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Sample records for nitrogen silicon chalcogen

  1. Possible atomic structures responsible for the sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ke-Fan; Shao, Hezhu; Liu, Kong; Qu, Shengchun E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn; Wang, Zhanguo; Wang, Yuanxu E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    Single-crystal silicon was hyperdoped with sulfur, selenium, and tellurium using ion implantation and nanosecond laser melting. The hyperdoping of such chalcogen elements led to strong and wide sub-bandgap light absorption. Annealing the hyperdoped silicon, even at low temperatures (such as 200–400 °C), led to attenuation of the sub-bandgap absorption. To explain the attenuation process, we modeled it as chemical decomposition reaction from an optically absorbing structure to a non-absorbing structure. Attenuation of the experimental absorption coefficient was fit using the Arrhenius equation. From the fitted data, we extracted the reaction activation energies of S-, Se-, and T-hyperdoped silicon as 0.338 ± 0.029 eV, 0.471 ± 0.040 eV, and 0.357 ± 0.028 eV, respectively. We discuss these activation energies in terms of the bond energies of chalcogen–Si metastable bonds, and suggest that several high-energy interstitial sites, rather than substitutional sites, are candidates for the atomic structures that are responsible for the strong sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen hyperdoped silicon.

  2. Enhanced visible and near-infrared optical absorption in silicon supersaturated with chalcogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Si H.; Recht, Daniel; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Williams, James S.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    We show that single-crystal silicon supersaturated with sulfur (S), selenium (Se), or tellurium (Te) displays a substantially enhanced absorption coefficient for light with wavelengths of 400 to 1600 nm. Alloys were prepared in silicon on insulator wafers by ion implantation followed by nanosecond pulsed laser melting. Measurements of the absorption coefficient were made by direct transmission through freestanding thin films and by spectroscopic ellipsometry.

  3. Fast Through-Bond Diffusion of Nitrogen in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    SCHULTZ,PETER A.; NELSON,JEFFREY S.

    2000-07-12

    The authors report first principles total energy calculations of interaction of nitrogen in silicon with silicon self-interstitials. Substitutional nitrogen captures a silicon interstitial with 3.5 eV binding energy forming a {l_angle}001{r_angle} split interstitial ground state geometry, with the nitrogen forming three bonds. The low energy migration path is through a bond bridge state having two bonds. Fast diffusion of nitrogen occurs through a pure interstitialcy mechanism; the nitrogen never has less than two bonds. Near-zero formation energy of the nitrogen interstitialcy with respect to the substitutional rationalizes the low solubility of substitutional nitrogen in silicon.

  4. Anion Transport with Chalcogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Benz, Sebastian; Macchione, Mariano; Verolet, Quentin; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    In this report, we introduce synthetic anion transporters that operate with chalcogen bonds. Electron-deficient dithieno[3,2-b;2',3'-d]thiophenes (DTTs) are identified as ideal to bind anions in the focal point of the σ holes on the cofacial endocyclic sulfur atoms. Anion binding in solution and anion transport across lipid bilayers are found to increase with the depth of the σ holes of the DTT anionophores. These results introduce DTTs and related architectures as a privileged motif to engineer chalcogen bonds into functional systems, complementary in scope to classics such as 2,2'-bipyrroles or 2,2'-bipyridines that operate with hydrogen bonds and lone pairs, respectively. PMID:27433964

  5. Nanoscale Nitrogen Doping in Silicon by Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Bin; Siampour, Hamidreza; Fan, Zhao; Wang, Shun; Kong, Xiang Yang; Mesli, Abdelmadjid; Zhang, Jian; Dan, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    This Report presents a nitrogen-doping method by chemically forming self-assembled monolayers on silicon. Van der Pauw technique, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy and low temperature Hall effect measurements are employed to characterize the nitrogen dopants. The experimental data show that the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen dopants is 3.66 × 10−15 cm2 s−1, 2 orders magnitude lower than that of phosphorus dopants in silicon. It is found that less than 1% of nitrogen dopants exhibit electrical activity. The analysis of Hall effect data at low temperatures indicates that the donor energy level for nitrogen dopants is located at 189 meV below the conduction band, consistent with the literature value. PMID:26227342

  6. Nanoscale Nitrogen Doping in Silicon by Self-Assembled Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Bin; Siampour, Hamidreza; Fan, Zhao; Wang, Shun; Kong, Xiang Yang; Mesli, Abdelmadjid; Zhang, Jian; Dan, Yaping

    2015-07-01

    This Report presents a nitrogen-doping method by chemically forming self-assembled monolayers on silicon. Van der Pauw technique, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy and low temperature Hall effect measurements are employed to characterize the nitrogen dopants. The experimental data show that the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen dopants is 3.66 × 10-15 cm2 s-1, 2 orders magnitude lower than that of phosphorus dopants in silicon. It is found that less than 1% of nitrogen dopants exhibit electrical activity. The analysis of Hall effect data at low temperatures indicates that the donor energy level for nitrogen dopants is located at 189 meV below the conduction band, consistent with the literature value.

  7. Generalized Valence Bond Description of Chalcogen-Nitrogen Compounds. III. Why the NO-OH and NS-OH Bonds Are So Different.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-09-01

    Crabtree et al. recently reported the microwave spectrum of nitrosyl-O-hydroxide (trans-NOOH), an isomer of nitrous acid, and found that this molecule has the longest O-O bond ever observed: 1.9149 Å ± 0.0005 Å. This is in marked contrast to the structure of the valence isoelectronic trans-NSOH molecule, which has a normal NS-OH bond length and strength. Generalized valence bond calculations show that the long bond in trans-NOOH is the result of a weak through-pair interaction that singlet couples the spins of the electrons in singly occupied orbitals on the hydroxyl radical and nitrogen atom, an interaction that is enhanced by the intervening lone pair of the oxygen atom in NO. The NS-OH bond is the result of the formation of a stable recoupled pair bond dyad, which accounts for both its length and strength.

  8. Generalized Valence Bond Description of Chalcogen-Nitrogen Compounds. III. Why the NO-OH and NS-OH Bonds Are So Different.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-09-01

    Crabtree et al. recently reported the microwave spectrum of nitrosyl-O-hydroxide (trans-NOOH), an isomer of nitrous acid, and found that this molecule has the longest O-O bond ever observed: 1.9149 Å ± 0.0005 Å. This is in marked contrast to the structure of the valence isoelectronic trans-NSOH molecule, which has a normal NS-OH bond length and strength. Generalized valence bond calculations show that the long bond in trans-NOOH is the result of a weak through-pair interaction that singlet couples the spins of the electrons in singly occupied orbitals on the hydroxyl radical and nitrogen atom, an interaction that is enhanced by the intervening lone pair of the oxygen atom in NO. The NS-OH bond is the result of the formation of a stable recoupled pair bond dyad, which accounts for both its length and strength. PMID:27501366

  9. Elastic properties of sub-stoichiometric nitrogen ion implanted silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmanova, M. F.; Karl, H.; Mändl, S.; Hirsch, D.; Mayr, S. G.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2015-04-01

    Elastic properties of sub-stoichiometric nitrogen implanted silicon were measured with nanometer-resolution using contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) as function of ion fluence and post-annealing conditions. The determined range of indentation moduli was between 100 and 180 GPa depending on the annealing duration and nitrogen content. The high indentation moduli can be explained by formation of Si-N bonds, as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  10. Boron/Carbon/Silicon/Nitrogen Ceramics And Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore; Hsu, Ming TA; Chen, Timothy S.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramics containing various amounts of boron, carbon, silicon, and nitrogen made from variety of polymeric precursors. Synthesized in high yield from readily available and relatively inexpensive starting materials. Stable at room temperature; when polymerized, converted to ceramics in high yield. Ceramics resist oxidation and other forms of degradation at high temperatures; used in bulk to form objects or to infiltrate other ceramics to obtain composites having greater resistance to oxidation and high temperatures.

  11. A nitrogen-hyperdoped silicon material formed by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xiao; Zhu, Zhen; Shao, Hezhu; Rong, Ximing; Zhuang, Jun; Li, Ning; Liang, Cong; Sun, Haibin; Zhao, Li; Feng, Guojin

    2014-03-03

    A supersaturation of nitrogen atoms is found in the surface layer of microstructured silicon after femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation in NF{sub 3}. The average nitrogen concentration in the uppermost 50 nm is about 0.5 ± 0.2 at. %, several orders of magnitude higher than the solid solubility of nitrogen atoms in silicon. The nitrogen-hyperdoped silicon shows high crystallinity in the doped layer, which is due to the repairing effect of nitrogen on defects in silicon lattices. Nitrogen atoms and vacancies can be combined into thermal stable complexes after fs laser irradiation, which makes the nitrogen-hyperdoped silicon exhibit good thermal stability of optical properties.

  12. Nature of chalcogen hor ellipsis chalcogen contact interactions in organic donor-molecule salts

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, J.J.; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan . Dept. of Chemistry); Williams, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The nature of chalcogen{hor ellipsis}chalcogen contact interactions in organic donor-molecule salts was examined by performing ab initio SCF-MO/MP2 calculations on H{sub 2}X{hor ellipsis}XH{sub 2}(X = O, S, SE, Te) and MM2 calculations on donor dimers (TXF){sub 2} (X = S, SE, Te) and (BEDX-TTF){sub 2} (X = O, S). 14 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-08-24

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  14. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2009-09-15

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  15. Nitrogen effects on silicon growth, defects, and carrier lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, T.F.; Wang, T.H.; Burrows, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    Silicon crystal or multicrystal growth in N{sub 2} or partial-N{sub 2} atmospheres can provide mechanical strengthening, lower purge-gas costs (nitrogen from liquid sources is about a factor of 4 less expensive than argon from liquid sources), and reduce swirl-type microdefect formation in dislocation-free (DF) crystals. There is not much literature on electrical effects of N in Si, including lifetime effects. We studied the effects of Si growth in atmospheres containing N{sub 2} on minority charge carrier lifetime E using the float-zone (FZ) crystal growth method. Ingots were grown with purge gases that ranged from pure argon (99.9995%) to pure N{sub 2} (99-999%). We found that multicrystalline silicon ingot growth in a partial or total nitrogen ambient has a negligible effect on {tau}. Values of 40 {mu}s < {tau} < 100 {mu}s were typical regardless of ambient. For DF growth, the degradation of {tau} is minimal and {tau} values above 1000 {mu}s are obtained if the amount of N{sub 2} in the purge gas is below the level at which nitride compounds form in the melt and disrupt DF growth.

  16. The allylic chalcogen effect in olefin metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuya A

    2010-01-01

    Summary Olefin metathesis has emerged as a powerful tool in organic synthesis. The activating effect of an allylic hydroxy group in metathesis has been known for more than 10 years, and many organic chemists have taken advantage of this positive influence for efficient synthesis of natural products. Recently, the discovery of the rate enhancement by allyl sulfides in aqueous cross-metathesis has allowed the first examples of such a reaction on proteins. This led to a new benchmark in substrate complexity for cross-metathesis and expanded the potential of olefin metathesis for other applications in chemical biology. The enhanced reactivity of allyl sulfide, along with earlier reports of a similar effect by allylic hydroxy groups, suggests that allyl chalcogens generally play an important role in modulating the rate of olefin metathesis. In this review, we discuss the effect of allylic chalcogens in olefin metathesis and highlight its most recent applications in synthetic chemistry and protein modifications. PMID:21283554

  17. Estimation of leaf nitrogen and silicon using hyperspectral remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhele, Tholang A.; Ahmed, Fethi B.

    2010-11-01

    The potential to estimate the nutrient status in important agricultural crops such as maize and sugarcane is of significant interest. In South African sugarcane agriculture, just like in global ecosystem, the estimation of Nitrogen (N) and Silicon (Si) is very important. These nutrients are one of the factors influencing the prevalence of the stalk borer Eldana saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Therefore, the researchers aim at estimating leaf N and Si concentration as well as their ratio in sugarcane using hyperspectral remote sensing (spectroradiometry) for monitoring E. saccharina. A hand-held Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) Field Spec® 3 spectroradiometer was used to take leaf spectral measurements of sugarcane plants from a potted-plant trial taking place under shade house conditions. In this trial, nitrogen and silicon nutrient applications as well as varieties used were known. In addition, watering regimes and artificial infestation of E. saccharina were carefully controlled. The study results indicate that the Red-edge Index (R740/R720) is linearly related to N concentration (R2 = 0.81, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) = 0.103) for N37 with the highest correlation coefficient. For Si, the index (R750-R560)/(R750+R560) was linearly related to Si concentration (R2 = 0.53, RMSE = 0.118) for N25. Finally, the N:Si ratio was linearly correlated to the index (R1075-R730)/(R1075+R730) (R2 = 0.67, RMSE = 1.508) for N37, hence this index can be used for early detection of E. saccharina damage or for identifying sugarcane that is prone to attack by E. saccharina. It was concluded that hyperspectral remote sensing has potential for use in estimating the N:Si ratio and E. saccharina potential infestations can be monitored rapidly and nondestructively in sugarcane under controlled conditions. It is recommended that an advanced study be conducted in field conditions using airborne and/or spaceborne hyperspectral sensors.

  18. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, Eloise A.; Morgan, Peter E. D.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N.sub.n H.sub.(n+m) wherein: n=1-4 and m=2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200.degree.-1700.degree. C. for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si-N-H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics.

  19. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1987-09-15

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N/sub n/H/sub (n+m)/ wherein: n = 1--4 and m = 2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200--1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si/endash/N/endash/H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid-state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics

  20. Chalcogen bond: a sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhou; Ji, Baoming; Zhang, Yu

    2009-07-16

    A sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond, termed chalcogen bond, is defined in this article. By selecting the complexes H(2)CS...Cl(-), F(2)CS...Cl(-), OCS...Cl(-), and SCS...Cl(-) as models, the bond-length change, interaction energy, topological property of the electron charge density and its Laplacian, and the charge transfer of the chalcogen bond have been investigated in detail theoretically. It was found that the similar misshaped electron clouds of the chalcogen atom and the halogen atom result in the similar properties of the chalcogen bond and the halogen bond. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  1. Locally induced laminar convection in liquid nitrogen and silicone oils.

    PubMed

    Dubois, C; Duchesne, A; Vanderheyden, B; Vanderbemden, P; Caps, H

    2016-08-01

    We present an experimental study of a laminar convective phenomenon induced by a centimetric heater totally immersed in a liquid pool (Rayleigh number ranging from 10(4) to 10(7)). This local heating is observed to induce a laminar convection that differs from the classical Rayleigh-Bénard cells created by heating the whole bottom of the fluid: the convection pattern is no more periodic. In order to obtain a complete map of the velocity field, we use Particle Image Velocimetry technique. The vertical velocity between the counter-rotating convective cells is used as the relevant physical parameter to describe the phenomenon. The potential cooling applications of this problem lead us to choose liquid nitrogen as an experimental fluid. We thus compare the results obtained for various temperature gradients in liquid nitrogen with experiments performed at room temperature with silicone oils of various viscosities. The theoretical law for the maximal vertical velocity from classical Rayleigh-Bénard experiments is adapted to the specific geometry investigated by using a new definition for the characteristic wavelength. This length is studied and appears to be dependent on the liquid properties. We finally obtain a remarkable agreement between theory and experimental data.

  2. Locally induced laminar convection in liquid nitrogen and silicone oils.

    PubMed

    Dubois, C; Duchesne, A; Vanderheyden, B; Vanderbemden, P; Caps, H

    2016-08-01

    We present an experimental study of a laminar convective phenomenon induced by a centimetric heater totally immersed in a liquid pool (Rayleigh number ranging from 10(4) to 10(7)). This local heating is observed to induce a laminar convection that differs from the classical Rayleigh-Bénard cells created by heating the whole bottom of the fluid: the convection pattern is no more periodic. In order to obtain a complete map of the velocity field, we use Particle Image Velocimetry technique. The vertical velocity between the counter-rotating convective cells is used as the relevant physical parameter to describe the phenomenon. The potential cooling applications of this problem lead us to choose liquid nitrogen as an experimental fluid. We thus compare the results obtained for various temperature gradients in liquid nitrogen with experiments performed at room temperature with silicone oils of various viscosities. The theoretical law for the maximal vertical velocity from classical Rayleigh-Bénard experiments is adapted to the specific geometry investigated by using a new definition for the characteristic wavelength. This length is studied and appears to be dependent on the liquid properties. We finally obtain a remarkable agreement between theory and experimental data. PMID:27562830

  3. Powder containing 2H-type silicon carbide produced by reacting silicon dioxide and carbon powder in nitrogen atmosphere in the presence of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuramoto, N.; Takiguchi, H.

    1984-01-01

    The production of powder which contains silicon carbide consisting of 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide, beta type silicon carbide and less than 3% of nitrogen is discussed. The reaction temperature to produce the powder containing 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide is set at above 1550 degrees C in an atmosphere of aluminum or aluminum compounds and nitrogen gas or an antioxidation atmosphere containing nitrogen gas. The mixture ratio of silicon dioxide and carbon powder is 0.55 - 1:2.0 and the contents of aluminum or aluminum compounds within silicon dioxide is less than 3% in weight.

  4. Enhanced surface hardness in nitrogen-implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Uslu, C.; Lee, D.H.; Berta, Y.

    1995-06-01

    Preliminary studies have been performed on the feasibility of carbon-silicon nitride formation ({beta}-Si{sub 1.5}C{sub 1.5}N{sub 4}, the homologue of equilibrium {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} or hypothetical {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) by high dose N{sup +}-implantation into polycrystalline {beta}-SiC (cubic). Thin films were formed using 100 keV implantations with varying ion doses in the range from 1.1 x 10{sup 17} to 27.1 x 10{sup 17} N/cm{sup 2}, and target temperatures between -196{degrees}C and 980{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction with a position-sensitive detector and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed that the as-implanted surfaces (up to 860{degrees}C) contained {approximately}0.1 {mu}m thick buried amorphous layers. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy showed that the peak concentration of nitrogen saturated up to approximately 54 at. % with increasing doses, suggesting formation of a new phase. Implantation to doses of 1.1 x 10{sup 17} and 2.3 x 10{sup 17} N/cm{sup 2} at 980{degrees}C caused enhanced surface hardness compared to SiC.

  5. Effect of MeV nitrogen ion implantation on the resistivity transition in Czochralski silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byeong-Sam; Lee, In-Ji; Park, Jea-Gun

    2012-12-01

    We investigated how MeV nitrogen ion implantation affects the resistivity transition in Czochralski (CZ) silicon wafers. After annealing at 800 °C for 20 h and again at 1000 °C for 10 h, the implanted nitrogen atoms accumulated in the projected range (R P ) for ion doses less than 5 × 1014 cm-2 whereas they accumulated at both R P /2 and R P at ion doses above 3 × 1015 cm-2. These results indicate that no resistivity transition was found at nitrogen ion doses less than 5 × 1013 cm-2 whereas n-/p or n+/p resistivity transition was shown at ion doses higher than 5 × 1014 cm-2. Many fewer than 1% of the implanted nitrogen atoms were ionized after the heat treatment. Thus, the resistivity of nitrogen-doped silicon wafers is more than 100 times higher than that of phosphorous-doped silicon wafers.

  6. Tellurium: a maverick among the chalcogens.

    PubMed

    Chivers, Tristram; Laitinen, Risto S

    2015-04-01

    The scant attention paid to tellurium in both inorganic and organic chemistry textbooks may reflect, in part, the very low natural abundance of the element. Such treatments commonly imply that the structures and reactivities of tellurium compounds can be extrapolated from the behaviour of their lighter chalcogen analogues (sulfur and selenium). In fact, recent findings and well-established observations clearly illustrate that this assumption is not valid. The emerging importance of the unique properties of tellurium compounds is apparent from the variety of their known and potential applications in both inorganic and organic chemistry, as well as materials science. With reference to selected contemporary examples, this Tutorial Review examines the fundamental concepts that are essential for an understanding of the unique features of tellurium chemistry with an emphasis on hypervalency, three-centre bonding, secondary bonding interactions, σ and π-bond energies (multiply bonded compounds), and Lewis acid behaviour. PMID:25692398

  7. Valence force field analysis on nitrogen in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, H.; Ohkubo, I.; Mikayama, T.; Yamanaka, Y.; Inoue, N.

    2001-12-01

    Nitrogen doping attracts attention because it reduces void defects drastically. But the mechanism has not been clarified yet. Various configurations of nitrogen have been proposed by using the first principles calculation but there is no description how the stress plays a role in determining these nitrogen configurations. We reveal normal vibration modes corresponding to well-known infrared absorption peaks at 766 and 963 cm -1 of nitrogen split interstitial (N-N) and derive force constants for bond stretching and bond bending. Local strain energy near nitrogen is calculated for the optimized structures of N-N, nitrogen-vacancy complex, substitutional N and interstitial N. As a result, it is found that in structures of N-N and N 2-V 2 with filled electron orbitals, strain energy plays an important role in the determination of the stable structure.

  8. Electron trap level of hydrogen incorporated nitrogen vacancies in silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, Ken'ichiro Tsukuda, Eiji; Tanizawa, Motoaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-03-14

    Hydrogen incorporation into nitrogen vacancies in silicon nitride and its effects on electron trap level are analyzed using simulation based on density functional theory with temperature- and pressure-dependent hydrogen chemical potential. If the silicon dangling bonds around a nitrogen vacancy are well separated each other, hydrogen incorporation is energetically stable up to 900 °C, which is in agreement with the experimentally observed desorption temperature. On the other hand, if the dangling bonds strongly interact, the incorporation is energetically unfavorable even at room temperature because of steric hindrance. An electron trap level caused by a nitrogen vacancy becomes shallow by the hydrogen incorporation. An electron is trapped in a deep level created by a silicon dangling bond before hydrogen incorporation, whereas it is trapped in a shallow level created by an anti-bonding state of a silicon-silicon bond after hydrogen incorporation. The simulation results qualitatively explain the experiment, in which reduced hydrogen content in silicon nitride shows superior charge retention characteristics.

  9. Ab Initio Identification of the Nitrogen Diffusion Mechanism in SIlicon

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, Nathan; Pichler, Peter; Duscher, Gerd J M; Windl, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter, we present ab initio results identifying a new diffusion path for the nitrogen pair complex in silicon, resulting in an effective diffusivity of 67exp(-2.38 eV/kT) cm{sup 2}/s. This nudged elastic band result is compared with other nitrogen diffusion paths and mechanisms, and is determined to have unmatched agreement with experimental results. It is also shown that careful consideration of total energy corrections and use of a fully temperature-dependent diffusion prefactor have modest but important effects on the calculation of diffusivity for paired and for interstitial nitrogen.

  10. Syntheses and Reactions of Chalcogen-containing Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Sashida, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    The advances in my laboratory for the past 20-25 years concerning the chemistry of chalcogen-containing heterocycles are reviewed. The intramolecular cyclization of the chalcogenols (-TeH, -SeH, -SH) into a triple bond or appropriate leaving group produced various chalcogen-containing heterocycles. The reactions of the obtained products were examined: the reactions of 1-benzo- and 2-benzopyrylium salts containing a tellurium or selenium element with several nucleophiles, including alkoxides, amines, the cyanide ion, an active methyl compound (acetone), Grignard reagents, copper reagents, and tin reagents, along with hydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions, provided corresponding chromes or isochromes having various functional groups at the 2- or 1-C position. Isothiocyanate and isoselenocyanate were used as chalcogen sources for the preparation of five- or six-membered heterocycles. In addition, double intramolecular cyclization, ring-expansion reactions, electrophilic cyclization and iodocyclization were also carried out. PMID:27252064

  11. Se···N chalcogen bond and Se···X halogen bond involving F2C═Se: influence of hybridization, substitution, and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; An, Xiulin; Li, Qingzhong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed for the chalcogen- and halogen-bonded complexes of F2CSe with a series of nitrogen bases (N2, NCH, NH3, NHCH2, NCLi, and NMe3) and dihalogen molecules (BrCl, ClF, and BrF), respectively. Both types of interactions are mainly driven by the electrostatic and orbital interactions. The chalcogen bond becomes stronger in the order of NCH (sp) < NH3 (sp(3)) < NHCH2 (sp(2)), showing some inconsistence with the electronegativity of the hybridized N atom. The Li and methyl groups have an enhancing effect on the strength of chalcogen bond; however, the former is jointly achieved through the electrostatic and orbital interactions, whereas the orbital interaction has dominant contribution to the latter enhancement. The halogen bond with F2CX (X = O, S, Se) as the electron donor is stronger for the heavier chalcogen atom, exhibiting a reverse dependence on the chalcogen atom with that in hydrogen bonds. The halogen bond is further strengthened by the presence of chalcogen bond in the ternary complexes. In addition, CSD research confirms the abundance of Se···N interaction in crystal materials.

  12. Method of making chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jong-Ho; Zelenay, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-12-14

    A method of making an electrode catalyst material using aqueous solutions. The electrode catalyst material includes a support comprising at least one transition metal and at least one chalcogen disposed on a surface of the transition metal. The method includes reducing a metal powder, mixing the metal powder with an aqueous solution containing at least one inorganic compound of the chalcogen to form a mixture, and providing a reducing agent to the mixture to form nanoparticles of the electrode catalyst. The electrode catalyst may be used in a membrane electrode assembly for a fuel cell.

  13. Chemical modification of a porous silicon surface induced by nitrogen dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sharov, Constantine S; Konstantinova, Elizaveta A; Osminkina, Lyubov A; Timoshenko, Victor Yu; Kashkarov, Pavel K

    2005-03-17

    The effect of gaseous and liquid nitrogen dioxide on the composition and electronic properties of porous silicon (PS) is investigated by means of optical spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance. It is detected that the interaction process is weak and strong forms of chemisorption on the PS surface, and the process may be regarded as an actual chemical reaction between PS and NO(2). It is found that NO(2) adsorption consists in forming different surface nitrogen-containing molecular groups and dangling bonds of Si atoms (P(b)-centers) as well as in oxidizing and hydrating the PS surface. Also observed are the formation of ionic complexes of P(b)-centers with NO(2) molecules and the generation of free charge carriers (holes) in the volume of silicon nanocrystals forming PS. PMID:16851549

  14. A Revival of Waste: Atmospheric Pressure Nitrogen Plasma Jet Enhanced Jumbo Silicon/Silicon Carbide Composite in Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Hong; Chuang, Shang-I; Liu, Wei-Ren; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a jumbo silicon/silicon carbide (Si/SiC) composite (JSC), a novel anode material source, was extracted from solar power industry cutting waste and used as a material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), instead of manufacturing the nanolized-Si. Unlike previous methods used for preventing volume expansion and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), the approach proposed here simply entails applying surface modification to JSC-based electrodes by using nitrogen-atmospheric pressure plasma jet (N-APPJ) treatment process. Surface organic bonds were rearranged and N-doped compounds were formed on the electrodes through applying different plasma treatment durations, and the qualitative examinations of before/after plasma treatment were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The surface modification resulted in the enhancement of electrochemical performance with stable capacity retention and high Coulombic efficiency. In addition, depth profile and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were executed to determine the existence of Li-N matrix and how the nitrogen compounds change the surface conditions of the electrodes. The N-APPJ-induced rapid surface modification is a major breakthrough for processing recycled waste that can serve as anode materials for next-generation high-performance LIBs.

  15. Annealing effect on thermodynamic and physical properties of mesoporous silicon: A simulation and nitrogen sorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pushpendra; Huber, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Discovery of porous silicon formation in silicon substrate in 1956 while electro-polishing crystalline Si in hydrofluoric acid (HF), has triggered large scale investigations of porous silicon formation and their changes in physical and chemical properties with thermal and chemical treatment. A nitrogen sorption study is used to investigate the effect of thermal annealing on electrochemically etched mesoporous silicon (PS). The PS was thermally annealed from 200˚C to 800˚C for 1 hr in the presence of air. It was shown that the pore diameter and porosity of PS vary with annealing temperature. The experimentally obtained adsorption / desorption isotherms show hysteresis typical for capillary condensation in porous materials. A simulation study based on Saam and Cole model was performed and compared with experimentally observed sorption isotherms to study the physics behind of hysteresis formation. We discuss the shape of the hysteresis loops in the framework of the morphology of the layers. The different behavior of adsorption and desorption of nitrogen in PS with pore diameter was discussed in terms of concave menisci formation inside the pore space, which was shown to related with the induced pressure in varying the pore diameter from 7.2 nm to 3.4 nm.

  16. Potential energy landscapes of elemental and heterogeneous chalcogen clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Varshneya, Arun K.

    2006-02-15

    We describe the potential energy landscapes of elemental S{sub 8}, Se{sub 8}, and Te{sub 8} clusters using disconnectivity graphs. Inherent structures include both ring and chain configurations, with rings especially dominant in Se{sub 8}. We also map the potential energy landscapes of heterogeneous Se{sub n}(S,Te){sub 8-n} clusters, which offer insights into the structure of heterogeneous chalcogen glasses.

  17. Regenerable antioxidants-introduction of chalcogen substituents into tocopherols.

    PubMed

    Poon, Jia-Fei; Singh, Vijay P; Yan, Jiajie; Engman, Lars

    2015-02-01

    To improve the radical-trapping capacity of the natural antioxidants, alkylthio-, alkylseleno-, and alkyltelluro groups were introduced into all vacant aromatic positions in β-, γ- and δ-tocopherol. Reaction of the tocopherols with electrophilic chalcogen reagents generated by persulfate oxidation of dialkyl dichalcogenides provided convenient but low-yielding access to many sulfur and selenium derivatives, but failed in the case of tellurium. An approach based on lithiation of the appropriate bromo-tocopherol, insertion of chalcogen into the carbon-lithium bond, air-oxidation to a dichalcogenide, and final borohydride reduction/alkylation turned out to be generally applicable to the synthesis of all chalcogen derivatives. Whereas alkylthio- and alkylseleno analogues were generally poorer quenchers of lipid peroxyl radicals than the corresponding parents, all tellurium compounds showed a substantially improved radical-trapping activity. Introduction of alkyltelluro groups into the tocopherol scaffold also caused a dramatic increase in the regenerability of the antioxidant. In a two-phase lipid peroxidation system containing N-acetylcysteine as a water-soluble co-antioxidant the inhibition time was up to six-fold higher than that recorded for the natural antioxidants.

  18. Process for producing organic products containing silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and organic amines

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, Eloise A.; Morgan, Peter E. D.

    1990-04-03

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity organic reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon. The process comprises reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity reactive amine reactant in a liquid state at a temperature of from about 0.degree. C. up to about 300.degree. C. A high purity silicon carbide/silicon nitride ceramic product can be formed from this intermediate product, if desired, by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200.degree.-1700.degree. C. for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours or the organic reaction product may be employed in other chemical uses.

  19. Process for producing organic products containing silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and organic amines and products formed thereby

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1988-04-04

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity organic reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon. The process comprises reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity reactive amine reactant in a liquid state at a temperature of from about O/degree/C up to about 300/degree/C. A high purity silicon carbide/silicon nitride ceramic product can be formed from this intermediate product, if desired, by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200-1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours or the organic reaction product may be employed in other chemical uses.

  20. Formation of size controlled silicon nanocrystals in nitrogen free silicon dioxide matrix prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, J. Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.; Bruns, M.; Kübel, C.; Weiss, C.

    2014-12-14

    This paper reports the growth of silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) from SiH4–O{sub 2} plasma chemistry. The formation of an oxynitride was avoided by using O{sub 2} instead of the widely used N{sub 2}O as precursor. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to prove the absence of nitrogen in the layers and determine the film stoichiometry. It is shown that the Si rich film growth is achieved via non-equilibrium deposition that resembles a interphase clusters mixture model. Photoluminescence and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy are used to monitor the formation process of the SiNCs, to reveal that the phase separation is completed at lower temperatures as for SiNCs based on oxynitrides. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy proves that the SiNC sizes are well controllable by superlattice configuration, and as a result, the optical emission band of the Si nanocrystal can be tuned over a wide range.

  1. Surface and morphological features of laser-irradiated silicon under vacuum, nitrogen and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced surface and structural modification of silicon (Si) has been investigated under three different environments of vacuum, nitrogen (100 Torr) and ethanol. The interaction of 1000 pulses of KrF (λ ≈ 248 nm, τ ≈ 18 ns, repetition rate ≈ 30 Hz) Excimer laser at two different fluences of 2.8 J/cm2 and 4 J/cm2 resulted in formation of various kinds of features such as laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), spikes, columns, cones and cracks. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets is explored by Raman spectroscopy. SEM analysis exhibits a non-uniform distribution of micro-scale pillars and spikes at the central ablated regime of silicon irradiated at low laser fluence of 2.8 J/cm2 under vacuum. Whereas cones, pits, cavities and ripples like features are seen at the boundaries. At higher fluence of 4 J/cm2, laser induced periodic structures as well as micro-columns are observed. In the case of ablation in nitrogen environment, melting, splashing, self-organized granular structures and cracks along with redeposition are observed at lower fluence. Such types of small scaled structures in nitrogen are attributed to confinement and shielding effects of nitrogen plasma. Whereas, a crater with multiple ablative layers is formed in the case of ablation at higher fluence. Significantly different surface morphology of Si is observed in the case of ablation in ethanol. It reveals the formation of cavities along with small scale pores and less redeposition. These results reveal that the growth of surface and morphological features of irradiated Si are strongly dependent upon the laser fluence as well as environmental conditions. The difference in surface morphology is attributable to cooling, confinement and shielding effects as well as difference in plasma temperature, density and pressure of environmental media that corresponds to different energy deposition

  2. Thermal Stability of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fiber in Nitrogen and Silicon Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Garg, A.

    1995-01-01

    The room temperature tensile strength of uncoated and two types of pyrolytic boron nitride coated (PBN and Si-rich PBN) Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers was determined after 1 to 400 hr heat treatments to 1800 C under N2 pressures of 0.1, 2, and 4 MPa, and under 0.1 Mpa argon and vacuum environments. In addition, strength stability of both uncoated and coated fibers embedded in silicon powder and exposed to 0.1 MPa N2 for 24 hrs at temperatures to 1400 C was investigated. The uncoated and both types of BN coated fibers exposed to N2 for 1 hr showed noticeable strength degradation above 1400 C and 1600 C, respectively. The strength degradation appeared independent of nitrogen pressure, time of heat treatment, and surface coatings. TEM microstructural analysis suggests that flaws created due to SiC grain growth are responsible for the strength degradation. In contact with silicon powder, the uncoated and both types of PBN coated fibers degrade rapidly above 1350 C.

  3. Chalcogen bonding in solution: interactions of benzotelluradiazoles with anionic and uncharged Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Graham E; Gibson, Gregory L; Straus, Rita N; Seferos, Dwight S; Taylor, Mark S

    2015-04-01

    Chalcogen bonding is the noncovalent interaction between an electron-deficient, covalently bonded chalcogen (Te, Se, S) and a Lewis base. Although substantial evidence supports the existence of chalcogen bonding in the solid state, quantitative data regarding the strengths of the interactions in the solution phase are lacking. Herein, determinations of the association constants of benzotelluradiazoles with a variety of Lewis bases (Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), NO3(-) and quinuclidine, in organic solvent) are described. The participation of the benzotelluradiazoles in chalcogen bonding interactions was probed by UV-vis, (1)H and (19)F NMR spectroscopy as well as nano-ESI mass spectrometry. Trends in the free energy of chalcogen bonds upon variation of the donor, acceptor and solvent are evident from these data, including a linear free energy relationship between chalcogen bond donor ability and calculated electrostatic potential at the tellurium center. Calculations using the dispersion-corrected B97-D3 functional were found to give good agreement with the experimental free energies of chalcogen bonding.

  4. Fingerprints of carbon, nitrogen, and silicon isotopes in small interstellar SiC grains from the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Peter; Geiss, Johannes; Buehler, Fritz; Neuenschwander, Juerg; Amari, Sachiko; Lewis, Roy S.

    1993-01-01

    We report ion microprobe determinations of the carbon, nitrogen, and silicon isotopic compositions of small SiC grains from the Murchison CM2 chondrite. Analyses were made on samples containing variable numbers of grains and on 14 individual grains. In some cases the multiple-grain sample compositions were probably dominated by only one or two grains. Total ranges observed are given. Only a few grains show values near the range limits. Both the total ranges of carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions, and even the narrower ranges typical for the majority of the grains, are similar to those observed for larger SiC grains. Two rare components appear to be present in the smaller-size fraction, one characterized by C-12/C-13 about 12-16 and the other by very heavy nitrogen. The carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions qualitatively may reflect hydrostatic H-burning via the CNO cycle and He-burning in red giants, as well as explosive H-burning in novae. The silicon isotopic compositions of most grains qualitatively show what is the signature of He-burning. The silicon isotopic composition of one grain, however, suggests a different process.

  5. Supramolecular macrocycles reversibly assembled by Te…O chalcogen bonding

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Peter C.; Szydlowski, Patrick; Sinclair, Jocelyn; Elder, Philip J. W.; Kübel, Joachim; Gendy, Chris; Lee, Lucia Myongwon; Jenkins, Hilary; Britten, James F.; Morim, Derek R.; Vargas-Baca, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules with heavy main-group elements frequently form supramolecular links to electron-rich centres. One particular case of such interactions is halogen bonding. Most studies of this phenomenon have been concerned with either dimers or infinitely extended structures (polymers and lattices) but well-defined cyclic structures remain elusive. Here we present oligomeric aggregates of heterocycles that are linked by chalcogen-centered interactions and behave as genuine macrocyclic species. The molecules of 3-methyl-5-phenyl-1,2-tellurazole 2-oxide assemble a variety of supramolecular aggregates that includes cyclic tetramers and hexamers, as well as a helical polymer. In all these aggregates, the building blocks are connected by Te…O–N bridges. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic experiments demonstrate that the two types of annular aggregates are persistent in solution. These self-assembled structures form coordination complexes with transition-metal ions, act as fullerene receptors and host small molecules in a crystal. PMID:27090355

  6. The palladium-catalyzed intermolecular C-H chalcogenation of arenes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Renhua; Reddy, Vutukuri Prakash; Iwasaki, Takanori; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Palladium catalyzes the intermolecular chalcogenation of carbazole, 2-phenylpyridine, benzo[h]quinolone, and indole derivatives with disulfides and diselenides via selective C-H bond cleavage, providing a convenient route to thio and selenoethers. PMID:25437148

  7. Chalcogen and pnicogen bonds in complexes of neutral icosahedral and bicapped square-antiprismatic heteroboranes.

    PubMed

    Pecina, Adam; Lepšík, Martin; Hnyk, Drahomír; Hobza, Pavel; Fanfrlík, Jindřich

    2015-02-26

    A systematic quantum mechanical study of σ-hole (chalcogen, pnicogen, and halogen) bonding in neutral experimentally known closo-heteroboranes is performed. Chalcogens and pnicogens are incorporated in the borane cage, whereas halogens are considered as exo-substituents of dicarbaboranes. The chalcogen and pnicogen atoms in the heteroborane cages have partial positive charge and thus more positive σ-holes. Consequently, these heteroboranes form very strong chalcogen and pnicogen bonds. Halogen atoms in dicarbaboranes also have a highly positive σ-hole, but only in the case of C-bonded halogen atoms. In such cases, the halogen bond of heteroboranes is also strong and comparable to halogen bonds in organic compounds with several electron-withdrawing groups being close to the halogen atom involved in the halogen bond.

  8. Surface science studies on the interaction of nitrogen trifluoride ion beams and plasmas with silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Thomas William

    As microelectronic dimensions continue to shrink, the role of plasma etching assumes greater importance. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) to replace perfluorocarbon (PFC) etchants in some applications. Nitrogen trifluoride is capable of high etching rates, environmentally more tolerable than PFCs, and eliminates buildup of macroscopic carbonaceous surface layers. Literature exists on NF3 etch rate, selectivity and profiles during plasma etching, but very little has been done in the way of detailed surface science examinations of the interaction of NF3 with silicon (Si) surfaces. Scientifically, NF3 offers an ideal tool to probe the surface science of plasma-Si interaction during etching. Previous studies of fluorine (F) etching of Si have relied on either F2, atomic F, or an inert gas compound such as XeF2. The present work employs a gas in which both atoms (N, F) are chemically active, and is one of the first surface science examinations of NF3-Si interaction. Through the complementary use of ion beams and actual plasmas, the effects of ions and neutrals inherent in the plasma have been separated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that the neutrals are responsible for Si-F bonding while ions are incorporated in complex Si-N-F moieties. The results show for the first time that N is incorporated in Si during the initial stages of etching. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been used to augment the XPS results. Finally, severe plasma etching produces anomalous XPS results which can be attributed to differential charging. Mechanistically, the charging is caused by ion bombardment damage during etching as evidenced by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The differential charging behavior has been studied, and it is suggested that the phenomenon may be utilized to quantify plasma etch damage.

  9. A search for thermal isomerization of olefins to carbenes: Thermal generations of the silicon-nitrogen double bond

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xianping.

    1990-09-21

    The first part of this thesis will search for the thermal isomerization of olefins to carbenes which is predicted to be a high energy process by calculations and has only been observed in a few strained olefins. The possibility of thermal isomerization of simple olefins to carbenes will be explored. Substitution of a silyl group on the double bond of an olefin allows a potential intermediate which has a {beta}-radical to the silyl group during the cis-trans isomerization. The effects of a trimethylsilyl group on this isomerization are the subject of this study. The second part of this thesis will include the generation and chemistry of intermediates containing a silicon-nitrogen double bond. The isomerization of parent silanimine to the aminosilylene was calculated to be a high energy process. New approaches to the silicon-nitrogen double bond will also be presented. 92 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  11. Chalcogen-Based Aerogels as Sorbents for Radionuclide Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Lepry, William C.; Matyas, Josef; Olszta, Matthew J.; Li, Xiaohong; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-06-13

    The efficient capture of radionuclides having long half-lives such as technetium-99 (99Tc), uranium-238 (238U), and iodine-129 (129I) is pivotal to prevent their transport into groundwater and/or release into the atmosphere. While different sorbents have been considered for capturing each of them, in the current work, a new nanostructured chalcogen-based aerogel, called a chalcogel, is shown to be very effective to capture ionic forms of 99Tc and 238U, as well as nonradioactive gaseous iodine (i.e., a surrogate for 129I), irrespective of the sorbent polarity. Some of the chalcogels performed better than others but the PtGeS sorbent performed the best with capture efficiencies of 98% and 99.4% for 99Tc and 238U, respectively. All sorbents showed >99% capture efficiency for iodine over the test duration. This unified sorbent would be an attractive option in environmental remediation for various radionuclides associated with legacy wastes from nuclear weapons production, wastes from nuclear power production, or potential future nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  12. Low resistance Ohmic contact to p-type crystalline silicon via nitrogen-doped copper oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Wan, Yimao; Bullock, James; Allen, Thomas; Cuevas, Andres

    2016-08-01

    This work explores the application of transparent nitrogen doped copper oxide (CuOx:N) films deposited by reactive sputtering to create hole-selective contacts for p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells. It is found that CuOx:N sputtered directly onto crystalline silicon is able to form an Ohmic contact. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements are used to characterise the structural and physical properties of the CuOx:N films. Both the oxygen flow rate and the substrate temperature during deposition have a significant impact on the film composition, as well as on the resulting contact resistivity. After optimization, a low contact resistivity of ˜10 mΩ cm2 has been established. This result offers significant advantages over conventional contact structures in terms of carrier transport and device fabrication.

  13. Chalcogen-based aerogels as sorbents for radionuclide remediation.

    PubMed

    Riley, Brian J; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Lepry, William C; Matyas, Josef; Olszta, Matthew J; Li, Xiaohong; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2013-07-01

    The efficient capture of radionuclides with long half-lives such as technetium-99 ((99)Tc), uranium-238 ((238)U), and iodine-129 ((129)I) is pivotal to prevent their transport into groundwater and/or release into the atmosphere. While different sorbents have been considered for capturing each of them, in the current work, nanostructured chalcogen-based aerogels called chalcogels are shown to be very effective at capturing ionic forms of (99)Tc and (238)U, as well as nonradioactive gaseous iodine (i.e., a surrogate for (129)I2), irrespective of the sorbent polarity. The chalcogel chemistries studied were Co0.7Bi0.3MoS4, Co0.7Cr0.3MoS4, Co0.5Ni0.5MoS4, PtGe2S5, and Sn2S3. The PtGe2S5 sorbent performed the best overall with capture efficiencies of 98.0% and 99.4% for (99)Tc and (238)U, respectively, and >99.0% for I2(g) over the duration of the experiment. The capture efficiencies for (99)Tc and (238)U varied between the different sorbents, ranging from 57.3-98.0% and 68.1-99.4%, respectively. All chalcogels showed >99.0% capture efficiency for iodine over the test duration. This versatile nature of chalcogels can provide an attractive option for the environmental remediation of the radionuclides associated with legacy wastes from nuclear weapons production as well as wastes generated during nuclear power production or nuclear fuel reprocessing. PMID:23763706

  14. Chalcogen-based aerogels as sorbents for radionuclide remediation.

    PubMed

    Riley, Brian J; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Lepry, William C; Matyas, Josef; Olszta, Matthew J; Li, Xiaohong; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2013-07-01

    The efficient capture of radionuclides with long half-lives such as technetium-99 ((99)Tc), uranium-238 ((238)U), and iodine-129 ((129)I) is pivotal to prevent their transport into groundwater and/or release into the atmosphere. While different sorbents have been considered for capturing each of them, in the current work, nanostructured chalcogen-based aerogels called chalcogels are shown to be very effective at capturing ionic forms of (99)Tc and (238)U, as well as nonradioactive gaseous iodine (i.e., a surrogate for (129)I2), irrespective of the sorbent polarity. The chalcogel chemistries studied were Co0.7Bi0.3MoS4, Co0.7Cr0.3MoS4, Co0.5Ni0.5MoS4, PtGe2S5, and Sn2S3. The PtGe2S5 sorbent performed the best overall with capture efficiencies of 98.0% and 99.4% for (99)Tc and (238)U, respectively, and >99.0% for I2(g) over the duration of the experiment. The capture efficiencies for (99)Tc and (238)U varied between the different sorbents, ranging from 57.3-98.0% and 68.1-99.4%, respectively. All chalcogels showed >99.0% capture efficiency for iodine over the test duration. This versatile nature of chalcogels can provide an attractive option for the environmental remediation of the radionuclides associated with legacy wastes from nuclear weapons production as well as wastes generated during nuclear power production or nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  15. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  16. The dominant role of chalcogen bonding in the crystal packing of 2D/3D aromatics.

    PubMed

    Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Přáda, Adam; Padělková, Zdeňka; Pecina, Adam; Macháček, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Holub, Josef; Růžička, Aleš; Hnyk, Drahomír; Hobza, Pavel

    2014-09-15

    The chalcogen bond is a nonclassical σ-hole-based noncovalent interaction with emerging applications in medicinal chemistry and material science. It is found in organic compounds, including 2D aromatics, but has so far never been observed in 3D aromatic inorganic boron hydrides. Thiaboranes, harboring a sulfur heteroatom in the icosahedral cage, are candidates for the formation of chalcogen bonds. The phenyl-substituted thiaborane, synthesized and crystalized in this study, forms sulfur⋅⋅⋅π type chalcogen bonds. Quantum chemical analysis revealed that these interactions are considerably stronger than both in their organic counterparts and in the known halogen bond. The reason is the existence of a highly positive σ-hole on the positively charged sulfur atom. This discovery expands the possibilities of applying substituted boron clusters in crystal engineering and drug design.

  17. Studies on culture conditions of benthic diatoms for feeding abalone. III. Effects of iron and silicon nutrients and of orthogonal combinations of nitrogen, phosphorus, iron and silicon on growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-Hua; Li, Ya-Juan; Li, Mei

    1999-06-01

    Effects of iron and silicon nutrients and of orthogonal combinations of nitrogen, phosphorus, iron and silicon on the growth rate of three benthic diatoms were studied by using an in situ OD measurement method. The results of monofactor tests of iron and silicon showed that Fe-EDTA was better than ferric citrate in the culture of these diatoms; that the favourable concentration of Fe-EDTA was about 0.5 mg/L of Fe and that of silicate was 2.5 mg/L of Si or more. The orthogonal test showed that the optimal concentration ratios (mg/L) of nitrogen, phosphorus, iron and silicon were: 5.0: 0.25: 0.5: 2.0 for Cocconeis scutellum var. parva; 2.5: 1.0: 1.0: 2.0 for Amphora coffeaeformis; and 5.0: 0.15: 0.5: 2.0 for N. mollis.

  18. Energetic Beam Processing of Silicon to Engineer Optoelectronically Active Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recht, Daniel

    This thesis explores ways to use ion implantation and nanosecond pulsed laser melting, both energetic beam techniques, to engineer defects in silicon. These defects are chosen to facilitate the use of silicon in optoelectronic applications for which its indirect bandgap is not ideal. Chapter 2 develops a kinetic model for the use of point defects as luminescence centers for light-emitting diodes and demonstrates an experimental procedure capable of high-throughput screening of the electroluminescent properties of such defects. Chapter 3 discusses the dramatic change in optical absorption observed in silicon highly supersaturated (i.e., hyperdoped) with the chalcogens sulfur, selenium, and tellurium and reports the first measurements of the optical absorption of such materials for photon energies greater than the bandgap of silicon. Chapter 3 examines the use of silicon hyperdoped with chalcogens in light detectors and concludes that while these devices display strong internal gain that is coupled to a particular type of surface defect, hyperdoping with chalcogens does not lead directly to measurable sub-bandgap photoconductivity. Chapter 4 considers the potential for Silicon to serve as the active material in an intermediate-band solar cell and reports experimental progress on two proposed approaches for hyperdoping silicon for this application. The main results of this chapter are the use of native-oxide etching to control the surface evaporation rate of sulfur from silicon and the first synthesis of monocrystalline silicon hyperdoped with gold.

  19. Silicon Nanoparticles with Surface Nitrogen: 90% Quantum Yield with Narrow Luminescence Bandwidth and the Ligand Structure Based Energy Law.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Luo, Tian-Yi; Zhou, Meng; Abroshan, Hadi; Huang, Jingchun; Kim, Hyung J; Rosi, Nathaniel L; Shao, Zhengzhong; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-09-27

    Silicon nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely accepted as an alternative material for typical quantum dots and commercial organic dyes in light-emitting and bioimaging applications owing to silicon's intrinsic merits of least toxicity, low cost, and high abundance. However, to date, how to improve Si nanoparticle photoluminescence (PL) performance (such as ultrahigh quantum yield, sharp emission peak, high stability) is still a major issue. Herein, we report surface nitrogen-capped Si NPs with PL quantum yield up to 90% and narrow PL bandwidth (full width at half-maximum (fwhm) ≈ 40 nm), which can compete with commercial dyes and typical quantum dots. Comprehensive studies have been conducted to unveil the influence of particle size, structure, and amount of surface ligand on the PL of Si NPs. Especially, a general ligand-structure-based PL energy law for surface nitrogen-capped Si NPs is identified in both experimental and theoretical analyses, and the underlying PL mechanisms are further discussed. PMID:27548639

  20. Influences of nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon addition on plant productivity and species richness in an alpine meadow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danghui; Fang, Xiangwen; Zhang, Renyi; Gao, Tianpeng; Bu, Haiyan; Du, Guozhen

    2015-11-15

    Fertilization, especially with nitrogen (N), increases aboveground primary productivity (APP), but reduces plant species richness at some level. Silicon (Si) fertilization alone, or with addition of N or phosphorus (P), has multiple direct and indirect beneficial effects on plant growth and development, both for individuals and the whole community. This study aimed to examine the effects of Si, N, P, NSi and PSi combinations on APP and species richness of the community and of four functional groups in an alpine meadow. The results showed that plots fertilized with Si in combination with either N or P had higher APP than when fertilized with N or P alone. Addition of N or P increased APP, and the higher APP occurred when the highest level of N was added, indicating co-limitation of N and P, with N being most limiting. Silicon fertilization alone or with addition of N increased the APP of grasses and forbs. Nitrogen addition decreased the community species richness; Si with addition of N alleviated the loss of species richness of the whole community and the forbs group. For the four functional groups, N or P addition increased the species richness of grasses and decreased that of forbs. Our findings highlight the importance of Si in improving APP and alleviating N fertilization-induced biodiversity loss in grasslands, and will help improve our ability to predict community composition and biomass dynamics in alpine meadow ecosystems subject to changing nutrient availability.

  1. Influences of nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon addition on plant productivity and species richness in an alpine meadow

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Danghui; Fang, Xiangwen; Zhang, Renyi; Gao, Tianpeng; Bu, Haiyan; Du, Guozhen

    2015-01-01

    Fertilization, especially with nitrogen (N), increases aboveground primary productivity (APP), but reduces plant species richness at some level. Silicon (Si) fertilization alone, or with addition of N or phosphorus (P), has multiple direct and indirect beneficial effects on plant growth and development, both for individuals and the whole community. This study aimed to examine the effects of Si, N, P, NSi and PSi combinations on APP and species richness of the community and of four functional groups in an alpine meadow. The results showed that plots fertilized with Si in combination with either N or P had higher APP than when fertilized with N or P alone. Addition of N or P increased APP, and the higher APP occurred when the highest level of N was added, indicating co-limitation of N and P, with N being most limiting. Silicon fertilization alone or with addition of N increased the APP of grasses and forbs. Nitrogen addition decreased the community species richness; Si with addition of N alleviated the loss of species richness of the whole community and the forbs group. For the four functional groups, N or P addition increased the species richness of grasses and decreased that of forbs. Our findings highlight the importance of Si in improving APP and alleviating N fertilization-induced biodiversity loss in grasslands, and will help improve our ability to predict community composition and biomass dynamics in alpine meadow ecosystems subject to changing nutrient availability. PMID:26574603

  2. Hyperdoping silicon with selenium: solid vs. liquid phase epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Liu, Fang; Prucnal, S.; Gao, Kun; Khalid, M.; Baehtz, C.; Posselt, M.; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon shows potential applications in silicon-based infrared photodetectors and intermediate band solar cells. Due to the low solid solubility limits of chalcogen elements in silicon, these materials were previously realized by femtosecond or nanosecond laser annealing of implanted silicon or bare silicon in certain background gases. The high energy density deposited on the silicon surface leads to a liquid phase and the fast recrystallization velocity allows trapping of chalcogen into the silicon matrix. However, this method encounters the problem of surface segregation. In this paper, we propose a solid phase processing by flash-lamp annealing in the millisecond range, which is in between the conventional rapid thermal annealing and pulsed laser annealing. Flash lamp annealed selenium-implanted silicon shows a substitutional fraction of ~ 70% with an implanted concentration up to 2.3%. The resistivity is lower and the carrier mobility is higher than those of nanosecond pulsed laser annealed samples. Our results show that flash-lamp annealing is superior to laser annealing in preventing surface segregation and in allowing scalability. PMID:25660096

  3. Hyperdoping silicon with selenium: solid vs. liquid phase epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Liu, Fang; Prucnal, S; Gao, Kun; Khalid, M; Baehtz, C; Posselt, M; Skorupa, W; Helm, M

    2015-01-01

    Chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon shows potential applications in silicon-based infrared photodetectors and intermediate band solar cells. Due to the low solid solubility limits of chalcogen elements in silicon, these materials were previously realized by femtosecond or nanosecond laser annealing of implanted silicon or bare silicon in certain background gases. The high energy density deposited on the silicon surface leads to a liquid phase and the fast recrystallization velocity allows trapping of chalcogen into the silicon matrix. However, this method encounters the problem of surface segregation. In this paper, we propose a solid phase processing by flash-lamp annealing in the millisecond range, which is in between the conventional rapid thermal annealing and pulsed laser annealing. Flash lamp annealed selenium-implanted silicon shows a substitutional fraction of ~ 70% with an implanted concentration up to 2.3%. The resistivity is lower and the carrier mobility is higher than those of nanosecond pulsed laser annealed samples. Our results show that flash-lamp annealing is superior to laser annealing in preventing surface segregation and in allowing scalability. PMID:25660096

  4. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  5. Walking Down the Chalcogenic Group of the Periodic Table: From Singlet to Triplet Organic Emitters.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Adrian; Aurisicchio, Claudia; De Leo, Federica; Ventura, Barbara; Wouters, Johan; Armaroli, Nicola; Barbieri, Andrea; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-10-19

    The synthesis, X-ray crystal structures, ground- and excited-state UV/Vis absorption spectra, and luminescence properties of chalcogen-doped organic emitters equipped on both extremities with benzoxa-, benzothia-, benzoselena- and benzotellurazole (1X and 2X ) moieties have been reported for the first time. The insertion of the four different chalcogen atoms within the same molecular skeleton enables the investigation of only the chalcogenic effect on the organisation and photophysical properties of the material. Detailed crystal-structure analyses provide evidence of similar packing for 2O -2Se , in which the benzoazoles are engaged in π-π stacking and, for the heavier atoms, in secondary X⋅⋅⋅X and X⋅⋅⋅N bonding interactions. Detailed computational analysis shows that the arrangement is essentially governed by the interplay of van der Waals and secondary bonding interactions. Progressive quenching of the fluorescence and concomitant onset of phosphorescence features with gradually shorter lifetimes are detected as the atomic weight of the chalcogen heteroatom increases, with the tellurium-doped derivatives exhibiting only emission from the lowest triplet excited state. Notably, the phosphorescence spectra of the selenium and tellurium derivatives can be recorded even at room temperature; this is a very rare finding for fully organic emitters. PMID:26471446

  6. Walking Down the Chalcogenic Group of the Periodic Table: From Singlet to Triplet Organic Emitters.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Adrian; Aurisicchio, Claudia; De Leo, Federica; Ventura, Barbara; Wouters, Johan; Armaroli, Nicola; Barbieri, Andrea; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-10-19

    The synthesis, X-ray crystal structures, ground- and excited-state UV/Vis absorption spectra, and luminescence properties of chalcogen-doped organic emitters equipped on both extremities with benzoxa-, benzothia-, benzoselena- and benzotellurazole (1X and 2X ) moieties have been reported for the first time. The insertion of the four different chalcogen atoms within the same molecular skeleton enables the investigation of only the chalcogenic effect on the organisation and photophysical properties of the material. Detailed crystal-structure analyses provide evidence of similar packing for 2O -2Se , in which the benzoazoles are engaged in π-π stacking and, for the heavier atoms, in secondary X⋅⋅⋅X and X⋅⋅⋅N bonding interactions. Detailed computational analysis shows that the arrangement is essentially governed by the interplay of van der Waals and secondary bonding interactions. Progressive quenching of the fluorescence and concomitant onset of phosphorescence features with gradually shorter lifetimes are detected as the atomic weight of the chalcogen heteroatom increases, with the tellurium-doped derivatives exhibiting only emission from the lowest triplet excited state. Notably, the phosphorescence spectra of the selenium and tellurium derivatives can be recorded even at room temperature; this is a very rare finding for fully organic emitters.

  7. Nitrogen-doped carbon coated silicon derived from a facile strategy with enhanced performance for lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lingxing; Liu, Renpin; Qiu, Heyuan; Chen, Xi; Huang, Xiaoxia; Xiong, Peixun; Qian, Qingrong; Chen, Qinghua; Wei, Mingdeng

    2016-07-01

    Silicon-based nanostructures are receiving intense interest in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because they have ultrahigh lithium ion storage ability. However, the fast capacity fading induced by the considerably tremendous volume changes of Si anode during the Li-ion intercalation processes as well as the low intrinsic electric conductivity have hindered its deployment. Herein, we initially developed an effective technique to synthesize the core-shell Si/nitrogen-doped carbon (Si/N‑C), composite by combining in situ interfacial polymerization and decorate with melamine, followed by carbonization. When used as anode material for LIBs, the Si/N‑C composite delivered a notable reversible capacity (1084 mAh g‑1 at 0.2 A g‑1 for 50 cycles) and high rate capability (495 mAh g‑1 at 1 A g‑1).

  8. STEM EDX Nitrogen Mapping of Nanoinclusions in Milky Diamonds from Juina, Brazil, Using a Windowless Silicon Drift Detector System.

    PubMed

    Rudloff-Grund, J; Brenker, F E; Marquardt, K; Kaminsky, F V; Schreiber, A

    2016-06-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) performed using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with a windowless detector setup allows high-resolution imaging and chemical composition mapping even of light elements present in low concentrations. The used TEM-system combines a field emission electron source with four silicon drift detectors allowing for high detection sensitivity. We used this enhanced system to investigate 20 to 200 nm sized inclusions in milky diamonds from Rio Soriso, Juina area, Brazil. The diamonds act as a chemical inert container and therefore protect their inclusions from further chemical reactions with their surroundings. We visualize the presence and distribution of nitrogen within focused ion beam (FIB) slices containing these nanoinclusions. The investigation of these specific diamonds may open a new window to deeper parts of the Earth (>660 km) as they represent pristine material of this deep mantle environment. PMID:27128863

  9. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  10. Synthesizing photovoltaic thin films of high quality copper-zinc-tin alloy with at least one chalcogen species

    DOEpatents

    Teeter, Glenn; Du, Hui; Young, Matthew

    2013-08-06

    A method for synthesizing a thin film of copper, zinc, tin, and a chalcogen species ("CZTCh" or "CZTSS") with well-controlled properties. The method includes depositing a thin film of precursor materials, e.g., approximately stoichiometric amounts of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), tin (Sn), and a chalcogen species (Ch). The method then involves re-crystallizing and grain growth at higher temperatures, e.g., between about 725 and 925 degrees K, and annealing the precursor film at relatively lower temperatures, e.g., between 600 and 650 degrees K. The processing of the precursor film takes place in the presence of a quasi-equilibrium vapor, e.g., Sn and chalcogen species. The quasi-equilibrium vapor is used to maintain the precursor film in a quasi-equilibrium condition to reduce and even prevent decomposition of the CZTCh and is provided at a rate to balance desorption fluxes of Sn and chalcogens.

  11. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 12 companies at 27 plants in 15 states in the United States during 2011. Sixty-one percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2011, U.S. producers operated at about 84 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Four companies — CF Industries Holdings Inc.; Koch Nitrogen Co.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 77 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity.

  12. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  13. An ab initio study on the concerted interaction between chalcogen and pnicogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Asiabar, Bahman Mohammadian; Esrafili, Mehdi D; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba; Sobhi, Hamid Reza; Javaheri, Majid

    2014-12-01

    We analyzed cooperation between chalcogen-bonding and pnicogen-bonding interactions in XHS···NCH2P···NCY (X = F, Cl; Y = H, OH, NH2, CN and NC) complexes at the MP2/6-311++G** level. These effects were studied in terms of geometric and energetic properties, harmonic frequencies, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A cooperativity factor was adopted to measure the cooperativity between the two types of interaction in triads based on S-X and P-CN stretching frequencies. The size of the cooperative effect in each complex depends on the strength of S···N and P···N interactions. It is largest for FHSN⋯CH2P⋯NCNH2 and smallest for ClHS⋯NCH2P⋯NCCN and ClHS⋯NCH2P⋯NCNC complexes. The total spin-spin coupling constants across the chalcogen and pnicogen bonds in the ternary complexes are always larger than those in the binary systems. This trend can be also interpreted as a cooperative effect between chalcogen and pnicogen bond interactions. The enhancing mechanism was analyzed in terms of electron redistribution effects in XHS···NCH2P···NCY complexes. PMID:25503702

  14. On the ultrafast charge migration dynamics in isolated ionized halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen, and tetrel bonded clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sankhabrata; Rana, Bhaskar; Periyasamy, Ganga; Bhattacharya, Atanu

    2016-06-01

    Here we demonstrate, compare and contrast relaxation- and correlation-driven charge migration dynamics in halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen and tetrel bonded clusters, following their vertical ionization. For this work, we have selected different isolated A-X:NH3 clusters, where A represents F, Cl, CN and NH2 substituents and X features Cl, SH, PH2 and SiH3 to exhibit specific noncovalent bonding interaction. The charge migration dynamics in these clusters is studied using the density functional theory (DFT) with the wB97XD functional and the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. Approximately 400-600 attosecond time scale is predicted for charge migration in (1:1) AX:NH3 complexes. Effects of basis set and intermolecular distance on the ultrafast charge migration dynamics through the halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen, and tetrel bonded clusters are also discussed. This is the first report on pure relaxation- and correlation-driven charge migration dynamics in chalcogen, pnicogen and tetrel bonded clusters.

  15. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  16. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  17. Effects of nitrogen impurities on the microstructure and electronic properties of P-doped Si nanocrystals emebedded in silicon-rich SiNx films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Deng-Hao; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Luo, Rui-Ying; Jiang, Zhao-Yi; Ma, Qiang; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Fan, Zhi-Qiang; Song, Deng-Yuan; Zhang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorus doped Si nanocrystals (SNCs) emebedded in silicon-rich SiNx:H films were prepared using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique, and the effects of nitrogen incorporation on the microstructure and electronic properties of the thin films have been systematically studied. Transmission electron microscope and Raman observation revealed that nitrogen incorporation prevents the growth of Si nanocrystals, and that their sizes can be adjusted by varying the flow rate of NH3. The reduction of photoluminescence (PL) intensity in the range of 2.1-2.6 eV of photon energy was observed with increasing nitrogen impurity, and a maximal PL intensity in the range 1.6-2.0 eV was obtained when the incorporation flow ratio NH3/(SiH4+H2+PH3) was 0.02. The conductivity of the films is improved by means of proper nitrogen impurity doping, and proper doping causes the interface charge density of the heterojunction (H-J) device to be lower than the nc-Si:H/c-Si H-J device. As a result, the proper incorporation of nitrogen could not only reduce the silicon banding bond density, but also fill some carrier capture centers, and suppress the nonradiative recombination of electrons.

  18. Application of INEPT nitrogen-15 and silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry to derivatized fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Folan, D.W.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.; MacCarthy, P.

    1989-01-01

    Use of the INEPT experiment has been examined in two derivatization studies of the Suwannee River fulvic acid. In the first study, the fulvic acid was derivatized with 15N enriched hydroxylamine. The quantitative 15N NMR spectrum, acquired with a 45° pulse angle, 2.0 second pulse delay and inverse gated decoupling, showed that oximes (390-340 ppm) were the major derivatives, followed by nitriles (270-240 ppm), hydroxamic acids (170-160 ppm), secondary amides (150-115 ppm), and lactams (115-90 ppm). The INEPT 15N NMR spectrum was acquired using refocussing delays and polarization transfer times optimized for signal enhancement of singly protonated nitrogens. INEPT greatly enhanced the amide and lactam resonances, and showed that resonances downfield of 180 ppm in the quantitative spectrum represented nonprotonated nitrogens. In the second study, the fulvic acid was first methylated with diazomethane and then silylated with hexamethyldisilazane. The 29Si NMR spectra exhibited two major peaks, from approximately 33 to 22 ppm, representing silyl esters of carboxylic acids, and from 22 to 13 ppm, representing silyl ethers of alcohols and phenols. The INEPT 29Si NMR spectrum was virtually identical to the quantitative 29Si spectrum, acquired with a 90° pulse angle, 5.0 second pulse delay, inverse gated decoupling, and relaxation reagent. INEPT therefore can be used for quantitative analysis of trimethylsilyl derivatives of the fulvic acid, saving spectrometer time and eliminating the need for relaxation reagents.

  19. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma CVD of Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) Films Using Triethylsilane and Nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan Guruvenket; Steven Andrie; Mark Simon; Kyle W. Johnson; Robert A. Sailer

    2011-10-04

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) thin films are synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor (AP-PECVD) deposition using the Surfx Atomflow{trademark} 250D APPJ source with triethylsilane (HSiEt{sub 3}, TES) and nitrogen as the precursor and the reactive gases, respectively. The effect of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the growth characteristics and the properties of a-SiCN:H films was evaluated. The properties of the films were investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) for surface morphological analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for chemical and compositional analyses; spectroscopic ellipsometry for optical properties and thickness determination and nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the a-SiCN:H films. Films deposited at low T{sub s} depict organic like features, while the films deposited at high T{sub s} depict ceramic like features. FTIR and XPS studies reveal that an increases in T{sub s} helps in the elimination of organic moieties and incorporation of nitrogen in the film. Films deposited at T{sub s} of 425 C have an index of refraction (n) of 1.84 and hardness (H) of 14.8 GPa. A decrease in the deposition rate between T{sub s} of 25 and 250 C and increase in deposition rate between T{sub s} of 250 and 425 C indicate that the growth of a-SiCN:H films at lower T{sub s} are surface reaction controlled, while at high temperatures film growth is mass-transport controlled. Based on the experimental results, a potential route for film growth is proposed.

  20. Phase stability and lattice thermal conductivity reduction in CoSb3 skutterudites, doped with chalcogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battabyal, M.; Priyadarshini, B.; Pradipkanti, L.; Satapathy, Dillip K.; Gopalan, R.

    2016-07-01

    We report a significant reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity of the CoSb3 skuttertudites, doped with chalcogen atoms. Te/Se chalcogen atoms doped CoSb3 skutterudite samples (Te0.1Co4Sb12, Se0.1Co4Sb12, Te0.05Se0.05Co4Sb12) are processed by ball milling and spark plasma sintering. X-ray diffraction data combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectra indicate the doping of Te/Se chalcogen atoms in the skutterudite. The temperature dependent X-ray diffraction confirms the stability of the Te/Se doped CoSb3 skutterudite phase and absence of any secondary phase in the temperature range starting from 300 K to 773 K. The Raman spectroscopy reveals that different chalcogen dopant atoms cause different resonant optical vibrational modes between the dopant atom and the host CoSb3 skutterudite lattice. These optical vibrational modes do scatter heat carrying acoustic phonons in a different spectral range. It was found that among the Te/Se chalcogen atoms, Te atoms alter the host CoSb3 skutterudite lattice vibrations to a larger extent than Se atoms, and can potentially scatter more Sb related acoustic phonons. The Debye model of lattice thermal conductivity confirms that the resonant phonon scattering has important contributions to the reduction of lattice thermal conductivity in CoSb3 skutterudites doped with Te/Se chalcogen atoms. Lattice thermal conductivity ˜ 0.9 W/mK at 773 K is achieved in Te0.1Co4Sb12 skutterudites, which is the lowest value reported so far in CoSb3 skutterudites, doped with single Te chalcogen atom.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of shallow nitrogen and silicon implantation into diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Ossi; Naydenov, Boris; Börner, Pia; Melentjevic, Kristina; Müller, Christoph; McGuinness, Liam Paul; Pezzagna, Sebastien; Meijer, Jan; Kaiser, Ute; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    A solid understanding of the implantation process of N and Si ions into diamond is needed for the controlled creation of shallow color centers for quantum computing, simulation, and sensing applications. Here, molecular dynamics simulations of the shallow implantation of N and Si ions into diamond is simulated at 100-5000 eV kinetic energies and different angles of incidence. We find that ion channeling is an important effect with an onset energy depending on the crystal orientation. Consequently, the molecular dynamics simulations produce improved predictions as compared to standard Monte Carlo simulations. When implanting in a channeling direction, the spatial distribution of the channeled ions becomes markedly narrow, allowing a higher degree of control over the location of the nitrogen vacancy (NV-) centers. A contamination layer on the ion entry surface reduces the fraction of channeled ions. A comparison to an experimentally determined depth profile based on a NMR signal from protons yields a quantitative agreement, validating the simulation approach.

  2. Nanostructured photoelectrochemical solar cell for nitrogen reduction using plasmon-enhanced black silicon.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muataz; Zhou, Fengling; Chen, Kun; Kotzur, Christopher; Xiao, Changlong; Bourgeois, Laure; Zhang, Xinyi; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2016-04-20

    Ammonia (NH3) is one of the most widely produced chemicals worldwide. It has application in the production of many important chemicals, particularly fertilizers. It is also, potentially, an important energy storage intermediate and clean energy carrier. Ammonia production, however, mostly uses fossil fuels and currently accounts for more than 1.6% of global CO2 emissions (0.57  Gt in 2015). Here we describe a solar-driven nanostructured photoelectrochemical cell based on plasmon-enhanced black silicon for the conversion of atmospheric N2 to ammonia producing yields of 13.3 mg m(-2) h(-1) under 2 suns illumination. The yield increases with pressure; the highest observed in this work was 60 mg m(-2) h(-1) at 7 atm. In the presence of sulfite as a reactant, the process also offers a direct solar energy route to ammonium sulfate, a fertilizer of economic importance. Although the yields are currently not sufficient for practical application, there is much scope for improvement in the active materials in this cell.

  3. Nanostructured photoelectrochemical solar cell for nitrogen reduction using plasmon-enhanced black silicon.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muataz; Zhou, Fengling; Chen, Kun; Kotzur, Christopher; Xiao, Changlong; Bourgeois, Laure; Zhang, Xinyi; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is one of the most widely produced chemicals worldwide. It has application in the production of many important chemicals, particularly fertilizers. It is also, potentially, an important energy storage intermediate and clean energy carrier. Ammonia production, however, mostly uses fossil fuels and currently accounts for more than 1.6% of global CO2 emissions (0.57  Gt in 2015). Here we describe a solar-driven nanostructured photoelectrochemical cell based on plasmon-enhanced black silicon for the conversion of atmospheric N2 to ammonia producing yields of 13.3 mg m(-2) h(-1) under 2 suns illumination. The yield increases with pressure; the highest observed in this work was 60 mg m(-2) h(-1) at 7 atm. In the presence of sulfite as a reactant, the process also offers a direct solar energy route to ammonium sulfate, a fertilizer of economic importance. Although the yields are currently not sufficient for practical application, there is much scope for improvement in the active materials in this cell. PMID:27093916

  4. Silicon nitride formation from a silane-nitrogen ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, J.C.; Stein, H.J. ); Popov, O.A.; Yoder, M. ); Outten, C.A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Good quality, low temperature silicon nitride and oxynitride films were deposited downstream from an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using SiH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gas mixtures. The Si/N ratio and H content in the deposited films were determined using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)and elastic recoil detection (ERD). The H concentration was minimum for films with compositions closest to that of stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The optimum conditions for producing a stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}were: a SiH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} flow ratio between 0.1 and 0.2, and an electrically isolated sample far from the ECR source. Infrared absorption spectra showed that as the film composition changed from N rich to Si rich the dominant bonds associated with H changed from N-H to Si-H. The addition of O{sub 2} to the background gas formed an oxynitride with a low H content similar to the stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Nanostructured photoelectrochemical solar cell for nitrogen reduction using plasmon-enhanced black silicon

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muataz; Zhou, Fengling; Chen, Kun; Kotzur, Christopher; Xiao, Changlong; Bourgeois, Laure; Zhang, Xinyi; MacFarlane, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is one of the most widely produced chemicals worldwide. It has application in the production of many important chemicals, particularly fertilizers. It is also, potentially, an important energy storage intermediate and clean energy carrier. Ammonia production, however, mostly uses fossil fuels and currently accounts for more than 1.6% of global CO2 emissions (0.57  Gt in 2015). Here we describe a solar-driven nanostructured photoelectrochemical cell based on plasmon-enhanced black silicon for the conversion of atmospheric N2 to ammonia producing yields of 13.3 mg m−2 h−1 under 2 suns illumination. The yield increases with pressure; the highest observed in this work was 60 mg m−2 h−1 at 7 atm. In the presence of sulfite as a reactant, the process also offers a direct solar energy route to ammonium sulfate, a fertilizer of economic importance. Although the yields are currently not sufficient for practical application, there is much scope for improvement in the active materials in this cell. PMID:27093916

  6. Nanostructured photoelectrochemical solar cell for nitrogen reduction using plasmon-enhanced black silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muataz; Zhou, Fengling; Chen, Kun; Kotzur, Christopher; Xiao, Changlong; Bourgeois, Laure; Zhang, Xinyi; Macfarlane, Douglas R.

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is one of the most widely produced chemicals worldwide. It has application in the production of many important chemicals, particularly fertilizers. It is also, potentially, an important energy storage intermediate and clean energy carrier. Ammonia production, however, mostly uses fossil fuels and currently accounts for more than 1.6% of global CO2 emissions (0.57 Gt in 2015). Here we describe a solar-driven nanostructured photoelectrochemical cell based on plasmon-enhanced black silicon for the conversion of atmospheric N2 to ammonia producing yields of 13.3 mg m-2 h-1 under 2 suns illumination. The yield increases with pressure; the highest observed in this work was 60 mg m-2 h-1 at 7 atm. In the presence of sulfite as a reactant, the process also offers a direct solar energy route to ammonium sulfate, a fertilizer of economic importance. Although the yields are currently not sufficient for practical application, there is much scope for improvement in the active materials in this cell.

  7. Response of northern San Francisco Bay to riverine inputs of dissolved inorganic carbon, silicon, nitrogen and phosphorus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.; Harmon, Dana D.; Eager, Stephen W.; Peterson, David H.; Kennedy, Victor S.

    1984-01-01

    Estuarine processes can be effective in modifying (filtering) distributions of dissolved inorganic forms of carbon (DIC), silicon (DIS), nitrogen (DIN), and phosphorus (DIP) in northern San Francisco Bay. During winter, high inflow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin river system supplied these nutrients to the estuary at rates that exceeded potential rates of estuarine supply and removal processes. During spring and summer, when inflow rates were lower, the estuary was an effective “filter” of the river inflow “signal” because rates of estuarine processes were high relative to river and other supply rates. At lower inflow rates, the river apparently influenced estuarine hydrodynamic features that controlled rates of phytoplankton nutrient removal. Largest biological removal effects were localized in San Pablo Bay during spring and Suisun Bay during summer, and they were generally more pronounced in shallow water areas of the bays. In San Pablo Bay, effects of biological removal appeared soon after river inflow decreased from high winter rates, but persisted for only a short time. During the following summer months, DIN and DIP distributions in San Pablo Bay indicated that estuarine sources contributed to higher concentrations of these nutrients.

  8. Proton induced gamma-ray production cross sections and thick-target yields for boron, nitrogen and silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Benoît; Mizohata, Kenichiro; Räisänen, Jyrki

    2016-07-01

    The excitation functions for the reactions 14N(p,p‧γ)14N, 28Si(p,p‧γ)28Si and 29Si(p,p‧γ)29Si were measured at an angle of 55° by bombarding a thin Si3N4 target with protons in the energy range of 3.6-6.9 MeV. The deduced γ-ray production cross section data is compared with available literature data relevant for ion beam analytical work. Thick-target γ-ray yields for boron, nitrogen and silicon were measured at 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 and 6.5 MeV proton energies utilizing thick BN and Si3N4 targets. The measured yield values are put together with available yield data found in the literature. The experimental yield data has been used to cross-check the γ-ray production cross section values by comparing them with calculated thick-target yields deduced from the present and literature experimental excitation curves. All values were found to be in reasonable agreement taking into account the experimental uncertainties.

  9. Hierarchically porous silicon-carbon-nitrogen hybrid materials towards highly efficient and selective adsorption of organic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lala; Zhang, Xiaofei; Tang, Yusheng; Su, Kehe; Kong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchically macro/micro-porous silicon-carbon-nitrogen (Si-C-N) hybrid material was presented with novel functionalities of totally selective and highly efficient adsorption for organic dyes. The hybrid material was conveniently generated by the pyrolysis of commercial polysilazane precursors using polydivinylbenzene microspheres as sacrificial templates. Owing to the Van der Waals force between sp-hybridized carbon domains and triphenyl structure of dyes, and electrostatic interaction between dyes and Si-C-N matrix, it exhibites high adsorption capacity and good regeneration and recycling ability for the dyes with triphenyl structure, such as methyl blue (MB), acid fuchsin (AF), basic fuchsin and malachite green. The adsorption process is determined by both surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion. According to the Langmuir model, the adsorption capacity is 1327.7 mg.g-1 and 1084.5 mg.g-1 for MB and AF, respectively, which is much higher than that of many other adsorbents. On the contrary, the hybrid materials do not adsorb the dyes with azo benzene structures, such as methyl orange, methyl red and congro red. Thus, the hierarchically porous Si-C-N hybrid material from a facile and low cost polymer-derived strategy provides a new perspective and possesses a significant potential in the treatment of wastewater with complex organic pollutants.

  10. Hierarchically porous silicon-carbon-nitrogen hybrid materials towards highly efficient and selective adsorption of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lala; Zhang, Xiaofei; Tang, Yusheng; Su, Kehe; Kong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchically macro/micro-porous silicon-carbon-nitrogen (Si-C-N) hybrid material was presented with novel functionalities of totally selective and highly efficient adsorption for organic dyes. The hybrid material was conveniently generated by the pyrolysis of commercial polysilazane precursors using polydivinylbenzene microspheres as sacrificial templates. Owing to the Van der Waals force between sp-hybridized carbon domains and triphenyl structure of dyes, and electrostatic interaction between dyes and Si-C-N matrix, it exhibites high adsorption capacity and good regeneration and recycling ability for the dyes with triphenyl structure, such as methyl blue (MB), acid fuchsin (AF), basic fuchsin and malachite green. The adsorption process is determined by both surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion. According to the Langmuir model, the adsorption capacity is 1327.7 mg·g(-1) and 1084.5 mg·g(-1) for MB and AF, respectively, which is much higher than that of many other adsorbents. On the contrary, the hybrid materials do not adsorb the dyes with azo benzene structures, such as methyl orange, methyl red and congro red. Thus, the hierarchically porous Si-C-N hybrid material from a facile and low cost polymer-derived strategy provides a new perspective and possesses a significant potential in the treatment of wastewater with complex organic pollutants. PMID:25604334

  11. Sulfur-Oxygen Chalcogen Bonding Mediates AdoMet Recognition in the Lysine Methyltransferase SET7/9.

    PubMed

    Fick, Robert J; Kroner, Grace M; Nepal, Binod; Magnani, Roberta; Horowitz, Scott; Houtz, Robert L; Scheiner, Steve; Trievel, Raymond C

    2016-03-18

    Recent studies have demonstrated that carbon-oxygen (CH···O) hydrogen bonds have important roles in S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) recognition and catalysis in methyltransferases. Here, we investigate noncovalent interactions that occur between the AdoMet sulfur cation and oxygen atoms in methyltransferase active sites. These interactions represent sulfur-oxygen (S···O) chalcogen bonds in which the oxygen atom donates a lone pair of electrons to the σ antibonding orbital of the AdoMet sulfur atom. Structural, biochemical, and computational analyses of an asparagine mutation in the lysine methyltransferase SET7/9 that abolishes AdoMet S···O chalcogen bonding reveal that this interaction enhances substrate binding affinity relative to the product S-adenosylhomocysteine. Corroborative quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that sulfonium systems form strong S···O chalcogen bonds relative to their neutral thioether counterparts. An inspection of high-resolution crystal structures reveals the presence of AdoMet S···O chalcogen bonding in different classes of methyltransferases, illustrating that these interactions are not limited to SET domain methyltransferases. Together, these results demonstrate that S···O chalcogen bonds contribute to AdoMet recognition and can enable methyltransferases to distinguish between substrate and product.

  12. Provision of nitrogen as ammonium rather than nitrate increases silicon uptake in sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Keeping, Malcolm G.; Rutherford, R. Stuart; Sewpersad, C.; Miles, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is important in mitigating abiotic and biotic plant stresses, yet many agricultural soils, such as those of the rainfed production areas of the South African sugar industry, are deficient in plant-available Si, making Si supplementation necessary. However, Si uptake by sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) is limited even where silicate amendments improve soil Si status. Rhizosphere pH, which can affect Si uptake, can be manipulated using different N-form fertilizers. We tested whether (i) fertilization with NH4+ (rhizosphere acidification) increased Si uptake compared with NO3− (rhizosphere alkalinization); and (ii) uptake differed between an N-efficient, more acid-tolerant cultivar (N12) and an N-inefficient, less acid-tolerant cultivar (N14). Two pot trials with low-Si soil were fertilized with calcium silicate (Ca2SiO4) slag, plus N from ammonium sulphate [(NH4)2SO4], ammonium thiosulphate [(NH4)2S2O3] and calcium nitrate [Ca(NO3)2] (Trial 1) or N from (NH4)2S2O3 and Ca(NO3)2 only (Trial 2). Trial 2 included cultivars N12 and N14. Nitrate treatments significantly increased soil pH and soil Si compared with NH4+. However, NH4+ treatments significantly increased leaf and stalk Si content compared with NO3−, reflected in a significant negative relationship between soil pH and leaf Si. Acid-extracted soil Si was negatively related to leaf and stalk Si, likely due to adsorption of silicic acid to soil surfaces under higher pH of the NO3− treatment and its reduced availability for plant uptake. We conclude that NH4+ increased Si uptake into leaf and stalk, and propose that reduced rhizosphere pH solubilized Si from Ca2SiO4 and increased silicic acid availability for plant uptake. By contrast, NO3− may have reduced Si uptake due to adsorption of Si to soil surfaces at higher pH. Our results indicate that ammoniacal fertilizers, such as (NH4)2SO4 and urea, have potential for promoting dissolution of applied Ca2SiO4 and subsequent uptake of Si by

  13. The influence of changes in nitrogen: silicon ratios on diatom growth dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilpin, L. C.; Davidson, K.; Roberts, E.

    2004-02-01

    Nitrate loading to coastal waters has increased over recent decades while silicon loading has remained relatively constant or decreased. As the N:Si ratio in coastal waters shifts due to these anthropogenic influences, silicate limitation of diatom biomass may become a feature of the biogeochemistry in coastal waters especially in regions of reduced exchange. Two sets of nutrient enrichment mesocosm experiments were conducted in successive years using a natural planktonic assemblage obtained from the Trondheimsfjord, Norway. The inorganic nutrient concentrations at the start of the experiments were manipulated to give a variety of N:Si concentrations at ratios representative of current and possible future values, should N loading continue. In June 1999 experiments were conducted with a gradient of inorganic N:Si ratios (1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 4:1) to investigate the influence of low and high N:Si ratio conditions and to determine the conditions that would generate Si limitation of diatom growth. In June 2000, based on 1999 data, highly replicated experiments were conducted at N:Si ratios of 1:1 and 4:1 which were expected to result in N and Si limitation of diatom growth, respectively; statistical differences in cellular composition were recorded. N limitation of diatom biomass increase was observed under the three lowest N:Si ratios: particulate carbon (C) accumulation continued to occur following N exhaustion resulting in an increase in the organic C:N ratio. Silicate limitation of diatom biomass increase only occurred at the highest N:Si ratio of 4:1. Silicate exhaustion was followed by continued nitrate uptake for several days, at a slower rate than previously. The resulting increase in organic N was accompanied by an increase in organic C such that the C:N ratio of the organic material at the highest N:Si ratio failed to increase to the extent observed under the N limited conditions. Statistically significant differences in chlorophyll-a yield per unit nitrate, C

  14. Defect chemistry and chalcogen diffusion in thin-film Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} materials

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Steven P.; Repins, Ingrid; Teeter, Glenn

    2015-02-21

    Selenium diffusion in polycrystalline thin-film Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} (CZTSe) on molybdenum-coated soda-lime glass substrates was investigated by in situ monitoring of the molybdenum back-contact resistance during high-temperature selenization treatments. In these measurements, selenium diffusion through the CZTSe layer results in conversion of the molybdenum layer to MoSe{sub 2}, increasing the sheet resistance of the film stack. By monitoring the rate of MoSe{sub 2} formation as a function of annealing temperature, an activation energy of 0.5 ± 0.1 eV has been measured for selenium diffusion in CZTSe. The partial pressure dependence of chalcogen diffusion suggests that chalcogen vacancies are not the defect controlling chalcogen diffusion in thin-film CZTSe.

  15. Halogen Bonding and Chalcogen Bonding in 4,7-Dibromo-5,6-dinitro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Mysore S; Jana, Ajay Kumar; Natarajan, S; Guru Row, Tayur N

    2015-08-27

    An organic solid, 4,7-dibromo-5,6-dinitro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole, has been designed to serve as an illustrative example to quantitatively evaluate the relative merits of halogen and chalcogen bonding in terms of charge density features. The compound displays two polymorphic modifications, one crystallizing in a non-centrosymmetric space group (Z' = 1) and the other in a centrosymmetric space group with two molecules in the asymmetric unit (Z' = 2). Topological analysis based on QTAIM clearly brings out the dominance of the chalcogen bond over the halogen bond along with an indication that halogen bonds are more directional compared to chalcogen bonds. The cohesive energies calculated with the absence of both strong and weak hydrogen bonds as well as stacking interaction are indicative of the stabilities associated with the polymorphic forms.

  16. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Liquid Nitrogen Valve Sizing for D-Zero Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-09-13

    There were 5 control valves and 2 manual valves for the liquid nitrogen distribution system that needed to be sized and procured for the upgrade. This engineering note documents the calculations done to properly size these valves. A table summarizes the valve choices. The raw calculations are attached as an appendix. The calculations jump around a bit. No effort was made to re-organize or rewrite them for the reader. The sizing calcs. on Pages 1 through 4 were first pass calcs. based on pure liquid to the valves with no attention to flashing/choking. The calcs on pages 5 through 8 then refine the calculations by considering the LN2 to the valve inlets to be two phase with quality of 0.032. This is a real situation if the LN2 subcooler is out of service for use as a He cooldown heat exchanger. Also, flashing would occur for this situation and is taken into account. The end result of this refinement pushed the Cv values up by about a factor of 3 over the initial calcs. of pages 1 through 4. The results of the refined (correct) calculations pages 5 through 8 appear in the table above. The required operating Cv's are smaller than commercially available LN2 control valves. Therefore it has been decided to use Fermilab Saver type control valve assemblies with the valve bullet Cv1s listed above. The bullets are 100: 1 equal percentage types and provide better control at the lower percentage of valve Cv values. See flow characteristic data and curve for these valves in appendix B. The manual valves will be commercially purchased, probably a Cryolab model CV3-84-5WPG2 or CV8-84-5WPG2 or CVI model V-1060-050-VJ. Pages 8-10 calculate a minimum required cooldown flowrate as referenced in Cryogenic Systems by Barron. This was done to be sure the valves and piping system did not choke the warm flow so much that cooldown could not be achieved. The minimum mass flow rate needed for a simultaneous, serial cooldown of the refrigerator, solenoid and VLPC system was 6.4 g/s. This warm

  17. Nitrogen Plasma Instabilities and the Growth of Silicon Nitride by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, F. S.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrogen plasma instabilities have been identified through fluctuations in the ion current density and substrate floating potential. The plasma characteristics for both nitrogen and silane-nitrogen plasmas are consistent with a transition from an underdense to overdense plasma at 0.9 and 1.0 mTorr respectively.

  18. Polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistor with nickel-titanium oxide by sol-gel spin-coating and nitrogen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shih-Chieh; Hou, Tuo-Hung; Chuang, Shiow-Huey; Chou, Hsin-Chih; Chao, Tien-Sheng; Lei, Tan-Fu

    2012-12-01

    This study demonstrates polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (poly-Si TFTs) integrated with a high-κ nickel-titanium oxide (NiTiO3) gate dielectric using sol-gel spin-coating and nitrogen channel implantation. This novel fabrication method of the high-κ NiTiO3 gate dielectric offers thin equivalent-oxide thickness and high gate capacitance density, favorable for increasing the current driving capability. Introducing nitrogen ions into the poly-Si using implantation effectively passivates the trap states not only in the poly-Si channel but also at the gate dielectric/poly-Si interface. The poly-Si NiTiO3 TFTs with nitrogen implantation exhibit significantly improved electrical characteristics, including lower threshold voltage, a steeper subthreshold swing, higher field-effect mobility, a larger on/off current ratio, and less threshold-voltage roll-off. Furthermore, the nitrogen implantation improves the reliability of poly-Si NiTiO3 TFTs against hot-carrier stress and positive bias temperature instability.

  19. Fractionation of highly siderophile and chalcogen elements in components of EH3 chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlag, Yogita; Becker, Harry

    2015-07-01

    Abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE: Re, platinum group elements and Au), chalcogens (Te, Se and S), 187Os/188Os and the major and minor elements Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni and Co were determined in the components of Sahara 97072 (EH3, find) and Kota Kota (EH3, find) in order to understand the element fractionation processes. In a 187Re-187Os isochron diagram, most magnetic components lie close to the 4.56 Ga IIIA iron meteorite isochron, whereas most other components show deviations from the isochron caused by late redistribution of Re, presumably during terrestrial weathering. Metal- and sulfide rich magnetic fractions and metal-sulfide nodules are responsible for the higher 187Os/188Os in bulk rocks of EH chondrites compared to CI chondrites. The HSE and chalcogens are enriched in magnetic fractions relative to slightly magnetic and nonmagnetic fractions and bulk compositions, indicating that Fe-Ni metal is the main host phase of the HSE in enstatite chondrites. HSE abundance patterns indicate mixing of two components, a CI chondrite like end member and an Au-enriched end member. Because of the decoupled variations of Au from those of Pd or the chalcogens, the enrichment of Au in EH metal cannot be due to metal-sulfide-silicate partitioning processes. Metal and sulfide rich nodules may have formed by melting and reaction of pre-existing refractory element rich material with volatile rich gas. A complex condensation and evaporation history is required to account for the depletion of elements having very different volatility than Au in EH chondrites. The depletions of Te relative to HSE, Se and S in bulk EH chondrites are mainly caused by the depletion of Te in metal. S/Se and S/Mn are lower than in CI chondrites in almost all components and predominantly reflect volatility-controlled loss of sulfur. The latter most likely occurred during thermal processing of dust in the solar nebula (e.g., during chondrule formation), followed by the non-systematic loss of S

  20. Suppression Effect and Mechanism of Platinum and Nitrogen-Containing Silane on the Tracking and Erosion of Silicone Rubber for High-Voltage Insulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan Juan; Zeng, Xingrong; Lai, Xuejun; Li, Hongqiang; Fang, Wei Zhen; Hou, Fei

    2016-08-17

    How to effectively improve the tracking and erosion resistance of silicone rubber (SR) was an urgent topic in the field of high-voltage insulation. In this work, the tracking and erosion resistance of SR was significantly improved by incorporating platinum (Pt) catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane (NS). The suppression effect and mechanism of Pt/NS on tracking and erosion were studied by inclined plane (IP) test, thermogravimetry (TG), thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, laser Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. It revealed that when 1.4 phr of NS and 6.7 ppm of Pt were added, the tracking resistance of SR was improved from 2.5 to 4.5 kV level in the IP test, and the eroded mass was significantly reduced. This might be attributed to the synergistic effect of Pt/NS on silicone chains. At a high temperature produced by arc discharge, Pt/NS would catalyze radical cross-linking, meanwhile suppressing oxidation and depolymerization of silicone chains. Hence, a tightly cross-linked network was formed and protected inner materials from arc ablation. Moreover, carbon deposit during pyrolysis was suppressed by Pt/NS, which served as the secondary mechanism of tracking suppression.

  1. Suppression Effect and Mechanism of Platinum and Nitrogen-Containing Silane on the Tracking and Erosion of Silicone Rubber for High-Voltage Insulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan Juan; Zeng, Xingrong; Lai, Xuejun; Li, Hongqiang; Fang, Wei Zhen; Hou, Fei

    2016-08-17

    How to effectively improve the tracking and erosion resistance of silicone rubber (SR) was an urgent topic in the field of high-voltage insulation. In this work, the tracking and erosion resistance of SR was significantly improved by incorporating platinum (Pt) catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane (NS). The suppression effect and mechanism of Pt/NS on tracking and erosion were studied by inclined plane (IP) test, thermogravimetry (TG), thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, laser Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. It revealed that when 1.4 phr of NS and 6.7 ppm of Pt were added, the tracking resistance of SR was improved from 2.5 to 4.5 kV level in the IP test, and the eroded mass was significantly reduced. This might be attributed to the synergistic effect of Pt/NS on silicone chains. At a high temperature produced by arc discharge, Pt/NS would catalyze radical cross-linking, meanwhile suppressing oxidation and depolymerization of silicone chains. Hence, a tightly cross-linked network was formed and protected inner materials from arc ablation. Moreover, carbon deposit during pyrolysis was suppressed by Pt/NS, which served as the secondary mechanism of tracking suppression. PMID:27462876

  2. Chalcogen vacancies in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides and Fermi level pinning at contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Liu, D.; Robertson, J.

    2015-04-01

    It is predicted that Schottky barriers of the transition metal dichalcogenides MoSe2, MoTe2, WS2, WSe2, and WTe2 will suffer less from Fermi level pinning by chalcogen vacancies than does MoS2, because their vacancy formation energies are larger. The reduction in vacancy numbers will allow a greater degree of Schottky barrier height tuning by varying metal work function of the contacts in these compounds. The vacancy levels of WS2, WSe2 and MoSe2, and MoTe2 are also calculated to lie nearer midgap, so that ambipolar conduction will be easier in these compounds than in MoS2.

  3. Supramolecular macrocycles reversibly assembled by Te(…)O chalcogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Ho, Peter C; Szydlowski, Patrick; Sinclair, Jocelyn; Elder, Philip J W; Kübel, Joachim; Gendy, Chris; Lee, Lucia Myongwon; Jenkins, Hilary; Britten, James F; Morim, Derek R; Vargas-Baca, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules with heavy main-group elements frequently form supramolecular links to electron-rich centres. One particular case of such interactions is halogen bonding. Most studies of this phenomenon have been concerned with either dimers or infinitely extended structures (polymers and lattices) but well-defined cyclic structures remain elusive. Here we present oligomeric aggregates of heterocycles that are linked by chalcogen-centered interactions and behave as genuine macrocyclic species. The molecules of 3-methyl-5-phenyl-1,2-tellurazole 2-oxide assemble a variety of supramolecular aggregates that includes cyclic tetramers and hexamers, as well as a helical polymer. In all these aggregates, the building blocks are connected by Te(…)O-N bridges. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic experiments demonstrate that the two types of annular aggregates are persistent in solution. These self-assembled structures form coordination complexes with transition-metal ions, act as fullerene receptors and host small molecules in a crystal. PMID:27090355

  4. Cooperativity of halogen, chalcogen, and pnictogen bonds in infinite molecular chains by electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    George, Janine; Deringer, Volker L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Halogen bonds (XBs) are intriguing noncovalent interactions that are frequently being exploited for crystal engineering. Recently, similar bonding mechanisms have been proposed for adjacent main-group elements, and noncovalent "chalcogen bonds" and "pnictogen bonds" have been identified in crystal structures. A fundamental question, largely unresolved thus far, is how XBs and related contacts interact with each other in crystals; similar to hydrogen bonding, one might expect "cooperativity" (bonds amplifying each other), but evidence has been sparse. Here, we explore the crucial step from gas-phase oligomers to truly infinite chains by means of quantum chemical computations. A periodic density functional theory (DFT) framework allows us to address polymeric chains of molecules avoiding the dreaded "cluster effects" as well as the arbitrariness of defining a "large enough" cluster. We focus on three types of molecular chains that we cut from crystal structures; furthermore, we explore reasonable substitutional variants in silico. We find evidence of cooperativity in chains of halogen cyanides and also in similar chalcogen- and pnictogen-bonded systems; the bonds, in the most extreme cases, are amplified through cooperative effects by 79% (I···N), 90% (Te···N), and 103% (Sb···N). Two experimentally known organic crystals, albeit with similar atomic connectivity and XB characteristics, show signs of cooperativity in one case but not in another. Finally, no cooperativity is observed in alternating halogen/acetone and halogen/1,4-dioxane chains; in fact, these XBs weaken each other by up to 26% compared to the respective gas-phase dimers.

  5. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  6. Formation and properties of high-dose nitrogen implanted epitaxially grown Gd2O3 on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A.; Tetzlaff, D.; Schmidt, J.; Böttger, R.; Wietler, T. F.; Osten, H. J.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of nitrogen incorporation by high-dose ion implantation in epitaxial Gd2O3 films on Si(111) followed by annealing have been investigated. Nitrogen incorporation is believed to occur by filling the oxygen vacancies or by removing hydroxyl group ions in gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3). The nitrogen content in the oxide layer has been altered by changing the implantation dose. The impact of nitrogen incorporation on Gd-O bonding is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A shift in the Gd and O peak positions indicate the presence of nitrogen in the layer. Raman spectroscopy reveals heavy structural changes. The newly appearing structure is crystalline, but not in agreement with either the known bixbyite (Gd2O3) or rocksalt (GdN) structure. Electron microscopic investigations reveal the formation of cracks and small areas with lower densities or even voids. That structure exhibits similarities with transmission electron microscopy images of gadolinium nitride (GdN) layers. The electronic band gap of Gd2O3 estimated from O1s plasmon energy loss measurements was found to decrease significantly by the incorporation of nitrogen. Reduction in the valence band and conduction band offset is obtained as a function of implantation dose.

  7. Performance Improvements of Metal-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon Nonvolatile Memory with ZrO2 Charge-Trapping Layer by Using Nitrogen Incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Xiong; Xu, Jing-Ping; Liu, Lu; Lai, Pui-To

    2013-08-01

    The properties of ZrO2 and ZrON as the charge-trapping layer (CTL) of metal-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon memory are investigated. The microstructure and chemical bonding are examined by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that nitrogen incorporation in ZrO2 can induce more charge-trapping sites, effectively suppress the formation of zirconium silicate (leading to better interface quality between the CTL and the SiO2 tunneling layer), and increase the dielectric constant of ZrO2, thus improving the memory performances (large memory window, high program/erase speed, good endurance characteristics, and small charge loss).

  8. Highly siderophile and chalcogen element constraints on the origin of components of the Allende and Murchison meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlag, Yogita; Becker, Harry

    2016-06-01

    187Re-187Os systematics, abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE: Re, PGE, and Au), chalcogen elements (Te, Se, and S), and some major and minor elements were determined in physically separated components of the Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2) carbonaceous chondrites. Substantial differences exist in the absolute and relative abundances of elements in the components, but the similarity of calculated and literature bulk rock abundances of HSE and chalcogens indicate that chemical complementarity exists among the components, with CI chondrite-like ratios for many elements. Despite subsequent alteration and oxidation, the overall cosmochemical behavior of most moderately to highly siderophile elements during high-temperature processing has been preserved in components of Allende at the sampling scale of the present study. The 187Re-187Os systematics and element variations of Allende are less disturbed compared with Murchison, which reflects different degrees of oxidation and alteration of these meteorites. The HSE systematics (with the exception of Au) is controlled by two types of materials: Pd-depleted condensates and CI chondrite-like material. Enrichment and heterogeneous distribution of Au among the components is likely the result of hydrothermal alteration. Chalcogen elements are depleted compared with HSE in all components, presumably due to their higher volatility. Small systematic variations of S, Se, and Te in components bear the signature of fractional condensation/partial evaporation and metal-sulfide-silicate partitioning.

  9. Improving dielectric properties of epitaxial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films on silicon by nitrogen doping

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Chaudhuri, Ayan; Osten, H. J.; Fissel, A.; Archakam, V. R.

    2013-01-14

    We report about the effect of nitrogen doping on the electrical properties of epitaxial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. Epitaxial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:N thin films were grown on Si (111) substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy using nitrous oxide as the nitridation agent. Substitutional nitrogen incorporation into the dielectric layer was confirmed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Substantial reduction of the leakage current density and disappearance of hysteresis in capacitance-voltage characteristics observed in the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:N layers indicate that nitrogen incorporation in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} effectively eliminates the adverse effects of the oxygen vacancy induced defects in the oxide layer.

  10. Chalcogen bonding interactions between reducible sulfur and selenium compounds and models of zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Patricia B; Bayse, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Reducible sulfur and selenium (r-S/Se) compounds, defined as sulfur and selenium compounds not in the lowest -2 oxidation state (e.g., -1 to +6), release Zn(2+) from zinc-sulfur proteins such as zinc fingers (ZFs) and metallothionein. A series of density functional theory calculations was performed on donor-acceptor complexes between r-S/Se compounds and models of the Cys2His2, Cys3His and Cys4 ZF sites. These S⋯S/Se chalcogen bonding interactions consist of the donation of electron density from a S lone pair on the ZF model to a S/Se-X antibonding molecular orbital of the r-S/Se compound. The strength of the interaction was shown to be dependent upon the Lewis basicity of the ZF model (Cys4>Cys3His>Cys2His2) and the Lewis acidity of the r-S/Se compound as measured by the energy of the S/Se-X antibonding orbital. Interactions with the softer r-Se compounds were stronger than the r-S compounds, consistent with the greater reactivity of the former with ZF proteins.

  11. Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Liam P; Batista, Enrique R; Boncella, James M; Yang, Ping; Scott, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

  12. Preparation of nitrogen doped silicon oxides thin films by plasma polymerization of 3-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane using atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Wang, Meng-Jiy

    2016-01-01

    Surface modification techniques have been applied in various applications including self-cleaning surface, antibacterial filter, and biomaterials. In this study we employed the atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) deposition, a dry process for surface modification, to deposit 3-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane (APTES) on stainless steel (SS) on the purposes of simultaneously incorporating SiOx and nitrogen containing functionalities for the modulation of biofunctionality. The APPJ deposition allowed to form a thin layer of APTES with linear growth rate by controlling the deposition time. In addition, the surface chemical and physical properties, such as surface chemical composition, wettability, film thickness, and interactions with mammalian cells were evaluated by using different analytical methods. The results showed that the surface wettability was improved significantly due to the APTES deposition along with the increase of the incorporated nitrogen content. Moreover, the viability of L-929 fibroblasts was clearly promoted on the APTES deposited SS, which is most probably due to the thicker deposited films and higher density of nitrogen-containing functional groups. The outcomes of this research showed great potential to apply on metallic substrates in real time for biomedical related applications.

  13. Silicon reduces impact of plant nitrogen in promoting stalk borer (Eldana saccharina) but not sugarcane thrips (Fulmekiola serrata) infestations in sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Keeping, Malcolm G.; Miles, Neil; Sewpersad, Chandini

    2014-01-01

    The stalk borer Eldana saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is a major limiting factor in South African sugarcane production, while yield is also reduced by sugarcane thrips Fulmekiola serrata Kobus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Borer management options include appropriate nitrogen (N) and enhanced silicon (Si) nutrition; the effect of N on sugarcane thrips is unknown. We tested the effects of these nutrients, in combination with resistant (N33) and susceptible (N27) sugarcane cultivars, on E. saccharina and F. serrata infestation. Two pot trials with three levels of N (60, 120, and 180 kg ha-1) and two levels each of calcium silicate and dolomitic lime (5 and 10 t ha-1) were naturally infested with thrips, then artificially water stressed and infested with borer. Higher N levels increased borer survival and stalk damage, while Si reduced these compared with controls. Silicon significantly reduced stalk damage in N27 but not in N33; hence, Si provided relatively greater protection for susceptible cultivars than for resistant ones. High N treatments were associated with greater thrips numbers, while Si treatments did not significantly influence thrips infestation. The reduction in borer survival and stalk damage by Si application at all N rates indicates that under field conditions, the opportunity exists for optimizing sugarcane yields through maintaining adequate N nutrition, while reducing populations of E. saccharina using integrated pest management (IPM) tactics that include improved Si nutrition of the crop and reduced plant water stress. Improved management of N nutrition may also provide an option for thrips IPM. The contrasting effects of Si on stalk borer and thrips indicate that Si-mediated resistance to insect herbivores in sugarcane has mechanical and biochemical components that are well developed in the stalk tissues targeted by E. saccharina but poorly developed in the young leaf spindles where F. serrata occurs. PMID:24999349

  14. Synthesis of silicon oxynitride by ion beam sputtering and the effects of nitrogen ion-assisted bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrinos, M. F.; Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J. S.

    1997-05-01

    Thin silicon oxynitride (SiO xN y) films were synthesised without substrate heating by means of N 2+ ion-beam sputtering of a silicon nitride target at an energy of 1000 eV in a N 2 and O 2 ambient with and without 200 eV N 2+ ion assistance. Unassisted films were deposited in a controlled O 2 partial pressure ranging from ambient to 5.0 × 10 -3 Pa whereas assisted films were deposited at a fixed O 2 partial pressure of 1.0 × 10 -3 Pa. The O/(O+N) atomic fraction and the SiO xN y asymmetric stretch mode IR absorption peak wavenumber of unassisted films increased almost linearly with increasing O 2 partial pressure, from 0.2 to 1.0 and 860 cm -1 to 1050 cm -1, respectively, while their refractive indices decreased from 1.92 to 1.46. The behaviour of the SiO xN y film refractive index with the SiO 2 fraction has been compared to that predicted by Drude, Lorentz-Lorenz and Bruggeman models under the assumption that the film is a mixture of SiO 2 and Si 3N 4 phases. For a fixed O 2 partial pressure, the O content of the N 2+ ion-assisted films increased with an increase in the N + ion to Si atom arrival ratio from 0 to 3. This increase in O content correlate with changes in the film refractive index and SiO xN y asymmetric stretch mode absorption peak position, from 1.56 to 1.43 and 1014 cm -1 to 1054 cm -1, respectively, indicating that the O/N atomic ratio increases with increasing N + ion to Si atom ratio until film properties consistent with stoichiometric SiO 2 are obtained.

  15. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  16. The roles of lithium-philic giant nitrogen-doped graphene in protecting micron-sized silicon anode from fading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxu; Chao, Dongliang; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Hai; Hu, Hailong; Zhao, Jiupeng; Li, Yao; Huang, Yizhong; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2015-10-01

    A stable Si-based anode with a high initial coulombic efficiency (ICE) for lithium-ion batteries (LIB) is critical for energy storage. In the present paper, a new scalable method is adopted in combination with giant nitrogen-doped graphene and micron-size electrode materials. We first synthesize a new type of freestanding LIB anode composed of micron-sized Si (mSi) particles wrapped by giant nitrogen-doped graphene (mSi@GNG) film. High ICE (>85%) and long cycle life (more than 80 cycles) are obtained. In the mSi@GNG composite, preferential formation of a stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the surface of graphene sheets is achieved. The formation and components of SEI are identified for the first time by using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy and Raman mapping, which will revive the study of formation and evolution of SEI by Raman. New mechanism is proposed that the giant graphene sheets protect the mSi particles from over-lithiation and fracture. Such a simple and scalable method may also be applied to other anode systems to boost their energy and power densities for LIB.

  17. The roles of lithium-philic giant nitrogen-doped graphene in protecting micron-sized silicon anode from fading

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoxu; Chao, Dongliang; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Hai; Hu, Hailong; Zhao, Jiupeng; Li, Yao; Huang, Yizhong; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2015-01-01

    A stable Si-based anode with a high initial coulombic efficiency (ICE) for lithium-ion batteries (LIB) is critical for energy storage. In the present paper, a new scalable method is adopted in combination with giant nitrogen-doped graphene and micron-size electrode materials. We first synthesize a new type of freestanding LIB anode composed of micron-sized Si (mSi) particles wrapped by giant nitrogen-doped graphene (mSi@GNG) film. High ICE (>85%) and long cycle life (more than 80 cycles) are obtained. In the mSi@GNG composite, preferential formation of a stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the surface of graphene sheets is achieved. The formation and components of SEI are identified for the first time by using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy and Raman mapping, which will revive the study of formation and evolution of SEI by Raman. New mechanism is proposed that the giant graphene sheets protect the mSi particles from over-lithiation and fracture. Such a simple and scalable method may also be applied to other anode systems to boost their energy and power densities for LIB. PMID:26497729

  18. Electrical properties of Ge crystals and effective Schottky barrier height of NiGe/Ge junctions modified by P and chalcogen (S, Se, or Te) co-doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Masahiro; Kamimuta, Yuuichi; Tezuka, Tsutomu; Yamabe, Kikuo

    2016-09-01

    The electrical properties of Ge crystals and the effective Schottky barrier height (SBH) of NiGe/Ge diodes fabricated by P and/or chalcogen (S, Se, or Te) doping were investigated for Ge n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with a NiGe/n+Ge junction. The electron concentration in Ge was increased more by co-doping with chalcogen and P than by doping with P alone. Moreover, SBH values were decreased in NiGe/nGe diodes and increased in NiGe/pGe diodes compared with undoped NiGe/Ge by both P doping and P and chalcogen co-doping. Co-doping with Te and P was most effective in modifying the SBH.

  19. Crystallization Behavior of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber Measured Using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis with Liquid Nitrogen Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

    2010-02-11

    Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Two dynamic temperature sweep tests, 25 to -100 C and 25 to -70 to 0 C (ramp rate = 1 C/min), were conducted at a frequency of 6.28 rad/s (1 Hz) using a torsion rectangular test geometry. A strain of 0.1% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on an initial dynamic strain sweep test. Storage (G{prime}) and loss (G{double_prime}) moduli, the ratio G{double_prime}/G{prime} (tan {delta}), and the coefficient of linear thermal expansion ({alpha}) were determined as a function of temperature. Crystallization occurred between -40 and -60 C, with G{prime} increasing from {approx}6 x 10{sup 6} to {approx}4 x 10{sup 8} Pa. The value of {alpha} was fairly constant before ({approx}4 x 10{sup -4} mm/mm- C) and after ({approx}3 x 10{sup -4} mm/mm- C) the transition, and peaked during the transition ({approx}3 x 10{sup -3} mm/mm- C). Melting occurred around -30 C upon heating.

  20. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  1. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  2. A comparative study of the chalcogen bond, halogen bond and hydrogen bond S⋯O/Cl/H formed between SHX and HOCl.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Li, An Yong; Ma, Fei Yan

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry methods were used to analyze the noncovalent interactions between HOCl and SHX (X = F, CN, NC, Cl, Br, NO2, CCH, CH3, H). Three energetic minimal configurations were characterized for each case, where the S center acts as a Lewis acid interacting with O to form a chalcogen bond, as well as a Lewis base interacting with Cl or H of HOCl to form halogen bond and hydrogen bond, respectively. An electronegative substituent such as F, CN, NC and NO2 tends to form a stronger chalcogen bond, while an electropositive substituent such as CCH, CH3 and H is inclined to form a more stable H-bonded complex. The chalcogen-bonded, halogen-bonded and H-bonded complexes are stabilized by charge transfers from Lp(O) to σ*(SX), from Lp(S) to σ*(ClO), and from Lp(S) to σ*(HO), respectively. As a result, the SHX unit becomes positively charged in halogen-bonded and hydrogen-bonded complexes but negatively charged in chalcogen-bonded complexes. Theory of atoms in molecules, natural bond orbital analysis, molecular electrostatic potential and localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis were applied to investigate these noncovalent bonds.

  3. S···O chalcogen bonding in sulfa drugs: insights from multipole charge density and X-ray wavefunction of acetazolamide.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sajesh P; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Guru Row, T N

    2015-10-14

    Experimental charge density analysis combined with the quantum crystallographic technique of X-ray wavefunction refinement (XWR) provides quantitative insights into the intra- and intermolecular interactions formed by acetazolamide, a diuretic drug. Firstly, the analysis of charge density topology at the intermolecular level shows the presence of exceptionally strong interaction motifs such as a DDAA-AADD (D-donor, A-acceptor) type quadruple hydrogen bond motif and a sulfonamide dimer synthon. The nature and strength of intra-molecular S···O chalcogen bonding have been characterized using descriptors from the multipole model (MM) and XWR. Although pure geometrical criteria suggest the possibility of two intra-molecular S···O chalcogen bonded ring motifs, only one of them satisfies the "orbital geometry" so as to exhibit an interaction in terms of an electron density bond path and a bond critical point. The presence of 'σ-holes' on the sulfur atom leading to the S···O chalcogen bond has been visualized on the electrostatic potential surface and Laplacian isosurfaces close to the 'reactive surface'. The electron localizability indicator (ELI) and Roby bond orders derived from the 'experimental wave function' provide insights into the nature of S···O chalcogen bonding.

  4. Role of chalcogen vapor annealing in inducing bulk superconductivity in Fe1+yTe1-xSex [How does annealing in chalcogen vapor induce superconductivity in Fe1+yTe-xSex?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Wenzhi; Ganesh, P.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony; Wang, Jun; Berlijn, Tom; Maier, Thomas A.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sales, Brian C.; Pan, Minghu

    2015-02-01

    Recent investigations have shown that Fe1+yTe1-xSex can be made superconducting by annealing it in Se and O vapors. The current lore is that these chalcogen vapors induce superconductivity by removing the magnetic excess Fe atoms. To investigate this phenomenon we performed a combination of magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and transport measurements together with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations on Fe1+yTe1-xSex treated with Te vapor. We conclude that the main role of the Te vapor is to quench the magnetic moments of the excess Fe atoms by forming FeTem (m ≥ 1) complexes. We show thatmore » the remaining FeTem complexes are still damaging to the superconductivity and therefore that their removal potentially could further improve superconductive properties in these compounds.« less

  5. Superlattice Structure in Chalcogen Square-Net Charge Density Wave Phases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foran, Brendan John

    Superstructures in materials with chalcogen square lattices are accounted for in terms of charge density waves associated with quasi-one-dimensional electronic structure. Two new compounds, DySe_{1.84} and Rb_{0.33}DySe _{2.67}, were grown in a RbCl/LiCl eutectic flux. Rb_{0.33}DySe _{2.67} has an orthorhombic subcell, space group Cmcm, a = 4.0579(6)A, b =26.47(1)A and c = 3.8909(6)A; the selenium square lattice has site occupancy waves and charge density waves. The average substructure of DySe_{1.84} is tetragonal, P4/nmm, but the complete modulated structure is better described in a 3 + 2 dimensional space group C_sp{c"m"m1}{Pm2 _1n}. The basic cell is a = 3.9912(3)A, b = 3.9863(1)A, and c = 8.206(1)A, with modulation wave vectors at q_1 = alpha{ bf a}^* + beta{bf b} ^* + 1/2{bf c}^*, and {bf q}_2 = alpha{ bf a}^* - beta{bf b} ^* + 1/2{bf c}^* where alpha = 0.33338(12), and beta = 0.27284(6). Refinement on main reflections plus first and second order satellites produced four solutions that could not be differentiated by R-factors. An energy minimum structure is predicted by mu_2 -scaled Huckel theory, and the superstructures found in elemental selenium, and LnQ_2(Ln=La,Ce; Q=S,Se) phases are rationalized. The concept of an effective band filling is introduced as a means of generating a model for the Fermi surface of a defective lattice from that of an ideal non-defective lattice. By this method the superstructures of La_{10}Se _{19}, Cs_3Te_{22 }, RbDy_3Se_8 and DySe _{1.84} are rationalized and predicted. The synthesis, structure and band structure analysis of the quaternary compound K_{0.33 }rm Ba_{0.67}AgTe_2 are reported. Crystals were obtained by reaction of K _2Te, BaTe, Ag and Te in a K _2Te/BaTe/Te flux cooling from 450 ^circC. The substructure is tetragonal, 14/mmm, a_{sub} = 4.624(2) A, {bf c}_{sub } = 23.326(4) A, 172 independent data, 13 variables, R/R_{w} = 0.054/0.067. A (Te_2]^{4/3-} square net should be metallic, but transport measurements show

  6. Hybrid compounds with two redox centres: modular synthesis of chalcogen-containing lapachones and studies on their antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Vieira, André A; Brandão, Igor R; Valença, Wagner O; de Simone, Carlos A; Cavalcanti, Bruno C; Pessoa, Claudia; Carneiro, Teiliane R; Braga, Antonio L; da Silva, Eufrânio N

    2015-08-28

    Chalcogen-containing β-lapachone derivatives were synthesized using a straightforward methodology and evaluated against several cancer cell lines (leukaemia, human colon carcinoma, prostate, human metastatic prostate, ovarian, central nervous system and breast), showing, in some cases, IC50 values below 1 μM. The cytotoxic potential of the lapachones evaluated was also assayed using non-tumor cells: human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, two murine fibroblast lines (L929 and V79 cells) and MDCK (canine kidney epithelial cells). These compounds could provide promising new lead derivatives for anticancer drug development. This manuscript reports important findings since few authors have described C-3 substituted β-lapachone with potent antitumor activity. The methodology employed allowed the preparation of the compounds from lapachol within a few minutes in a green approach.

  7. Chalcogen-height dependent magnetic interactions and magnetic order switching in FeSexTe1-x.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chang-Youn; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic properties of iron chalcogenide superconducting materials are investigated using density-functional calculations. We find that the stability of magnetic phases is very sensitive to the height of chalcogen species from the Fe plane: while FeTe with optimized Te height has the double-stripe (pi, 0) magnetic ordering, the single-stripe (pi, pi) ordering becomes the ground state when Te is lowered below a critical height by, e.g., Se doping. This behavior is understood by opposite Te-height dependences of the superexchange interaction and a longer range magnetic interaction mediated by itinerant electrons. We also demonstrate a linear temperature dependence of the macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in the single-stripe phase in contrast with the constant behavior in the double-stripe phase. Our findings provide a comprehensive and unified view on the magnetism in FeSexTe1-x and iron pnictide superconductors.

  8. Chalcogen doping at anionic site: A scheme towards more dispersive valence band in CuAlO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Nilesh; Sen, Dipayan; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we propose to enhance the dispersion of the top of valence band at high-symmetry points by selective introduction of chalcogen (Ch) impurities at oxygen site. As ab-plane hole mobility of CuAlO2 is large enough to support a band-conduction model over a polaronic one at room temperature [M. S. Lee et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 79, 2029, (2001); J. Tate et al. Phys. Rev. B 80, 165206, (2009)], we examine its electronic and optical properties normal to c-axis. Intrinsic indirectness of energy-gap at Γ-point can be effectively removed along with substantial increase in density of states near Fermi level (EF) upon Ch addition. This can be attributed to S 2p-Cu 3d interaction just at or below EF, which should result in significantly improved carrier mobility and conductivity profile for this important p-type TCO.

  9. Preparation of II-VI semiconductor nanocrystallites in a glass matrix using chalcogenizing agent: Application to CdSe

    SciTech Connect

    Marc, J.L.; Granier, W.; Pradel, A.; Ribes, M.; Richard, T.; Allegre, J.; Lefebvre, P.

    1994-12-31

    A new route for preparing CdX (X = S, Se, Te, S+Se) nanocrystallites dispersed in a sodium borosilicate glass matrix from a hydrogel is proposed. Chalcogenizing complexing molecules -- for instance a mixture of NH{sub 4}SCN + H{sub 2}SeO{sub 3} -- introduced in the starting solution allowed an in situ crystallite preparation concomitant to gel densification. Prevention of crystallite oxidation is thus obtained. Moreover, coalescence is minimized because of the low gel-glass transition temperature. Low temperature absorption spectra have been interpreted in terms of exciton and electron-hole confinements, accounting for both an intrinsic broadening of energy states inside each nanocrystal and a Gaussian size distribution. Crystallite sizes and size dispersion can be adjusted by changing the initial Cd concentration. The crystallinity of the nanoparticles without change in dispersion is strongly improved by thermal treatment above the T{sub g} of the glass matrix.

  10. Interplay between halogen and chalcogen bonding in the XCl∙∙∙OCS∙∙∙NH₃ (X = F, OH, NC, CN, and FCC) complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The interplay between halogen and chalcogen bonding in the XCl∙∙∙OCS and XCl∙∙∙OCS∙∙∙NH3 (X = F, OH, NC, CN, and FCC) complex was studied at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) computational level. Cooperative effect is observed when halogen and chalcogen bonding coexist in the same complex. The effect is studied by means of binding distance, interaction energy, and cooperative energy. Molecular electrostatic potential calculation reveals the electrostatic nature of the interactions. Cooperative effect is explained by the difference of the electron density. Second-order stabilization energy was calculated to study the orbital interaction in the complex. Atoms in molecules analysis was performed to analyze the enhancement of the electron density in the bond critical point.

  11. Electrochemical Kinetics and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigations of Oxygen Reduction on Chalcogen-Modified Ruthenium Catalysts in Alkaline Media

    SciTech Connect

    N Ramaswamy; R Allen; S Mukerjee; Y

    2011-12-31

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media has been investigated on chalcogen-modified ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru/C, Se/Ru/C, Se/RuMo/C, S/Ru/C, S/RuMo/C) synthesized in-house via aqueous routes. In acidic medium, it is well known that modification by a chalcogen prevents the oxidation of the underlying transition-metal (Ru) surface, thereby promoting direct molecular O{sub 2} adsorption on the Ru metal. On an unmodified Ru catalyst in alkaline media, the surface oxides on Ru mediate the 2e{sup -} reduction of molecular O{sub 2} to a stable peroxide anion (HO{sub 2}{sup -}) intermediate via an outer-sphere electron-transfer mechanism. This increases the activity of HO{sub 2}{sup -} near the electrode surface and decreases the overpotential for ORR by effectively carrying out the reduction of HO{sub 2}{sup -} to OH{sup -} at the oxide-free ruthenium metal site. An increase in ORR activity of Ru is observed by modification with a chalcogen; however, the increase is not as significant as observed in acidic media. Ternary additives, such as Mo, were found to significantly improve the stability of the chalcogen-modified catalysts. Detailed investigations of the ORR activity of this class of catalyst have been carried out in alkaline media along with comparisons to acidic media wherever necessary. A combination of electrochemical and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (EXAFS, XANES, {Delta}{mu}) studies has been performed in order to understand the structure/property relationships of these catalysts within the context of ORR in alkaline electrolytes.

  12. Role of axial base coordination in isonitrile binding and chalcogen atom transfer to vanadium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Subhojit; Stauber, Julia M; Palluccio, Taryn D; Cai, Xiaochen; Velian, Alexandra; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V; Temprado, Manuel; Captain, Burjor; Cummins, Christopher C; Hoff, Carl D

    2014-10-20

    The enthalpy of oxygen atom transfer (OAT) to V[(Me3SiNCH2CH2)3N], 1, forming OV[(Me3SiNCH2CH2)3N], 1-O, and the enthalpies of sulfur atom transfer (SAT) to 1 and V(N[t-Bu]Ar)3, 2 (Ar = 3,5-C6H3Me2), forming the corresponding sulfides SV[(Me3SiNCH2CH2)3N], 1-S, and SV(N[t-Bu]Ar)3, 2-S, have been measured by solution calorimetry in toluene solution using dbabhNO (dbabhNO = 7-nitroso-2,3:5,6-dibenzo-7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene) and Ph3SbS as chalcogen atom transfer reagents. The V-O BDE in 1-O is 6.3 ± 3.2 kcal·mol(-1) lower than the previously reported value for 2-O and the V-S BDE in 1-S is 3.3 ± 3.1 kcal·mol(-1) lower than that in 2-S. These differences are attributed primarily to a weakening of the V-Naxial bond present in complexes of 1 upon oxidation. The rate of reaction of 1 with dbabhNO has been studied by low temperature stopped-flow kinetics. Rate constants for OAT are over 20 times greater than those reported for 2. Adamantyl isonitrile (AdNC) binds rapidly and quantitatively to both 1 and 2 forming high spin adducts of V(III). The enthalpies of ligand addition to 1 and 2 in toluene solution are -19.9 ± 0.6 and -17.1 ± 0.7 kcal·mol(-1), respectively. The more exothermic ligand addition to 1 as compared to 2 is opposite to what was observed for OAT and SAT. This is attributed to less weakening of the V-Naxial bond in ligand binding as opposed to chalcogen atom transfer and is in keeping with structural data and computations. The structures of 1, 1-O, 1-S, 1-CNAd, and 2-CNAd have been determined by X-ray crystallography and are reported. PMID:25280113

  13. Synthesis and Properties of Benzo[a]phenoxazinium Chalcogen Analogues as Novel Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Photosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Foley, James W.; Song, Xiangzhi; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Jilal, Fatima; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to develop improved photosensitizers for use as antimicrobial drugs in photodynamic therapy of localized infections. Replacement of the oxygen atom in 5-(ethylamino)-9-diethylaminobenzo[a]phenoxazinium chloride (1) with sulfur and selenium afforded thiazinium and selenazinium analogues 2 and 3, respectively. All three dyes are water soluble, lipophilic, and red light absorbers. The relative photodynamic activities of the chalcogen series were evaluated against a panel of prototypical pathogenic microorganisms: the Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis, the Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and the fungus Candida albicans. Selenium dye 3 was highly effective as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizer with fluences of 4–32 J/cm2 killing 2–5 more logs of all cell types than sulfur dye 2, which was slightly more effective than oxygen analogue 1. These data, taken with the findings of uptake and retention studies, suggest that the superior activity of selenium derivative 3 can be attributed to its much higher triplet quantum yield. PMID:16913718

  14. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  15. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  16. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  17. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  18. Targeting the Gatekeeper MET146 of C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 3 Induces a Bivalent Halogen/Chalcogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Lange, Andreas; Günther, Marcel; Büttner, Felix Michael; Zimmermann, Markus O; Heidrich, Johannes; Hennig, Susanne; Zahn, Stefan; Schall, Christoph; Sievers-Engler, Adrian; Ansideri, Francesco; Koch, Pierre; Laemmerhofer, Michael; Stehle, Thilo; Laufer, Stefan A; Boeckler, Frank M

    2015-11-25

    We target the gatekeeper MET146 of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3) to exemplify the applicability of X···S halogen bonds in molecular design using computational, synthetic, structural and biophysical techniques. In a designed series of aminopyrimidine-based inhibitors, we unexpectedly encounter a plateau of affinity. Compared to their QM-calculated interaction energies, particularly bromine and iodine fail to reach the full potential according to the size of their σ-hole. Instead, mutation of the gatekeeper residue into leucine, alanine, or threonine reveals that the heavier halides can significantly influence selectivity in the human kinome. Thus, we demonstrate that, although the choice of halogen may not always increase affinity, it can still be relevant for inducing selectivity. Determining the crystal structure of the iodine derivative in complex with JNK3 (4X21) reveals an unusual bivalent halogen/chalcogen bond donated by the ligand and the back-pocket residue MET115. Incipient repulsion from the too short halogen bond increases the flexibility of Cε of MET146, whereas the rest of the residue fails to adapt being fixed by the chalcogen bond. This effect can be useful to induce selectivity, as the necessary combination of methionine residues only occurs in 9.3% of human kinases, while methionine is the predominant gatekeeper (39%).

  19. One-Pot Approach to Organo-Phosphorus-Chalcogen Macrocycles Incorporating Double OP(S)SCn or OP(Se)SeCn Scaffolds: A Synthetic and Structural Study.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoxiong; Du, Junyi; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Woollins, J Derek

    2016-06-01

    The development of new methodology for the preparation of functional macrocycles with practical applications is an important research area in macromolecular science. In this study, we report a new one-pot route for the synthesis of a series of macro-heterocycles by incorporating two phosphorus atoms and two chalcogen atoms and two oxygen atoms (double OP(S)SCn or OP(Se)SeCn scaffolds). The three-component condensation reactions of 2,4-diferrocenyl-1,3,2,4-diathiadiphosphetane 2,4-disulfide (FcLR, a ferrocene analogue of Lawesson's reagent) or 2,4-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3,2,4-dithiadiphosphetane 2,4-disulfide (LR, Lawesson's reagent), or 2,4-diphenyl-1,3,2,4-diselenadiphosphetane 2,4-diselenide (WR, Woollins' reagent), disodium alkenyl-diols, and dihalogenated alkanes are performed, giving rise to soluble and air or moisture-stable macrocycles in good-to-excellent yields (up to 92 %). This is the first systemically preparative and readily scalable example of one-pot ring opening/ring extending reaction of three-components to prepare phosphorus-chalcogen containing macrocycles. We also provide a systematic crystallographic study.

  20. Partial re-equilibration of highly siderophile elements and the chalcogens in the mantle: A case study on the Baldissero and Balmuccia peridotite massifs (Ivrea Zone, Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry; Gawronski, Timo

    2013-05-01

    The conditions at which melt percolation and reactive infiltration of depleted mantle peridotites fractionate highly siderophile elements (HSE) and cause re-equilibration of 187Os/188Os in mantle rocks are still poorly constrained. In a comparative study of the Paleozoic Balmuccia (BM) and Baldissero (BD) peridotite tectonites (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Northern Italy), the influence of partial melting and melt infiltration on abundances of HSE, chalcogens (S, Se and Te) and 187Os/188Os have been studied. At BM, Re depletion ages (TRD) of lherzolites and replacive dunites display a uniform distribution with a maximum near 400-500 Ma. BD peridotites also display a Paleozoic distribution peak but a significant number of samples yielded Proterozoic TRD. The predominance of Paleozoic Re depletion ages in both bodies is consistent with Sm-Nd ages and the late Paleozoic magmatic and geodynamic evolution of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone. The different extents of preservation of ancient 187Os/188Os in BM and BD peridotites are interpreted to reflect different degrees of isotopic homogenization and chemical re-equilibration with incompatible element-depleted infiltrating melt during the Paleozoic. The differences between the two bodies are also reflected by differences in HSE and chalcogen abundances, with BD displaying large scatter among HSE patterns, slight re-enrichment of Re relative to Au, and linear trends of Pd, Se and Te with Al2O3. The differences in distributions of model ages and heterogeneity in HSE abundances support the view that the lithophile element, HSE and chalcogen variations of different suites of lherzolites likely reflect different extents of reactive melt infiltration in mantle peridotites, with partial re-equilibration and melt extraction in open system environments. However, the variable re-equilibration of BM and BD lherzolites apparently did not produce significant differences in HSE ratios such as Os/Ir, Ru/Ir, Rh/Ir, and Pd/Pt, which are in the range of

  1. Metallization of Large Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    A metallization scheme was developed which allows selective plating of silicon solar cell surfaces. The system is comprised of three layers. Palladium, through the formation of palladium silicide at 300 C in nitrogen, makes ohmic contact to the silicon surface. Nickel, plated on top of the palladium silicide layer, forms a solderable interface. Lead-tin solder on the nickel provides conductivity and allows a convenient means for interconnection of cells. To apply this metallization, three chemical plating baths are employed.

  2. Control of silicon nanoparticle size embedded in silicon oxynitride dielectric matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhardt, F.; Ferblantier, G.; Muller, D.; Slaoui, A.; Ulhaq-Bouillet, C.; Rinnert, H.

    2013-07-21

    In this study, silicon rich silicon oxynitride layers containing more than 15% nitrogen were deposited by electron cyclotron resonance assisted plasma enhanced vapor deposition in order to form silicon nanoparticles after a high temperature thermal annealing. The effect of the flows of the precursor gases on the composition and the structural properties of the layers was assessed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, and infrared spectroscopic measurements. The morphological and crystallinity properties were investigated by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. We show that the excess of silicon in the silicon oxynitride layer controls the silicon nanoparticles size. On the other hand, the crystalline fraction of particles is found to be strongly correlated to the nanoparticle size. Finally, the photoluminescence measurements show that it is also possible to tune the photoluminescence peak position between 400 and 800 nm and its intensity by changing the silicon excess in the silicon rich silicon oxynitride matrix.

  3. Determination of Silicon in Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Mark B.; Mast, Dion; Greene, Ben; Maes, Miguel J.

    2006-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a highly sensitive technique sometimes used for the trace determination of silicon at a mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of 28, the most abundant natural isotope of silicon. Unfortunately, ICP-MS is unable to differentiate between other sources of m/z 28 and false positive results for silicon will result when other sources of m/z 28 are present. Nitrogen was a major source of m/z 28 and contributes to the m/z 28 signal when hydrazine sample or nitric acid preservative is introduced into the plasma. Accordingly, this work was performed to develop a sample preparation step coupled with an ICP-MS analysis that minimized non-silicon sources of m/z 28. In the preparatory step of this method, the hydrazine sample was first decomposed predominately to nitrogen gas and water with copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide. In the analysis step, ICP-MS was used without nitric acid preservative in samples or standards. Glass, a potential source of silicon contamination, was also avoided where possible. The method was sensitive, accurate, and reliable for the determination of silicon in monopropellant grade hydrazine (MPH) in AF-E-332 elastomer leaching tests. Results for silicon in MPH were comparable to those reported in the literature for other studies.

  4. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide.

  5. Structure and energetics of As dimers on GaAs:(chalcogen) (001) surfaces and GaAs/Te/InAs interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, R. H.; Ferraz, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    We have performed first principles calculations for the adsorption of As2 molecules over GaAs:Te, GaAs:Se and GaAs:S(001) surfaces. We investigate the dimer exchange process between the adsorbed As2 dimer and the sublayer chalcogen atoms. The adsorption on Te terminated surface and the subsequent exchange process, confirm the surfactant action of Te atoms. For Se and S covered surfaces, the adsorption of As2 molecule is an exothermic process, but the subsequent Se(S) ↔ As exchange process is not energetically favourable. The GaAs/Te/InAs interface with half a monolayer of Te is also considered. For the interface we find a valence-band offset of 0.18 eV.

  6. Room temperature oxidative intercalation with chalcogen hydrides: Two-step method for the formation of alkali-metal chalcogenide arrays within layered perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Ranmohotti, K.G. Sanjaya; Montasserasadi, M. Dariush; Choi, Jonglak; Yao, Yuan; Mohanty, Debasish; Josepha, Elisha A.; Adireddy, Shiva; Caruntu, Gabriel; Wiley, John B.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Topochemical reactions involving intercalation allow construction of metal chalcogenide arrays within perovskite hosts. ► Gaseous chalcogen hydrides serve as effect reactants for intercalation of sulfur and selenium. ► New compounds prepared by a two-step intercalation strategy are presented. -- Abstract: A two-step topochemical reaction strategy utilizing oxidative intercalation with gaseous chalcogen hydrides is presented. Initially, the Dion-Jacobson-type layered perovskite, RbLaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}, is intercalated reductively with rubidium metal to make the Ruddlesden-Popper-type layered perovskite, Rb{sub 2}LaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This compound is then reacted at room-temperature with in situ generated H{sub 2}S gas to create Rb-S layers within the perovskite host. Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data (tetragonal, a = 3.8998(2) Å, c = 15.256(1) Å; space group P4/mmm) shows the compound to be isostructural with (Rb{sub 2}Cl)LaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7} where the sulfide resides on a cubic interlayer site surrounded by rubidium ions. The mass increase seen on sulfur intercalation and the refined S site occupation factor (∼0.8) of the product indicate a higher sulfur content than expected for S{sup 2−} alone. This combined with the Raman studies, which show evidence for an H-S stretch, indicate that a significant fraction of the intercalated sulfide exists as hydrogen sulfide ion. Intercalation reactions with H{sub 2}Se{sub (g)} were also carried out and appear to produce an isostructural selenide compound. The utilization of such gaseous hydride reagents could significantly expand multistep topochemistry to a larger number of intercalants.

  7. Partitioning of platinum-group elements (PGE) and chalcogens (Se, Te, As, Sb, Bi) between monosulfide-solid solution (MSS), intermediate solid solution (ISS) and sulfide liquid at controlled fO2-fS2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanan; Brenan, James

    2015-06-01

    In order to better understand the behavior of highly siderophile elements (HSEs: Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, Au, Re), Ag, Pb and chalcogens (As, Se, Sb, Te and Bi) during the solidification of sulfide magmas, we have conducted a series of experiments to measure partition coefficients (D values) between monosulfide solid solution (MSS) and sulfide melt, as well as MSS and intermediate solid solution (ISS), at 0.1 MPa and 860-926 °C, log fS2 -3.0 to -2.2 (similar to the Pt-PtS buffer), with fO2 controlled at the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. The IPGEs (Os, Ir, Ru), Rh and Re are found to be compatible in MSS relative to sulfide melt with D values ranging from ∼20 to ∼5, and DRe/DOs of ∼0.5. Pd, Pt, Au, Ag, Pb, as well as the chalcogens, are incompatible in MSS, with D values ranging from ∼0.1 to ∼1 × 10-3. For the same metal/sulfur ratio, D values for the IPGEs, Rh and Re are systematically larger than most past studies, correlating with higher oxygen content in the sulfide liquid, reflecting the significant effect of oxygen on increasing the activity coefficients for these elements in the melt phase. MSS/ISS partitioning experiments reveal that Ru, Os, Ir, Rh and Re are partitioned into MSS by a factor of >50, whereas Pd, Pt, Ag, Au and the chalcogens partition from weakly (Se, As) to strongly (Ag, Au) into ISS. Uniformly low MSS- and ISS- melt partition coefficients for the chalcogens, Pt, Pd, Ag and Au will lead to enrichment in the residual sulfide liquid, but D values are generally too large to reach early saturation in Pt-Pd-chalcogen-rich accessory minerals, based on current solubility estimates. Instead, these phases likely precipitate at the last dregs of crystallization. Modeled evolution curves for the PGEs and chalcogens are in reasonably good agreement with whole-rock sulfide compositions for the McCreedy East deposit (Sudbury, Ontario), consistent with an origin by crystallization of MSS, then MSS + ISS from sulfide magma.

  8. Fractionation of highly siderophile and chalcogen elements during magma transport in the mantle: Constraints from pyroxenites of the Balmuccia peridotite massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry

    2015-06-01

    Sulfide segregation from sulfur saturated basic magmas affects the compositions of chalcophile elements such as the highly siderophile elements (HSE) and the chalcogens S, Se, Te to variable extent. Whether this process predominantly occurs in the lower crust or in the mantle and how segregation of liquid sulfide and accumulation affects concentrations and ratios of these elements at different mantle depths and in presumed primitive basic magmas remains uncertain. Abundances of the HSE, S, Se and Te and Os isotopes in websterites and spinel clinopyroxenites of the Balmuccia peridotite massif (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italian Alps) provide new insight on sulfide segregation and the compositional change of melt and peridotite during magma transport in the mantle. Balmuccia websterites and clinopyroxenites formed from late Paleozoic and Mesozoic melt influx into stretched continental lithospheric mantle of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone, respectively. The HSE and chalcogen element compositions of websterites and clinopyroxenites reflect the segregation and accumulation of sulfide melt from S saturated silicate melts with different abundances and ratios of chalcogens and the HSE. The pyroxenites display large variations in abundances of the platinum group elements (PGE) and Te whereas abundances of less chalcophile elements S, Se and Re are much less variable. The fractionation between the PGE and fractionation of Re/Os, S/Se and Se/Te in the mantle pyroxenites are consistent with sulfide melt-silicate melt partitioning with a sequence of apparent coefficients of DPGE > DAu ⩾ DTe > DSe ⩾ DS ≈ DRe. Concentrations in ocean ridge basalts and in gabbros of the lower oceanic crust are also consistent with such fractionation. Websterites which have formed during refertilization of depleted peridotites display ratios of the HSE and moderately suprachondritic initial 187Os/188Os similar to interstitial sulfides of refertilized peridotites. These compositions are different from

  9. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-01-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  10. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-03-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  11. Silicon spintronics.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Ron

    2012-04-23

    Worldwide efforts are underway to integrate semiconductors and magnetic materials, aiming to create a revolutionary and energy-efficient information technology in which digital data are encoded in the spin of electrons. Implementing spin functionality in silicon, the mainstream semiconductor, is vital to establish a spin-based electronics with potential to change information technology beyond imagination. Can silicon spintronics live up to the expectation? Remarkable advances in the creation and control of spin polarization in silicon suggest so. Here, I review the key developments and achievements, and describe the building blocks of silicon spintronics. Unexpected and puzzling results are discussed, and open issues and challenges identified. More surprises lie ahead as silicon spintronics comes of age.

  12. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  13. Benzodipyrrolidone (BDP)-based polymer semiconductors containing a series of chalcogen atoms: comprehensive investigation of the effect of heteroaromatic blocks on intrinsic semiconducting properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Cheol; Park, Won-Tae; Noh, Yong-Young; Yang, Changduk

    2014-04-01

    In order to determine the effects of actual 'chalcogen atoms' on semiconducting properties for application in a variety of optoelectronic devices, a class of donor (D)-acceptor (A) polymer semiconductors, namely PBDP-Fu, PBDP-Th, and PBDP-Se, containing the recently formulated benzodipyrrolidone (BDP) accepting unit and furan (Fu), thiophene (Th), or selenophene (Se) as a donating unit has been synthesized, characterized, and used in an active layer of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). With the LUMO levels being comparatively consistent for all three polymers (-3.58 to -3.60 eV) due to the dominant BDP contribution to the polymer backbone, the HOMO energies are somewhat sensitive to the structurally distinctive feature of the donor counits used. Utilizing a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is apparent that further crystalline domains occur with edge-on orientation for the polymers (PBDP-Th and PBDP-Se) with relatively heavier chalcogen atoms such as Th and Se, compared with PBDP-Fu which has a rather amorphous nature. Investigation of their OFET performance indicates that all the polymers show well balanced ambipolar operations. The desirable morphological structures of both the PBDP-Th and PBDP-Se result in higher mobilities in OFETs than those of PBDP-Fu. In particular, 200 °C annealed PBDP-Se OFETs results in ambipolarity being mobile for both holes of up to 1.7 × 10(-2) cm(2)/V·s and electrodes of up to 1.9 × 10(-2) cm(2)/V·s. In addition, OFETs with PBDP-Th show nearly equivalent charge carrier mobilities for both holes (μ(h) = 1.2 × 10(-2) cm(2)/V·s) and electrons (μ(e) = 1.1 × 10(-2) cm(2)/V·s). Consequently, we systematically demonstrate how the manipulation of existing heteroaromatics can modulate the electronic properties of conjugated D-A polymers, elucidating structure-property relationships that are desirable for the rational design of next generation materials. PMID:24620709

  14. Lithium counterdoped silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I. (Inventor); Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The resistance to radiation damage of an n(+)p boron doped silicon solar cell is improved by lithium counterdoping. Even though lithium is an n-dopant in silicon, the lithium is introduced in small enough quantities so that the cell base remains p-type. The lithium is introduced into the solar cell wafer by implantation of lithium ions whose energy is about 50 keV. After this lithium implantation, the wafer is annealed in a nitrogen atmosphere at 375 C for two hours.

  15. Silicon Needles Fabricated by Highly Selective Anisotropic Dry Etching and Their Field Emission Current Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanechika, Masakazu; Mitsushima, Yasuichi

    2000-12-01

    A new process to fabricate a silicon needle, whose tip radius is about 5 nm and aspect ratio is about 7, was developed. The silicon needles were fabricated by highly selective anisotropic dry etching. The etching mask was oxygen precipitation, which was formed by nitrogen ion implantation and the subsequent oxidation. The process is simple enough to be integrated with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. The density of the silicon needle can be controlled by adjusting the dose for nitrogen ion implantation. The position of the silicon needle can be controlled by adjusting the position for nitrogen ion implantation, because silicon needles are formed only in the nitrogen ion implantation area. Furthermore, using these silicon needles as micro emitters, a field emission diode was fabricated. The Fowler-Nordheim plot shows that the field around the tip of the silicon needles was highly enhanced.

  16. Tetrel, chalcogen, and CH⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds in complexes pairing carbonyl-containing molecules with 1, 2, and 3 molecules of CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Azofra, Luis M.; Scheiner, Steve

    2015-01-21

    The complexes formed by H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 3}CHO, and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO with 1, 2, and 3 molecules of CO{sub 2} are studied by ab initio calculations. Three different types of heterodimers are observed, most containing a tetrel bond to the C atom of CO{sub 2}, and some supplemented by a CH⋅⋅O H-bond. One type of heterodimer is stabilized by an anti-parallel arrangement of the C=O bonds of the two molecules. The binding energies are enhanced by methyl substitution on the carbonyl, and vary between 2.4 and 3.5 kcal/mol. Natural bond orbital analysis identifies a prime source of interaction as charge transfer into the π*(CO) antibonding orbital. Heterotrimers and tetramers carry over many of the geometrical and bonding features of the binary complexes, but also introduce O⋅⋅O chalcogen bonds. These larger complexes exhibit only small amounts of cooperativity.

  17. Application of copper(I) iodide/diorganoyl dichalcogenides to the synthesis of 4-organochalcogen isoquinolines by regioselective C-N and C-chalcogen bond formation.

    PubMed

    Stein, André L; Bilheri, Filipe N; da Rocha, Juliana T; Back, Davi F; Zeni, Gilson

    2012-08-20

    A copper-catalyzed cyclization of (ortho-alkynyl)benzaldimines with diorganoyl dichalcogenides allowed the synthesis of 4-organochalcogen isoquinolines, whereas the presence of base in the reaction medium inhibited the product formation producing the undesirable isoquinoline without the organochalcogen atom at the 4-position. The cyclization reaction was carried out by using CuI (20 %) as a catalyst with diorganoyl dichalcogenides (1.5 equiv) in the presence of DMF at 100 °C. Furthermore, the reaction did not require an argon atmosphere and was carried out in an open flask. The cyclization reaction tolerated a variety of functional groups both in ortho-alkynylbenzaldimines and diorganoyl dichalcogenides, such as trifluoromethyl, chloro, fluorine, and methoxyl, to give the six-membered heterocyclic ring exclusively through a 6-endo-dig cyclization process. The organochalcogen group present at the 4-position of the isoquinoline ring was further subjected to a selective chalcogen-lithium exchange reaction followed by the addition of aldehydes to afford the desired secondary alcohols in good yields. The obtained isoquinolines also proved to be suitable substrates for the Suzuki and Sonogashira coupling conditions affording the corresponding products through C-C bond formation. PMID:22807116

  18. Research of materials for porous matrices in sol-gel systems based on silicon dioxide and metallic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraeva, E. V.; Bobkov, A. A.; Maximov, A. I.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Nalimova, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study silicon dioxide - stannic oxide and silicon dioxide - zinc nanomaterials oxide were obtained through sol-gel technology. The results of nitrogen thermal desorption measurements, atomic force microscopy measurements and particle sizes measurements are discussed.

  19. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  20. Sputtered silicon nitride coatings for wear protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride films were deposited by RF sputtering on 304 stainless steel substrates in a planar RF sputtering apparatus. The sputtering was performed from a Si3N4 target in a sputtering atmosphere of argon and nitrogen. The rate of deposition, the composition of the coatings, the surface microhardness and the adhesion of the coatings to the substrates were investigated as a function of the process parameters, such as: substrate target distance, fraction nitrogen in the sputtering atmosphere and sputtering pressure. Silicon rich coating was obtained for fraction nitrogen below 0.2. The rate of deposition decreases continuously with increasing fraction nitrogen and decreasing sputtering pressure. It was found that the adherence of the coatings improves with decreasing sputtering pressure, almost independently of their composition.

  1. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, R.A.

    1994-04-05

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

  2. The Nature of the Chemical Bond in Linear Three-Body Systems: From I3− to Mixed Chalcogen/Halogen and Trichalcogen Moieties

    PubMed Central

    Aragoni, M. Carla; Arca, Massimiliano; Devillanova, Francesco A.; Garau, Alessandra; Isaia, Francesco; Lippolis, Vito; Mancini, Annalisa

    2007-01-01

    The 3 centre-4 electrons (3c-4e) and the donor/acceptor or charge-transfer models for the description of the chemical bond in linear three-body systems, such as I3− and related electron-rich (22 shell electrons) systems, are comparatively discussed on the grounds of structural data from a search of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). Both models account for a total bond order of 1 in these systems, and while the former fits better symmetric systems, the latter describes better strongly asymmetric situations. The 3c-4e MO scheme shows that any linear system formed by three aligned closed-shell species (24 shell electrons overall) has reason to exist provided that two electrons are removed from it to afford a 22 shell electrons three-body system: all combinations of three closed-shell halides and/or chalcogenides are considered here. A survey of the literature shows that most of these three-body systems exist. With some exceptions, their structural features vary continuously from the symmetric situation showing two equal bonds to very asymmetric situations in which one bond approaches to the value corresponding to a single bond and the second one to the sum of the van der Waals radii of the involved atoms. This indicates that the potential energy surface of these three-body systems is fairly flat, and that the chemical surrounding of the chalcogen/halogen atoms can play an important role in freezing different structural situations; this is well documented for the I3− anion. The existence of correlations between the two bond distances and more importantly the linearity observed for all these systems, independently on the degree of their asymmetry, support the state of hypervalency of the central atom. PMID:18389065

  3. Heteroatomic SenS8-n Molecules Confined in Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbons as Reversible Cathode Materials for High-Performance Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fugen; Cheng, Hongye; Chen, Jianzhuang; Zheng, Nan; Li, Yongsheng; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-09-27

    A reversible cathode material in an ether-based electrolyte for high-energy lithium batteries was successfully fabricated by homogeneously confining heteroatomic SenS8-n molecules into nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons (NMCs) via a facile melt-impregnation route. The resultant SenS8-n/NMC composites exhibit highly reversible electrochemical behavior, where selenium sulfides are recovered through the reversible conversion of polysulfoselenide intermediates during discharge-charge cycles. The recovery of selenium sulfide molecules endows the SenS8-n/NMC cathodes with the rational integration of S and Se cathodes. Density functional theory calculations further reveal that heteroatomic selenium sulfide molecules with higher polarizability could bind more strongly with NMCs than homoatomic sulfur molecules, which provides more efficient suppression of the shuttling phenomenon. Therefore, with further assistance of mesopore confinement of the nitrogen-doped carbons, the Se2S6/NMC composite with an optimal Se/S mole ratio of 2/6 presents excellent cycle stability with a high initial Coulombic efficiency of 96.5% and a high reversible capacity of 883 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles and 780 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at 250 mA g(-1). These encouraging results suggest that the heteroatomization of chalcogen (such as S, Se, or Te) molecules in mesostructured carbon hosts is a promising strategy in enhancing the electrochemical performances of chalcogen/carbon-based cathodes for Li batteries. PMID:27522865

  4. Heteroatomic SenS8-n Molecules Confined in Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbons as Reversible Cathode Materials for High-Performance Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fugen; Cheng, Hongye; Chen, Jianzhuang; Zheng, Nan; Li, Yongsheng; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-09-27

    A reversible cathode material in an ether-based electrolyte for high-energy lithium batteries was successfully fabricated by homogeneously confining heteroatomic SenS8-n molecules into nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons (NMCs) via a facile melt-impregnation route. The resultant SenS8-n/NMC composites exhibit highly reversible electrochemical behavior, where selenium sulfides are recovered through the reversible conversion of polysulfoselenide intermediates during discharge-charge cycles. The recovery of selenium sulfide molecules endows the SenS8-n/NMC cathodes with the rational integration of S and Se cathodes. Density functional theory calculations further reveal that heteroatomic selenium sulfide molecules with higher polarizability could bind more strongly with NMCs than homoatomic sulfur molecules, which provides more efficient suppression of the shuttling phenomenon. Therefore, with further assistance of mesopore confinement of the nitrogen-doped carbons, the Se2S6/NMC composite with an optimal Se/S mole ratio of 2/6 presents excellent cycle stability with a high initial Coulombic efficiency of 96.5% and a high reversible capacity of 883 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles and 780 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at 250 mA g(-1). These encouraging results suggest that the heteroatomization of chalcogen (such as S, Se, or Te) molecules in mesostructured carbon hosts is a promising strategy in enhancing the electrochemical performances of chalcogen/carbon-based cathodes for Li batteries.

  5. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) for producing silicon from dichlorosilane in a 1,000 MT/yr plant was continued. Progress and status for the chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process are reported for the primary process design engineering activities: base case conditions (85%), reaction chemistry (85%), process flow diagram (60%), material balance (60%), energy balance (30%), property data (30%), equipment design (20%) and major equipment list (10%). Engineering design of the initial distillation column (D-01, stripper column) in the process was initiated. The function of the distillation column is to remove volatile gases (such as hydrogen and nitrogen) which are dissolved in liquid chlorosilanes. Initial specifications and results for the distillation column design are reported including the variation of tray requirements (equilibrium stages) with reflux ratio for the distillation.

  6. Corrosion of silicon nitride in high temperature alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liyan; Guzonas, Dave A.; Qian, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion of silicon nitride (Si3N4) in alkaline solutions was studied at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C. Si3N4 experienced significant corrosion above 100 °C. The release rates of silicon and nitrogen follow zero order reaction kinetics and increase with increasing temperature. The molar ratio of dissolved silicon and nitrogen species in the high temperature solutions is the same as that in the solid phase (congruent dissolution). The activation energy for silicon and nitrogen release rates is 75 kJ/mol which agrees well with that of silica dissolution. At 300 °C, the release of aluminum is observed and follows first order reaction kinetics while other minor constituents including Ti and Y are highly enriched on the corrosion films due to the low solubility of their oxides.

  7. Deposition of reactively ion beam sputtered silicon nitride coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.

    1982-01-01

    An ion beam source was used to deposit silicon nitride films by reactively sputtering a silicon target with beams of Ar + N2 mixtures. The nitrogen fraction in the sputtering gas was 0.05 to 0.80 at a total pressure of 6 to 2 millionth torr. The ion beam current was 50 mA at 500 V. The composition of the deposited films was investigated by auger electron spectroscopy and the rate of deposition was determined by interferometry. A relatively low rate of deposition of about 2 nm. one-tenth min. was found. AES spectra of films obtained with nitrogen fractions higher than 0.50 were consistent with a silicon to nitrogen ratio corresponding to Si3N4. However the AES spectra also indicated that the sputtered silicon nitride films were contaminated with oxygen and carbon and contained significant amounts of iron, nickel, and chromium, most probably sputtered from the holder of the substrate and target.

  8. Prokaryotic silicon utilizing microorganisms in the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    Although a little study has been done to determine the silicon utilizing prokaryotes, our previous experiments indicated that almost all Gram-positive bacteria are silicon utilizing; one of them, Streptococci survived exposure on the lunar surface for a long period in experiment done by others. Our initial experiments with these Gram positive microorganisms showed that there were limited growths of these microorganisms on carbon free silicate medium probably with the help of some carry over carbon and nitrogen during cultivation procedures. However, increase in growth rate after repeated subcultures could not be explained at present. The main groups of prokaryotes which were found silicon utilizing microorganisms were Mycobacterium, Bacillus, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, and Clostridium. In a another previous study by us when silicon level was studied in such grown up cells on carbon "free" silicate medium by electron prove microanalyser, it was found that silicon in cells grown on carbon "free" silicate medium was much higher (24.9%) than those grown on conventional carbon based medium (0.84%). However, these initial findings are encouraging for our future application of this group of organisms on extraterrestrial surfaces for artificial micro-ecosystem formation. It was found that when electropositive elements are less in extraterrestrial situation, then polymerization of silicon-oxygen profusion may occur easily, particularly in carbon and nitrogen paucity in the rocky worlds of the Universe.

  9. Role of chalcogen vapor annealing in inducing bulk superconductivity in Fe1+yTe1-xSex [How does annealing in chalcogen vapor induce superconductivity in Fe1+yTe-xSex?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wenzhi; Ganesh, P.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony; Berlijn, Tom; Maier, Thomas A.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sales, Brian C.; Pan, Minghu

    2015-02-01

    Recent investigations have shown that Fe1+yTe1-xSex can be made superconducting by annealing it in Se and O vapors. The current lore is that these chalcogen vapors induce superconductivity by removing the magnetic excess Fe atoms. To investigate this phenomenon we performed a combination of magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and transport measurements together with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations on Fe1+yTe1-xSex treated with Te vapor. We conclude that the main role of the Te vapor is to quench the magnetic moments of the excess Fe atoms by forming FeTem (m ≥ 1) complexes. We show that the remaining FeTem complexes are still damaging to the superconductivity and therefore that their removal potentially could further improve superconductive properties in these compounds.

  10. RBS study of amorphous silicon carbide films deposited by PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huran, J.; Hotovy, I.; Kobzev, A. P.; Balalykin, N. I.

    2004-03-01

    We present properties of nitrogen-doped amorphous silicon carbide films that were grown by a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique and annealed by pulsed electron beam. Samples with different amounts of N were achieved by a small addition of ammonia NH3 into the gas mixture of silane SiH4 and methane CH4, which were directly introduced into the reaction chamber. The actual amount of nitrogen in the SiC films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). A simulation of the RBS spectra was used to calculate the concentration of carbon, silicon and nitrogen.

  11. Covalent Nitrogen Doping and Compressive Strain in MoS2 by Remote N2 Plasma Exposure.

    PubMed

    Azcatl, Angelica; Qin, Xiaoye; Prakash, Abhijith; Zhang, Chenxi; Cheng, Lanxia; Wang, Qingxiao; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Addou, Rafik; Hinkle, Christopher L; Appenzeller, Joerg; Wallace, Robert M

    2016-09-14

    Controllable doping of two-dimensional materials is highly desired for ideal device performance in both hetero- and p-n homojunctions. Herein, we propose an effective strategy for doping of MoS2 with nitrogen through a remote N2 plasma surface treatment. By monitoring the surface chemistry of MoS2 upon N2 plasma exposure using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we identified the presence of covalently bonded nitrogen in MoS2, where substitution of the chalcogen sulfur by nitrogen is determined as the doping mechanism. Furthermore, the electrical characterization demonstrates that p-type doping of MoS2 is achieved by nitrogen doping, which is in agreement with theoretical predictions. Notably, we found that the presence of nitrogen can induce compressive strain in the MoS2 structure, which represents the first evidence of strain induced by substitutional doping in a transition metal dichalcogenide material. Finally, our first principle calculations support the experimental demonstration of such strain, and a correlation between nitrogen doping concentration and compressive strain in MoS2 is elucidated.

  12. Covalent Nitrogen Doping and Compressive Strain in MoS2 by Remote N2 Plasma Exposure.

    PubMed

    Azcatl, Angelica; Qin, Xiaoye; Prakash, Abhijith; Zhang, Chenxi; Cheng, Lanxia; Wang, Qingxiao; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Addou, Rafik; Hinkle, Christopher L; Appenzeller, Joerg; Wallace, Robert M

    2016-09-14

    Controllable doping of two-dimensional materials is highly desired for ideal device performance in both hetero- and p-n homojunctions. Herein, we propose an effective strategy for doping of MoS2 with nitrogen through a remote N2 plasma surface treatment. By monitoring the surface chemistry of MoS2 upon N2 plasma exposure using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we identified the presence of covalently bonded nitrogen in MoS2, where substitution of the chalcogen sulfur by nitrogen is determined as the doping mechanism. Furthermore, the electrical characterization demonstrates that p-type doping of MoS2 is achieved by nitrogen doping, which is in agreement with theoretical predictions. Notably, we found that the presence of nitrogen can induce compressive strain in the MoS2 structure, which represents the first evidence of strain induced by substitutional doping in a transition metal dichalcogenide material. Finally, our first principle calculations support the experimental demonstration of such strain, and a correlation between nitrogen doping concentration and compressive strain in MoS2 is elucidated. PMID:27494551

  13. Synthesis of silicon nitride films by ion beam enhanced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianghuai, Liu; Bin, Xue; Zhihong, Zheng; Zuyao, Zhou; Shichang, Zou

    1989-03-01

    Silicon nitride films with stoichiometric ratio of Si 3N 4 have been synthesized by concurrent electron beam evaporation of silicon and bombardment with nitrogen ions. The results show that the component ratio of nitrogen to silicon in IBED silicon nitride films can be controlled and predicted by the atomic arrival rate ratio of nitrogen to silicon. IR measurement shows that the characteristic absorption peak of IBED Si 3N 4 is located at a wavenumber of 840 cm -1. The refractive index ranges from 2.2 to 2.6. RBS, AES, TEM, SEM, ED and spreading resistance measurement were used for investigation of the depth profiles of composition and structure of silicon nitride films synthesized by IBED. An intermixed layer is formed at the interface by the knock on effect, and a silicon enriched layer is observed at the surface region of the film. Normally the films were found to be amorphous, but electron diffraction patterns taken from deposited layer showed a certain crystallinity. The silicon nitride films prepared by IBED have dramatically less oxygen content than that formed by non-ion-assisted deposition.

  14. Nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; Mccormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  15. PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films mechanical characterization using membrane point load deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagolini, Alvise; Picciotto, Antonino; Crivellari, Michele; Conci, Paolo; Bellutti, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    An analysis of the mechanical properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) silicon nitrides is presented, using micro fabricated silicon nitride membranes under point load deflection. The membranes are made of PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films. The mechanical performance of the bended membranes is examined both with analytical models and finite element simulation in order to extract the elastic modulus and residual stress values. The elastic modulus of low stress silicon nitride is calculated using stress free analytical models, while for silicon-rich silicon nitride and annealed low stress silicon nitride it is estimated with a pre-stressed model of point-load deflection. The effect of annealing both in nitrogen and hydrogen atmosphere is evaluated in terms of residual stress, refractive index and thickness variation. It is demonstrated that a hydrogen rich annealing atmosphere induces very little change in low stress silicon nitride. Nitrogen annealing effects are measured and shown to be much higher in silicon-rich nitride than in low stress silicon nitride. An estimate of PECVD silicon-rich nitride elastic modulus is obtained in the range between 240-320 GPa for deposited samples and 390 GPa for samples annealed in nitrogen atmosphere. PECVD low stress silicon nitride elastic modulus is estimated to be 88 GPa as deposited and 320 GPa after nitrogen annealing.

  16. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  17. The Effect of Polymer Char on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Rickmond C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of polymer char on nitridation kinetics of attrition milled silicon powder have been investigated from 1200 to 1350 C. Results indicate that at and above 1250 C, the silicon compacts containing 3.5 wt percent polymer char were fully converted to Si3N4 after 24 hr exposure in nitrogen. In contrast, the silicon compacts without polymer char could not be fully converted to Si3N4 at 1350 C under similar exposure conditions. At 1250 and 1350 C, the silicon compacts with polymer char showed faster nitridation kinetics than those without the polymer char. As the polymer char content is increased, the amount of SiC in the nitrided material is also increased. By adding small amounts (approx. 2.5 wt percent) of NiO, the silicon compacts containing polymer char can be completely nitrided at 1200 C. The probable mechanism for the accelerated nitridation of silicon containing polymer char is discussed.

  18. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  19. Silicon oxynitride: A field emission suppression coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Nimel D.

    We have studied coatings deposited using our inductively-coupled RF plasma ion implantation and desposition system to suppress field emission from large, 3-D electrode structures used in high voltage applications, like those used by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in their DC-field photoelectron gun. Currently time and labor-intensive hand-polishing procedures are used to minimize field emission from these structures. Previous work had shown that the field emission from polished stainless steel (27 muA of field-emitted current at 15 MV/m) could be drastically reduced with simultaneous deposition of sputtered silicon dioxide during nitrogen implantation (167 pA of field-emitted current at 30 MV/m). We have determined that this unique implantation and deposition procedure produces high-purity silicon oxynitride films that can suppress field emission from stainless steel regardless of their initial surface polish. However, when this implantation procedure was applied to large, 3-D substrates, arcs occurred, damaging the coating and causing unreliable and unrepeatable field emission suppression. We have developed a novel reactive sputtering procedure to deposit high-purity silicon oxynitride coatings without nitrogen ion implantation. We can control the stoichometry and deposition rate of these coatings by adjusting the nitrogen pressure and incident RF-power. Using profilometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis, and current-voltage measurements, we have determined that the elemental composition, chemical bonding, density, and electrical properties of the reactively-sputtered silicon oxynitride coatings are similar to those produced by nitrogen implantation during silicon dioxide deposition. Furthermore, high voltage tests determined that both coatings similarly suppress field emission from 6" diameter, polished

  20. Silicon micromachining based on porous silicon formation

    SciTech Connect

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Stevenson, J.O.; Howard, A.; Houston, J.E.; Tsao, S.S.

    1991-12-31

    We describe a new electrochemical processing technique based on porous silicon formation that can produce surface and buried insulators, conductors, and sacrificial layers required for silicon micromachining to fabricate micromechanical devices and sensors. Porosity and thickness of porous silicon layers for micromachining can be controlled to a relative precision better than 0.3% for porosities ranging from 20--80% and thicknesses ranging from sub- micron to hundreds of microns. The technique of using porous silicon has important implications for microfabrication of silicon electromechanical devices and sensors. The high relative precision in realizing a given thickness is superior to that obtained with conventional chemical etches. 8 refs.

  1. Silicon micromachining based on porous silicon formation

    SciTech Connect

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Stevenson, J.O.; Howard, A.; Houston, J.E.; Tsao, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a new electrochemical processing technique based on porous silicon formation that can produce surface and buried insulators, conductors, and sacrificial layers required for silicon micromachining to fabricate micromechanical devices and sensors. Porosity and thickness of porous silicon layers for micromachining can be controlled to a relative precision better than 0.3% for porosities ranging from 20--80% and thicknesses ranging from sub- micron to hundreds of microns. The technique of using porous silicon has important implications for microfabrication of silicon electromechanical devices and sensors. The high relative precision in realizing a given thickness is superior to that obtained with conventional chemical etches. 8 refs.

  2. Upgrading Metallurgical-Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, L. M.; Moore, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    Closed-loop process produces semiconductor-grade silicon. Metallurgical-grade silicon converted to ultrapure silicon by reacting with hydrogen and silicon tetrahalide to form trihalosilane, purifying this intermediate and again decomposing to high purity silicon in third stage. Heterogeneously and homogeneously nucleated polycrystalline silicon used in semiconductor device applications and in silicon photovoltaic solar cell fabrication.

  3. Thin silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. B.; Bacon, C.; Direda, V.; Ford, D. H.; Ingram, A. E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J. A.; Ruffins, T. R.; Barnett, A. M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (less than 50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  4. Thin silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  5. Pressure-induced phase transformations during femtosecond-laser doping of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Lin, Yu-Ting; Sher, Meng-Ju; Winkler, Mark T.; Mazur, Eric; Gradečak, Silvija

    2011-09-01

    Silicon hyperdoped with chalcogens via femtosecond-laser irradiation exhibits unique near-unity sub-bandgap absorptance extending into the infrared region. The intense light-matter interactions that occur during femtosecond-laser doping produce pressure waves sufficient to induce phase transformations in silicon, resulting in the formation of metastable polymorphic phases, but their exact formation mechanism and influence on the doping process are still unknown. We report direct observations of these phases, describe their formation and distribution, and consider their potential impact on sub-bandgap absorptance. Specifically, the transformation from diamond cubic Si-I to pressure-induced polymorphic crystal structures (amorphous Si, Si-XII, and Si-III) during femtosecond-laser irradiation was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Amorphous Si, Si-XII, and Si-III were found to form in femtosecond-laser doped silicon regardless of the presence of a gaseous or thin-film dopant precursor. The rate of pressure loading and unloading induced by femtosecond-laser irradiation kinetically limits the formation of pressure-induced phases, producing regions of amorphous Si 20 to 200 nm in size and nanocrystals of Si-XII and Si-III. The surface texturing that occurs during femtosecond-laser irradiation produces inhomogeneous pressure distributions across the surface and causes delayed development of high-pressure silicon polymorphs over many laser pulses. Finally, we find that the polymorph phases disappear during annealing more rapidly than the sub-bandgap absorptance decreases, enabling us to decouple these two processes through post-treatment annealing.

  6. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  7. Thermogravimetric analysis of silicon carbide-silicon nitride polycarbosilazane precursor during pyrolysis from ambient to 1000 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledbetter, F. E., III; Daniels, J. G.; Clemons, J. M.; Hundley, N. H.; Penn, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis data are presented on the unmeltable polycarbosilazane precursor of silicon carbide-silicon nitride fibers, over the room temperature-1000 C range in a nitrogen atmosphere, in order to establish the weight loss at various temperatures during the precursor's pyrolysis to the fiber material. The fibers obtained by this method are excellent candidates for use in applications where the oxidation of carbon fibers (above 400 C) renders them unsuitable.

  8. Silicon material technology status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutwack, R.

    Silicon has been the basic element for the electronic and photovoltaic industries. The use of silicon as the primary element for terrestrial photovoltaic solar arrays is projected to continue. The reasons for this projection are related to the maturity of silicon technology, the ready availability of extremely pure silicon, the performance of silicon solar cells, and the considerable present investment in technology and manufacturing facilities. The technologies for producing semiconductor grade silicon and, to a lesser extent, refined metallurgical grade silicon are considered. It is pointed out that nearly all of the semiconductor grade silicon is produced by processes based on the Siemens deposition reactor, a technology developed 26 years ago. The state-of-the-art for producing silicon by this process is discussed. It is expected that efforts to reduce polysilicon process costs will continue.

  9. Purified silicon production system

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  10. Silicon Nitride Balls For Cryogenic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, Myles F.; Ng, Lillian W.

    1990-01-01

    Resistance to wear greater than that of 440C steel. Experiments show lives of ball bearings immersed in liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen increased significantly when 440C steel balls (running on 440C steel races) replaced by balls of silicon nitride. Developed for use at high temperatures, where lubrication poor or nonexistent. Best wear life of any bearing tested to date and ball material spalls without fracturing. Plans for future tests call for use of liquid oxygen as working fluid.

  11. Effect of Various Plasmas on Vacuum Deposited Amorphous and Microscrystal Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, P. H.; Huan, Zhong; Gao, Yinqun; Schubert, C. C.; Kinnier, J. H.

    1983-03-01

    A gaseous plasma of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen and air has been used to treat amorphous and microcrystal silicon. The resultant effect, as measured by the photovoltaic characteristics of solar cells made of these materials, is that all of these gases can be effectively incorporated into the amorphous and microcrystal silicon to produce a beneficial photovoltaic effect. There is some difference in thermal stability; nitrogen is very similar to hydrogen and is higher in stability, and oxygen and air are somewhat lower.

  12. Silicon (100)/SiO2 by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Madaan, Nitesh; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-25

    Silicon (100) wafers are ubiquitous in microfabrication and, accordingly, their surface characteristics are important. Herein, we report the analysis of Si (100) via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using monochromatic Al K radiation. Survey scans show that the material is primarily silicon and oxygen, and the Si 2p region shows two peaks that correspond to elemental silicon and silicon dioxide. Using these peaks the thickness of the native oxide (SiO2) was estimated using the equation of Strohmeier.1 The oxygen peak is symmetric. The material shows small amounts of carbon, fluorine, and nitrogen contamination. These silicon wafers are used as the base material for subsequent growth of templated carbon nanotubes.

  13. Role of surface-reaction layer in HBr/fluorocarbon-based plasma with nitrogen addition formed by high-aspect-ratio etching of polycrystalline silicon and SiO2 stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Taku; Matsui, Miyako; Yokogawa, Kenetsu; Arase, Takao; Mori, Masahito

    2016-06-01

    The etching of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)/SiO2 stacks by using VHF plasma was studied for three-dimensional NAND fabrication. One critical goal is achieving both a vertical profile and high throughput for multiple-stack etching. While the conventional process consists of multiple steps for each stacked layer, in this study, HBr/fluorocarbon-based gas chemistry was investigated to achieve a single-step etching process to reduce process time. By analyzing the dependence on wafer temperature, we improved both the etching profile and rate at a low temperature. The etching mechanism is examined considering the composition of the surface reaction layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that the adsorption of N–H and Br was enhanced at a low temperature, resulting in a reduced carbon-based-polymer thickness and enhanced Si etching. Finally, a vertical profile was obtained as a result of the formation of a thin and reactive surface-reaction layer at a low wafer temperature.

  14. Shrinking of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon oxide matrix during rapid thermal annealing in a forming gas atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, M.; Fusi, A.; Xie, L.; Ali, H.; van Swaaij, R. A. C. M. M.; Leifer, K.; Zeman, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen on the crystallization process of silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon oxide matrix. We show that hydrogen gas during annealing leads to a lower sub-band gap absorption, indicating passivation of defects created during annealing. Samples annealed in pure nitrogen show expected trends according to crystallization theory. Samples annealed in forming gas, however, deviate from this trend. Their crystallinity decreases for increased annealing time. Furthermore, we observe a decrease in the mean nanocrystal size and the size distribution broadens, indicating that hydrogen causes a size reduction of the silicon nanocrystals.

  15. PVT gauging with liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dresar, Neil T.

    2006-02-01

    Experimental results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) liquid quantity gauging of a 0.17 m 3 liquid nitrogen tank pressured with ambient temperature helium in the normal gravity environment. A previously reported PVT measurement procedure has been improved to include helium solubility in liquid nitrogen. Gauging data was collected at nominal tank fill levels of 80%, 50% and 20% and at nominal tank pressures of 0.3, 1.0, and 1.7 MPa. The test tank was equipped with a liquid pump and spray manifold to circulate and mix the fluid contents and therefore create near-isothermal conditions throughout the tank. Silicon diode sensors were distributed throughout the tank to monitor temperatures. Close-spaced arrays of silicon diode point sensors were utilized to precisely detect the liquid level at the nominal 80%, 50%, and 20% fill levels. The tests simulated the cryogenic tank-side conditions only; helium mass added to the tank was measured by gas flowmeters rather than using pressure and temperature measurements from a dedicated helium supply bottle. Equilibrium data for cryogenic nitrogen and helium mixtures from numerous sources was correlated to predict soluble helium mole fractions. Results show that solubility should be accounted for in the PVT gauging calculations. Mole fractions predicted by Dalton's Law were found to be in good agreement with the compiled equilibrium data within the temperature-pressure range of interest. Therefore, Dalton's Law was deemed suitable for calculating ullage composition. Gauging results from the PVT method agreed with the reference liquid level measurements to within 3%.

  16. Process for producing silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Carleton, K.L.

    1982-06-10

    A process of producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  17. Producing Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Manufacturing process makes CxSiyNz fibers. Precursor fibers spun from extruding machine charged with polycarbosilazane resin. When pyrolyzed, resin converted to cross-linked mixture of silicon carbide and silicon nitride, still in fiber form. CxSiyNz fibers promising substitutes for carbon fibers in high-strength, low-weight composites where high electrical conductivity unwanted.

  18. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    DOEpatents

    De Mattei, Robert C.; Elwell, Dennis; Feigelson, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is removed from the bath.

  19. Efficient Silicon Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Hill, D. M.; Jewett, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    High-purity silicon efficiently produced and transferred by continuous two-cycle reactor. New reactor operates in relatively-narrow temperature rate and uses large surfaces area to minimize heat expenditure and processing time in producing silicon by hydrogen reduction of trichlorosilane. Two cycles of reactor consists of silicon production and removal.

  20. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Mattei, R.C.; Elwell, D.; Feigelson, R.S.

    1981-09-29

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is then removed from the bath.

  1. Influence of Chemical Composition and Structure in Silicon Dielectric Materials on Passivation of Thin Crystalline Silicon on Glass.

    PubMed

    Calnan, Sonya; Gabriel, Onno; Rothert, Inga; Werth, Matteo; Ring, Sven; Stannowski, Bernd; Schlatmann, Rutger

    2015-09-01

    In this study, various silicon dielectric films, namely, a-SiOx:H, a-SiNx:H, and a-SiOxNy:H, grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) were evaluated for use as interlayers (ILs) between crystalline silicon and glass. Chemical bonding analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that high values of oxidant gases (CO2 and/or N2), added to SiH4 during PECVD, reduced the Si-H and N-H bond density in the silicon dielectrics. Various three layer stacks combining the silicon dielectric materials were designed to minimize optical losses between silicon and glass in rear side contacted heterojunction pn test cells. The PECVD grown silicon dielectrics retained their functionality despite being subjected to harsh subsequent processing such as crystallization of the silicon at 1414 °C or above. High values of short circuit current density (Jsc; without additional hydrogen passivation) required a high density of Si-H bonds and for the nitrogen containing films, additionally, a high N-H bond density. Concurrently high values of both Jsc and open circuit voltage Voc were only observed when [Si-H] was equal to or exceeded [N-H]. Generally, Voc correlated with a high density of [Si-H] bonds in the silicon dielectric; otherwise, additional hydrogen passivation using an active plasma process was required. The highest Voc ∼ 560 mV, for a silicon acceptor concentration of about 10(16) cm(-3), was observed for stacks where an a-SiOxNy:H film was adjacent to the silicon. Regardless of the cell absorber thickness, field effect passivation of the buried silicon surface by the silicon dielectric was mandatory for efficient collection of carriers generated from short wavelength light (in the vicinity of the glass-Si interface). However, additional hydrogen passivation was obligatory for an increased diffusion length of the photogenerated carriers and thus Jsc in solar cells with thicker absorbers.

  2. Effect of attrition milling on the reaction sintering of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.; Glasgow, T. K.; Yeh, H. C.

    1978-01-01

    Silicon powder was ground in a steel attrition mill under nitrogen. Air exposed powder was compacted, prefired in helium, and reaction sintered in nitrogen-4 v/o hydrogen. For longer grinding times, oxygen content, surface area and compactability of the powder increased; and both alpha/beta ratio and degreee of nitridation during sintering increased. Iron content remained constant.

  3. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  4. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M.

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  5. Does Silicon Have a Role in Ornamental Crop Production?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silicon (Si) is not considered to be an essential plant nutrient because most plant species can complete their life cycle without it. Still, some plants can accumulate Si at concentrations greater than nitrogen and potassium, and all species evaluated so far have concentrations of Si in tissue grea...

  6. Tribological studies of silicon for magnetic recording applications (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Koinkar, Vilas N.

    1993-10-01

    Read-write sliders made of silicon using integrated-circuit technology offer advantages of low-cost and high volume production. In the present study our objective is to investigate whether the friction and wear performance of bare silicon is adequate for disk drive application or whether certain coatings/treatments are necessary for low friction and wear. Macrotribological experiments have been performed with various pin/slider materials and magnetic disks in a modified disk drive. Microtribological studies have also been conducted on silicon using a friction force microscope. Based on macrotests, we found that the friction and wear performance of bare silicon is not adequate. With single and polycrystalline silicon, transfer of amorphous carbon from the disk to the pin/slider and oxidation-enhanced fracture of pin/slider material followed by oxidation of the transfer coating is responsible for degradation of the sliding interface and consequent friction increase in ambient air. With dry-oxidized or PECVD-SiO2-coated silicon, no significant friction increase or interfacial degradation was observed in ambient air. In the absence of an oxidizing environment (in dry nitrogen), the coefficient of friction decreased from 0.2 to 0.05 following amorphous carbon transfer for the materials tested. Nanoscratching/nanowear and nanoindentation studies also indicate that coated silicon is superior to bare silicon.

  7. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  8. Strength of hot isostatically pressed and sintered reaction bonded silicon nitrides containing Y2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, William A.; Mieskowski, Diane M.

    1989-01-01

    The hot isostatic pressing of reaction bonded Si3N4 containing Y2O3 produced specimens with greater room temperature strengths than those by high pressure nitrogen sintering of the same material. Average room temperature bend strengths for hot isostatically pressed reaction bonded silicon nitride and high pressure nitrogen sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride were 767 and 670 MPa, respectively. Values of 472 and 495 MPa were observed at 1370 C. For specimens of similar but lower Y2O3 content produced from Si3N4 powder using the same high pressure nitrogen sintering conditions, the room temperature strength was 664 MPa and the 1370 C strength was 402 MPa. The greater strengths of the reaction bonded silicon nitride materials in comparison to the sintered silicon nitride powder material are attributed to the combined effect of processing method and higher Y2O3 content.

  9. NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Lokhandwala; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; Z. He; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans; A. Morisato; K. Amo; A. DaCosta; R.W. Baker; R. Olsen; H. Hassani; T. Rathkamp

    1999-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process for the denitrogenation of natural gas. Large proven reserves in the Lower-48 states cannot be produced because of the presence of nitrogen. To exploit these reserves, cost-effective, simple technology able to reduce the nitrogen content of the gas to 4-5% is required. Technology applicable to treatment of small gas streams (below 10 MMscfd) is particularly needed. In this project membranes that selectively permeate methane and reject nitrogen in the gas were developed. Preliminary calculations show that a membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 3 to 5 is required to make the process economically viable. A number of polymer materials likely to have the required selectivities were evaluated as composite membranes. Polyacetylenes such as poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) [PTMSP] and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] had high selectivities and fluxes, but membranes prepared from these polymers were not stable, showing decreasing flux and selectivity during tests lasting only a few hours. Parel, a poly(propylene oxide allyl glycidyl ether) had a selectivity of 3 at ambient temperatures and 4 or more at temperatures of {minus}20 C. However, Parel is no longer commercially available, and we were unable to find an equivalent material in the time available. Therefore, most of our experimental work focused on silicone rubber membranes, which have a selectivity of 2.5 at ambient temperatures, increasing to 3-4 at low temperatures. Silicone rubber composite membranes were evaluated in bench-scale module tests and with commercial-scale, 4-inch-diameter modules in a small pilot plant. Over six days of continuous operation at a feed gas temperature of {minus}5 to {minus}10 C, the membrane maintained a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 3.3. Based on the pilot plant performance data, an analysis of the economic potential of the process was prepared. We conclude that a stand-alone membrane process is the lowest

  10. Two-dimensional silicon and carbon monochalcogenides with the structure of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Dario; Abboud, Ali; Lebègue, Sébastien; Vaitheeswaran, Ganapathy

    Phosphorene has recently attracted interest for applications in transistors and photodetectors. Inspired by this material we carried out an ab initio study to predict new binary materials with a structure similar to phosphorene. Specifically, carbon or silicon atoms and chalcogen atoms (up to Te) were combined to form a phosphorene-like monolayer. The structure of these new compounds was then optimized and the dynamical stability of the structures was demonstrated by computing phonon dispersion curves. A series of materials were found to be stable: CS, CSe, CTe, SiO, SiS, SiSe, and SiTe. Electronic properties such as band gaps and effective masses were computed at the density functional theory level. By using the accurate HSE hybrid functional it was found that these materials span a broad range of bandgaps, going from the 2.1 eV of SiS to the 0.55 eV of SiTe. The effective masses were also computed; similarly to phosphorene, a strong anisotropy was found when comparing the zigzag and armchair directions. The variety of electronic properties found for these systems will contribute to broaden the technological applicability of two dimensional materials.

  11. Synthesis of fine-grained .alpha.-silicon nitride by a combustion process

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J. Birch; Kingman, Donald D.; Bianchini, Gregory M.

    1990-01-01

    A combustion synthesis process for the preparation of .alpha.-silicon nitride and composites thereof is disclosed. Preparation of the .alpha.-silicon nitride comprises the steps of dry mixing silicon powder with an alkali metal azide, such as sodium azide, cold-pressing the mixture into any desired shape, or loading the mixture into a fused, quartz crucible, loading the crucible into a combustion chamber, pressurizing the chamber with nitrogen and igniting the mixture using an igniter pellet. The method for the preparation of the composites comprises dry mixing silicon powder (Si) or SiO.sub.2, with a metal or metal oxide, adding a small amount of an alkali metal azide such as sodium azide, introducing the mixture into a suitable combustion chamber, pressurizing the combustion chamber with nitrogen, igniting the mixture within the combustion chamber, and isolating the .alpha.-silicon nitride formed as a reaction product.

  12. Silicon release coating, method of making same, and method of using same

    DOEpatents

    Jonczyk, Ralf

    2011-11-22

    A method of making a release coating includes the following steps: forming a mixture that includes (a) solid components comprising (i) 20-99% silicon by weight and (ii) 1-80% silicon nitride by weight and (b) a solvent; applying the mixture to an inner portion of a crucible or graphite board adapted to form an ingot or wafer comprising silicon; and annealing the mixture in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from 1000 to 2000.degree. C. The invention may also relate to release coatings and methods of making a silicon ingot or wafer including the use of a release coating.

  13. Silicone oil and fluorosilicone.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S; Takeuchi, S

    2000-03-01

    Silicone oil has been used to fill the vitreous cavity for long-term or permanent internal tamponade in eyes with proliferative vitreoretinopathy or complicated retinal detachment due to ocular trauma, giant retinal tears, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and cytomegalovirus retinitis. Reports from the Silicone Study confirmed its efficacy in the treatment of proliferative vitreoretinopathy and addressed outcome differences in vitrectomized and nonvitrectomized eyes, combined retinotomy, silicone oil removal, and complications associated with silicone oil tamponade, such as intraocular pressure abnormalities and corneal abnormalities. Because silicone oil is lighter than water and not adequate in supporting the inferior quadrants, several heavier-than-water materials have been introduced for intraocular tamponade. Silicone oil can be a potential vehicle for delivering antiproliferative agents to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  14. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  15. Effect of additive gases and injection methods on chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F{sub 2} remote plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Y. B.; Park, S. M.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, N.-E.; Kim, K. S.; Bae, G. H.

    2007-07-15

    The authors investigated the effects of various additive gases and different injection methods on the chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F{sub 2} remote plasmas. N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}+O{sub 2} gases in the F{sub 2}/Ar/N{sub 2} and F{sub 2}/Ar/N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} remote plasmas effectively increased the etch rate of the layers. The addition of direct-injected NO gas increased the etch rates most significantly. NO radicals generated by the addition of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}+O{sub 2} or direct-injected NO molecules contributed to the effective removal of nitrogen and oxygen in the silicon nitride and oxide layers, by forming N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 2} by-products, respectively, and thereby enhancing SiF{sub 4} formation. As a result of the effective removal of the oxygen, nitrogen, and silicon atoms in the layers, the chemical dry etch rates were enhanced significantly. The process regime for the etch rate enhancement of the layers was extended at elevated temperature.

  16. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  17. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  18. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  19. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  20. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  1. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  2. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  3. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  4. Silicon Stokes terahertz laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, S. G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Hovenier, J. N.; Klaassen, T. O.; Carder, D. A.; Phillips, P. J.; Redlich, B.; Riemann, H.; Zhukavin, R. Kh.; Shastin, V. N.

    2007-04-10

    A Raman-type silicon laser at terahertz frequencies has been realized. Stokes-shifted stimulated emission has been observed from silicon crystals doped by antimony donors when optically excited by an infrared free electron laser. The Raman lasing was obtained due to resonant scattering on electronic states of a donor atom.

  5. Cleaning up Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A development program that started in 1975 between Union Carbide and JPL, led to Advanced Silicon Materials LLC's, formerly ASiMI, commercial process for producing silane in viable quantities. The process was expanded to include the production of high-purity polysilicon for electronic devices. The technology came out of JPL's Low Cost Silicon Array Project.

  6. Silicon research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of solar cells suitable for space applications are discussed, along with the advantages and disadvantages of silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells. The goal of a silicon solar cell with 18% efficiency has not been reached and does not appear promising in the near future.

  7. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  8. Reversible Cycling of Silicon and Silicon Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrovac, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Lithium ion batteries typically use a graphite negative electrode. Silicon can store more lithium than any other element and has long been considered as an attractive replacement for graphite. The theoretical lithium storage capacity of silicon is nearly ten times higher than graphite volumetrically and three times higher gravimetrically. The equilibrium Si-Li binary system is well known. Completely new phase behaviors are observed at room temperature. This includes the formation of a new phase, Li15Si4, which is the highest lithium containing phase at room temperature [1]. The formation of Li15Si4 is accompanied by a 280 percent volume expansion of silicon. During de-alloying this phase contracts, forming amorphous silicon. The volume expansion of alloys can cause intra-particle fracture and inter-particle disconnection; leading to loss of cycle life. To overcome issues with volume expansion requires a detailed knowledge of Li-Si phase behavior, careful design of the composition and nanostructure of the alloy and the microstructure of the negative electrode [2]. In this presentation the phase behavior of the Li-Si system will be described. Using this knowledge alone, strategies can be developed so that silicon can be reversibly cycled in a battery hundreds of times. Further increases in energy density and efficiency can be gained by alloying silicon with other elements, while controlling microstructure [2]. Coupled with negative electrode design strategies, practical negative electrodes for lithium ion cells can be developed based on bulk materials, with significant energy density improvement over conventional electrodes. [4pt] [1] M.N. Obrovac and L.J. Krause, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A103. [0pt] [2] M.N. Obrovac, Leif Christensen, Dinh Ba Le, and J.R. Dahn, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A849

  9. Silicone-containing composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    2012-01-24

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selected from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.

  10. Intraventricular Silicone Oil

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Stéphane; Boissonnot, Michèle; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Simonet, Charles; Ciron, Jonathan; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial silicone oil is a rare complication of intraocular endotamponade with silicone oil. We describe a case of intraventricular silicone oil fortuitously observed 38 months after an intraocular tamponade for a complicated retinal detachment in an 82 year-old woman admitted in the Department of Neurology for a stroke. We confirm the migration of silicone oil along the optic nerve. We discuss this rare entity with a review of the few other cases reported in the medical literature. Intraventricular migration of silicone oil after intraocular endotamponade is usually asymptomatic but have to be known of the neurologists and the radiologists because of its differential diagnosis that are intraventricular hemorrhage and tumor. PMID:26735537

  11. Quantification of silane molecules on oxidized silicon: are there options for a traceable and absolute determination?

    PubMed

    Dietrich, P M; Streeck, C; Glamsch, S; Ehlert, C; Lippitz, A; Nutsch, A; Kulak, N; Beckhoff, B; Unger, W E S

    2015-10-01

    Organosilanes are used routinely to functionalize various support materials for further modifications. Nevertheless, reliable quantitative information about surface functional group densities after layer formation is rarely available. Here, we present the analysis of thin organic nanolayers made from nitrogen containing silane molecules on naturally oxidized silicon wafers with reference-free total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An areic density of 2-4 silane molecules per nm(2) was calculated from the layer's nitrogen mass deposition per area unit obtained by reference-free TXRF. Complementary energy and angle-resolved XPS (ER/AR-XPS) in the Si 2p core-level region was used to analyze the outermost surface region of the organic (silane layer)-inorganic (silicon wafer) interface. Different coexisting silicon species as silicon, native silicon oxide, and silane were identified and quantified. As a result of the presented proof-of-concept, absolute and traceable values for the areic density of silanes containing nitrogen as intrinsic marker are obtained by calibration of the XPS methods with reference-free TXRF. Furthermore, ER/AR-XPS is shown to facilitate the determination of areic densities in (mono)layers made from silanes having no heteroatomic marker other than silicon. After calibration with reference-free TXRF, these areic densities of silane molecules can be determined when using the XPS component intensity of the silane's silicon atom.

  12. Electromagnetic Levitation of Silicon and Silicon-Iron Alloy Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Paul; Yang, Yindong; Barati, Mansoor; McLean, Alex

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the design of an electromagnetic levitation system and a technique for non-conductive silicon heating and conductive silicon levitation is described. The aim of the work is to describe the various parameters including coil design, applied power and specimen weight that govern the temperature of levitated silicon and silicon-iron alloy droplets.

  13. Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kovačević, Goran Pivac, Branko

    2014-01-28

    The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

  14. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Agnew, Stephen F.; Christensen, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  15. The teleconnection between marine silicon supply and desertification in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongfang; Wu, Jianping; Chen, Shengtao; Lu, Qing

    2007-01-01

    Desertification has been notably expanding in China in the recent decade, especially in North China where dust/sand storm (DSS) frequently assaulted local communities. Analyses in marine ecology found that the earth ecosystem could be able to complement nutrient silicon for keeping sustainable development of marine ecosystem, and decreasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere; as a result, the area of desertification would be enlarged. Modern human being activities have resulted in constant changes in the amount of silicon transport from land into sea, leading to oversupply of nitrogen and phosphorus but silicon in seawater. The proportion of nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon was seriously imbalanced and the limitation of silicon for phytoplankton growth has become more serious. The silicon deficiency has damaged the marine ecosystem in coastal regions and slowed down the carbon sedimentation in the atmosphere of the world. The authors believe that the continual discharge of CO2 into the atmosphere is the cause for the global warming including marine water temperature rise. Consequently, the earth ecosystem would have to trigger its complementary action to resume to the silicon balance by algae bloom in seawater for reducing air and water temperatures. In order to complement nutrient silicon into the sea, the ecosystem would transport silicon via the atmosphere; therefore, the desertification in the inner land is a natural reaction. As marine phytoplankton booming can reduce the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and further ease the green-house effect, during this process, a large amount of silicon are demanded by the ecosystem, which human being are unable to stop desertification from happening but slow down the progress and ease the risk. Therefore, as an important role in earth ecosystem, people should reduce the CO2 discharge into the atmosphere first; then, the normal function of river transporting silicon must be restored. In this way, the CO2 in the

  16. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Influence of nitrogen dose on the charge density of nitrogen-implanted buried oxide in SOI wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhongshan, Zheng; Zhongli, Liu; Ning, Li; Guohua, Li; Enxia, Zhang

    2010-02-01

    To harden silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers fabricated using separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX) to total-dose irradiation, the technique of nitrogen implantation into the buried oxide (BOX) layer of SIMOX wafers can be used. However, in this work, it has been found that all the nitrogen-implanted BOX layers reveal greater initial positive charge densities, which increased with increasing nitrogen implantation dose. Also, the results indicate that excessively large nitrogen implantation dose reduced the radiation tolerance of BOX for its high initial positive charge density. The bigger initial positive charge densities can be ascribed to the accumulation of implanted nitrogen near the Si-BOX interface after annealing. On the other hand, in our work, it has also been observed that, unlike nitrogen-implanted BOX, all the fluorine-implanted BOX layers show a negative charge density. To obtain the initial charge densities of the BOX layers, the tested samples were fabricated with a metal-BOX-silicon (MBS) structure based on SIMOX wafers for high-frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) analysis.

  17. Use of (77)Se and (125)Te NMR Spectroscopy to Probe Covalency of the Actinide-Chalcogen Bonding in [Th(En){N(SiMe3)2}3](-) (E = Se, Te; n = 1, 2) and Their Oxo-Uranium(VI) Congeners.

    PubMed

    Smiles, Danil E; Wu, Guang; Hrobárik, Peter; Hayton, Trevor W

    2016-01-27

    Reaction of [Th(I)(NR2)3] (R = SiMe3) (1) with 1 equiv of either [K(18-crown-6)]2[Se4] or [K(18-crown-6)]2[Te2] affords the thorium dichalcogenides, [K(18-crown-6)][Th(η(2)-E2)(NR2)3] (E = Se, 2; E = Te, 3), respectively. Removal of one chalcogen atom via reaction with Et3P, or Et3P and Hg, affords the monoselenide and monotelluride complexes of thorium, [K(18-crown-6)][Th(E)(NR2)3] (E = Se, 4; E = Te, 5), respectively. Both 4 and 5 were characterized by X-ray crystallography and were found to feature the shortest known Th-Se and Th-Te bond distances. The electronic structure and nature of the actinide-chalcogen bonds were investigated with (77)Se and (125)Te NMR spectroscopy accompanied by detailed quantum-chemical analysis. We also recorded the (77)Se NMR shift for a U(VI) oxo-selenido complex, [U(O)(Se)(NR2)3](-) (δ((77)Se) = 4905 ppm), which features the highest frequency (77)Se NMR shift yet reported, and expands the known (77)Se chemical shift range for diamagnetic substances from ∼3300 ppm to almost 6000 ppm. Both (77)Se and (125)Te NMR chemical shifts of given chalcogenide ligands were identified as quantitative measures of the An-E bond covalency within an isoelectronic series and supported significant 5f-orbital participation in actinide-ligand bonding for uranium(VI) complexes in contrast to those involving thorium(IV). Moreover, X-ray diffraction studies together with NMR spectroscopic data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide convincing evidence for the actinide-chalcogen multiple bonding in the title complexes. Larger An-E covalency is observed in the [U(O)(E)(NR2)3](-) series, which decreases as the chalcogen atom becomes heavier. PMID:26667146

  18. Process for purification of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rath, H. J.; Sirtl, E.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1981-01-01

    The purification of metallurgically pure silicon having a silicon content of more than 95% by weight is accomplished by leaching with an acidic solution which substantially does not attack silicon. A mechanical treatment leading to continuous particle size reduction of the granulated silicon to be purified is combined with the chemical purification step.

  19. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  20. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  1. The bonded unipolar silicon-silicon junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Stefan; Andersson, Gert I.; Andersson, Mats O.; Engström, Olof

    1992-07-01

    The electrical and optical properties of wafer bonded unipolar silicon-silicon junctions were investigated. The interfaces, both n-n type and p-p type, were prepared using wafers with hydrophilic surfaces. The current versus voltage characteristics, the current transients following stepwise changes in the applied bias, and the capacitance versus voltage characteristics as well as the temperature dependence of the current and capacitance were experimentally obtained and theoretically modeled. The proposed model assumes two distributions of interface states, one of acceptors and one of donors, causing a potential barrier at the bonded interface. It is argued that the origins of the interface states are impurities and crystallographic defects in the interfacial region. The capacitance of the bonded structures includes contributions from the depletion regions as well as from minority carriers. When bonded n-n type samples were illuminated with light of photon energies larger than the silicon band gap the current across the junction increased. This is caused by the photogenerated increase in the minority carrier concentration in the interfacial region, which results in a lowering of the potential barrier. Illumination of n-n type structures with light of photon energies lower than the band gap caused a considerable photocurrent at low temperatures. In this case the observed behavior cannot be explained by interaction with the interface states. Instead, the mechanism is the change in the occupancy of deep electron traps caused by the illumination. These traps are located in the silicon in a small volume around the bonded interface with energies close to the center of the band gap and with a peak concentration of about 1013 cm-3. Impurities present on the silicon surfaces before bonding and impurities gettered to the bonded interface are possible reasons for the increased concentration of deep electron traps in the vicinity of the bonded interface.

  2. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  3. Emissivity of microstructured silicon.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick G; Smith, Peter; King, Vernon; Billman, Curtis; Winkler, Mark; Mazur, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Infrared transmittance and hemispherical-directional reflectance data from 2.5 to 25 microm on microstructured silicon surfaces have been measured, and spectral emissivity has been calculated for this wavelength range. Hemispherical-total emissivity is calculated for the samples and found to be 0.84 before a measurement-induced annealing and 0.65 after the measurement for the sulfur-doped sample. Secondary samples lack a measurement-induced anneal, and reasons for this discrepancy are presented. Emissivity numbers are plotted and compared with a silicon substrate, and Aeroglaze Z306 black paint. Use of microstructured silicon as a blackbody or microbolometer surface is modeled and presented, respectively.

  4. Recrystallization of polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lall, C.; Kulkarni, S. B.; Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Optical metallography is used to investigate the recrystallization properties of polycrystalline semiconductor-grade silicon. It is found that polycrystalline silicon recrystallizes at 1380 C in relatively short times, provided that the prior deformation is greater than 30%. For a prior deformation of about 40%, the recrystallization process is essentially complete in about 30 minutes. Silicon recrystallizes at a substantially slower rate than metals at equivalent homologous temperatures. The recrystallized grain size is insensitive to the amount of prestrain for strains in the range of 10-50%.

  5. Advanced silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godbey, D.; Hughes, H.; Kub, F.

    1991-01-01

    Undoped, thin-layer silicon-on-insulator was fabricated using wafer bonding and selective etching techniques employing a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Si0.7Ge0.3 layer as an etch stop. Defect free, undoped 200-350 nm silicon layers over silicon dioxide are routinely fabricated using this procedure. A new selective silicon-germanium etch was developed that significantly improves the ease of fabrication of the bond and etch back silicon insulator (BESOI) material.

  6. Cryogenic silicon photoconductive power switches for high-power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Petr, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The silicon photoconductive power switch (PCPS) is an attractive switch technology because it is capable of switching extremely large energy pulses of short duration with good efficiency and precise timing control. At high operating frequencies, there are enormous advantages to be gained by operating at liquid nitrogen temperatures. For example, the mechanical properties of silicon at 77K are such that its power-dissipation limit due to stress fracture is an order of magnitude higher than at 300K. Also, its thermal conductivity is improved at lower temperatures. Another important characteristic of 77K silicon is that its optical absorption depth at 1.06um extends out to 13cm, as compared to 0.1cm at 300K. Important aspects of operating a cryogenic silicon PCPS at high average power levels are addressed here. Electrical and optical properties of silicon at both 77K and 300K are developed, along with its thermomechanical properties when switching high peak and average power. In addition, experimental data concerning PCPS electrical-switching characteristics, optical trigger uniformity, and thermal stress response during conduction are presented. Finally, a system study compares the silicon PCPS to the thyratron.

  7. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  8. Silicone azide fireproof material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Finely powdered titanium oxide was added to silicone azide as the sintering agent to produce a nonflammable material. Mixing proportions, physical properties, and chemical composition of the fireproofing material are included.

  9. Porous silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-10-01

    In this mini-review, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures-single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion batteries, gas sensors and drug delivery.

  10. Silicon-electroceramics integration

    SciTech Connect

    Tuller, H.L.

    1996-12-31

    Electroceramics provides unique functionality as sensors, transducers, and non-volatile storage media while silicon is nearly unique in its signal processing and micromechanical properties. We discuss how these two materials technologies, when integrated, provide unique devices and structures.

  11. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Engineering design of the third distillation column in the process was accomplished. The initial design is based on a 94.35% recovery of dichlorosilane in the distillate and a 99.9% recovery of trichlorosilane in the bottoms. The specified separation is achieved at a reflux ratio of 15 with 20 trays (equilibrium stages). Additional specifications and results are reported including equipment size, temperatures and pressure. Specific raw material requirements necessary to produce the silicon in the process are presented. The primary raw materials include metallurgical grade silicon, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen, copper (catalyst) and lime (waste treatment). Hydrogen chloride is produced as by product in the silicon deposition. Cost analysis of the process was initiated during this reporting period.

  12. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The chemical engineering analysis of the preliminary process design of a process for producing solar cell grade silicon from dichlorosilane is presented. A plant to produce 1,000 MT/yr of silicon is analyzed. Progress and status for the plant design are reported for the primary activities of base case conditions (60 percent), reaction chemistry (50 percent), process flow diagram (35 percent), energy balance (10 percent), property data (10 percent) and equipment design (5 percent).

  13. SPS silicon reference system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The design analysis of a silicon power conversion system for the solar power satellite (SPS) is summarized. The solar array, consisting of glass encapsulated 50 micrometer silicon solar cells, is described. The general scheme for power distribution to the array/antenna interface is described. Degradation by proton irradiation is considered. The interface between the solar array and the klystron equipped power transmitter is described.

  14. Nitrogen spark denoxer

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Henry K.; Novick, Vincent J.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.

    1997-01-01

    A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

  15. Flameless nitrogen skid unit

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, S.B.; John, J.C.; Mints, D.K.

    1984-03-27

    A flameless nitrogen vaporizing unit includes a first internal combustion engine driving a nitrogen pump through a transmission. A second internal combustion engine drives three hydraulic oil pumps against a variable back pressure so that a variable load may be imposed upon the second engine. Liquid nitrogen is pumped from the nitrogen pump driven by the first engine into a first heat exchanger where heat is transferred from exhaust gases from the first and second internal combustion engines to the liquid nitrogen to cause the nitrogen to be transformed into a gaseous state. The gaseous nitrogen then flows into a second heat exchanger where it is superheated by an engine coolant fluid to heat the gaseous nitrogen to essentially an ambient temperature. The superheated nitrogen is then injected into the well. The engine coolant fluid flows in a coolant circulation system. Heat is transferred to the coolant fluid directly from the internal combustion engine. Heat is also provided to the coolant fluid from lubrication oil pumped by the three pumps attached to the second internal combustion engine. The coolant fluid circulating system includes a comingling chamber for comingling warmer coolant fluid flowing from the internal combustion engines to the second heat exchanger with cooler coolant fluids flowing from the second heat exchanger to the internal combustion engines. Methods of vaporizing nitrogen are also disclosed.

  16. Silicon oxynitride films deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering using nitrous oxide as a single-source precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Hänninen, Tuomas Schmidt, Susann; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2015-09-15

    Silicon oxynitride thin films were synthesized by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering of silicon in argon/nitrous oxide plasmas. Nitrous oxide was employed as a single-source precursor supplying oxygen and nitrogen for the film growth. The films were characterized by elastic recoil detection analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, scanning electron microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Results show that the films are silicon rich, amorphous, and exhibit a random chemical bonding structure. The optical properties with the refractive index and the extinction coefficient correlate with the film elemental composition, showing decreasing values with increasing film oxygen and nitrogen content. The total percentage of oxygen and nitrogen in the films is controlled by adjusting the gas flow ratio in the deposition processes. Furthermore, it is shown that the film oxygen-to-nitrogen ratio can be tailored by the high power impulse magnetron sputtering-specific parameters pulse frequency and energy per pulse.

  17. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  18. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  19. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  20. Albert Behnke: nitrogen narcosis.

    PubMed

    Grover, Casey A; Grover, David H

    2014-02-01

    As early as 1826, divers diving to great depths noted that descent often resulted in a phenomenon of intoxication and euphoria. In 1935, Albert Behnke discovered nitrogen as the cause of this clinical syndrome, a condition now known as nitrogen narcosis. Nitrogen narcosis consists of the development of euphoria, a false sense of security, and impaired judgment upon underwater descent using compressed air below 3-4 atmospheres (99 to 132 feet). At greater depths, symptoms can progress to loss of consciousness. The syndrome remains relatively unchanged in modern diving when compressed air is used. Behnke's use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures subsequent to his discovery during the 1939 rescue of the wrecked submarine USS Squalus pioneered the use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures, which are used by modern divers when working at great depth to avoid the effects of nitrogen narcosis.

  1. Nitrogen In Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M. D.; Baragiola, R.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Crary, F.; Young, D. T.

    2004-12-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions in the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to our models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  2. Silicon and silicone: theoretical and clinical implications of breast implants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S H; Chang, C C; Teuber, S S; Gershwin, M E

    1993-02-01

    In the past 10 years, there have been multiple published reports associating silicone breast implants with scleroderma, morphea, SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, CREST syndrome and "human adjuvant disease." The alleged offending material, silicone, is a synthetic polymer containing a silicon-oxygen backbone. Beginning with the heating of SiO2 in the presence of carbon, elemental silicon is produced. Methylchloride is added and the resulting product is hydrolyzed to form low molecular weight prepolymers which are linked to form linear silicone polymers and cross-linked to yield silicone rubbers or elastomers. The polymeric and hydrophobic characteristics of silicone and the presence of electrostatic charges and organic sidegroups make silicone a potentially ideal immunogen, leading to cross-reactivity with autoantigens. Silicon is an essential constituent of proteoglycans which theoretically could result in immunological cross-reactions between silicone and connective tissues. Although the literature contains numerous examples of silicone-associated autoimmune disease, there is no consistent pattern of immunological abnormalities observed. There are, however, some intriguing and interesting observations. Further large-scale studies are needed to determine if a link between silicone exposure and autoimmunity exists. Also, since the inducing events of autoimmune diseases are unknown, studies on silicone could provide a model for autoimmune diseases associated with toxicological factors.

  3. Silicon and silicone: theoretical and clinical implications of breast implants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S H; Chang, C C; Teuber, S S; Gershwin, M E

    1993-02-01

    In the past 10 years, there have been multiple published reports associating silicone breast implants with scleroderma, morphea, SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, CREST syndrome and "human adjuvant disease." The alleged offending material, silicone, is a synthetic polymer containing a silicon-oxygen backbone. Beginning with the heating of SiO2 in the presence of carbon, elemental silicon is produced. Methylchloride is added and the resulting product is hydrolyzed to form low molecular weight prepolymers which are linked to form linear silicone polymers and cross-linked to yield silicone rubbers or elastomers. The polymeric and hydrophobic characteristics of silicone and the presence of electrostatic charges and organic sidegroups make silicone a potentially ideal immunogen, leading to cross-reactivity with autoantigens. Silicon is an essential constituent of proteoglycans which theoretically could result in immunological cross-reactions between silicone and connective tissues. Although the literature contains numerous examples of silicone-associated autoimmune disease, there is no consistent pattern of immunological abnormalities observed. There are, however, some intriguing and interesting observations. Further large-scale studies are needed to determine if a link between silicone exposure and autoimmunity exists. Also, since the inducing events of autoimmune diseases are unknown, studies on silicone could provide a model for autoimmune diseases associated with toxicological factors. PMID:8441826

  4. Bend strengths of reaction bonded silicon nitride prepared from dry attrition milled silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dry attrition milled silicon powder was compacted, sintered in helium, and reaction bonded in nitrogen-4 volume percent hydrogen. Bend strengths of bars with as-nitrided surfaces averaged as high as 210 MPa at room temperature and 220 MPa at 1400 C. Bars prepared from the milled powder were stronger than those prepared from as-received powder at both room temperature and at 1400 C. Room temperature strength decreased with increased milling time and 1400 C strength increased with increased milling time.

  5. Sintered silicon nitrode recuperator fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, A.; Chiu, W. S.; Mccreight, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    The preliminary design and a demonstration of the feasibility of fabricating submodules of an automotive Stirling engine recuperator for waste heat recovery at 370 C are described. Sinterable silicon nitride (Sialon) tubing and plates were fabricated by extrusion and hydrostatic pressing, respectively, suitable for demonstrating a potential method of constructing ceramic recuperator-type heat exchangers. These components were fired in nitrogen atmosphere to 1800 C without significant scale formation so that they can be used in the as-fired condition. A refractory glass composition (Al2O3 x 4.5 CaO.MgO x 11SiO2) was used to join and seal component parts by a brazing technique which formed strong recuperator submodules capable of withstanding repeated thermal cycling to 1370 C. The corrosion resistance of these materials to Na2SO4 + NaCl carbon mixtures was also assessed in atmospheres of air, hydrogen and CO2-N2-H2O mixtures at both 870 C and 1370 C for times to 1000 hours. No significant reaction was observed under any of these test conditions.

  6. Surface wettability enhancement of silicone hydrogel lenses by processing with polar plastic molds.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y C; Friends, G D

    1997-06-01

    In the quest for hydrogel contact lenses with improved extended wear capability, the use of siloxane moieties in the lens materials was investigated. However, the introduction of hydrophobic siloxane groups gave rise to wettability and lipidlike deposit problems. It was found that when polysiloxane-based compositions for hydrogels were processed with polar plastic molds, such as those fabricated from an acrylonitrile-based polymer, the hydrogel lenses fabricated were wettable, with minimized lipidlike deposits. These findings were supported by the wettability of silicone hydrogel films, silicon, and nitrogen element contents near lens surfaces, as well as the results from clinical assessment of silicone hydrogel lenses. PMID:9138069

  7. Method of increasing minority carrier lifetime in silicon web or the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. K.; Schwuttke, G. H.; Koliwad, K. M. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A silicon dendrite is grown as a ribbon forming two silicon crystal layers which are separated by an interface layer which contains a large number of defects. Significant increase of minority carrier lifetime with homogeneous distribution at the outer surfaces of the two silicon crystal layers is achieved by processing the web in an atmosphere of a selected gas, e.g., oxygen, nitrogen or an inert gas, for about 30 minutes to several hours at a temperature preferably on the order of 900 to 1200 C.

  8. Fifth workshop on the role of impurities and defects in silicon device processing. Extended abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Luque, A.; Sopori, B.; Swanson, D.; Gee, J.; Kalejs, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Tan, T.

    1995-08-01

    This workshop dealt with engineering aspects and material properties of silicon electronic devices. Crystalline silicon growth, modeling, and properties are discussed in general and as applied to solar cells. Topics considered in discussions of silicon growth include: casting, string ribbons, Al backside contacts, ion implantation, gettering, passivation, and ultrasound treatments. Properties studies include: Electronic properties of defects and impurities, dopant and carrier concentrations, structure and bonding, nitrogen effects, degradation of bulk diffusion length, and recombination parameters. Individual papers from the workshop are indexed separately on the Energy Data Bases.

  9. Very high temperature silicon on silicon pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Anthony D.; Nunn, Timothy A.; Briggs, Stephen A.; Ned, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    A silicon on silicon pressure sensor has been developed for use at very high temperatures (1000 F). The design principles used to fabricate the pressure sensor are outlined and results are presented of its high temperature performance.

  10. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Bondability of RTV silicon rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delollis, N. J.; Montoya, O.

    1972-01-01

    Glow discharge method for producing a bondable Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) silicone is described. Mechanical and chemical properties of silicone specimens are described. Theory concerning the relationship between surface characteristics and bondability is examined with respect to the polymer specimen.

  12. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  13. Silicon Bulk Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, T. K.; Gutierrez, R. C.; Wilcox, J. Z.; Stell, C.; Vorperian, V.; Calvet, R.; Li, W. J.; Charkaborty, I.; Bartman, R.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on design, modeling, fabrication, and characterization of a novel silicon bulk micromachined vibratory rate gyroscope designed for microspacecraft applications. The new microgyroscope consists of a silicon four leaf cloverstructure with a post attached to the center.

  14. Silicon source for vacuum deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, G. W.; Rutecki, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Device using two independent silicon sources for ultra-high-vacuum deposition on large substrates can deposit P and N types of silicon simultaneously. Efficient water cooled copper shield supports and cools structure and isolates two filaments.

  15. Bond Sensitivity to Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, G. A.; Hudson, W. D.; Hudson, W. D.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Currently during fabrication of the Space Shuttle booster rocket motors, the use of silicone and silicone-containing products is prohibited in most applications. Many shop aids and other materials containing silicone have the potential, if they make contact with a bond surface, to transfer some of the silicone to the substrates being bonded. Such transfer could result in a reduction of the bond strength or even failure of the subsequent bonds. This concern is driving the need to understand the effect of silicones and the concentration needed to affect a given bond-line strength. Additionally, as silicone detection methods used for materials acceptance improve what may have gone unnoticed earlier is now being detected. Thus, realistic silicone limits for process materials (below which bond performance is satisfactory) are needed rather than having an absolute no silicone permitted policy.

  16. Nitrogen trading tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  17. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  18. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  19. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  20. Stoichiometric silicon oxynitride thin films reactively sputtered in Ar/N2O plasmas by HiPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänninen, Tuomas; Schmidt, Susann; Wissting, Jonas; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Silicon oxynitride (SiO x N y , x=0.2-1.3, y=0.2 -0.7) thin films were synthesized by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering from a pure silicon target in Ar/N2O atmospheres. It was found that the composition of the material can be controlled by the reactive gas flow and the average target power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that high average powers result in more silicon-rich films, while lower target powers yield silicon-oxide-like material due to more pronounced target poisoning. The amount of nitrogen in the films can be controlled by the percentage of nitrous oxide in the working gas. The nitrogen content remains at a constant level while the target is operated in the transition region between metallic and poisoned target surface conditions. The extent of target poisoning is gauged by the changes in peak target current under the different deposition conditions. XPS also shows that varying concentrations and ratios of oxygen and nitrogen in the films result in film chemical bonding structures ranging from silicon-rich to stoichiometric silicon oxynitrides having no observable Si-Si bond contributions. Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows that the film optical properties depend on the amount and ratio of oxygen and nitrogen in the compound, with film refractive indices measured at 633 nm ranging between those of SiO2 and Si3N4.

  1. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  2. Floating Silicon Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  3. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale. PMID:27624590

  4. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor.

    PubMed

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E; Scullion, Mark G; Krauss, Thomas F; Johnson, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale. PMID:27624590

  5. Palladium contamination in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Mica, I.; Ceresoli, M.; Codegoni, D.; Somaini, F.; Bianchi, I.; Volonghi, D.

    2015-04-01

    In this work palladium is characterized as a silicon contaminant by recombination lifetime, DLTS, C-V and C-t measurements of palladium-implanted wafers. Palladium introduced by ion implantation is found to remain in the solid solution in silicon after rapid thermal treatments, and to be a very effective recombination center. For this reason recombination lifetime measurements are the most sensitive method to detect palladium in silicon. Two palladium-related levels were found by DLTS in p-type material. One of these levels corresponds to a level reported in the literature as the single donor level of substitutional palladium. For what concerns MOS capacitors, palladium is responsible for negative oxide charge and for degradation of the generation lifetime. In addition, palladium is confirmed to be a very fast diffuser, which segregates at the wafer surface even with low temperature treatments (250 °C). Microscopy inspections showed that palladium precipitates and surface defects were formed upon segregation.

  6. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  7. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale.

  8. Thick silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Hall mobility measurements on a number of single crystal silicon ribbons grown from graphite dies have shown some ribbons to have mobilities consistent with their resistivities. The behavior of other ribbons appears to be explained by the introduction of impurities of the opposite sign. Growth of a small single crystal silicon ribbon has been achieved from a beryllia dia. Residual internal stresses of the order of 7 to 18,000 psi have been determined to exist in some silicon ribbon, particularly those grown at rates in excess of 1 in./min. Growth experiments have continued toward definition of a configuration and parameters to provide a reasonable yield of single crystal ribbons. High vacuum outgassing of graphite dies and evacuation and backfilling of growth chambers have provided significant improvements in surface quality of ribbons grown from graphite dies.

  9. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to the study of heavy flavour physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The primary goal of the experiment is to search for indirect evidence of new physics via measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The LHCb detector has a large-area silicon micro-strip detector located upstream of a dipole magnet, and three tracking stations with silicon micro-strip detectors in the innermost region downstream of the magnet. These two sub-detectors form the LHCb Silicon Tracker (ST). This paper gives an overview of the performance and operation of the ST during LHC Run 1. Measurements of the observed radiation damage are shown and compared to the expectation from simulation.

  10. Nitrogen in Chinese coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, D.; Lei, J.; Zheng, B.; Tang, X.; Wang, M.; Hu, Jiawen; Li, S.; Wang, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and six coal samples were taken from main coal mines of twenty-six provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China, according to the resource distribution and coal-forming periods as well as the coal ranks and coal yields. Nitrogen was determined by using the Kjeldahl method at U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), which exhibit a normal frequency distribution. The nitrogen contents of over 90% Chinese coal vary from 0.52% to 1.41% and the average nitrogen content is recommended to be 0.98%. Nitrogen in coal exists primarily in organic form. There is a slight positive relationship between nitrogen content and coal ranking. ?? 2011 Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

  11. The microbial nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Mike S M

    2008-11-01

    This special issue highlights several recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle including the diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in special habitats, distribution and contribution of aerobic ammonium oxidation by bacteria and crenarchaea in various aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, regulation of metabolism in nitrifying bacteria, the molecular diversity of denitrifying microorganisms and their enzymes, the functional diversity of freshwater and marine anammox bacteria, the physiology of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation and the degradation of recalcitrant organic nitrogen compounds. Simultaneously the articles in this issue show that many questions still need to be addressed, and that the microbes involved in catalyzing the nitrogen conversions still harbour many secrets that need to be disclosed to fully understand the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, and make future predictions and global modelling possible.

  12. Silicon photonic integration in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Silicon photonics is the guiding of light in a planar arrangement of silicon-based materials to perform various functions. We focus here on the use of silicon photonics to create transmitters and receivers for fiber-optic telecommunications. As the need to squeeze more transmission into a given bandwidth, a given footprint, and a given cost increases, silicon photonics makes more and more economic sense.

  13. LHCb Silicon Tracker infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermoline, Yuri

    2004-02-01

    The LHCb Silicon Tracker is a vital part of the experiment. It consists of four planar stations: one trigger and three inner tracking stations. The operation of the Silicon Tracker detectors and electronics is provided by its infrastructure: cooling system, high- and low-voltage power supply systems, temperature and radiation monitoring systems. Several components of these systems are located in the experimental hall and subjected to radiation. This paper mainly concentrates on the recent development: requirements definition, evaluation of possible implementation scenarios, component choice and component radiation tests.

  14. Thermodynamics of paracrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, P. M.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Gibson, J. M.

    2000-05-09

    Fluctuation microscopy experiments have shown that the as-deposited structure of amorphous silicon thin films is paracrystalline. A paracrystal consists of small (< 3 nm in diameter) topologically crystalline grains separated by a disordered matrix. Here the authors consider the thermodynamics of paracrystalline silicon as a function of the grain size and the temperature. They offer a simple model that qualitatively explains the observed metastability of the ordered structure at low temperature (300 K), the relaxation towards a more disordered structure at intermediate temperatures (600 K), and the recrystallization at high temperatures (1,000 K).

  15. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  16. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  17. Demonstrating Paramagnetism Using Liquid Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Ray; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how liquid nitrogen is attracted to the poles of neodymium magnets. Nitrogen is not paramagnetic, so the attraction suggests that the liquid nitrogen contains a small amount of oxygen, which causes the paramagnetism. (MVL)

  18. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  19. [Biological function of some elements and their compounds. IV. Silicon, silicon acids, silicones].

    PubMed

    Puzanowska-Tarasiewicz, Helena; Kuźmicka, Ludmiła; Tarasiewicz, Mirosław

    2009-11-01

    The review is devoted for the occurance, meaning of silicon and their compounds, especially silicon acids and silicones. Silicon participates in biosynthesis of collagen, the basic component of connective tissue. It strengthens and makes the walls of blood vessels more flexible, diminishes capillaries permeability, accelerates healing processes, has a sebostatic activity, strengthens hair and nails. This element has a beneficial effect on phosphorylation of proteins saccharides, and nucleotides. It is also essential for the formation of cytoskeleton and other cellular structures of mechanical or supportive function. Silicon is an initial substrate for obtaining silicones. These are synthetic polymers, in which silicon atoms are bound by oxygen bridges. They are used in almost all kinds of products due to their most convenient physical and chemical properties: moistening and film-forming, giving liquid form increasing solubility. Silicon acids form colloid gel, silica gel, with absorptive abilities, like active carbon. PMID:19999810

  20. Light emission from porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penczek, John

    The continuous evolution of silicon microelectronics has produced significant gains in electronic information processing. However, greater improvements in performance are expected by utilizing optoelectronic techniques. But these techniques have been severely limited in silicon- based optoelectronics due to the lack of an efficient silicon light emitter. The recent observation of efficient light emission from porous silicon offer a promising opportunity to develop a suitable silicon light source that is compatible with silicon microelectronics. This dissertation examined the porous silicon emission mechanism via photoluminescence, and by a novel device structure for porous silicon emitters. The investigation first examined the correlation between porous silicon formation conditions (and subsequent morphology) with the resulting photoluminescence properties. The quantum confinement theory for porous silicon light emission contends that the morphology changes induced by the different formation conditions determine the optical properties of porous silicon. The photoluminescence spectral shifts measured in this study, in conjunction with TEM analysis and published morphological data, lend support to this theory. However, the photoluminescence spectral broadening was attributed to electronic wavefunction coupling between adjacent silicon nanocrystals. An novel device structure was also investigated in an effort to improve current injection into the porous silicon layer. The selective etching properties of porous silicon were used to create a p-i-n structure with crystalline silicon contacts to the porous silicon layer. The resulting device was found to have unique characteristics, with a negative differential resistance region and current-induced emission that spanned from 400 nm to 5500 nm. The negative differential resistance was correlated to resistive heating effects in the device. A numerical analysis of thermal emission spectra from silicon films, in addition to

  1. Metastable Defects in Tritiated Amorphous Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, T.; Whitaker, J.; Zukotynski, S.; Kherani, N.; Taylor, P. C.; Stradins, P.

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of optically or electrically induced defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), especially those that contribute to the Staebler-Wronski effect, has been the topic of numerous studies, yet the mechanism of defect creation and annealing is far from clarified. We have been observing the growth of defects caused by tritium decay in tritiated a Si-H instead of inducing defects optically. Tritium decays to {sup 3}He, emitting a beta particle (average energy of 5.7 keV) and an antineutrino. This reaction has a half-life of 12.5 years. In these 7 at.% tritium-doped a-Si:H samples each beta decay will create a defect by converting a bonded tritium to an interstitial helium, leaving behind a silicon dangling bond. We use ESR (electron spin resonance) and PDS( photothermal deflection spectroscopy) to track the defects. First we annealed these samples, and then we used ESR to determine the initial defect density around 10{sup 16} to 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3}, which is mostly a surface spin density. After that we have kept the samples in liquid nitrogen for almost two years. During the two years we have used ESR to track the defect densities of the samples. The defect density increases without saturation to a value of 3 x 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} after two years, a number smaller than one would expect if each tritium decay were to create a silicon dangling bond (2 x 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3}). This result suggests that there might be either an annealing process that remains at liquid nitrogen temperature, or tritium decay in clustered phase not producing a dangling bond due to bond reconstruction and emission of the hydrogen previously paired to Si-bonded tritium atom. After storage in liquid nitrogen for two years, we have annealed the samples. We have stepwise annealed one sample at temperatures up to 200, where all of the defects from beta decay are annealed out, and reconstructed the annealing energy distribution. The second sample, which was grown at 150, has

  2. The nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation.

  3. Nitrogen control in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Merrick, M J; Edwards, R A

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in prokaryotes involves the coordinated expression of a large number of enzymes concerned with both utilization of extracellular nitrogen sources and intracellular biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds. The control of this expression is determined by the availability of fixed nitrogen to the cell and is effected by complex regulatory networks involving regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. While the most detailed studies to date have been carried out with enteric bacteria, there is a considerable body of evidence to show that the nitrogen regulation (ntr) systems described in the enterics extend to many other genera. Furthermore, as the range of bacteria in which the phenomenon of nitrogen control is examined is being extended, new regulatory mechanisms are also being discovered. In this review, we have attempted to summarize recent research in prokaryotic nitrogen control; to show the ubiquity of the ntr system, at least in gram-negative organisms; and to identify those areas and groups of organisms about which there is much still to learn. PMID:8531888

  4. The nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation. PMID:26859274

  5. Nitrogen control in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, M J; Edwards, R A

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in prokaryotes involves the coordinated expression of a large number of enzymes concerned with both utilization of extracellular nitrogen sources and intracellular biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds. The control of this expression is determined by the availability of fixed nitrogen to the cell and is effected by complex regulatory networks involving regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. While the most detailed studies to date have been carried out with enteric bacteria, there is a considerable body of evidence to show that the nitrogen regulation (ntr) systems described in the enterics extend to many other genera. Furthermore, as the range of bacteria in which the phenomenon of nitrogen control is examined is being extended, new regulatory mechanisms are also being discovered. In this review, we have attempted to summarize recent research in prokaryotic nitrogen control; to show the ubiquity of the ntr system, at least in gram-negative organisms; and to identify those areas and groups of organisms about which there is much still to learn. PMID:8531888

  6. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H2O. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  7. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Jones (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H20. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  8. Silicone containing solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small amount, for example 1% by weight, of a liquid silicone oil to a metal containing solid rocket propellant provides a significant reduction in heat transfer to the inert nozzle walls. Metal oxide slag collection and blockage of the nozzle are eliminated and the burning rate is increased by about 5% to 10% thus improving ballistic performance.

  9. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  10. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  11. Antifuse with a single silicon-rich silicon nitride insulating layer

    DOEpatents

    Habermehl, Scott D.; Apodaca, Roger T.

    2013-01-22

    An antifuse is disclosed which has an electrically-insulating region sandwiched between two electrodes. The electrically-insulating region has a single layer of a non-hydrogenated silicon-rich (i.e. non-stoichiometric) silicon nitride SiN.sub.X with a nitrogen content X which is generally in the range of 0silicon. Arrays of antifuses can also be formed.

  12. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  13. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  14. Silicon Nanowire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamins, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    Metal-catalyzed, self-assembled, one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires are being considered as possible device elements to augment and supplant conventional electronics and to extend the use of CMOS beyond the physical and economic limits of conventional technology. Such nanowires can create nanostructures without the complexity and cost of extremely fine scale lithography. The well-known and controllable properties of silicon make silicon nanowires especially attractive. Easy integration with conventional electronics will aid their acceptance and incorporation. For example, connections can be formed to both ends of a nanowire by growing it laterally from a vertical surface formed by etching the top silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator structure into isolated electrodes. Field-effect structures are one class of devices that can be readily built in silicon nanowires. Because the ratio of surface to volume in a thin nanowire is high, conduction through the nanowire is very sensitive to surface conditions, making it effective as the channel of a field-effect transistor or as the transducing element of a gas or chemical sensor. As the nanowire diameter decreases, a greater fraction of the mobile charge can be modulated by a given external charge, increasing the sensitivity. Having the gate of a nanowire transistor completely surround the nanowire also enhances the sensitivity. For a field-effect sensor to be effective, the charge must be physically close to the nanowire so that the majority of the compensating charge is induced in the nanowire and so that ions in solution do not screen the charge. Because only induced charge is being sensed, a coating that selectively binds the target species should be added to the nanowire surface to distinguish between different species in the analyte. The nanowire work at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories was supported in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  15. Silicon supply modifies C:N:P stoichiometry and growth of Phragmites australis.

    PubMed

    Schaller, J; Brackhage, C; Gessner, M O; Bäuker, E; Gert Dudel, E

    2012-03-01

    Silicon is a non-essential element for plant growth. Nevertheless, it affects plant stress resistance and in some plants, such as grasses, it may substitute carbon (C) compounds in cell walls, thereby influencing C allocation patterns and biomass production. How variation in silicon supply over a narrow range affects nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake by plants has also been investigated in some detail. However, little is known about effects on the stoichiometric relationships between C, N and P when silicon supply varies over a broader range. Here, we assessed the effect of silicon on aboveground biomass production and C:N:P stoichiometry of common reed, Phragmites australis, in a pot experiment in which three widely differing levels of silicon were supplied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that elevated silicon supply promoted silica deposition in the epidermis of Phragmites leaves. This resulted in altered N:P ratios, whereas C:N ratios changed only slightly. Plant growth was slightly (but not significantly) enhanced at intermediate silicon supply levels but significantly decreased at high levels. These findings point to the potential of silicon to impact plant growth and elemental stoichiometry and, by extension, to affect biogeochemical cycles in ecosystems dominated by Phragmites and other grasses and sedges.

  16. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  17. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  18. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  19. Reliability of two sintered silicon nitride materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Sanders, W. A.; Pierce, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    Two types of sintered silicon nitride were evaluated in terms of reliability: an experimental high pressure nitrogen sintered material and a commercial material. The results show wide variations in strength for both materials. The Weibull moduli were 5.5, 8.9, and 11 for the experimental material at room temperature, 1200, and 1370 C, respectively. The commercial material showed Weibull moduli of 9.0, 8.6, and 8.9 at these respective temperatures. No correlation between strength and flaw size was noted for the experimental material. The applicability of the Weibull and Griffith theories to processing defects on the order of 100 microns or less in size are discussed.

  20. Strong Narrow-Band Luminescence from Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers in Spatially Localized Sub-10 nm Nanodiamond

    PubMed Central

    Catledge, Shane A.; Singh, Sonal

    2011-01-01

    Discrete nanodiamond particles of 500 nm and 6 nm average size were seeded onto silicon substrates and plasma treated using chemical vapor deposition to create silicon-vacancy color centers. The resulting narrow-band room temperature photoluminescence is intense, and readily observed even for weakly agglomerated sub-10 nm size diamond. This is in contrast to the well-studied nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond which has luminescence properties that are strongly dependant on particle size, with low probability for incorporation of centers in sub-10 nm crystals. We suggest the silicon-vacancy center to be a viable alternative to nitrogen-vacancy defects for use as a biomarker in the clinically-relevant sub-10 nm size regime, for which nitrogen defect-related luminescent activity and stability is reportedly poor. PMID:21603120

  1. Nitrogen Uptake in Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J.; VanBenthem, P.

    2013-12-01

    A plant's absorption of nitrogen can be encouraged by a variety of environmental factors, especially the application of fertilizers. As a common limiting factor in plant growth, not up taking enough nitrogen can be a result of an unhealthy plant. Moreover, as farmers seek out methods to increase growth of plants, fertilizers are used as a solution to the issue of nitrogen deficiency to incorporate additional nitrogen from chemical or organic sources, by not using the right fertilizer can greatly affect the plats. The point of this research project is to determine the effect of various fertilizers on the plant growth, and to correlate the measured nitrogen, water and chlorophyll content in spinach leaves. Spinach leaves were used because they are known to quickly uptake chemicals in the environment. The spinach plants were exposed to four different growing parameters, which are referred to as control, ammonium nitrate, MiracleGro , and organic. The spinach was originally placed in nitrogen deficient soil with only 2.2x10 4 weight percent (wt. %) nitrogen. The leaves in the control group were grown in this nitrogen deficient soil without any fertilizer added. Ammomium nitrate and MiracleGro were added to the spinach in the A and MG groups, respectively, and organic chicken stool was used for the O group. By using a spectral imaging system and flame combustion techniques, the chlorophyll content can be related to the nitrogen content in the spinach leaves. In these spinach leaves, nitrogen and chlorophyll content were measured, chlorophyll is a green pigment that plays a crucial role in producing nutrients for green plants. The lack of chlorophyll will allow the plant to become susceptible to diseases, so it is extremely important that the plants have a high content of chlorophyll. The role of nitrogen in chlorophyll is very important and helps in the creation of chlorophyll; therefore it is necessary that an appropriate amount of nitrogen is added for optimal growth

  2. Delta nitrogen tetroxide fueling operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, R. B.; Cross, T. M.; Rucci, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the Delta second stage nitrogen tetroxide fueling system is briefly summarized. The nitrogen tetroxide fueling system and the equipment used to protect the spacecraft environment from the toxic nitrogen tetroxide fumes are described. Topics covered include: the nitrogen tetroxide transfer system; loading operations; safety precautions; and chemical treatment of all toxic vapors.

  3. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project are presented. Task 3 is directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulating system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials. The technical approach of the contract effort is divided into four special tasks: (1) technology review; (2) generation of concepts for screening and processing silicon encapsulation systems; (3) assessment of encapsulation concepts; and (4) evaluation of encapsulation concepts. The candidate silicon materials are reviewed. The silicon and modified silicon resins were chosen on the basis of similarity to materials with known weatherability, cost, initial tangential modulus, accelerated dirt pick-up test results and the ratio of the content of organic phenyl substitution of methyl substitution on the backbone of the silicon resin.

  4. Synthesis of nanocrystals by discharges in liquid nitrogen from Si-Sn sintered electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbara, H.; Noël, C.; Ghanbaja, J.; Hussein, K.; Mariotti, D.; Švrček, V.; Belmonte, T.

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis feasibility of silicon-tin nanocrystals by discharges in liquid nitrogen is studied using a Si-10 at % Sn sintered electrode. Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy shows that silicon and tin melt almost simultaneously. The presence of both vapours does not lead to the synthesis of alloyed nanocrystals but to the synthesis of separate nanocrystals of silicon and tin with average sizes of 10 nm. These nanocrystals are transformed into amorphous silicon oxide (am-SiO2) and β-SnO2 by air oxidation, after evaporation of the liquid nitrogen. The synthesis of an am-Si0.95Sn0.05 phase around large silicon crystals (~500 nm) decorated by β-Sn spheroids is achieved if the current flowing through electrodes is high enough. When the sintered electrode is hit by powerful discharges, some grains are heated and tin diffuses in the large silicon crystals. Next, these grains are shelled and fall into the dielectric liquid.

  5. Top-Coating Silicon Onto Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Nelson, L. D.; Zook, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon for solar cells produced at low cost. Molten silicon poured from quartz trough onto moving carbon-coated ceramic substrate. Doctor blade spreads liquid silicon evenly over substrate. Molten material solidifies to form sheet of polycrystalline silicon having photovoltaic conversion efficiency greater than 10 percent. Method produces 100-um-thick silicon coatings at speed 0.15 centimeter per second.

  6. A silicon electromechanical photodetector.

    PubMed

    Tallur, Siddharth; Bhave, Sunil A

    2013-06-12

    Optomechanical systems have enabled wide-band optical frequency conversion and multichannel all-optical radio frequency amplification. Realization of an on-chip silicon communication platform is limited by photodetectors needed to convert optical information to electrical signals for further signal processing. In this paper we present a coupled silicon microresonator, which converts near-IR optical intensity modulation at 174.2 MHz and 1.198 GHz into motional electrical current. This device emulates a photodetector which detects intensity modulation of continuous wave laser light in the full-width-at-half-maximum bandwidth of the mechanical resonance. The resonant principle of operation eliminates dark current challenges associated with convetional photodetectors. While the results presented here constitute a purely classical demonstration, the device can also potentially be extended to the quantum regime to realize a photon-phonon translator. PMID:23706144

  7. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  8. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  9. Making silicon stronger.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, Brad Lee

    2010-11-01

    Silicon microfabrication has seen many decades of development, yet the structural reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is far from optimized. The fracture strength of Si MEMS is limited by a combination of poor toughness and nanoscale etch-induced defects. A MEMS-based microtensile technique has been used to characterize the fracture strength distributions of both standard and custom microfabrication processes. Recent improvements permit 1000's of test replicates, revealing subtle but important deviations from the commonly assumed 2-parameter Weibull statistical model. Subsequent failure analysis through a combination of microscopy and numerical simulation reveals salient aspects of nanoscale flaw control. Grain boundaries, for example, suffer from preferential attack during etch-release thereby forming failure-critical grain-boundary grooves. We will discuss ongoing efforts to quantify the various factors that affect the strength of polycrystalline silicon, and how weakest-link theory can be used to make worst-case estimates for design.

  10. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  11. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  12. More competitive silicon smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1996-02-01

    Over the past several years, foreign manufacturers of ferrosilicon and silicon alloys have been making inroads in American markets such as computer chips. To make domestic smelting of these materials more competitive, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded the development of a direct-current plasma-arc-furnace smelting process by the South Carolina Research Authority (SCRA) in North Charleston. This new technology can reduce the energy consumption of the smelting process, saving million of dollars in energy costs per year. Typically, silicon and ferrosilicon alloys are produced in open-top, submerged-arc, alternating-current furnaces. A mixture of quartz ore and reducing agents are fed into the furnace, multiple electrodes are inserted into the material, and the mixture is charged to produce the desired metal. The process consumes high amounts of electrical power relative to the amount of metal recovered.

  13. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  14. Effects of ambient conditions on the adhesion of cubic boron nitride films on silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G.F.; Howitt, D.G.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; McCarty, K.F.; Klaus, E.J.; Medlin, D.L.

    1994-08-01

    Effect of environmental conditions on cubic boron nitride (cBN) film adhesion to silicon substrates was studied. cBN films were deposited onto (100)-oriented silicon substrates by ion-assisted pulsed laser deposition. Irradiating ions were mixtures of nitrogen with argon, krypton, and xenon. Under room-ambient conditions, the films delaminated in the following time order: N/Xe, N/Kr, and N/Ar. cBN films deposited using N/Xe ion-assisted deposition were exposed to four environmental conditions for several weeks: a 1-mTorr vacuum, high humidity, dry oxygen, and dry nitrogen. Films exposed to the humid environment delaminated whereas those stored under vacuum or in dry gases did not. Films stored in dry nitrogen were removed after nearly two weeks and placed in the high-humidity chamber; these films subsequently delaminated within 14 hours.

  15. Silicon dendritic web growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, S.

    1984-01-01

    Technological goals for a silicon dendritic web growth program effort are presented. Principle objectives for this program include: (1) grow long web crystals front continuously replenished melt; (2) develop temperature distribution in web and melt; (3) improve reproductibility of growth; (4) develop configurations for increased growth rates (width and speed); (5) develop new growth system components as required for improved growth; and (6) evaluate quality of web growth.

  16. Pickled luminescent silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukherroub, R.; Morin, S.; Wayner, D. D. M.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    In freshly prepared porous Si, the newly exposed silicon-nanostructure surface is protected with a monolayer of hydrogen, which is very reactive and oxidizes in air leading to a loss of luminescence intensity and a degradation of the electronic properties. We report a surface passivation approach based on organic modification that stabilizes the luminescence. This novel 'pickling' process not only augments the desired optoelectronic properties, but also is adaptable to further chemical modification for integration into chemical and biophysical sensors.

  17. Bringing Silicon Valley inside.

    PubMed

    Hamel, G

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, Silicon Valley companies produced 41 IPOs, which by January 1999 had a combined market capitalization of $27 billion--that works out to $54,000 in new wealth creation per worker in a single year. Multiply the number of employees in your company by $54,000. Did your business create that much new wealth last year? Half that amount? It's not a group of geniuses generating such riches. It's a business model. In Silicon Valley, ideas, capital, and talent circulate freely, gathering into whatever combinations are most likely to generate innovation and wealth. Unlike most traditional companies, which spend their energy in resource allocation--a system designed to avoid failure--the Valley operates through resource attraction--a system that nurtures innovation. In a traditional company, people with innovative ideas must go hat in hand to the guardians of the old ideas for funding and for staff. But in Silicon Valley, a slew of venture capitalists vie to attract the best new ideas, infusing relatively small amounts of capital into a portfolio of ventures. And talent is free to go to the companies offering the most exhilarating work and the greatest potential rewards. It should actually be easier for large, traditional companies to set up similar markets for capital, ideas, and talent internally. After all, big companies often already have extensive capital, marketing, and distribution resources, and a first crack at the talent in their own ranks. And some of them are doing it. The choice is yours--you can do your best to make sure you never put a dollar of capital at risk, or you can tap into the kind of wealth that's being created every day in Silicon Valley.

  18. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  19. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  20. The PHOBOS silicon sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Birger; Betts, Russell; Ganz, Rudolf; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan H.; Holzman, Burt; Kucewicz, Wojtek; Lin, Willis T.; Mülmenstädt, Johannes; van Nieuwenhuizen, Gerrit J.; Nouicer, Rachid; Pernegger, Heinz; Reuter, Michael; Sarin, Pradeep; Tsay, Vincent; Vale, Carla M.; Wadsworth, Bernard; Wuosmaa, Alan; Wyslouch, Bolek

    1999-08-01

    PHOBOS is one of the four experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. PHOBOS almost exclusively utilizes silicon sensors to measure charged particle multiplicity distributions and to track particles in a 2-arm spectrometer. The detector consists of about 450 silicon pad sensors. Nine different pad geometries are used to match the different physics needs of the experiment. A relatively high granularity, of up to 1536 channels per sensor, is used in the spectrometer. The multiplicity detector uses 128 and 64 channel sensors and the charge deposition per pad is measured to determine the multiplicity of single events. All sensors are of the double-metal silicon pad type with pad sizes from 1 cm 2 up to 4 cm 2. They are produced in Taiwan by the ERSO foundry under supervision of Miracle Co. and National Central University. An extensive testing procedure makes it possible to select sensors suited for use in PHOBOS. Detector modules consisting of up to five sensors are read out with integrated chips of either 64 or 128 channels. The testing of the sensors and the performance of assembled detector modules is discussed.

  1. Silicon nanotubes: Why not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. Q.; Lee, S. T.; Law, Chi-Kin; Li, Wai-Kee; Teo, Boon K.

    2002-10-01

    A diamond nanowire (CNW), a silicon nanowire (SiNW), a carbon nanotube (CNT), and a silicon nanotube (SiNT) were studied using the semiempirical molecular orbital PM3 method, with confirmations by calculations at the HF/3-21G and HF/3-21G(d) levels. It was shown that the systems with a diamond structure generally possess larger band gaps than their tubular counterparts. Carbon nanotubular structure shows efficient sp 2 hybridization and π bonding, thus allowing a high stability of the carbon nanotube structure. In contrast, silicon prefers sp 3 hybridization and favors the tetrahedral diamond-like structures, thereby forming the commonly observed nanowires. This distinction can be traced to the differences in the energetics and overlaps of the valence s and p orbitals of C vs Si. Nevertheless, when the dangling bonds are properly terminated, SiNT can in principle be formed. The resulting energy minimized SiNT, however, adopts a severely puckered structure (with a corrugated surface) with SiSi distances ranging from 1.85 to 2.25 Å.

  2. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Young-Soo; Park, Jinsung; Yoon, Gwonchan; Song, Jiseok; Jee, Sang-Won; Lee, Jung-Ho; Na, Sungsoo; Kwon, Taeyun; Eom, Kilho

    2009-10-27

    Nanowires have been taken much attention as a nanoscale building block, which can perform the excellent mechanical function as an electromechanical device. Here, we have performed atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments of silicon nanowires in order to investigate the mechanical properties of silicon nanowires. It is shown that stiffness of nanowires is well described by Hertz theory and that elastic modulus of silicon nanowires with various diameters from ~100 to ~600 nm is close to that of bulk silicon. This implies that the elastic modulus of silicon nanowires is independent of their diameters if the diameter is larger than 100 nm. This supports that finite size effect (due to surface effect) does not play a role on elastic behavior of silicon nanowires with diameter of >100 nm.

  4. Special Issue: The Silicon Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittler, Martin; Yang, Deren

    2006-03-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of articles about different aspects of current silicon research and applications, ranging from basic investigations of mono- and polycrystalline silicon materials and nanostructures to technologies for device fabrication in silicon photovoltaics, micro- and optoelectronics. Guest Editors are Martin Kittler and Deren Yang, the organizers of a recent Sino-German symposium held in Cottbus, Germany, 19-24 September 2005.The cover picture shows four examples of The Silicon Age: the structure of a thin film solar cell on low-cost SSP (silicon sheet from powder) substrate (upper left image) [1], a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image and diffraction pattern of a single-crystalline Si nanowire (upper right) [2], a carrier lifetime map from an n-type multicrystalline silicon wafer after gettering by a grain boundary (lower left) [3], and a scanning acoustic microscopy image of a bonded 150 mm diameter wafer pair (upper right) [4].

  5. Mechanical Properties of Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires have been taken much attention as a nanoscale building block, which can perform the excellent mechanical function as an electromechanical device. Here, we have performed atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments of silicon nanowires in order to investigate the mechanical properties of silicon nanowires. It is shown that stiffness of nanowires is well described by Hertz theory and that elastic modulus of silicon nanowires with various diameters from ~100 to ~600 nm is close to that of bulk silicon. This implies that the elastic modulus of silicon nanowires is independent of their diameters if the diameter is larger than 100 nm. This supports that finite size effect (due to surface effect) does not play a role on elastic behavior of silicon nanowires with diameter of >100 nm. PMID:20652130

  6. Stabilization of elusive silicon oxides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhong; Chen, Mingwei; Xie, Yaoming; Wei, Pingrong; Schaefer, Henry F; Schleyer, Paul von R; Robinson, Gregory H

    2015-06-01

    Molecular SiO2 and other simple silicon oxides have remained elusive despite the indispensable use of silicon dioxide materials in advanced electronic devices. Owing to the great reactivity of silicon-oxygen double bonds, as well as the low oxidation state of silicon atoms, the chemistry of simple silicon oxides is essentially unknown. We now report that the soluble disilicon compound, L:Si=Si:L (where L: = :C{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)CH}2), can be directly oxidized by N2O and O2 to give the carbene-stabilized Si2O3 and Si2O4 moieties, respectively. The nature of the silicon oxide units in these compounds is probed by spectroscopic methods, complementary computations and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  7. Silicon Nitride for Direct Water-Splitting and Corrosion Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Head, J.; Turner, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Todays fossil fuels are becoming harder to obtain, creating pollution problems, and posing hazards to people’s health. One alternative to fossil fuels is hydrogen, capable of serving as a clean and efficient energy carrier. Certain semiconductors are able to harness the energy of photons and direct it into water electrolysis in a process known as photoelectrochemical water splitting. Triple junction devices integrate three semiconductors of different band gaps resulting in a monolithic material that absorbs over a broader spectrum. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is one such material that, when stacked in tandem, possesses water-splitting capabilities. Even though a-Si is capable of splitting water, it is an unstable material in solution and therefore requires a coating to protect the surface from corrosion. A stable, transparent material that has the potential for corrosion protection is silicon nitride. In this study, silicon nitride thin films were grown using DC magnetron sputtering with varying amounts of argon and nitrogen added to the system. X-ray diffraction indicated amorphous silicon nitride films. Current as a function of potential was determined from cyclic voltammetry measurements. Mott-Schottky analysis showed n-type behavior with absorption and transmission measurements indicated variation in flatband potentials. Variation in band gap values ranging from 1.90 to 4.0 eV. Corrosion measurements reveal that the silicon nitride samples exhibit both p-type and n-type behavior. Photocurrent over a range of potentials was greater in samples that were submerged in acidic electrolyte. Silicon nitride shows good stability in acidic, neutral, and basic solutions, indicative of a good material for corrosion mitigation.

  8. Purity of (28)Si-Enriched Silicon Material Used for the Determination of the Avogadro Constant.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Giancarlo; Di Luzio, Marco; Mana, Giovanni; Oddone, Massimo; Bennett, John W; Stopic, Attila

    2016-07-01

    At present, counting atoms in a one-kilogram sphere made of (28)Si-enriched silicon allows the determination of the Avogadro constant with the 2.0 × 10(-8) relative standard uncertainty required for the realization of the definition of the new kilogram. With the exception of carbon, oxygen, boron, nitrogen, and hydrogen, the claimed uncertainty is based on the postulation that the silicon material used to manufacture the sphere was above a particular level of purity. Two samples of the silicon were measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis to collect experimental data to test the purity assumption. The results obtained in two experiments carried out using different research reactor neutron sources are reported. The analysis confirmed that the silicon material was of sufficient purity by quantifying the ultratrace concentration of 12 elements and determining the detection limits of another 54 elements.

  9. Nitrogen Inputs via Nitrogen Fixation in Northern Plants and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dominated by cold and often acidic water logged environments, mineralization of organic matter is slow in the majority of northern ecosystems. Measures of extractable ammonium and nitrate are generally low and can be undetectable in peat pore waters. Despite this apparent nitrogen limitation, many of these environments produce deep deposits of soil organic matter. Biological nitrogen fixation carried out by autotrophic and heterotrophic diazotrophs associated with cryptograms provides the majority of known nitrogen inputs in these northern ecosystems. Nitrogen fixation was assessed in a variety of northern soils within rhizospheres of dominant plant communities. We investigated the availability of this newly fixed nitrogen to the vascular plant community in nitrogen limited northern plant communities. We tracked nitrogen flow from 15N2 gas fixed in Sphagnum mosses into tissues of two native vascular plant species, boreal cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and black spruce (Picea mariana). 15N-labeled Sphagnum microcosms were grown within variable mesh size exclusion/inclusion fabrics in a nitrogen addition experiment in situ in order to investigate the role of mycorrhizal fungi in the uptake of newly fixed nitrogen. Up to 24% of daily fixed 15N label was transferred to vascular plant tissues during 2 months. Nitrogen addition resulted in decreased N2 fixation rates; however, with higher nitrogen availability there was a higher rate of 15N label uptake into the vascular plants, likely the result of increased production of dissolved organic nitrogen. Reliance on mycorrhizal networks for nitrogen acquisition was indicated by nitrogen isotope fractionation patterns. Moreover, N2 fixation activities in mosses were stimulated when vascular plants were grown in moss microcosms versus "moss only" treatments. Results indicate that bog vascular plants may derive considerable nitrogen from atmospheric N2 biologically fixed within Sphagnum mosses. This work demonstrates that

  10. Epitaxial Silicon Doped With Antimony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, James E.; Halleck, Bradley L.

    1996-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial silicon doped with antimony made by chemical vapor deposition, using antimony pentachloride (SbCI5) as source of dopant and SiH4, SiCI2H2, or another conventional source of silicon. High purity achieved in layers of arbitrary thickness. Epitaxial silicon doped with antimony needed to fabricate impurity-band-conduction photodetectors operating at wavelengths from 2.5 to 40 micrometers.

  11. Uniform silicon slow light waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.

    2011-01-01

    An uniform silicon waveguide is proposed featuring ultralow-dispersion slow light. The core of the waveguide consists of one silicon trip and two pairs of air/silicon strip and the cladding is composed of several alternative silicon and air strips, which form a transverse band gap to confine propagating light in the core. The waveguide has several nearly linear photonic bands in a large frequency range, which can support broadband slow modes with a group velocity of 0.03-0.08 c and tolerable group velocity dispersion.

  12. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  13. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  14. Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole composites; preparation and physicochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Omastova, Maria . E-mail: upolmaom@savba.sk; Boukerma, Kada; Chehimi, Mohamed M.; Trchova, Miroslava

    2005-05-18

    Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole (SiC/PPy) conducting composites were prepared using silicon carbide as inorganic substrate. The surface modification of SiC was performed in aqueous solution by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ferric chloride as oxidant. Elemental analysis was used to determine the mass loading of polypyrrole in the SiC/PPy composites. Scanning electron microscopy showed the surface modification of SiC by PPy. PPy in composites was confirmed by the presence of PPy bands in the infrared spectra of SiC/PPy containing various amounts of conducting polymer. The conductivity of SiC/PPy composites depends on PPy content on the surface. The composite containing 35 wt.% PPy showed conductivity about 2 S cm{sup -1}, which is in the same range as the conductivity of pure polypyrrole powder prepared under the same conditions using the same oxidant. PPy in the composites was clearly detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements by its N1s and Cl2p peaks. High resolution scans of the C1s regions distinguished between silicon carbide and polypyrrole carbons. The fraction of polypyrrole at the composite surface was estimated from the silicon and nitrogen levels. The combination of XPS and conductivity measurements suggests that the surface of the SiC/PPy composites is polypyrrole-rich for a conducting polymer mass loading of at least 12.6 wt.%.

  15. Solar silicon from directional solidification of MG silicon produced via the silicon carbide route

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustioni, M.; Margadonna, D.; Pirazzi, R.; Pizzini, S.

    1986-01-01

    A process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon production is presented which appears particularly suitable for photovoltaic (PV) applications. The MG silicon is prepared in a 240 KVA, three electrode submerged arc furnace, starting from high grade quartz and high purity silicon carbide. The silicon smelted from the arc furnace was shown to be sufficiently pure to be directionally solidified to 10 to 15 kg. After grinding and acid leaching, had a material yield larger than 90%. With a MG silicon feedstock containing 3 ppmw B, 290 ppmw Fe, 190 ppmw Ti, and 170 ppmw Al, blended with 50% of off grade electronic grade (EG) silicon to reconduct the boron content to a concentration acceptable for solar cell fabrication, the 99% of deep level impurities were concentrated in the last 5% of the ingot. Quite remarkably this material has OCV values higher tham 540 mV and no appreciable shorts due to SiC particles.

  16. Fluidized bed for production of polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Flagella, R.N.

    1992-08-18

    This patent describes a method for removing silicon powder particles from a reactor that produces polycrystalline silicon by the pyrolysis of a silane containing gas in a fluidized bed reaction zone of silicon seed particles. It comprises introducing the silane containing gas stream into the reaction zone of fluidized silicon seed particles; heterogeneously decomposing the silane containing gas under conditions; collecting the silicon product particles from the collection zone; and removing silicon powder particles from the reactor.

  17. METHOD FOR THE PREPARATION OF BINARY NITROGEN-FLUORINE COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1962-05-01

    A process is given for preparing binary nitrogenfluorine compounds, in particular, tetrafluorohydrazine (N/sub 2/F/sub 4/) and difluorodiazine (N/sub 2/ F/sub 2/), The process comprises subjecting gaseous nitrogen trifluoride to the action of an alternating current electrical glow discharge in the presence of mercury vapors. By the action of the electrical discharge, the nitrogen trifluoride is converted into a gaseous product comprising a mixture of tetrafluorohydrazine, the isomers of difluorodiazine, and other impurities including nitrogen, nitrogen oxides, silicon tetrafiuoride, and unreacted nitrogen trifluoride. The gaseous products and impurities are passed into a trap maintained at about - 196 deg C to freeze out the desired products and impurities with the exception of nitregen gas which passes off from the trap and is discarded. Subsequently, the desired products and remaining impurities are warmed to the gaseous state and passed through a silica gel trap maintained at about - 55DEC, wherein the desired tetrafluorohydrazine and difluorodiazine products are retained while the remaining gaseous impurities pass therethrough. The desired products are volatilized from the silica gel trap by heating and then separated by gas chrounatography means into the respective tetrafluorohydrazine and difluorodiazine products. (A.e.C)

  18. Laser induced lifetime degradation in p-type crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ametowobla, M.; Bilger, G.; Koehler, J. R.; Werner, J. H.

    2012-06-01

    Pulsed, green laser irradiation of uncoated p-type silicon leads to a significant reduction of the effective minority carrier lifetime. The reason for the lifetime drop lies in the introduction of recombination centres into the laser melted and recrystallized surface layer, leading to a low local minority carrier lifetime {tau} Almost-Equal-To 10 ns inside this surface layer. The laser treatment introduces the impurities oxygen, carbon and nitrogen into the silicon and further leads to an n-type doping of the surface layer. There are strong indications that these impurities are responsible for the observed n-type doping, as well as the lifetime reduction after irradiation. Both effects are removed by thermal annealing. An estimate shows that the low local lifetime does nevertheless not affect the performance of industrial or contacted selective solar cell emitter structures.

  19. Laser induced lifetime degradation in p-type crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ametowobla, M.; Bilger, G.; Köhler, J. R.; Werner, J. H.

    2012-06-01

    Pulsed, green laser irradiation of uncoated p-type silicon leads to a significant reduction of the effective minority carrier lifetime. The reason for the lifetime drop lies in the introduction of recombination centres into the laser melted and recrystallized surface layer, leading to a low local minority carrier lifetime τ ≈ 10 ns inside this surface layer. The laser treatment introduces the impurities oxygen, carbon and nitrogen into the silicon and further leads to an n-type doping of the surface layer. There are strong indications that these impurities are responsible for the observed n-type doping, as well as the lifetime reduction after irradiation. Both effects are removed by thermal annealing. An estimate shows that the low local lifetime does nevertheless not affect the performance of industrial or contacted selective solar cell emitter structures.

  20. Micro-cutting of silicon implanted with hydrogen and post-implantation thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenković, Emil V.; To, Suet; Sundaravel, B.; Xiao, Gaobo; Huang, Hu

    2016-07-01

    It was reported that non-amorphizing implantation by hydrogen has a potential in improving silicon machining. Post-implantation high-temperature treatment will affect implantation-induced damage, which can have impact on silicon machining. In this article, a relation of a thermal annealing of hydrogen implanted in silicon to micro-cutting experiment is investigated. Hydrogen ions were implanted into 4″ silicon wafers with 175 keV, 150 keV, 125 keV and doses of 2 × 1016 cm-2, 2 × 1016 cm-2 and 3 × 1016 cm-2, respectively. In this way, low hydrogen atom-low defect concentration was created in the region less than ~0.8 μm deep and high hydrogen atom-high defect concentration was obtained at silicon depth of ~0.8-1.5 μm. The post-implantation annealing was carried out at 300 and 400 °C in nitrogen for 1 h. Physical and electrical properties of implanted and annealed samples were characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nanoindentation. Plunge cutting experiment was carried out in <110> and <100> silicon crystal direction. The critical depth of cut and cutting force were monitored and found to be influenced by the annealing. The limits of hydrogen implantation annealing contribution to the cutting characteristics of silicon are discussed in light of implantation process and redistribution of hydrogen and defects generation during annealing process.

  1. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1998-06-02

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  2. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  3. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  4. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  5. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A program was established to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost.

  6. Nanostructured silicon nitride from wheat and rice husks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, S. B.; Rath, B. B.; Gorzkowski, E. P.; Wollmershauser, J. A.; Feng, C. R.

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles, submicron-diameter tubes, and rods of Si3N4 were synthesized from the thermal treatment of wheat and rice husks at temperatures at and above 1300 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. The whole pattern Rietveld analysis of the observed diffraction data from treatments at 1300 °C showed the formation of only hexagonal α-phase of Si3N4 with an R-factor of 1%, whereas samples treated at 1400 °C and above showed both α- and β-phases with an R-factor of 2%. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of tubes, rods, and nanoparticles of Si3N4. In a two-step process, where pure SiC was produced first from rice or wheat husk in an argon atmosphere and subsequently treated in a nitrogen atmosphere at 1450 °C, a nanostructured composite material having α- and β-phases of Si3N4 combined with cubic phase of SiC was formed. The thermodynamics of the formation of silicon nitride is discussed in terms of the solid state reaction between organic matter (silica content), which is inherently present in the wheat and rice husks, with the nitrogen from the furnace atmosphere. Nanostructures of silicon nitride formed by a single direct reaction or their composites with SiC formed in a two-step process of agricultural byproducts provide an uncomplicated sustainable synthesis route for silicon nitride used in mechanical, biotechnology, and electro-optic nanotechnology applications.

  7. Micromachined Silicon Waveguide Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    Rectangular waveguides are commonly used as circuit elements in remote-sensing heterodyne receivers at millimeter wavelengths. The advantages of waveguides are low loss and mechanical tunability. However, conventional machining techniques for waveguide components operating above a few hundred GHz are complicated and costly. Waveguides micromachined from silicon however would have several important advantages including low-cost; small size for very high frequency (submillimeter wave) operation; high dimensional accuracy (important for high-Q circuits); atomically smooth walls, thereby reducing rf losses; and the ability to integrate active and passive devices directly in the waveguide on thin membranes, thereby solving the traditional problem of mounting thin substrates.

  8. Edgeless silicon pad detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea Solano, B.; Abreu, M. C.; Avati, V.; Boccali, T.; Boccone, V.; Bozzo, M.; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Chen, W.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Mäki, T.; Mirabito, L.; Morelli, A.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V. G.; Rato Mendes, P.; Rodrigues, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silvestris, L.; Sousa, P.; Tapprogge, S.; Trocmé, B.

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy pion beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in "edgeless" planar silicon pad diode detectors diced through their contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of the device, but the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at low temperature. The depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is measured to be (12.5±8 stat..±6 syst.) μm.

  9. Silicon Encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A dual stage process of depositing bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (BCNTs) by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and coating Si using Radio frequency sputtering (RFS) technique. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron field emission studies (EFE). SEM results suggest a dense network of homogeneous silicon-coated BCNTs. From the comprehensive analysis of the results provided by these techniques emerges the picture of Si encapsulated BCNTs. PMID:20652067

  10. Silicon material task review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project Silicon Material Task are to evaluate technologies, new and old; to develop the most promising technologies; to establish practicality of the processes to meet production, energy use, and economic criteria; and to develop an information base on impurities in polysilicon and to determine their effects on solar cell performance. The approach involves determining process feasibility, setting milestones for the forced selection of the processes, and establishing the technical readiness of the integrated process.

  11. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  12. Colloidal luminescent silicon nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaotang; Hessel, Colin M; Yu, Yixuan; Bogart, Timothy D; Korgel, Brian A

    2013-07-10

    Silicon nanorods are grown by trisilane decomposition in hot squalane in the presence of tin (Sn) nanocrystals and dodecylamine. Sn induces solution-liquid-solid nanorod growth with dodecylamine serving as a stabilizing ligand. As-prepared nanorods do not luminesce, but etching with hydrofluoric acid to remove residual surface oxide followed by thermal hydrosilylation with 1-octadecene induces bright photoluminescence with quantum yields of 4-5%. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the ligands prevent surface oxidation for months when stored in air. PMID:23731184

  13. Silicon Web Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Heimlich, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of techniques to grow silicon web at 25 wq cm/min output rate is reported. Feasibility of web growth with simultaneous melt replenishment is discussed. Other factors covered include: (1) tests of aftertrimmers to improve web width; (2) evaluation of growth lid designs to raise speed and output rate; (3) tests of melt replenishment hardware; and (4) investigation of directed gas flow systems to control unwanted oxide deposition in the system and to improve convective cooling of the web. Compatibility with sufficient solar cell performance is emphasized.

  14. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  15. Separation and Detection of Toxic Gases with a Silicon Micromachined Gas Chromatography System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolesar, Edward S.; Reston, Rocky R.

    1995-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatography (GC) system was designed and fabricated using silicon micromachining and integrated circuit (IC) processing techniques. The silicon micromachined gas chromatography system (SMGCS) is composed of a miniature sample injector that incorporates a 10 microliter sample loop; a 0.9 meter long, rectangular shaped (300 micrometer width and 10 micrometer height) capillary column coated with a 0.2 micrometer thick copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) stationary phase; and a dual detector scheme based upon a CuPc-coated chemiresistor and a commercially available 125 micrometer diameter thermal conductivity detector (TCD) bead. Silicon micromachining was employed to fabricate the interface between the sample injector and the GC column, the column itself, and the dual detector cavity. A novel IC thin-film processing technique was developed to sublime the CuPc stationary phase coating on the column walls that were micromachined in the host silicon wafer substrate and Pyrex (r) cover plate, which were then electrostatically bonded together. The SMGCS can separate binary gas mixtures composed of parts-per-million (ppm) concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) when isothermally operated (55-80 degrees C). With a helium carrier gas and nitrogen diluent, a 10 microliter sample volume containing ammonia and nitrogen dioxide injected at 40 psi ((2.8 x 10(exp 5)Pa)) can be separated in less than 30 minutes.

  16. Nitrogen Trading Tool (NTT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) recently developed a prototype web-based nitrogen trading tool to facilitate water quality credit trading. The development team has worked closely with the Agriculture Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit (ARS-SPNR) and the Environmenta...

  17. Nitrogen catch crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High costs of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and the potential for N losses to ground and surface water have resulted in increased interest in using catch crops to recover this N. Research on potatoes has shown that the amount of N lost to leaching can be as much as the amount of N removed from the field ...

  18. Nitrogen recommendation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen fertilization for corn production is complicated by soil and weather variability, yet has far-reaching economic and environmental implications. To address this challenge, alternative N management strategies have been explored extensively in recent years by both public and private groups for...

  19. ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Harold S.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter is in three parts. The first concerns interpretations that can be made from atmospheric observations regarding nitrogen compounds and ozone, the second reviews some predictions made by atmospheric models, and the third compares between certain model results and atmospheric measurements with an emphasis on detecting evidence of significant disagreements.

  20. Ruminant nitrogen usage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book brings together the latest research on protein absorption by ruminants and takes a look at the calculation of optimum nutrient requirements, including bacterial digestion, in the calculations. It also describes the parameters of nitrogen conversion in the ruminant and examines the different kinds of protein found in animal feedstuffs.

  1. The nitrogen cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway J.N.; Aber J.D.; Erisman J.W.; Seitzinger S.P.; Howarth R.W.; Cowling E.B.; Cosby B.J.

    2003-04-01

    Human production of food and energy is the dominant continental process that breaks the triple bond in molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and creates reactive nitrogen (Nr) species. Circulation of anthropogenic Nr in Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere has a wide variety of consequences, which are magnified with time as Nr moves along its biogeochemical pathway. The same atom of Nr can cause multiple effects in the atmosphere, in terrestrial ecosystems, in freshwater and marine systems, and on human health. We call this sequence of effects the nitrogen cascade. As the cascade progresses, the origin of Nr becomes unimportant. Reactive nitrogen does not cascade at the same rate through all environmental systems; some systems have the ability to accumulate Nr, which leads to lag times in the continuation of the cascade. These lags slow the cascade and result in Nr accumulation in certain reservoirs, which in turn can enhance the effects of Nr on that environment. The only way to eliminate Nr accumulation and stop the cascade is to convert Nr back to nonreactive N{sub 2}.

  2. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  3. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  4. Smoother Scribing of Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed new tool used to scribe silicon wafers into chips more smoothly than before. New scriber produces surface that appears ductile. Scribed groove cuts have relatively smooth walls. Scriber consists of diamond pyramid point on rigid shaft. Ethanol flows through shaft and around point, like ink in ballpoint pen. Ethanol has significantly different effect for scribing silicon than water, used in conventional diamond scribers.

  5. Recent developments in silicon calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.

    1990-11-01

    We present a survey of some of the recent calorimeter applications of silicon detectors. The numerous attractive features of silicon detectors are summarized, with an emphasis on those aspects important to calorimetry. Several of the uses of this technology are summarized and referenced. We consider applications for electromagnetic calorimetry, hadronic calorimetry, and proposals for the SSC.

  6. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamics maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicone carbide is the single stable solid phase in region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4 and SiH. Analyses of the kinetics of reaction for region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  7. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  8. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  9. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamic maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of Region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicon carbide is the single stable solid phase in Region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4, and SiH. Analysis of the kinetics of reaction for Region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to Regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  10. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, J. V.; Cleland, J. W.; Westbrook, R. D.; Davis, H. L.; Wood, R. F.; Lindmayer, J.; Wakefield, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The economic production of silicon solar cell arrays circumvents p-n junction degradation by nuclear doping, in which the Si-30 transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron capture. Also considered are chemical purity specifications for improved silicon bulk states, surface induced states, and surface states.

  11. Enthalpy of sublimation as measured using a silicon oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hamza; Pomeroy, J. M.

    In this study, we report the enthalpy of sublimation of common gases (nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, neon, krypton, xenon, and water vapor) using a large area silicon oscillator with a sub-ng (~0.027 ng/cm2) mass sensitivity. The double paddle oscillator design enables high frequency stability (17 ppb) at cryogenic temperatures and provides a consistent technique for enthalpy measurements. The enthalpies of sublimation are derived from the rate of mass loss during programmed thermal desorption and are detected as a change in the resonance frequency of the self-tracking oscillator. These measured enthalpy values show excellent agreement with the accepted literature values.

  12. Relative thrombogenicity of polydimethylsiloxane and silicone rubber constituents.

    PubMed

    Weathersby, P K; Kolobow, T; Stool, E W

    1975-11-01

    Medical grade silicone rubber (MGSR) is composed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as well as silica filler, oxidation products from the curing process, and other components. In a test that excludes air-blood interfaces, PDMS radiation cured under nitrogen has a whole blood clotting time 22% longer than MGSR. Curing the PDMS under oxidizing conditions maintains a 10% prolongation, but addition of silica filler to the PDMS returns the clotting time to that of MGSR. Extracting MGSR with solvents other than water appreciably lowers the clotting time. These results indicate the "pure" PDMS has an intrinsically high thromboresistance. Thrombogenicity is increased by the use of silica filler and oxidizing cure, as in MGSR.

  13. Formation of dielectric silicon compounds by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselov, D. S.; Voronov, Yu A.

    2016-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of reactive magnetron sputtering of the silicon target in the ambient of inert argon gas with reactive gas, nitrogen or oxygen. The magnetron was powered by two mid-frequency generators of a rectangular pulse of opposite polarity. The negative polarity pulse provides the sputtering of the target. The positive polarity pulse provides removal of accumulated charge from the surface of the target. This method does not require any special devices of resistances matching and provides continuous sputtering of the target.

  14. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    Once upon a time nitrogen did not exist. Today it does. In the intervening time the universe was formed, nitrogen was created, the Earth came into existence, and its atmosphere and oceans were formed! In this analysis of the Earth's nitrogen cycle, I start with an overview of these important events relative to nitrogen and then move on to the more traditional analysis of the nitrogen cycle itself and the role of humans in its alteration.The universe is ˜15 Gyr old. Even after its formation, there was still a period when nitrogen did not exist. It took ˜300 thousand years after the big bang for the Universe to cool enough to create atoms; hydrogen and helium formed first. Nitrogen was formed in the stars through the process of nucleosynthesis. When a star's helium mass becomes great enough to reach the necessary pressure and temperature, helium begins to fuse into still heavier elements, including nitrogen.Approximately 10 Gyr elapsed before Earth was formed (˜4.5 Ga (billion years ago)) by the accumulation of pre-assembled materials in a multistage process. Assuming that N2 was the predominate nitrogen species in these materials and given that the temperature of space is -270 °C, N2 was probably a solid when the Earth was formed since its boiling point (b.p.) and melting point (m.p.) are -196 °C and -210 °C, respectively. Towards the end of the accumulation period, temperatures were probably high enough for significant melting of some of the accumulated material. The volcanic gases emitted by the resulting volcanism strongly influenced the surface environment. Nitrogen was converted from a solid to a gas and emitted as N2. Carbon and sulfur were probably emitted as CO and H2S (Holland, 1984). N2 is still the most common nitrogen volcanic gas emitted today at a rate of ˜2 TgN yr-1 (Jaffee, 1992).Once emitted, the gases either remained in the atmosphere or were deposited to the Earth's surface, thus continuing the process of biogeochemical cycling. The rate of

  15. Sorption Properties of Aerogel in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogel products are now available as insulation materials of the future. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is developing aerogel-based thermal insulation systems for space launch applications. Aerogel beads (Cabot Nanogel ) and aerogel blankets (Aspen Aerogels Spaceloft ) have outstanding ambient pressure thermal performance that makes them useful for applications where sealing is not possible. Aerogel beads are open-celled silicone dioxide and have tiny pores that run throughout the body of the bead. It has also recently been discovered that aerogel beads can be used as a filtering device for aqueous compounds at room temperature. With their hydrophobic covering, the beads absorb any non-polar substance and they can be chemically altered to absorb hot gases. The combination of the absorption and cryogenic insulating properties of aerogel beads have never been studied together. For future cryogenic insulation applications, it is crucial to know how the beads react while immersed in cryogenic liquids, most notably liquid nitrogen. Aerogel beads in loose-fill situation and aerogel blankets with composite fiber structure have been tested for absorption properties. Depending on the type of aerogel used and the preparation, preliminary results show the material can absorb up to seven times its own weight of liquid nitrogen, corresponding to a volumetric ratio of 0.70 (unit volume nitrogen per unit volume aerogel). These tests allow for an estimate on how much insulation is needed in certain situations. The theory behind the different processes of sorption is necessary for a better understanding of the preparation of the beads before they are used in an insulation system.

  16. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  17. Silicone Granulomas, a Growing Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Curreri, Alexis T.; Taylor, Gina A.; Burris, Katy

    2016-01-01

    The formation of granulomas is known to be a possible adverse effect of liquid silicone administration, used for soft tissue augmentation. Its plumping effects provide enhancement of certain body parts, such as the lips, hips, and buttocks. The desire for enhancement, perhaps influenced by popular culture and an unrealistic standard of beauty, leads individuals to seek silicone injections. There is a growing population of women and men receiving injections by unlicensed, unskilled “practitioners” not related to the healthcare profession. Complications under such circumstances are not uncommon, particularly the emergence of silicone granulomas, and the authors’ medical center has seen an increase in such cases. In this case report, the authors illustrate a young patient with significant complications from her silicone injections, review current therapies for silicone granulomas, and discuss this growing medical problem. PMID:27386046

  18. Silicone Granulomas, a Growing Problem?

    PubMed

    Park, Michelle E; Curreri, Alexis T; Taylor, Gina A; Burris, Katy

    2016-05-01

    The formation of granulomas is known to be a possible adverse effect of liquid silicone administration, used for soft tissue augmentation. Its plumping effects provide enhancement of certain body parts, such as the lips, hips, and buttocks. The desire for enhancement, perhaps influenced by popular culture and an unrealistic standard of beauty, leads individuals to seek silicone injections. There is a growing population of women and men receiving injections by unlicensed, unskilled "practitioners" not related to the healthcare profession. Complications under such circumstances are not uncommon, particularly the emergence of silicone granulomas, and the authors' medical center has seen an increase in such cases. In this case report, the authors illustrate a young patient with significant complications from her silicone injections, review current therapies for silicone granulomas, and discuss this growing medical problem. PMID:27386046

  19. RF sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides: Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or - 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or - 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  20. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  1. Cordierite silicon nitride filters

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B. ); Duiven, R.; Berger, M. ); Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J. )

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

  2. Multimode Silicon Nanowire Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The combined capabilities of both a nonplanar design and nonconventional carrier injection mechanisms are subject to recent scientific investigations to overcome the limitations of silicon metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. In this Letter, we present a multimode field effect transistors device using silicon nanowires that feature an axial n-type/intrinsic doping junction. A heterostructural device design is achieved by employing a self-aligned nickel-silicide source contact. The polymorph operation of the dual-gate device enabling the configuration of one p- and two n-type transistor modes is demonstrated. Not only the type but also the carrier injection mode can be altered by appropriate biasing of the two gate terminals or by inverting the drain bias. With a combined band-to-band and Schottky tunneling mechanism, in p-type mode a subthreshold swing as low as 143 mV/dec and an ON/OFF ratio of up to 104 is found. As the device operates in forward bias, a nonconventional tunneling transistor is realized, enabling an effective suppression of ambipolarity. Depending on the drain bias, two different n-type modes are distinguishable. The carrier injection is dominated by thermionic emission in forward bias with a maximum ON/OFF ratio of up to 107 whereas in reverse bias a Schottky tunneling mechanism dominates the carrier transport. PMID:25303290

  3. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis was continued for the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) in which solar cell silicon is produced in a 1,000 MT/yr plant. Progress and status are reported for the primary engineering activities involved in the preliminary process engineering design of the plant base case conditions (96%), reaction chemistry (96%), process flow diagram (85%), material balance (85%), energy balance (60%), property data (60%), equipment design (40%), major equipment list (30%) and labor requirements (10%). Engineering design of the second distillation column (D-02, TCS column) in the process was completed. The design is based on a 97% recovery of the light key (TCS, trichlorosilane) in the distillate and a 97% recovery of the heavy key (TET, silicon tetrachloride) in the bottoms. At a reflux ratio of 2, the specified recovery of TCS and TET is achieved with 20 trays (equilibrium stages, N=20). Respective feed tray locations are 9, 12 and 15 (NF sub 1 = 9, NF sub 2 = 12,, and NF sub 3 = 15). A total condenser is used for the distillation which is conducted at a pressure of 90 psia.

  4. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  5. Multimode silicon nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Glassner, Sebastian; Zeiner, Clemens; Periwal, Priyanka; Baron, Thierry; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2014-11-12

    The combined capabilities of both a nonplanar design and nonconventional carrier injection mechanisms are subject to recent scientific investigations to overcome the limitations of silicon metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. In this Letter, we present a multimode field effect transistors device using silicon nanowires that feature an axial n-type/intrinsic doping junction. A heterostructural device design is achieved by employing a self-aligned nickel-silicide source contact. The polymorph operation of the dual-gate device enabling the configuration of one p- and two n-type transistor modes is demonstrated. Not only the type but also the carrier injection mode can be altered by appropriate biasing of the two gate terminals or by inverting the drain bias. With a combined band-to-band and Schottky tunneling mechanism, in p-type mode a subthreshold swing as low as 143 mV/dec and an ON/OFF ratio of up to 10(4) is found. As the device operates in forward bias, a nonconventional tunneling transistor is realized, enabling an effective suppression of ambipolarity. Depending on the drain bias, two different n-type modes are distinguishable. The carrier injection is dominated by thermionic emission in forward bias with a maximum ON/OFF ratio of up to 10(7) whereas in reverse bias a Schottky tunneling mechanism dominates the carrier transport. PMID:25303290

  6. Silicon nanowire Esaki diodes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Heinz; Bessire, Cedric; Björk, Mikael T; Schenk, Andreas; Riel, Heike

    2012-02-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon nanowire tunnel diodes. The silicon nanowires were grown on p-type Si substrates using Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth and in situ n-type doping. Electrical measurements reveal Esaki diode characteristics with peak current densities of 3.6 kA/cm(2), peak-to-valley current ratios of up to 4.3, and reverse current densities of up to 300 kA/cm(2) at 0.5 V reverse bias. Strain-dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements exhibit a decrease of the peak tunnel current with uniaxial tensile stress and an increase of 48% for 1.3 GPa compressive stress along the <111> growth direction, revealing the strain dependence of the Si band structure and thus the tunnel barrier. The contributions of phonons to the indirect tunneling process were probed by conductance measurements at 4.2 K. These measurements show phonon peaks at energies corresponding to the transverse acoustical and transverse optical phonons. In addition, the low-temperature conductance measurements were extended to higher biases to identify potential impurity states in the band gap. The results demonstrate that the most likely impurity, namely, Au from the catalyst particle, is not detectable, a finding that is also supported by the excellent device properties of the Esaki diodes reported here.

  7. Aqueous phase removal of nitrogen from nitrogen compounds

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alex G.

    1993-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of compounds containing nitrogen present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the types of nitrogen compounds present in a waste stream, (2) determining the concentrations of nitrogen compounds, (3) balancing oxidized and reduced form of nitrogen by adding a reactant, and (4) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 300.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., thereby resulting in less harmful nitrogen and oxygen gas, hydroxides, alcohols, and hydrocarbons.

  8. Bacteria and the Nitrogen Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayanaba, A.

    1982-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation accounts for almost 70 percent of nitrogen for plant growth. If food is to keep abreast of population growth, even more nitrogen must be fixed. For this international research institutes continue the search for natural variants in the bacterial population while also pursuing novel genetic engineering methods. (Author)

  9. The nitrogen and sulphur cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.A.; Ferguson, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic regulation of nitrogen fixation; On the analysis of symbiotic genes of Rhizobium; Regulation of nitrogen assimilation by bacteria; Alternative and conventional nitrogenases; and The role of oxygen and hydrogen in nitrogen fixation.

  10. Nitrogen cycling and nitrogen saturation in temperate forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Aber, J D

    1992-07-01

    The last decade has seen a dramatic shift in the focus of nitrogen cycling research in forest ecosystems. Concerns over nitrogen deficiencies and effects of removal in harvest have given way to concerns over excess nitrogen availability and the potential for forest decline and surface water pollution. Driving this paradigm shift is the increase in atmospheric deposition of nitrogen to forests due to industrial and agricultural activity. At the core of the new paradigm is the concept of 'nitrogen saturation' of forest ecosystems. The purpose of this review is to synthesize recent advances in research relating to nitrogen deposition effects on temperate zone forest ecosystems, and the further effects of nitrogen saturation on environmental quality. PMID:21236013

  11. Synthesis of nanocrystals by discharges in liquid nitrogen from Si–Sn sintered electrode

    PubMed Central

    Kabbara, H.; Noël, C.; Ghanbaja, J.; Hussein, K.; Mariotti, D.; Švrček, V.; Belmonte, T.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis feasibility of silicon–tin nanocrystals by discharges in liquid nitrogen is studied using a Si–10 at % Sn sintered electrode. Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy shows that silicon and tin melt almost simultaneously. The presence of both vapours does not lead to the synthesis of alloyed nanocrystals but to the synthesis of separate nanocrystals of silicon and tin with average sizes of 10 nm. These nanocrystals are transformed into amorphous silicon oxide (am–SiO2) and β–SnO2 by air oxidation, after evaporation of the liquid nitrogen. The synthesis of an am-Si0.95Sn0.05 phase around large silicon crystals (~500 nm) decorated by β–Sn spheroids is achieved if the current flowing through electrodes is high enough. When the sintered electrode is hit by powerful discharges, some grains are heated and tin diffuses in the large silicon crystals. Next, these grains are shelled and fall into the dielectric liquid. PMID:26621791

  12. Recent Optical and SEM Characterization of Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator Diamond on Silicon Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Burkett, P. J.; Ross, D. K.; Gonzalez, C. P.; McNamara, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the 4 Genesis solar wind concentrator collectors was a silicon substrate coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) in which to capture solar wind. This material was designed for analysis of solar nitrogen and noble gases [1, 2]. This particular collector fractured during landing, but about 80% of the surface was recovered, including a large piece which was subdivided in 2012 [3, 4, 5]. The optical and SEM imaging and analysis described below supports the subdivision and allocation of the diamond-on-silicon (DOS) concentrator collector.

  13. Inelastic electron scattering in amorphous silicon nitride and aluminum oxide with multiple-scattering corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livins, Peteris; Aton, T.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1988-09-01

    Electron-energy-loss measurements for an amorphous chemical-vapor-deposited silicon nitride film and evaporated sapphire in the broad energy range 1-200 eV are investigated. A method, not requiring the zero-loss peak, to remove the multiple scattering is discussed, applied, and the optical constants obtained. An Elliot-type model used with aluminum oxide gives a valence-exciton binding energy of 1.36+/-0.2 eV with a band gap of 9.8+/-0.2 eV. The unexpected strength of the nitrogen 2s transition is noted in silicon nitride.

  14. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project, directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulation system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials, are reported. Results of the following are discussed: (1) weather-ometer stressing vs. weathering history of silicon and silicon modified materials; (2) humidity/temperature cycling exposure; (3) exposure at high humidity/high temperature; (4) outdoor exposure stress; (5) thermal cycling stress; and (6) UV screening agents. The plans for the next quarter are outlined.

  15. Solar nitrogen - Evidence for a secular increase in the ratio of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Solar wind nitrogen, implanted in lunar soil samples, exhibits isotopic variations that are related to the time, although not to the duration, of implantation, with earlier samples characterized by lower ratios of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14. An increase in the solar nitrogen-15 content during the lifetime of the lunar regolith is probably caused by spallation of oxygen-16 in the surface regions of the sun.-

  16. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2002-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  17. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  18. Silicene: silicon conquers the 2D world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Lay, Guy; Salomon, Eric; Angot, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    We live in the digital age based on the silicon chip and driven by Moore's law. Last July, IBM created a surprise by announcing the fabrication of a 7 nm test chip with functional transistors using, instead of just silicon, a silicon-germanium alloy. Will silicon be dethroned?

  19. Ceramic for Silicon-Shaping Dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekercioglu, I.; Wills, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon beryllium oxynitride (SiBON) is a promising candidate material for manufacture of shaping dies used in fabricating ribbons or sheets of silicon. It is extremely stable, resists thermal shock, and has excellent resistance to molten silicon. SiBON is a solid solution of beryllium silicate in beta-silicon nitride.

  20. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  1. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Pinnau, Ingo; Segelke, Scott

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  2. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Ista, Linnea K.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul; Zeineldin, Reema R.; Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J.

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  3. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  4. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  5. Effect of oxygen-nitrogen ratio on sinterability of Sialons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of varying the sintering temperature and the oxygen to nitrogen ratio (O/N) on the sinterability of Sialons of the formula Si2.55Al0.6OyN4-0.667y was investigated for y between 0.57 and 1.92 (O/N between 0.157 and 0.706). The Sialons reached maximum density on pressureless sintering for 4 hours at about 1760 C in nitrogen. Optimum sinterability with densities up to about 98 percent of theoretical was attained with negligible X-phase in the O/N range from about 0.2 to 0.3. On sintering at approximately 1830 C the Sialons decomposed with evolution of silicon and aluminum.

  6. Nitrogen metabolism in haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Pire, Carmen; Zafrilla, Basilio; Richardson, David J

    2008-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle (N-cycle), principally supported by prokaryotes, involves different redox reactions mainly focused on assimilatory purposes or respiratory processes for energy conservation. As the N-cycle has important environmental implications, this biogeochemical cycle has become a major research topic during the last few years. However, although N-cycle metabolic pathways have been studied extensively in Bacteria or Eukarya, relatively little is known in the Archaea. Halophilic Archaea are the predominant microorganisms in hot and hypersaline environments such as salted lakes, hot springs or salted ponds. Consequently, the denitrifying haloarchaea that sustain the nitrogen cycle under these conditions have emerged as an important target for research aimed at understanding microbial life in these extreme environments. The haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei was isolated 20 years ago from Santa Pola salted ponds (Alicante, Spain). It was described as a denitrifier and it is also able to grow using NO3-, NO2- or NH4+ as inorganic nitrogen sources. This review summarizes the advances that have been made in understanding the N-cycle in halophilic archaea using Hfx mediterranei as a haloarchaeal model. The results obtained show that this microorganism could be very attractive for bioremediation applications in those areas where high salt, nitrate and nitrite concentrations are found in ground waters and soils. PMID:18593475

  7. Ice sheets and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Eric W

    2013-07-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2-3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas.

  8. Ice sheets and nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land–atmosphere and ocean–atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2–3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas. PMID:23713125

  9. Homogeneous nucleation of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iland, Kristina; Wedekind, Jan; Wölk, Judith; Strey, Reinhard

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the homogeneous nucleation of nitrogen in a cryogenic expansion chamber [A. Fladerer and R. Strey, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 164710 (2006)]. Gas mixtures of nitrogen and helium as carrier gas were adiabatically expanded and cooled down from an initial temperature of 83 K until nucleation occurred. This onset was detected by constant angle light scattering at nitrogen vapor pressures of 1.3-14.2 kPa and temperatures of 42-54 K. An analytical fit function well describes the experimental onset pressures with an error of ±15%. We estimate the size of the critical nucleus with the Gibbs-Thomson equation yielding critical sizes of about 50 molecules at the lowest and 70 molecules at the highest temperature. In addition, we estimate the nucleation rate and compare it with nucleation theories. The predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT) are 9 to 19 orders of magnitude below the experimental results and show a stronger temperature dependence. The Reguera-Reiss theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165701 (2004)] predicts the correct temperature dependence at low temperatures and decreases the absolute deviation to 7-13 orders of magnitude. We present an empirical correction function to CNT describing our experimental results. These correction parameters are remarkably close to the ones of argon [Iland et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154506 (2007)] and even those of water [J. Wölk and R. Strey, J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11683 (2001)].

  10. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  11. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  12. Replacement of silicone polymer A with silicone polymer B and the subsequent characterization of the new cellular silicone materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to replace silicone polymer A with silicone polymer B produced by Vendor B. Silicone polymer B and the resulting B-50 cellular silicone have been used to produce cushions for the W87 program. Approximately 5.5 years of stress relaxation aging study data as well as actual part surveillance data have been collected, characterizing the stockpile life performance of the B-50 cellular silicone cushion material. Process characterization of new cellular silicone materials as a result of replacing silicone polymer A with silicone polymer B has been completed. Load deflection requirements for the new cellular silicone materials based on silicone polymer B have been met. The silicone polymer B based cellular silicone materials must be compounded at densities of approximately 0.03 g/cm{sup 3} less than the silicone polymer A based cellular silicone materials in order to achieve the same load deflection requirements has also been demonstrated. The change in silicone polymers from A to B involved a decrease in volatile content as well as a decrease in part shrinkage.

  13. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fludized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  14. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C. (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fluidized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of porous silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daeyoon; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Moon, Taeho; Sohn, Honglae

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of porous silicon nanowires through the metalassisted chemical etching of porous silicon in a solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The morphology of porous silicon nanowires was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The etch rate of the porous silicon nanowires was faster than that of silicon nanowires, but slower than that of porous silicon. The porous silicon nanowires distributed uniformly on the entire porous silicon layer and the tips of the porous silicon nanowires congregated together. The single crystalline and sponge-like porous structure with the pore diameters of less than 5 nm was confirmed for the porous silicon nanowires. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Concentrator silicon cell research

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A.

    1992-04-01

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  17. The ISOLDE Silicon Ball

    SciTech Connect

    Fraile, L.M.

    2003-09-16

    The investigation of weakly bound nuclei close to the particle driplines makes necessary the development of new spectroscopy devices with the capability of detecting charged particles and precisely determining their energy, angular distribution and nature. With this aim the ISOLDE Silicon Ball is under construction. It is a charged particle spectroscopy device with the requirements of high geometrical efficiency and broad energy range coverage, designed for the investigation of the exotic nuclei produced at ISOLDE and at other similar facilities. In order to allow for particle identification the simultaneous use of the Time of Flight (TOF) and Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques is intended. Recoil tagging capabilities, suitable for transfer reactions to be performed at REX-ISOLDE, should be foreseen for a future development. The design and realization of the first prototype, together with the first tests are reported.

  18. Silicon tracker data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Large particle physics experiments are making increasing technological demands on the design and implementation of real-time data acquisition systems. The LHC will have bunch crossing intervals of 25 nanoseconds and detectors, such as CMS, will contain over 10 million electronic channels. Readout systems will need to cope with 100 kHz rates of 1 MByte-sized events. Over 70% of this voluminous flow will stem from silicon tracker and MSGC devices. This paper describes the techniques currently being harnessed from ASIC devices through to modular microprocessor-based architectures around standards such as VMEbus and PCI. In particular, the experiences gained at the HERA H1 experiment are highlighted where many of the key technological concepts have already been im implemented.

  19. Crystallization of Silicon Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Purity constraints for reasonable solar-cell efficiency require that silicon-ribbon growth for photovoltaics occur in a regime in which constitutional supercooling or other compositional effects on the crystallization front are not important. A major consideration in the fundamentals of crystallization is the removal of the latent heat of fusion. The direction of removal, compared with the growth direction, has a major influence on the crystallization rate and the development of localized stresses. The detailed shape of the crystallization front appears to have two forms: that required for dendritic-web growth, and that occurring in all others. After the removal of the latent heat of fusion, the thermal-mechanical behavior of all ribbons appears similar within the constraints of the exothermal gradient. The technological constraints in achieving the required thermal and mechanical conditions vary widely among the growth processes.

  20. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  1. Silicone plesiotherapy molds

    SciTech Connect

    Karolis, C.; Reay-Young, P.S.; Walsh, W.; Velautham, G.

    1983-04-01

    Plesiotherapy, the treatment of superficial lesions by radioactive molds has largely been replaced by teletherapy techniques involving high energy photon and electron beams. There are, however, situations for which a short distance type treatment, in one form or another, is superior to any other presently available. Traditionally, molds have taken the form of rigid devices incorporating clamps to attach them to the patient. This ensures a reproducible geometry about a localized region since the molds are applied on a daily basis. To make such devices requires considerable skill and patience. This article describes an alternative method that eliminates the use of cumbersome devices in many situations. Silicone molds made from a plaster cast model have been found suitable for the treatment of surface lesions and especially for lesions in the oral and nasal cavities. With the use of radioactive gold seeds the molds may be left in place for a few days without fear of them moving.

  2. Thick film silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Jewett, D. N.; Mlavsky, A. I.; White, V. E.

    1974-01-01

    One inch wide silicon ribbons up to 14 inches long have been produced from graphite dies. Several different techniques have been employed to improve the semiconductor purity of silicon. This has resulted in a general increase in quality although the techniques involved have not been optimized. The power factor of uncoated ribbon solar cells produced for material evaluation has increased to approximately 75% of those evaluation cells made from commercial silicon. The present limitation is believed due to low lifetime. Additional work has continued with new die materials; however, only composite dies of SiO2 and C show significant potential at this time.

  3. Three-dimensional silicon micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, S.; Song, J.; Dang, Z. Y.; Liang, H. D.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2012-11-01

    A process for fabricating arbitrary-shaped, two- and three-dimensional silicon and porous silicon components has been developed, based on high-energy ion irradiation, such as 250 keV to 1 MeV protons and helium. Irradiation alters the hole current flow during subsequent electrochemical anodization, allowing the anodization rate to be slowed or stopped for low/high fluences. For moderate fluences the anodization rate is selectively stopped only at depths corresponding to the high defect density at the end of ion range, allowing true three-dimensional silicon machining. The use of this process in fields including optics, photonics, holography and nanoscale depth machining is reviewed.

  4. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  5. Investigations of silicon nitride films for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elmiger, J.R.; Kunst, M.

    1996-12-31

    Silicon nitride films on crystalline silicon were deposited in a low-temperature (<400 C) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition process. The deposition process is monitored with in situ Time Resolved Microwave Conductivity measurements leading to an on-line quality control of the deposited films. It is shown that at the start of the deposition there is a strong decrease of the lifetime of the measured transient signal due to plasma induced damage at the silicon surface. Afterwards an increase of the lifetime is observed due to passivation of the interface. For thin films (<30 nm), the lifetime and the film composition depend on the film thickness. Furthermore, the film composition has a strong impact on the passivation of thick (100 nm) silicon nitride films. The best passivation is obtained for almost stoichiometric films characterized by a refractive index of 1.95.

  6. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A cost effective encapsulant system was identified and a silicone acrylic cover material containing a durable ultraviolet screening agent was prepared. The effectiveness of the cover material in protecting photo-oxidatively sensitive polymers was demonstrated.

  7. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  8. Integrated silicon and silicon nitride photonic circuits on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Mo

    2014-06-15

    Flexible integrated photonic devices based on crystalline materials on plastic substrates have a promising potential in many unconventional applications. In this Letter, we demonstrate a fully integrated photonic system including ring resonators and grating couplers, based on both crystalline silicon and silicon nitride, on flexible plastic substrate by using the stamping-transfer method. A high yield has been achieved by a simple, yet reliable transfer method without significant performance degradation.

  9. Silicon Holder For Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    Simple assembly of silicon wafers holds silicon-based charge-coupled device (CCD) during postprocessing in which silicon deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy. Attains temperatures similar to CCD, so hotspots suppressed. Coefficients of thermal expansion of holder and CCD equal, so thermal stresses caused by differential thermal expansion and contraction do not develop. Holder readily fabricated, by standard silicon processing techniques, to accommodate various CCD geometries. Silicon does not contaminate CCD or molecular-beam-epitaxy vacuum chamber.

  10. Studies of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Zhila

    Silicon carbide semiconductor technology is continuing to advance rapidly. The excellent physical and electronic properties of silicon carbide recently take itself to be the main focused power device material for high temperature, high power, and high frequency electronic devices because of its large band gap, high thermal conductivity, and high electron saturation drift velocity. SiC is more stable than Si because of its high melting point and mechanical strength. Also the understanding of the structure and properties of semiconducting thin film alloys is one of the fundamental steps toward their successful application in technologies requiring materials with tunable energy gaps, such as solar cells, flat panel displays, optical memories and anti-reflecting coatings. Silicon carbide and silicon nitrides are promising materials for novel semiconductor applications because of their band gaps. In addition, they are "hard" materials in the sense of having high elastic constants and large cohesive energies and are generally resistant to harsh environment, including radiation. In this research, thin films of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride were deposited in a r.f magnetron sputtering system using a SiC target. A detailed analysis of the surface chemistry of the deposited films was performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy whereas structure and morphology was studied atomic force microscopy (AFM), and nonoindentation.

  11. [Study of purity tests for silicone resins].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kyoko; Otsuki, Noriko; Ohori, Akio; Chinda, Mitsuru; Furusho, Noriko; Osako, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    In the 8th edition of Japan's Specifications and Standards for Food Additives, the purity test for silicone resins requires the determination of the refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the extracted silicone oil, and allows for only a limited amount of silicon dioxide. In the purity test, carbon tetrachloride is used to separate the silicone oil and silicon dioxide. To exclude carbon tetrachloride, methods were developed for separating the silicone oil and silicon dioxide from silicone resin, which use hexane and 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane. For silicone oil, the measured refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the silicone oil obtained from the hexane extract were shown to be equivalent to those of the intact silicone oil. In regard to silicon dioxide, it was confirmed that, following the separation with 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane, the level of silicon dioxide in silicone resin can be accurately determined. Therefore, in this study, we developed a method for testing the purity of silicone resins without the use of carbon tetrachloride, which is a harmful reagent.

  12. Surface Area, and Oxidation Effects on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon Powder Compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Commercially available silicon powders were wet-attrition-milled from 2 to 48 hr to achieve surface areas (SA's) ranging from 1.3 to 70 sq m/g. The surface area effects on the nitridation kinetics of silicon powder compacts were determined at 1250 or 1350 C for 4 hr. In addition, the influence of nitridation environment, and preoxidation on nitridation kinetics of a silicon powder of high surface area (approximately equals 63 sq m/g) was investigated. As the surface area increased, so did the percentage nitridation after 4 hr in N2 at 1250 or 1350 C. Silicon powders of high surface area (greater than 40 sq m/g) can be nitrided to greater than 70% at 1250 C in 4 hr. The nitridation kinetics of the high-surface-area powder compacts were significantly delayed by preoxidation treatment. Conversely, the nitridation environment had no significant influence on the nitridation kinetics of the same powder. Impurities present in the starting powder, and those accumulated during attrition milling, appeared to react with the silica layer on the surface of silicon particles to form a molten silicate layer, which provided a path for rapid diffusion of nitrogen and enhanced the nitridation kinetics of high surface area silicon powder.

  13. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry is presented that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds and contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine-structure levels of the silicon atom. As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, the model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundance of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  14. Morphological Characterization of Silicone Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gido, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Silicone hydrogel materials are used in the latest generation of extended wear soft contact lenses. To ensure comfort and eye health, these materials must simultaneously exhibit high oxygen permeability and high water permeability / hydrophilicity. The materials achieve these opposing requirements based on bicontinuous composite of nanoscale domains of oxygen permeable (silicones) and hydrophilic (water soluble polymer) materials. The microphase separated morphology of silicone hydrogel contact lens materials was imaged using field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Additional morphological information was provided by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). These results all indicate a nanophase separated structure of silicone rich (oxygen permeable) and carbon rich (water soluble polymer) domains separated on a length scale of about 10 nm.

  15. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  16. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  17. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  18. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status. PMID:26747521

  19. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  20. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  1. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  2. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  3. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  4. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  5. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  6. Silicone-Rubber Stitching Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    Fabric products protected from raveling by coating threads and filling stitching holes with silicone rubber. Uncored silicone rubber applied to stitching lines with air-pressurized sealant gun. Next, plastic release film placed on coated side, and blanket flipped over so release film lies underneath. Blanket then bagged and adhesive cured under partial vacuum of about 3.5 psi or under pressure. Applications include balloons, parachutes, ultralight aircraft, sails, rescue harnesses, tents, or other fabric products highly stressed in use.

  7. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  8. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, K. V.; Serreze, H. B.; Bates, H. E.; Morrison, A. D.; Jewett, D. N.; Ho, J. C. T.; Schwuttke, G. H.; Ciszek, T. F.; Kran, A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous growth methodology for silicon solar cell ribbons deals with capillary effects, die effects, thermal effects and crystal shape effects. Emphasis centers on the shape of the meniscus at the ribbon edge as a factor contributing to ribbon quality with respect to defect densities. Structural and electrical characteristics of edge defined, film-fed grown silicon ribbons are elaborated. Ribbon crystal solar cells produce AMO efficiencies of 6 to 10%.

  9. Silicon Hot-Electron Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Mitchell, Robert R.; Isenberg, Hal D.; Stahle, Carl M.; Cao, Nga T.; Schneider, Gideon; Travers, Douglas E.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new type of direct detector, a silicon hot-electron bolometer, for measurements in the far-infrared and submillimeter spectral ranges. High performance bolometers can be made using the electron-phonon conductance in heavily doped silicon to provide thermal isolation from the cryogenic bath. Noise performance is expected to be near thermodynamic limits, allowing background limited performance for many far infrared and submillimeter photometric and spectroscopic applications.

  10. Single Crystal Silicon Instrument Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bly, Vince

    2007-01-01

    The goals for the fabrication of single crystal silicon instrument mirrors include the following: 1) Develop a process for fabricating lightweight mirrors from single crystal silicon (SCS); 2) Modest lightweighting: 3X to 4X less than equivalent solid mirror; 3) High surface quality, better than lambda/40 RMS @ 633nm; 4) Significantly less expensive than current technology; and 5) Negligible distortion when cooled to cryogenic temperatures.

  11. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  12. Annealing of silicon optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; McMillen, C.; Singh, R.; Podila, R.; Rao, A. M.; Hawkins, T.; Foy, P.; Morris, S.; Rice, R.; Poole, K. F.; Zhu, L.; Ballato, J.

    2011-11-01

    The recent realization of silicon core optical fibers has the potential for novel low insertion loss rack-to-rack optical interconnects and a number of other uses in sensing and biomedical applications. To the best of our knowledge, incoherent light source based rapid photothermal processing (RPP) was used for the first time to anneal glass-clad silicon core optical fibers. X-ray diffraction examination of the silicon core showed a considerable enhancement in the length and amount of single crystallinity post-annealing. Further, shifts in the Raman frequency of the silicon in the optical fiber core that were present in the as-drawn fibers were removed following the RPP treatment. Such results indicate that the RPP treatment increases the local crystallinity and therefore assists in the reduction of the local stresses in the core, leading to more homogenous fibers. The dark current-voltage characteristics of annealed silicon optical fiber diodes showed lower leakage current than the diodes based on as-drawn fibers. Photons in UV and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions play a very important role in improving the bulk and carrier transport properties of RPP-treated silicon optical fibers, and the resultant annealing permits a path forward to in situ enhancement of the structure and properties of these new crystalline core optical fibers.

  13. Nitrogen fixation and nitrogen transformations in marine symbioses.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cara L; Jarett, Jessica K; Olson, Nathan D; Lesser, Michael P

    2010-10-01

    Many marine organisms have coevolved symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria in nitrogen limited environments such as coral reefs. In addition, some of these organisms also harbor microbes that carry out nitrification and denitrification. Prokaryotes involved in nitrogen fixation and other nitrogen transformations are symbionts in a range of eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment including shipworms, diatoms, corals and sponges. Molecular genetic approaches, and other analytical techniques, have provided exciting new insights into symbiont diversity and the relationship between host and symbiont. We review the current state of knowledge of these symbioses and highlight important avenues for future studies.

  14. Nitrogen fixation and nitrogen transformations in marine symbioses.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cara L; Jarett, Jessica K; Olson, Nathan D; Lesser, Michael P

    2010-10-01

    Many marine organisms have coevolved symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria in nitrogen limited environments such as coral reefs. In addition, some of these organisms also harbor microbes that carry out nitrification and denitrification. Prokaryotes involved in nitrogen fixation and other nitrogen transformations are symbionts in a range of eukaryotic hosts in the marine environment including shipworms, diatoms, corals and sponges. Molecular genetic approaches, and other analytical techniques, have provided exciting new insights into symbiont diversity and the relationship between host and symbiont. We review the current state of knowledge of these symbioses and highlight important avenues for future studies. PMID:20674366

  15. Effect of laser parameters and assist gas on spectral response of silicon fibrous nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Alubiady, M.; Tan, Bo

    2010-11-15

    This article report, for the first time, the influence of laser parameters on the spectral response of weblike silicon fibrous nanostructures. These nanostructures are formed by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz pulse frequency under atmosphere and nitrogen ambient. The observed decreasing in reflectance is correlated with the density of fibrous nanostructures and the size of the agglomerated nanoparticles. Compared to bulk silicon, Raman spectra of fibrous nanostructures shows a downward shift and asymmetric broadening at the first order phonon peak. The shift and broadening are attributed to phonon confinement of fibrous nanostructure. Polarization and nitrogen gas modify the morphology of generated nanomaterials but does not have effect on light absorptance. Pulsewidth and pulse frequency do not have significant effect on light absorptance.

  16. Effect of laser parameters and assist gas on spectral response of silicon fibrous nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo; Alubiady, M.

    2010-11-01

    This article report, for the first time, the influence of laser parameters on the spectral response of weblike silicon fibrous nanostructures. These nanostructures are formed by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz pulse frequency under atmosphere and nitrogen ambient. The observed decreasing in reflectance is correlated with the density of fibrous nanostructures and the size of the agglomerated nanoparticles. Compared to bulk silicon, Raman spectra of fibrous nanostructures shows a downward shift and asymmetric broadening at the first order phonon peak. The shift and broadening are attributed to phonon confinement of fibrous nanostructure. Polarization and nitrogen gas modify the morphology of generated nanomaterials but does not have effect on light absorptance. Pulsewidth and pulse frequency do not have significant effect on light absorptance.

  17. Electroluminescence efficiencies of erbium in silicon-based hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Cueff, Sébastien E-mail: christophe.labbe@ensicaen.fr; Manel Ramírez, Joan; Berencén, Yonder; Garrido, Blas; Kurvits, Jonathan A.; Zia, Rashid; Rizk, Richard; Labbé, Christophe E-mail: christophe.labbe@ensicaen.fr

    2013-11-04

    We report on room-temperature 1.5 μm electroluminescence from trivalent erbium (Er{sup 3+}) ions embedded in three different CMOS-compatible silicon-based hosts: SiO{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and SiN{sub x}. We show that although the insertion of either nitrogen or excess silicon helps enhance electrical conduction and reduce the onset voltage for electroluminescence, it drastically decreases the external quantum efficiency of Er{sup 3+} ions from 2% in SiO{sub 2} to 0.001% and 0.0004% in SiN{sub x} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, respectively. Furthermore, we present strong evidence that hot carrier injection is significantly more efficient than defect-assisted conduction for the electrical excitation of Er{sup 3+} ions. These results suggest strategies to optimize the engineering of on-chip electrically excited silicon-based nanophotonic light sources.

  18. On the photoluminescence of as-deposited Tb-doped silicon oxides and oxynitrides fabricated by ECR-PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, J. M.; Wojcik, J.; Berencén, Y.; Mascher, P.; Garrido, B.

    2014-05-01

    In-situ doping of Tb3+ ions in silicon oxides and oxynitrides deposited by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma enhanced chemical-vapour (ECR-PECVD) has been performed. Oxygen and nitrogen gas flow rates were changed to produce a gradual substitution of oxygen by nitrogen in the host matrix. Bright green luminescence from as-deposited layers is observed by the naked eye under daylight conditions. Tbdoped nitrogen-rich samples showed a considerable photoluminescence (PL) enhancement compared to Tb-doped silicon oxides. An optimum layer composition for efficient Tb3+ excitation under non-resonant optical pumping is obtained. The combination of a low temperature treatment with bright luminescence could be instrumental for the development of light emitting devices in other platforms with more restrictive temperature requirements.

  19. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The

  20. Nitrogen fixation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  1. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  2. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  3. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion.

  4. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  5. Nitrogen In Saturn's Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Baragiola, R. A.; Crary, F.; Young, D.

    2004-11-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions to the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to the models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and the CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  6. Temperature dependence of the biaxial modulus, intrinsic stress and composition of plasma deposited silicon oxynitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David R.; Ogbuji, Linus U. T.; Freeman, Mathieu J.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. The elemental composition was varied between silicon nitride and silicon dioxide: SiO(0.3)N(1.0), SiO(0.7)N(1.6), SiO(0.7)N(1.1), and SiO(1.7)N(0.%). These films were annealed in air, at temperatures of 40-240 C above the deposition temperature (260 C), to determine the stability and behavior or each composition. the biaxial modulus, biaxial intrinsic stress, and elemental composition were measured at discrete intervals within the annealing cycle. Films deposited from primarily ammonia possessed considerable hydrogen (up to 38 at.%) and lost nitrogen and hydrogen at anneal temperatures (260-300 C) only marginally higher than the deposition temperature. As the initial oxygen content increased a different mechanism controlled the behavior or the film: The temperature threshold for change rose to approximately equal to 350 C and the loss of nitrogen was compensated by an equivalent rise in the oxygen content. The transformation from silicon oxynitride to silica was completed after 50 h at 400 C. The initial biaxial modulus of all compositions was 21-3- GPa and the intrinsic stress was -30 to 85 MPa. Increasing the oxygen content raised the temperature threshold where cracking first occurred; the two film compositions with the highest initial oxygen content did not crack, even at the highest temperature (450 C) investigated. At 450 C the biaxial modulus increased to approximately equal to 100 GPa and the intrinsic stress was approximately equal to 200 MPa. These increases could be correlated with the observed change in the film's composition. When nitrogen was replaced by oxygen, the induced stress remained lower than the biaxial strength of the material, but, when nitrogen and hydrogen were lost, stress-relieving microcracking occurred.

  7. Performance of a Commercial Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, Edward A

    2008-01-01

    Silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are rapidly becoming the energy dispersive spectrometer of choice especially for scanning electron microscopy applications. The complementary features of large active areas (i.e., collection angle) and high count rate capability of these detector contribute to their popularity, as well as the absence of liquid nitrogen cooling of the detector. The performance of an EDAX Apollo 40 SDD on a JEOL 6500F SEM will be discussed.

  8. Enhancement in photovoltaic properties of silicon solar cells by surface plasmon effect of palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaoui, Malek; Atyaoui, Atef; Khalifa, Marwen; Elyagoubi, Jalel; Dimassi, Wissem; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the surface Plasmon effect of Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) on the photovoltaic properties of silicon solar cells. Pd NPs were deposited on the p-type silicon base of the n+/p junction using a chemical deposition method in an aqueous solution containing Palladium (II) Nitrate (PdNO3)2 and Ammonium Hydroxide (NH4OH) followed by a thermal treatment at 500 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Chemical composition and surface morphology of the treated silicon base were examined by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The effect of the deposited Pd NPs on the electrical properties was evaluated by the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The results indicate that the formation of the Pd NPs is accompanied by an enhanced light absorption and improved photovoltaic parameters.

  9. Large area Czochralski silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Gleim, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The overall cost effectiveness of the Czochralski process for producing large-area silicon was determined. The feasibility of growing several 12 cm diameter crystals sequentially at 12 cm/h during a furnace run and the subsequent slicing of the ingot using a multiblade slurry saw were investigated. The goal of the wafering process was a slice thickness of 0.25 mm with minimal kerf. A slice + kerf of 0.56 mm was achieved on 12 cm crystal using both 400 grit B4C and SiC abrasive slurries. Crystal growth experiments were performed at 12 cm diameter in a commercially available puller with both 10 and 12 kg melts. Several modifications to the puller hoz zone were required to achieve stable crystal growth over the entire crystal length and to prevent crystallinity loss a few centimeters down the crystal. The maximum practical growth rate for 12 cm crystal in this puller design was 10 cm/h, with 12 to 14 cm/h being the absolute maximum range at which melt freeze occurred.

  10. Silicon Photomultiplier charaterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Leonel; Osornio, Leo; Para, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Silicon Photo Multiples (SiPM's) are relatively new photon detectors. They offer many advantages compared to photo multiplier tubes (PMT's) such as insensitivity to magnetic field, robustness at varying lighting levels, and low cost. The SiPM output wave forms are poorly understood. The experiment conducted collected waveforms of responses of Hamamatsu SiPM to incident laser pulse at varying temperatures and bias voltages. Ambient noise was characterized at all temperatures and bias voltages by averaging the waveforms. Pulse shape of the SiPM response was determined under different operating conditions: the pulse shape is nearly independent of the bias voltage but exhibits strong variation with temperature, consistent with the temperature variation of the quenching resistor. Amplitude of responses of the SiPM to low intensity laser light shows many peaks corresponding to the detection of 1,2,3 etc. photons. Amplitude of these pulses depends linearly on the bias voltage, enabling determination of the breakdown voltage at each temperature. Poisson statistics has been used to determine the average number of detected photons at each operating conditions. Department of Education Grant No. P0315090007 and the Department of Energy/ Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  11. Silicon MINP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.; Addis, F. W.; Miller, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The MINP solar cell concept refers to a cell structure designed to be a base region dominated device. Thus, it is desirable that recombination losses are reduced to the point that they occur only in the base region. The most unique feature of the MINP cell design is that a tunneling contact is utilized for the metallic contact on the front surface. The areas under the collector grid and bus bar are passivated by a thin oxide of tunneling thickness. Efforts must also be taken to minimize recombination at the surface between grid lines, at the junction periphery and within the emitter. Results of both theoretical and experimental studies of silicon MINP cells are given. Performance calculations are described which give expected efficiencies as a function of base resistivity and junction depth. Fabrication and characterization of cells are discussed which are based on 0.2 ohm-cm substrates, diffused emitters on the order of 0.15 to 0.20 microns deep, and with Mg MIS collector grids. A total area AM 1 efficiency of 16.8% was achieved. Detailed analyses of photocurrent and current loss mechanisms are presented and utilized to discuss future directions of research. Finally, results reported by other workers are discussed.

  12. Silicon Carbide Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Andrew Trunek has focused on supporting the Sic team through the growth of Sic crystals, making observations and conducting research that meets the collective needs and requirements of the team while fulfilling program commitments. Cancellation of the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has had a significant negative impact on resources and research goals. This report highlights advancements and achievements made with this cooperative agreement over the past year. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) continues to make advances in silicon carbide (SiC) research during the past year. Step free surfaces were used as substrates for the deposition of GaN epilayers that yielded very low dislocation densities. Defect free 3C- SiC was successfully nucleated on step free mesas and test diodes were fabricated. Web growth techniques were used to increase the usable surface area of dislocation free SiC by approximately equal to 40%. The greatest advancement has been attained on stepped surfaces of SiC. A metrology standard was developed using high temperature etching techniques titled "Nanometer Step Height Standard". This development culminated in being recognized for a 2004 R&D100 award and the process to produce the steps received a NASA Space Act award.

  13. The development of a nitrogen dioxide sonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluis, W. W.; Allaart, M. A. F.; Piters, A. J. M.; Gast, L. F. L.

    2010-07-01

    A growing number of space-borne instruments measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations in the troposphere, but validation of these instruments is hampered by lack of ground-based and in-situ profile measurements. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) has developed a working NO2 sonde. The sonde is attached to a small meteorological balloon and measures a tropospheric NO2 profile. The NO2 sonde has a vertical resolution of 5 m, and a measurement range between 1 and 100 ppbv. The instrument is light in weight (±700 g), cheap (disposable), energy efficient and not harmful to the environment or the person who finds the package after use. The sonde uses the chemiluminescent reaction of NO2 in an aqueous luminol solution. The NO2-luminol reaction produces faint blue/purple light (at about 425 nm), which is detected by an array of silicon photodiodes. The luminol solution is optimised to be specific to NO2. An on-ground comparison with measurements from a Photolytic Analyzer of RIVM shows that both instruments measure similar NO2 variations in ambient air. During the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) in June/July 2009 six vertical profiles of NO2 from the ground to 5 km altitude were measured, which clearly show that the largest amount of NO2 is measured in the boundary layer. The measured boundary layer heights of the NO2 sonde are in good agreement with boundary layer heights determined by a LD40 Ceilometer at Cabauw.

  14. The development of a nitrogen dioxide sonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluis, W. W.; Allaart, M. A. F.; Piters, A. J. M.; Gast, L. F. L.

    2010-12-01

    A growing number of space-borne instruments measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations in the troposphere, but validation of these instruments is hampered by the lack of ground-based and in situ profile measurements. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) has developed a working NO2 sonde. The sonde is attached to a small meteorological balloon and measures a tropospheric NO2 profile. The NO2 sonde has a vertical resolution of 5 m and a measurement range between 1 and 100 ppbv. The instrument is light in weight (0.7 kg), cheap (disposable), energy efficient and not harmful to the environment or the person who finds the package after use. The sonde uses the chemiluminescent reaction of NO2 in an aqueous luminol solution. The NO2-luminol reaction produces faint blue/purple light (at about 425 nm), which is detected by an array of silicon photodiodes. The luminol solution is optimised to be specific to NO2. An on-ground comparison with measurements from a Photolytic Analyser of The National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) shows that both instruments measure similar NO2 variations in ambient air. During the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring instruments (CINDI) in June/July 2009, six vertical profiles of NO2 from the ground to a 5 km altitude were measured, which clearly show that the largest amount of NO2 is measured in the boundary layer. The measured boundary layer heights of the NO2 sonde are in good agreement with boundary layer heights determined by a LD40 Ceilometer at Cabauw.

  15. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Wimmer, J. M.; Huang, H. H.; Rorabaugh, M. E.; Schienle, J.; Styhr, K. H.

    1985-01-01

    The AiResearch Casting Company baseline silicon nitride (92 percent GTE SN-502 Si sub 3 N sub 4 plus 6 percent Y sub 2 O sub 3 plus 2 percent Al sub 2 O sub 3) was characterized with methods that included chemical analysis, oxygen content determination, electrophoresis, particle size distribution analysis, surface area determination, and analysis of the degree of agglomeration and maximum particle size of elutriated powder. Test bars were injection molded and processed through sintering at 0.68 MPa (100 psi) of nitrogen. The as-sintered test bars were evaluated by X-ray phase analysis, room and elevated temperature modulus of rupture strength, Weibull modulus, stress rupture, strength after oxidation, fracture origins, microstructure, and density from quantities of samples sufficiently large to generate statistically valid results. A series of small test matrices were conducted to study the effects and interactions of processing parameters which included raw materials, binder systems, binder removal cycles, injection molding temperatures, particle size distribution, sintering additives, and sintering cycle parameters.

  16. Orchard nitrogen management: Which nitrogen source is best?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suboptimal management of nitrogen fertility in pecan orchards leads to a loss of nutmeat yield and quality, but also a waste of natural resources and money. This article reviews several basic guiding principles useful to orchard managers when developing nitrogen management strategies, and determini...

  17. Influence of intermediate layers on the surface condition of laser crystallized silicon thin films and solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höger, Ingmar; Himmerlich, Marcel; Gawlik, Annett; Brückner, Uwe; Krischok, Stefan; Andrä, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The intermediate layer (IL) between glass substrate and silicon plays a significant role in the optimization of multicrystalline liquid phase crystallized silicon thin film solar cells on glass. This study deals with the influence of the IL on the surface condition and the required chemical surface treatment of the crystallized silicon (mc-Si), which is of particular interest for a-Si:H heterojunction thin film solar cells. Two types of IL were investigated: sputtered silicon nitride (SiN) and a layer stack consisting of silicon nitride and silicon oxide (SiN/SiO). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed the formation of silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy) or silicon oxide (SiO2) layers at the surface of the mc-Si after liquid phase crystallization on SiN or SiN/SiO, respectively. We propose that SiOxNy formation is governed by dissolving nitrogen from the SiN layer in the silicon melt, which segregates at the crystallization front during crystallization. This process is successfully hindered, when additional SiO layers are introduced into the IL. In order to achieve solar cell open circuit voltages above 500 mV, a removal of the formed SiOxNy top layer is required using sophisticated cleaning of the crystallized silicon prior to a-Si:H deposition. However, solar cells crystallized on SiN/SiO yield high open circuit voltage even when a simple wet chemical surface treatment is applied. The implementation of SiN/SiO intermediate layers facilitates the production of mesa type solar cells with open circuit voltages above 600 mV and a power conversion efficiency of 10%.

  18. Boron and silicon: Effects on growth, plasma lipids, urinary cyclic AMP and bone and brain mineral composition of male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Seaborn, C.D.; Nielsen, F.H. . Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center)

    1994-06-01

    Because boron resembles silicon in its chemical properties, an experiment was performed to determine if excessive dietary boron would affect the response to silicon deprivation and, conversely, if silicon would influence the effects of an excessive intake of boron. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to groups of 6 or 12 in a two-by-two factorially arranged experiment. Supplemented to a ground corn/casein diet containing 1.2 [mu]g silicon and 3 [mu]g boron per gram were silicon as sodium metasilicate at 0 or 50 [mu]g/g and boron as orthoboric acid at 0 or 500 [mu]g/g diet. At nine weeks, animals fed high dietary boron had significantly decreased final body weights, liver-weight-to-body-weight ratios, urinary cAMP concentrations, plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, glycine, valine, leucine, and lysine concentrations and skull copper, sodium, and manganese concentrations. High dietary boron also significantly increased brain-weight-to-body-weight ratios, magnesium concentrations of femur, brain, and plasma, zinc concentration of femur, and iron concentration of skull. The bone mineral findings suggest that excess dietary boron exerts subtle effects on bone composition. Dietary silicon affected blood urea nitrogen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and the concentrations of plasma threonine and aspartic acid in animals fed excess boron. Depression of the testes-weight-to-body-weight ratio of animals fed 500 [mu]g boron per gram diet was most marked in animals not fed silicon. Although excessive dietary boron did not markedly enhanced the response of rats to silicon deprivation, dietary silicon affected their response to high dietary boron. Thus, dietary silicon apparently can influence boron toxicity.

  19. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  20. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.