Mario; Paul, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are recognized as important posttranscriptional regulators in plants. The relevance of micro-RNAs as regulators of the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis is emerging. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the role of micro-RNA172 (miR172) and its conserved target APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium etli symbiosis. Our expression analysis revealed that mature miR172c increased upon rhizobial infection and continued increasing during nodule development, reaching its maximum in mature nodules and decaying in senescent nodules. The expression of AP2-1 target showed a negative correlation with miR172c expression. A drastic decrease in miR172c and high AP2-1 mRNA levels were observed in ineffective nodules. Phenotypic analysis of composite bean plants with transgenic roots overexpressing miR172c or a mutated AP2-1 insensitive to miR172c cleavage demonstrated the pivotal regulatory role of the miR172 node in the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. Increased miR172 resulted in improved root growth, increased rhizobial infection, increased expression of early nodulation and autoregulation of nodulation genes, and improved nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In addition, these plants showed decreased sensitivity to nitrate inhibition of nodulation. Through transcriptome analysis, we identified 114 common bean genes that coexpressed with AP2-1 and proposed these as being targets for transcriptional activation by AP2-1. Several of these genes are related to nodule senescence, and we propose that they have to be silenced, through miR172c-induced AP2-1 cleavage, in active mature nodules. Our work sets the basis for exploring the miR172-mediated improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean, the most important grain legume for human consumption. PMID:25739700

  3. Treatment of congenital leg length discrepancies in children using an Ilizarov external fixator: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bukva, Bojan; Vrgoc, Goran; Brdar, Radivoj; Ducić, Sinisa; Gulan, Gordan; Jurdana, Hari

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of intramedullary (IM) alignment used in combination with an Ilizarov external fixation on the healing index (HI) and lengthening index (LI) in the treatment of congenital leg length discrepancies (LLD). This study included 35patients aged from 3.5 to 19 (average age 10.73) who underwent thl egalisation procedure using an Ilizarov external fixator. We compared the duration of the external fixator application, LLD, HI and LI between two groups of children: children in Group I underwent limb lengthening by the conventional llizarov technique using an Ilizarov external fixator alone, and children in Group II underwent a combination of Ilizarov technique and intramedullary alignment with two Kirschner wires, introduced through two mini-incisions. We found significant differences between the two groups of patients for duration of external fixator application and HI. Patients with congeni- tal LLD treated with combined method of treatment had benefit from intramedullary alignment due to its better outcome.

  4. Understanding mechanisms and factors related to implant fixation; a model study of removal torque.

    PubMed

    Stenlund, Patrik; Murase, Kohei; Stålhandske, Christina; Lausmaa, Jukka; Palmquist, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Osseointegration is a prerequisite for achieving a stable long-term fixation and load-bearing capacity of bone anchored implants. Removal torque measurements are often used experimentally to evaluate the fixation of osseointegrated screw-shaped implants. However, a detailed understanding of the way different factors influence the result of removal torque measurements is lacking. The present study aims to identify the main factors contributing to anchorage. Individual factors important for implant fixation were identified using a model system with an experimental design in which cylindrical or screw-shaped samples were embedded in thermosetting polymers, in order to eliminate biological variation. Within the limits of the present study, it is concluded that surface topography and the mechanical properties of the medium surrounding the implant affect the maximum removal torque. In addition to displaying effects individually, these factors demonstrate interplay between them. The rotational speed was found not to influence the removal torque measurements within the investigated range.

  5. HOPE-fixation of lung tissue allows retrospective proteome and phosphoproteome studies.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Olga; Abidi, Nada; Klawonn, Frank; Wissing, Josef; Nimtz, Manfred; Kugler, Christian; Steinert, Michael; Goldmann, Torsten; Jänsch, Lothar

    2014-11-07

    Hepes-glutamic acid buffer-mediated organic solvent protection effect (HOPE)-fixation has been introduced as an alternative to formalin fixation of clinical samples. Beyond preservation of morphological structures for histology, HOPE-fixation was demonstrated to be compatible with recent methods for RNA and DNA sequencing. However, the suitability of HOPE-fixed materials for the inspection of proteomes by mass spectrometry so far remained undefined. This is of particular interest, since proteins constitute a prime resource for drug research and can give valuable insights into the activity status of signaling pathways. In this study, we extracted proteins from human lung tissue and tested HOPE-treated and snap-frozen tissues comparatively by proteome and phosphoproteome analyses. High confident data from accurate mass spectrometry allowed the identification of 2603 proteins and 3036 phosphorylation sites. HOPE-fixation did not hinder the representative extraction of proteins, and investigating their biochemical properties, covered subcellular localizations, and cellular processes revealed no bias caused by the type of fixation. In conclusion, proteome as well as phosphoproteome data of HOPE lung samples were qualitatively equivalent to results obtained from snap-frozen tissues. Thus, HOPE-treated tissues match clinical demands in both histology and retrospective proteome analyses of patient samples by proteomics.

  6. Fixation light hue bias revisited: implications for using adaptive optics to study color vision.

    PubMed

    Hofer, H J; Blaschke, J; Patolia, J; Koenig, D E

    2012-03-01

    Current vision science adaptive optics systems use near infrared wavefront sensor 'beacons' that appear as red spots in the visual field. Colored fixation targets are known to influence the perceived color of macroscopic visual stimuli (Jameson, D., & Hurvich, L. M. (1967). Fixation-light bias: An unwanted by-product of fixation control. Vision Research, 7, 805-809.), suggesting that the wavefront sensor beacon may also influence perceived color for stimuli displayed with adaptive optics. Despite its importance for proper interpretation of adaptive optics experiments on the fine scale interaction of the retinal mosaic and spatial and color vision, this potential bias has not yet been quantified or addressed. Here we measure the impact of the wavefront sensor beacon on color appearance for dim, monochromatic point sources in five subjects. The presence of the beacon altered color reports both when used as a fixation target as well as when displaced in the visual field with a chromatically neutral fixation target. This influence must be taken into account when interpreting previous experiments and new methods of adaptive correction should be used in future experiments using adaptive optics to study color.

  7. Ocean acidification slows nitrogen fixation and growth in the dominant diazotroph Trichodesmium under low-iron conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dalin; Kranz, Sven A; Kim, Ja-Myung; Morel, François M M

    2012-11-06

    Dissolution of anthropogenic CO(2) increases the partial pressure of CO(2) (pCO(2)) and decreases the pH of seawater. The rate of Fe uptake by the dominant N(2)-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium declines as pH decreases in metal-buffered medium. The slower Fe-uptake rate at low pH results from changes in Fe chemistry and not from a physiological response of the organism. Contrary to previous observations in nutrient-replete media, increasing pCO(2)/decreasing pH causes a decrease in the rates of N(2) fixation and growth in Trichodesmium under low-Fe conditions. This result was obtained even though the bioavailability of Fe was maintained at a constant level by increasing the total Fe concentration at low pH. Short-term experiments in which pCO(2) and pH were varied independently showed that the decrease in N(2) fixation is caused by decreasing pH rather than by increasing pCO(2) and corresponds to a lower efficiency of the nitrogenase enzyme. To compensate partially for the loss of N(2) fixation efficiency at low pH, Trichodesmium synthesizes additional nitrogenase. This increase comes partly at the cost of down-regulation of Fe-containing photosynthetic proteins. Our results show that although increasing pCO(2) often is beneficial to photosynthetic marine organisms, the concurrent decreasing pH can affect primary producers negatively. Such negative effects can occur both through chemical mechanisms, such as the bioavailability of key nutrients like Fe, and through biological mechanisms, as shown by the decrease in N(2) fixation in Fe-limited Trichodesmium.

  8. The effect of cement on hip stem fixation: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Talip; Mutlu, İbrahim; Özkan, Arif; Kişioğlu, Yasin

    2017-03-20

    This study presents the numerical analysis of stem fixation in hip surgery using with/without cement methods since the use of cement is still controversial based on the clinical studies in the literature. Many different factors such as stress shielding, aseptic loosening, material properties of the stem, surgeon experiences etc. play an important role in the failure of the stem fixations. The stem fixation methods, cemented and uncemented, were evaluated in terms of mechanical failure aspects using computerized finite element method. For the modeling processes, three dimensional (3D) femur model was generated from computerized tomography (CT) images taken from a patient using the MIMICS Software. The design of the stem was also generated as 3D CAD model using the design parameters taken from the manufacturer catalogue. These 3D CAD models were generated and combined with/without cement considering the surgical procedure using SolidWorks program and then imported into ANSYS Workbench Software. Two different material properties, CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V, for the stem model and Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) for the cement were assigned. The material properties of the femur were described according to a density calculated from the CT images. Body weight and muscle forces were applied on the femur and the distal femur was fixed for the boundary conditions. The calculations of the stress distributions of the models including cement and relative movements of the contacts examined to evaluate the effects of the cement and different stem material usage on the failure of stem fixation. According to the results, the use of cement for the stem fixation reduces the stress shielding but increases the aseptic loosening depending on the cement crack formations. Additionally, using the stiffer material for the stem reduces the cement stress but increases the stress shielding. Based on the results obtained in the study, even when taking the disadvantages into account, the cement usage

  9. Anatomo-experimental study for lace fixation of winged scapula in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Heller, K D; Prescher, A; Forst, J; Stadtmüller, A; Forst, R

    1996-01-01

    Winging of the scapula is one of the major features of the rare facio-scapulo-humeral muscular dystrophy. Several methods of retention and fixation of the scapulae have been published, but most have technical disadvantages or complications. A modified method of operative fixation of the scapula to the chest using three polyester laces is described with the results of cadaveric studies on the stability of this system. In order to determine the optimal region for the scapula fixation using polyester laces we performed pull-out tests on twenty cadaver scapulae. Four points of insertion in the inferior part of the scapula were tested. The lateral margin showed the best results with regard to the tensile strength and the morphology of the resulting fractures. The elongation of the laces was measured as well. Compared to scapulothoracic arthrodesis interscapulo-scapulocostal scapulopexy leads to greater preserved mobility between the scapula and the chest wall and conserves vital capacity.

  10. RbohB, a Phaseolus vulgaris NADPH oxidase gene, enhances symbiosome number, bacteroid size, and nitrogen fixation in nodules and impairs mycorrhizal colonization.

    PubMed

    Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Nava, Noreide; Santana, Olivia; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by respiratory burst oxidative homologs (Rbohs) are involved in numerous plant cell signaling processes, and have critical roles in the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Previously, down-regulation of RbohB in Phaseolus vulgaris was shown to suppress ROS production and abolish Rhizobium infection thread (IT) progression, but also to enhance arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonization. Thus, Rbohs function both as positive and negative regulators. Here, we assessed the effect of enhancing ROS concentrations, by overexpressing PvRbohB, on the P. vulgaris--rhizobia and P. vulgaris--AMF symbioses. We estimated superoxide concentrations in hairy roots overexpressing PvRbohB, determined the status of early and late events of both Rhizobium and AMF interactions in symbiont-inoculated roots, and analyzed the nodule ultrastructure of transgenic plants overexpressing PvRbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB significantly enhanced ROS production, the formation of ITs, nodule biomass, and nitrogen-fixing activity, and increased the density of symbiosomes in nodules, and the density and size of bacteroides in symbiosomes. Furthermore, PvCAT, early nodulin, PvSS1, and PvGOGAT transcript abundances were elevated in these nodules. By contrast, mycorrhizal colonization was reduced in roots that overexpressed RbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB augmented nodule efficiency by enhancing nitrogen fixation and delaying nodule senescence, but impaired AMF colonization.

  11. Evaluation of Histomorphometric Changes in Tissue Architecture in Relation to Alteration in Fixation Protocol – An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Sreedhar, Gadiputi; Banerjee, Sumita; Batra, Manu; Garg, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Preparation of good tissue specimens for microscopy requires complete fixation. No ideal fixative has been found till date, with every fixative showing advantages and disadvantages. Appropriate fixation is required to maintain clear and consistent morphologic features for histologic examination. Pathologists mostly examine formalin fixed tissue sections and are less used to the morphologic changes induced by other fixatives. Underfixed and overfixed tissue in various fixatives can lead to tissue architectural changes which can affect its diagnostic value. Aim To assess sectioning ability, staining intensity and microscopic details of tissues kept in different fixatives at different time intervals. Materials and Methods Fresh tissue specimen i.e., goat tongue was collected and its middle-third portion was used for the study purpose. The tissue was grossed into 10 equal pieces and kept in various fixatives (10% Buffered formalin, Carnoy’s solution, Absolute ethyl alcohol, Bouin’s fluid) for five different time intervals (6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 hours) and normal tissue processing steps were carried out followed by sectioning and staining. During sectioning, sectioning parameter was assessed. Following sectioning, sections were observed under light microscope and were histologically evaluated for staining and microscopic details. To calculate the sectioning parameter Fisher’s exact test was used and to assess parameters for staining and microscopic details Mann-Whitney U test was used. Results According to the study, 10% buffered formaldehyde is considered as a superior fixative under all parameters followed by Bouin’s fluid, Carnoy’s solution and Absolute alcohol. Conclusion In our study, it was concluded that 10% buffered formaldehyde should be continued as a routine fixative however, other fixatives can be used depending upon the non-availability of required fixative or in case of emergencies. Pathologist should be accustomed to histologic and

  12. [Resorbable rods and screws for fixation of ankle fractures. A randomized clinical prospective study].

    PubMed

    Springer, M A; van Binsbergen, E A; Patka, P; Bakker, F C; Haarman, H J

    1998-05-01

    A prospective randomized clinical trial was performed to evaluate the use of self-reinforced absorbable composites (Biofix) in the fixation of ankle fractures. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that fixation with Biofix rods and screws is as good as the standard A.O. fixation. The benefits of Biofix rods and screws are: a reduction in costs since no secondary operation is needed, prevention of stress-shielding and thereby diminishing the risk of bone porosity. Patients aged between 16 and 75 years old with closed, non-comminuted fractures of the lateral and/or medial malleolus and dislocation of the fracture fragments greater than 2 mm were included in the study. 22 patients were treated with Biofix rods and screws and the control group of 19 patients with a standard technique. After 3, 6 and 12 months, rontgenograms were taken. At the same time functional results were evaluated following the criteria of Olerud and Molander. Two patients were withdrawn from the trial for non-medical reasons. 22 patients (12 from the Biofix group, 10 from the AO group) operated two or more years ago were contacted to see if any complications had occurred since they were last seen. In 4 cases a Biofix screw broke down just beneath the head during insertion. This did not result in an insufficient fixation of the fracture. There were no early post-operative complications. The functional and rontgenological results in both groups were equal. In three cases a sterile sinus developed at the site of screw insertion. Biofix rods and screws, made of polylactic acid, are a good alternative for the fixation of fractures of the ankle. The use of resorbable fracture fixation material has the advantage that a second operation to remove osteosynthesis material is not necessary. The long term results are good. There is, however, a possibility of development of tissue reaction to the resorbable material.

  13. High rate of N2 fixation by East Siberian cryophilic soil bacteria as determined by measuring acetylene reduction in nitrogen-poor medium solidified with gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Hara, Shintaro; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Desyatkin, Roman V; Hatano, Ryusuke; Tahara, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    For evaluating N(2) fixation of diazotrophic bacteria, nitrogen-poor liquid media supplemented with at least 0.5% sugar and 0.2% agar are widely used for acetylene reduction assays. In such a soft gel medium, however, many N(2)-fixing soil bacteria generally show only trace acetylene reduction activity. Here, we report that use of a N(2) fixation medium solidified with gellan gum instead of agar promoted growth of some gellan-preferring soil bacteria. In a soft gel medium solidified with 0.3% gellan gum under appropriate culture conditions, bacterial microbiota from boreal forest bed soils and some free-living N(2)-fixing soil bacteria isolated from the microbiota exhibited 10- to 200-fold-higher acetylene reduction than those cultured in 0.2% agar medium. To determine the N(2) fixation-activating mechanism of gellan gum medium, qualitative differences in the colony-forming bacterial components from tested soil microbiota were investigated in plate cultures solidified with either agar or gellan gum for use with modified Winogradsky's medium. On 1.5% agar plates, apparently cryophilic bacterial microbiota showed strictly distinguishable microbiota according to the depth of soil in samples from an eastern Siberian Taiga forest bed. Some pure cultures of proteobacteria, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens and Burkholderia xenovorans, showed remarkable acetylene reduction. On plates solidified with 1.0% gellan gum, some soil bacteria, including Luteibacter sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Paenibacillus sp., and Arthrobacter sp., uniquely grew that had not grown in the presence of the same inoculants on agar plates. In contrast, Pseudomonas spp. and Burkholderia spp. were apparent only as minor colonies on the gellan gum plates. Moreover, only gellan gum plates allowed some bacteria, particularly those isolated from the shallow organic soil layer, to actively swarm. In consequence, gellan gum is a useful gel matrix to bring out growth potential capabilities of many soil

  14. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cortical bone trajectory screw fixation versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion using traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Several biomechanical studies have demonstrated the favorable mechanical properties of the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw. However, no reports have examined surgical outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with CBT screw fixation for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) compared with those after PLIF using traditional pedicle screw (PS) fixation. The purposes of this study were thus to elucidate surgical outcomes after PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS and to compare these results with those after PLIF using traditional PS fixation. METHODS Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS (CBT group; mean followup 35 months). A historical control group consisted of 82 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with traditional PS fixation (PS group; mean follow-up 40 months). Clinical status was assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale score. Fusion status was assessed by dynamic plain radiographs and CT. The need for additional surgery and surgery-related complications was also evaluated. RESULTS The mean JOA score improved significantly from 13.7 points before surgery to 23.3 points at the latest follow-up in the CBT group (mean recovery rate 64.4%), compared with 14.4 points preoperatively to 22.7 points at final follow-up in the PS group (mean recovery rate 55.8%; p < 0.05). Solid spinal fusion was achieved in 84 patients from the CBT group (88.4%) and in 79 patients from the PS group (96.3%, p > 0.05). Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease developed in 3 patients from the CBT group (3.2%) compared with 9 patients from the PS group (11.0%, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS provided comparable improvement of clinical symptoms with PLIF using traditional PS fixation. However, the successful fusion rate tended to be lower in the CBT group than in the PS group, although the difference was not statistically significant between the 2 groups.

  15. EnviroAtlas - Biological nitrogen fixation in natural/semi-natural ecosystems by 12-digit HUC for the Conterminous United States, 2006

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EnviroAtlas dataset contains data on the mean biological nitrogen fixation in natural/semi-natural ecosystems per 12-digit Hydrologic Unit (HUC) in 2006. Biological N fixation (BNF) in natural/semi-natural ecosystems was estimated using a correlation with actual evapotranspiration (AET). This correlation is based on a global meta-analysis of BNF in natural/semi-natural ecosystems (Cleveland et al. 1999). AET estimates for 2006 were calculated using a regression equation describing the correlation of AET with climate (average annual daily temperature, average annual minimum daily temperature, average annual maximum daily temperature, and annual precipitation) and land use/land cover variables in the conterminous US (Sanford and Selnick 2013). Data describing annual average minimum and maximum daily temperatures and total precipitation for 2006 were acquired from the PRISM climate dataset (http://prism.oregonstate.edu). Average annual climate data were then calculated for individual 12-digit USGS Hydrologic Unit Codes (HUC12s; http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/huc.html; 22 March 2011 release) using the Zonal Statistics tool in ArcMap 10.0. AET for individual HUC12s was estimated using equations described in Sanford and Selnick (2013). BNF in natural/semi-natural ecosystems within individual HUC12s was modeled with an equation describing the statistical relationship between BNF (kg N ha-1 yr-1) and actual evapotranspiration (AET; cm yr-1) and scaled to the proportion

  16. Thousand Year Archives of the Bulk and Compound-Specific δ15N of Export Production From the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre Indicate Increasing Nitrogen Fixation Over the Past 150 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, O.; Batista, F. C.; Brown, J. T.; Guilderson, T. P.; McCarthy, M.

    2012-12-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopic analysis of amino acids (δ15N-AA) preserved in proteins has emerged as a powerful new tool to explore trophic levels and nutrient cycling in nature. To date, little has been done to explore δ15N-AA in paleo-studies of the marine nitrogen cycle. We analysed the bulk and AA-specific δ15N in the long-lived, deep-sea, proteinaceous coral Gerardia. By feeding on sinking particulate organic matter, proteinaceous corals integrate the biogeochemical signature of recently exported production within discrete skeletal growth layers. Sub-decadal resolution time-series records spanning the time period 1000 AD to present were generated from specimens of Gerardia collected from the main Hawaiian Islands, Cross Seamount, and French Frigate Shoals in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Records of bulk δ15N from the three different locations, geographically separated by up to 1000 km, showed remarkably similar long term trends. Bulk δ15N remained relatively stable from ~1000-1850 years AD, and then decreased by a total of 2 ‰ from ~1850 AD to the present. The δ15N-AA of the "trophic" group of amino acids indicated no significant changes in trophic level or microbial re-synthesis of export production over this time period. The δ15N of "source" amino acids was significantly correlated with corresponding values of bulk δ15N, with the δ15N of phenylalanine decreasing from 4.2 to 2.1‰. The latter value is similar to recent measurements of subsurface nitrate δ15N near Hawaii, suggesting that the δ15N of phenylalanine may be used to quantitatively track changes in the isotopic signature of nitrate at the base of the food web. Using a simple isotopic mass balance between upwelled nitrate and nitrogen fixation we calculate a 30% increase in nitrogen fixation in the NPSG since ~1850. These results provide invaluable long-term context for recent observations, and highlight profound changes in the marine biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen over the

  17. Evaluation of the tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) diversity panel for response to the NL 3 strain of Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and for biological nitrogen fixation with Bradyrhizobium strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aphid-transmitted Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) are potyviruses that are seed transmitted in tepary bean. Developing resistance to these viruses will be critical for expanding production in areas where they are endemic. Biological nitrogen fixation (BN...

  18. Design Fixation and Cooperative Learning in Elementary Engineering Design Project: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study examining 3rd, 4th and 5th graders' design fixation and cooperative learning in an engineering design project. A mixed methods instrument, the Cooperative Learning Observation Protocol (CLOP), was adapted to record frequency and class observation on cooperative learning engagement through detailed field notes.…

  19. Bacteriohopanepolyols record stratification, nitrogen fixation and other biogeochemical perturbations in Holocene sediments of the Central Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenberg, M.; Berndmeyer, C.; Moros, M.; Muschalla, M.; Schmale, O.; Thiel, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Baltic Sea, one of the world's largest brackish-marine basins, established after deglaciation of Scandinavia about 17 000 to 15 000 yr ago. In the changeable history of the Baltic Sea, the initial freshwater system was connected to the North Sea about 8000 yr ago and the modern brackish-marine setting (Littorina Sea) was established. Today, a relatively stable stratification developed in the water column of the deep basins due to salinity differences. Stratification is only occasionally interrupted by mixing events, and controls nutrient availability and growth of specifically adapted microorganisms and algae. We studied bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs), lipids of specific bacterial groups, in a sediment core from the Central Baltic Sea (Gotland Deep) and found considerable differences between the distinct stages of the Baltic Sea's history. Individual BHP structures indicate contributions from as yet unknown redoxcline-specific bacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol isomer), methanotrophic bacteria (35-aminobacteriohopanetetrol), cyanobacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol cyclitol ether isomer) and, through allochthonous input after the Littorina transgression, from soil bacteria (adenosylhopane), whereas the origin of other BHPs in the core has still to be identified. Notably high BHP abundances were observed in the deposits of the brackish-marine Littorina phase, particularly in laminated sediment layers. Because these sediments record periods of stable water column stratification, bacteria specifically adapted to these conditions may account for the high portions of BHPs. An additional and/or accompanying source may be nitrogen-fixing (cyano)bacteria, which is indicated by a good correlation of BHP abundances with Corg and δ15N.

  20. Uptake Hydrogenase Activity Determined by Plasmid pRL6JI in Rhizobium leguminosarum Does Not Increase Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Scott D.; Kapulnik, Yoram; Brewin, Nicholas J.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1985-01-01

    Six mutants of Rhizobium leguminosarum 3855 lacking uptake hydrogenase activity (Hup− phenotype) as a result of Tn5-mob mutagenesis of the hup-containing plasmid pRL6JI were tested for symbiotic performance on Pisum sativum L. and Vicia benghalensis L. Three pea cultivars and one vetch line, which induce four different levels of Hup activity in strain 3855, were grown to flowering under microbiologically controlled conditions in the absence of combined N. Direct Kjeldahl N measurements showed that in every case at least one Hup− mutant fixed as much N2 as the isogenic Hup+ strain. Measures of C2H2 reduction, H2 evolution, 3H2 incorporation, and plant dry weight were consistent with the interpretation that the oxidation of H2 produced by the nitrogenase enzyme complex was not necessarily associated with increased N2 fixation in these symbiotic associations. Tests with a smaller subset of the Hup− strains under four different root environments ranging from pH 5.0 to 8.2 likewise showed no significant advantage for the isogenic Hup+ strain. It was concluded that the improvements in symbiotic N2 fixation produced by pRL6JI are associated with some trait other than the Hup+ phenotype. PMID:16346912

  1. Association between aflatoxin contamination and N2 fixation in peanut under drought conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traits related to nitrogen fixation may be used as indirect selection criteria for aflatoxin resistance in peanut. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between N2 fixation traits and aflatoxin contamination in peanut under different drought conditions. Eleven peanut genotypes we...

  2. Regulation of nitrogen fixation in Azorhizobium caulinodans: identification of a fixK-like gene, a positive regulator of nifA.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, P A; Mandon, K; Arigoni, F; Desnoues, N; Elmerich, C

    1991-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 1 kb fragment upstream of Azorhizobium caulinodans fixL was established. An open reading frame of 744 bp was identified as a fixK homologue. A kanamycin cartridge was inserted into the cloned fixK-like gene and recombined into the host genome. The resulting mutant was Nif-Fix-, suggesting that FixK was required for nitrogen fixation both in symbiotic conditions and in the free-living state. Using a pfixK-lacZ fusion, the FixLJ products were shown to control the expression of fixK. Using a pnifA-lacZ fusion, the FixK product was shown to regulate positively the transcription of nifA in bacteria grown in the free-living state. In addition, a double ntrC-fixL mutant was constructed and was shown to be completely devoid of nitrogenase activity. A model of regulation, based on these data, is presented and might explain the unusual ability of A. caulinodans to fix nitrogen both under symbiotic conditions and in the free-living state.

  3. Bacteriohopanepolyols record stratification, nitrogen fixation and other biogeochemical perturbations in Holocene sediments of the central Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenberg, M.; Berndmeyer, C.; Moros, M.; Muschalla, M.; Schmale, O.; Thiel, V.

    2013-04-01

    The Baltic Sea, one of the world's largest brackish-marine basins, established after deglaciation of Scandinavia about 17 000 to 15 000 yr ago. In the changeable history of the Baltic Sea, the initial freshwater system was connected to the North Sea about 8000 yr ago and the modern brackish-marine setting (Littorina Sea) was established. Today, a relatively stable stratification has developed in the water column of the deep basins due to salinity differences. Stratification is only occasionally interrupted by mixing events, and it controls nutrient availability and growth of specifically adapted microorganisms and algae. We studied bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs), lipids of specific bacterial groups, in a sediment core from the central Baltic Sea (Gotland Deep) and found considerable differences between the distinct stages of the Baltic Sea's history. Some individual BHP structures indicate contributions from as yet unknown redoxcline-specific bacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol isomer), methanotrophic bacteria (35-aminobacteriohopanetetrol), cyanobacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol cyclitol ether isomer) and from soil bacteria (adenosylhopane) through allochthonous input after the Littorina transgression, whereas the origin of other BHPs in the core has still to be identified. Notably high BHP abundances were observed in the deposits of the brackish-marine Littorina phase, particularly in laminated sediment layers. Because these sediments record periods of stable water column stratification, bacteria specifically adapted to these conditions may account for the high portions of BHPs. An additional and/or accompanying source may be nitrogen-fixing (cyano)bacteria, which is indicated by a positive correlation of BHP abundances with Corg and δ15N.

  4. Structural characterization of the protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a metalloprotein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2009-03-11

    The genome of many cyanobacacteria contain the sequence for a small protein (<100 amino acids) with a commom "domain of unknown function" grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that fall into the DUF683 family, cce_0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce_0567, to 1.84 Å resolution. Cce_0567 crystallized in space group P21 with two protein molecules and one Ni2+ cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two α-helices from residues P11 to G41 (α1) and L49-E74 (α2) with the second α-helix containing a short 310-helix (Y46 - N48). A four-residue linker (L42 - D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle that cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce_0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of ~1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer coordinate with Ni2+ in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni2+ was titrated into 15N-labelled cce_0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni2+ binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce_0567 upon binding Ni2+, even in large molar excess of Ni2+, indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce_0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of ~62ºC that was reversible.

  5. Nitrogen fixation by U.S. and Middle Eastern chickpeas with commercial and wild Middle Eastern inocula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chickpeas (Cicer arietinum L.) are native to the Middle East (ME), and must be inoculated with symbiotic bacteria in order to fix nitrogen (N) in North American soils. Commercial inocula for chickpea contain several strains of the known N-fixing symbiont Mesorhizobium ciceri. It is not known whethe...

  6. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-08-01

    Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury.Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation.Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but <17.1 mm (disc depth). Except the axial screw length, increase in all the measurements was seen with level up to C5-C6 segment. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimens demonstrated that ATAS fixation could be successfully performed at C2-C3, C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6 levels, but impossible at C6-C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens.The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning.

  7. The novel regulatory ncRNA, NfiS, optimizes nitrogen fixation via base pairing with the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yuhua; Yan, Yongliang; Deng, Zhiping; Chen, Ming; Lu, Wei; Lu, Chao; Shang, Liguo; Yang, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun; Ke, Qi; Lu, Jiasi; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Liwen; Xie, Zhihong; Cheng, Qi; Elmerich, Claudine; Lin, Min

    2016-01-01

    Unlike most Pseudomonas, the root-associated bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 fixes nitrogen after the horizontal acquisition of a nitrogen-fixing (nif) island. A genome-wide search for small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in P. stutzeri A1501 identified the novel P. stutzeri-specific ncRNA NfiS in the core genome, whose synthesis was significantly induced under nitrogen fixation or sorbitol stress conditions. The expression of NfiS was RNA chaperone Hfq-dependent and activated by the sigma factor RpoN/global nitrogen activator NtrC/nif-specific activator NifA regulatory cascade. The nfiS-deficient mutant displayed reduced nitrogenase activity, as well as increased sensitivity to multiple stresses, such as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Secondary structure prediction and complementation studies confirmed that a stem-loop structure was essential for NfiS to regulate the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA synthesis and thus nitrogenase activity. Microscale thermophoresis and physiological analysis showed that NfiS directly pairs with nifK mRNA and ultimately enhances nitrogenase activity by increasing the translation efficiency and the half-life of nifK mRNA. Our data also suggest structural and functional divergence of NfiS evolution in diazotrophic and nondiazotrophic backgrounds. It is proposed that NfiS was recruited by nifK mRNA as a novel regulator to integrate the horizontally acquired nif island into host global networks. PMID:27407147

  8. Heterotrophic 15N2 Fixation and Distribution of Newly Fixed Nitrogen in a Rice-Flooded Soil System 1

    PubMed Central

    Eskew, David L.; Eaglesham, Allan R. J.; App, A. A.

    1981-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants growing in pots of flooded soil were exposed to a 15N2-enriched atmosphere for 3 to 13 days in a gas-tight chamber. The floodwater and soil surface were shaded with a black cloth to reduce the activity of phototrophic N2-fixing micro-organisms. The highest 15N enrichments were consistently observed in the roots, although the total quantity of 15N incorporated into the soil was much greater. The rate of 15N incorporation into roots was much higher at the heading than at the tillering stage of growth. Definite enrichments were also found in the basal node and in the lower outer leaf sheath fractions after 3 days of exposure at the heading stage. Thirteen days was the shortest time period in which definite 15N enrichment was observed in the leaves and panicle. When plants were exposed to 15N2 for 13 days just before heading and then allowed to mature in a normal atmosphere, 11.3% of the total 15N in the system was found in the panicles, 2.3% in the roots, and 80.7% in the subsurface soil. These results provide direct evidence of heterotrophic N2 fixation associated with rice roots and the flooded soil and demonstrate that part of the newly fixed N is available to the plant. PMID:16661887

  9. Associative nitrogen fixation in nodules of the conifer Lepidothamnus fonkii (Podocarpaceae) inhabiting ombrotrophic bogs in southern Patagonia

    PubMed Central

    Borken, Werner; Horn, Marcus A.; Geimer, Stefan; Aguilar, Nelson A. Bahamonde; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2016-01-01

    Biological N2 fixation (BNF) in the rhizosphere of Podocarpaceae is currently attributed to unspecific diazotrophs with negligible impact on N acquisition. Here, we report specific and high associative BNF in dead cells of root nodules of Lepidothamnus fonkii distributed in ombrotrophic peatlands of Patagonia. BNF of nodulated roots, intact plants of L. fonkii and rhizospheric peat was assessed by 15N2 and acetylene reduction. Diazotrophs were identified by electron microscopy, analysis of nitrogenase encoding genes (nifH) and transcripts, and 16S rRNA. Nitrogenase encoding nifH transcripts from root nodules point to Beijerinckiaceae (Rhizobiales), known as free-living diazotrophs. Electron microscopy and 16S rRNA analysis likewise identified active Beijerinckiaceae in outer dead cells of root nodules. NifH transcripts from the rhizopshere peat revealed diverse active diazotrophs including Beijerinckiaceae. Both methods revealed high activity of nitrogenase rates in cut roots of L. fonkii (2.5 μmol N g−1 d.w. d−1 based on 15N2 assay; 2.4 μmol C2H4 g−1 d.w. d−1 based on acetylene reduction assay). The data suggest that (i) nodules recruit diazotrophic Beijerinckiaceae from peat, (ii) dead nodule cells provide an exclusive habitat for Beijerinckiaceae, and (iii) BNF in L. fonkii is one potent pathway to overcome N deficiency in ombrotrophic peatlands of Patagonia. PMID:27976730

  10. Associative nitrogen fixation in nodules of the conifer Lepidothamnus fonkii (Podocarpaceae) inhabiting ombrotrophic bogs in southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borken, Werner; Horn, Marcus A.; Geimer, Stefan; Aguilar, Nelson A. Bahamonde; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2016-12-01

    Biological N2 fixation (BNF) in the rhizosphere of Podocarpaceae is currently attributed to unspecific diazotrophs with negligible impact on N acquisition. Here, we report specific and high associative BNF in dead cells of root nodules of Lepidothamnus fonkii distributed in ombrotrophic peatlands of Patagonia. BNF of nodulated roots, intact plants of L. fonkii and rhizospheric peat was assessed by 15N2 and acetylene reduction. Diazotrophs were identified by electron microscopy, analysis of nitrogenase encoding genes (nifH) and transcripts, and 16S rRNA. Nitrogenase encoding nifH transcripts from root nodules point to Beijerinckiaceae (Rhizobiales), known as free-living diazotrophs. Electron microscopy and 16S rRNA analysis likewise identified active Beijerinckiaceae in outer dead cells of root nodules. NifH transcripts from the rhizopshere peat revealed diverse active diazotrophs including Beijerinckiaceae. Both methods revealed high activity of nitrogenase rates in cut roots of L. fonkii (2.5 μmol N g‑1 d.w. d‑1 based on 15N2 assay; 2.4 μmol C2H4 g‑1 d.w. d‑1 based on acetylene reduction assay). The data suggest that (i) nodules recruit diazotrophic Beijerinckiaceae from peat, (ii) dead nodule cells provide an exclusive habitat for Beijerinckiaceae, and (iii) BNF in L. fonkii is one potent pathway to overcome N deficiency in ombrotrophic peatlands of Patagonia.

  11. Biomechanical evaluation of an integrated fixation cage during fatigue loading: a human cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Palepu, Vivek; Peck, Jonathan H; Simon, David D; Helgeson, Melvin D; Nagaraja, Srinidhi

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Lumbar cages with integrated fixation screws offer a low-profile alternative to a standard cage with anterior supplemental fixation. However, the mechanical stability of integrated fixation cages (IFCs) compared with a cage with anterior plate fixation under fatigue loading has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability of a screw-based IFC with a standard cage coupled with that of an anterior plate under fatigue loading. METHODS Eighteen functional spinal units were implanted with either a 4-screw IFC or an anterior plate and cage (AP+C) without integrated fixation. Flexibility testing was conducted in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR) on intact spines, immediately after device implantation, and post-fatigue up to 20,000 cycles of FE loading. Stability parameters such as range of motion (ROM) and lax zone (LZ) for each loading mode were compared between the 2 constructs at multiple stages of testing. In addition, construct loosening was quantified by subtracting post-instrumentation ROM from post-fatigue ROM. RESULTS IFC and AP+C configurations exhibited similar stability (ROM and LZ) at every stage of testing in FE (p ≥ 0.33) and LB (p ≥ 0.23) motions. In AR, however, IFCs had decreased ROM compared with AP+C constructs at pre-fatigue (p = 0.07) and at all post-fatigue time points (p ≤ 0.05). LZ followed a trend similar to that of ROM in AR. ROM increased toward intact motion during fatigue cycling for AP+C and IFC implants. IFC specimens remained significantly (p < 0.01) more rigid than specimens in the intact condition during fatigue for each loading mode, whereas AP+C construct motion did not differ significantly (p ≥ 0.37) in FE and LB and was significantly greater (p < 0.01) in AR motion compared with intact specimens after fatigue. Weak to moderate correlations (R(2) ≤ 56%) were observed between T-scores and construct loosening, with lower T

  12. Enhancement of Apoptosis by Titanium Alloy Internal Fixations during Microwave Treatments for Fractures: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Fu, Tengfei; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microwaves are used in one method of physical therapy and can increase muscle tissue temperature which is useful for improving muscle, tendon and bone injuries. In the study, we sought to determine whether titanium alloy internal fixations influence apoptosis in tissues subjected to microwave treatments at 2,450 MHz and 40 W during the healing of fractures because this issue is not yet fully understood. Methods In this study, titanium alloy internal fixations were used to treat 3.0-mm transverse osteotomies in the middle of New Zealand rabbits’ femurs. After the operation, 30-day microwave treatments were applied to the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies 3 days after the operation. The changes in the temperatures of the muscle tissues in front of the implants or the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies were measured during the microwave treatments. To characterize the effects of titanium alloy internal fixations on apoptosis in the muscles after microwave treatment, we performed TUNEL assays, fluorescent real-time (quantitative) PCR, western blotting analyses, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection and transmission electron microscopy examinations. Results The temperatures were markedly increased in the animals with the titanium alloy implants. Apoptosis in the muscle cells of the implanted group was significantly more extensive than that in the non-implanted control group at different time points. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of the skeletal muscles of the implanted groups revealed muscular mitochondrial swelling, vacuolization. ROS, Bax and Hsp70 were up-regulated, and Bcl-2 was down-regulated in the implanted group. Conclusion Our results suggest that titanium alloy internal fixations caused greater muscular tissue cell apoptosis following 2,450 MHz, 40 W microwave treatments in this rabbit femur fracture models. PMID:26132082

  13. Bone Healing by Using Ilizarov External Fixation Combined with Flexible Intramedullary Nailing versus Ilizarov External Fixation Alone in the Repair of Tibial Shaft Fractures: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Popkov, A. V.; Kononovich, N. A.; Gorbach, E. N.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Irianov, Y. M.; Popkov, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Our research was aimed at studying the radiographic and histological outcomes of using flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN) combined with Ilizarov external fixation (IEF) versus Ilizarov external fixation alone on a canine model of an open tibial shaft fracture. Materials and Methods. Transverse diaphyseal tibial fractures were modelled in twenty dogs. Fractures in the dogs of group 1 (n = 10) were stabilized with the Ilizarov apparatus while it was combined with FIN in group 2 (n = 10). Results. On day 14, a bone tissue envelope started developing round the FIN wires. Histologically, we revealed only endosteal bone union in group 1 while in group 2 the radiographs revealed complete bone union on day 28. At the same time-point, the areas of cancellous and mature lamellar bone tissues were observed in the intermediary area in group 2. The periosteal layers were formed of the trabeculae net of lamellar structure and united the bone fragments. The frame was removed at 30 days after the fracture in group 2 and after 45 days in group 1 according to bone regeneration. Conclusion. The combination of the Ilizarov apparatus and FIN accelerates bone repair and augments stabilization of tibial shaft fractures as compared with the use of the Ilizarov fixation alone. PMID:25379523

  14. The nitrogen-fixation island insertion site is conserved in diazotrophic Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas sp. isolated from distal and close geographical regions.

    PubMed

    Venieraki, Anastasia; Dimou, Maria; Vezyri, Eleni; Vamvakas, Alexandros; Katinaki, Pagona-Artemis; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Tampakaki, Anastasia; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The presence of nitrogen fixers within the genus Pseudomonas has been established and so far most isolated strains are phylogenetically affiliated to Pseudomonas stutzeri. A gene ortholog neighborhood analysis of the nitrogen fixation island (NFI) in four diazotrophic P. stutzeri strains and Pseudomonas azotifigens revealed that all are flanked by genes coding for cobalamin synthase (cobS) and glutathione peroxidise (gshP). The putative NFIs lack all the features characterizing a mobilizable genomic island. Nevertheless, bioinformatic analysis P. stutzeri DSM 4166 NFI demonstrated the presence of short inverted and/or direct repeats within both flanking regions. The other P. stutzeri strains carry only one set of repeats. The genetic diversity of eleven diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates was also investigated. Multilocus sequence typing grouped nine isolates along with P. stutzeri and two isolates are grouped in a separate clade. A Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis grouped the eleven isolates into four distinct genotypes. We also provided evidence that the putative NFI in our diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates is flanked by cobS and gshP genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the putative NFI of Pseudomonas sp. Gr65 is flanked by inverted repeats identical to those found in P. stutzeri DSM 4166 and while the other P. stutzeri isolates harbor the repeats located in the intergenic region between cobS and glutaredoxin genes as in the case of P. stutzeri A1501. Taken together these data suggest that all putative NFIs of diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates are anchored in an intergenic region between cobS and gshP genes and their flanking regions are designated by distinct repeats patterns. Moreover, the presence of almost identical NFIs in diazotrophic Pseudomonas strains isolated from distal geographical locations around the world suggested that this horizontal gene transfer event may have taken place early in the evolution.

  15. Overexpression of BetS, a Sinorhizobium meliloti high-affinity betaine transporter, in bacteroids from Medicago sativa nodules sustains nitrogen fixation during early salt stress adaptation.

    PubMed

    Boscari, Alexandre; Van de Sype, Ghislaine; Le Rudulier, Daniel; Mandon, Karine

    2006-08-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti possesses several betaine transporters to cope with salt stress, and BetS represents a crucial high-affinity glycine and proline betaine uptake system involved in the rapid acquisition of betaines by cells subjected to osmotic upshock. Using a transcriptional lacZ (beta-galactosidase) fusion, we showed that betS is expressed during the establishment of the symbiosis and in mature nitrogen-fixing nodules. However, neither Nod nor Fix phenotypes were impaired in a betS mutant. BetS is functional in isolated bacteroids, and its activity is strongly activated by high osmolarity. In bacteroids from a betS mutant, glycine betaine and proline betaine uptake was reduced by 85 to 65%, indicating that BetS is a major component of the overall betaine uptake activity in bacteroids in response to osmotic stress. Upon betS overexpression (strain UNA349) in free-living cells, glycine betaine transport was 2.3-fold higher than in the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the accumulation of proline betaine, the endogenous betaine synthesized by alfalfa plants, was 41% higher in UNA349 bacteroids from alfalfa plants subjected to 1 week of salinization (0.3 M NaCl) than in wild-type bacteroids. In parallel, a much better maintenance of nitrogen fixation activity was observed in 7-day-salinized plants nodulated with the overexpressing strain than in wild-type nodulated plants. Taken altogether, these results are consistent with the major role of BetS as an emergency system involved in the rapid uptake of betaines in isolated and in planta osmotically stressed bacteroids of S. meliloti.

  16. Different representations of biological nitrogen fixation cause major variation in projected terrestrial biosphere responses to elevated levels of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerholt, J.; Zaehle, S.; Smith, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Including a land nitrogen (N) cycle in current Earth system models has led to substantial attenuation of predicted land-climate feedbacks, but the magnitude of this N effect remains highly uncertain. The current magnitude and global change responses of major land N cycle processes are still not well understood. Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is one particularly important process, being the largest natural land input of N. However, global terrestrial BNF rates are highly uncertain and models lack observations on which to base their predictions. The current variety of terrestrial biosphere models use a wide array of differing, largely untested BNF representations. We tested the six most widely used formulations within the O-CN model and examined the resulting differences in model predictions both under current atmospheric [CO2], as well as under future scenarios of elevated atmospheric [CO2]: a prescribed global map of static BNF rates, two simple empirical relationships between BNF and other ecosystem variables (net primary production and evapotranspiration), two process-based formulations based on plant N status, and an approach following a basic form of optimality of plant N acquisition. We found that the predicted global BNF rates for current conditions were fairly comparable, ranging from 93 to 134 Tg N yr-1 (median 118 Tg N yr-1). However, at 587 ppm atmospheric [CO2], model responses in BNF rates ranged from -5 Tg N yr-1 (-4 %) to 113 Tg N yr-1 (+88 %) (median 14 Tg N yr-1 (+15 %)). As a consequence, future projections of global net primary productivity and carbon storage (increases of different magnitudes), as well as N2O emission (negative responses or unchanged) differed significantly across the different model formulations. Our results emphasize the importance of better understanding the nature and magnitude of BNF responses to change induced perturbations; particularly through new empirical perturbation experiments.

  17. The involvement of the nif-associated ferredoxin-like genes fdxA and fdxN of Herbaspirillum seropedicae in nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Souza, André L F; Invitti, Adriana L; Rego, Fabiane G M; Monteiro, Rose A; Klassen, Giseli; Souza, Emanuel M; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Rigo, Liu U

    2010-02-01

    The pathway of electron transport to nitrogenase in the endophytic beta-Proteobacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae has not been characterized. We have generated mutants in two nif-associated genes encoding putative ferredoxins, fdxA and fdxN. The fdxA gene is part of the operon nifHDKENXorf1orf2fdxAnifQmodABC and is transcribed from the nifH promoter, as revealed by lacZ gene fusion. The fdxN gene is probably cotranscribed with the nifB gene. Mutational analysis suggests that the FdxA protein is essential for maximum nitrogenase activity, since the nitrogenase activity of the fdxA mutant strain was reduced to about 30% of that of the wild-type strain. In addition, the fdxA mutation had no effect on the nitrogenase switch-off in response to ammonium. Nitrogenase activity of a mutant strain lacking the fdxN gene was completely abolished. This phenotype was reverted by complementation with fdxN expressed under lacZ promoter control. The results suggest that the products of both the fdxA and fdxN genes are probably involved in electron transfer during nitrogen fixation.

  18. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  19. Recent studies of the ocean nitrogen cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppley, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle in the ocean is dominated by the activities of organisms. External nitrogen inputs from land and from the atmosphere are small compared with rates of consumption and production by organisms and with rates of internal rearrangements of nitrogen pools within the ocean. The chief reservoirs of nitrogen are, in decreasing order of size: nitrogen in sediments, dissolved N2, nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), particulate organic nitrogen (PON) (mostly organisms and their by-products). The biogenic fluxes of nitrogen were reviewed. The rate of PON decomposition in the surface layer must be comparable to the rate of ammonium consumption; and at the same time the nitrate consumption rate will be similar to the rates of: (1) sinking of PON out of the surface layer and its decompositon at depth, (2) the rate of nitrification at depth, and (3) the rate of nitrate return to the surface layer by upwelling.

  20. Potential nitrogen fixation activity of different aged biological soil crusts from rehabilitated grasslands of the hilly Loess Plateau, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, M.; Belnap, J.

    2010-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) cover up to 60–70% of the soil surface in grasslands rehabilitated during the "Grain for Green" project implemented in the hilly Loess Plateau region in 1999. As biocrusts fix nitrogen (N), they are an important part of restoring soil fertility. We measured nitrogenase activity (NA) in biocrusts from sites rehabilitated at six different time periods to estimate 1) the effects of moisture content and temperature on NA in biocrusts of different ages and 2) the potential N contribution from biocrusts to soils and plants in this region. Results show that NA in the biocrusts was mostly controlled by the species composition, as the activity of biocrusts dominated by free-living soil cyanobacteria was significantly higher than that of moss-dominated biocrusts. Nitrogenase activity was also influenced by soil moisture content and ambient temperature, with a significant decline in activity when moisture levels were decreased to 20% field water-holding capacity. The optimal temperature for NA was 35–40 °C and 30–40 °C for cyanobacteria- and moss-dominated biocrusts, respectively. Biocrust fixed N is likely an important source of N in this ecosystem, as we estimated annual potential N inputs per hectare in these grasslands to be up to 13 kg N ha-1 and 4 kg N ha-1 for cyanobacteria- and moss-dominated biocrusts, respectively.

  1. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content of living and fixed cells: a comparative study using various fixatives.

    PubMed

    Rousselle, C; Robert-Nicoud, M; Ronot, X

    1998-11-01

    The majority of studies dealing with DNA analyses are made on fixed cells. In this context, the efficiency as fixatives of ethanol, methanol, acetone, Carnoy, Boehm-Sprenger and aldehydes was determined using two different DNA fluorescent probes, Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide. The purpose of our study was to find the fixative that would provide the best results with respect to the following parameters: aggregates, cell size and granularity, and DNA staining analysis. Using murine fibroblasts, we found that 68% ethanol, 85% methanol and aldehydes did not increase aggregate formation, whereas Carnoy, acetone or Boehm-Sprenger fixatives did. The results show that aldehydes seem to alter cell size least. All fixatives induce an increase in cell granularity, which is very pronounced with alcohols, but aldehydes alter morphology less than alcohols. We observed that the fixatives giving the best resolution with Hoechst 33342 staining lead to a lower measurement variability than with propidium iodide staining. This study leads us to conclude that 68% ethanol and 85% methanol can be considered as appropriate fixatives for flow cytometry studies of DNA content.

  2. Theoretical studies on nitrogen rich energetic azoles.

    PubMed

    Ghule, Vikas Dasharath; Sarangapani, Radhakrishnan; Jadhav, Pandurang M; Tewari, Surya P

    2011-06-01

    Different nitro azole isomers based on five membered heterocyclics were designed and investigated using computational techniques in order to find out the comprehensive relationships between structure and performances of these high nitrogen compounds. Electronic structure of the molecules have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and the heat of formation has been calculated using the isodesmic reaction approach at B3LYP/6-31G* level. All designed compounds show high positive heat of formation due to the high nitrogen content and energetic nitro groups. The crystal densities of these energetic azoles have been predicted with different force fields. All the energetic azoles show densities higher than 1.87 g/cm(3). Detonation properties of energetic azoles are evaluated by using Kamlet-Jacobs equation based on the calculated densities and heat of formations. It is found that energetic azoles show detonation velocity about 9.0 km/s, and detonation pressure of 40GPa. Stability of the designed compounds has been predicted by evaluating the bond dissociation energy of the weakest C-NO(2) bond. The aromaticity using nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) is also explored to predict the stability via delocalization of the π-electrons. Charge on the nitro group is used to assess the impact sensitivity in the present study. Overall, the study implies that all energetic azoles are found to be stable and expected to be the novel candidates of high energy density materials (HEDMs).

  3. Genomic and Physiological Characterization of the Verrucomicrobia Isolate Diplosphaera colitermitum gen. nov., sp. nov., Reveals Microaerophily and Nitrogen Fixation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunji; Breznak, John A.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Rodrigues, Jorge L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Previously we reported the cultivation of novel verrucomicrobia, including strain TAV2 (93% 16S rRNA gene identity to its nearest cultivated representative, Opitutus terreae PB90-1) from the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes. To gain better insight into the Verrucomicrobia as a whole and understand the role of verrucomicrobia within the termite gut ecosystem, we analyzed a draft genome and undertook a physiological characterization of TAV2. Strain TAV2 is an autochthonous member of the R. flavipes gut microbiota and groups phylogenetically among diverse Verrucomicrobia from R. flavipes and other termites that are represented by 16S rRNA gene sequences alone. TAV2 is a microaerophile, possessing a high-affinity cbb3-type terminal oxidase-encoding gene and exhibiting an optimum growth rate between 2 and 8% (vol/vol) oxygen. It has the genetic potential to degrade cellulose, an important function within termite guts, but its in vitro substrate utilization spectrum was limited to starch and a few mono- and disaccharides. Growth occurred on nitrogen-free medium, and genomic screening revealed genes for dinitrogenases, heretofore detected in only a few members of the Verrucomicrobia. This represents the first (i) characterization of a verrucomicrobial species from the termite gut, (ii) report of nif and anf genes in a nonacidophilic verrucomicrobial species, and (iii) description of a microaerophilic genotype and phenotype in this phylum of bacteria. The genetic and physiological distinctiveness of TAV2 supports its recognition as the type strain of a new genus and species, for which the name Diplosphaera colitermitum gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. PMID:22194293

  4. Ultrastructural study of archaeological Vitis vinifera L. seeds using rapid-freeze fixation and substitution.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Claudio; Vignani, Rita; Ciacci, Andrea; Nardini, Alessandra; Valenti, Marco; Cantini, Federico; Ciampolini, Fabrizio; Faleri, Claudia; Cresti, Mauro

    2009-12-01

    The ultrastructure of Vitis vinifera seeds from different archaeological sites was studied. Preservation status differed between sites. Preliminary investigations of grape seeds from Poggio Bacherina (Chianciano Terme, Siena) and Miranduolo (Chiusdino, Siena) showed collapsed or charred tegument, making this material suitable for morphometric studies only. Rapid-freeze fixation and substitution of grape seeds from Shahr-I Sokhta in Iran and via De' Castellani in Florence revealed well preserved tegument suitable for chemical and cytochemical analysis. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis was used to determine chemical composition. Cytochemical analysis based on fluorescent staining with DAPI suggested the presence of cytoplasm residues.

  5. The Overproduction of Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) in Endophytes Upregulates Nitrogen Fixation in Both Bacterial Cultures and Inoculated Rice Plants.

    PubMed

    Defez, Roberto; Andreozzi, Anna; Bianco, Carmen

    2017-02-14

    Endophytic bacteria from roots and leaves of rice plants were isolated and identified in order to select the diazotrophs and improve their nitrogen-fixing abilities. The nitrogen-fixing endophytes were identified by PCR amplification of the nifH gene fragment. For this purpose, two isolates, Enterobacter cloacae RCA25 and Klebsiella variicola RCA26, and two model bacteria (Herbaspirillum seropedicae z67 and Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234) were transformed to increase the biosynthesis of the main plant auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). A significant increase in the production of IAA was observed for all strains. When the expression of nifH gene and the activity of the nitrogenase enzyme were analyzed in liquid cultures, we found that they were positively affected in the IAA-overproducing endophytes as compared to the wild-type ones. Rice plants inoculated with these modified strains showed a significant upregulation of the nitrogenase activity when plants infected with the wild-type strains were used as reference. Similar results were obtained too with common bean plants infected with the S. fredii NGR234 strain. These findings suggest that IAA overproduction improves nitrogen-fixing apparatus of endophytic bacteria both in liquid cultures and in inoculated host plants. The present study highlights new perspectives to enhance nitrogen-fixing ability in non-legume crops. These strains could be used as bioinoculants to improve the growth and the yield of agricultural crops, offering an alternative to the use of chemical nitrogen fertilizers.

  6. Anammox revisited: thermodynamic considerations in early studies of the microbial nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2015-08-01

    This paper explores the early literature on the thermodynamics of processes in the microbial nitrogen cycle, evaluating parameters of transfer of energy which depends on the initial and final states of the system, the mechanism of the reactions involved and the rates of these reactions. Processes discussed include the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (the anammox reaction), the use of inorganic nitrogen compounds as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis, and the mechanism and bioenergetics of biological nitrogen fixation.

  7. Improved Intermittent-clamped Drainage in Lower Lumbar Internal Fixation: A Randomized Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qing-Ying; Liu, Chu-Yin; Fu, Chan-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Tan, Ming-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Continuous negative pressure drainage (CNPD) is widely used after lower lumbar internal fixation; however, it may cause tremendous blood loss and lead to postoperative hemorrhagic anemia. The present study explored the efficacy and safety of improved intermittent-clamped drainage (ICD) for lower lumbar internal fixation. Methods: This was a prospective study that included 156 patients with decompression of the spinal canal and internal fixation for the first time from January 2012 to December 2014. The patients were randomly divided into ICD group and CNPD group, and each group had 78 cases. A drainage tube was placed under the deep fascia in all patients within 10 min after the commencement of wound closure. The postoperative drainage amount at different time points, the hemoglobin level, and postoperative complications were recorded and compared between the two groups. Shapiro-Wilk test, independent samples t-test, and Mann-Whitney U-test were used in this study. Results: The drainage amount was significantly reduced in the ICD group, as compared with the CNPD group (Z = 10.74, P < 0.01). The mean total drainage amount (in ml) of the single-segment and two-segment procedures was significantly greater in the CNPD group than the ICD group (Z = 10.63 and 10.75, respectively; P < 0.01). For the adverse events, there was no significant difference in postoperative temperature, wound problem, and complications between the two groups. Conclusions: The present study showed a statistically significant reduction in postoperative drainage amount between ICD and CNPD groups, and ICD is an effective, convenient, and safe method for routine use in lower lumbar surgery. It is essential to focus on the effect of clamping drainage with long-segment surgical procedure and complex lumbar disease in the further investigation, as well as the effect of clamping on long-term functional outcomes. PMID:27900992

  8. Rigid internal fixation and the effects on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory system: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Williams, B; Stapleford, R

    1992-12-01

    A prospective study of 22 patients who underwent a bilateral sagittal osteotomy to advance the mandible and subsequent rigid internal fixation, were examined for signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and masticatory dysfunction. A modified Helkimo index was used to analyze the anamnestic, clinical, and occlusal data. In addition, 12 of the cases chosen at random were mounted on a semiadjustable (SAM2) articulator and analyzed with the mandibular position indicator (MPI) to determine the amount and the direction of condylar displacement postoperatively. Anamnestic dysfunction decreased because of a reported decrease in muscular pain, joint noise, headache frequency, and parafunctional habits postoperatively. Clinical dysfunction remained unchanged, with a decrease in muscular soreness but with an increased incidence of joint clicking of 7%. The increased incidence of temporomandibular joint pain postoperatively was 4%. Increase in clinical dysfunction was most often seen in women and older patients. Occlusal dysfunction decreased, with the majority of interferences remaining after surgery as a result of insufficient lingual crown torque of the maxillary buccal segments. Occlusion is thought to have played only a minor role in temporomandibular joint and masticatory dysfunction. Reduction in range of motion was 10%, indicating the added benefit of early mobilization with rigid internal fixation procedures. The MPI study found the condyles inferiorly or inferoposteriorly displaced less than 1 mm from their preoperative position. These findings suggest that rigid internal fixation had no adverse effects on the temporomandibular and masticatory system. The variable responses and results can be attributed, at least in part, to the heterogenous population of patients studied and the variations in surgical techniques employed.

  9. The Asian nitrogen cycle case study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xunhua; Fu, Congbin; Xu, Xingkai; Yan, Xiaodong; Huang, Yao; Han, Shenghui; Hu, Fei; Chen, Guanxiong

    2002-03-01

    We analyzed nitrogen budgets at national and regional levels on a timeline from 1961-2030 using a model, IAP-N 1.0. The model was designed based upon the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methods using Asia-specific parameters and a Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) database. In this paper we discuss new reactive-nitrogen and its various fates, and environmental nitrogen enrichment and its driving forces. The anthropogenic reactive nitrogen of Asia dramatically increased from approximately 14.4 Tg N yr-1 in 1961 to approximately 67.7 Tg N yr-1 in 2000 and is likely to be 105.3 Tg N yr-1 by 2030. Most of the anthropogenic reactive-nitrogen has accumulated in the environment. We found that an increasing demand for food and energy supplies and the lack of effective measures to improve the efficiency of fertilizer nitrogen use, as well as effective measures for the prevention of NOx emissions from fossil-fuel combustion, are the principal drivers behind the environmental nitrogen-enrichment problem. This problem may be finally solved by substituting synthetic nitrogen fertilizers with new high-efficiency nitrogen sources, but solutions are dependent on advances in biological technology.

  10. Diversity of Plasmid Profiles and Conservation of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation Genes in Newly Isolated Rhizobium Strains Nodulating Sulla (Hedysarum coronarium L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mozo, Teresa; Cabrera, Ezequiel; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five Rhizobium strains nodulating sulla (Hedysarum coronarium L.), isolated from plants grown in different sites in Menorca Island and southern Spain, were examined for plasmid content and the location and organization of nif (nitrogen fixation) and nod (nodulation) sequences. A great diversity in both number and size of the plasmids was observed in this native population of strains, which could be distributed among 19 different groups according to their plasmid profiles. No correlation was found between plasmid profile and geographical origin of the strains. In each strain a single plasmid ranging from 187 to 349 megadaltons hybridized to Rhizobium meliloti nifHD and nodD DNA, and in three strains the spontaneous loss of this plasmid resulted in the loss of the nodulation capacity. In addition to the symbiotic plasmid, 18 different cryptic plasmids were identified. A characteristic cryptic plasmid of >1,000 megadaltons was present in all strains. Total DNA hybridization experiments, with nifHD and portions of nodC and nodD genes (coding for common nodulation functions) from R. meliloti as probes, demonstrated that both the sequence and organization of nif and common nod genes were highly conserved within rhizobia nodulating sulla. Evidence for reiteration of nodD sequences and for linkage of nodC to at least one copy of nodD was obtained for all the strains examined. From these results we conclude that Rhizobium strains nodulating sulla are a homogeneous group of symbiotic bacteria that are closely related to the classical fast-growing group of rhizobia. Images PMID:16347636

  11. A comparative study of early and late extubation following transoral odontoidectomy and posterior fixation

    PubMed Central

    Marda, Manish; Pandia, Mihir Prakash; Rath, Girija Prasad; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Dash, Harihara

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Elective ventilation is the usual practice after transoral odontoidectomy (TOO) and posterior fixation. This practice of elective ventilation is not based on any evidence. The primary objective of our study was to find out the difference in oxygenation and ventilation in patients extubated early compared to those extubated late after TOO and posterior fixation. The secondary objectives were to compare the length of Intensive Care Unit (ICU)/hospital stay and pulmonary complications between the two groups. Material and Methods: After TOO and posterior fixation, patients were either extubated in the operating room (Group E) or extubated next day (Group D). The oxygenation (PaO2:FiO2 ratio) and ventilation (PaCO2) of the two groups before surgery, at 30 min and at 6/12/24 and 48 h after extubation were compared. Complications, durations of ICU and hospital stay were noted. Results: The base-line PaO2:FiO2 and PaCO2 was comparable between the groups. No significant change in the PaO2:FiO2 was noted in the postoperative period in either group as compared to the preoperative values. Except for at 12 h after surgery, there was no significant difference between the two groups at various time intervals. No significant change in the PaCO2 level was seen during the study period in either group. PaCO2 measured at 30 min after surgery was more in Group E (37.5 ± 3.2 mmHg in Group E vs. 34.6 ± 2.9 mmHg in Group D), otherwise there was no significant difference between the two groups at various time intervals. One patient in Group E (7.1%) and two patients in Group D (13%) developed postoperative respiratory complication, but the difference was not statistically significant. The mean ICU stay (Group D = 42 ± 25 h vs. Group E = 25.1 ± 16.9 h) and mean hospital stay (Group D = 9.9 ± 4 days vs. Group E = 7.6 ± 2.2 days) were longer in Group D patients. Conclusion: Ventilation and oxygenation in the postoperative period in patients undergoing TOO and

  12. The calcar screw in angular stable plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures - a case study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With new minimally-invasive approaches for angular stable plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures, the need for the placement of oblique inferomedial screws ('calcar screw') has increasingly been discussed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of calcar screws on secondary loss of reduction and on the occurrence of complications. Methods Patients with a proximal humeral fracture who underwent angular stable plate fixation between 01/2007 and 07/2009 were included. On AP views of the shoulder, the difference in height between humeral head and the proximal end of the plate were determined postoperatively and at follow-up. Additionally, the occurrence of complications was documented. Patients with calcar screws were assigned to group C+, patients without to group C-. Results Follow-up was possible in 60 patients (C+ 6.7 ± 5.6 M/C- 5.0 ± 2.8 M). Humeral head necrosis occurred in 6 (C+, 15.4%) and 3 (C-, 14.3%) cases. Cut-out of the proximal screws was observed in 3 (C+, 7.7%) and 1 (C-, 4.8%) cases. In each group, 1 patient showed delayed union. Implant failure or lesions of the axillary nerve were not observed. In 44 patients, true AP and Neer views were available to measure the head-plate distance. There was a significant loss of reduction in group C- (2.56 ± 2.65 mm) compared to C+ (0.77 ± 1.44 mm; p = 0.01). Conclusions The placement of calcar screws in the angular stable plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures is associated with less secondary loss of reduction by providing inferomedial support. An increased risk for complications could not be shown. PMID:21943090

  13. Stability of tibial defect reconstruction with fibular graft and unilateral external fixation: a finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huiqiang; Zhang, Ying; Xia, Hong; Wang, Fei; Li, Zhibo; Chen, Xuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Tibial defect is generally caused by high-energy injury, tumor, osteomyelitis, development deformity and bone non-union after internal fixation. This study was to determine stability of tibial defect reconstruction with fibular graft (FG) of different lengths by single free vascularized fibular graft (SFVFG) and double-barrel free vascularized fibular graft (DBFVFG). The left lower extremity of a male volunteer was scanned with computer tomography scanner. The contours of the tibia and fibula were extracted and the geometry of both bones rebuilt. From this intact model, the models of tibial defect reconstruction with fibular graft and external fixation were developed. Inter-fragmentary motion (IFM) and Von Mises stress on the fibular bone flap, and the locations of maximum Von Mises stress were introduced to quantify the biomechanical environment. Under the condition of the same graft length, the Von Mises stress value in DBFVFG group was 1.37 to 1.77 times higher than that in SFVFG group. When the length of graft was greater than 15 cm in the SFVFG group, the IFM exceeded 1 mm, but the IFM of the graft in the DBFVFG group was always less than 1 mm. The maximum Von Mises stress of models was frequently located at the second or third pin-bone interface. Thus, external fixation can provide a stable biomechanical environment for the reconstruction of tibial defect by both SFVFG and DBFVFG. The second or third pin-bone interface requires intensive care and that in the reconstruction of tibial defect by SFVFG, the graft length should not exceed 15 cm. PMID:24482691

  14. Tracer studies of nitrogen assimilation in yeast.

    PubMed

    ABRAMS, R; HAMMARSTEN, E

    1949-01-01

    By using N(15) as a tracer the assimilation of ammonia by the yeast, Torulopsis utilis, has been studied. It has been shown that: 1. There was no measurable incorporation of N in the protein or polynucleotide purine of carbon-starved yeast. 2. When ammonia is added to nitrogen-starved yeast there is a long lag period before division begins during which the yeast rapidly synthesizes protein, this process being accompanied by a turnover of polynucleotide purine. There was no significant dilution of the N(15)H(4) (+) of the medium by ordinary NH(4) (+). 3. When yeast containing N(15) is allowed to divide and grow in ordinary ammonia, the total amount of N(15) in the yeast remains constant. The dicarboxylic amino acids are most diluted, while arginine and nucleic acid guanine are not diluted at all.

  15. A biomechanical study of bankart lesion fixation - biodegradable ArthroRivet tack vs. suture repair.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kevin J; Mukherjee, Debi P; Ogden, Alan L; Sadasivan, Kalia K; Albright, James A; Pietrzak, William S

    2007-01-01

    Bioabsorbable fixation is commonly used in soft tissue procedures performed in the shoulder. ArthroRivettrade mark tacks (referred to as rivets here), made from a copolymer of 82% poly-L-lactic acid and 18% polyglycolic acid, were developed for the Bankart procedure. Although a previous in vivo study demonstrated favorable comparison of the fixation strength and absorption characteristics of this device with that of polyglyconate bioabsorbable tacks, there have been no published biomechanical studies of this rivet in the shoulder. Fourteen shoulders were harvested from fresh-frozen cadavers of average age 74 years (46-89). Biomechanical testing was performed by measuring the energy, or work, required to anteriorly displace the humeral head 6 mm from the glenoid. Each shoulder was tested intact, vented, and before and after repair of a simulated Bankart lesion at 0, 45, and 90 degrees of abduction with and without maximal external rotation. Overall, the average work required ranged from 54.7 N-mm to 178.27 N-mm. Although the biomechanical performance of the rivet, based on resistance to anterior displacement of the humeral head, was indistinguishable from that of the suture repair, the statistical power of the test was low due to the large variance in the cadaver specimens. The results, in general, correlated well with those of previously published studies, suggesting the suitability of the bioabsorbable rivet for use in Bankart repair.

  16. Studies of Wettability of Medical PVC by Remote Nitrogen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru; Chen, Jierong

    2006-05-01

    The effects of remote nitrogen plasma and nitrogen plasma on medical PVC's surface modification are studied. The surface properties are characterized by the contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the remote nitrogen plasma treatments modify the PVC surface in both morphology and composition and the treatment by the remote nitrogen plasma in PVC surface modification is more effective than that by the nitrogen plasma. Remote nitrogen plasma can modify the surface more uniformly. After the PVC surface is treated for 2 min by remote nitrogen plasma, the [w(O)+ w(N)]/w(C)] value increases from 0.13 to 0.51 and the water contact angle decreases from 89o to 18o.

  17. Nystagmus and Related Fixation Instabilities Following Extraction of Unilateral Infantile Cataract in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS)

    PubMed Central

    Felius, Joost; Busettini, Claudio; Lynn, Michael J.; Hartmann, E. Eugenie; Lambert, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To study eye movements in a large group of children after the removal of unilateral infantile cataract, and to compare fixation instabilities between treatment groups with or without IOL implantation. Methods. The Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS) is a randomized, multicenter clinical trial comparing IOL to contact lens (CL) treatment with a unilateral infantile cataract in participants who underwent cataract surgery at 1 to 6 months of age. At age 4.5 years, eye movements were recorded in 103 participants, using a high-speed video camera while the child performed a fixation task. The recordings were inspected by masked readers for the presence of fixation instabilities (nystagmus and saccadic oscillations). Results. Overall, fixation instabilities were observed in 50 (60%) of 83 children who had evaluable recordings, with no differences between treatment groups (27 [64%] of 42 in the IOL group, 23 [56%] of 41 in the CL group; P = 0.51). Nystagmus was seen in 38% and saccadic oscillations in 31%, with no differences between treatment groups (P > 0.33). Children without a fixation instability had better visual acuity (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Nystagmus and saccadic oscillations are well-known consequences of infantile cataracts, presumably the result of visual deprivation during the critical period of visual development. After early cataract extraction, successful optical correction may reduce further form deprivation and minimize the incidence of these fixation instabilities. In this study, no differences in the presence of fixation instabilities were found between the two treatment strategies (CL or IOL) for optical correction after cataract removal. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00212134.) PMID:25097243

  18. In vivo study effect of particulate Bioglass in the prevention of infection in open fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zong-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Yi, Cheng-Qing; Qiu, Jian-Jun; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Zhou, Juan

    2009-07-01

    There are many in vitro experiments showing that particulate bioactive glasses have a broad and certain antibacterial effect, but there is no report about this antibacterial effect in vivo so far. The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy of particulate Bioglass in reducing the rate of infection with Staphylococcus aureus after the fixation of open tibial fractures in rabbits. The test in vivo was carried out with male rabbits split into two groups infected with Staphylococcus aureus at the right tibial fracture sites fixed with plate and screw, either with or without bioactive glass respectively. Culture results show that six of ten rabbits from the control group had a positive culture for the strain of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923, compared with six of the nine rabbits from the Bioglass group. The median radiographic score is 4.5 points for the rabbits from the control group and 4 points for the rabbits from the Bioglass group. The median histopathological score was 2.5 points for the rabbits in the control group and 3 points for the rabbits in the Bioglass group. In conclusion, this study sh