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Sample records for nitroimidazole hypoxia marker

  1. Effect of a second nitroimidazole redox centre on the accumulation of a hypoxia marker: synthesis and in vitro evaluation of 99mTc-labeled bisnitroimidazole propylene amine oxime complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huafan; Zhou, Hao; Li, Zejun; Wang, Xiangyun; Chu, Taiwei

    2012-01-01

    Up to now, most of the hypoxia markers contain only one nitroimidazole redox centre, such as Oxo[[3,3,9,9-tetramethyl-1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,8-diazaundecane-2,10-dione dioximato] (3-)-N,N',N″,N″']-technetium ((99m)Tc-1, BMS181321). Introducing a second nitroimidazole redox centre may enhance the hypoxic accumulation of the markers. In the present work, four (99m)Tc-1 (BMS181321, containing one 2-nitroimidazole) analogues, that is, (99m)Tc-2 (containing two 2-nitroimidazoles), (99m)Tc-3 (containing one 4-nitroimidazole), (99m)Tc-4 (containing two 4-nitroimidazoles) and (99m)Tc-5 (containing both a 2-nitroimidazole and a 4-nitroimidazole) were synthesized, and the hypoxic accumulation was evaluated in vitro using murine sarcoma S180 cells. (99m)Tc-3 and (99m)Tc-4 displayed no significant anoxic/normoxic differentials, whereas (99m)Tc-1 (BMS181321), (99m)Tc-2 and (99m)Tc-5 showed high anoxic cellular uptakes. The anoxic uptake of (99m)Tc-2 reached up to 59.0±0.9% at 4h, which was 2.4 times as that of (99m)Tc-1. (99m)Tc-2 displayed high hypoxic accumulation, indicating that introducing a second nitroimidazole redox centre, that is, 2-nitroimidazole, affected the hypoxic accumulation. Consequently, (99m)Tc-2 may serve as a viable candidate for hypoxia marker. This finding may eventually lead to the development of compounds containing multi-redox centres as hypoxia markers.

  2. Targeting tumor hypoxia with 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine green dye conjugates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Aguirre, Andres; Wang, Tianheng; Yang, Yi; Kuhn, Liisa; Smith, Michael B; Zhu, Quing

    2013-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a major indicator of treatment resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, and fluorescence optical tomography has tremendous potential to provide clinically useful, functional information by identifying tumor hypoxia. The synthesis of a 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine green conjugate using a piperazine linker (piperazine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG) capable of robust fluorescent imaging of tumor hypoxia is described. In vivo mouse tumor imaging studies were completed and demonstrate an improved imaging capability of the new dye relative to an earlier version of the dye that was synthesized with an ethanolamine linker (ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG). Mouse tumors located at imaging depths of 1.5 and 2.0 cm in a turbid medium were imaged at various time points after intravenous injection of the dyes. On average, the reconstructed maximum fluorescence concentration of the tumors injected with piperazine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG was twofold higher than that injected with ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG within 3 h postinjection period and 1.6 to 1.7 times higher beyond 3 h postinjection. The untargeted bis-carboxylic acid ICG completely washed out after 3 h postinjection. Thus, the optimal window to assess tumor hypoxia is beyond 3 h postinjection. These findings were supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples and an immunohistochemistry technique for identifying tumor hypoxia.

  3. Targeting tumor hypoxia with 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine green dye conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Aguirre, Andres; Wang, Tianheng; Yang, Yi; Kuhn, Liisa; Smith, Michael B.; Zhu, Quing

    2013-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a major indicator of treatment resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, and fluorescence optical tomography has tremendous potential to provide clinically useful, functional information by identifying tumor hypoxia. The synthesis of a 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine green conjugate using a piperazine linker (piperazine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG) capable of robust fluorescent imaging of tumor hypoxia is described. In vivo mouse tumor imaging studies were completed and demonstrate an improved imaging capability of the new dye relative to an earlier version of the dye that was synthesized with an ethanolamine linker (ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG). Mouse tumors located at imaging depths of 1.5 and 2.0 cm in a turbid medium were imaged at various time points after intravenous injection of the dyes. On average, the reconstructed maximum fluorescence concentration of the tumors injected with piperazine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG was twofold higher than that injected with ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG within 3 h postinjection period and 1.6 to 1.7 times higher beyond 3 h postinjection. The untargeted bis-carboxylic acid ICG completely washed out after 3 h postinjection. Thus, the optimal window to assess tumor hypoxia is beyond 3 h postinjection. These findings were supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples and an immunohistochemistry technique for identifying tumor hypoxia.

  4. Targeting tumor hypoxia: a third generation 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine dye-conjugate with improved fluorescent yield.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feifei; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Dietz, Christopher; Abuteen, Akram; Smith, Michael B; Zhu, Quing

    2015-12-14

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with the rapid proliferation and growth of malignant tumors, and the ability to detect tumor hypoxia is important for predicting tumor response to anti-cancer treatments. We have developed a class of dye-conjugates that are related to indocyanine green (ICG, ) to target tumor hypoxia, based on in vivo infrared fluorescence imaging using nitroimidazole moieties linked to indocyanine fluorescent dyes. We previously reported that linking 2-nitroimidazole to an indocyanine dicarboxylic acid dye derivative () using an ethanolamine linker (ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG, ), led to a dye-conjugate that gave promising results for targeting cancer hypoxia in vivo. Structural modification of the dye conjugate replaced the ethanolamine unit with a piperazineacetyl unit and led a second generation dye conjugate, piperzine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG (). This second generation dye-conjugate showed improved targeting of tumor hypoxia when compared with . Based on the hypothesis that molecules with more planar and rigid structures have a higher fluorescence yield, as they could release less absorbed energy through molecular vibration or collision, we have developed a new 2-nitroimidazole ICG conjugate, , with two carbon atoms less in the polyene linker. Dye-conjugate was prepared from our new dye (), and coupled to 2-nitroimidazole using a piperazine linker to produce this third-generation dye-conjugate. Spectral measurements showed that the absorption/emission wavelengths of 657/670 were shifted ∼100 nm from the second-generation hypoxia dye of 755/780 nm. Its fluorescence quantum yield was measured to be 0.467, which is about 5 times higher than that of (0.083). In vivo experiments were conducted with balb/c mice and showed more than twice the average in vivo fluorescence intensity in the tumor beyond two hours post retro-orbital injection as compared with . These initial results suggest that may significantly improve in vivo tumor hypoxia targeting.

  5. Nitroimidazole conjugates of bis(thiosemicarbazonato)64Cu(II) - Potential combination agents for the PET imaging of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bonnitcha, Paul D; Bayly, Simon R; Theobald, Mark B M; Betts, Helen M; Lewis, Jason S; Dilworth, Jonathan R

    2010-02-01

    Combination agents comprising two different pharmacophores with the same biological target have the potential to show additive or synergistic activity. Bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) complexes (e.g. (64)Cu-ATSM) and nitroimidazoles (e.g. (18)F-MISO) are classes of tracer used for the delineation of tumor hypoxia by positron emission tomography (PET). Three nitroimidazole-bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) conjugates were produced in order to investigate their potential as combination hypoxia imaging agents. Two were derived from the known bifunctional bis(thiosemicarbazone) H(2)ATSM/A and the third from the new precursor diacetyl-2-(4-N-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone)-3-(4-N-ethylamino-3-thiosemicarbazone) - H(2)ATSM/en. Oxygen-dependent uptake studies were performed using the (64)Cu radiolabelled complexes in EMT6 carcinoma cells. All the complexes displayed appreciable hypoxia selectivity, with the nitroimidazole conjugates displaying greater selectivity than a simple propyl derivative used as a control. Participation of the nitroimidazole group in the trapping mechanism is indicated by the increased hypoxic uptake of the 2- vs. the 4-substituted (64)Cu-ATSM/A derivatives. The 2-nitroimidazole derivative of (64)Cu-ATSM/en demonstrated superior hypoxia selectivity to (64)Cu-ATSM over the range of oxygen concentrations tested. Biodistribution of the radiolabelled 2-nitroimidazole conjugates was carried out in EMT6 tumor-bearing mice. The complexes showed significantly different uptake trends in comparison to each other and previously studied Cu-ATSM derivatives. Uptake of the Cu-ATSM/en conjugate in non-target organs was considerably lower than for derivatives based on Cu-ATSM/A.

  6. TcO(PnA.O-1-(2-nitroimidazole)) [BMS-181321], a new technetium-containing nitroimidazole complex for imaging hypoxia: synthesis, characterization, and xanthine oxidase-catalyzed reduction.

    PubMed

    Linder, K E; Chan, Y W; Cyr, J E; Malley, M F; Nowotnik, D P; Nunn, A D

    1994-01-01

    A technetium(V)oxo nitroimidazole complex that shows promise for imaging regional hypoxia in vivo, [BMS-181321, TcO(PnAO-1-(2-nitroimidazole))] (1) was prepared from 3,3,9,9-tetramethyl-1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,8-diazaundecane -2,10-dione dioxime, a 2-nitroimidazole-containing derivative of propyleneamine oxime (PnAO). The 99Tc complex [99Tc]Oxo[[3,3,9,9-tetramethyl-1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,8- diazaundecane-2,10-dione dioximato]-(3-)-N,N',N'',N''']technetium (V) was synthesized both from pertechnetate and [TcO(Eg)2]- (Eg = ethylene glycol). A new synthetic route to TcO(PnAO) (2) is also described. 99TcO(PnAO-1-(2-nitroimidazole)) was characterized by 1H NMR, IR, and UV/vis spectroscopy, HPLC, FAB mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. Electrochemistry of 1 reveals that the nitro redox chemistry found in the ligand is maintained upon coordination to technetium but shifts to a slightly more positive potential. Using chiral HPLC (Chiracel OD), 99mTc (1) was resolved into its two enantiomers. However, the two isomers were found to racemize quickly (t1/2 < 2 min) in the presence of water. Localization of 1 is believed to be mediated by enzymatically catalyzed reduction of the nitroimidazole group, so the in vitro reaction of 99Tc(1) with the nitroreductase enzyme xanthine oxidase (XOD) was studied. XOD catalyzed the quantitative reduction of the nitroimidazole group on the molecule under anaerobic conditions in the presence of hypoxanthine. No reaction was noted using a non-nitro-containing complex (2). The rate of reduction of the Tc-nitroimidazole complex (1.5 +/- 0.16 nmol/min per unit XOD) was faster than that observed previously for the nitroimidazole BATOs (BATO = boronic acid adduct of technetium dioxime) and was about two-thirds that of fluoromisonidazole, a compound that has proven useful for imaging hypoxia in humans when labeled with 18F. These data suggest that BMS-181321 (1) has the potential to be recognized by nitroreductase enzymes in

  7. In vivo click reaction between Tc-99m-labeled azadibenzocyclooctyne-MAMA and 2-nitroimidazole-azide for tumor hypoxia targeting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Chu, Taiwei

    2015-10-15

    The bioactivity of nitroimidazole in Tc-99m-labeled 2-nitroimidazole, a traditional solid tumor hypoxia-imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is reduced by the presence of large ligand and metallic radionuclide, exhibiting lower tumor-to-nontumor ratios. In an effort to solve this general problem, a pretargeting strategy based on click chemistry (strain-promoted cyclooctyne-azide cycloaddition) was applied. The functional click synthons were synthesized as pretargeting components: an azide group linked to 2-nitroimidazole (2NIM-Az) serves for tumor hypoxia-targeting and azadibenzocyclooctyne conjugated with monoamine monoamide dithiol ligand (AM) functions as radiolabeling and binding group to azides in vivo. 2NIM-triazole-MAMA was obtained from in vitro click reaction with a reaction rate constant of 0.98M(-1)s(-1). AM and 2NIM-triazole-MAMA were radiolabeled with Tc-99m. The hypoxia-pretargeting biodistribution was studied in Kunming mice bearing S180 tumor; (99m)Tc-AM and (99m)Tc-triazole-2NIM were used as blank control and conventional control. Compared to the control groups, the pretargeting experiment exhibits the best radio-uptake and retention in tumor, with higher tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios (up to 8.55 and 1.44 at 8h post-(99m)Tc-complex-injection, respectively). To some extent, the pretargeting strategy protects the bioactivity of nitroimidazole and therefore provides an innovative approach for the development of tumor hypoxia-SPECT imaging agents. PMID:26358160

  8. In vivo click reaction between Tc-99m-labeled azadibenzocyclooctyne-MAMA and 2-nitroimidazole-azide for tumor hypoxia targeting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Chu, Taiwei

    2015-10-15

    The bioactivity of nitroimidazole in Tc-99m-labeled 2-nitroimidazole, a traditional solid tumor hypoxia-imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is reduced by the presence of large ligand and metallic radionuclide, exhibiting lower tumor-to-nontumor ratios. In an effort to solve this general problem, a pretargeting strategy based on click chemistry (strain-promoted cyclooctyne-azide cycloaddition) was applied. The functional click synthons were synthesized as pretargeting components: an azide group linked to 2-nitroimidazole (2NIM-Az) serves for tumor hypoxia-targeting and azadibenzocyclooctyne conjugated with monoamine monoamide dithiol ligand (AM) functions as radiolabeling and binding group to azides in vivo. 2NIM-triazole-MAMA was obtained from in vitro click reaction with a reaction rate constant of 0.98M(-1)s(-1). AM and 2NIM-triazole-MAMA were radiolabeled with Tc-99m. The hypoxia-pretargeting biodistribution was studied in Kunming mice bearing S180 tumor; (99m)Tc-AM and (99m)Tc-triazole-2NIM were used as blank control and conventional control. Compared to the control groups, the pretargeting experiment exhibits the best radio-uptake and retention in tumor, with higher tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios (up to 8.55 and 1.44 at 8h post-(99m)Tc-complex-injection, respectively). To some extent, the pretargeting strategy protects the bioactivity of nitroimidazole and therefore provides an innovative approach for the development of tumor hypoxia-SPECT imaging agents.

  9. Synthesis and radiolabeling of (64)Cu-labeled 2-nitroimidazole derivative (64)Cu-BMS2P2 for hypoxia imaging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng; Zhu, Hua; Lin, Xinfeng; Chu, Taiwei; Luo, Ruyi; Wang, Yunhua; Yang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) probe with hypoxia targeting specificity and a relatively long half-life. The synthesis, (64)Cu-labeling in vitro and in vivo study of the novel 2-nitroimidazole complex (64)Cu-BMS2P2 is presented in this study. The hypoxia targeting capacity of (64)Cu-BMS2P2 in vitro was evaluated and compared with the (64)Cu-BMS181321, and confirmed by PET imaging in vivo and immunohistochemistry for carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) in a tumor mouse model. These results suggest that (64)Cu-BMS2P2 is a promising candidate for PET hypoxia imaging and worthy of further investigations in dynamic hypoxia imaging.

  10. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent “Pimonidazole” in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  11. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent "Pimonidazole" in Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  12. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a New Nitroimidazole-99mTc-Complex for Imaging of Hypoxia in Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Guan, Yanxing; Liu, Shaozheng; Chen, Qingjie; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was specifically designed to develop a new 99mTc compound with 3-amino-4-[2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol)-ethylamino]-4-oxo-butyrate (5-ntm-asp) and to verify whether this compound is feasible to be a radiopharmaceutical for hypoxic tumors. Material/Methods Metronidazole derivative 5-ntm-asp was synthesized and then radio-labeled by Na [99mTcO4], forming 99mTc-5-ntm-asp. Another two complexes of 99mTc-2- and 99mTc-5-nitroimidazole-iminodiacetic acid (99mTc-2-ntm-IDA and 99mTc-5-ntm-IDA) were also synthesized based on previous studies. Physicochemical properties (stability, lipophilicity, protein binding) of the compounds were compared, and we also assessed the accumulation status of the compounds within A549 cells under both hypoxic and aerobic conditions. Distribution of the complex was also studied in vivo using BALB/c nude mice that were injected with A549 cells. Results Compared with 99mTc-2-ntm-IDA and 99mTc-5-ntm-IDA, 99mTc-5-ntm-asp was more stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer and human plasma (P<0.05). Besides that, 99mTc-5-ntm-asp offered lower lipophilicity and protein-binding rate than the two complexes (P<0.05). During assessment of hypoxic uptake status and high hypoxic/aerobic ratio in mice injected with A549 cells, 99mTc-5-ntm-asp exhibited a more favorable profile than 9mTc-2-ntm-IDA and 99mTc-5-ntm-IDA, including uptake ratio of tumor/blood and uptake ratio of tumor/muscle. Conclusions With overall consideration of physicochemical properties and biological uptake behavior, it is feasible to use 99mTc-5-ntm-asp as an imaging agent for tumor hypoxia. PMID:27752036

  13. Nitroimidazole radiopharmaceuticals in bioimaging: part I: synthesis and imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2011-10-01

    The paper is review on synthesis of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers useful in imaging of tumor cells. Nitroimidazole compounds are radiolabeled probes for specific use in imaging such as 18F for positron emission tomography; 99mTc for single photon emission computed tomography; 123I, or 131I for computer assisted tomography and 19F for magnetic resonance imaging. In synthesis of radiopharmaceutical compounds, parent nitroimidazole is modified to thiopyranosyl nucleosides, neuraminic acid derivatives followed by nitro group deprotection-substitution and radiolabeling by specific isotopes. Commercial attempts have been made to radiolabel the nitroimidazole by [18F]fluorine, [131I or 123I]iodine, [99mTc]technicium and [64Cu]copper on modified side chain of nitroimidazole compounds to design multimodal and multifunctional imaging techniques to detect and monitor the tumor hypoxia by measuring distribution of radiatiolabel or radiation. Nitroimidazole initially showed poor diffusion and poor stability in tissues with neurotoxicity concern limited its use as radiosensitizer. In last decade, several nitroimidazole derivatives were developed as potent less toxic and highly stable radiopharmaceuticals with optimized radiolabel concentration with high detectability of tumor oxygen or hypoxia. Currently, nitroimidazole based radiopharmaceuticals have emerged as multimodal and multifunctional hypoxia reporters with antitumor, anti-ischemic, anti-inflammatory and tumor targeting properties. In conclusion, nitroimidazole based radiopharmaceuticals are a new generation hypoxia biosensors for localized theradiagnostic utility in clinical medicine.

  14. Tumor Hypoxia: Causative Mechanisms, Microregional Heterogeneities, and the Role of Tissue-Based Hypoxia Markers.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of solid malignant tumor growth, profoundly influences malignant progression and contributes to the development of therapeutic resistance. Pathogenesis of tumor hypoxia is multifactorial, with contributions from both acute and chronic factors. Spatial distribution of hypoxia within tumors is markedly heterogeneous and often changes over time, e.g., during a course of radiotherapy. Substantial changes in the oxygenation status can occur within the distance of a few cell layers, explaining the inability of currently used molecular imaging techniques to adequately assess this crucial trait. Due to the possible importance of tumor hypoxia for clinical decision-making, there is a great demand for molecular tools which may provide the necessary resolution down to the single cell level. Exogenous and endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia have been investigated for this purpose. Their potential use may be greatly enhanced by multiparametric in situ methods in experimental and human tumor tissue. PMID:27526128

  15. Hypoxia in human colorectal adenocarcinoma: Comparison between extrinsic and potential intrinsic hypoxia markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goethals, Laurence; Debucquoy, Annelies; Perneel, Christiaan; Geboes, Karel; Ectors, Nadine; De Schutter, Harlinde; Penninckx, Freddy; McBride, William H.; Begg, Adrian C.; Haustermans, Karin M. . E-mail: karin.haustermans@uzleuven.be

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To detect and quantify hypoxia in colorectal adenocarcinomas by use of pimonidazole and iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) as extrinsic markers and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), microvessel density (MVD), epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as intrinsic markers of hypoxia. Methods and Material: Twenty patients with an adenocarcinoma of the left colon and rectum treated by primary surgery were injected with pimonidazole and IdUrd. Serial sections of tumor biopsies were single stained for VEGF, EGFR, Ki67, and double stained for blood vessels in combination with either pimonidazole, IdUrd, or CA IX. Percentage of expression was scored as well as colocalization of pimonidazole with CA IX. Results: The median percentage of hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole staining, was 16.7% (range, 0-52.4%). The expression of pimonidazole correlated inversely with the total MVD and endothelial cord MVD (R = -0.55, p = 0.01; R = -0.47, p = 0.04). Good colocalization was found between pimonidazole and CA IX in only 30% of tumors, with no correlation overall between pimonidazole and CA IX, VEGF, or EGFR or between the different intrinsic markers. Cells around some vessels (0.08-11%) were negative for IdUrd but positive for Ki 67, which indicated their lack of perfusion at the time of injection. Conclusion: Chronic and acute hypoxic regions are present in colorectal tumors, as shown by pimonidazole and IdUrd staining. Only in a minority of tumors did an association exist between the areas stained by pimonidazole and those positive for CA IX. Pimonidazole also did not correlate with expression of other putative intrinsic hypoxia markers (VEGF, EGFR)

  16. Modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    The potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents by radiation sensitizers has been extensively studied for several years. There is little doubt that the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs, primarily alkylating agents, can readily be enhanced both in vitro and in vivo through the addition of a sensitizer. While enhanced effects have been observed in certain critical normal tissues, in general most animal model studies have demonstrated a therapeutic gain at large sensitizer doses. This approach to combination therapies therefore appears promising. Yet many questions concerning the interaction between chemotherapeutic agents and radiosensitizers, particularly in the aspects of modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles are reviewed and discussed. These address the importance in chemopotentiation of (i) hypoxia, (ii) alterations in DNA damage and/or repair, (iii) depletion of intracellular sulfhydryls and (iv) modification of drug pharmacokinetics.

  17. Preparation of Nucleosides Derived from 2-Nitroimidazole and d-Arabinose, d-Ribose, and d-Galactose by the Vorbrüggen Method and Their Conversion to Potential Precursors for Tracers To Image Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    2-Nitroimidazole was silylated using hexaethyldisilazane and then reacted with 1-O-acetyl derivatives of d-arabinose, d-ribose, and d-galactose in acetonitrile at mild temperatures (−20 °C to rt), catalyzed by triethylsilyl triflate (Vorbrüggen conditions). The α-anomer was formed in the former case and the β-anomers in the latter two cases (highly) selectively. When d-arabinose and d-ribose were silylated with tert-butyldiphenylsilyl chloride in pyridine at the hydroxyl groups at C-5 and acetylated at the other ones in a one-pot reaction, mixtures of anomeric 1-O-acetyl derivatives were obtained. These were coupled by the Vorbrüggen method and then deblocked at C-5 and tosylated to give precursors for tracers to image hypoxia in four steps without using Hg(CN)2 necessary for other methods. The Vorbrüggen conditions enable a shorter route to azomycin nucleoside analogues than the previous coupling procedures. PMID:21905640

  18. Kinetics of a putative hypoxic tissue marker, Technetium-99m-nitroimidazole (BMS181321), in normoxic, hypoxic, ischemic and stunned myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuoka, Hideo; Hashimoto, Katsuji; Fukuchi, Kazuki

    1994-08-01

    This study focused on the kinetics of the newly developed {sup 99m}TTc-nitroimidazole, propyleneamine oxime-1,2-nitroimidazole (BMS181321) in the different setting of myocardial perfusion states and oxygenation levels, and compared the kinetics of BMS181321 with those of other technetium analogues. The kinetics of BMS181321 were evaluated in isolated perfused rat hearts. Technetium-99m-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and a non-nitroimidazole-containing analogue of BMS 181321 (6-methyl propyleneamine oxime; PAO-6-Me) were used to compare their kinetics with those of BMS181321. BMS181321 cleared quickly from normoxic hearts and the retention in the myocardium 10 min after injection was 0.84% {plus_minus} 0.04% ID/g wet wt (mean {plus_minus} s.e.m.). In contrast, BMS181321 was retained after reperfusion when it was injected before ischemia; the uptake in the myocardium 10 min after reperfusion was significantly greater than in controls (23.9% {plus_minus} 3.9%ID/g wt, p<0.05). These results indicate that {sup 99m}Tc-BMS181321 is well trapped in ischemic myocardium and moderately trapped in hypoxic myocardium, but washed out quickly in stunned myocardium. The residence time influences the amount retained. 14 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Immunohistochemical Detection of Changes in Tumor Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, James Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean A.; Wen Bixiu; Yang, Kwang Mo; Ling, C. Clifton

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Although hypoxia is a known prognostic factor, its effect will be modified by the rate of reoxygenation and the extent to which the cells are acutely hypoxic. We tested the ability of exogenous and endogenous markers to detect reoxygenation in a xenograft model. Our technique might be applicable to stored patient samples. Methods and Materials: The human colorectal carcinoma line, HT29, was grown in nude mice. Changes in tumor hypoxia were examined by injection of pimonidazole, followed 24 hours later by EF5. Cryosections were stained for these markers and for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF1{alpha}). Tumor hypoxia was artificially manipulated by carbogen exposure. Results: In unstressed tumors, all four markers showed very similar spatial distributions. After carbogen treatment, pimonidazole and EF5 could detect decreased hypoxia. HIF1{alpha} staining was also decreased relative to CAIX, although the effect was less pronounced than for EF5. Control tumors displayed small regions that had undergone spontaneous changes in tumor hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole relative to EF5; most of these changes were reflected by CAIX and HIF1{alpha}. Conclusion: HIF1{alpha} can be compared with either CAIX or a previously administered nitroimidazole to provide an estimate of reoxygenation.

  20. Temporal and topographic profiles of tissue hypoxia following transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Noto, Takahisa; Furuichi, Yasuhisa; Ishiye, Masayuki; Matsuoka, Nobuya; Aramori, Ichiro; Mutoh, Seitaro; Yanagihara, Takehiko; Manabe, Noboru

    2006-08-01

    Intravascular accumulation of blood cells after brain ischemia-reperfusion can cause obstruction of cerebral blood flow and tissue hypoxia/ischemia as a consequence. In the present study, we examined temporal and topographic changes of tissue hypoxia/ischemia after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) for 60 min in rats with immunohistochemical staining for hypoxia (2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker: hypoxyprobe-1 adducts). Our results showed that tissue hypoxia expressed as positive staining for hypoxyprobe-1 adducts preceded neuronal degeneration. Platelets and granulocytes were detected close to the hypoxyprobe-1 adducts positive area. These results suggested that the hypoxic environment could persist even after reperfusion of MCA, because of vascular obstruction with accumulation of platelets and granulocytes.

  1. Myoglobin expression in prostate cancer is correlated to androgen receptor expression and markers of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Meller, Sebastian; Bicker, Anne; Montani, Matteo; Ikenberg, Kristian; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Sailer, Verena; Wild, Peter; Dietrich, Dimo; Uhl, Barbara; Sulser, Tullio; Moch, Holger; Gorr, Thomas A; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Hankeln, Thomas; Kristiansen, Glen

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies identified unexpected expression and transcriptional complexity of the hemoprotein myoglobin (MB) in human breast cancer but its role in prostate cancer is still unclear. Expression of MB was immunohistochemically analyzed in three independent cohorts of radical prostatectomy specimens (n = 409, n = 625, and n = 237). MB expression data were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and molecular parameters of androgen and hypoxia signaling. Expression levels of novel tumor-associated MB transcript variants and the VEGF gene as a hypoxia marker were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Fifty-three percent of the prostate cancer cases were MB positive and significantly correlated with androgen receptor (AR) expression (p < 0.001). The positive correlation with CAIX (p < 0.001) and FASN (p = 0.008) as well as the paralleled increased expression of the tumor-associated MB transcript variants and VEGF suggest that hypoxia participates in MB expression regulation. Analogous to breast cancer, MB expression in prostate cancer is associated with steroid hormone signaling and markers of hypoxia. Further studies must elucidate the novel functional roles of MB in human carcinomas, which probably extend beyond its classic intramuscular function in oxygen storage. PMID:25172328

  2. Hypoxia promotes redifferentiation and suppresses markers of hypertrophy and degeneration in both healthy and osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    matrix accumulation, but still little is known of its effects on catabolism. We show herein that the increased expression of matrix proteins, combined with decreased expression of numerous degradative enzymes by hypoxia, minimizes but does not abolish differences between redifferentiated healthy and OA chondrocytes. Hypoxia-induced HIF expression is associated with hypertrophic marker and degradative enzyme downregulation and increased measures of redifferentiation in both healthy and OA chondrocytes. Therefore, though HIFs may be involved in the pathogenesis of OA, conditions that promote HIF expression in vitro promote matrix accumulation and decrease degradation and hypertrophy, even in cells from OA joints. PMID:23965235

  3. Nitroimidazole derivatives: a patent review of US 2014/0141084 A1.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peng-Cheng; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2015-04-01

    Nitroimidazoles and their derivatives have drawn continuing interest over the years because of their varied biological activities and their recently found applications in drug development for antimicrobial chemotherapeutics and antiangiogenic hypoxic cell radiosensitizers. The electron-deficient nitroaromatic compounds have been investigated for use in cancer treatment as chemical modifiers. In this patent (US 2014/0141084 A1), amphiphilic polymers were designed and prepared based on nitroimidazole derivatives and carboxymethyl dextran, which can be used for the hypoxia-selective release of diagnostics or drugs. PMID:25641545

  4. Expression and Prognostic Significance of a Panel of Tissue Hypoxia Markers in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Quynh-Thu Kong, Christina; Lavori, Phillip W.; O'Byrne, Ken; Erler, Janine T.; Huang Xin; Chen Yijun; Cao Hongbin; Tibshirani, Robert; Denko, Nic; Giaccia, Amato J.; Koong, Albert C.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the expression pattern of hypoxia-induced proteins identified as being involved in malignant progression of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and to determine their relationship to tumor pO{sub 2} and prognosis. Methods and Materials: We performed immunohistochemical staining of hypoxia-induced proteins (carbonic anhydrase IX [CA IX], BNIP3L, connective tissue growth factor, osteopontin, ephrin A1, hypoxia inducible gene-2, dihydrofolate reductase, galectin-1, I{kappa}B kinase {beta}, and lysyl oxidase) on tumor tissue arrays of 101 HNSCC patients with pretreatment pO{sub 2} measurements. Analysis of variance and Fisher's exact tests were used to evaluate the relationship between marker expression, tumor pO{sub 2}, and CA IX staining. Cox proportional hazard model and log-rank tests were used to determine the relationship between markers and prognosis. Results: Osteopontin expression correlated with tumor pO{sub 2} (Eppendorf measurements) (p = 0.04). However, there was a strong correlation between lysyl oxidase, ephrin A1, and galectin-1 and CA IX staining. These markers also predicted for cancer-specific survival and overall survival on univariate analysis. A hypoxia score of 0-5 was assigned to each patient, on the basis of the presence of strong staining for these markers, whereby a higher score signifies increased marker expression. On multivariate analysis, increasing hypoxia score was an independent prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival (p = 0.015) and was borderline significant for overall survival (p = 0.057) when adjusted for other independent predictors of outcomes (hemoglobin and age). Conclusions: We identified a panel of hypoxia-related tissue markers that correlates with treatment outcomes in HNSCC. Validation of these markers will be needed to determine their utility in identifying patients for hypoxia-targeted therapy.

  5. Radiosynthesis of the Tumor Hypoxia Marker [18F]TFMISO via O-[18F]Trifluoroethylation Reveals a Striking Difference Between Trifluoroethyl Tosylate and Iodide in Regiochemical Reactivity Toward Oxygen Nucleophiles

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Makiko; Yang, Guangbin; Torchon, Geralda; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Humm, John; Koutcher, Jason; Ouerfelli, Ouathek

    2014-01-01

    The MRI hypoxia marker trifluoro-misonidazole (TFMISO) [1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)propan-2-ol] was successfully labeled with 18F to expand its role into a bimodal PET/MRI probe. 18F-Labeling was achieved via a 3-step procedure in which 2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethyl p-toluenesulfonate prepared by 18F-19F exchange served as the [18F]trifluoroethylating agent. The O-[18F]trifluoroethylation reaction proceeded efficiently to give the intermediate 1,2-epoxy-3-(2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethoxy)propane, with approximately 60% of 18F incorporated from the tosylate precursor, which was condensed with 2-nitroimidazole to yield [18F]TFMISO. Approximately 40% of the [18F]trifluoroethyl tosylate precursor was converted into the final product. In stark contrast, 2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethyl iodide failed to produce [18F]TFMISO, giving instead 1,1-[18F]difluoro-2-iodoethoxy and 1-[18F]fluoro-2-iodovinyloxy analogs of [18F]TFMISO. Thus, this investigation has identified 2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethyl tosylate as an excellent [18F]trifluoroethylating agent, which can convert efficiently an alcohol into the corresponding [18F]trifluoroethyl ether. PMID:21398131

  6. Transcriptional control of the tumor- and hypoxia-marker carbonic anhydrase 9: a one transcription factor (HIF-1) show?

    PubMed Central

    Kaluz, Stefan; Kaluzová, Milota; Liao, Shu-Yuan; Lerman, Michael; Stanbridge, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcriptional activation by hypoxia is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) via binding to the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE). Hypoxia in solid tumors associates with poorer outcome of the disease and reliable cellular markers of tumor hypoxia would represent a valuable diagnostic marker and a potential therapeutic target. In this category, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is one of the most promising candidates. Here, we summarize the knowledge about transcriptional regulation of CA9. The HRE is the central regulatory element in the CA9 promoter, whereas other elements are limited to lesser roles of amplification of signals received at the HRE. The analysis of known mechanisms of activation of CA9 reveals the prominent role of the HIF-1 pathway. Experimental paradigms with uncoupled HIF-1α stability and transcriptional activity (pericellular hypoxia, proteasomal inhibitor) provide evidence that CA9 expression monitors transcriptional activity of HIF-1, rather than the abundance of HIF-1α. Furthermore, these paradigms could provide a corollary to some of the apparently discordant cases (CAIX+, HIF-1α−) or (CAIX−, HIF-1α+) observed in vivo. In conclusion, the existing data support the notion that CA9, due to the unique structure of its promoter, is one of the most sensitive endogenous sensors of HIF-1 activity. PMID:19344680

  7. Influences of normobaric hypoxia training on physical fitness and metabolic risk markers in overweight to obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Susanne; Haufe, Sven; Engeli, Stefan; Mutschler, Harry; Haas, Ute; Luft, Friedrich C; Jordan, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that hypoxia and exercise may have a synergistic effect on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. We conducted a single blind study in overweight to obese subjects to test the hypothesis that training under hypoxia (HG, n = 24, FiO(2) = 15%) results in similar or even greater improvement in body weight and metabolic risk markers compared with exercise under normoxia (NG, n = 21, FiO(2) = 21%). After an initial metabolic evaluation including incremental exercise testing, subjects trained in normoxic or hypoxic conditions thrice weekly over a 4-week period at a heart rate corresponding to 65% of maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)). The experimental groups were similar at the start of the investigation and weight stable during the training period. Subjects in the hypoxia group trained at a significantly lower workload (P < 0.05). Yet, both groups showed similar improvements in VO(2max) and time to exhaustion. Respiratory quotient and lactate at the anaerobic threshold as well as body composition improved more in the hypoxia group. We conclude that in obese subjects, training in hypoxia elicits a similar or even better response in terms of physical fitness, metabolic risk markers, and body composition at a lower workload. The fact that workload and, therefore, mechanic strain can be reduced in hypoxia could be particularly beneficial in obese patients with orthopedic comorbidities.

  8. Hypoxia inducible BHLHB2 is a novel and independent prognostic marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weibin; Reiser-Erkan, Carolin; Michalski, Christoph W.; Raggi, Matthias C.; Quan, Liao; Yupei, Zhao; Friess, Helmut; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Joerg

    2010-10-22

    cells. Patients with weak/absent nuclear BHLHB2 staining had significantly worse median survival compared to those with strong staining (13 months vs. 27 months, p = 0.03). In a multivariable analysis, BHLHB2 staining was an independent prognostic factor (Hazard-Ratio = 2.348, 95% CI = 1.250-4.411, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Hypoxia-inducible BHLHB2 expression is a novel independent prognostic marker in pancreatic cancer patients and indicates increased chemosensitivity towards gemcitabine.

  9. Hypoxia targeted carbon nanotubes as a sensitive contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Aguirre, Andres; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    Development of new and efficient contrast agents is of fundamental importance to improve detection sensitivity of smaller lesions. Within the family of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) not only have emerged as a new alternative and efficient transporter and translocater of therapeutic molecules but also as a photoacoustic molecular imaging agent owing to its strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. Drugs, Antibodies and nucleic acids could functionalize the CNT and prepare an appropriate system for delivering the cargos to cells and organs. In this work, we present a novel photoacoustic contrast agent which is based on a unique hypoxic marker in the near infrared region, 2-nitroimidazole -bis carboxylic acid derivative of Indocyanine Green conjugated to single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT-2nitroimidazole-ICG). The 2-nitroimidazole-ICG has an absorption peak at 755 nm and an extinction coefficient of 20,5222 M-1cm-1. The conjugation of this marker with SWCNT shows more than 25 times enhancement of optical absorption of carbon nanotubes in the near infrared region. This new conjugate has been optically evaluated and shows promising results for high contrast photoacoustic imaging of deeply located tumors. The conjugate specifically targets tumor hypoxia, an important indicator of tumor metabolism and tumor therapeutic response. The detection sensitivity of the new contrast agent has been evaluated in-vitro cell lines and with in-vivo tumors in mice.

  10. Decomposition of nitroimidazole ions: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Feketeová, Linda; Postler, Johannes; Zavras, Athanasios; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-05-21

    Nitroimidazoles are important compounds with chemotherapeutic applications as antibacterial drugs or as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. Despite their use in biological applications, little is known about the fundamental properties of these compounds. Understanding the ionization reactions of these compounds is crucial in evaluating the radiosensitization potential and in developing new and more effective drugs. Thus, the present study investigates the decomposition of negative and positive ions of 2-nitroimidazole and 4(5)-nitroimidazole using low- and high-energy Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) and Electron-Induced Dissociation (EID) by two different mass spectrometry techniques and is supported by quantum chemistry calculations. EID of [M+H](+) leads to more extensive fragmentation than CID and involves many radical cleavages including loss of H˙ leading to the formation of the radical cation, M˙(+). The stability (metastable decay) and the fragmentation (high-energy CID) of the radical cation M˙(+) have been probed in a crossed-beam experiment involving primary electron ionization of the neutral nitroimidazole. Thus, fragments in the EID spectra of [M+H](+) that come from further dissociation of radical cation M˙(+) have been highlighted. The loss of NO˙ radical from M˙(+) is associated with a high Kinetic Energy Release (KER) of 0.98 eV. EID of [M-H](-) also leads to additional fragments compared to CID, however, with much lower cross section. Only EID of [M+H](+) leads to a slight difference in the decomposition of 2-nitroimidazole and 4(5)-nitroimidazole.

  11. Decomposition of nitroimidazole ions: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Feketeová, Linda; Postler, Johannes; Zavras, Athanasios; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-05-21

    Nitroimidazoles are important compounds with chemotherapeutic applications as antibacterial drugs or as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. Despite their use in biological applications, little is known about the fundamental properties of these compounds. Understanding the ionization reactions of these compounds is crucial in evaluating the radiosensitization potential and in developing new and more effective drugs. Thus, the present study investigates the decomposition of negative and positive ions of 2-nitroimidazole and 4(5)-nitroimidazole using low- and high-energy Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) and Electron-Induced Dissociation (EID) by two different mass spectrometry techniques and is supported by quantum chemistry calculations. EID of [M+H](+) leads to more extensive fragmentation than CID and involves many radical cleavages including loss of H˙ leading to the formation of the radical cation, M˙(+). The stability (metastable decay) and the fragmentation (high-energy CID) of the radical cation M˙(+) have been probed in a crossed-beam experiment involving primary electron ionization of the neutral nitroimidazole. Thus, fragments in the EID spectra of [M+H](+) that come from further dissociation of radical cation M˙(+) have been highlighted. The loss of NO˙ radical from M˙(+) is associated with a high Kinetic Energy Release (KER) of 0.98 eV. EID of [M-H](-) also leads to additional fragments compared to CID, however, with much lower cross section. Only EID of [M+H](+) leads to a slight difference in the decomposition of 2-nitroimidazole and 4(5)-nitroimidazole. PMID:25899156

  12. Imaging hypoxia in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Mendichovszky, I; Jackson, A

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia plays a central role in tumour development, angiogenesis, growth and resistance to treatment. Owing to constant developments in medical imaging technology, significant advances have been made towards in vitro and in vivo imaging of hypoxia in a variety of tumours, including gliomas of the central nervous system. The aim of this article is to review the literature on imaging approaches currently available for measuring hypoxia in human gliomas and provide an insight into recent advances and future directions in this field. After a brief overview of hypoxia and its importance in gliomas, several methods of measuring hypoxia will be presented. These range from invasive monitoring by Eppendorf polarographic O2 microelectrodes, positron electron tomography (PET) tracers based on 2-nitroimidazole compounds [18F-labelled fluoro-misonidazole (18F-MISO) or 1-(2-[(18)F]fluoro-1-[hydroxymethyl]ethoxy)methyl-2-nitroimidazole (FRP-170)], 64Cu-ATSM Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) or 99mTc- and 68Ga-labelled metronidazole (MN) agents to advanced MRI methods, such as blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI, oxygen-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:22433825

  13. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) as an endogenous marker of chronic hypoxia in live human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Kaffer, Anja; Riedl, Susanne; Katzer, Astrid; Flentje, Michael

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Published clinical studies provide conflicting data regarding the prognostic significance of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) overexpression as an endogenous marker of tumor hypoxia and its comparability with other methods of hypoxia detection. We performed a systematic analysis of CA IX protein levels under various in vitro conditions of tumor hypoxia in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma and FaDu human pharyngeal carcinoma cells. Because sorting of live CA IX positive cells from tumors provides a tool to study the radiosensitivity of chronically hypoxic cells, we modified and tested a CA IX flow cytometry protocol on mixed hypoxic/aerobic suspensions of HT 1080 and FaDu cells. Methods and materials: HT 1080 and FaDu cells were treated with up to 24 h of in vitro hypoxia and up to 96 h of reoxygenation. To test the effect of nonhypoxic stimuli, glucose and serum availability, pH and cell density were modified. CA IX protein was quantified in Western blots of whole-cell lysates. Mixed suspensions with known percentages of hypoxic cells were prepared for CA IX flow cytometry. The same mixtures were assayed for clonogenic survival after 10 Gy. Results: Hypoxia-induced CA IX protein expression was seen after >6 h at {<=}5% O{sub 2}, and protein was stable over 96 h of reoxygenation in both cell lines. Glucose deprivation abolished the hypoxic CA IX response, and high cell density caused CA IX induction under aerobic conditions. Measured percentages of CA IX-positive cells in mixtures closely reflected known percentages of hypoxic cells in HT 1080 and were associated with radioresistance of mixtures after 10 Gy. Conclusion: CA IX is a stable marker of current or previous chronic hypoxia but influenced by nonhypoxic stimuli. Except the time course of accumulation, all properties of this marker resembled our previous findings for hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}. A modified flow cytometry protocol provided good separability of CA IX-negative and -positive cells in vitro

  14. A comparison of oral and intravenous pimonidazole in canine tumors using intravenous CCI-103F as a control hypoxia marker

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiter, Miriam M.; Thrall, Donald E.; Malarkey, David E.; Ji Xiaoshen; Lee, David Y.W.; Chou, S.-C.; Raleigh, James A. . E-mail: james_raleigh@med.unc.edu

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: Pimonidazole HCl is widely used in immunohistochemical analyses of hypoxia in normal and malignant tissues. The present study investigates oral administration as a means of minimizing invasiveness. Methods and Materials: Twelve dogs with confirmed malignancy received 0.5 g/m{sup 2} of pimonidazole HCl: 6 by mouth and 6 by i.v. infusion. All dogs received i.v. CCI-103F as a control. Plasma levels of pimonidazole, pimonidazole N-oxide, and CCI-103F were measured. Tumor biopsies were formalin fixed, paraffin embedded, sectioned, immunostained, and analyzed for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding. pH dependence for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding was studied in vitro. Results: Pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding in carcinomas and sarcomas was strongly correlated for both oral and i.v. pimonidazole HCl (r {sup 2} = 0.97). On average, the extent of pimonidazole binding exceeded that for CCI-103F by a factor of approximately 1.2, with the factor ranging from 1.0 to 1.65. Binding of both markers was pH dependent, but pimonidazole binding was greater at all values of pH. Conclusions: Oral pimonidazole HCl is effective as a hypoxia marker in spontaneously arising canine tumors. Selective cellular uptake and concomitant higher levels of binding in regions of hypoxia at the high end of pH gradients might account for the greater extent of pimonidazole binding.

  15. A Comparison of the Imaging Characteristics and Microregional Distribution of 4 Hypoxia PET Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Sean; Zhang, Hanwen; Reese, Megan; Ramos, Nicholas N.; Chen, Qing; Ricketts, Sally-Ann

    2014-01-01

    We compared the imaging characteristics and hypoxia selectivity of 4 hypoxia PET radiotracers (18F-fluoromisonidazole [18F-FMISO], 18F-flortanidazole [18F-HX4], 18F-fluoroazomycin arabinoside [18F-FAZA], and 64Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylsemicarbazone) [64Cu-ATSM]) in a single murine xenograft tumor model condition using small-animal PET imaging and combined ex vivo autoradiography and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Methods Nude mice bearing SQ20b xenograft tumors were administered 1 of 4 hypoxia PET tracers and images acquired 80–90 min after injection. Frozen sections from excised tumors were then evaluated for tracer distribution using digital autoradiography and compared with histologic markers of tumor hypoxia (pimonidazole, carbonic anydrase 9 [CA9]) and vascular perfusion (Hoechst 33342). Results The highest tumor uptake was observed with 64Cu-ATSM (maximum standardized uptake values [SUVmax], 1.26 ± 0.13) and the lowest with 18F-FAZA (SUVmax, 0.41 ± 0.24). 18F-FMISO and 18F-HX4 had similar intermediate tumor uptake (SUVmax, 0.76 ± 0.38 and 0.65 ± 0.19, respectively). Digital autoradiographs of hypoxia tracer distribution were compared pixel by pixel with images of immunohistochemistry stains. The fluorinated nitroimidazoles all showed radiotracer uptake increasing with pimonidazole and CA9 staining. 64Cu-ATSM showed the opposite pattern, with highest radiotracer uptake observed in regions with the lowest pimonidazole and CA9 staining. Conclusion The fluorinated nitroimidazoles showed similar tumor distributions when compared with immunohistochemistry markers of hypoxia. Variations in tumor standardized uptake value and normal tissue distribution may determine the most appropriate clinical setting for each tracer. 64Cu-ATSM showed the highest tumor accumulation and little renal clearance. However, the lack of correlation between 64Cu-ATSM distribution and immunohistochemistry hypoxia markers casts some doubt on the hypoxia selectivity of 64Cu

  16. Hypoxia Increases the Expression of Stem-Cell Markers and Promotes Clonogenicity in Glioblastoma Neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Eli E.; Lin, Alex; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Matsui, William; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia promotes the expansion of non-neoplastic stem and precursor cell populations in the normal brain, and is common in malignant brain tumors. We examined the effects of hypoxia on stem-like cells in glioblastoma (GBM). When GBM-derived neurosphere cultures are grown in 1% oxygen, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) protein levels increase dramatically, and mRNA encoding other hypoxic response genes, such as those encoding hypoxia-inducible gene-2, lysyl oxidase, and vascular endothelial growth factor, are induced over 10-fold. Hypoxia increases the stem-like side population over fivefold, and the percentage of cells expressing CD133 threefold or more. Notch pathway ligands and targets are also induced. The rise in the stem-like fraction in GBM following hypoxia is paralleled by a twofold increase in clonogenicity. We believe HIF1α plays a causal role in these changes, as when oxygen-stable HIF1α is expressed in normoxic glioma cells CD133 is induced. We used digoxin, which has been shown to lower HIF protein levels in vitro and in vivo, to inhibit the hypoxic response. Digoxin suppressed HIF1α protein expression, HIF1α downstream targets, and slowed tumor growth in vivo. In addition, pretreatment with digoxin reduced GBM flank xenograft engraftment of hypoxic GBM cells, and daily intraperitoneal injections of digoxin were able to significantly inhibit the growth of established subcutaneous glioblastoma xenografts, and suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:20671264

  17. Proteomic Identification of Novel Differentiation Plasma Protein Markers in Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia. Methods In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat induced by hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 7620 m (25,000 ft, 282 mm Hg) in a hypobaric chamber. Total plasma proteins collected at different time points (0, 6, 12 and 24 h), separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF). Biological processes that were enriched in the plasma proteins during hypobaric hypoxia were identified using Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. According to their properties and obvious alterations during hypobaric hypoxia, changes of plasma concentrations of Ttr, Prdx-2, Gpx -3, Apo A-I, Hp, Apo-E, Fetub and Nme were selected to be validated by Western blot analysis. Results Bioinformatics analysis of 25 differentially expressed proteins showed that 23 had corresponding candidates in the database. The expression patterns of the eight selected proteins observed by Western blot were in agreement with 2-DE results, thus confirming the reliability of the proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins identified are related to cellular defense mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. Their presence reflects the consequence of serial cascades initiated by hypobaric hypoxia. Conclusion/Significance This study provides information about the plasma proteome changes induced in response to hypobaric hypoxia and thus identification of the candidate proteins which can act as novel biomarkers. PMID:24842778

  18. Irradiation-Dependent Effects on Tumor Perfusion and Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers in an A549 Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Haenze, Joerg; Kamlah, Florentine; Eul, Bastian G.; Lang, Nico; Keil, Boris; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; An Hanxiang; Rose, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a major determinant of tumor radiosensitivity, and microenvironmental changes in response to ionizing radiation (IR) are often heterogenous. We analyzed IR-dependent changes in hypoxia and perfusion in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts. Materials and Methods: Immunohistological analysis of two exogenously added chemical hypoxic markers, pimonidazole and CCI-103F, and of the endogenous marker Glut-1 was performed time dependently after IR. Tumor vessels and apoptosis were analyzed using CD31 and caspase-3 antibodies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and fluorescent beads (Hoechst 33342) were used to monitor vascular perfusion. Results: CCI-103F signals measuring the fraction of hypoxic areas after IR were significantly decreased by approximately 50% when compared with pimonidazole signals, representing the fraction of hypoxic areas from the same tumors before IR. Interestingly, Glut-1 signals were significantly decreased at early time point (6.5 h) after IR returning to the initial levels at 30.5 h. Vascular density showed no difference between irradiated and control groups, whereas apoptosis was significantly induced at 10.5 h post-IR. DCE-MRI indicated increased perfusion 1 h post-IR. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the hypoxic fractions of CCI-103F and Glut-1 forces us to consider the possibility that both markers reflect different metabolic alterations of tumor microenvironment. The reliability of endogenous markers such as Glut-1 to measure reoxygenation in irradiated tumors needs further consideration. Monitoring tumor microvascular response to IR by DCE-MRI and measuring tumor volume alterations should be encouraged.

  19. Hypoxia imaging agents labeled with positron emitters.

    PubMed

    Hoigebazar, Lathika; Jeong, Jae Min

    2013-01-01

    Imaging hypoxia using positron emission tomography (PET) is of great importance for therapy of cancer. [(18)F]Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) was the first PET agent for hypoxia imaging, and various radiolabeled nitroimidazole derivatives such as [(18)F]fluoroerythronitroimidazole (FETNIM), [(18)F]1-α-D: -(2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (FAZA), [(18)F]2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl) acetamide (EF-5), and [(18)F]fluoroetanidazole (FETA) have been developed successively. To overcome the high cost of cyclotron installation, (68)Ga-labeled nitroimidazole derivatives also have been developed. Another important hypoxia imaging agent is (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N (4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM), which can distribute in cancer tissue rapidly due to high lipophilicity. However, its application is limited due to high cost of radionuclide production. Although various hypoxia imaging agents have been reported and tested, hypoxia PET images still have to be improved, because of the low blood flow in hypoxic tissues and resulting low uptake of the agents.

  20. Imaging hypoxia in tumors.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, J R

    2001-10-01

    For many years, it has been known that hypoxia affects the response to radiotherapy in human cancers. Hypoxic regions can develop as a tumor grows beyond the ability of its blood supply to deliver oxygen to the full extent of the tumor, exacerbated by vascular spasm or compression caused by increased interstitial fluid pressure. However, hypoxia is heterogeneous, and tumors that appear identical by clinical and radiographic criteria can vary greatly in their extent of hypoxia. Several invasive procedures to measure hypoxia in tumors have been developed and are predictive of response to therapy, but none of these is in routine clinical use because of technical complexity, inconvenience, and inability to obtain repeated measures. Noninvasive imaging with a hypoxia-directed radiopharmaceutical could be of great clinical utility. Most such radiopharmaceuticals under development use 2-nitroimidazole as the targeting moiety. 2-Nitroimidazole, which is selectively reduced and bound in hypoxic tissues, has been labeled with F-18, Cu-64/67, I-123, and Tc-99m. Of these, F-18-fluoromisonidazole and I-123-iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) have been most widely studied clinically. Non-nitro-containing bioreductive complexes, such as the Cu-60/62/64 thiosemicarbazone ATSM and Tc-99m butylene amineoxime (BnAO or HL91), have also been evaluated. In particular, 1-123-IAZA and Cu-60-ATSM have shown correlation with response to radiotherapy in preliminary clinical studies. However, more preclinical studies comparing imaging with validated invasive methods and clinical studies with outcome measures are required. Nuclear medicine is poised to play an important role in optimizing the therapy of patients with hypoxic tumors.

  1. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Hypoxic Effect of Nitroimidazole Embedded Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh; Kwon, Soonjo

    2016-05-01

    Adenylate cyclase is a key intracellular enzyme involved in energy imbalance leading to tumor hypoxia and cytotoxicity. In this study, adenylate cyclase activities in isolated hepatocytes and Kupffer cells were compared in the presence of several metabolic stimulators. In cultured hepatocyte cells, adenylate cyclase was stimulated by guanylyl imidotriphosphate (GITP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), progesterone and nitroimidazole embedded nanoparticle (NNP) effectors, while prostaglandin E2 and F2α were used as effectors in cultured Kupffer cells. The results showed that NNPs decreased adenylate cyclase specific activity in a dose-dependent manner after preincubation of hepatocytes with NNPs. The NNPs stimulated adenylate cyclase activities in hepatocytes were evaluated based on measurement of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The stimulatory effects of NNPs on adenylate cyclase were independent of the presence of GTP and may have been due to a direct effect on the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase. In addition, basal cAMP generation in hepatocyte cells was efficiently suppressed by the NNPs. In conclusion, NNPs exerted direct effects on the catalytic subunit of the adenylate cyclase system, and adenylate cyclase was hormone sensitive in liver cells. PMID:27483789

  2. Lycopene Enriched Tomato Extract Inhibits Hypoxia, Angiogenesis, and Metastatic Markers in early Stage N-Nitrosodiethylamine Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Nisha; Gupta, Prachi; Singh, Baljinder; Koul, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    Targeting altered pathways during initial stage of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is viewed as an effective and promising strategy to control this disease. Present study investigated the potential effect of lycopene-enriched tomato extract (LycT) on hypoxia-induced factor (HIF)-1α, HOX, VEGF, CD31, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and alpha fetoprotein (AFP)expression during initial stages of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) induced HCC. Female Balb/c mice (8-10 wk) were assigned to 4 groups: control, NDEA (200 mg NDEA i.p./kg body weight, cumulative), LycT (5 mg lycopene orally/kg body weight; 3 times a week), and LycT + NDEA. LycT treatment began 2 wk before NDEA administration and continued until the end of the 10 wk study. The onset of HCC by NDEA was associated with significant alteration in serum biochemical markers [alanine transaminases (ALT), aspartate transaminases (AST), and alkaline phosphatases (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), urea, A/G ratio, and bilirubin] and in liver histopathology. LycT treatment significantly reduced the levels of these markers. LycT treatment to NDEA mice also led to significant reduction in protein levels of AFP, HIF-1α, VEGF, CD31, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in comparison with NDEA group alone. These parameters are important biomarkers of hypoxia, angiogenesis, and metastasis, which reflect the advanced disease stage. The study provides evidence that prophylactic dietary supplementation with LycT may counteract HCC progression and/or protect against disease onset. PMID:26474105

  3. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α as a predictive marker in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    AKHILESH, MEENAKSHI; MAHALINGAM, VIVEKANANDA; NALLIAH, SIVALINGAM; ALI, ROSALINA MOHD; GANESALINGAM, MURALI; HALEAGRAHARA, NAGARAJA

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether or not the increased levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) could be used to demonstrate failed placentation in pre-eclamptic mothers. Twenty pregnant females with (pre-eclampsia group) or without pre-eclampsia (control group) were included in the present study. Antenatal and post-delivery HIF-1α transcription factor levels were measured. A significant increase was observed in the HIF-1α levels in the pre- and post-natal pre-eclampsia mothers. The findings suggest that the levels of HIF-1α in the blood of mothers with pre-eclampsia decrease after delivery of the placenta. The results confirm that there is increased HIF-1α in pre-eclampsia and a steady increase in the levels of HIF-1α could be commensurate with the possibility of a patient developing pre-eclampsia at a later trimester. PMID:24648931

  4. Fifteen days of 3,200 m simulated hypoxia marginally regulates markers for protein synthesis and degradation in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    D’Hulst, Gommaar; Ferri, Alessandra; Naslain, Damien; Bertrand, Luc; Horman, Sandrine; Francaux, Marc; Bishop, David J; Deldicque, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia leads to muscle atrophy. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not well defined in vivo. We sought to determine how chronic hypoxia regulates molecular markers of protein synthesis and degradation in human skeletal muscle and whether these regulations were related to the regulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. Eight young male subjects lived in a normobaric hypoxic hotel (FiO2 14.1%, 3,200 m) for 15 days in well-controlled conditions for nutrition and physical activity. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained in the musculus vastus lateralis before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) hypoxic exposure. Intramuscular hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) protein expression decreased (−49%, P=0.03), whereas hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2α) remained unaffected from PRE to POST hypoxic exposure. Also, downstream HIF-1α target genes VEGF-A (−66%, P=0.006) and BNIP3 (−24%, P=0.002) were downregulated, and a tendency was measured for neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally Nedd4 (−47%, P=0.07), suggesting lowered HIF-1α transcriptional activity after 15 days of exposure to environmental hypoxia. No difference was found on microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 type II/I (LC3b-II/I) ratio, and P62 protein expression tended to increase (+45%, P=0.07) compared to PRE exposure levels, suggesting that autophagy was not modulated after chronic hypoxia. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway was not altered as Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, S6 kinase 1, and 4E-binding protein 1 phosphorylation did not change between PRE and POST. Finally, myofiber cross-sectional area was unchanged between PRE and POST. In summary, our data indicate that moderate chronic hypoxia differentially regulates HIF-1α and HIF-2α, marginally affects markers of protein degradation, and does not modify markers of protein synthesis or myofiber cross-sectional area in human skeletal muscle

  5. Episodic neonatal hypoxia evokes executive dysfunction and regionally specific alterations in markers of dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Decker, M J; Hue, G E; Caudle, W M; Miller, G W; Keating, G L; Rye, D B

    2003-01-01

    Perinatal ischemic-anoxic and prolonged anoxic insults lead to impaired dopaminergic signaling and are hypothesized to contribute, at least in part, to the pathogenesis of disorders of minimal brain dysfunction such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. We hypothesized that subtle intermittent hypoxic insults, occurring during a period of critical brain development, are also pathogenic to dopaminergic signaling, thereby contributing to behavioral and executive dysfunction. Between postnatal days 7 and 11, rat pups were exposed to either 20-s bursts of isocapnic hypoxic gas, compressed air, or were left undisturbed with the dam. On postnatal days 23 pups were instrumented with electroencephalographic/electromyographic electrodes and sleep-wake architecture was characterized. Locomotor activity was assessed between postnatal days 35 and 38, learning, and working memory evaluated between postnatal days 53 and 64. Rats were killed on postnatal day 80 and tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter, dopamine transporter, and dopamine D1 receptors were quantified in the prefrontal cortex, primary sensorimotor cortex, and precommissural striatum by Western blot analyses. Post-hypoxic pups spent less time awake and more time in rapid-eye-movement sleep during the lights-on phase of the circadian cycle, were hyperlocomotive, and expressed impaired working memory. Striatal expression of vesicular monoamine transporter and D1 receptor proteins were increased in post-hypoxic rats, consistent with depressed dopaminergic signaling. These observations lead to the intriguing hypothesis that intermittent hypoxia occurring during a period of critical brain development evokes behavioral and neurochemical alterations that are long lasting, and consistent with disorders of minimal brain dysfunction. PMID:12614682

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the nitroimidazole antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Lamp, K C; Freeman, C D; Klutman, N E; Lacy, M K

    1999-05-01

    Metronidazole, the prototype nitroimidazole antimicrobial, was originally introduced to treat Trichomonas vaginalis, but is now used for the treatment of anaerobic and protozoal infections. The nitroimidazoles are bactericidal through toxic metabolites which cause DNA strand breakage. Resistance, both clinical and microbiological, has been described only rarely. Metronidazole given orally is absorbed almost completely, with bioavailability > 90% for tablets; absorption is unaffected by infection. Rectal and intravaginal absorption are 67 to 82%, and 20 to 56%, of the dose, respectively. Metronidazole is distributed widely and has low protein binding (< 20%). The volume of distribution at steady state in adults is 0.51 to 1.1 L/kg. Metronidazole reaches 60 to 100% of plasma concentrations in most tissues studied, including the central nervous system, but does not reach high concentrations in placental tissue. Metronidazole is extensively metabolised by the liver to 5 metabolites. The hydroxy metabolite has biological activity of 30 to 65% and a longer elimination half-life than the parent compound. The majority of metronidazole and its metabolites are excreted in urine and faeces, with less than 12% excreted unchanged in urine. The pharmacokinetics of metronidazole are unaffected by acute or chronic renal failure, haemodialysis, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, age, pregnancy or enteric disease. Renal dysfunction reduces the elimination of metronidazole metabolites; however, no toxicity has been documented and dosage alterations are unnecessary. Liver disease leads to a decreased clearance of metronidazole and dosage reduction is recommended. Recent pharmacodynamic studies of metronidazole have demonstrated activity for 12 to 24 hours after administration of metronidazole 1 g. The post-antibiotic effect of metronidazole extends beyond 3 hours after the concentration falls below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The concentration

  7. Nitroimidazoles for the treatment of TB: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Boshoff, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a leading cause of death resulting from an infectious agent, and the spread of multi- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis poses a threat to management of global health. New drugs that effectively shorten the duration of treatment and are active against drug-resistant strains of this pathogen are urgently required to develop effective chemotherapies to combat this disease. Two nitroimidazoles, PA-824 and OPC-67683, are currently in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of TB and the outcome of these may determine the future directions of drug development for anti-tubercular nitroimidazoles. In this review we summarize the development of these nitroimidazoles and alternative analogs in these series that may offer attractive alternatives to PA-824 and OPC-67683 for further development in the drug-discovery pipeline. Lastly, the potential pitfalls in the development of nitroimidazoles as drugs for TB are discussed. PMID:21879846

  8. Patterns and Levels of Hypoxia in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Their Relationship to Patient Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Sydney M. V. Du, Kevin L.; Chalian, Ara A.; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhang, Paul J.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Quon, Harry; Lustig, Robert; Weinstein, Gregory S.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: EF5, a 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker, was used to study the presence, levels, and prognostic significance of hypoxia in primary head and neck squamous cell tumors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, or larynx with at least 2 years of clinical follow-up were included in this study. Quantitative analyses of EF5 immunofluorescence was carried out, and these data were compared with patient outcome. Results: EF5 immunostaining showed substantial intra- and intertumoral hypoxic heterogeneity. The majority of cells in all tumors were well oxygenated. Three patterns of EF5 binding in cells were identified using criteria based on the cellular region that was stained (peripheral or central) and the relationship of binding to necrosis. We tested the association between EF5-binding levels with event-free and overall survival irrespective of the pattern of cellular binding or treatment regimen. Patients with tumors containing EF5-binding regions corresponding to severe hypoxia ({<=}0.1% oxygen) had a shorter event-free survival time than patients with pO{sub 2} values greater than 0.1% (p = 0.032). Nodal status was also predictive for outcome. Conclusions: These data illustrate the potential utility of EF5 binding based on quantitative immunohistochemistry of tissue pO{sub 2} and provide support for the development of noninvasive hypoxia positron emission tomographic studies with fluorine 18-labeled EF5.

  9. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  10. Molecular probes for imaging of hypoxia in the retina.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephanie M; Kim, Kwangho; Moore, Chauca E; Uddin, Md Imam; Capozzi, Megan E; Craft, Jason R; Sulikowski, Gary A; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2014-11-19

    Hypoxia has been associated with retinal diseases which lead the causes of irreversible vision loss, including diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and age-related macular degeneration. Therefore, technologies for imaging hypoxia in the retina are needed for early disease detection, monitoring of disease progression, and assessment of therapeutic responses in the patient. Toward this goal, we developed two hypoxia-sensitive imaging agents based on nitroimidazoles which are capable of accumulating in hypoxic cells in vivo. 2-nitroimidazole or Pimonidazole was conjugated to fluorescent dyes to yield the imaging agents HYPOX-1 and HYPOX-2. Imaging agents were characterized in cell culture and animal models of retinal vascular diseases which exhibit hypoxia. Both HYPOX-1 and -2 were capable of detecting hypoxia in cell culture models with >10:1 signal-to-noise ratios without acute toxicity. Furthermore, intraocular administration of contrast agents in mouse models of retinal hypoxia enabled ex vivo detection of hypoxic tissue. These imaging agents are a promising step toward translation of hypoxia-sensitive molecular imaging agents in preclinical animal models and patients.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of two novel 2-nitroimidazole derivatives as potential PET radioligands for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Zhihao; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yajing; Du, Fenghua; Gan, Hongmei; Qiao, Jinpin; Kung, Hank F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Nitroimidazole (azomycin) derivatives labeled with radioisotopes have been developed as cancer imaging and radiotherapeutic agents based on the oncological hypoxic mechanism. By attaching nitroimidazole core with different functional groups, we synthesized new nitroimidazole derivatives, and evaluated their potentiality as tumor imaging agents. Methods Starting with commercially available 2-nitroimdazole, 2-fluoro-N-(2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl)acetamide (NEFA, [19F]7) and 2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl 2-fluoroacetate (NEFT, [19F]8), as well as radiolabeling precursors - the bromo substituted analogs were quickly synthesized through a three-step synthetic pathway. The precursors were radiolabeled with [18F]F-/18-crown-6/KHCO3 in DMSO at 90 °C for 10 min followed by purification with an Oasis HLB cartridge. Biodistribution studies were carried out in EMT-6 tumor-bearing mice. The uptake (%ID/g) in tumors and normal tissues were measured at 30 min post injection. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used to distinguish metabolites from parent drugs in urine and plasma of rat injected with “cold” NEFA ([19F]7) and NEFT ([19F]8). Results Two radiotracers, [18F]NEFA ([18F]7) and [18F]NEFT ([18F]8), were prepared with average yields of 6-7% and 9-10% (no decay corrected). Radiochemical purity for both tracers was >95% as determined by HPLC. Biodistribution studies in EMT-6 tumor-bearing mice indicated that the tumor to blood and tumor to liver ratios of both [18F]7 (0.96, 0.98) and [18F]8 (0.61,1.10) at 30 min were higher than those observed for [18F]FMISO (1) (0.91, 0.59), a well-investigated azomycin type hypoxia radiotacer. LC/MS analysis demonstrated that fluoroacetate was the main in vivo metabolite for both NEFA ([19F]7) and NEFT ([19F]8). Conclusions In this research, two new fluorine-18 labeled 2-nitroimdazole derivatives, [18F]7 and [18F]8, both of which containing in vivo hydrolyzable

  12. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-1α downregulates the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition early marker proteins without undermining cell survival in hypoxic lens epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Neelam, Sudha; Brooks, Morgan M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify potential therapeutic strategies to slow down or prevent the expression of early-onset epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker proteins (fibronectin and alpha smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) without sacrificing the synthesis and accumulation of the prosurvival protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cultured virally transformed human lens epithelial (HLE) cells. Methods HLE-B3 cells, maintained in a continuous hypoxic environment (1% oxygen), were treated with SB216763, a specific inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) catalytic activity. Western blot analysis was employed to detect the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of β-catenin, as well as the total lysate content of fibronectin and α-SMA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the levels of VEGF in cell culture medium. A hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) translation inhibitor and an HIF-2α translation inhibitor were independently employed to evaluate the effect of hypoxia inducible factor inhibition on EMT marker protein and VEGF expression. XAV932 was used to assess the suppression of nuclear β-catenin and its downstream effect on EMT marker proteins and VEGF expression. Results SB216763-treated HLE-B3 cells caused marked inhibition of GSK-3β activity prompting a significant increase in the translocation of cytoplasmic β-catenin to the nucleus. The enhancement of nuclear β-catenin looked as if it positively correlated with a significant increase in the basal expression of VEGF as well as increased expression of fibronectin and α-SMA. In conjunction with SB216763, coadministration of an HIF-1α translation inhibitor, but not an HIF-2α translation inhibitor, markedly suppressed the expression of fibronectin and α-SMA without affecting VEGF levels. Treatment with XAV932 significantly reduced the level of nuclear β-catenin, but the levels of neither the EMT marker proteins nor VEGF were changed

  13. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Emily G.; Kotze, Helen L.; Allwood, J. William; Dunn, Warwick B.; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments. PMID:26508589

  14. Inhibition of plant fatty acid synthesis by nitroimidazoles.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A V; Harwood, J L; Stratford, M R; Stumpf, P K

    1981-01-01

    1. The effect of the addition of a number of nitroimidazoles was tested on fatty acid synthesis by germinating pea seeds, isolated lettuce chloroplasts and a soluble fraction from pea seeds. 2. All the compounds tested had a marked inhibition on stearate desaturation by lettuce chloroplasts and on the synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids by pea seeds. 3. In contrast, the effect of the drugs on total fatty acid synthesis from [14C]acetate in chloroplasts was related to the compound's electron reduction potentials. 4. Of the compounds used, only metronidazole had a marked inhibition on palmitate elongation in the systems tested. 5. The mechanism of inhibition of plant fatty acid synthesis by nitroimidazoles is discussed and the possible relevance of these findings to their neurotoxicity is suggested. PMID:7325993

  15. Mechanisms of selective toxicity of metronidazole and other nitroimidazole drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, D I

    1980-01-01

    The selectively toxic effect of nitroimidazole drugs towards anaerobic bacteria and protozoa depends on a number of factors. The killing action of such drugs as metronidazole requires the reduction of the nitro group, a process which influences the rate of entry of the drug into the susceptible cell and which is determined by mechanisms involving ferredoxin-linked (or the equivalent) reactions in the cell. The reduced agent subsequently causes strand breakage of DNA, the extent of which depends on the A + T content of the DNA. Other effects of such drugs may include the possible inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms which exacerbate DNA damage, Inhibition of activity of nitroimidazoles may be caused by aminothiol radical scavengers and radioprotectors normally present in the cell or by the presence of other organisms in the environment (that is, the vagina) capable of inactivating the drugs. PMID:7000306

  16. Clinical Biomarkers for Hypoxia Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Courter, Don

    2010-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia or a reduction of the tissue oxygen tension is a key microenvironmental factor for tumor progression and treatment resistance in solid tumors. Because hypoxic tumor cells have been demonstrated to be more resistant to ionizing radiation, hypoxia has been a focus of laboratory and clinical research in radiation therapy for many decades. It is believed that proper detection of hypoxic regions would guide treatment options and ultimately improve tumor response. To date, most clinical efforts in targeting tumor hypoxia have yielded equivocal results due to the lack of appropriate patient selection. However, with improved understanding of the molecular pathways regulated by hypoxia and the discovery of novel hypoxia markers, the prospect of targeting hypoxia has become more tangible. This chapter will focus on the development of clinical biomarkers for hypoxia targeting. PMID:18483785

  17. Trypanocidal nitroimidazole derivatives: relationships among chemical structure and genotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Buschini, Annamaria; Giordani, Federica; de Albuquerque, Cristina Northfleet; Pellacani, Claudia; Pelosi, Giorgio; Rossi, Carlo; Zucchi, Tânia Maria Araújo Domingues; Poli, Paola

    2007-05-15

    Human American trypanosomiasis is resurgent in Latin Americans, and new drugs are urgently required as current medications suffer from a number of drawbacks. Some nitroheterocycles have been demonstrated to exert a potent activity against trypanosomes. However, host toxicity issues halted their development as trypanocides. As part of the efforts to develop new compounds in order to treat parasitic infections, it is important to define their structure-activity relationship. In this study, 5-nitromegazol and two of its analogues, 4-nitromegazol, and 1-methyl-5-nitro-2-imidazolecarboxaldehyde 5-nitroimidazole-thiosemicarbazone, were tested and compared for in vitro induction of DNA damage in human leukocytes by the comet assay, performed at different pHs to better identify the types of damage. Specific oxidatively generated damage to DNA was also measured by using the comet assay with endonucleases. DNA damage was found in 5-nitromegazol-treated cells: oxidative stress appeared as the main source of DNA damage. 4-Nitromegazol did not produce any significant effect, thus confirming that 4-nitroimidazoles isomers have no important biological activity. The 5-nitroimidazole-thiosemicarbazone induced DNA damage with a higher efficiency than 5-nitromegazol. The central role in the reduction process played by the acidic hydrazine proton present in the thiosemicarbazone group but not in the cyclic (thiadiazole) form can contribute to rationalise our results. Given its versatility, thiosemicarbazone moiety could be involved in different reactions with nitrogenous bases (nucleophilic and/or electrophilic attacks).

  18. Imaging tumor hypoxia by near-infrared fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Aguirre, Andres; Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Kuhn, Liisa T.; Claffey, Kevin P.; Zhu, Quing

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel nitroimidazole indocyanine dye conjugate for tumor-targeted hypoxia fluorescence tomography. The hypoxia probe has been evaluated in vitro using tumor cell lines and in vivo with tumor targeting in mice. The in vitro cell studies were performed to assess fluorescence labeling differences between hypoxia and normoxia conditions. When treated with the hypoxia probe, a fluorescence emission ratio of 2.5-fold was found between the cells incubated under hypoxia compared to the cells in normoxia condition. Hypoxia specificity was also confirmed by comparing the cells treated with indocyanine dye alone. In vivo tumor targeting in mice showed that the fluorescence signals measured at the tumor site were twice those at the normal site after 150 min post-injection of the hypoxia probe. On the other hand, the fluorescence signals measured after injection of indocyanine dye were the same at tumor and normal sites. In vivo fluorescence tomography images of mice injected with the hypoxia probe showed that the probe remained for more than 5 to 7 h in the tumors, however, the images of mice injected with indocyanine only dye confirmed that the unbound dye washed out in less than 3 h. These findings are supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples using a Li-COR scanner and immunohistochemistry technique for tumor hypoxia.

  19. Physiological noise in murine solid tumours using T2*-weighted gradient-echo imaging: a marker of tumour acute hypoxia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudelet, Christine; Ansiaux, Réginald; Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Havaux, Xavier; Macq, Benoit; Gallez, Bernard

    2004-08-01

    T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging (T2*-weighted GRE MRI) was used to investigate spontaneous fluctuations in tumour vasculature non-invasively. FSa fibrosarcomas, implanted intramuscularly (i.m.) in the legs of mice, were imaged at 4.7 T, over a 30 min or 1 h sampling period. On a voxel-by-voxel basis, time courses of signal intensity were analysed using a power spectrum density (PSD) analysis to isolate voxels for which signal changes did not originate from Gaussian white noise or linear drift. Under baseline conditions, the tumours exhibited spontaneous signal fluctuations showing spatial and temporal heterogeneity over the tumour. Statistically significant fluctuations occurred at frequencies ranging from 1 cycle/3 min to 1 cycle/h. The fluctuations were independent of the scanner instabilities. Two categories of signal fluctuations were reported: (i) true fluctuations (TFV), i.e., sequential signal increase and decrease, and (ii) profound drop in signal intensity with no apparent signal recovery (SDV). No temporal correlation between tumour and contralateral muscle fluctuations was observed. Furthermore, treatments aimed at decreasing perfusion-limited hypoxia, such as carbogen combined with nicotinamide and flunarizine, decreased the incidence of tumour T2*-weighted GRE fluctuations. We also tracked dynamic changes in T2* using multiple GRE imaging. Fluctuations of T2* were observed; however, fluctuation maps using PSD analysis could not be generated reliably. An echo-time dependency of the signal fluctuations was observed, which is typical to physiological noise. Finally, at the end of T2*-weighted GRE MRI acquisition, a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed to characterize the microenvironment in which tumour signal fluctuations occurred in terms of vessel functionality, vascularity and microvascular permeability. Our data showed that TFV were predominantly located in regions with functional vessels, whereas SDV occurred in regions

  20. Toward hypoxia-selective rhenium and technetium tricarbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    North, Andrea J; Hayne, David J; Schieber, Christine; Price, Katherine; White, Anthony R; Crouch, Peter J; Rigopoulos, Angela; O'Keefe, Graeme J; Tochon-Danguy, Henri; Scott, Andrew M; White, Jonathan M; Ackermann, Uwe; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    With the aim of preparing hypoxia-selective imaging and therapeutic agents, technetium(I) and rhenium(I) tricarbonyl complexes with pyridylhydrazone, dipyridylamine, and pyridylaminocarboxylate ligands containing nitrobenzyl or nitroimidazole functional groups have been prepared. The rhenium tricarbonyl complexes were synthesized with short reaction times using microwave irradiation. Rhenium tricarbonyl complexes with deprotonated p-nitrophenyl pyridylhydrazone ligands are luminescent, and this has been used to track their uptake in HeLa cells using confocal fluorescent microscopy. Selected rhenium tricarbonyl complexes displayed higher uptake in hypoxic cells when compared to normoxic cells. A (99m)Tc tricarbonyl complex with a dipyridylamine ligand bearing a nitroimidazole functional group is stable in human serum and was shown to localize in a human renal cell carcinoma (RCC; SK-RC-52) tumor in a mouse.

  1. Overexpression of Intrinsic Hypoxia Markers HIF1{alpha} and CA-IX Predict for Local Recurrence in Stage T1-T2 Glottic Laryngeal Carcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijvers, M.L.; Laan, B.F.A.M. van der; Bock, G.H. de; Pattje, W.J.; Mastik, M.F.; Menkema, L.; Langendijk, J.A.; Kluin, P.M.; Schuuring, E.; Wal, J.E. van der

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic value of three endogenous hypoxia markers (hypoxia inducible factor 1 {alpha} subunit [HIF1{alpha}], carbonic anhydrase IX [CA-IX], and glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT-1]) on the clinical outcome in patients with early-stage glottic carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy (RT) and to determine the predictive hypoxic profile to choose the optimal treatment of early-stage laryngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry for HIF1{alpha}, CA-IX, and GLUT-1 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, pretreatment tissue samples of 91 glottic squamous cell carcinoma specimens. The patient group consisted only of those with early-stage (T1-T2) glottic carcinoma, and all patients were treated with RT only. Relative tumor staining was scored on the tissue samples. Receiver operating curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff value for each tumor marker. Cox regression analyses for the variables HIF1{alpha}, CA-IX, GLUT-1, gender, age, hemoglobin level, T category, N category, tobacco use, and alcohol use were performed with local control and overall survival as endpoints. Results: HIF1{alpha} overexpression in early-stage glottic carcinoma correlated significantly with worse local control (hazard ratio [HR], 3.05; p = 0.021) and overall survival (HR, 2.92; p = 0.016). CA-IX overexpression correlated significantly with worse local control (HR, 2.93; p = 0.020). GLUT-1 overexpression did not show any correlation with the clinical outcome parameters. Tumors with a nonhypoxic profile (defined as low HIF1{alpha} and low CA-IX expression) had significantly better local control (HR, 6.32; p 0.013). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that early-stage glottic laryngeal carcinomas with low HIF1{alpha} and CA-IX expression are highly curable with RT. For this group, RT is a good treatment option. For tumors with HIF1{alpha} or CA-IX overexpression, hypoxic modification before RT or primary

  2. Imaging tumor hypoxia by magnetic resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia results from the negative balance between the oxygen demands of the tissue and the capacity of the neovasculature to deliver sufficient oxygen. The resulting oxygen deficit has important consequences with regard to the aggressiveness and malignancy of tumors, as well as their resistance to therapy, endowing the imaging of hypoxia with vital repercussions in tumor prognosis and therapy design. The molecular and cellular events underlying hypoxia are mediated mainly through hypoxia-inducible factor, a transcription factor with pleiotropic effects over a variety of cellular processes, including oncologic transformation, invasion and metastasis. However, few methodologies have been able to monitor noninvasively the oxygen tensions in vivo. MRI and MRS are often used for this purpose. Most MRI approaches are based on the effects of the local oxygen tension on: (i) the relaxation times of (19)F or (1)H indicators, such as perfluorocarbons or their (1)H analogs; (ii) the hemodynamics and magnetic susceptibility effects of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin; and (iii) the effects of paramagnetic oxygen on the relaxation times of tissue water. (19)F MRS approaches monitor tumor hypoxia through the selective accumulation of reduced nitroimidazole derivatives in hypoxic zones, whereas electron spin resonance methods determine the oxygen level through its influence on the linewidths of appropriate paramagnetic probes in vivo. Finally, Overhauser-enhanced MRI combines the sensitivity of EPR methodology with the resolution of MRI, providing a window into the future use of hyperpolarized oxygen probes.

  3. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  4. Cerebral hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... death. Treatment depends on the cause of the hypoxia. Basic life support is most important. Treatment involves: Breathing ... Complications of cerebral hypoxia include a prolonged vegetative ... sleep-wake cycle, and eye opening, but the person is not alert ...

  5. Targeting tumour hypoxia to prevent cancer metastasis. From biology, biosensing and technology to drug development: the METOXIA consortium.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Erik O; Ebbesen, Peter; Gieling, Roben G; Williams, Kaye J; Dubois, Ludwig; Lambin, Philippe; Ward, Carol; Meehan, James; Kunkler, Ian H; Langdon, Simon P; Ree, Anne H; Flatmark, Kjersti; Lyng, Heidi; Calzada, Maria J; Peso, Luis Del; Landazuri, Manuel O; Görlach, Agnes; Flamm, Hubert; Kieninger, Jochen; Urban, Gerald; Weltin, Andreas; Singleton, Dean C; Haider, Syed; Buffa, Francesca M; Harris, Adrian L; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Moser, Isabella; Jobst, Gerhard; Busk, Morten; Toustrup, Kasper; Overgaard, Jens; Alsner, Jan; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Chiche, Johanna; Mazure, Nathalie; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Parks, Scott; Ahmed, Afshan; Ashcroft, Margaret; Pastorekova, Silvia; Cao, Yihai; Rouschop, Kasper M; Wouters, Brad G; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Mujcic, Hilda; Cojocari, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxic areas of solid cancers represent a negative prognostic factor irrespective of which treatment modality is chosen for the patient. Still, after almost 80 years of focus on the problems created by hypoxia in solid tumours, we still largely lack methods to deal efficiently with these treatment-resistant cells. The consequences of this lack may be serious for many patients: Not only is there a negative correlation between the hypoxic fraction in tumours and the outcome of radiotherapy as well as many types of chemotherapy, a correlation has been shown between the hypoxic fraction in tumours and cancer metastasis. Thus, on a fundamental basis the great variety of problems related to hypoxia in cancer treatment has to do with the broad range of functions oxygen (and lack of oxygen) have in cells and tissues. Therefore, activation-deactivation of oxygen-regulated cascades related to metabolism or external signalling are important areas for the identification of mechanisms as potential targets for hypoxia-specific treatment. Also the chemistry related to reactive oxygen radicals (ROS) and the biological handling of ROS are part of the problem complex. The problem is further complicated by the great variety in oxygen concentrations found in tissues. For tumour hypoxia to be used as a marker for individualisation of treatment there is a need for non-invasive methods to measure oxygen routinely in patient tumours. A large-scale collaborative EU-financed project 2009-2014 denoted METOXIA has studied all the mentioned aspects of hypoxia with the aim of selecting potential targets for new hypoxia-specific therapy and develop the first stage of tests for this therapy. A new non-invasive PET-imaging method based on the 2-nitroimidazole [(18)F]-HX4 was found to be promising in a clinical trial on NSCLC patients. New preclinical models for testing of the metastatic potential of cells were developed, both in vitro (2D as well as 3D models) and in mice (orthotopic grafting

  6. Interactions between amphotericin B and nitroimidazoles against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Cury, A E; Hirschfeld, M P

    1997-10-01

    This work proved that nitroimidazole antiprotozoal agents, such as metronidazole, ornidazole, secnidazole and tinidazole, in concentrations of up to 64 micrograms ml-1 did not present any antifungal activity against 17 strains of Candida albicans. The combination of each drug with amphotericin B showed the occurrence of variable interactions according to the studied strain. Promising results were observed based on synergistic and additive interactions of the polyene with the metronidazole; the inhibitory and lethal activities of the drugs were potentiated against all strains in concentrations reachable in vivo. PMID:9476486

  7. Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics Analysis of Bicyclic 4-Nitroimidazole Analogs in a Murine Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Cherian, Joseph; Ravindran, Sindhu; Goh, Anne; Jiricek, Jan; Nanjundappa, Mahesh; Nayyar, Amit; Gurumurthy, Meera; Singh, Ramandeep; Dick, Thomas; Blasco, Francesca; Barry, Clifton E.; Ho, Paul C.; Manjunatha, Ujjini H.

    2014-01-01

    PA-824 is a bicyclic 4-nitroimidazole, currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of tuberculosis. Dose fractionation pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies in mice indicated that the driver of PA-824 in vivo efficacy is the time during which the free drug concentrations in plasma are above the MIC (fT>MIC). In this study, a panel of closely related potent bicyclic 4-nitroimidazoles was profiled in both in vivo PK and efficacy studies. In an established murine TB model, the efficacy of diverse nitroimidazole analogs ranged between 0.5 and 2.3 log CFU reduction compared to untreated controls. Further, a retrospective analysis was performed for a set of seven nitroimidazole analogs to identify the PK parameters that correlate with in vivo efficacy. Our findings show that the in vivo efficacy of bicyclic 4-nitroimidazoles correlated better with lung PK than with plasma PK. Further, nitroimidazole analogs with moderate-to-high volume of distribution and Lung to plasma ratios of >2 showed good efficacy. Among all the PK-PD indices, total lung T>MIC correlated the best with in vivo efficacy (rs = 0.88) followed by lung Cmax/MIC and AUC/MIC. Thus, lung drug distribution studies could potentially be exploited to guide the selection of compounds for efficacy studies, thereby accelerating the drug discovery efforts in finding new nitroimidazole analogs. PMID:25141257

  8. Copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) Pharmacokinetics in FaDu Xenograft Tumors and Correlation With Microscopic Markers of Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Keisha C.; Humm, John L.; Bartlett, Rachel; Reese, Megan; Carlin, Sean

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The behavior of copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ({sup 64}Cu-ATSM) in hypoxic tumors was examined through a combination of in vivo dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiographic and histologic evaluation using a xenograft model of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: {sup 64}Cu-ATSM was administered during dynamic PET imaging, and temporal changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution within tumors were evaluated for at least 1 hour and up to 18 hours. Animals were sacrificed at either 1 hour (cohort A) or after 18 hours (cohort B) postinjection of radiotracer and autoradiography performed. Ex vivo analysis of microenvironment subregions was conducted by immunohistochemical staining for markers of hypoxia (pimonidazole hydrochloride) and blood flow (Hoechst-33342). Results: Kinetic analysis revealed rapid uptake of radiotracer by tumors. The net influx (K{sub i}) constant was 12-fold that of muscle, whereas the distribution volume (V{sub d}) was 5-fold. PET images showed large tumor-to-muscle ratios, which continually increased over the entire 18-hour course of imaging. However, no spatial changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution occurred in PET imaging at 20 minutes postinjection. Microscopic intratumoral distribution of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole were not correlated at 1 hour or after 18 hours postinjection, nor was {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and Hoechst-33342. Conclusions: The oxygen partial pressures at which {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole are reduced and bound in cells are theorized to be distinct and separable. However, this study demonstrated that microscopic distributions of these tracers within tumors are independent. Researchers have shown {sup 64}Cu-ATSM uptake to be specific to malignant expression, and this work has also demonstrated clear tumor targeting by the radiotracer.

  9. Keynote address: cellular reduction of nitroimidazole drugs: potential for selective chemotherapy and diagnosis of hypoxic cells.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J D; Lee, J; Meeker, B E

    1989-04-01

    Nitroimidazole drugs were initially developed as selective radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells and, consequently, as adjuvants to improve the local control probabilities of current radiotherapies. Misonidazole (MISO), the prototype radiosensitizing drug, was found in Phase I clinical studies to cause dose-limiting neurotoxicities (mainly peripheral neuropathies). MISO was also found to be cytotoxic in the absence of radiation and to covalently bind to cellular molecules, both processes demonstrating rates much higher in hypoxic compared with oxygenated cells. It is likely that neurotoxicity, cellular cytotoxicity and adduct formation results from reactions between reduction intermediates of MISO and cellular target molecules. Spin-offs from radiosensitizer research include the synthesis and characterization of more potent hypoxic cytotoxins and the exploitation of sensitizer-adducts as probes for measuring cellular and tissue oxygen levels. Current developments in hypoxic cell cytotoxin and hypoxic cell marker research are reviewed with specific examples from studies which characterize the cellular reduction of TF-MISO, (1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3[2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy]-2-propanol).

  10. Determination of five nitroimidazole residues in artificial porcine muscle tissue samples by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingyun; Su, Yan; Liao, Xiulin; Yang, Na; Yang, Xiupei; Choi, Martin M F

    2012-01-15

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method with ultraviolet detection has been developed for simultaneous detection and quantification of five nitroimidazoles including benzoylmetronidazole, dimetridazole, metronidazole, ronidazole, and secnidazole in porcine muscles. Nitroimidazoles in samples were extracted by ethyl acetate with subsequent clean-up by a strong cation exchange solid phase extraction column. The clean extracts were subjected to CE separation with optimal experimental conditions: pH 3.0 running buffer containing 25mM sodium phosphate and 0.10mM tetrabutylammonium bromide, 5s hydrodynamic injection at 0.5psi and 28kV separation voltage. The nitroimidazoles could be monitored and detected at 320nm within 18min. The limits of detection were below 1.0μg/kg and limits of quantification were lower than 3.2μg/kg for all nitroimidazoles in the muscle samples. The recoveries and relative standard deviations were 85.4-96.0, 83.5-92.5, 1.3-3.9, and 1.1-4.2%, respectively for the intra-day and inter-day analyses. The proposed CE method has been successfully applied to determine nitroimidazoles in artificial porcine muscle samples with good accuracy and recovery, demonstrating that it has potential for detection and quantification of multi-nitroimidazole residue in real muscle samples. PMID:22265553

  11. Immunohistochemical detection of osteopontin in advanced head-and-neck cancer: Prognostic role and correlation with oxygen electrode measurements, hypoxia-inducible-factor-1{alpha}-related markers, and hemoglobin levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, Matthias; Reddemann, Rolf; Said, Harun M.; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen; Taubert, Helge; Becker, Axel; Kuhnt, Thomas; Haensgen, Gabriele; Dunst, Juergen; Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The tumor-associated glycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) is discussed as a plasma marker of tumor hypoxia. However, the association of immunohistochemical OPN expression in tumor sections with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), the hypoxia-related markers hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), or hemoglobin and systemic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels has not been investigated. Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue sections of 34 patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy were assessed by immunochemistry for the expression of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX. Relationship of OPN expression with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), HIF-1{alpha} and CA IX expression, hemoglobin and serum VEGF level, and clinical parameters was studied. Results: Bivariate analysis showed a significant correlation of positive OPN staining with low hemoglobin level (p = 0.02), high HIF-1{alpha} expression (p = 0.02), and high serum vascular endothelial growth factor level (p = 0.02) for advanced head-and-neck cancer. Furthermore, considering the 31 Stage IV patients, the median pO{sub 2} correlated significantly with the OPN expression (p = 0.02). OPN expression alone had only a small impact on prognosis. However, in a univariate Cox proportional hazard regression model, the expression of either OPN or HIF-1{alpha} or CA IX was associated with a 4.1-fold increased risk of death (p = 0.02) compared with negativity of all three markers. Conclusion: Osteopontin expression detected immunohistochemically is associated with oxygenation parameters in advanced head-and-neck cancer. When the results of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX immunohistochemistry are combined into a hypoxic profile, a strong and statistically significant impact on overall survival is found.

  12. Optimizing Hypoxia Detection and Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Cameron J.; Evans, Sydney M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies using Eppendorf® needle sensors have invariably documented the resistance of hypoxic human tumors to therapy. These studies first documented the need for individual patient measurement of hypoxia, since hypoxia varied from tumor-to-tumor. Furthermore, hypoxia in sarcomas & cervical cancer leads to distant metastasis or local/regional spread, respectively. For various reasons, the field has moved away from direct needle-sensor oxygen measurements to indirect assays (HIF-related changes; bioreductive metabolism) and the latter can be imaged non-invasively. Many of hypoxia’s detrimental therapeutic effects are reversible in mice but little treatment-improvement in hypoxic human tumors has been seen. The question is why? What factors cause human tumors to be refractory to anti-hypoxia strategies? We suggest the primary cause to be the complexity of hypoxia formation and its characteristics. Three basic types of hypoxia exist, encompassing various diffusional (distance from perfused vessel), temporal (on/off cycling) and perfusional (blood-flow efficiency) limitations. Surprisingly, there is no current information on their relative prevalence in human tumors and even animal models. This is important because different hypoxia sub-types are predicted to require different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, but the implications of this remain unknown. Even more challenging, no agreement exists for the best way to measure hypoxia. Some results even suggest that hypoxia is unlikely to be targetable therapeutically. In this review, the authors will revisit various critical aspects of this field that are sometimes forgotten or misrepresented in the recent literature. Since most current non-invasive imaging studies involve PET-isotope-labelled 2-nitroimidazoles, we will emphasize key findings made in our studies using EF5 [2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)acetamide] and F18-labelled EF5. These will show the importance of

  13. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis: metronidazole and other nitroimidazole drugs are reduced by the flavin enzyme thioredoxin reductase and disrupt the cellular redox system. Implications for nitroimidazole toxicity and resistance.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Kolarich, Daniel; Binder, Marina; Stadlmann, Johannes; Altmann, Friedrich; Duchêne, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Infections with the microaerophilic parasite Trichomonas vaginalis are treated with the 5-nitroimidazole drug metronidazole, which is also in use against Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis and microaerophilic/anaerobic bacteria. Here we report that in T. vaginalis the flavin enzyme thioredoxin reductase displays nitroreductase activity with nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, and with the nitrofuran drug furazolidone. Reactive metabolites of metronidazole and other nitroimidazoles form covalent adducts with several proteins that are known or assumed to be associated with thioredoxin-mediated redox regulation, including thioredoxin reductase itself, ribonucleotide reductase, thioredoxin peroxidase and cytosolic malate dehydrogenase. Disulphide reducing activity of thioredoxin reductase was greatly diminished in extracts of metronidazole-treated cells and intracellular non-protein thiol levels were sharply decreased. We generated a highly metronidazole-resistant cell line that displayed only minimal thioredoxin reductase activity, not due to diminished expression of the enzyme but due to the lack of its FAD cofactor. Reduction of free flavins, readily observed in metronidazole-susceptible cells, was also absent in the resistant cells. On the other hand, iron-depleted T. vaginalis cells, expressing only minimal amounts of PFOR and hydrogenosomal malate dehydrogenase, remained fully susceptible to metronidazole. Thus, taken together, our data suggest a flavin-based mechanism of metronidazole activation and thereby challenge the current model of hydrogenosomal activation of nitroimidazole drugs. PMID:19415801

  15. A limited overlap between intratumoral distribution of 1-(5-fluoro-5-deoxy-α-D-arabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole and copper-diacetyl-bis[N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takako; Yuan, Qinghua; Jin, Zhao-Hui; Aung, Winn; Yoshii, Yukie; Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Endo, Hiroko; Inoue, Masahiro; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor hypoxia provides valuable information for cancer treatment planning. Two types of PET tracers, nitroimidazole compounds and [62,64Cu] copper-diacetyl-bis[N(4)-methylthio- semicarbazone] (Cu-ATSM), have been used for imaging hypoxic tumors. High accumulation of these tracers in tumors was shown to predict poor prognosis. Both similar and different intratumoral distributions of these PET tracers have been reported with some studies questioning the dependence of the Cu-ATSM accumulation on hypoxia. In the present study, we compared the intratumoral distribution and cellular uptake of 1-(5-fluoro-5-deoxy-α-D-arabinofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (FAZA) and Cu-ATSM. Intratumoral distributions of FAZA and Cu-ATSM compared by double tracer autoradiography in xenografts of 8 cancer cell lines and 3 cancer tissue originated spheroids (CTOSs) showed that only a limited overlap was observed between the regions with high levels of FAZA and Cu-ATSM accumulation in all the xenografts. Immunohistochemistry in the regions enriched with FAZA and Cu-ATSM in xenografts demonstrated that pimonidazole adducts were in regions that accumulated high levels of FAZA, while HIF-1α was in areas enriched with either tracer. In addition, we examined the cellular uptake of FAZA and Cu-ATSM at different levels of oxygen concentration in 4 cell lines and revealed that cellular uptake of FAZA was increased with the decrease of oxygen concentration from 20 to 2 and from 2 to 1%, while the Cu-ATSM uptake increased with the decrease of oxygen concentration from 20 to 2%, but did not increase with the decrease from 2 to 1%. Our findings indicate that intratumoral distributions of FAZA and Cu-ATSM were essentially non-overlapping and although hypoxia affects the buildup of both tracers, the accumulation of Cu-ATSM occurred at milder hypoxia compared to the conditions required for the accumulation of FAZA. Therefore, accumulation levels of FAZA and

  16. Glioblastoma multiforme: Effect of hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factors on therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system-based cancers have a much higher mortality rate with the 2016 estimates at 6.4 for incidence and 4.3 for deaths per 100,000 individuals. Grade IV astrocytomas, known as glioblastomas are highly aggressive and show a high proliferation index, diffused infiltration, angiogenesis, microvascular proliferation and pleomorphic vessels, resistance to apoptosis, and pseudopalisading necrosis. Extensive hypoxic regions in glioblastomas contribute to the highly malignant phenotype of these tumors. Hypoxic regions of glioblastoma exacerbate the prognosis and clinical outcomes of the patients as hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy and are also protected by the malfunctional vasculature that developed due to hypoxia. Predominantly, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor, transforming growth factor-β, epidermal growth factor receptor and PI3 kinase/Akt signaling systems are involved in tumor progression and growth. Glioblastomas are predominantly glycolytic and hypoxia-induced factors are useful in the metabolic reprogramming of these tumors. Abnormal vessel formation is crucial in generating pseudopalisading necrosis regions that protect cancer stem cells residing in that region from therapeutic agents and this facilitates the cancer stem cell niche to expand and contribute to cell proliferation and tumor growth. Therapeutic approaches that target hypoxia-induced factors, such as use of the monoclonal antibody against VEGF, bevacizumab, have been useful only in stabilizing the disease but failed to increase overall survival. Hypoxia-activated TH-302, a nitroimidazole prodrug of cytotoxin bromo-isophosphoramide mustard, appears to be more attractive due to its better beneficial effects in glioblastoma patients. A better understanding of the hypoxia-mediated protection of glioblastoma cells is required for developing more effective therapeutics. PMID:27698790

  17. Glioblastoma multiforme: Effect of hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factors on therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system-based cancers have a much higher mortality rate with the 2016 estimates at 6.4 for incidence and 4.3 for deaths per 100,000 individuals. Grade IV astrocytomas, known as glioblastomas are highly aggressive and show a high proliferation index, diffused infiltration, angiogenesis, microvascular proliferation and pleomorphic vessels, resistance to apoptosis, and pseudopalisading necrosis. Extensive hypoxic regions in glioblastomas contribute to the highly malignant phenotype of these tumors. Hypoxic regions of glioblastoma exacerbate the prognosis and clinical outcomes of the patients as hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy and are also protected by the malfunctional vasculature that developed due to hypoxia. Predominantly, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor, transforming growth factor-β, epidermal growth factor receptor and PI3 kinase/Akt signaling systems are involved in tumor progression and growth. Glioblastomas are predominantly glycolytic and hypoxia-induced factors are useful in the metabolic reprogramming of these tumors. Abnormal vessel formation is crucial in generating pseudopalisading necrosis regions that protect cancer stem cells residing in that region from therapeutic agents and this facilitates the cancer stem cell niche to expand and contribute to cell proliferation and tumor growth. Therapeutic approaches that target hypoxia-induced factors, such as use of the monoclonal antibody against VEGF, bevacizumab, have been useful only in stabilizing the disease but failed to increase overall survival. Hypoxia-activated TH-302, a nitroimidazole prodrug of cytotoxin bromo-isophosphoramide mustard, appears to be more attractive due to its better beneficial effects in glioblastoma patients. A better understanding of the hypoxia-mediated protection of glioblastoma cells is required for developing more effective therapeutics.

  18. Nitroimidazoles, Quinolones and Oxazolidinones as Fluorine Bearing Antitubercular Clinical Candidates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Park, Se Won

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of lives worldwide and the global curse of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is attaining really dangerous levels. Synergistic interaction of HIV and TB is the twin epidemics in resource-limited countries as each potentiate progression of the other. The increasing emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB place an immense burden for the treatment of TB with currently available drugs. The situation urgently demands for the discovery of new drugs with novel mode of action and differs in structural features in order to overcome resistance appears in conventional TB therapeutics. The present report covers the discovery of three classes of antituberculosis drugs, Nitroimidazoles, Quinolones and Oxazolidinones, undergoing clinical development with fluorine atom in their structures. Highly electronegative fluorine atom plays a signature role in advancing medicinal innovations as it existence in the drug compounds critically influences metabolic stability and lipophilicity thereby delaying its elimination by the body which results into a long term in vivo efficiency of the drug. Presence of fluorine atom(s) in the drug structures described in this report, has been associated with the several fold increase in the overall potency of the compound as demonstrated since the early discoveries. 6 Fluorinated derivatives from these three classes as pretomanid, delamanid, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, linezolid and sutezolid have been discussed with their antituberculosis effects, mode of action, chemical synthetic routes and results of clinical studies.

  19. Enhanced radiation-sensitivity by preincubation with nitroimidazoles: Effect of glutathione depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, C.J. ); Skov, K.A. )

    1994-05-15

    The mechanism of enhanced radiosensitization by nitroheterocyclics after a preincubation period under hypoxic conditions was investigated. The hypothesis that this phenomenon was caused by glutathione depletion was tested. The phenomena of enhanced radiosensitization by nitroheterocyclics after a preincubation period under hypoxic conditions is potentially of importance therapeutically because essentially nonlethal preradiation exposures to the electron affinic drugs cause a much larger radiation sensitization than would otherwise be expected. We have investigated this interesting property of several 2-nitroimidazoles to determine its possible cause and to test various hypotheses about maximizing its possible therapeutic benefit. In view of many observations that thiols are depleted by incubation of cells with nitroimidazoles under hypoxic conditions, we have specifically investigated this aspect of the preincubation effect. Depletion of glutathione was either enhanced by an overnight incubation with buthionine sulfoximine or minimized by preincubation with a 2-nitroimidazole which is sterically inhibited from causing thiol depletion. When conditions were chosen which minimized variations in cellular glutathione content during the preincubation period, no preincubation effect was observed. At low, therapeutically relevant radiation doses, where 2-nitroimidazoles are less efficient sensitizers, the preincubation effect may be even more important, but thiol depletion still minimizes its impact in this region of the dose-response curve. These results suggest that the preincubation effect is caused by a [open quotes]self-sensitization[close quotes] involving the known enhancement of radiation sensitization by thiol depletion. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Metabolism of a 5-nitroimidazole in susceptible and resistant isogenic strains of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, J P; Sellier, N; Rager, M N; Reysset, G

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the metabolism of dimetridazole (1,2-dimethyl-5-nitroimidazole) (DMZ) by the resting cell method in a susceptible strain of Bacteroides fragilis and in the same strain containing the nimA gene, which conferred resistance to 5-nitroimidazole drugs. In both cases, under strict anaerobic conditions DMZ was metabolized without major ring cleavage or nitrate formation. However, one of two distinct metabolic pathways is involved, depending on the susceptibility of the strain. In the susceptible strain, the classical reduction pathway of nitroaromatic compounds is followed at least as far as the nitroso-radical anion, with further formation of the azo-dimer: 5,5'-azobis-(1,2-dimethylimidazole). In the resistant strain, DMZ is reduced to the amine derivative, namely, 5-amino-1,2-dimethylimidazole, preventing the formation of the toxic form of the drug. The specificity of the six-electron reduction of the nitro group, which is restricted to 4- and 5-nitroimidazole, suggests an enzymatic reaction. We thus conclude that nimA and related genes may encode a 5-nitroimidazole reductase. PMID:9210672

  1. Studies of genotoxicity and mutagenicity of nitroimidazoles: demystifying this critical relationship with the nitro group

    PubMed Central

    Boechat, Núbia; Carvalho, Alcione S; Salomão, Kelly; de Castro, Solange L; Araujo-Lima, Carlos F; Mello, Francisco VC; Felzenszwalb, Israel; Aiub, Claudia AF; Conde, Taline Ramos; Zamith, Helena PS; Skupin, Rolf; Haufe, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Nitroimidazoles exhibit high microbicidal activity, but mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic properties have been attributed to the presence of the nitro group. However, we synthesised nitroimidazoles with activity against the trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, but that were not genotoxic. Herein, nitroimidazoles (11-19) bearing different substituent groups were investigated for their potential induction of genotoxicity (comet assay) and mutagenicity (Salmonella/Microsome assay) and the correlations of these effects with their trypanocidal effect and with megazol were investigated. The compounds were designed to analyse the role played by the position of the nitro group in the imidazole nucleus (C-4 or C-5) and the presence of oxidisable groups at N-1 as an anion receptor group and the role of a methyl group at C-2. Nitroimidazoles bearing NO2 at C-4 and CH3 at C-2 were not genotoxic compared to those bearing NO2 at C-5. However, when there was a CH3 at C-2, the position of the NO2 group had no influence on the genotoxic activity. Fluorinated compounds exhibited higher genotoxicity regardless of the presence of CH3 at C-2 or NO2 at C-4 or C-5. However, in compounds 11 (2-CH3; 4-NO2; N-CH2OHCH2Cl) and 12 (2-CH3; 4-NO2; N-CH2OHCH2F), the fluorine atom had no influence on genotoxicity. This study contributes to the future search for new and safer prototypes and provide. PMID:26018452

  2. Removal of nitroimidazole antibiotics from aqueous solution by adsorption/bioadsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Utrilla, J; Prados-Joya, G; Sánchez-Polo, M; Ferro-García, M A; Bautista-Toledo, I

    2009-10-15

    The objective of the present study was to analyse the behaviour of activated carbon with different chemical and textural properties in nitroimidazole adsorption, also assessing the combined use of microorganisms and activated carbon in the removal of these compounds from waters and the influence of the chemical nature of the solution (pH and ionic strength) on the adsorption process. Results indicate that the adsorption of nitroimidazoles is largely determined by activated carbon chemical properties. Application of the Langmuir equation to the adsorption isotherms showed an elevated adsorption capacity (X(m)=1.04-2.04 mmol/g) for all contaminants studied. Solution pH and electrolyte concentration did not have a major effect on the adsorption of these compounds on activated carbon, confirming that the principal interactions involved in the adsorption of these compounds are non-electrostatic. Nitroimidazoles are not degraded by microorganisms used in the biological stage of a wastewater treatment plant. However, the presence of microorganisms during nitroimidazole adsorption increased their adsorption on the activated carbon, although it weakened interactions between the adsorbate and carbon surface. In dynamic regime, the adsorptive capacity of activated carbon was markedly higher in surface water and groundwater than in urban wastewaters.

  3. A Functional CT Contrast Agent for In Vivo Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongyuan; Wang, Zhiming; Huang, Chusen; Gu, Xiaoli; Jia, Ti; Zhang, Amin; Wu, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Lan; Luo, Xianfu; Zhao, Xuesong; Jia, Nengqin; Miao, Fei

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia, which has been well established as a key feature of the tumor microenvironment, significantly influences tumor behavior and treatment response. Therefore, imaging for tumor hypoxia in vivo is warranted. Although some imaging modalities for detecting tumor hypoxia have been developed, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and optical imaging, these technologies still have their own specific limitations. As computed tomography (CT) is one of the most useful imaging tools in terms of availability, efficiency, and convenience, the feasibility of using a hypoxia-sensitive nanoprobe (Au@BSA-NHA) for CT imaging of tumor hypoxia is investigated, with emphasis on identifying different levels of hypoxia in two xenografts. The nanoprobe is composed of Au nanoparticles and nitroimidazole moiety which can be electively reduced by nitroreductase under hypoxic condition. In vitro, Au@BSA-NHA attain the higher cellular uptake under hypoxic condition. Attractively, after in vivo administration, Au@BSA-NHA can not only monitor the tumor hypoxic environment with CT enhancement but also detect the hypoxic status by the degree of enhancement in two xenograft tumors with different hypoxic levels. The results demonstrate that Au@BSA-NHA may potentially be used as a sensitive CT imaging agent for detecting tumor hypoxia. PMID:27345304

  4. Targeting radiosensitizers to DNA by attachment of an intercalating group: Nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, D.S.; Panicucci, R.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M. )

    1991-07-01

    The nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridine series of compounds (NLP-1, 2, and 3) were synthesized under the assumption that it should be possible to enhance the molar efficiency of 2-nitroimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and cytotoxins by targeting them to their likely site of action, DNA. The targeting group chosen was the phenanthridine moiety, the major component of the classical DNA intercalating compound, ethidium bromide. The sole difference between the compounds is the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the nitroimidazole to the phenanthridine. The phenanthridine group with a three-carbon side chain, P-1, was also synthesized to allow studies on the effect of the targeting group by itself. The ability of the compounds to bind to DNA is inversely proportional to their linker chain length with binding constant values ranging from approximately 1 {times} 10(5) mol-1 for NLP-2 to 6 {times} 10(5) mol-1 for NLP-3. The NLP compounds show selective toxicity to hypoxic cells at 37 degrees C at external drug concentrations 10-40 times lower than would be required for untargeted 2-nitroimidazoles such as misonidazole in vitro. Toxicity to both hypoxic and aerobic cells is dependent on the linker chain: the shorter the chain, the greater the toxicity. In addition, the NLP compounds radiosensitize hypoxic cells at external drug concentrations as low as 0.05 mM with almost the full oxygen effect being observed at a concentration of 0.5 mM. These concentrations are 10-100 times lower than would be required for similar radiosensitization using misonidazole. Radiosensitizing ability is independent of linker chain length. The present compounds represent prototypes for further studies of the efficacy and mechanism of action of 2-nitroimidazoles targeted to DNA by linkage to an intercalating group.

  5. The Clinical Importance of Assessing Tumor Hypoxia: Relationship of Tumor Hypoxia to Prognosis and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph C.; Lebedev, Artem; Aten, Edward; Madsen, Kathleen; Marciano, Liane

    2014-01-01

    I. Introduction II. The Clinical Importance of Tumor Hypoxia A. Pathophysiology of hypoxia B. Hypoxia's negative impact on the effectiveness of curative treatment 1. Hypoxic tumors accumulate and propagate cancer stem cells 2. Hypoxia reduces the effectiveness of radiotherapy 3. Hypoxia increases metastasis risk and reduces the effectiveness of surgery 4. Hypoxic tumors are resistant to the effects of chemotherapy and chemoradiation C. Hypoxia is prognostic for poor patient outcomes III. Diagnosis of Tumor Hypoxia A. Direct methods 1. Oxygen electrode—direct pO2 measurement most used in cancer research 2. Phosphorescence quenching—alternative direct pO2 measurement 3. Electron paramagnetic resonance 4. 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy 5. Overhauser-enhanced MRI B. Endogenous markers of hypoxia 1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α 2. Carbonic anhydrase IX 3. Glucose transporter 1 4. Osteopontin 5. A combined IHC panel of protein markers for hypoxia 6. Comet assay C. Physiologic methods 1. Near-infrared spectroscopy/tomography—widely used for pulse oximetry 2. Photoacoustic tomography 3. Contrast-enhanced color duplex sonography 4. MRI-based measurements 5. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI 6. Pimonidazole 7. EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) 8. Hypoxia PET imaging—physiologic hypoxia measurement providing tomographic information a. 18F-fluoromisonidazole b. 18F-fluoroazomycinarabinofuranoside c. 18F-EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) d. 18F-flortanidazole e. Copper (II) (diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone)) f. 18F-FDG imaging of hypoxia IV. Modifying Hypoxia to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes A. Use of hypoxia information in radiation therapy planning B. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to nimorazole C. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to tirapazamine D. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients

  6. Reactions in Nitroimidazole and Methylnitroimidazole Triggered by Low-Energy (0-8 eV) Electrons.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, Katrin; Feketeová, Linda; Puschnigg, Benjamin; Scheier, Paul; Illenberger, Eugen; Denifl, Stephan

    2015-06-25

    Low-energy electrons (0-8 eV) effectively decompose 4-nitroimidazole (4NI) and the two methylated isomers 1-methyl-5-nitroimidazole and 1-methyl-4-nitroimidazole via dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The involved unimolecular decompositions range from simple bond cleavages (loss of H(•), formation of NO2(-)) to complex reactions possibly leading to a complete degradation of the target molecule (formation of CN(-), etc.). At energies below 2 eV, the entire rich chemistry induced by DEA is completely quenched by methylation, as demonstrated in a previous communication (Tanzer, K.; Feketeová, L.; Puschnigg, B.; Scheier, P.; Illenberger. E.; Denifl, S. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 12240). The observation that in 4NI neutral radicals and radical anions are formed via DEA at high efficiency already at threshold (0 eV) may have significant implications for the development of nitroimidazole-based radiosensitizers in tumor radiation therapy.

  7. Nitroimidazole carboxamides as antiparasitic agents targeting Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Jarrad, A M; Debnath, A; Miyamoto, Y; Hansford, K A; Pelingon, R; Butler, M S; Bains, T; Karoli, T; Blaskovich, M A T; Eckmann, L; Cooper, M A

    2016-09-14

    Diarrhoeal diseases caused by the intestinal parasites Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica constitute a major global health burden. Nitroimidazoles are first-line drugs for the treatment of giardiasis and amebiasis, with metronidazole 1 being the most commonly used drug worldwide. However, treatment failures in giardiasis occur in up to 20% of cases and development of resistance to metronidazole is of concern. We have re-examined 'old' nitroimidazoles as a foundation for the systematic development of next-generation derivatives. Using this approach, derivatisation of the nitroimidazole carboxamide scaffold provided improved antiparasitic agents. Thirty-three novel nitroimidazole carboxamides were synthesised and evaluated for activity against G. lamblia and E. histolytica. Several of the new compounds exhibited potent activity against G. lamblia strains, including metronidazole-resistant strains of G. lamblia (EC50 = 0.1-2.5 μM cf. metronidazole EC50 = 6.1-18 μM). Other compounds showed improved activity against E. histolytica (EC50 = 1.7-5.1 μM cf. metronidazole EC50 = 5.0 μM), potent activity against Trichomonas vaginalis (EC50 = 0.6-1.4 μM cf. metronidazole EC50 = 0.8 μM) and moderate activity against the intestinal bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile (0.5-2 μg/mL, cf. metronidazole = 0.5 μg/mL). The new compounds had low toxicity against mammalian kidney and liver cells (CC50 > 100 μM), and selected antiparasitic hits were assessed for human plasma protein binding and metabolic stability in liver microsomes to demonstrate their therapeutic potential. PMID:27236016

  8. Symptomatic Trichomonas vaginalis infection in the setting of severe nitroimidazole allergy: successful treatment with boric acid.

    PubMed

    Muzny, Christina; Barnes, Arti; Mena, Leandro

    2012-09-01

    This report describes a patient with symptomatic Trichomonas vaginalis infection who was unable to tolerate nitroimidazole drugs because of severe hypersensitivity, for which desensitisation was not possible. Use of intravaginal clotrimazole, intravaginal paromomycin, intravaginal furazolidone, povidone-iodine douches, and oral nitazoxanide were unsuccessful in eradicating the patient's T. vaginalis infection. A 2-month course of intravaginal topical boric acid subsequently achieved a complete symptomatic cure and the patient remained T. vaginalis wet prep- and culture-negative 60 days after treatment.

  9. Development and method validation for the determination of nitroimidazole residues in salmon, tilapia and shrimp muscle.

    PubMed

    Watson, Lynn; Potter, Ross; MacNeil, James D; Murphy, Cory

    2014-01-01

    The use of nitroimidazoles in aquacultured fish has been banned in many countries due to the suspected mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of these compounds. In response to the need to conduct residue testing of these compounds in fish, a simple, rapid, and sensitive method was developed and validated that is suitable for regulatory monitoring of nitroimidazole residues and their hydroxy metabolites in fish muscle tissue. Following solvent extraction of homogenized tissue and clean-up using a C18 SPE cartridge, analyses were conducted by ultra-performance UPLC-MS/MS. A precursor ion and two product ions were monitored for each of the parent compounds and metabolites included in the method. The validated method has an analytical range from 1 to 50 ng/g in the representative species (tilapia, salmon, and shrimp), with an LOD and LOQ ranging from 0.07 to 1.0 nglg and 0.21 to 3.0 nglg, respectively, depending on the analyte. Recoveries ranged from 81 to 124% and repeatability was between 4 and 17%. HorRat values were within typical limits of acceptability for a single laboratory. Working standards were stable for 12 months, extracts were stable for 5 days, and tissues for 2 months under appropriate storage conditions. This method was determined to be suitable for routine use for screening, quantification, and confirmation of nitroimidazole residues in a residue monitoring program for fish with regulatory oversight.

  10. Extracellular brain pH with or without hypoxia is a marker of profound metabolic derangement and increased mortality after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Ivan; Nortje, Jurgens; Al-Rawi, Pippa G; Hutchinson, Peter JA; Gupta, Arun K

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia and acidosis can follow traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are associated with increased mortality. This study aimed to evaluate a relationship between reduced pHbt and disturbances of cerebral metabolism. Prospective data from 56 patients with TBI, receiving microdialysis and Neurotrend monitoring, were analyzed. Four tissue states were defined based on pHbt and PbtO2: 1—low PbtO2/pHbt, 2—low pHbt/normal PbtO2, 3—normal pHbt/low PbtO2, and 4—normal pHbt/PbtO2). Microdialysis values were compared between the groups. The relationship between PbtO2 and lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio was evaluated at different pHbt levels. Proportional contribution of each state was evaluated against mortality. As compared with the state 4, the state 3 was not different, the state 2 exhibited higher levels of lactate, LP, and glucose and the state 1—higher LP and reduced glucose (P<0.001). A significant negative correlation between LP and PbtO2 (rho=−0.159, P<0.001) was stronger at low pHbt (rho=−0.201, P<0.001) and nonsignificant at normal pHbt (P=0.993). The state 2 was a significant discriminator of mortality categories (P=0.031). Decreased pHbt is associated with impaired metabolism. Measuring pHbt with PbtO2 is a more robust way of detecting metabolic derangements. PMID:23232949

  11. Current issues in the utility of 19F nuclear magnetic resonance methodologies for the assessment of tumour hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Simon P; Griffiths, John R

    2004-01-01

    It is now well established that uncontrolled proliferation of tumour cells together with the chaotic and poorly regulated blood supply of solid tumours result in tissue hypoxia, and that hypoxic regions of tumours are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The development and application of non-invasive methods to rapidly determine the degree and extent of tumour hypoxia in an individual tumour would clearly enhance cancer treatment strategies. This review describes the current status of two (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies that have been exploited to investigate tumour hypoxia, namely: (i) (19)F NMR oximetry following administration of perfluorocarbons, from which tumour p(O)(2) measurements can be made; and (ii) (19)F NMR measurements of the tumour retention of fluorinated 2-nitroimidazoles. PMID:15306411

  12. Simultaneous determination of seven nitroimidazole residues in meat by using HPLC-UV detection with solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Han-Wen; Wang, Feng-Chi; Ai, Lian-Feng

    2007-10-01

    A method was developed for the determination of the seven nitroimidazoles including metronidazole (MNZ), ronidazole (RNZ), dimetridazole (DMZ), tinidazole (TNZ), ornidazole (ONZ), secnidazole (SNZ) and the common metabolite of RNZ and hydroxydimetridazole (DMOHZ) in poultry and pork muscles by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection (UV). After extraction with ethyl acetate and evaporation, the nitroimidazoles were redissolved in ethyl acetate and purified using strong cation exchange (SCX) solid-phase extraction (SPE) column. The HPLC separation was carried through on a C(18) bonded silica column with a deionized water-methanol-acetonitrile mobile phase using a gradient elution procedure. The limit of detection of all the seven nitroimidazoles was 0.2 microg/kg. The recoveries of the seven nitroimidazoles for chicken, pork and bacon samples spiked with 1-20 microg/kg were in the range of 71.4-99.5%. The linearity is satisfactory with a correlation coefficient of >0.998 at concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 60 microg/kg. The relative standard deviations of 10 measurements for spiked chicken, pork and bacon samples at the concentration of 1 and 20 microg/kg were in the range of 6.2-13.9% and 4.0-8.7%, respectively. The intra-day precision (n=5) for nitroimidazoles residues in chicken spiked at 20 microg/kg is 6.9%, and the inter-day precision for 5 days (n=25) is 11%. The method is capable of identifying nitroimidazole residues at > or =0.7 microg/kg levels and was applied in the determination of nitroimidazole residues in meat sample. PMID:17719280

  13. DNA-Targeted 2-Nitroimidazoles: Studies of the Influence of the Phenanthridine-Linked Nitroimidazoles, 2-NLP-3 and 2-NLP-4, on DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W. ); Weinfeld, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines 2-NLP-3 (5-[3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl]-phenanthridinium bromide) and 2-NLP-4 (5-[3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-butyl1]-phenanthridinium bromide) are composed of the radiosensitizer, 2-nitroimidazole, attached to the DNA intercalator phenanthridine via a 3- and 4-carbon linker, respectively. Previous in vitro assays show both compounds to be 10 - 100 times more efficient as hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole[Cowan et al., Radiat. Res. 127, 81-89, 1991]. Here we have used a 32P postlabeling assay and 5'-end labeled oligonucleotide assay to compare the radiogenic DNA damage generated in the presence of 2-NLP-3, 2-NLP-4 compared to irradiation in the presence of misonidazole. This may account, at least in part, for the greater cellular radiosensitization shown by the nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines over misonidazole.

  14. PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of tumor hypoxia: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lopci, Egesta; Grassi, Ilaria; Chiti, Arturo; Nanni, Cristina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Toschi, Luca; Fonti, Cristina; Lodi, Filippo; Mattioli, Sandro; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition arising in living tissues when oxygen supply does not adequately cover the cellular metabolic demand. Detection of this phenomenon in tumors is of the utmost clinical relevance because tumor aggressiveness, metastatic spread, failure to achieve tumor control, increased rate of recurrence, and ultimate poor outcome are all associated with hypoxia. Consequently, in recent decades there has been increasing interest in developing methods for measurement of oxygen levels in tumors. Among the image-based modalities for hypoxia assessment, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most extensively investigated based on the various advantages it offers, i.e., broad range of radiopharmaceuticals, good intrinsic resolution, three-dimensional tumor representation, possibility of semiquantification/quantification of the amount of hypoxic tumor burden, overall patient friendliness, and ease of repetition. Compared with the other non-invasive techniques, the biggest advantage of PET imaging is that it offers the highest specificity for detection of hypoxic tissue. Starting with the 2-nitroimidazole family of compounds in the early 1980s, a great number of PET tracers have been developed for the identification of hypoxia in living tissue and solid tumors. This paper provides an overview of the principal PET tracers applied in cancer imaging of hypoxia and discusses in detail their advantages and pitfalls. PMID:24982822

  15. DNA-targeted 2-nitroimidazoles: studies of the influence of the phenanthridine-linked nitroimidazoles, 2-NLP-3 and 2-NLP-4, on DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Weinfeld, Michael

    2002-09-01

    The nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines 2-NLP-3 (5-[3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl]-phenanthridinium bromide) and 2-NLP-4 (5-[3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-butyl]-phenanthridinium bromide) are composed of the radiosensitizer, 2-nitroimidazole, attached to the DNA intercalator phenanthridine by a 3- and 4-carbon linker, respectively. Previous in vitro assays showed both compounds to be 10-100 times more efficient as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers (based on external drug concentrations) than the untargeted 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer, misonidazole (Cowan et al., Radiat. Res. 127, 81-89, 1991). Here we have used a (32)P postlabeling assay and 5'-end-labeled oligonucleotide assay to compare the radiation-induced DNA damage generated in the presence of 2-NLP-3, 2-NLP-4, phenanthridine and misonidazole. After irradiation of the DNA under anoxic conditions, we observed a significantly greater level of 3'-phosphoglycolate DNA damage in the presence of 2-NLP-3 or 2-NLP-4 compared to irradiation of the DNA in the presence of misonidazole. This may account at least in part for the greater cellular radiosensitization shown by the nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines over misonidazole. Of the two nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines, the better in vitro radiosensitizer, 2-NLP-4, generated more 3'-phosphoglycolate in DNA than did 2-NLP-3. At all concentrations, phenanthridine had little effect on the levels of DNA damage, suggesting that the enhanced radiosensitization displayed by 2-NLP-3 and 2-NLP-4 is due to the localization of the 2-nitroimidazole to the DNA by the phenanthridine substituent and not to radiosensitization by the phenanthridine moiety itself.

  16. Disrupted intracellular redox balance of the diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus vortens by 5-nitroimidazoles and garlic-derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Williams, C F; Lloyd, D; Kolarich, D; Alagesan, K; Duchêne, M; Cable, J; Williams, D; Leitsch, D

    2012-11-23

    The 5-nitroimidazole, metronidazole, has traditionally been employed in veterinary medicine to treat a range of infections including the diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus. This study aims to determine the mode of action of metronidazole on Spironucleus vortens, including the specific mechanism of activation of the pro-drug and subsequent cellular targets of the drug metabolites. Due to the ban on use of metronidazole in the treatment of production animals in Europe and USA, garlic-derived compounds were also investigated as natural alternatives to metronidazole chemotherapy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provided an overview of gross cellular damage caused by metronidazole and garlic derivatives. Proteomic analyses by 2D gel electrophoresis identified the proteins involved in specific covalent adduct formation with nitroimidazoles. Furthermore, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity and non-protein thiol concentration were assayed in extracts of S. vortens before and after treatment with nitroimidazoles and garlic-derivatives. Metronidazole and garlic-derived compounds caused severe damage of trophozoites indicated by membrane blebbing and lysed cell debris. Analysis of the S. vortens proteome identified several proteins capable of specific nitroimidazole binding, including; uridine phosphorylase, enolase, protein disulphide isomerase, aminoacyl-histidine dipeptidase and malic enzyme. Of the compounds tested, metronidazole and the garlic-derived compound ajoene were the most effective at inhibiting TrxR activity and depleting non-protein thiols. These data suggest TrxR-mediated activation of nitroimidazoles, leading to depletion of non-protein thiols. Redox imbalance due to antioxidant failure is implicated as the mode of action of nitroimidazoles and garlic-derived compounds, ultimately leading to cell death. Possible synergy between garlic derivatives and metronidazole should be further investigated in vitro in order to determine their theoretical

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of the Nitroimidazole TBA-354 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, S.; Yang, T. J.; Kim, Y.; Wang, Y.; Lu, Y.; Wang, B.; Xu, J.; Mdluli, K.; Ma, Z.; Franzblau, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitroimidazoles are a promising new class of antitubercular agents. The nitroimidazo-oxazole delamanid (OPC-67683, Deltyba) is in phase III trials for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, while the nitroimidazo-oxazine PA-824 is entering phase III for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant tuberculosis. TBA-354 (SN31354[(S)-2-nitro-6-((6-(4-trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)pyridine-3-yl)methoxy)-6,7-dihydro-5H-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]oxazine]) is a pyridine-containing biaryl compound with exceptional efficacy against chronic murine tuberculosis and favorable bioavailability in preliminary rodent studies. It was selected as a potential next-generation antituberculosis nitroimidazole following an extensive medicinal chemistry effort. Here, we further evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties and activity of TBA-354 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TBA-354 is narrow spectrum and bactericidal in vitro against replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with potency similar to that of delamanid and greater than that of PA-824. The addition of serum protein or albumin does not significantly alter this activity. TBA-354 maintains activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv isogenic monoresistant strains and clinical drug-sensitive and drug-resistant isolates. Spontaneous resistant mutants appear at a frequency of 3 × 10−7. In vitro studies and in vivo studies in mice confirm that TBA-354 has high bioavailability and a long elimination half-life. In vitro studies suggest a low risk of drug-drug interactions. Low-dose aerosol infection models of acute and chronic murine tuberculosis reveal time- and dose-dependent in vivo bactericidal activity that is at least as potent as that of delamanid and more potent than that of PA-824. Its superior potency and pharmacokinetic profile that predicts suitability for once-daily oral dosing suggest that TBA-354 be studied further for its potential as a next-generation nitroimidazole. PMID:25331696

  18. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Koshi N.; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Kazuo; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  19. Cytotoxic Effect of Some 1, 4-Dihydropyridine Derivatives Containing Nitroimidazole Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Ramin; Javidnia, Katayoun; Amirghofran, Zahra; Salimi, Seyyed Hossein; Sabetghadam, Zahra; Meili, Savis; Mehdipour, Ahmad Reza

    2011-01-01

    The 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) derivatives are a known class of calcium channel blockers. Some derivatives of DHP showed significant cytotoxicity. It was shown that this effect may not be the result of interaction with Ca2+ channels. In this study, we performed an investigation about the intrinsic cytotoxicity of some derivatives of DHP containing nitroimidazole moiety on their C4 position on four different cancer cell lines (Raji, K562, Fen and HeLa). The result showed that these compounds had moderate-good cytotoxic activity. In addition, QSAR model shows the importance of N atom in cytotoxicity; Ca2+ channels. PMID:24250381

  20. The pharmacokinetics in mice and dogs of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.; Workman, P.; Owen, L.

    1982-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole (MISO) were examined. In dogs, 2 analogues showed comparable peak plasma concentrations with considerable shorter half-lives (t1/2) and reduced areas under curves (AUC). Benznidazole (R0 07-1051) had a much longer t1/2, a higher AUC, and somewhat higher peak concentrations. In mice tumor/plasma, brain/plasma, and tumor/brain ratios were generally similar to MISO, as was penetration of brain and peripheral nerve by benznidazole in dogs. Selection of lipophilic analogues with appropriate pharmacokinetic properties may facilitate accommodation of the potentially different requirements for improved radiosensitization or chemosensitization.

  1. Simultaneous determination of 15 nitroimidazoles in cosmetics by HPLC coupled with electrospray ionization- tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xian-Shuang; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Qing; Lv, Qing; Chen, Yun-Xia; Ma, Hui-Juan; Li, Jing-Rui; Ma, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive and reliable analytical method based on HPLC/MSIMS has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 15 nitroimidazoles in cosmetics. A diversity of cosmetic samples, including powder, lotion, shampoo, and cream were collected. The samples were ultrasonically extracted with aqueous methanol, and the extracts were then subjected to cleanup bySPE using an Oasis HLB cartridge followed by filtration with a 0.20 pm membrane filter. Afterwards, chromatographic separation was performed on an XSelect CSH C18 column (2.1 x 150 mm, 3.5 pm) maintained at 30°C within 15 min by a gradient of acetonitrile-0.1% aqueous formic acid solution at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min. The mass spectrometric detection was carried, out using electrospray positive ionization under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. A good linearity was observed over the concentration range from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL. The intraday and interday precisions, which were investigated by determining all target compounds in cosmetics seven times/day and on 7 consecutive days, were below 5.00%. The mean recoveries at three spiked levels ranged from 80.42 to 100.83% with the RSDs from 0.45 to 9.02%. The LOQs were determined to be between 0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg. The method was sufficiently rapid, reliable, and sensitive for the determination of 15 nitroimidazoles in cosmetics. PMID:25632431

  2. Simultaneous determination of 15 nitroimidazoles in cosmetics by HPLC coupled with electrospray ionization- tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xian-Shuang; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Qing; Lv, Qing; Chen, Yun-Xia; Ma, Hui-Juan; Li, Jing-Rui; Ma, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive and reliable analytical method based on HPLC/MSIMS has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 15 nitroimidazoles in cosmetics. A diversity of cosmetic samples, including powder, lotion, shampoo, and cream were collected. The samples were ultrasonically extracted with aqueous methanol, and the extracts were then subjected to cleanup bySPE using an Oasis HLB cartridge followed by filtration with a 0.20 pm membrane filter. Afterwards, chromatographic separation was performed on an XSelect CSH C18 column (2.1 x 150 mm, 3.5 pm) maintained at 30°C within 15 min by a gradient of acetonitrile-0.1% aqueous formic acid solution at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min. The mass spectrometric detection was carried, out using electrospray positive ionization under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. A good linearity was observed over the concentration range from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL. The intraday and interday precisions, which were investigated by determining all target compounds in cosmetics seven times/day and on 7 consecutive days, were below 5.00%. The mean recoveries at three spiked levels ranged from 80.42 to 100.83% with the RSDs from 0.45 to 9.02%. The LOQs were determined to be between 0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg. The method was sufficiently rapid, reliable, and sensitive for the determination of 15 nitroimidazoles in cosmetics.

  3. Mutagenicity study on pyrazole, seven pyrazole derivatives, and two nitroimidazoles with the L-arabinose resistance test of Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Alejandre-Duran, E.; Ruiz-Rubio, M.; Claramunt, R.M.; Lopez, C.; Pueyo, C.

    1986-01-01

    The mutagenicity of pyrazole and seven pyrazole derivatives (4-nitropyrazole, 4-bromopyrazole, 1-methyl-4-nitropyrazole, 3,5-dimethyl-4-nitropyrazole, 1-methyl-4-bromopyrazole, 4,4'-dinitro-1, 1'-methylene-dipyrazole and 4,4'-dibromo-1,1'-methylene-dipyrazole) has been investigated with the L-arabinose forward mutation assay of Salmonella typhimurium. Two nitroimidazoles (1-methyl-5-nitroimidazole and metronidazole) were included as reference drugs. The mutagenicity of each chemical was determined by both preincubation and liquid tests, in the presence or absence of S9 microsomal fraction. The mutagenic responses was expressed as the absolute number of L-arabinose resistant mutants growing in selective plates, supplemented with traces of D-glucose. Strain BA13 with a wild-type lipopolysaccharide barrier was used as a comparison to the deep rough derivative BA9. No mutagenic effect was detected with pyrazole and two of its derivatives, 1-methyl-4-bromopyrazole and 4,4'-dibromo-1,1'-methylene-dipyrazole. The other five pyrazole derivatives were mutagenic to different degrees, although their mutagenic potencies were always considerably lower than those of the two nitroimidazoles. The results suggest that 4-nitropyrazoles, as well as 4,4'-dinitro-1, 1'-methylene-dipyrazoles, should be investigated further as alternatives to, or even substitutes for, the currently used nitroimidazoles.

  4. S-2-amino-5-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid: a model for potential bioreductively activated prodrugs for inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity.

    PubMed

    Ulhaq, S; Naylor, M A; Chinje, E C; Threadgill, M D; Stratford, I J

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of 1,1-dimethylethyl S-(2-1,1-dimethylethoxycarbonylamino)-5-bromopentanoate with 1-potassio-2-nitroimidazole, followed by deprotection, afforded S-2-amino-5-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid, which was reduced to S-2-amino-5-(2-aminoimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid. This aminoimadazole inhibited rat brain nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity 3.2 times more potently than did the nitro analogue. Thus S-2-amino-5-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid is a potent prodrug which may be bioreductively activated to a NOS inhibitor in hypoxic solid tumours.

  5. Preparation and Biodistribution of Technetium-99m-Labeled Bis- Misonidazole (MISO) as an Imaging Agent for Tumour Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Fan, Di; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Zhe; Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of tumour hypoxia is an important aspect in determining the course of tumour therapy. In this study, we developed a novel imaging agent, (99m)Tc-ethylenedicysteine-bis-misonidazole ((99m)Tc-EC-MISO), for diagnosing tumour hypoxia. We used 2-nitroimidazole as a reactant to synthesize the amino derivative of misonidazole (MISO) in the first step and then conjugated the di-amino derivative of MISO to the chelating agent ethylenedicysteine (EC) for labelling (99m)Tc in the second step. (99m)Tc-pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4-) was reduced by tin chloride (SnCl2) for radiolabeling. The radiochemical purity was up to 94%. Tissue biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were conducted on subcutaneous gliomal tumour-bearing mice. The tumour-to-muscle ratio in the (99m)Tc-EC-MISO group increased with time, up to 4.6 at 4 h after injection. SPECT/CT imaging confirmed that the tumours could be visualized clearly with (99m)Tc-EC-MISO at 2 h. By introducing a second 2-nitroimidazole redox centre, an apparent hypoxic accumulation of this novel (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agent in the tumour was observed.

  6. Effect of nitroimidazoles on the oxygen consumption rate and respiratory control ratio of beef heart mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, C.F.; Ting, L.; Subjeck, J.R.; Johnson, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    The neurotoxic effect of the nitroimidazole radiosensitizers misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has seriously compromised their clinical effectiveness. The authors compare here the effect of MISO and DMM on oxygen consumption in purified beef heart mitochondria. MISO has been found to significantly increase the oxygen consumption rate and decrease the respiratory control ratio in isolated mitochondria when incubated in the presence of the NAD+ dependent substrate, ..beta..-hydroxybutyrate. DMM has a similar but less pronounced effect than MISO on these respiratory parameters. When mitochondria were incubated in the presence of these radiosensitizers for 8, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, the oxygen consumption rate was decreased when succinate, a FAD dependent substrate, was added following the incubation. This decrease, which is both time and dosage dependent, is equivalent for MISO and DMM.

  7. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and thioredoxin reductase are involved in 5-nitroimidazole activation while flavin metabolism is linked to 5-nitroimidazole resistance in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Burgess, Anita G.; Dunn, Linda A.; Krauer, Kenia G.; Tan, Kevin; Duchêne, Michael; Upcroft, Peter; Eckmann, Lars; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mechanism of action of, and resistance to, metronidazole in the anaerobic (or micro-aerotolerant) protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia has long been associated with the reduction of ferredoxin (Fd) by the enzyme pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the subsequent activation of metronidazole by Fd to toxic radical species. Resistance to metronidazole has been associated with down-regulation of PFOR and Fd. The aim of this study was to determine whether the PFOR/Fd couple is the only pathway involved in metronidazole activation in Giardia. Methods PFOR and Fd activities were measured in extracts of highly metronidazole-resistant (MTRr) lines and activities of recombinant G. lamblia thioredoxin reductase (GlTrxR) and NADPH oxidase were assessed for their involvement in metronidazole activation and resistance. Results We demonstrated that several lines of highly MTRr G. lamblia have fully functional PFOR and Fd indicating that PFOR/Fd-independent mechanisms are involved in metronidazole activation and resistance in these cells. Flavin-dependent GlTrxR, like TrxR of other anaerobic protozoa, reduces 5-nitroimidazole compounds including metronidazole, although expression of TrxR is not decreased in MTRr Giardia. However, reduction of flavins is suppressed in highly MTRr cells, as evidenced by as much as an 80% decrease in NADPH oxidase flavin mononucleotide reduction activity. This suppression is consistent with generalized impaired flavin metabolism in highly MTRr Trichomonas vaginalis. Conclusions These data add to the mounting evidence against the dogma that PFOR/Fd is the only couple with a low enough redox potential to reduce metronidazole in anaerobes and point to the multi-factorial nature of metronidazole resistance. PMID:21602576

  8. Development of 99mTc-N4-NIM for Molecular Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohammad S.; Kong, Fan-Lin; Rollo, Alex; Mendez, Richard; Kohanim, Saady; Smith, Daniel Lee; Yang, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The nitro group of 2-nitroimidazole (NIM) enters the tumor cells and is bioreductively activated and fixed in the hypoxia cells. 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (N4) has shown to be a stable chelator for 99mTc. The present study was aimed to develop 99mTc-cyclam-2-nitroimidazole (99mTc-N4-NIM) for tumor hypoxia imaging. N4-NIM precursor was synthesized by reacting N4-oxalate and 1,3-dibromopropane-NIM, yielded 14% (total synthesis). Cell uptake of 99mTc-N4-NIM and 99mTc-N4 was obtained in 13762 rat mammary tumor cells and mesothelioma cells in 6-well plates. Tissue distribution of 99mTc-N4-NIM was evaluated in breast-tumor-bearing rats at 0.5–4 hrs. Tumor oxygen tension was measured using an oxygen probe. Planar imaging was performed in the tumor-bearing rat and rabbit models. Radiochemical purity of 99mTc-N4-NIM was >96% by HPLC. Cell uptake of 99mTc-N4-NIM was higher than 99mTc-N4 in both cell lines. Biodistribution of 99mTc-N4-NIM showed increased tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle count density ratios as a function of time. Oxygen tension in tumor tissue was 6–10 mmHg compared to 40–50 mmHg in normal muscle tissue. Planar imaging studies confirmed that the tumors could be visualized clearly with 99mTc-N4-NIM in animal models. Efficient synthesis of N4-NIM was achieved. 99mTc-N4-NIM is a novel hypoxic probe and may be useful in evaluating cancer therapy. PMID:22719210

  9. Hypoxia in Diabetic Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Yumi; Haneda, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is now a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. In addition, DN accounts for the increased mortality in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and then patients without DN achieve long-term survival compatible with general population. Hypoxia represents an early event in the development and progression of DN, and hypoxia-inducible factor- (HIF-) 1 mediates the metabolic responses to renal hypoxia. Diabetes induces the “fraternal twins” of hypoxia, that is, pseudohypoxia and hypoxia. The kidneys are susceptible to hyperoxia because they accept 20% of the cardiac output. Therefore, the kidneys have specific vasculature to avoid hyperoxia, that is, AV oxygen shunting. The NAD-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) sirtuins are seven mammalian proteins, SIRTs 1–7, which are known to modulate longevity and metabolism. Recent studies demonstrated that some isoforms of sirtuins inhibit the activation of HIF by deacetylation or noncatalyzing effects. The kidneys, which have a vascular system that protects them against hyperoxia, unfortunately experience extraordinary hypernutrition today. Then, an unexpected overload of glucose augments the oxygen consumption, which ironically results in hypoxia. This review highlights the primary role of HIF in diabetic kidneys for the metabolic adaptation to diabetes-induced hypoxia. PMID:25054148

  10. Efficacy of 5-Nitroimidazoles for the Treatment of Giardiasis: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Thota, Priyaleela; Roman, Yuani; Hernandez, Adrian V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Giardiasis is one of the most common causes of diarrheal disease worldwide and 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NI) are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of giardiasis. We evaluated the efficacy of 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NI) in the treatment of giardiasis in a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a comprehensive literature search in PubMed-Medline, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane Library for RCTs evaluating the efficacy of 5-NI vs. control (placebo or active treatment) on parasitological cure in patients with parasitologically-demonstrated giardiasis. The search was performed in May 2013 with no language restriction by two authors independently. The efficacy outcome was parasitological cure, and harmful outcomes were abdominal pain, bitter or metallic taste, and headache. We included 30 RCTs (n = 3,930). There was a significant and slightly higher response rate with 5-NI in giardiasis treatment (RR 1.06, 95%CI 1.02–1.11, p = 0.005). There was high heterogeneity among studies (I2 = 72%). The response rates for metronidazole, tinidazole and secnidazole were similar (RR 1.05, 95%CI 1.01–1.09, p = 0.01; RR 1.32 95%CI 1.10–1.59, p = 0.003; and RR 1.18 95%CI 0.93–1.449, p = 0.18, respectively). On subgroup analyses, the response rates did not vary substantially and high heterogeneity persisted (I2 = 57%–80%). Harmful outcomes were uncommon, and 5-NIs were associated with lower risk of abdominal pain, and higher risk of both bitter or metallic taste and headache. Conclusions Studies investigating the efficacy of 5-NI in giardiasis treatment are highly heterogeneous. 5-NIs have a slightly better efficacy and worse profile for mild harmful outcomes in the treatment of giardiasis in comparison to controls. Larger high quality RCTs are needed to further assess efficacy and safety profiles of 5-NI. PMID:24625554

  11. Capillary electrochromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of 5-nitroimidazole antibiotics in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mesa, Maykel; D'Orazio, Giovanni; Rocco, Anna; García-Campaña, Ana M; Blanco, Carmen Cruces; Fanali, Salvatore

    2015-10-01

    The separation of eight antibiotics belonging to 5-nitroimidazole family was carried out by means of CEC coupled with MS. Preliminary experiments were carried out with ultraviolet detection in order to select the proper stationary and mobile phase. Among the different stationary phases studied (namely Lichrospher C18, 5 μm particle size; Cogent(TM) Bidentate C18, 4.2 μm; Pinnacle II™ Phenyl, 3 μm; Pinnacle II™ Cyano, 3 μm), Cogent™ Bidentate C18 (4.2 μm) gave the best performance. For CEC-MS coupling, a laboratory assembled liquid-junction-nano-spray interface was used. In order to achieve a good sensitivity, special attention was paid to both optimization of the sheath liquid composition as well as selection of the injection mode. Under optimized CEC-ESI-MS conditions, the separation was accomplished within 22 min by using a column packed with a mixture of Bidentate C18:Lichrospher Silica-60 (5 μm) 3:1 w/w, an inlet pressure of 11 bar, a voltage of 15 kV, and a mobile phase composed by 45:10:45 v/v/v ACN/MeOH/water containing ammonium acetate (5 mM pH 5). A combined hydrodynamic and electrokinetic injection of 8 bar, 15 kV, and 96 s was adopted. The method was validated in terms of repeatability and intermediate precision of retention times and peak areas, linearity, and LODs and LOQs. RSDs values were <2.9% for retention times and <16.1% for peak areas in both intraday and interday experiments. LOQ values were between 0.09 and 0.42 μg/mL for all compounds. Finally, the method was applied to the determination of three most employed 5-nitroimidazole antibiotics (metronidazole, secnidazole, and ternidazole) in spiked urine samples, subjected to a SPE procedure. Recovery values in the 67-103% range were obtained. Furthermore, for the selected antibiotics, CEC-MS(2) spectra were obtained providing the unambiguous confirmation of these drugs in urine samples. PMID:26200811

  12. Hypoxia. 4. Hypoxia and ion channel function

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to oxygen deprivation is required for survival; thus, understanding the mechanisms by which changes in oxygen are linked to cell viability and function is of great importance. Ion channels play a critical role in regulating cell function in a wide variety of biological processes, including neuronal transmission, control of ventilation, cardiac contractility, and control of vasomotor tone. Since the 1988 discovery of oxygen-sensitive potassium channels in chemoreceptors, the effect of hypoxia on an assortment of ion channels has been studied in an array of cell types. In this review, we describe the effects of both acute and sustained hypoxia (continuous and intermittent) on mammalian ion channels in several tissues, the mode of action, and their contribution to diverse cellular processes. PMID:21178108

  13. Survey of 11 nitroimidazole residues in hen and duck eggs from the Irish market.

    PubMed

    Cronly, Mark; Behan, Patrice; Foley, Barry; Danaher, Martin; Malone, Edward; Regan, Liam

    2011-01-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method, recently developed, validated and accredited, was used to screen for metronidazole, ronidazole dimetridazole ipronidazole, ternidazole, tinidazole, ornidazole carnidazole and three hydroxy metabolites (hydroxy-metronidazole, HMMNI and hydroxy-ipronidazole) in Irish retail egg samples. The method used had decision limits (CCα) in the range 0.33-1.26 µg kg(-1) and detection capabilities (CCβ) ranging 0.56-2.15 µg kg(-1) for all analytes. Internal standard-corrected recovery, calculated for the various analytes, ranged 87.2-106.2%, while the coefficient of variance, expressed as % CV, ranged 3.7-11.3%. The method was applied to 160 samples of caged, free range and organic hen and duck eggs available on the Irish retail market as well as two incurred proficiency test egg samples. No nitroimidazole residues were detected in the survey samples above the CCα and the results achieved for the two proficiency test samples were acceptable when compared with the assigned values.

  14. Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas enzymes activate metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivate metronidazole (nitroimidazole reductases).

    PubMed

    Pal, Dibyarupa; Banerjee, Sulagna; Cui, Jike; Schwartz, Aaron; Ghosh, Sudip K; Samuelson, John

    2009-02-01

    Infections with Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, and Trichomonas vaginalis, which cause diarrhea, dysentery, and vaginitis, respectively, are each treated with metronidazole. Here we show that Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas have oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase (ntr) genes which are homologous to those genes that have nonsense mutations in metronidazole-resistant Helicobacter pylori isolates. Entamoeba and Trichomonas also have nim genes which are homologous to those genes expressed in metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolates. Recombinant Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas nitroreductases used NADH rather than the NADPH used by Helicobacter, and two recombinant Entamoeba nitroreductases increased the metronidazole sensitivity of transformed Escherichia coli strains. Conversely, the recombinant nitroimidazole reductases (NIMs) of Entamoeba and Trichmonas conferred very strong metronidazole resistance to transformed bacteria. The Ehntr1 gene of the genome project HM-1:IMSS strain of Entamoeba histolytica had a nonsense mutation, and the same nonsense mutation was present in 3 of 22 clinical isolates of Entamoeba. While ntr and nim mRNAs were variably expressed by cultured Entamoeba and Trichomonas isolates, there was no relationship to metronidazole sensitivity. We conclude that microaerophilic protists have bacterium-like enzymes capable of activating metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivating metronidazole (NIMs). While Entamoeba and Trichomonas displayed some of the changes (nonsense mutations and gene overexpression) associated with metronidazole resistance in bacteria, these changes did not confer metronidazole resistance to the microaerophilic protists examined here.

  15. A new-generation 5-nitroimidazole can induce highly metronidazole-resistant Giardia lamblia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Linda A; Burgess, Anita G; Krauer, Kenia G; Eckmann, Lars; Vanelle, Patrice; Crozet, Maxime D; Gillin, Frances D; Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A

    2010-07-01

    The 5-nitroimidazole (NI) compound C17, with a side chain carrying a remote phenyl group in the 2-position of the imidazole ring, is at least 14-fold more active against the gut protozoan parasite Giardialamblia than the 5-NI drug metronidazole (MTR), with a side chain in the 1-position of the imidazole ring, which is the primary drug for the treatment of giardiasis. Over 10 months, lines resistant to C17 were induced in vitro and were at least 12-fold more resistant to C17 than the parent strains. However, these lines had ID(90) values (concentration of drug at which 10% of control parasite ATP levels are detected) for MTR of >200 microM, whilst lines induced to be highly resistant to MTR in vitro have maximum ID(90) values around 100 microM (MTR-susceptible isolates typically have an ID(90) of 5-12.8 microM). The mechanism of MTR activation in Giardia apparently involves reduction to toxic radicals by the activity of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the electron acceptor ferredoxin. MTR-resistant Giardia have decreased PFOR activity, which is consistent with decreased activation of MTR in these lines, but C17-resistant lines have normal levels of PFOR. Therefore, an alternative mechanism of resistance in Giardia must account for these super-MTR-resistant cells. PMID:20456926

  16. Probing NMR parameters, structure and dynamics of 5-nitroimidazole derivatives. Density functional study of prototypical radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Teodorico C; Bühl, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The 15N chemical shifts of metronidazole (1), secnidazole (2), nimorazole (3) and tinidazole (4), radiosensitizers based on the 5-nitroimidazole motif, are reported. A detailed computational study of 1 is presented, calling special attention to the performance of various theoretical methods in reproducing the 13C and 15N data observed in solution. The most sophisticated approach involves density functional-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations (CPMD) of 1 in aqueous solution (BP86 level) and averaging chemical shifts over snapshots from the trajectory. In the NMR calculations for these snapshots (performed at the B3LYP level), a small number of discrete water molecules are retained, and the remaining bulk solution effects are included via a polarizable continuum model (PCM). A similarly good accord with experiment is obtained from much less involved, static geometry optimization and NMR computation of pristine 1 employing a PCM approach. Solvent effects on delta(15N), which are of the order of up to 20 ppm, are not due to changes in geometric parameters upon solvation, but arise from the direct response of the electronic wavefunction to the presence of the solvent, which can be represented by discrete molecules and/or the dielectric bulk. PMID:15558660

  17. An ionically tagged water-soluble artificial enzyme promotes the dephosphorylation reaction with nitroimidazole: enhanced ionic liquid effect and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, José G L; Ramos, Luciana M; de Oliveira, Aline L; Orth, Elisa S; Neto, Brenno A D

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel synthesized ionically tagged water-soluble artificial enzyme (PI) that can efficiently cleave phosphate esters, with enhanced an ionic liquid effect through cooperative effects for the substrate activation and further nucleophilic reaction. The dephosphorylation reaction with PI was evaluated in the presence and absence of 2-methyl-4(5)-nitroimidazole, showing impressive rate enhancements of up to 2 × 10(6)-fold, ascribed to the imidazolide species known as excellent nucleophiles, and formed favorably at lower pH values in the presence of PI.

  18. Hypoxia in paradise: widespread hypoxia tolerance in coral reef fishes.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Göran E; Ostlund-Nilsson, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Using respirometry, we examined the hypoxia tolerance of 31 teleost fish species (seven families) inhabiting coral reefs at a 2-5 m depth in the lagoon at Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia). All fishes studied maintained their rate of oxygen consumption down to relatively severe hypoxia (20-30% air saturation). Indeed, most fishes appeared unaffected by hypoxia until the oxygen level fell below 10% of air saturation. This, hitherto unrecognized, hypoxia tolerance among coral reef fishes could reflect adaptations to nocturnal hypoxia in tide pools. It may also be needed to enable fishes to reside deep within branching coral at night to avoid predation. Widespread hypoxia tolerance in a habitat with such an extreme biodiversity as coral reefs indicate that there is a wealth of hypoxia related adaptations to be discovered in reef fishes. PMID:15101411

  19. Antitrypanosomal activity of fexinidazole, a new oral nitroimidazole drug candidate for treatment of sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Marcel; Bray, Michael A; Cal, Monica; Bourdin Trunz, Bernadette; Torreele, Els; Brun, Reto

    2011-12-01

    Fexinidazole is a 5-nitroimidazole drug currently in clinical development for the treatment of human sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis [HAT]), caused by infection with species of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The compound and its two principal metabolites, sulfoxide and sulfone, have been assessed for their ability to kill a range of T. brucei parasite strains in vitro and to cure both acute and chronic HAT disease models in the mouse. The parent molecule and both metabolites have shown trypanocidal activity in vitro in the 0.7-to-3.3 μM (0.2-to-0.9 μg/ml) range against all parasite strains tested. In vivo, fexinidazole is orally effective in curing both acute and chronic diseases in the mouse at doses of 100 mg/kg of body weight/day for 4 days and 200 mg/kg/day for 5 days, respectively. Pharmacokinetic data indicate that it is likely that the sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites provide most, if not all, of the in vivo killing activity. Fexinidazole and its metabolites require up to 48 h exposure in order to induce maximal trypanocidal efficacy in vitro. The parent drug and its metabolites show no in vitro cross-reactivity in terms of trypanocidal activity with either themselves or other known trypanocidal drugs in use in humans. The in vitro and in vivo antitrypanosomal activities of fexinidazole and its two principal metabolites provide evidence that the compound has the potential to be an effective oral treatment for both the T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense forms of human sleeping sickness and both stages of the disease.

  20. Use of Molecular Imaging Markers of Glycolysis, Hypoxia and Proliferation (18F-FDG, 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FLT) in a Dog with Fibrosarcoma: The Importance of Individualized Treatment Planning and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zornhagen, Kamilla Westarp; Clausen, Malene M.; Hansen, Anders E.; Law, Ian; McEvoy, Fintan J.; Engelholm, Svend A.; Kjær, Andreas; Kristensen, Annemarie T.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolysis, hypoxia, and proliferation are important factors in the tumor microenvironment contributing to treatment-resistant aggressiveness. Imaging these factors using combined functional positron emission tomography and computed tomography can potentially guide diagnosis and management of cancer patients. A dog with fibrosarcoma was imaged using 18F-FDG, 64Cu-ATSM, and 18F-FLT before, during, and after 10 fractions of 4.5 Gy radiotherapy. Uptake of all tracers decreased during treatment. Fluctuations in 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET uptakes and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of the three tracers were seen. Tracer distributions partially overlapped. It appears that each tracer provides distinct information about tumor heterogeneity and treatment response. PMID:26854160

  1. Use of Molecular Imaging Markers of Glycolysis, Hypoxia and Proliferation ((18)F-FDG, (64)Cu-ATSM and (18)F-FLT) in a Dog with Fibrosarcoma: The Importance of Individualized Treatment Planning and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zornhagen, Kamilla Westarp; Clausen, Malene M; Hansen, Anders E; Law, Ian; McEvoy, Fintan J; Engelholm, Svend A; Kjær, Andreas; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2015-01-01

    Glycolysis, hypoxia, and proliferation are important factors in the tumor microenvironment contributing to treatment-resistant aggressiveness. Imaging these factors using combined functional positron emission tomography and computed tomography can potentially guide diagnosis and management of cancer patients. A dog with fibrosarcoma was imaged using (18)F-FDG, (64)Cu-ATSM, and (18)F-FLT before, during, and after 10 fractions of 4.5 Gy radiotherapy. Uptake of all tracers decreased during treatment. Fluctuations in (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT PET uptakes and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of the three tracers were seen. Tracer distributions partially overlapped. It appears that each tracer provides distinct information about tumor heterogeneity and treatment response. PMID:26854160

  2. No Detectable Hypoxia in Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wijffels, Karien; Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Lok, Jasper; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Wilde, Peter C.M. de; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is detected in most solid tumors and is associated with malignant progression and adverse treatment outcomes. However, the oxygenation status of malignant salivary gland tumors has not been previously studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential clinical relevance of hypoxia in this tumor type. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients scheduled for surgical resection of a salivary gland tumor were preoperatively injected with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the proliferation marker iododeoxyuridine. Tissue samples of the dissected tumor were immunohistochemically stained for blood vessels, pimonidazole, carbonic anhydrase-IX, glucose transporters-1 and -3 (Glut-1, Glut-3), hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}, iododeoxyuridine, and epidermal growth factor receptor. The tissue sections were quantitatively assessed by computerized image analysis. Results: The tissue material from 8 patients was of sufficient quality for quantitative analysis. All tumors were negative for pimonidazole binding, as well as for carbonic anhydrase-IX, Glut-1, Glut-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}. The vascular density was high, with a median value of 285 mm{sup -2} (range, 209-546). The iododeoxyuridine-labeling index varied from <0.1% to 12.2% (median, 2.2%). Epidermal growth factor receptor expression levels were mostly moderate to high. In one-half of the cases, nuclear expression of epidermal growth factor receptor was observed. Conclusion: The absence of detectable pimonidazole binding, as well as the lack of expression of hypoxia-associated proteins in all tumors, indicates that malignant salivary gland tumors are generally well oxygenated. It is unlikely that hypoxia is a relevant factor for their clinical behavior and treatment responsiveness.

  3. HypoxiaDB: a database of hypoxia-regulated proteins.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Pankaj; Sugadev, Ragumani; Jain, Jaspreet; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2013-01-01

    There has been intense interest in the cellular response to hypoxia, and a large number of differentially expressed proteins have been identified through various high-throughput experiments. These valuable data are scattered, and there have been no systematic attempts to document the various proteins regulated by hypoxia. Compilation, curation and annotation of these data are important in deciphering their role in hypoxia and hypoxia-related disorders. Therefore, we have compiled HypoxiaDB, a database of hypoxia-regulated proteins. It is a comprehensive, manually-curated, non-redundant catalog of proteins whose expressions are shown experimentally to be altered at different levels and durations of hypoxia. The database currently contains 72 000 manually curated entries taken on 3500 proteins extracted from 73 peer-reviewed publications selected from PubMed. HypoxiaDB is distinctive from other generalized databases: (i) it compiles tissue-specific protein expression changes under different levels and duration of hypoxia. Also, it provides manually curated literature references to support the inclusion of the protein in the database and establish its association with hypoxia. (ii) For each protein, HypoxiaDB integrates data on gene ontology, KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway, protein-protein interactions, protein family (Pfam), OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PDB (Protein Data Bank) structures and homology to other sequenced genomes. (iii) It also provides pre-compiled information on hypoxia-proteins, which otherwise requires tedious computational analysis. This includes information like chromosomal location, identifiers like Entrez, HGNC, Unigene, Uniprot, Ensembl, Vega, GI numbers and Genbank accession numbers associated with the protein. These are further cross-linked to respective public databases augmenting HypoxiaDB to the external repositories. (iv) In addition, HypoxiaDB provides an online sequence-similarity search tool for

  4. Preparation and characterization of a molecularly imprinted monolithic column for pressure-assisted CEC separation of nitroimidazole drugs.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sulan; Wang, Xiaochun; Lin, Xucong; Xie, Zenghong

    2010-08-01

    A polymethacrylate-based molecularly imprinted monolithic column bearing mixed functional monomers, using non-covalent imprinting approach, was designed for the rapid separation of nitroimidazole compounds. The new monolithic column has been prepared via simple in situ polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate, using (S)-ornidazole ((S)-ONZ) as template in a binary porogenic mixture consisting of toluene and dodecanol. The composition of the polymerization mixture was systematically altered and optimized by altering the amount of monomers as well as the composition of the porogenic solvent. The column performance was evaluated in pressure-assisted CEC mode. Separation conditions such as pH, voltage, amount of organic modifier and salt concentration were studied. The optimized monolithic column resulted in excellent separation of a group of structurally related nitroimidazole drugs within 10 min in isocratic elution condition. Column efficiencies of 99 000, 80 000, 103 000, 60 000 and 99 000 plates/m were obtained for metronidazole, secnidazole, ronidazole, tinidazole and dimetridazole, respectively. Parallel experiments were carried out using molecularly imprinted and non-imprinted capillary columns. The separation might be the result of combined effects including hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and the imprinting cavities on the (S)-ONZ-imprinted monolithic column. PMID:20661943

  5. Design, synthesis and antimicrobial activities of nitroimidazole derivatives containing 1,3,4-oxadiazole scaffold as FabH inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Luo, Yin; Hu, Yang; Zhu, Di-Di; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Jun; Gong, Hai-Bin; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2012-07-15

    Nitroimidazoles and their derivatives have drawn continuing interest over the years because of their varied biological activities, recently found application in drug development for antimicrobial chemotherapeutics and antiangiogenic hypoxic cell radiosensitizers. In order to search for novel antibacterial agents, we designed and synthesized a series of secnidazole analogs based on oxadiazole scaffold (4-21). Among these compounds, 4 and 7-21 were reported for the first time. These compounds were tested for antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. This new nitroimidazole derivatives class demonstrated strong antibacterial activities. Escherichia coli β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) inhibitory assay and docking simulation indicated that the compounds 2-(2-methoxyphenyl)-5-((2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (11) with MIC of 1.56-3.13 μg/mL against the tested bacterial strains and 2-((2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)-5-(2-methylbenzyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (12) with MIC of 1.56-6.25 μg/mL were most potent inhibitors of Escherichia coli FabH. PMID:22710102

  6. Determination of nitroimidazole residues in aquaculture tissue using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gadaj, Anna; di Lullo, Valentina; Cantwell, Helen; McCormack, Martin; Furey, Ambrose; Danaher, Martin

    2014-06-01

    An UHPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the quantitative confirmatory analysis of residues of nitroimidazole drugs (dimetridazole, ipronidazole, metronidazole, ornidazole and ronidazole) and their corresponding hydroxy metabolites (HMMNI, ipronidazile-OH and metronidazole-OH) in aquaculture tissue. Samples were extracted by shaking in acetonitrile, water, MgSO4 and NaCl before being defatted with n-hexane pre-saturated with acetonitrile and concentrated under nitrogen. Nitroimidazole residues were determined by UHPLC-MS/MS operating in positive electrospray ionisation mode using a reversed phase BEH C18 column. The method was validated according to the EU Commission Decision 2002/657/EC guidelines. The following performance studies were carried out: specificity, selectivity, linearity, within laboratory repeatability (WLr)/reproducibility (WLR), accuracy, precision, decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), absolute recovery and stability. The analytical range of the method is 0.1-20 μg kg(-1). Accuracy and precision of the method, under within-laboratory reproducibility conditions, ranged from 83 to 105% and 2.3 to 14.0%, respectively. CCα were 0.07-1.0 μg kg(-1) depending on analyte and matrix. A total of 50 samples can be analysed in a single day using the assay. The method has been extensively evaluated through application to real test samples.

  7. Correlating hypoxia with insulin secretion using a fluorescent hypoxia detection system.

    PubMed

    Skiles, Matthew L; Fancy, Romone; Topiwala, Pritesh; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O

    2011-04-01

    A common obstacle to the survival of encapsulated tissue is oxygen insufficiency. This appears particularly true of encapsulated pancreatic β-cells. Our work investigates a fluorescent hypoxia detection system for early recognition of hypoxic stress in encapsulated pancreatic tissue. Murine insulinoma (MIN6) cells were engineered to produce a red fluorescent protein under the control of hypoxia-inducible-factor-1. Aggregates of these cells were encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels at densities of 200,000, 600,000, and 1 million cells per capsule then incubated in either a 1% or 20% oxygen environment. Cell function was evaluated by daily measurement of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Encapsulated cells were also fluorescently imaged periodically over 72 h for expression of the marker signal. Results indicate that oxygen insufficiency severely impacts insulin release from MIN6 cells, and that large aggregates are especially vulnerable to oxygen limitations. Our marker was found to be successfully indicative of hypoxia and could be used as a predictor of subsequent insulin release. Further work will be required to fully characterize signal dynamics and to evaluate in vivo efficacy. The method presented here represents a unique and valuable approach to detecting hypoxic stress in living tissues which may prove useful to a variety of fields of biological research.

  8. Determination of three nitroimidazoles in rabbit plasma by two-step stacking in capillary zone electrophoresis featuring sweeping and micelle to solvent stacking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiupei; Cheng, Xiumei; Lin, Yingyun; Tan, Zhijing; Xie, Linxiang; Choi, Martin M F

    2014-01-17

    This study reports a sweeping and micelle to solvent stacking (MSS) method for fast stacking of nitroimidazoles in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The optimal experimental conditions are run buffer of 25mM sodium phosphate (pH 1.5) and 0.50% (v/v) methanol, micellar solution of 30mM sodium dodecyl sulfate, applied voltage of 28kV, and sample and micellar solution injection of 100s. By applying this new on-line preconcentration technique, the nitroimidazoles content can be determined within 9min with the limit of detection (S/N=3) ranging 2.3-3.0ng/mL, which is lower than that of conventional CZE analysis. The proposed MSS technique affords 20-, 12- and 38-fold improvements in sensitivity for the detection of dimetridazole, metronidazole and secnidazole, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intra-day and inter-day are 2.1-3.6% and 2.7-4.6% (n=6), respectively. The recoveries in pretreated rabbit plasma at spiked levels of 5.0-10.0μg/mL are 92.0-101.1% with RSDs lower than 3.4%. The proposed sweeping and MSS-CZE is a highly sensitive method for the detection of nitroimidazoles in biological and clinical samples and has been successfully applied to analyze nitroimidazoles in pretreated rabbit plasma. PMID:24359723

  9. Lactase gene transcription is activated in response to hypoxia in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Young; Madan, Ashima; Furuta, Glenn T; Colgan, Sean P; Sibley, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, a brush-border membrane disaccharidase, is a marker of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation and digestive function. The intestine is susceptible to conditions of hypoxia resulting from vascular perfusion deficits. We hypothesized that lactase gene induction may provide a mechanism to efficiently increase nutrient energy substrates during gut hypoxia. These studies sought to characterize expression of the lactase gene in response to hypoxia and to characterize a role for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) in mediating the hypoxic response. Microarray analysis and confirmatory RT-PCR identified a 4-fold induction of lactase mRNA abundance in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells exposed to hypoxia. Lactase promoter activity was similarly induced by hypoxia in cells stably transfected with a 2.0-kb 5' flanking region of the rat lactase gene linked to a reporter gene. Transient cotransfection with HIF-1alpha and beta stimulated lactase promoter activity 2.4- and 3.5-fold under conditions of normoxia and hypoxia, respectively. We conclude that HIF-1 can activate the lactase promoter in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to hypoxia. Induction of lactase transcription may represent an adaptive response to gut hypoxia.

  10. Hypoxia and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jankovic Velickovic, Ljubinka; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2014-05-01

    This review mainly focuses on our understanding of spermatogenesis in physiological and pathological hypoxic condition. Real hypoxia is closely related to vascular changes and an increase in testicular temperature. Both induce a reduction in sperm count and can be related to the increase in germ cell apoptosis. On the other hand, change in the temperature, and oxygen levels in the microenvironment have influence on spermatogonial stem cell function and differentiation. The initial connection between hypoxia and a factor critical for stem cell maintenance is alteration in Oct-4 expression, and these data may be a useful strategy for modulating stem cell function. Unilateral testicular ischemia-induced cell death can be accompanied by an increase in germ cell apoptosis in the contralateral testis. The injury of contralateral testis following unilateral testicular damage is controversial, and it can contribute to the reduction in fertility. PMID:24265038

  11. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors. PMID:25997947

  12. Hypoxia and fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Arai, Takatomo; Kanai, Mai; Goda, Nobuhito

    2014-11-01

    The liver is a central organ that metabolizes excessive nutrients for storage in the form of glycogen and lipids and supplies energy-producing substrates to the peripheral tissues to maintain their function, even under starved conditions. These processes require a considerable amount of oxygen, which causes a steep oxygen gradient throughout the hepatic lobules. Alcohol consumption and/or excessive food intake can alter the hepatic metabolic balance drastically, which can precipitate fatty liver disease, a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis, through steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis, to liver cirrhosis. Altered hepatic metabolism and tissue remodeling in fatty liver disease further disrupt hepatic oxygen homeostasis, resulting in severe liver hypoxia. As master regulators of adaptive responses to hypoxic stress, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) modulate various cellular and organ functions, including erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, metabolic demand, and cell survival, by activating their target genes during fetal development and also in many disease conditions such as cancer, heart failure, and diabetes. In the past decade, it has become clear that HIFs serve as key factors in the regulation of lipid metabolism and fatty liver formation. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia and HIFs regulate lipid metabolism in the development and progression of fatty liver disease. PMID:25386057

  13. Hypoxia and fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, A J; Zhang, L

    2010-10-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although "normal" hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart's development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation.

  14. Rapid confirmatory method for the determination of 11 nitroimidazoles in egg using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cronly, Mark; Behan, Patrice; Foley, Barry; Malone, Edward; Regan, Liam

    2009-11-13

    A rapid confirmatory method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous identification, confirmation and quantitation of 11 nitroimidazoles in eggs by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The method is validated in accordance with Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and is capable of analysing metronidazole (MNZ), dimetridazole (DMZ), ronidazole (RNZ), ipronidazole (IPZ) and their hydroxy metabolites MNZ-OH, HMMNI (hydroxymethyl, methyl nitroimidazole), IPZ-OH. The method is also capable of analysing carnidazole (CRZ), ornidazole (ORZ), tinidazole (TNZ) and ternidazole (TRZ). MNZ, DMZ and RNZ have been assigned a recommended level (RL) of 3 microg kg(-1) by the Community Reference Laboratory (CRL) in Berlin. The developed method described in this study is easily able to detect all the nitroimidazole compounds investigated at this level and below. Egg samples are extracted with acetonitrile, and NaCl is added to help remove matrix contaminants. The acetonitrile extract undergoes a liquid-liquid wash step with hexane; it is then evaporated and reconstituted in mobile phase. The reconstituted samples are analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The decision limits (CCalpha) range from 0.33 to 1.26 microg kg(-1) and the detection capabilities (CCbeta), range from 0.56 to 2.15 microg kg(-1). The results of the in ter-assay study, which was performed by fortifying hen egg samples (n=18) on three separate days, show the accuracy calculated for the various analytes to range between 87.2 and 106.2%. The precision of the method, expressed as %CV values for the inter-assay variation of each analyte at the three levels of fortification (3, 4.5 and 6.0 microg kg(-1)), ranged between 3.7 and 11.3%. A Day 4 analysis was carried out to examine species variances in eggs from different birds such as duck and quail and investigating differences in various battery and free range hen eggs.

  15. Temporal Onset of Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress After Pulmonary Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fleckenstein, Katharina; Zgonjanin, Larisa; Chen Liguang; Rabbani, Zahid; Jackson, Isabel L.; Thrasher, Bradley; Kirkpatrick, John; Foster, W. Michael; Vujaskovic, Zeljko . E-mail: vujas@radonc.duke.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the temporal onset of hypoxia following irradiation, and to show how it relates to pulmonary vascular damage, macrophage accumulation, and the production of reactive oxygen species and cytokines. Our previous studies showed that tissue hypoxia in the lung after irradiation contributed to radiation-induced injury. Methods and Materials: Female Fisher 344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax with a single dose of 28 Gy. Serial studies were performed up to 20 weeks following irradiation. Radionuclide lung-perfusion studies were performed to detect changes in pulmonary vasculature. Immunohistochemical studies were conducted to study macrophages, tissue hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase-9 marker), oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and the expression of profibrogenic (transforming growth factor-{beta} [TGF-{beta}]) and proangiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) cytokines. Results: Significant changes in lung perfusion along with tissue hypoxia were observed 3 days after irradiation. Significant oxidative stress was detected 1 week after radiation, whereas macrophages started to accumulate at 4 weeks. A significant increase in TGF-{beta} expression was seen within 1 day after radiation, and for VEGF at 2 weeks after radiation. Levels of hypoxia, oxidative stress, and both cytokines continued to rise with time after irradiation. The steepest increase correlated with vast macrophage accumulation. Conclusions: Early changes in lung perfusion, among other factors initiate, the development of hypoxia and chronic oxidative stress after irradiation. Tissue hypoxia is associated with a significant increase in the activation of macrophages and their continuous production of reactive oxygen species, stimulating the production of fibrogenic and angiogenic cytokines, and maintaining the development of chronic radiation-induced lung injury.

  16. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  17. Contribution of the nitroimidazoles PA-824 and TBA-354 to the activity of novel regimens in murine models of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tasneen, Rokeya; Williams, Kathy; Amoabeng, Opokua; Minkowski, Austin; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E; Upton, Anna M; Nuermberger, Eric L

    2015-01-01

    New regimens based on two or more novel agents are sought in order to shorten or simplify the treatment of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. PA-824 is a nitroimidazo-oxazine now in phase II trials and has shown significant early bactericidal activity alone and in combination with the newly approved agent bedaquiline or with pyrazinamide with or without moxifloxacin. While the development of PA-824 continues, a potential next-generation derivative, TBA-354, has been discovered to have in vitro potency superior to that of PA-824 and greater metabolic stability than that of the other nitroimidazole derivative in clinical development, delamanid. In the present study, we compared the activities of PA-824 and TBA-354 as monotherapies in murine models of the initial intensive and continuation phases of treatment, as well as in combination with bedaquiline plus pyrazinamide, sutezolid, and/or clofazimine. The monotherapy studies demonstrated that TBA-354 is 5 to 10 times more potent than PA-824, but selected mutants are cross-resistant to PA-824 and delamanid. The combination studies revealed that TBA-354 is 2 to 4 times more potent than PA-824 when combined with bedaquiline, and when administered at a dose equivalent to that of PA-824, TBA-354 demonstrated superior sterilizing efficacy. Perhaps most importantly, the addition of either nitroimidazole significantly improved the sterilizing activities of bedaquiline and sutezolid, with or without pyrazinamide, confirming the value of each agent in this potentially universally active short-course regimen.

  18. Contribution of the Nitroimidazoles PA-824 and TBA-354 to the Activity of Novel Regimens in Murine Models of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tasneen, Rokeya; Williams, Kathy; Amoabeng, Opokua; Minkowski, Austin; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E.; Upton, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    New regimens based on two or more novel agents are sought in order to shorten or simplify the treatment of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. PA-824 is a nitroimidazo-oxazine now in phase II trials and has shown significant early bactericidal activity alone and in combination with the newly approved agent bedaquiline or with pyrazinamide with or without moxifloxacin. While the development of PA-824 continues, a potential next-generation derivative, TBA-354, has been discovered to have in vitro potency superior to that of PA-824 and greater metabolic stability than that of the other nitroimidazole derivative in clinical development, delamanid. In the present study, we compared the activities of PA-824 and TBA-354 as monotherapies in murine models of the initial intensive and continuation phases of treatment, as well as in combination with bedaquiline plus pyrazinamide, sutezolid, and/or clofazimine. The monotherapy studies demonstrated that TBA-354 is 5 to 10 times more potent than PA-824, but selected mutants are cross-resistant to PA-824 and delamanid. The combination studies revealed that TBA-354 is 2 to 4 times more potent than PA-824 when combined with bedaquiline, and when administered at a dose equivalent to that of PA-824, TBA-354 demonstrated superior sterilizing efficacy. Perhaps most importantly, the addition of either nitroimidazole significantly improved the sterilizing activities of bedaquiline and sutezolid, with or without pyrazinamide, confirming the value of each agent in this potentially universally active short-course regimen. PMID:25331697

  19. [Endogenous ethanol in the blood and tissues of rats with hypobaric hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Iu A; Ostrovskiĭ, Iu M; Satanovskaia, V I; Liopo, A V; Velichko, M G; Abakumov, G Z

    1989-01-01

    Albino male rats weighing 160-180 g were used to study the effect of short-term hypobaric hypoxia (ascent in an altitude chamber to 2500 m and 5000 m for 1 hr) on endogenous ethanol measured in blood, brain and liver; simultaneously enzymes responsible for ethanol and acetaldehyde metabolism were determined. Endogenous ethanol in blood and tissues was found to be a very sensitive marker of hypoxia which was not correlated with lactate, pyruvate, lipid peroxidation or 11-hydroxycorticosteroids. The latter parameters varied in response to severe hypoxia.

  20. The expanding universe of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huafeng; Semenza, Gregg L

    2008-07-01

    Reduced oxygen availability (hypoxia) is sensed and transduced into changes in the activity or expression of cellular macromolecules. These responses impact on virtually all areas of biology and medicine. In this meeting report, we summarize major developments in the field that were presented at the 2008 Keystone Symposium on Cellular, Physiological, and Pathogenic Responses to Hypoxia.

  1. Characterization of the expression of the hypoxia-induced genes neuritin, TXNIP and IGFBP3 in cancer.

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Sébastien; Le Meur, Nolwenn; Cazes, Aurélie; Philippe, Josette; Le Cunff, Martine; Léger, Jean; Corvol, Pierre; Germain, Stéphane

    2006-06-12

    By triggering an adaptive response to hypoxia which is a common feature of tumor microenvironments, endothelial cells contribute to the onset of angiogenic responses involved in tumor growth. Therefore, identifying hypoxic markers represent a challenge for a better understanding of tumor angiogenesis and for the optimization of anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategy. Using representational difference analysis combined with microarray, we here report the identification of 133 hypoxia-induced transcripts in human microendothelial cells (HMEC-1). By Northern blot, we confirm hypoxia-induced expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (igfbp3), thioredoxin-interacting protein (txnip), neuritin (nrn1). Finally, by performing in situ hybridization on several types of human tumors, we provide evidence for nrn1 and txnip as hypoxic perinecrotic markers and for igfbp3 as a tumor endothelial marker. We propose these hypoxia-induced genes could represent relevant prognostic tools and targets for therapeutic intervention in cancers. PMID:16723126

  2. Role of catalase on the hypoxia/reoxygenation stress in the hypoxia-tolerant Nile tilapia.

    PubMed

    Welker, Alexis F; Campos, Elida G; Cardoso, Luciano A; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2012-05-01

    The specific contribution of each antioxidant enzyme to protection against the reoxygenation-associated oxidative stress after periods of hypoxia is not well understood. We assessed the physiological role of catalase during posthypoxic reoxygenation by the combination of two approaches. First, catalase activity of Nile tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus) was 90% suppressed by intraperitoneal injection of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATZ, 1g/kg). In ATZ-injected fish, liver GSH levels, oxidative stress markers, and activities of other antioxidant enzymes remained unchanged. Second, animals with depleted catalase activity (or those saline-injected) were subjected to a cycle of severe hypoxia (dissolved O(2) = 0.28 mg/l for 3 h) followed by reoxygenation (0.5 to 24 h). Hypoxia did not induce changes in the above-mentioned parameters, either in saline- or in ATZ-injected animals. Reoxygenation increased superoxide dismutase activity in saline-injected fish, whose levels were similar to ATZ-injected animals. The activities of glutathione S-transferase, selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and total-GPX and the levels of GSH-eq, GSSG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances remained unchanged during reoxygenation in both saline- and ATZ-injected fish. The GSSG/GSH-eq ratio in ATZ-injected fish increased at 30 min of reoxygenation compared with saline-injected ones. Reoxygenation also increased carbonyl protein levels in saline-injected fish, whose levels were similar to the ATZ-injected group. Our work shows that inhibition of liver tilapia catalase causes a redox imbalance during reoxygenation, which is insufficient to induce further oxidative stress. This indicates the relevance of hepatic catalase for hypoxia/reoxygenation stress in tilapia fish. PMID:22378777

  3. Validation of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and quantification of 5-nitroimidazole drugs and their corresponding hydroxy metabolites in lyophilised pork meat.

    PubMed

    Zeleny, Reinhard; Harbeck, Stefan; Schimmel, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous detection and quantitation of 5-nitroimidazole veterinary drugs in lyophilised pork meat, the chosen format of a candidate certified reference material, has been developed and validated. Six analytes have been included in the scope of validation, i.e. dimetridazole (DMZ), metronidazole (MNZ), ronidazole (RNZ), hydroxymetronidazole (MNZOH), hydroxyipronidazole (IPZOH), and 2-hydroxymethyl-1-methyl-5-nitroimidazole (HMMNI). The analytes were extracted from the sample with ethyl acetate, chromatographically separated on a C(18) column, and finally identified and quantified by tandem mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM) using matrix-matched calibration and (2)H(3)-labelled analogues of the analytes (except for MNZOH, where [(2)H(3)]MNZ was used). The method was validated in accordance with Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, by determining selectivity, linearity, matrix effect, apparent recovery, repeatability and intermediate precision, decision limits and detection capabilities, robustness of sample preparation method, and stability of extracts. Recovery at 1 microg/kg level was at 100% (estimates in the range of 101-107%) for all analytes, repeatabilities and intermediate precisions at this level were in the range of 4-12% and 2-9%, respectively. Linearity of calibration curves in the working range 0.5-10 microg/kg was confirmed, with r values typically >0.99. Decision limits (CCalpha) and detection capabilities (CCbeta) according to ISO 11843-2 (calibration curve approach) were 0.29-0.44 and 0.36-0.54 microg/kg, respectively. The method reliably identifies and quantifies the selected nitroimidazoles in the reconstituted pork meat in the low and sub-microg/kg range and will be applied in an interlaboratory comparison for determining the mass fraction of the selected nitroimidazoles in the candidate reference material currently developed at

  4. Microneedle-array patches loaded with hypoxia-sensitive vesicles provide fast glucose-responsive insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Ye, Yanqi; DiSanto, Rocco; Sun, Wujin; Ranson, Davis; Ligler, Frances S; Buse, John B; Gu, Zhen

    2015-07-01

    A glucose-responsive "closed-loop" insulin delivery system mimicking the function of pancreatic cells has tremendous potential to improve quality of life and health in diabetics. Here, we report a novel glucose-responsive insulin delivery device using a painless microneedle-array patch ("smart insulin patch") containing glucose-responsive vesicles (GRVs; with an average diameter of 118 nm), which are loaded with insulin and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme. The GRVs are self-assembled from hypoxia-sensitive hyaluronic acid (HS-HA) conjugated with 2-nitroimidazole (NI), a hydrophobic component that can be converted to hydrophilic 2-aminoimidazoles through bioreduction under hypoxic conditions. The local hypoxic microenvironment caused by the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in the hyperglycemic state promotes the reduction of HS-HA, which rapidly triggers the dissociation of vesicles and subsequent release of insulin. The smart insulin patch effectively regulated the blood glucose in a mouse model of chemically induced type 1 diabetes. The described work is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of a synthetic glucose-responsive device using a hypoxia trigger for regulation of insulin release. The faster responsiveness of this approach holds promise in avoiding hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia if translated for human therapy. PMID:26100900

  5. Microneedle-array patches loaded with hypoxia-sensitive vesicles provide fast glucose-responsive insulin delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Ye, Yanqi; DiSanto, Rocco; Sun, Wujin; Ranson, Davis; Ligler, Frances S.; Buse, John B.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    A glucose-responsive “closed-loop” insulin delivery system mimicking the function of pancreatic cells has tremendous potential to improve quality of life and health in diabetics. Here, we report a novel glucose-responsive insulin delivery device using a painless microneedle-array patch (“smart insulin patch”) containing glucose-responsive vesicles (GRVs; with an average diameter of 118 nm), which are loaded with insulin and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme. The GRVs are self-assembled from hypoxia-sensitive hyaluronic acid (HS-HA) conjugated with 2-nitroimidazole (NI), a hydrophobic component that can be converted to hydrophilic 2-aminoimidazoles through bioreduction under hypoxic conditions. The local hypoxic microenvironment caused by the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in the hyperglycemic state promotes the reduction of HS-HA, which rapidly triggers the dissociation of vesicles and subsequent release of insulin. The smart insulin patch effectively regulated the blood glucose in a mouse model of chemically induced type 1 diabetes. The described work is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of a synthetic glucose-responsive device using a hypoxia trigger for regulation of insulin release. The faster responsiveness of this approach holds promise in avoiding hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia if translated for human therapy. PMID:26100900

  6. Isolation and characterization of 2-nitroimidazole produced by Streptomyces species as an inhibitor of both carbonic anhydrase and shell formation in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Mari; Ozaki, Noriaki; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Furihata, Keiko; Hayakawa, Yoichi; Sakuda, Shohei; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2002-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase is thought to be involved in the process of calcium carbonate deposition in calcified tissues of many organisms. Barnacles form hard calcified shells for protection against predation, and represent a class of marine-fouling animals. In order to inhibit barnacle growth by inhibiting shell formation, we searched for carbonic anhydrase inhibitors from microbial secondary metabolites. A simple assay for assessing carbonic-anhydrase-inhibiting activity was developed. Screening of many microorganisms isolated from soil with this assay resulted in a microbial strain that produced a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. This strain was identified as Streptomyces eurocidicus mf294. The inhibitor was isolated through 4 purification steps and identified as 2-nitroimidazole on the basis of spectroscopic data. 2-Nitroimidazole inhibited barnacle carbonic anhydrase dose-dependently and complete inhibition was reached at the concentration of 1 x 10(-5) M. 2-Nitroimidazole did not affect settlement or metamorphosis of barnacle larvae, but inhibited shell formation at concentrations higher than 1 x 10(-4) M. These findings strongly support the idea that carbonic anhydrase is involved in calcification.

  7. Expression of miR-210 in relation to other measures of hypoxia and prediction of benefit from hypoxia modification in patients with bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irlam-Jones, J J; Eustace, A; Denley, H; Choudhury, A; Harris, A L; Hoskin, P J; West, C M L

    2016-01-01

    Background: The addition of hypoxia modifiers carbogen and nicotinamide (CON) to radiotherapy (RT) improved overall survival (OS) in bladder cancer patients in the BCON phase III clinical trial. We investigate whether expression of hsa-miR-210 in BCON patient samples reflects hypoxia and predicts benefit from hypoxia modification. Methods: In all, 183 T1–T4a bladder cancer samples were available for miR-210 analysis. A total of 86 received RT+CON and 97 received RT alone. TaqMan qPCR plates were used to assess miR-210 expression. Patients were classified as low (hypoxia biomarkers were available for comparison. Results: Patients with high miR-210 had a trend towards improved 5-year OS with RT+CON (53.2%) compared with RT alone (37.8% hazard ratio (HR) 1.68, 95% CI 0.95–2.95, P=0.07). No benefit was seen with low miR-210 (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.58–1.79, P=0.97). High miR-210 was significantly associated with high HIF-1α protein (P=0.001), CA9 protein (P=0.0004), Glut-1 protein (P=0.001), 26-gene hypoxia score (P=0.007), tumour necrosis (P=0.02) and concurrent pTis (P=0.03). Conclusions: High miR-210 may reflect hypoxia in bladder cancer. However, its ability to predict benefit from hypoxia modification does not improve upon other hypoxia markers. Investigation as part of a miRNA hypoxia signature may reveal the full potential of miR-210. PMID:27441495

  8. Adipogenesis, lipogenesis and lipolysis is stimulated by mild but not severe hypoxia in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Weiszenstein, Martin; Musutova, Martina; Plihalova, Andrea; Westlake, Katerina; Elkalaf, Moustafa; Koc, Michal; Prochazka, Antonin; Pala, Jan; Gulati, Sumeet; Trnka, Jan; Polak, Jan

    2016-09-16

    In-vitro investigation of the effects of hypoxia is limited by physical laws of gas diffusion and cellular O2 consumption, making prolonged exposures to stable O2 concentrations impossible. Using a gas-permeable cultureware, chronic effects of mild and severe hypoxia on triglyceride accumulation, lipid droplet size distribution, spontaneous lipolysis and gene expression of adipocyte-specific markers were assessed. 3T3-L1 cells were differentiated under 20%, 4% or 1% O2 using a gas-permeable cultureware. Triglyceride accumulation, expression of genes characteristic for advanced adipocyte differentiation and involvement of key lipogenesis enzymes were assessed after exposures. Lipogenesis increased by 375% under mild hypoxia, but dropped by 43% in severe hypoxia. Mild, but not severe, hypoxia increased formation of large lipid droplets 6.4 fold and strongly induced gene expression of adipocyte-specific markers. Spontaneous lipolysis increased by 488% in mild, but only by 135% in severe hypoxia. Inhibition of ATP-dependent citrate lyase suppressed hypoxia-induced lipogenesis by 81% and 85%. Activation of HIF inhibited lipogenesis by 59%. Mild, but not severe, hypoxia stimulates lipolysis and promotes adipocyte differentiation, probably through excess of acetyl-CoA originating from tricarboxylic acid cycle independently of HIF activation.

  9. Adipogenesis, lipogenesis and lipolysis is stimulated by mild but not severe hypoxia in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Weiszenstein, Martin; Musutova, Martina; Plihalova, Andrea; Westlake, Katerina; Elkalaf, Moustafa; Koc, Michal; Prochazka, Antonin; Pala, Jan; Gulati, Sumeet; Trnka, Jan; Polak, Jan

    2016-09-16

    In-vitro investigation of the effects of hypoxia is limited by physical laws of gas diffusion and cellular O2 consumption, making prolonged exposures to stable O2 concentrations impossible. Using a gas-permeable cultureware, chronic effects of mild and severe hypoxia on triglyceride accumulation, lipid droplet size distribution, spontaneous lipolysis and gene expression of adipocyte-specific markers were assessed. 3T3-L1 cells were differentiated under 20%, 4% or 1% O2 using a gas-permeable cultureware. Triglyceride accumulation, expression of genes characteristic for advanced adipocyte differentiation and involvement of key lipogenesis enzymes were assessed after exposures. Lipogenesis increased by 375% under mild hypoxia, but dropped by 43% in severe hypoxia. Mild, but not severe, hypoxia increased formation of large lipid droplets 6.4 fold and strongly induced gene expression of adipocyte-specific markers. Spontaneous lipolysis increased by 488% in mild, but only by 135% in severe hypoxia. Inhibition of ATP-dependent citrate lyase suppressed hypoxia-induced lipogenesis by 81% and 85%. Activation of HIF inhibited lipogenesis by 59%. Mild, but not severe, hypoxia stimulates lipolysis and promotes adipocyte differentiation, probably through excess of acetyl-CoA originating from tricarboxylic acid cycle independently of HIF activation. PMID:27498031

  10. Lanthanum Probe Studies of Cellular Pathophysiology Induced by Hypoxia in Isolated Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Karen P.; Hagler, Herbert K.; Templeton, Gordon H.; Willerson, James T.; Buja, L. Maximilian

    1977-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate directly the relationship between evolution of irreversible myocardial injury induced by hypoxia in an isolated papillary muscle preparation and the development of pathophysiological alterations related to severely impaired membrane function. An ionic lanthanum probe technique was employed as a cytochemical marker to monitor the progression of cellular injury, and data from this cytologic technique were correlated with ultrastructure and measurements of contractile parameters in a total of 67 muscles subjected to control conditions or to graded intervals of hypoxia with or without reoxygenation. Marked depression of developed tension and rate of tension development occurred after 30 min of hypoxia. Contractile function showed significant recovery with reoxygenation after 1 h and 15 min of hypoxia but remained depressed when reoxygenation was provided after 2 or 3 h of hypoxia. Examination by transmission and analytical electron microscopy (energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis) revealed lanthanum deposition only in extracellular regions of control muscles and muscles subjected to 30 min of hypoxia. After hypoxic intervals of over 1 h, abnormal intracytoplasmic and intramitochondrial localization of lanthanum were detected. After 1 h and 15 min of hypoxia, abnormal intracellular lanthanum accumulation was associated with only minimal ultrastructural evidence of injury; muscle provided reoxygenation after 1 h and 15 min of hypoxia showed improved ultrastructure and did not exhibit intracellular lanthanum deposits upon exposure to lanthanum during the reoxygenation period. After 2 to 3 h of hypoxia, abnormal intracellular lanthanum accumulation was associated with ultrastructural evidence of severe muscle injury which persisted after reoxygenation. Thus, the data support the conclusion that cellular and membrane alterations responsible for abnormal intracellular lanthanum deposition precede the development of irreversible injury

  11. Development of a certified reference material for the content of nitroimidazole parent drugs and hydroxy metabolites in pork meat.

    PubMed

    Zeleny, R; Schimmel, H; Ulberth, F; Emons, H

    2009-02-23

    Nitroimidazoles have been applied in the past to poultry and pigs to treat protozoan diseases and to combat bacterial infections, but due to adverse health effects their use in food-producing animals has meanwhile been banned in the EU. The request for a certified reference material in a representative matrix was stipulated by the responsible Community Reference Laboratory and is underpinned by the need to improve the accuracy and comparability of measurement data and to establish metrological traceability of analytical results. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) has responded to this demand by developing and producing a new certified matrix reference material, ERM-BB124. This incurred lyophilised pork meat material was certified according to ISO guides 34 and 35 for the mass fractions of six nitroimidazole compounds. Processing of the frozen muscle tissue to the final material was accomplished by application of cutting, freeze-drying, mixing and milling techniques. Homogeneity and stability measurements were performed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The relative standard uncertainty due to possible heterogeneity showed to be below 1.8% for all analytes. Potential degradation during transport and storage was assessed by isochronous stability studies. No significant instability was detected at a storage temperature of -20 degrees C for a shelf-life of 2 years. The certified mass fraction values were assigned upon evaluation of the data acquired in an international laboratory inter-comparison involving 12 expert laboratories using different sample preparation procedures, but exclusively LC-MS/MS methods. Relative standard uncertainty contributions for the characterisation (between-lab variation of mean values) were found to be between 1.6 and 4.8%. Certified values for five analytes were in the range of 0.7 to 6.2 microg kg(-1), with expanded relative uncertainties ranging between 7 and 14%. Dimetridazole could be

  12. Hypoxia promotes thyroid differentiation of native murine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yipeng; Lu, Yunshu; Chen, Tong; Zhang, Shenglai; Chu, Bingfeng; Gong, Yurong; Zhao, Weixin; Zhu, Jian; Liu, Yingbin

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a very common hormonal deficiency and the stem cell technology which developed in the recent years may offer a therapeutic strategy for treating this disorder. Hypoxia has been demonstrated to play an important role in embryonic formation and development and to modulate stem cell differentiation. However, the influence of oxygen tension on thyroid differentiation has not been studied. In this study, we used murine induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for thyroid cell differentiation under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and compared differentiation efficiency in morphology, function, gene and protein expression under both conditions. We found that hypoxia promoted adhesion and outgrowth of embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from murine iPS cells. Expression of endodermal markers (Foxa2 and Gata4) and thyroid transcription factors (Pax8 and Nkx2.1) was increased by hypoxia at both gene and protein levels during early-mid differentiation stages (p<0.05). And so were the thyroid specific markers NIS and TSHR at the end of the experiment (p<0.05). In addition, functional iodide uptake by differentiated cells was also increased after hypoxia. Thyroid differentiation from iPS cells is enhanced under hypoxia and this may involve hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) and their downstream gene FGF2. Our data offer a foundation for understanding thyroid development and provide a potentially more efficient way to use cell therapy for treating thyroid deficiency. PMID:27389981

  13. Hypoxia and Hypoxia-Inducible Factors in Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Deynoux, Margaux; Sunter, Nicola; Hérault, Olivier; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Despite huge improvements in the treatment of leukemia, the percentage of patients suffering relapse still remains significant. Relapse most often results from a small number of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) within the bone marrow, which are able to self-renew, and therefore reestablish the full tumor. The marrow microenvironment contributes considerably in supporting the protection and development of leukemic cells. LSCs share specific niches with normal hematopoietic stem cells with the niche itself being composed of a variety of cell types, including mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, bone cells, immune cells, neuronal cells, and vascular cells. A hallmark of the hematopoietic niche is low oxygen partial pressure, indeed this hypoxia is necessary for the long-term maintenance of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Hypoxia is a strong signal, principally maintained by members of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family. In solid tumors, it has been well established that hypoxia triggers intrinsic metabolic changes and microenvironmental modifications, such as the stimulation of angiogenesis, through activation of HIFs. As leukemia is not considered a “solid” tumor, the role of oxygen in the disease was presumed to be inconsequential and remained long overlooked. This view has now been revised since hypoxia has been shown to influence leukemic cell proliferation, differentiation, and resistance to chemotherapy. However, the role of HIF proteins remains controversial with HIFs being considered as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, depending on the study and model. The purpose of this review is to highlight our knowledge of hypoxia and HIFs in leukemic development and therapeutic resistance and to discuss the recent hypoxia-based strategies proposed to eradicate leukemias. PMID:26955619

  14. Marker development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  15. Expanded therapeutic potential in activity space of next-generation 5-nitroimidazole antimicrobials with broad structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Kalisiak, Jaroslaw; Korthals, Keith; Lauwaet, Tineke; Cheung, Dae Young; Lozano, Ricardo; Cobo, Eduardo R; Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A; Berg, Douglas E; Gillin, Frances D; Fokin, Valery V; Sharpless, K Barry; Eckmann, Lars

    2013-10-22

    Metronidazole and other 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NI) are among the most effective antimicrobials available against many important anaerobic pathogens, but evolving resistance is threatening their long-term clinical utility. The common 5-NIs were developed decades ago, yet little 5-NI drug development has since taken place, leaving the true potential of this important drug class unexplored. Here we report on a unique approach to the modular synthesis of diversified 5-NIs for broad exploration of their antimicrobial potential. Many of the more than 650 synthesized compounds, carrying structurally diverse functional groups, have vastly improved activity against a range of microbes, including the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, and the bacterial pathogens Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile, and Bacteroides fragilis. Furthermore, they can overcome different forms of drug resistance, and are active and nontoxic in animal infection models. These findings provide impetus to the development of structurally diverse, next-generation 5-NI drugs as agents in the antimicrobial armamentarium, thus ensuring their future viability as primary therapeutic agents against many clinically important infections.

  16. High-throughput method for the determination of nitroimidazoles in muscle samples by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, A; Sans, G; Kumar, P; Granados, M; Companyó, R; Centrich, F

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-throughput confirmatory method for the analysis of 11 nitroimidazoles in muscle samples (metronidazole, MNZ; dimetridazole, DMZ; ronidazole, RNZ; tinidazole, TNZ; carnidazole, CRZ; secnidazole semihydrate, SCZ; ornidazole, ORZ; metronidazole-hydroxy, MNZ-OH; ipronidazole, IPZ; ipronidazole-hydroxy, IPZ-OH; and dimetridazole-hydroxy, HMMNI). Extraction with acetonitrile is efficient and simple, with the majority of recoveries ranging between 65 and 101%, and without the need for clean-up of the extracts. The chromatographic analysis is performed using UPLC-QqQ-MS in the MRM mode, with an electrospray source operated in positive mode. Total chromatographic analysis time is 12 min. This method has been fully validated in muscle according to Decision 657/2002/CE guidelines, and the CCα values obtained were in the range of 0.04-0.4 μg·kg(-1). The method is currently used for the analysis of muscle samples and has been tested in other matrices of animal origin, such as kidney, retina and egg, with excellent results.

  17. PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis for Identification of Bacteroides spp. and Characterization of Nitroimidazole Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Simon L. J.; Brazier, Jon S.; Talbot, Paul R.; Duerden, Brian I.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides spp. are opportunist pathogens that cause blood and soft tissue infections and are often resistant to antimicrobial agents. We have developed a combined PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique to characterize the 16S rRNA gene for identification purposes and the nitroimidazole resistance (nim) gene for detection of resistance to the major antimicrobial agent used to treat Bacteroides infections: metronidazole (MTZ). PCR-RFLP analysis of 16S ribosomal (rDNA) with HpaII and TaqI produced profiles that enabled discrimination of type strains and identification of 70 test strains to the species level. The 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP identification results agreed with routine phenotypic testing for 62 of the strains. The discrepancies between phenotypic and PCR-RFLP methods for eight strains were resolved by 16S rDNA sequencing in three cases, but five strains remain unidentified. The presence of nim genes was indicated by PCR in 25 of 28 strains that exhibited reduced sensitivity to MTZ. PCR-RFLP of the nim gene products identified the four reported genes (nimA, -B, -C, and -D) and indicated the presence of a previously unreported nim gene in 5 strains. This novel nim gene exhibited 75% DNA sequence similarity with nimB. These rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods should enable improved identification of Bacteroides spp. and the detection of MTZ resistance determinants. PMID:10970359

  18. Novel solid phase extraction method for the analysis of 5-nitroimidazoles and metabolites in milk samples by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mesa, Maykel; García-Campaña, Ana M; Cruces-Blanco, Carmen

    2014-02-15

    A new sample treatment has been developed for the extraction of 5-nitroimidazole (5-NDZ) drugs in milk samples previous to their determination by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). Fat removing and protein precipitation were simultaneously carried out by the addition of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and subsequent centrifugation. Clean-up and off-line concentration were achieved by a novel solid-phase extraction (SPE) method employing mixed cation exchange (MCX) cartridges, obtaining an off-line concentration factor of 18. Analyses were performed in less than 18 min employing 20mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.5) and 150 mM SDS as background electrolyte (BGE). During the separation procedure a temperature of 20 °C and a voltage of 25 kV (normal mode) were applied. Due to sweeping effects, an on-line concentration was achieved for all the studied compounds and detection limits lower than 1.8 μg L(-1) were obtained. This method has been successfully applied to milk samples of different origins, including raw ewe milk.

  19. High-throughput method for the determination of nitroimidazoles in muscle samples by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, A; Sans, G; Kumar, P; Granados, M; Companyó, R; Centrich, F

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-throughput confirmatory method for the analysis of 11 nitroimidazoles in muscle samples (metronidazole, MNZ; dimetridazole, DMZ; ronidazole, RNZ; tinidazole, TNZ; carnidazole, CRZ; secnidazole semihydrate, SCZ; ornidazole, ORZ; metronidazole-hydroxy, MNZ-OH; ipronidazole, IPZ; ipronidazole-hydroxy, IPZ-OH; and dimetridazole-hydroxy, HMMNI). Extraction with acetonitrile is efficient and simple, with the majority of recoveries ranging between 65 and 101%, and without the need for clean-up of the extracts. The chromatographic analysis is performed using UPLC-QqQ-MS in the MRM mode, with an electrospray source operated in positive mode. Total chromatographic analysis time is 12 min. This method has been fully validated in muscle according to Decision 657/2002/CE guidelines, and the CCα values obtained were in the range of 0.04-0.4 μg·kg(-1). The method is currently used for the analysis of muscle samples and has been tested in other matrices of animal origin, such as kidney, retina and egg, with excellent results. PMID:25577363

  20. Synthesis and Electrochemistry of 2-Ethenyl and 2-Ethanyl Derivatives of 5-Nitroimidazole and Antimicrobial Activity against Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Carlos A.; Tripp, Jonathan C.; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Kalisiak, Jaroslaw; Hruz, Petr; Andersen, Yolanda S.; Brown, Sabrina E.; Kangas, Karina; Arzu, Leo V.; Davids, Barbara J.; Gillin, Frances D.; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.; Upcroft, Peter; Fokin, Valery V.; Smith, Diane K.; Sharpless, K. Barry; Eckmann, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Infections with the diarrheagenic pathogen, Giardia lamblia, are commonly treated with the 5-nitroimidazole (5-NI) metronidazole (Mz), and yet treatment failures and Mz resistance occur. Using a panel of new 2-ethenyl and 2-ethanyl 5-NI derivatives, we found that compounds with a saturated bridge between the 5-NI core and a pendant ring system exhibited only modestly increased antigiardial activity and could not overcome Mz resistance. By contrast, olefins with a conjugated bridge connecting the core and a substituted phenyl or heterocyclic ring showed greatly increased antigiardial activity without toxicity, and several overcame Mz resistance and were more effective than Mz in a murine giardiasis model. Determination of the half-wave potential of the initial one-electron transfer by cyclic voltammetry revealed that easier redox activation correlated with greater antigiardial activity and capacity to overcome Mz resistance. These studies show the potential of combining systematic synthetic approaches with biological and electrochemical evaluations in developing improved 5-NI drugs. PMID:19480409

  1. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  2. Hypoxia and Hypoxia Inducible Factors: Diverse Roles in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Bharath; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to have a role in the pathogenesis of several forms of liver disease. The Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulators that affect a homeostatic response to low oxygen tension and have been identified as key mediators of angiogenesis, inflammation, and metabolism. In this review, we summarize the evidence for a role of HIFs across a range of hepatic pathophysiology. We describe regulation of the hypoxia inducible factors and review investigations that demonstrate a role for HIFs in the development of liver fibrosis, activation of innate immune pathways, hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as other liver diseases in both human disease as well as murine models. PMID:22120903

  3. Lung oxidative damage by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Tuesta, M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  4. Physiological effects of intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Powell, F L; Garcia, N

    2000-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH), or periodic exposure to hypoxia interrupted by return to normoxia or less hypoxic conditions, occurs in many circumstances. In high altitude mountaineering, IH is used to optimize acclimatization although laboratory studies have not generally revealed physiologically significant benefits. IH enhances athletic performance at sea level if blood oxygen capacity increases and the usual level of training is not decreased significantly. IH for high altitude workers who commute from low altitude homes is of considerable practical interest and the ideal commuting schedule for physical and mental performance is being studied. The effect of oxygen enrichment at altitude (i.e., intermittent normoxia on a background of chronic hypoxia) on human performance is under study also. Physiological mechanisms of IH, and specifically the differences between effects of IH and acute or chronic continuous hypoxia remains to be determined. Biomedical researchers are defining the molecular and cellular mechanisms for effects of hypoxia on the body in health and disease. A comparative approach may provide additional insight about the biological significance of these effects.

  5. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  6. Lung oxidative damage by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Tuesta, M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described.

  7. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  8. Hypoxia-Independent Downregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Targets by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ragnum, Harald Bull; Røe, Kathrine; Holm, Ruth; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Nesland, Jahn Marthin; Aarnes, Eva-Katrine; Ree, Anne Hansen; Flatmark, Kjersti; Seierstad, Therese; Lilleby, Wolfgang; Lyng, Heidi

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We explored changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) signaling during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenografts under conditions in which no significant change in immunostaining of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole had occurred. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles of volume-matched androgen-exposed and androgen-deprived CWR22 xenografts, with similar pimonidazole-positive fractions, were compared. Direct targets of androgen receptor (AR) and HIF1 transcription factors were identified among the differentially expressed genes by using published lists. Biological processes affected by ADT were determined by gene ontology analysis. HIF1α protein expression in xenografts and biopsy samples from 35 patients receiving neoadjuvant ADT was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 1344 genes showed more than 2-fold change in expression by ADT, including 35 downregulated and 5 upregulated HIF1 targets. Six genes were shared HIF1 and AR targets, and their downregulation was confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Significant suppression of the biological processes proliferation, metabolism, and stress response in androgen-deprived xenografts was found, consistent with tumor regression. Nineteen downregulated HIF1 targets were involved in those significant biological processes, most of them in metabolism. Four of these were shared AR and HIF1 targets, including genes encoding the regulatory glycolytic proteins HK2, PFKFB3, and SLC2A1. Most of the downregulated HIF1 targets were induced by hypoxia in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines, confirming their role as hypoxia-responsive HIF1 targets in prostate cancer. Downregulation of HIF1 targets was consistent with the absence of HIF1α protein in xenografts and downregulation in patients by ADT (P<.001). Conclusions: AR repression by ADT may lead to downregulation of HIF1 signaling independently of hypoxic fraction, and this may contribute to

  9. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia results in higher oxidative stress compared to normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ribon, A; Pialoux, V; Saugy, J J; Rupp, T; Faiss, R; Debevec, T; Millet, G P

    2016-03-01

    Sixteen healthy exercise trained participants underwent the following three, 10-h exposures in a randomized manner: (1) Hypobaric hypoxia (HH; 3450m terrestrial altitude) (2) Normobaric hypoxia (NH; 3450m simulated altitude) and (3) Normobaric normoxia (NN). Plasma oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, MDA; advanced oxidation protein products, AOPP) and antioxidant markers (superoxide dismutase, SOD; glutathione peroxidase, GPX; catalase; ferric reducing antioxidant power, FRAP) were measured before and after each exposure. MDA was significantly higher after HH compared to NN condition (+24%). SOD and GPX activities were increased (vs. before; +29% and +54%) while FRAP was decreased (vs. before; -34%) only after 10h of HH. AOPP significantly increased after 10h for NH (vs. before; +83%), and HH (vs. before; +99%) whereas it remained stable in NN. These results provide evidence that prooxidant/antioxidant balance was impaired to a greater degree following acute exposure to terrestrial (HH) vs. simulated altitude (NH) and that the chamber confinement (NN) did likely not explain these differences. PMID:26732282

  10. Historical Assessment of Hypoxia in Narragansett Bay Using Geochemical Markers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eutrophication due to anthropogenic activities has affected aquatic ecosystems globally. Increased inputs of nitrogen and other nutrients to estuarine and marine ecosystems as a result of agricultural practices, urbanization and suburbanization have resulted in degradation of wat...

  11. Substrate specificity of the Deazaflavin-Dependent Nitroreductase (Ddn) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Responsible for the Bioreductive Activation of Bicyclic Nitroimidazoles

    PubMed Central

    Gurumurthy, Meera; Mukherjee, Tathagata; Dowd, Cynthia S.; Singh, Ramandeep; Niyomrattanakit, Pornwaratt; Tay, Jo Ann; Nayyar, Amit; Lee, Yong Sok; Cherian, Joseph; Boshoff, Helena I.; Dick, Thomas; Barry, Clifton E.; Manjunatha, Ujjini H.

    2012-01-01

    The bicyclic 4-nitroimidazoles PA-824 and OPC-67683 represent a promising novel class of therapeutics for tuberculosis (TB) and are currently in phase II clinical development. Both compounds are pro-drugs that are reductively activated by a deazaflavin (F420) dependent nitroreductase (Ddn). Herein we describe the biochemical properties of Ddn including the optimal enzymatic turnover conditions, cofactor and substrate specificity. The preference of the enzyme for the (S) isomer of PA-824 over the (R) isomer is directed by the presence of a long hydrophobic tail. For nitroimidazo-oxazoles bearing only short alkyl substituents on the C-7 position of the oxazole, substrates were reduced by Ddn without stereochemical preference. However, with bulkier substitutions on the tail of the oxazole, Ddn displayed stereo-specificity. Ddn mediated metabolism of PA-824 results in the release of reactive nitrogen species. We have employed a direct chemiluminescence based nitric oxide (NO) detection assay to measure the kinetics of NO production by Ddn. Binding affinity of PA-824 to Ddn was monitored through intrinsic fluorescence quenching of the protein facilitating a turn-over independent assessment of affinity. Using this assay we found that (R)-PA-824, despite not being turned over by Ddn, binds to the enzyme with the same affinity as the active (S) isomer. This result, in combination with docking studies in the active site, suggests that the (R) isomer likely has a different binding mode than the (S) with the C-3 of the imidazole ring orienting in a non-productive position with respect to the incoming hydride from F420. The results presented provide insight into the biochemical mechanism of reduction and elucidate structural features important for understanding substrate binding. PMID:22023140

  12. Hypoxia and the Lung: Beyond Hypoxic Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Nicolls, Mark R.; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2011-01-01

    This article extends the influence and effects of hypoxia on the lung beyond vasoconstriction and regional blood flow control. Clearly, hypoxia, via the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, induces a large number of genes encoding proteins, which control cellular metabolism and growth and also participate in inflammation. Hypoxia, likely via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), recruits bone marrow precursor cells to the lung and affects the behavior of immune cells. How hypoxia shapes immune responses through VEGF and its receptors on mast cells, eosinophils, and dendritic cells and through lung endothelial cell/lymphocyte interactions will be a productive area for future research. PMID:17511589

  13. Hypoxia induces a novel signature of chromatin modifications and global repression of transcription.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amber Buescher; Denko, Nicholas; Barton, Michelle Craig

    2008-04-01

    Tumor cells respond to the harsh hypoxic microenvironment, in part, by transcriptional regulation of specific target genes. We found that hypoxia-mediated activation of selected genes occurs amidst widespread repression of transcription that is neither cell type-specific nor HIF-1-dependent. Despite overall repression, hypoxia induces a pool of histone modifications typically associated with transcriptional activation or repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that this global mixture of hypoxia-modified histones is sorted in a gene-specific manner to correlate with transcriptional response to hypoxia. Exceptions to this were unexpected increases in H3K4me3 levels, typically associated with transcriptional activation, and decreased H3K27me3 levels, generally a marker of transcriptional silencing, at core promoters of both hypoxia-activated and -repressed genes. These data suggest that a novel signature of chromatin modifications is induced under hypoxic stress, which may play a role in gene regulatory switches active in proliferating tumor cells undergoing cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation.

  14. Hypoxia induces a novel signature of chromatin modifications and global repression of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amber Buescher; Denko, Nicholas; Barton, Michelle Craig

    2008-01-01

    Tumor cells respond to the harsh hypoxic microenvironment, in part, by transcriptional regulation of specific target genes. We found that hypoxia-mediated activation of selected genes occurs amidst widespread repression of transcription that is neither cell type-specific nor HIF-1-dependent. Despite overall repression, hypoxia induces a pool of histone modifications typically associated with transcriptional activation or repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that this global mixture of hypoxia-modified histones is sorted in a gene-specific manner to correlate with transcriptional response to hypoxia. Exceptions to this were unexpected increases in H3K4me3 levels, typically associated with transcriptional activation, and decreased H3K27me3 levels, generally a marker of transcriptional silencing, at core promoters of both hypoxia-activated and -repressed genes. These data suggest that a novel signature of chromatin modifications is induced under hypoxic stress, which may play a role in gene regulatory switches active in proliferating tumor cells undergoing cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:18294659

  15. Influence of moderate hypoxia on vaccine efficacy against Vibrio anguillarum in Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia).

    PubMed

    Gallage, Sanchala; Katagiri, Takayuki; Endo, Makoto; Futami, Kunihiko; Endo, Masato; Maita, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia is known as a potential immunomodulator in fish. This study therefore assesses the impact of chronic, moderate hypoxia on vaccine efficacy in Oreochromis niloticus. Serum antibody titer was used as a surrogate marker to detect vaccine efficacy. The fish were acclimatized to either moderate hypoxia (55 ± 5% DO) or normoxia (85 ± 5%DO) and immunized with formalin inactivated Vibrio anguillarum. Significantly, a higher antibody titer was found in normoxic fish than in moderate hypoxia. The normoxic group titer peaked at 14th dpv (days post vaccination) while the moderate hypoxic group peaked at 21st or 28th dpv. The absolute blood lymphocyte counts and serum bactericidal activities against V. anguillarum were significantly higher in normoxic fish. Serum killing of V. anguillarum appeared to be mainly via antibody-dependent classical complement pathway. Furthermore, the first week following vaccination appears critical for antibody production. This view was further supported by results obtained from gene expression assay, where the transcription level of all the detected immune related genes (IgM, IL-1 β, TCR-β, MHC-II β), except B cell activating factor, were significantly suppressed following exposure to moderate hypoxia. The overall results highlight that even though moderate hypoxia is not easily detectable in Oreochromis niloticus, it negatively affects antibody production by suppressing and delaying antibody response, ultimately affecting vaccine efficacy.

  16. Dynamics of Tumor Hypoxia in Response to Patupilone and Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Katrin; Rohrer Bley, Carla; Zimmermann, Martina; Vuong, Van; Hug, Daniel; Soltermann, Alex; Broggini-Tenzer, Angela; Pruschy, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is one of the most important parameters that determines treatment sensitivity and is mainly due to insufficient tumor angiogenesis. However, the local oxygen concentration in a tumor can also be shifted in response to different treatment modalities such as cytotoxic agents or ionizing radiation. Thus, combined treatment modalities including microtubule stabilizing agents could create an additional challenge for an effective treatment response due to treatment-induced shifts in tumor oxygenation. Tumor hypoxia was probed over a prolonged observation period in response to treatment with different cytotoxic agents, using a non-invasive bioluminescent ODD-Luc reporter system, in which part of the oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of HIF-1α is fused to luciferase. As demonstrated in vitro, this system not only detects hypoxia at an ambient oxygen concentration of 1% O2, but also discriminates low oxygen concentrations in the range from 0.2 to 1% O2. Treatment of A549 lung adenocarcinoma-derived tumor xenografts with the microtubule stabilizing agent patupilone resulted in a prolonged increase in tumor hypoxia, which could be used as marker for its antitumoral treatment response, while irradiation did not induce detectable changes in tumor hypoxia. Furthermore, despite patupilone-induced hypoxia, the potency of ionizing radiation (IR) was not reduced as part of a concomitant or adjuvant combined treatment modality. PMID:23251549

  17. Original Research: Diametric effects of hypoxia on pathophysiology of sickle cell disease in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Fang; Ghosh, Samit; Mosunjac, Mario; Manci, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia causes erythrocyte sickling in vitro; however, its role in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease is poorly understood. We report that hypoxia rapidly decreased oxygen saturation in transgenic sickle cell disease mice, but this effect was immediately buffered by a robust ventilatory response. The initial hypoxemia improved steadily throughout the duration of hypoxia without any detectable acute pulmonary adverse effect. Furthermore, the mice suffered acute anemia that ironically was associated with lowering of both plasma hemoglobin and heme. These results were corroborated by increased plasma haptoglobin and hemopexin levels. Markers of ischemic tissue injury increased spatiotemporally following repeated hypoxia exposures. This variation was supported by organ-specific induction of hypoxia-responsive genes. Our results show that hypoxia exerts diametric effects on sickle cell disease by promoting ischemic injury while enhancing the expression of hemolysis scavenger molecules. This phenomenon may help to understand the disparate clinical syndromes associated with hemolysis and vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease. PMID:27026725

  18. Influence of moderate hypoxia on vaccine efficacy against Vibrio anguillarum in Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia).

    PubMed

    Gallage, Sanchala; Katagiri, Takayuki; Endo, Makoto; Futami, Kunihiko; Endo, Masato; Maita, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia is known as a potential immunomodulator in fish. This study therefore assesses the impact of chronic, moderate hypoxia on vaccine efficacy in Oreochromis niloticus. Serum antibody titer was used as a surrogate marker to detect vaccine efficacy. The fish were acclimatized to either moderate hypoxia (55 ± 5% DO) or normoxia (85 ± 5%DO) and immunized with formalin inactivated Vibrio anguillarum. Significantly, a higher antibody titer was found in normoxic fish than in moderate hypoxia. The normoxic group titer peaked at 14th dpv (days post vaccination) while the moderate hypoxic group peaked at 21st or 28th dpv. The absolute blood lymphocyte counts and serum bactericidal activities against V. anguillarum were significantly higher in normoxic fish. Serum killing of V. anguillarum appeared to be mainly via antibody-dependent classical complement pathway. Furthermore, the first week following vaccination appears critical for antibody production. This view was further supported by results obtained from gene expression assay, where the transcription level of all the detected immune related genes (IgM, IL-1 β, TCR-β, MHC-II β), except B cell activating factor, were significantly suppressed following exposure to moderate hypoxia. The overall results highlight that even though moderate hypoxia is not easily detectable in Oreochromis niloticus, it negatively affects antibody production by suppressing and delaying antibody response, ultimately affecting vaccine efficacy. PMID:26915308

  19. Hypoxia regulates SOX2 expression to promote prostate cancer cell invasion and sphere formation

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyung-Mi; Dai, Yao; Vieweg, Johannes; Siemann, Dietmar W

    2016-01-01

    SOX2 is an embryonic stem cell marker that in prostate cancer has been associated not only with tumorigenesis but also metastasis. Furthermore hypoxia in primary tumors has been linked to poor prognosis and outcomes in this disease. The goal of the present study was to investigate the impact of hypoxia on SOX2 expression and metastasis-associated functions in prostate cancer cells. A tissue microarray of 80 samples from prostate cancer patients or healthy controls was employed to examine the expression of HIF-1α and its correlation with SOX2. The role of SOX2 and HIF-1/2α in the regulation of cell invasion and sphere formation capacity under hypoxic conditions was investigated in vitro using short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown in three human prostate cancer cell lines. HIF-1α expression was significantly elevated in malignant prostate tissue compared to benign or normal tissue, and in tumor samples its expression was highly correlated with SOX2. In prostate cancer cells, acute and chronic exposures to hypoxia that resulted in elevated expression levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, respectively, also induced SOX2. Genetic depletion of SOX2 attenuated hypoxia-induced cell functions. Knockdown of HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, decreased acute hypoxia-mediated cell invasion and SOX2 up-regulation, whereas only HIF-2α gene silencing reduced sphere formation capacity and chronic hypoxia-mediated SOX2 up-regulation. Enhanced SOX2 expression and HIF-1α or HIF-2α associated phenotypes are dependent on the time duration of exposure to hypoxia. The present results indicate that SOX2 may be a key mediator of hypoxia-induced metastasis-associated functions and hence may serve as a potential target for therapeutic interventions for metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27294000

  20. Androgen Withdrawal Fails to Induce Detectable Tissue Hypoxia in the Rat Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Regter, Sietze; Hedayati, Mohammad; Zhang, Yonggang; Zhou, Haoming; Dalrymple, Susan; Koch, Cameron J.; Isaacs, John T.; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND It has been reported that significant hypoxia may occur in the rat prostate following androgen deprivation (AD). It is well known that hypoxia substantially reduces radiation sensitivity of cells both in vitro and in vivo. Given that contemporary management of men with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer includes the use of neoadjuvant androgen suppression and radiation, AD-induced hypoxia in the prostate could result in suboptimal therapeutic results. Given this concern, we fully investigate possible AD-induced hypoxia in the ventral prostate (VP) of adult rats by two independent methods. METHODS Tissue pO2 levels in the VP of adult Spraque-Dawley rats were evaluated prior to and at various time points following castration by two independent techniques. First, an Oxylab tissue oxygen monitor with a 240 μm probe was used for quantitative monitoring of global VP oxygenation. Second, fluorescence immunohistochemistry using the hypoxia marker EF5, known to be metabolically activated by hypoxic cells, was used to evaluate cell-to-cell variation in hypoxia at various days post-castration. RESULTS Neither the oxygen probe nor EF5 method demonstrate any substantive change in pO2 levels in the rat VP at any time point post-castration. CONCLUSIONS We find no evidence that the rat VP becomes hypoxic at any point following castration using an animal model that closely mimics the human prostate. These data are in contrast to previous reports suggesting prostatic hypoxia occurs following AD and provide assurance that our present therapeutic strategy of neoadjuvant AD followed by radiation is not compromised by AD-induced tissue hypoxia. PMID:24677180

  1. Validated method for determination of eight banned nitroimidazole residues in natural casings by LC/MS/MS with solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanwen; Wang, Fengchi; Ai, Lianfeng; Guo, Chunhai; Chen, Ruichun

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive method based on solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry interfaced with electrospray ionization (SPE-LC-MS/MS-ESI) was developed for the simultaneous determination of 8 banned nitroimidazole (NOZ) drugs including metronidazole (MNZ), ronidazole (RNZ), dimetridazole (DMZ), tinidazole, ornidazole, secnidazole, metronidazole-OH (MNZOH, the metabolite of MNZ), and 2-hydroxymethyl-1-methyl-5-nitroimidazole (HMMNI, the metabolite of RNZ and DMZ) in natural casings. After extraction with ethyl acetate and evaporation, the NOZs were reconstituted in ethyl acetate and purified on a strong cation-exchange SPE column, and then LC/MS/MS analysis was performed by positive ESI applying multiple reaction monitoring of 2 transition reactions for each compound. The method was validated according to the European Union requirements (Commission Decision 2002/657/EC). Specificity, linearity, decision limit (CCalpha), detection capability (CCbeta), accuracy, and precision were determined. Average recoveries of the 8 NOZs from natural animal casing fortified at 3 levels (0.1, 0.5, and 1 microg/kg) ranged from 87.3 to 116.5%. The calculated CCalpha for NOZs ranged from 0.029 to 0.049 microg/kg, and CCbeta ranged from 0.049 to 0.083 microg/kg. Repeatability was in the range of 3.35-10.1%, and within-laboratory reproducibility was <10.3%. PMID:19485222

  2. A Case of Self-treatment Induced Recurrent Fixed Drug Eruptions Associated with the Use of Different Fixed Dose Combinations of Fluoroquinolone-Nitroimidazole

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Agnik; Sen, Sukanta; Das, Suvajit; Biswas, Arunava; Tripathi, Santanu K

    2014-01-01

    A young male patient used fixed dose combinations of different fluoroquinolones and nitroimidazoles several times in the last few years for self-treating repeated episodes of diarrhea and loose motion. Each time, he experienced fixed drug eruptions that increased in number and severity on subsequent occasions. Suspecting association between the drug and the rashes, the patient each time discontinued the treatment prematurely, and preferred to switch to a similar formulation next time, but with different molecules of fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin) and nitroimidazole (tinidazole or ornidazole). He could not however avoid the rash. This time the patient presented with multiple, round-to-oval, well-defined, hyperpigmented cutaneous patches of different dimensions, all over the body. He appeared to have run out of options and therefore consulted us seeking advice on how he should treat himself next time he suffered from diarrhea. Causality assessment by Naranjo’s algorithm revealed a definite relationship between the cutaneous adverse reaction and the offending drug. He was counselled regarding medication in general and advised, in particular, to avoid the tendency to self-treat any future episode of diarrhea. PMID:25429184

  3. Simultaneous determination of nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles, and chloramphenicol components in bovine milk by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Ding, Shuangyang; Jiang, Haiyang; Li, Jiancheng; Shen, Jianzhong; Xia, Xi

    2016-02-01

    A sensitive, confirmatory ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method was developed and validated to detect 23 veterinary drugs and metabolites (nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles, and chloramphenicol components) in bovine milk. Compounds of interest were sequentially extracted from milk with acetonitrile and basified acetonitrile using sodium chloride to induce liquid-liquid partition. The extract was purified on a mixed mode solid-phase extraction cartridge. Using rapid polarity switching in electrospray ionization, a single injection was capable of detecting both positively and negatively charged analytes in a 9 min chromatography run time. Recoveries based on matrix-matched calibrations and isotope labeled internal standards for milk ranged from 51.7% to 101.8%. The detection limits and quantitation limits of the analytical method were found to be within the range of 2-20 ng/kg and 5-50 ng/kg, respectively. The recommended method is simple, specific, and reliable for the routine monitoring of nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles, and chloramphenicol components in bovine milk samples.

  4. Guanfacine ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced spatial working memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Kauser, H; Sahu, S; Kumar, S; Panjwani, U

    2014-01-17

    Hypobaric hypoxia (HH) observed at high altitude causes mild cognitive impairment specifically affecting attention and working memory. Adrenergic dysregulation and neuronal damage in prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been implicated in hypoxia induced memory deficits. Optimal stimulation of alpha 2A adrenergic receptor in PFC facilitates the spatial working memory (SWM) under the conditions of adrenergic dysregulation. Therefore the present study was designed to test the efficacy of alpha 2A adrenergic agonist, Guanfacine (GFC), to restore HH induced SWM deficits and PFC neuronal damage. The rats were exposed to chronic HH equivalent to 25,000ft for 7days in an animal decompression chamber and received daily treatment of GFC at a dose of 1mg/kg body weight via the intramuscular route during the period of exposure. The cognitive performance was assessed by Delayed Alternation Task (DAT) using T-Maze and PFC neuronal damage was studied by apoptotic and neurodegenerative markers. Percentage of correct choice decreased significantly while perseverative errors showed a significant increase after 7days HH exposure, GFC significantly ameliorated the SWM deficits and perseveration. There was a marked and significant increase in chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, neuronal pyknosis and fluoro Jade positive cells in layer II of the medial PFC in hypoxia exposed group, administration of GFC significantly reduced the magnitude of these changes. Modulation of adrenergic mechanisms by GFC may serve as an effective countermeasure in amelioration of prefrontal deficits and neurodegenerative changes during HH. PMID:24184415

  5. Wound Hypoxia in Deep Tissue after Incision in the Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sinyoung; Lee, Dongchul; Theusch, Brett E.; Arpey, Christopher J.; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies using rat models of incisional pain have demonstrated that tissue lactate levels increase and pH decreases for several days after incision, suggesting the presence of an ischemic-like condition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time course and the extent of tissue hypoxia that develops in incised muscle and skin. We directly measured oxygen tension at several time points after incisions of the gastrocnemius muscle, the paraspinal skin, and the plantar hindpaw in anesthetized rats using an oxygen-sensitive microelectrode. In vivo hypoxia of the incised tissues was also evaluated immunohistochemically using a hypoxia marker pimonidazole hydrochloride. To minimized inter-subject variability, unincised contralateral tissues were used as a control. Tissue oxygen tension was decreased in both skeletal muscle and skin compared to control, for several days after incision: when measured directly, oxygen tension decreased immediately and remained low for several days after incisions. Pimonidazole immunostaining revealed hypoxic areas in incised muscle and skin for several days. By postoperative day 10, tissue oxygen tension recovered to that of control tissue. These results support the evidence that a hypoxic condition is present in deep tissue after incisions and that an ischemic-like mechanism may contribute to postoperative pain. PMID:23926943

  6. Hypoxia and the antipredator behaviours of fishes.

    PubMed

    Domenici, P; Lefrançois, C; Shingles, A

    2007-11-29

    Hypoxia is a phenomenon occurring in marine coastal areas with increasing frequency. While hypoxia has been documented to affect fish activity and metabolism, recent evidence shows that hypoxia can also have a detrimental effect on various antipredator behaviours. Here, we review such evidence with a focus on the effect of hypoxia on fish escape responses, its modulation by aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and schooling behaviour. The main effect of hypoxia on escape behaviour was found in responsiveness and directionality. Locomotor performance in escapes was expected to be relatively independent of hypoxia, since escape responses are fuelled anaerobically. However, hypoxia decreased locomotor performance in some species (Mugilidae) although only in the absence of ASR in severe hypoxia. ASR allows fish to show higher escape performance than fish staying in the water column where hypoxia occurs. This situation provides a trade-off whereby fish may perform ASR in order to avoid the detrimental effects of hypoxia, although they would be subjected to higher exposure to aerial predation. As a result of this trade-off, fishes appear to minimize surfacing behaviour in the presence of aerial predators and to surface near shelters, where possible. For many fish species, schooling can be an effective antipredator behaviour. Severe hypoxia may lead to the disruption of the school unit. At moderate levels, hypoxia can increase school volume and can change the shuffling behaviour of individuals. By altering school structure and dynamics, hypoxia may affect the well functioning of schooling in terms of synchronization and execution of antipredator manoeuvres. School structure and volume appear to be the results of numerous trade-offs, where school shape may be dictated by the presence of predators, the need for energy saving via hydrodynamic advantages and oxygen level. The effects of hypoxia on aquatic organisms can be taxon specific. While hypoxia may not necessarily

  7. Hypoxia-ischemia induces DNA synthesis without cell proliferation in dying neurons in adult rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Chia-Yi; Schloemer, Aryn J; Lu, Aigang; Burns, Kevin A; Weng, Wei-Lan; Williams, Michael T; Strauss, Kenneth I; Vorhees, Charles V; Flavell, Richard A; Davis, Roger J; Sharp, Frank R; Rakic, Pasko

    2004-11-24

    Recent studies suggest that postmitotic neurons can reenter the cell cycle as a prelude to apoptosis after brain injury. However, most dying neurons do not pass the G1/S-phase checkpoint to resume DNA synthesis. The specific factors that trigger abortive DNA synthesis are not characterized. Here we show that the combination of hypoxia and ischemia induces adult rodent neurons to resume DNA synthesis as indicated by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and expression of G1/S-phase cell cycle transition markers. After hypoxia-ischemia, the majority of BrdU- and neuronal nuclei (NeuN)-immunoreactive cells are also terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-stained, suggesting that they undergo apoptosis. BrdU+ neurons, labeled shortly after hypoxia-ischemia, persist for >5 d but eventually disappear by 28 d. Before disappearing, these BrdU+/NeuN+/TUNEL+ neurons express the proliferating cell marker Ki67, lose the G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p16INK4 and p27Kip1 and show induction of the late G1/S-phase CDK2 activity and phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein. This contrasts to kainic acid excitotoxicity and traumatic brain injury, which produce TUNEL-positive neurons without evidence of DNA synthesis or G1/S-phase cell cycle transition. These findings suggest that hypoxia-ischemia triggers neurons to reenter the cell cycle and resume apoptosis-associated DNA synthesis in brain. Our data also suggest that the demonstration of neurogenesis after brain injury requires not only BrdU uptake and mature neuronal markers but also evidence showing absence of apoptotic markers. Manipulating the aberrant apoptosis-associated DNA synthesis that occurs with hypoxia-ischemia and perhaps neurodegenerative diseases could promote neuronal survival and neurogenesis.

  8. Development of Hypoxia in a Preclinical Model of Tumor Micrometastases

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsen, Trude G.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Hypoxic regions have been shown to be a characteristic feature of a wide variety of human primary tumors, whereas the oxygenation status of subclinical micrometastases is in general unknown. The development of hypoxia in a xenograft model of microscopic metastases was investigated in this study. Methods and Materials: U-25-GFP human melanomas growing in dorsal window chamber preparations in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as a preclinical model of micrometastases. Tumor blood supply time and morphologic parameters of the vascular network were determined from first-pass imaging movies and vascular maps recorded by use of 155-kDa tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled dextran as a vascular tracer. Tumor hypoxia was assessed from immunohistochemical preparations of the imaged tissue by use of pimonidazole as a hypoxia marker. Results: Nearly half of the tumors had developed hypoxic regions when they reached a diameter of 2 to 3 mm. Tumors with multiple hypoxic foci showed a low growth rate, low blood flow velocity, high vessel tortuosity, high vessel segment length, and high vascular density, whereas tumors with a single hypoxic region showed a high growth rate, high blood flow velocity, low vessel tortuosity, low vessel segment length, and low vascular density. The tumors with hypoxic regions did not differ from those without hypoxia in any single parameter. Conclusions: U-25-GFP xenograft models of vascularized human tumor micrometastases may develop hypoxic regions as a consequence of two distinctly different morphologic abnormalities in the vascular network: high resistance against blood flow (i.e., high vessel tortuosity and high vessel segment length) or low vascular density.

  9. The Feyrter cell in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Homeira; Smith, Paul; Heath, Donald

    1973-01-01

    Moosavi, H., Smith, P., and Heath, D. (1973).Thorax,28, 729-741. The Feyrter cell in hypoxia. It is clear that the bronchial tree has functions beyond the mere conduction of air into the alveolar spaces. In addition to the familiar ciliated respiratory epithelial cells the bronchus is lined by non-ciliated Clara and Feyrter cells. In the present study we investigated the histological and ultrastructural features of the bronchial argyrophilic (Feyrter) cell of the neonatal rat. On electron microscopy this cell has all the features of an APUD cell which is associated with the secretion of polypeptide hormones. It bears a close ultrastructural resemblance to the chief cell of the carotid body and shows the same changes in its membrane-bound bodies on exposure to chronic hypoxia. These are strong grounds for believing that the bronchi and bronchioles have either a chemoreceptor or an endocrine function in the neonatal period. Images PMID:4787985

  10. CD133 Modulate HIF-1α Expression under Hypoxia in EMT Phenotype Pancreatic Cancer Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Koki; Ding, Qiang; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Kuwahata, Taisaku; Miyazaki, Yumi; Tsukasa, Koichirou; Hayashi, Tomomi; Shinchi, Hiroyuki; Natsugoe, Shoji; Takao, Sonshin

    2016-01-01

    Although CD133 is a known representative cancer stem cell marker, its function in tumor aggressiveness under hypoxia is not fully known. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that CD133 regulates hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression with tumor migration. The CD133+ pancreatic cancer cell line, Capan1M9, was compared with the CD133− cell line, shCD133M9, under hypoxia. HIF-1α expression levels were compared by Western blot, HIF-1α nucleus translocation assay and real-time (RT)-PCR. The hypoxia responsive element (HRE) was observed by luciferase assay. The migration ability was analyzed by migration and wound healing assays. Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) related genes were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. HIF-1α was highly expressed in Capan1M9 compared to shCD133M9 under hypoxia because of the high activation of HRE. Furthermore, the migration ability of Capan1M9 was higher than that of shCD133M9 under hypoxia, suggesting higher expression of EMT related genes in Capan1M9 compared to shCD133M9. Conclusion: HIF-1α expression under hypoxia in CD133+ pancreatic cancer cells correlated with tumor cell migration through EMT gene expression. Understanding the function of CD133 in cancer aggressiveness provides a novel therapeutic approach to eradicate pancreatic cancer stem cells. PMID:27367674

  11. Activation of microglia and astrocytes in the nucleus tractus solitarius during ventilatory acclimatization to 10% hypoxia in unanesthetized mice.

    PubMed

    Tadmouri, A; Champagnat, J; Morin-Surun, M P

    2014-05-01

    Nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the integrative sensory relay of autonomic functions in the brainstem. To explore the nonneuronal cellular basis of central chemosensitivity during the first 24 hr of ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VHA), we have investigated glial activation markers in the NTS. Conscious mice (C57/BL6) were placed in a hermetic hypoxia chamber containing a plethysmograph to record ventilation. After 4 days of habituation to the normoxic environment, mice were subjected to physiological hypoxia (10% O2 ) for 1, 6, or 24 hr. To dissociate interactions between microglia and astrocytes, another group received daily minocycline, a microglia activation blocker. By immunochemical localization of astrocytes (GFAP), activated microglia (Cd11b), and total microglia (Iba-1), we identified an oxygen-sensing glial layer in the NTS, in which astrocytes are first activated after 1-6 hr of hypoxia, followed by microglia after 6-24 hr of hypoxia. Minocycline administration suppressed microglial activation and decreased astrocyte activation at 6 hr and VHA at 24 hr of hypoxia. These results suggest that astrocytes contribute to the neuronal response during the first hour of hypoxia, whereas microglial cells, via cross-talk with astrocytes, are involved in the VHA during the first 24 hr of acclimatization.

  12. Vascular effects of intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kanagy, Nancy L

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by repeated upper airway obstruction during sleep and affects between 5% and 20% of the population. Epidemiological studies reveal that sleep apnea and associated intermittent hypoxemia increase the risk for hypertension and vascular disease but the mechanisms underlying these effects are incompletely understood. This review reports the results of rodent models of intermittent hypoxia (IH) and relates them to the observed hemodynamic and vascular consequences of sleep apnea. These animal studies have demonstrated that IH exposure in the absence of any other comorbidity causes hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and augmented constrictor sensitivity, all due at least in part to increased vascular oxidative stress. Animal studies have used a variety of exposure paradigms to study intermittent hypoxia and these different exposure protocols can cause hypocapnia or hypercapnia-or maintain eucapnia-with accompanying alterations in plasma pH. It appears that these different profiles of arterial blood gases can lead to divergent results but the impact of these differences is still being investigated. Overall, the studies in rodents have clearly demonstrated that the vascular and hemodynamic impact of intermittent hypoxia provides a strong rationale for treating clinical sleep apnea to prevent the resulting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  13. [Hypoxia and oxygen content during dialysis].

    PubMed

    Tulli, G; Vignali, G; Guadagnucci, A; Mondello, V; Pacciani, S; Pappagallo, S

    1992-03-01

    In a study of 72 patients treated with acetate and bicarbonate dialysis, the Authors verified if hypoxic hypoxia caused by dialysis depends on a deficit in oxygen content with an inherent risk of tissue hypoxia. PO2uv (uncompensated venous oxygen partial pressure) and CQ (cardiac compensation factor) derived from the oxygen absorption curve were studied by a new Ole Siggard-Andersen algorithm. The results do not show a risk of tissue hypoxia in the postdialytic period. PMID:1589077

  14. Identification of one-electron reductases that activate both the hypoxia prodrug SN30000 and diagnostic probe EF5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingli; Guise, Chris P; Dachs, Gabi U; Phung, Yen; Hsu, Annie Huai-Ling; Lambie, Neil K; Patterson, Adam V; Wilson, William R

    2014-10-15

    SN30000 is a second-generation benzotriazine-N-oxide hypoxia-activated prodrug scheduled for clinical trial. Previously we showed that covalent binding of the hypoxia probe EF5 predicts metabolic activation of SN30000 in a panel of cancer cell lines under anoxia, suggesting that they are activated by the same reductases. However the identity of these reductases is unknown. Here, we test whether forced expression of nine oxidoreductases with known or suspected roles in bioreductive prodrug metabolism (AKR1C3, CYB5R3, FDXR, MTRR, NDOR1, NOS2A, NQO1, NQO2 and POR) enhances oxic or anoxic reduction of SN30000 and EF5 by HCT116 cells. Covalent binding of (14)C-EF5 and reduction of SN30000 to its 1-oxide and nor-oxide metabolites was highly selective for anoxia in all lines, with significantly elevated anoxic metabolism of both compounds in lines over-expressing POR, MTRR, NOS2A or NDOR1. There was a strong correlation between EF5 binding and SN30000 metabolism under anoxia across the cell lines (R(2)=0.84, p=0.0001). Antiproliferative potency of SN30000 under anoxia was increased most strongly by overexpression of MTRR and POR. Transcript abundance in human tumours, evaluated using public domain mRNA expression data, was highest for MTRR, followed by POR, NOS2A and NDOR1, with little variation between tumour types. Immunostaining of tissue microarrays demonstrated variable MTRR protein expression across 517 human cancers with most displaying low expression. In conclusion, we have identified four diflavin reductases (POR, MTRR, NOS2A and NDOR1) capable of reducing both SN30000 and EF5, further supporting use of 2-nitroimidazole probes to predict the ability of hypoxic cells to activate SN30000. PMID:25130546

  15. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall Steven; Rocha, Sonia

    2008-08-15

    Hypoxia induces profound changes in the cellular gene expression profile. The discovery of a major transcription factor family activated by hypoxia, HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor), and the factors that contribute to HIF regulation have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the molecular aspects of the hypoxic response. However, in addition to HIF, other transcription factors and cellular pathways are activated by exposure to reduced oxygen. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge of how additional hypoxia-responsive transcription factors integrate with HIF and how other cellular pathways such as chromatin remodelling, translation regulation and microRNA induction, contribute to the co-ordinated cellular response observed following hypoxic stress.

  16. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Koziel, Violette; Jazi, Rozat; Audonnet, Sandra; Vert, Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Daval, Jean-Luc; Pourié, Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min) on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence). We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP) kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  17. Arabidopsis CML38, a Calcium Sensor That Localizes to Ribonucleoprotein Complexes under Hypoxia Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Carlee; Li, Tian

    2016-01-01

    During waterlogging and the associated oxygen deprivation stress, plants respond by the induction of adaptive programs, including the redirected expression of gene networks toward the synthesis of core hypoxia-response proteins. Among these core response proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is the calcium sensor CML38, a protein related to regulator of gene silencing calmodulin-like proteins (rgsCaMs). CML38 transcripts are up-regulated more than 300-fold in roots within 6 h of hypoxia treatment. Transfer DNA insertional mutants of CML38 show an enhanced sensitivity to hypoxia stress, with lowered survival and more severe inhibition of root and shoot growth. By using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) translational fusions, CML38 protein was found to be localized to cytosolic granule structures similar in morphology to hypoxia-induced stress granules. Immunoprecipitation of CML38 from the roots of hypoxia-challenged transgenic plants harboring CML38pro::CML38:YFP followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of protein targets associated with messenger RNA ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes including stress granules, which are known to accumulate as messenger RNA storage and triage centers during hypoxia. This finding is further supported by the colocalization of CML38 with the mRNP stress granule marker RNA Binding Protein 47 (RBP47) upon cotransfection of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Ruthenium Red treatment results in the loss of CML38 signal in cytosolic granules, suggesting that calcium is necessary for stress granule association. These results confirm that CML38 is a core hypoxia response calcium sensor protein and suggest that it serves as a potential calcium signaling target within stress granules and other mRNPs that accumulate during flooding stress responses. PMID:26634999

  18. Differential roles of hypoxia and innate immunity in juvenile and adult dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Preuße, Corinna; Allenbach, Yves; Hoffmann, Olaf; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Pehl, Debora; Radke, Josefine; Doeser, Alexandra; Schneider, Udo; Alten, Rieke H E; Kallinich, Tilmann; Benveniste, Olivier; von Moers, Arpad; Schoser, Benedikt; Schara, Ulrike; Stenzel, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) can occur in both adults and juveniles with considerable clinical differences. The links between immune-mediated mechanisms and vasculopathy with respect to development of perifascicular pathology are incompletely understood. We investigated skeletal muscle from newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve juvenile (jDM) and adult dermatomyositis (aDM) patients focusing on hypoxia-related pathomechanisms, vessel pathology, and immune mechanisms especially in the perifascicular region. Therefore, we assessed the skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 aDM, and 15 jDM patients by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Transcriptional analyses of genes involved in hypoxia, as well as in innate and adaptive immunity were performed by quantitative Polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of whole tissue cross sections including perifascicular muscle fibers.Through these analysis, we found that basic features of DM, like perifascicular atrophy and inflammatory infiltrates, were present at similar levels in jDM and aDM patients. However, jDM was characterized by predominantly hypoxia-driven pathology in perifascicular small fibers and by macrophages expressing markers of hypoxia. A more pronounced regional loss of capillaries, but no relevant activation of type-1 Interferon (IFN)-associated pathways was noted. Conversely, in aDM, IFN-related genes were expressed at significantly elevated levels, and Interferon-stimulated gene (ISG)15 was strongly positive in small perifascicular fibers whereas hypoxia-related mechanisms did not play a significant role.In our study we could provide new molecular data suggesting a conspicuous pathophysiological 'dichotomy' between jDM and aDM: In jDM, perifascicular atrophy is tightly linked to hypoxia-related pathology, and poorly to innate immunity. In aDM, perifascicular atrophy is prominently associated with molecules driving innate immunity, while hypoxia-related mechanisms seem to be less relevant. PMID:27121733

  19. Grave Markers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMuro, Ted

    1985-01-01

    Junior high school students studied the cultural uses, symbolic meanings, and general physical forms of tombs and tombstones and then used basic slab building techniques to construct large clay grave markers. (RM)

  20. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  1. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ng, C T; Biniecka, M; Kennedy, A; McCormick, J; FitzGerald, O; Bresnihan, B; Buggy, D; Taylor, C T; O'Sullivan, J; Fearon, U; Veale, D J

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO2) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. Methods Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO2 under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 1β (IL1β), interferon γ (IFNγ), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3α (MIP3α) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. Results The tPO2 was 22.5 (range 3.2–54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=−0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (−0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=−0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO2 in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), IL1β, IFNγ and MIP3α in patients with tPO2 <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). Conclusions This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO2, inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint. PMID:20439288

  2. Hypoxia Induces Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Follicular Thyroid Cancer: Involvement of Regulation of Twist by Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeon Ju; Na, Hwi Jung; Suh, Michelle J.; Ban, Myung Jin; Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Kim, Won Shik; Kim, Jae Wook; Choi, Eun Chang; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Chang, Jae Won

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a relatively fair prognosis, distant metastasis sometimes results in poor prognosis and survival. There is little understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the aggressiveness potential of thyroid cancer. We showed that hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) induced aggressiveness in FTC cells and identified the underlying mechanism of the HIF-1α-induced invasive characteristics. Materials and Methods Cells were cultured under controlled hypoxic environments (1% O2) or normoxic conditions. The effect of hypoxia on HIF-1α, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) related markers were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Invasion and wound healing assay were conducted to identify functional character of EMT. The involvement of HIF-1α and Twist in EMT were studied using gene overexpression or silencing. After orthotopic nude mouse model was established using the cells transfected with lentiviral shHIF-1α, tissue analysis was done. Results Hypoxia induces HIF-1α expression and EMT, including typical morphologic changes, cadherin shift, and increased vimentin expression. We showed that overexpression of HIF-1α via transfection resulted in the aforementioned changes without hypoxia, and repression of HIF-1α with RNA interference suppressed hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and EMT. Furthermore, we also observed that Twist expression was regulated by HIF-1α. These were confirmed in the orthotopic FTC model. Conclusion Hypoxia induced HIF-1α, which in turn induced EMT, resulting in the increased capacity for invasion and migration of cells via regulation of the Twist signal pathway in FTC cells. These findings provide insight into a possible therapeutic strategy to prevent invasive and metastatic FTC. PMID:26446630

  3. Glyceryl Trinitrate Inhibits Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Apoptosis in the Syncytiotrophoblast of the Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Belkacemi, Louiza; Bainbridge, Shannon A.; Dickinson, Michelle A.; Smith, Graeme N.; Graham, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    Damage of the placenta resulting from ischemia-reperfusion is important to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Here we investigated whether low concentrations of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a nitric oxide mimetic with anti-apoptotic properties, inhibit hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis in the syncytiotrophoblast of chorionic villous explants from human placentas. Compared with villi analyzed immediately after delivery or maintained under normoxic conditions, villi exposed to a 6-hour cycle of hypoxia/reoxygenation exhibited greater numbers of syncytiotrophoblasts with terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive nuclei in the syncytiotrophoblast. This increased number of TUNEL-positive nuclei was paralleled by higher levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (marker of lipid peroxidation), nitrotyrosine residues, and active caspase-3 and polyADP-ribose polymerase expression. Morphological analysis of explants exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation revealed apoptotic and aponecrotic features similar to those of chorionic villi from preeclamptic pregnancies. Treatment with GTN during the hy-poxia/reoxygenation cycle blocked the increases in the number of TUNEL-positive nuclei and in the levels of 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine, and active caspase-3. Incubation with GTN also attenuated the hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced polyADP-ribose polymerase expression and the apoptotic and aponecrotic morphological alterations. These results suggest that small concentrations of nitric oxide protect chorionic villi from hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced damage and provide a rationale for the use of low doses of nitric oxide mimetics in the treatment and/or prevention of preeclampsia. PMID:17322376

  4. Superoxide radical production in response to environmental hypoxia in cultured shrimp.

    PubMed

    Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Saldierna, Ricardo; Ahuejote-Sandoval, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    Markers of oxidative stress in response to hypoxia and reoxygenation were assessed in Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). Adult shrimp were either exposed to hypoxia (1 mg O(2)/L) for 6, 12, or 24 h followed by 1-h reoxygenation, or exposed to hypoxia for 24 h followed by 1- to 6-h reoxygenation. In all cases, shrimp maintained at constant normoxia were used as controls. Spectrophotometric techniques were applied to analyze lactate concentration, superoxide radical (O(2)(*-)) production, lipid peroxidation (TBARS), and antioxidant capacity status in muscle, hepatopancreas, and gill samples. Results indicate differences among tissues, even under control conditions. O(2)(*-) production and TBARS levels were higher in hepatopancreas than in gill or muscle. No effect of exposure to hypoxia was found. However, reoxygenation following exposure to hypoxia was found to affect the oxidative metabolism of muscle and hepatopancreas from cultured shrimp. Lactate concentration and O(2)(*-) production increased while antioxidant capacity decreased in hepatopancreas and muscle in the first hours of reoxygenation. This could translate into tissue damage, which may significantly jeopardize the commercial aquaculture product.

  5. Hypoxia-induced gene expression results from selective mRNA partitioning to the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Jonas J.; Naarmann-de Vries, Isabel S.; Ujvari, Stefanie J.; Klinger, Bertram; Kasim, Mumtaz; Benko, Edgar; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H.; Bondke Persson, Anja; Lorenzen, Stephan; Meier, Jochen C.; Blüthgen, Nils; Persson, Pontus B.; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Mrowka, Ralf; Fähling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a primary energy-consuming process in the cell. Therefore, under hypoxic conditions, rapid inhibition of global mRNA translation represents a major protective strategy to maintain energy metabolism. How some mRNAs, especially those that encode crucial survival factors, continue to be efficiently translated in hypoxia is not completely understood. By comparing specific transcript levels in ribonucleoprotein complexes, cytoplasmic polysomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound ribosomes, we show that the synthesis of proteins encoded by hypoxia marker genes is favoured at the ER in hypoxia. Gene expression profiling revealed that transcripts particularly increased by the HIF-1 transcription factor network show hypoxia-induced enrichment at the ER. We found that mRNAs favourably translated at the ER have higher conservation scores for both the 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) and contain less upstream initiation codons (uAUGs), indicating the significance of these sequence elements for sustained mRNA translation under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, we found enrichment of specific cis-elements in mRNA 5′- as well as 3′-UTRs that mediate transcript localization to the ER in hypoxia. We conclude that transcriptome partitioning between the cytoplasm and the ER permits selective mRNA translation under conditions of energy shortage. PMID:25753659

  6. Approximate Simulation of Acute Hypobaric Hypoxia with Normobaric Hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Some manufacturers of reduced oxygen (O2) breathing devices claim a comparable hypobaric hypoxia (HH) training experience by providing F(sub I) O2 < 0.209 at or near sea level pressure to match the ambient O2 partial pressure (iso-pO2) of the target altitude. METHODS. Literature from investigators and manufacturers indicate that these devices may not properly account for the 47 mmHg of water vapor partial pressure that reduces the inspired partial pressure of O2 (P(sub I) O2). Nor do they account for the complex reality of alveolar gas composition as defined by the Alveolar Gas Equation. In essence, by providing iso-pO2 conditions for normobaric hypoxia (NH) as for HH exposures the devices ignore P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 as more direct agents to induce signs and symptoms of hypoxia during acute training exposures. RESULTS. There is not a sufficient integrated physiological understanding of the determinants of P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 under acute NH and HH given the same hypoxic pO2 to claim a device that provides isohypoxia. Isohypoxia is defined as the same distribution of hypoxia signs and symptoms under any circumstances of equivalent hypoxic dose, and hypoxic pO2 is an incomplete hypoxic dose. Some devices that claim an equivalent HH experience under NH conditions significantly overestimate the HH condition, especially when simulating altitudes above 10,000 feet (3,048 m). CONCLUSIONS. At best, the claim should be that the devices provide an approximate HH experience since they only duplicate the ambient pO2 at sea level as at altitude (iso-pO2 machines). An approach to reduce the overestimation is to at least provide machines that create the same P(sub I)O2 (iso-P(sub I)O2 machines) conditions at sea level as at the target altitude, a simple software upgrade.

  7. Validation of a method for simultaneous determination of nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles and chloramphenicols in swine tissues by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xia; Li, Yun; Zhong, Feng; Li, Xiaowei; Huang, Yaoling; Ding, Shuangyang; Shen, Jianzhong

    2013-05-31

    This paper presents a sensitive and confirmatory multi-residue method for the analysis of 23 veterinary drugs and metabolites belonging to three classes (nitroimidazoles, benzimidazoles, and chloramphenicols) in porcine muscle, liver, and kidney. After extracted with ethyl acetate and basic ethyl acetate sequentially, the crude extracts were defatted with hexane and further purified using Oasis MCX solid-phase extraction cartridges. Rapid determination was carried out by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Data acquisition was performed under positive and negative mode simultaneously. Recoveries based on matrix-matched calibrations for meat, liver, and kidney ranged from 50.6 to 108.1%. The method quantification limits were in the range of 3-100ng/kg. PMID:23017446

  8. Hypoxia signaling--license to metastasize.

    PubMed

    Vanharanta, Sakari; Massagué, Joan

    2013-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) have long been linked to malignant tumor phenotypes in various cancer types, and several downstream mediators of HIF action are deregulated in metastatic carcinomas. A new study links hypoxia-induced collagen remodeling to sarcoma progression, providing evidence for unifying mechanisms of carcinoma and sarcoma metastasis. PMID:24124230

  9. Cancer cell-associated cytoplasmic B7–H4 is induced by hypoxia through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and promotes cancer cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, You-Kyoung; Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, Il-Whan; Lee, Soo-Woong; Lee, Sang Min

    2015-04-03

    Aberrant B7–H4 expression in cancer tissues serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for poor survival in patients with cancer. However, the factor(s) that induce cancer cell-associated B7–H4 remain to be fully elucidated. We herein demonstrate that hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription in primary CD138{sup +} multiple myeloma cells and cancer cell lines. In support of this finding, analysis of the Multiple Myeloma Genomics Portal (MMGP) data set revealed a positive correlation between the mRNA expression levels of B7–H4 and the endogenous hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrogenase 9. Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 expression was detected in the cytoplasm, but not in cancer cell membranes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) to proximal hypoxia-response element (HRE) sites within the B7–H4 promoter. Knockdown of HIF-1α and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α diminished B7–H4 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of cytoplasmic B7–H4 in MCF-7 decreased the S-phase cell population under hypoxia. Finally, MMGP analysis revealed a positive correlation between the transcript levels of B7–H4 and proliferation-related genes including MKI67, CCNA1, and Myc in several patients with multiple myeloma. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms underlying B7–H4 upregulation and its role in cancer cell proliferation in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription and protein expression. • Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 is detected in the cytoplasm, but not on membrane. • ChIP assay reveals a binding of HIF-1α to B7–H4 promoter at HRE site. • Knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α reduce B7–H4 expression. • B7–H4 knockdown decrease the number of cells in S-phase of cell cycle.

  10. Impaired acclimatization to chronic hypoxia in adult male and female rats following neonatal hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lumbroso, Delphine; Joseph, Vincent

    2009-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that neonatal exposure to hypoxia alters acclimatization to chronic hypoxia later in life. Rat pups were exposed to normobaric hypoxia (12% O(2); nHx group) in a sealed chamber, or to normoxia (21% O(2); nNx group) from the day before birth to postnatal day 10. The animals were then raised in normal conditions until reaching 12 wk of age. At this age, we assessed ventilatory and hematological acclimatization to chronic hypoxia by exposing male and female nHx and nNx rats for 2 wk to 10% O(2). Minute ventilation, metabolic rate, hypoxic ventilatory response, hematocrit, and hemoglobin levels were measured both before and after acclimatization. We also quantified right ventricular hypertrophy as an index of pulmonary hypertension both before and after acclimatization. There was a significant effect of neonatal hypoxia that decreases ventilatory response (relative to metabolic rate, VE/VCO(2)) to acute hypoxia before acclimatization in males but not in females. nHx rats had an impaired acclimatization to chronic hypoxia characterized by altered respiratory pattern and elevated hematocrit and hemoglobin levels after acclimatization, in both males and females. Right ventricular hypertrophy was present before and after acclimatization in nHx rats, indicating that neonatal hypoxia results in pulmonary hypertension in adults. We conclude that neonatal hypoxia impairs acclimatization to chronic hypoxia in adults and may be a factor contributing to the establishment of chronic mountain sickness in humans living at high altitude.

  11. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF A NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARY TO HYPOXIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bottom water hypoxia is a common adverse consequence of nutrient enrichment in estuaries and coastal waters. To protect against hypoxia, it is helpful to know which waters are most susceptible to hypoxia. Hypoxia has been observed regularly in Pensacola Bay, a northeastern Gulf o...

  12. Focus on the Controversial Aspects of 64Cu-ATSM in Tumoral Hypoxia Mapping by PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Colombié, Mathilde; Gouard, Sébastien; Frindel, Mathieu; Vidal, Aurélien; Chérel, Michel; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bourgeois, Mickaël

    2015-01-01

    Mapping tumor hypoxia is a great challenge in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging as the precise functional information of the biological processes is needed for many effective therapeutic strategies. Tumor hypoxia has been widely reported as a poor prognostic indicator and is often associated with tumor aggressiveness, chemo- and radio-resistance. An accurate diagnosis of hypoxia is a challenge and is crucial for providing accurate treatment for patients’ survival benefits. This challenge has led to the emergence of new and novel PET tracers for the functional and metabolic characterization of tumor hypoxia non-invasively. Among these tracers, copper semicarbazone compound [64Cu]-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (=64Cu-ATSM) has been developed as a tracer for hypoxia imaging. This review focuses on 64Cu-ATSM PET imaging and the concept is presented in two sections. The first section describes its in vitro development and pre-clinical testing and particularly its affinity in different cell lines. The second section describes the controversial reports on its specificity for hypoxia imaging. The review concludes that 64Cu-ATSM – more than a hypoxic tracer, exhibits tracer accumulation in tumor, which is linked to the redox potential and reactive oxygen species. The authors concluded that 64Cu-ATSNM is a marker of over-reduced cell state and thus an indirect marker for hypoxia imaging. The affinity of 64Cu-ATSM for over-reduced cells was observed to be a complex phenomenon. And to provide a definitive and convincing mechanism, more in vivo studies are needed to prove the diagnostic utility of 64Cu-ATSM. PMID:26380261

  13. Focus on the Controversial Aspects of (64)Cu-ATSM in Tumoral Hypoxia Mapping by PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Colombié, Mathilde; Gouard, Sébastien; Frindel, Mathieu; Vidal, Aurélien; Chérel, Michel; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bourgeois, Mickaël

    2015-01-01

    Mapping tumor hypoxia is a great challenge in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging as the precise functional information of the biological processes is needed for many effective therapeutic strategies. Tumor hypoxia has been widely reported as a poor prognostic indicator and is often associated with tumor aggressiveness, chemo- and radio-resistance. An accurate diagnosis of hypoxia is a challenge and is crucial for providing accurate treatment for patients' survival benefits. This challenge has led to the emergence of new and novel PET tracers for the functional and metabolic characterization of tumor hypoxia non-invasively. Among these tracers, copper semicarbazone compound [64Cu]-diacetyl-bis(N (4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) (=64Cu-ATSM) has been developed as a tracer for hypoxia imaging. This review focuses on 64Cu-ATSM PET imaging and the concept is presented in two sections. The first section describes its in vitro development and pre-clinical testing and particularly its affinity in different cell lines. The second section describes the controversial reports on its specificity for hypoxia imaging. The review concludes that 64Cu-ATSM - more than a hypoxic tracer, exhibits tracer accumulation in tumor, which is linked to the redox potential and reactive oxygen species. The authors concluded that 64Cu-ATSNM is a marker of over-reduced cell state and thus an indirect marker for hypoxia imaging. The affinity of 64Cu-ATSM for over-reduced cells was observed to be a complex phenomenon. And to provide a definitive and convincing mechanism, more in vivo studies are needed to prove the diagnostic utility of 64Cu-ATSM. PMID:26380261

  14. Hypoxia and metabolic adaptation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Eales, K L; Hollinshead, K E R; Tennant, D A

    2016-01-01

    Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) is a pervasive physiological and pathophysiological stimulus that metazoan organisms have contended with since they evolved from their single-celled ancestors. The effect of hypoxia on a tissue can be either positive or negative, depending on the severity, duration and context. Over the long-term, hypoxia is not usually consistent with normal function and so multicellular organisms have had to evolve both systemic and cellular responses to hypoxia. Our reliance on oxygen for efficient adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation has meant that the cellular metabolic network is particularly sensitive to alterations in oxygen tension. Metabolic changes in response to hypoxia are elicited through both direct mechanisms, such as the reduction in ATP generation by oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of fatty-acid desaturation, and indirect mechanisms including changes in isozyme expression through hypoxia-responsive transcription factor activity. Significant regions of cancers often grow in hypoxic conditions owing to the lack of a functional vasculature. As hypoxic tumour areas contain some of the most malignant cells, it is important that we understand the role metabolism has in keeping these cells alive. This review will outline our current understanding of many of the hypoxia-induced changes in cancer cell metabolism, how they are affected by other genetic defects often present in cancers, and how these metabolic alterations support the malignant hypoxic phenotype. PMID:26807645

  15. Hypoxia-targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Perche, F; Biswas, S; Wang, T; Zhu, L; Torchilin, V P

    2014-03-24

    Altered vasculature and the resultant chaotic tumor blood flow lead to the appearance in fast-growing tumors of regions with gradients of oxygen tension and acute hypoxia (less than 1.4% oxygen). Due to its roles in tumorigenesis and resistance to therapy, hypoxia represents a problem in cancer therapy. Insufficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the hypoxic regions in solid tumors is recognized as one of the causes of resistance to therapy. This led to the development of hypoxia imaging agents, and the use of hypoxia-activated anticancer prodrugs. Here we show the first example of the hypoxia-induced siRNA uptake and silencing using a nanocarrier consisting of polyethyleneglycol 2000, azobenzene, polyethyleneimine (PEI)(1.8 kDa), and 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) units (the nanocarrier is referred to as PAPD), where azobenzene imparts hypoxia sensitivity and specificity. We report hypoxia-activated green fluorescent protein (GFP) silencing in vitro and its downregulation in GFP-expressing tumors after intravenous administration. The proposed nanoformulation represents a novel tumor-environment-responsive modality for cancer targeting and siRNA delivery. PMID:24554550

  16. Mitochondrial respiratory function induces endogenous hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Prior, Sara; Kim, Ara; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia influences many key biological functions. In cancer, it is generally believed that hypoxic condition is generated deep inside the tumor because of the lack of oxygen supply. However, consumption of oxygen by cancer should be one of the key means of regulating oxygen concentration to induce hypoxia but has not been well studied. Here, we provide direct evidence of the mitochondrial role in the induction of intracellular hypoxia. We used Acetylacetonatobis [2-(2'-benzothienyl) pyridinato-kN, kC3'] iridium (III) (BTP), a novel oxygen sensor, to detect intracellular hypoxia in living cells via microscopy. The well-differentiated cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MCF-7, showed intracellular hypoxia without exogenous hypoxia in an open environment. This may be caused by high oxygen consumption, low oxygen diffusion in water, and low oxygen incorporation to the cells. In contrast, the poorly-differentiated cancer cell lines: PC-3 and MDAMB231 exhibited intracellular normoxia by low oxygen consumption. The specific complex I inhibitor, rotenone, and the reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content reduced intracellular hypoxia, indicating that intracellular oxygen concentration is regulated by the consumption of oxygen by mitochondria. HIF-1α was activated in endogenously hypoxic LNCaP and the activation was dependent on mitochondrial respiratory function. Intracellular hypoxic status is regulated by glucose by parabolic dose response. The low concentration of glucose (0.045 mg/ml) induced strongest intracellular hypoxia possibly because of the Crabtree effect. Addition of FCS to the media induced intracellular hypoxia in LNCaP, and this effect was partially mimicked by an androgen analog, R1881, and inhibited by the anti-androgen, flutamide. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory function determines intracellular hypoxic status and may regulate oxygen-dependent biological functions. PMID:24586439

  17. Imaging Hypoxia in Orthotopic Rat Liver Tumors with Iodine 124–labeled Iodoazomycin Galactopyranoside PET1

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Christopher C.; Brader, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Chun, Yun Shin; Woo, Yanghee; Singh, Paramjeet; Carlin, Sean; Wen, Bixiu; Ling, C. Clifton; Hricak, Hedvig; Fong, Yuman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate iodine 124 (124I)-labeled iodoazomycin galactopyranoside (IAZGP) positron emission tomography (PET) in the detection of hypoxia in an orthotopic rat liver tumor model by comparing regions of high 124I-IAZGP uptake with independent measures of hypoxia and to determine the optimal time after injection to depict hypoxia. Materials and Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. Morris hepatoma tumors were established in the livers of 15 rats. Tumor oxygenation was measured in two rats with a fluorescence fiberoptic oxygen probe. 124I-IAZGP was coadministered with the established hypoxia markers pimonidazole and EF5 in nine rats; 12-hour PET data acquisition was performed 24 hours later. Tumor cryosections were analyzed with immunofluorescence and autoradiography. In the four remaining rats, serial 20- and 60-minute PET data acquisition was peformed up to 48 hours after tracer administration. Results: Oxygen probe measurements showed severe hypoxia (<1 mm Hg) distributed evenly throughout tumor tissue. Analysis of cryosections showed diffuse homogeneous uptake of 124I-IAZGP throughout all tumors. The 124I-IAZGP distribution correlated positively with pimonidazole (r = 0.78) and EF5 (r = 0.76) distribution. Tracer uptake in tumors was detectable with PET after 24 hours in seven of nine rats. In rats that underwent serial PET, tumor-to-liver contrast was sufficient to enable detection of hypoxia between 6 and 48 hours after tracer administration. The optimal ratio between signal intensity and tumor-to-liver contrast occurred 6 hours after tracer administration. Conclusion: Regions of high 124I-IAZGP uptake in orthotopic rat liver tumors are consistent with independent measures of hypoxia; visualization of hypoxia with 124I-IAZGP PET is optimal 6 hours after injection. © RSNA, 2008 PMID:18641253

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells protect from hypoxia-induced alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Uzunhan, Yurdagül; Bernard, Olivier; Marchant, Dominique; Dard, Nicolas; Vanneaux, Valérie; Larghero, Jérôme; Gille, Thomas; Clerici, Christine; Valeyre, Dominique; Nunes, Hilario; Boncoeur, Emilie; Planès, Carole

    2016-03-01

    Administration of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) reduces lung inflammation, fibrosis, and mortality in animal models of lung injury, by a mechanism not completely understood. We investigated whether hMSC would prevent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by hypoxia in primary rat alveolar epithelial cell (AEC). In AEC cultured on semipermeable filters, prolonged hypoxic exposure (1.5% O2 for up to 12 days) induced phenotypic changes consistent with EMT, i.e., a change in cell morphology, a decrease in transepithelial resistance (Rte) and in the expression of epithelial markers [zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin, AQP-5, TTF-1], together with an increase in mesenchymal markers [vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)]. Expression of transcription factors driving EMT such as SNAIL1, ZEB1, and TWIST1 increased after 2, 24, and 48 h of hypoxia, respectively. Hypoxia also induced TGF-β1 mRNA expression and the secretion of active TGF-β1 in apical medium, and the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), two inducers of EMT. Coculture of AEC with hMSC partially prevented the decrease in Rte and in ZO-1, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 expression, and the increase in vimentin expression induced by hypoxia. It also abolished the increase in TGF-β1 expression and in TGF-β1-induced genes ZEB1, TWIST1, and CTGF. Finally, incubation with human recombinant KGF at a concentration similar to what was measured in hMSC-conditioned media restored the expression of TTF-1 and prevented the increase in TWIST1, TGF-β1, and CTGF in hypoxic AEC. Our results indicate that hMSC prevent hypoxia-induced alveolar EMT through the paracrine modulation of EMT signaling pathways and suggest that this effect is partly mediated by KGF.

  19. Direct effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide on ecdysone secretion by insect prothoracic glands.

    PubMed

    DeLalio, Leon J; Dion, Sara M; Bootes, Abigail M; Smith, Wendy A

    2015-05-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are controlled by the molt stimulating hormone ecdysone. A recent study suggests that reduced tissue oxygenation correlates with the size-sensing mechanism responsible for triggering molting. When reared in hypoxia, larvae of Manduca sexta and Drosophila melanogaster initiate molting at lower weights than do larvae reared in normoxia. Furthermore, in Drosophila, the signaling gas nitric oxide (NO) appears to be required for normal developmental timing. As observed in Drosophila, NO signaling targets the nuclear hormone receptor beta fushi tarazu transcription factor 1 (βFTZ-F1) through activation of Drosophila hormone receptor 3 (DHR3), two key regulators of ecdysone production and metamorphic tissue progression. We set out to directly examine the effects of hypoxia and NO on ecdysone secretion using prothoracic glands from feeding fifth (last) larval stage M. sexta. Our results indicate that in vitro treatment of prothoracic glands with hypoxia (2% oxygen) or the NO donor DETA-NONOate significantly inhibit ecdysone secretion. Protein markers of glandular activity were also in keeping with an initial inhibition, measured a decrease in phosphorylated ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase) and an increase in non-phosphorylated 4EBP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein). Additionally, gene expression levels of Manduca hormone receptor 3 (mhr3), βftz-f1, nitric oxide synthase (nos), and the PTTH receptor torso, were quantified using real-time PCR. NO treatment increased mhr3 expression and decreased nos expression. Hypoxia increased mhr3 transcription after 2 hr, but decreased transcription after 12 hr, with no effect on nos expression. Both NO and hypoxia had small effects on βftz-f1 expression, yet strongly increased torso transcription. Our results demonstrate that, in isolated prothoracic glands, hypoxia and NO signaling directly inhibit ecdysteroid secretion, but at the same time alter aspects of prothoracic

  20. Metabolic consequences of intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    Insulin resistance is being recognized increasingly as the basis for the constellation of metabolic abnormalities that make up the metabolic syndrome, or Syndrome X. Insulin resistance is also the primary risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is currently reaching epidemic proportions by affecting more than 170 million people worldwide. A combination of environmental and genetic factors have led to a dramatic rise in visceral adiposity, the predominant factor causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Visceral adiposity is also the major risk factor for the development of Sleep Apnea (SA)--an association that has fueled interest in the co-morbidity of SA and the metabolic syndrome, but hampered attempts to ascribe an independent causative role for Sleep Apnea in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Numerous population and clinic-based epidemiologic studies have shown associations, often independent of obesity, between SA (or surrogates such as snoring) and measures of glucose dysregulation or type 2 diabetes. However, treatment of SA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has not been conclusive in demonstrating improvements in insulin resistance, perhaps due to the overwhelming effects of obesity. Here we show that in lean, otherwise healthy mice that exposure to intermittent hypoxia produced whole-body insulin resistance as determined by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and reduced glucose utilization in oxidative muscle fibers, but did not cause a change in hepatic glucose output. Furthermore, the increase in insulin resistance was not affected by blockade of the autonomic nervous system. We conclude that intermittent hypoxia can cause acute insulin resistance in otherwise lean healthy animals, and the response occurs independent of activation of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:18269187

  1. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7 day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15 min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans.

  2. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7 day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15 min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans. PMID:26341542

  3. Hypoxia and its implications in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-08-22

    Alterations in tissue oxygen pressure contribute to a number of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Low partial pressure of oxygen, a condition known as hypoxia, is a relevant feature in RA since it is involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, apoptosis, cartilage degradation, energy metabolism, and oxidative damage. Therefore, alterations in hypoxia-related signaling pathways are considered potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. The objective of this review is to highlight and update our current knowledge of the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of RA. We describe the experimental evidence that RA synovial tissue exists in a hypoxic state, as well as the origin and involvement of synovial hypoxia in different aspects of the pathogenic process.

  4. Hypoxia and its implications in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in tissue oxygen pressure contribute to a number of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Low partial pressure of oxygen, a condition known as hypoxia, is a relevant feature in RA since it is involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, apoptosis, cartilage degradation, energy metabolism, and oxidative damage. Therefore, alterations in hypoxia-related signaling pathways are considered potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. The objective of this review is to highlight and update our current knowledge of the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of RA. We describe the experimental evidence that RA synovial tissue exists in a hypoxic state, as well as the origin and involvement of synovial hypoxia in different aspects of the pathogenic process. PMID:27549205

  5. Evaluation of Hypoxia with Cu-ATSM

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Suzanne E.; Lewis, Jason S.; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of hypoxia is important in many diseases states in oncology, cardiology and neurology. The radiopharmaceutical, copper labelled diacetyl-bis(N-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM), has been used to assess hypoxia in many studies. In particular, Cu-ATSM has been used in oncologic settings to investigate tumor hypoxia and the role of this parameter in response to therapy and outcome. Other groups have conducted imaging studies assessing the role of hypoxia in cardiovascular disease and neurological disorders. Additionally, several groups have made significant progress into understanding the mechanism by which this compound accumulates in cells. Multiple preclinical and clinical studies have been conducted, shedding light on the important of careful image analysis when using this tracer. This review article focusses on the recent preclinical and clinical studies with this tracer. PMID:25704389

  6. Hypoxia: from molecular responses to ecosystem responses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rudolf S S

    2002-01-01

    Hypoxia affects thousands of km2 of marine waters all over the world, and has caused mass mortality of marine animals, benthic defaunation and decline in fisheries production in many places. The severity, frequency occurrence and spatial scale of hypoxia have increased in the last few decades. Due to rapid human population growth and global warming, the problem of hypoxia is likely to become worse in the coming years. Molecular responses of marine animals to hypoxia are poorly known. In many animals, a haem protein probably serves as the cellular sensor for oxygen, and reactive oxygen species are generated as signaling molecules. In mammal and fish, a heterodimeric transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) has been identified. HIF-1 receives signals from the molecular oxygen senor through redox reactions and/or phosphorylation, and in turn, regulates the transcription of a number of hypoxia-inducible genes, including genes involved in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and glycolysis. These molecular responses then cascade into a series of biochemical and physiological adjustments, enabling the animal to survive better under hypoxic conditions. Marine animals respond to hypoxia by first attempting to maintain oxygen delivery (e.g. increases in respiration rate, number of red blood cells, or oxygen binding capacity of hemoglobin), then by conserving energy (e.g. metabolic depression, down regulation of protein synthesis and down regulation/modification of certain regulatory enzymes). Upon exposure to prolonged hypoxia, animals must eventually resort to anaerobic respiration. Hypoxia reduces growth and feeding, which may eventually affect individual fitness. Effects of hypoxia on reproduction and development of marine animals, albeit important in affecting species survival, remain almost unknown. Many fish and marine organisms can detect, and actively avoid hypoxia. Some benthos may leave their burrows and move to sediment surface during hypoxia. These

  7. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies, presumed airway hypoxia sensors, in hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jie; Bishop, Tammie; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Yeger, Herman; Cutz, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs), presumed polymodal airway sensors, consist of innervated clusters of amine (serotonin) and peptide-producing cells. While NEB responses to acute hypoxia are mediated by a membrane-bound O2 sensor complex, responses to sustained and/or chronic hypoxia involve a prolyl hydroxylase (PHD)–hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent mechanism. We have previously reported hyperplasia of NEBs in the lungs of Phd1−/− mice associated with enhanced serotonin secretion. Here we use a novel multilabel immunofluorescence method to assess NEB distribution, frequency, and size, together with the number and size of NEB cell nuclei, and to colocalize multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear epitopes in the lungs of Phd1−/−, Phd2+/−, and Phd3−/− mice and compare them with wild-type controls. To define the mechanisms of NEB cell hyperplasia, we used antibodies against Mash1 and Prox1 (neurogenic genes involved in NEB cell differentiation/maturation), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, and the cell proliferation marker Ki67. Morphometric analysis of (% total lung area) immunostaining for synaptophysin (% synaptophysin), a cytoplasmic marker of NEB cells, was significantly increased in Phd1−/− and Phd3−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, NEB size and the number and size of NEB nuclei were also significantly increased, indicating that deficiency of Phds is associated with striking hyperplasia and hypertrophy of NEBs. In Phd2+/− mice, while mean % synaptophysin was comparable to wild-type controls, the NEB size was moderately increased, suggesting an effect even in heterozygotes. NEBs in all Phd-deficient mice showed increased expression of Mash1, Prox1, Ki67, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, in keeping with enhanced differentiation from precursor cells and a minor component of cell proliferation. Since the loss of PHD activity mimics chronic hypoxia, our data provide critical information on the potential role of PHDs in

  8. Hypoxia in relation to vasculature and proliferation in liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van . E-mail: h.vanlaarhoven@onco.umcn.nl; Kaanders, Johannes; Lok, Jasper; Peeters, Wenny J.M.; Rijken, Paul F.J.W.; Wiering, Bastiaan; Ruers, Theo J.M.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Heerschap, Arend; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypoxia measured by pimonidazole binding, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX) expression, proliferation, and vascularity in liver metastases of colorectal cancer and to compare GLUT1 and CA-IX expression in corresponding primary tumors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer, planned for metastasectomy, were included. The hypoxia marker pimonidazole and proliferation marker iododeoxyuridine were administered before surgery. After immunofluorescent staining of the frozen metastases, pimonidazole binding, vascularity, and proliferation were analyzed quantitatively. Thirteen paraffin-embedded primary tumors were stained immunohistochemically for GLUT1 and CA-IX expression, which was analyzed semiquantitatively in primary tumors and corresponding liver metastases. Results: In liver metastases, pimonidazole binding showed a pattern consistent with diffusion-limited hypoxia. The mean pimonidazole-positive fraction was 0.146; the mean distance from vessels to pimonidazole-positive areas was 80 {mu}m. When expressed, often co-localization was observed between pimonidazole binding and GLUT1 or CA-IX expression, but microregional areas of mismatch were also observed. No correlation between the level of pimonidazole binding and GLUT1 or CA-IX expression was observed. In some patients, a large fraction (up to 30%) of proliferating cells was present in pimonidazole-stained areas. Expression of CA-IX in primary tumors and metastases showed a significant correlation, which was absent for GLUT1 expression. Conclusions: Compared with other tumor types, liver metastases of colorectal cancer contain large amounts of hypoxic cells. The lack of correlation with pimonidazole binding brings into question the value of GLUT1 and CA-IX as endogenous markers of hypoxia.

  9. Acid-sensing ion channels under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yingjun, Guo; Xun, Qu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia represents the lack of oxygen below the basic level, and the range of known channels related to hypoxia is continually increasing. Since abnormal hypoxia initiates pathological processes in numerous diseases via, to a great degree, producing acidic microenvironment, the significance of these channels in this environment has, until now, remained completely unknown. However, recent discovery of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have enhanced our understanding of the hypoxic channelome. They belong to the degenerin/epithelial Na+ channel family and function once extracellular pH decreases to a certain level. So does the ratiocination emerge that ASICs participate in many hypoxia-induced pathological processes, including pain, apoptosis, malignancy, which all appear to involve them. Since evidence suggests that activity of ASICs is altered under pathological hypoxia, future studies are needed to deeply explore the relationship between ASICs and hypoxia, which may provide a progressive understanding of hypoxic effects in cancer, arthritis, intervertebral disc degeneration, ischemic brain injury and so on. PMID:23764948

  10. Sensing and surviving hypoxia in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Jonz, Michael G; Buck, Leslie T; Perry, Steve F; Schwerte, Thorsten; Zaccone, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    Surviving hypoxia is one of the most critical challenges faced by vertebrates. Most species have adapted to changing levels of oxygen in their environment with specialized organs that sense hypoxia, while only few have been uniquely adapted to survive prolonged periods of anoxia. The goal of this review is to present the most recent research on oxygen sensing, adaptation to hypoxia, and mechanisms of anoxia tolerance in nonmammalian vertebrates. We discuss the respiratory structures in fish, including the skin, gills, and air-breathing organs, and recent evidence for chemosensory neuroepithelial cells (NECs) in these tissues that initiate reflex responses to hypoxia. The use of the zebrafish as a genetic and developmental model has allowed observation of the ontogenesis of respiratory and chemosensory systems, demonstration of a putative intracellular O2 sensor in chemoreceptors that may initiate transduction of the hypoxia signal, and investigation into the effects of extreme hypoxia on cardiorespiratory development. Other organisms, such as goldfish and freshwater turtles, display a high degree of anoxia tolerance, and these models are revealing important adaptations at the cellular level, such as the regulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in defense of homeostasis in central neurons.

  11. The influence of chronic hypoxia upon chemoreception

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Frank L.

    2007-01-01

    Carotid body chemoreceptors are essential for time-dependent changes in ventilatory control during chronic hypoxia. Early theories of ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia focused on time-dependent changes in known ventilatory stimuli, such as small changes in arterial pH that may play a significant role in some species. However, plasticity in the cellular and molecular mechanisms of carotid body chemoreception play a major role in ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in all species studied. Chronic hypoxia causes changes in (a) ion channels (potassium, sodium, calcium) to increase glomus cell excitability, and (b) neurotransmitters (dopamine, acetylcholine, ATP) and neuromodulators (endothelin-1) to increase carotid body afferent activity for a given PO2 and optimize O2-sensitivity. O2-sensing heme-containing molecules in the carotid body have not been studied in chronic hypoxia. Plasticity in medullary respiratory centers processing carotid body afferent input also contributes to ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia. It is not known if the same mechanisms occur in patients with chronic hypoxemia from lung disease or high altitude natives. PMID:17291837

  12. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of bifunctional bisthiosemicarbazone 64Cu-complexes for the positron emission tomography imaging of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bonnitcha, Paul D; Vāvere, Amy L; Lewis, Jason S; Dilworth, Jonathan R

    2008-05-22

    The copper(II) bisthiosemicarbazonato complex, copper-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonate) (Cu-ATSM), has been used clinically as a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for the delineation of hypoxia. Six novel, asymmetric bis(thiosemicarbazones) derived from diacetyl-2-(4-N-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone)-3-(4-N-amino-3-thiosemicarbazone) (H2ATSM/A), one of which contained a nitroimidazole functionality, were radiolabeled with 64Cu (t1/2=12.7 h, beta+=19.3%). In vitro studies were performed on three of the compounds using EMT6 mammary carcinoma cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. All compounds displayed rapid cellular association and appreciable hypoxic selectivity with increased uptake under normoxic and hypoxic conditions when compared to 64Cu-ATSM. Biodistribution and small animal PET imaging studies were then carried out in vivo using two compounds in EMT6 tumor-bearing mice. The compounds showed high tumor uptake, but also substantial accumulation in the liver. These complexes demonstrate that H 2ATSM/A represents a novel and versatile synthetic platform that can be utilized to provide hypoxic cell selectivity through functionalization of the bisthiosemicarbazonate group.

  13. Radiosensitization by a new potent nucleoside analog: 1-(1[prime],3[prime],4[prime]-trihydroxy-2[prime]-Butoxy)methyl-2-nitroimidazole(RP-343)

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Chieko; Shoji, Takahiro; Mori, Tomoyuki ); Suzuki, Akira; Sato, Chihiro; Tanabe, Yoshitaka; Miyata, Yoshiyuki; Nishio, Azuma; Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Sakaguchi, Masakazu )

    1993-06-15

    A new hypoxic cell sensitizer has been synthesized; this is a 2-nitroimidazole nucleoside analog having erythritol as sugar moiety at the N-1 position of the imidazole ring (RP-343). Its potential as a potent hypoxic cell sensitizer was compared with that of RP-170 and etanidazole. Radiosensitization was tested in two murine tumors, EMT6 using in vitro and in vivo-in vitro assays and SCCVII using growth delay and TCD[sub 50] assays. Pharmacokinetic study was performed in Balb/c mice bearing EMT6 tumors and in Beagle dogs. The LD[sub 50] of each sensitizer was obtained with ICR mice. As might be expected from the almost identical electron affinities of the three sensitizers, they were equally effective against hypoxic EMT6 cells in vitro. While having the lowest partition coefficient (0.035), RP-343 exhibited almost equally effective distribution to tumors and sensitizing radiation activity. An intravenous (i.v.) injection of 100 mg/kg of RP-343, RP-170 and etanidazole showed an almost equal sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) of about 1.4 to solid EMT6 tumor under in vivo-in vitro assay and a virtually equal SER of 1.33-1.44 to solid SCCVII tumor under both tumor growth delay assay and TCD[sub 50] assay. A great advantage of RP-343 over RP-170 and etanidazole is its very much lower toxicity; their LD[sub 50]s in mice were > 6.0, 4.3 and 4.8 g/kg, respectively, on i.v. injection. The lower toxicity of RP-343 was supported by its lower concentrations in the brain; the RP-343 AUC for brain was 0.43 times that of RP-170. Three indices were selected to compare the three nitroimidazoles. SER at 5% LD[sub 50] doses of RP-343, RP-170 and etanidazole was 1.66, 1.59 and 1.56. At the same toxicity levels, RP-343 was found to have better sensitization of solid tumors over both etanidazole and RP-170. The maximum tumor concentration/AUC for brain (C[sub max/tumor]/AUC[sub brain]) ratios for RP-343 and RP-170 were 9.62 and 3.98. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Nanoparticles for Targeting Intratumoral Hypoxia: Exploiting a Potential Weakness of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Mihaela; Florian, Ioan Alexandru; Kacso, Gabriel; Craciun, Lucian; Boca, Sanda; Soritau, Olga; Florian, Ioan Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Extensive hypoxic regions are the daunting hallmark of glioblastoma, as they host aggressive stem-like cells, hinder drug delivery and shield cancer cells from the effects of radiotherapy. Nanotechnology could address most of these issues, as it employs nanoparticles (NPs) carrying drugs that selectively accumulate and achieve controlled drug release in tumor tissues. Methods overcoming the stiff interstitium and scarce vascularity within hypoxic zones include the incorporation of collagenases to degrade the collagen-rich tumor extracellular matrix, the use of multistage systems that progressively reduce NP size or of NP-loaded cells that display inherent hypoxia-targeting abilities. The unfavorable hypoxia-induced low pH could be converted into a therapeutical advantage by pH-responsive NPs or multilayer NPs, while overexpressed markers of hypoxic cells could be specifically targeted for an enhanced preferential drug delivery. Finally, promising new gene therapeutics could also be incorporated into nanovehicles, which could lead to silencing of hypoxia-specific genes that are overexpressed in cancer cells. In this review, we highlight NPs which have shown promising results in targeting cancer hypoxia and we discuss their applicability in glioblastoma, as well as possible limitations. Novel research directions in this field are also considered.

  15. Nanoparticles for Targeting Intratumoral Hypoxia: Exploiting a Potential Weakness of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Mihaela; Florian, Ioan Alexandru; Kacso, Gabriel; Craciun, Lucian; Boca, Sanda; Soritau, Olga; Florian, Ioan Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Extensive hypoxic regions are the daunting hallmark of glioblastoma, as they host aggressive stem-like cells, hinder drug delivery and shield cancer cells from the effects of radiotherapy. Nanotechnology could address most of these issues, as it employs nanoparticles (NPs) carrying drugs that selectively accumulate and achieve controlled drug release in tumor tissues. Methods overcoming the stiff interstitium and scarce vascularity within hypoxic zones include the incorporation of collagenases to degrade the collagen-rich tumor extracellular matrix, the use of multistage systems that progressively reduce NP size or of NP-loaded cells that display inherent hypoxia-targeting abilities. The unfavorable hypoxia-induced low pH could be converted into a therapeutical advantage by pH-responsive NPs or multilayer NPs, while overexpressed markers of hypoxic cells could be specifically targeted for an enhanced preferential drug delivery. Finally, promising new gene therapeutics could also be incorporated into nanovehicles, which could lead to silencing of hypoxia-specific genes that are overexpressed in cancer cells. In this review, we highlight NPs which have shown promising results in targeting cancer hypoxia and we discuss their applicability in glioblastoma, as well as possible limitations. Novel research directions in this field are also considered. PMID:27230936

  16. Bacopa monniera leaf extract ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced spatial memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Hota, Sunil Kumar; Barhwal, Kalpana; Baitharu, Iswar; Prasad, Dipti; Singh, Shashi Bala; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2009-04-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment has been attributed to several factors including increased oxidative stress, depleted mitochondrial bioenergetics, altered neurotransmission and apoptosis. This multifactorial response of the brain to hypobaric hypoxia limits the use of therapeutic agents that target individual pathways for ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment. The present study aimed at exploring the therapeutic potential of a bacoside rich leaf extract of Bacopa monniera in improving the memory functions in hypobaric conditions. The learning ability was evaluated in male Sprague Dawley rats along with memory retrieval following exposure to hypobaric conditions simulating an altitude of 25,000 ft for different durations. The effect of bacoside administration on apoptosis, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP levels, and oxidative stress markers and on plasma corticosterone levels was investigated. Expression of NR1 subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, neuronal cell adhesion molecules and was also studied along with CREB phosphorylation to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of bacoside action. Bacoside administration was seen to enhance learning ability in rats along with augmentation in memory retrieval and prevention of dendritic atrophy following hypoxic exposure. In addition, it decreased oxidative stress, plasma corticosterone levels and neuronal degeneration. Bacoside administration also increased cytochrome c oxidase activity along with a concomitant increase in ATP levels. Hence, administration of bacosides could be a useful therapeutic strategy in ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia induced cognitive dysfunctions and other related neurological disorders.

  17. Hypoxia on the Expression of Hepatoma Upregulated Protein in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Ingrid; Sakiyama, Marcelo J.; Ma, Tangeng; Fair, Logan; Zhou, Xinchun; Hassan, Mohamed; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Gomez, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoma upregulated protein (HURP) is a multifunctional protein with clinical promise. This protein has been demonstrated to be a predictive marker for the outcome in high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) patients, besides being a resistance factor in PCa. Although changes in oxygen tension (pO2) are associated with PCa aggressiveness, the role of hypoxia in the regulation of tumor progression genes such as HURP has not yet been described. We hypothesized that pO2 alteration is involved in the regulation of HURP expression in PCa cells. In the present study, PCa cells were incubated at 2% O2 (hypoxia) and 20% O2 (normoxia) conditions. Hypoxia reduced cell growth rate of PCa cells, when compared to the growth rate of cells cultured under normoxia (p < 0.05). The decrease in cell viability was accompanied by fivefold (p < 0.05) elevated rate of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. The expression of VEGF and the hypoxia-inducible metabolic enzyme carbonic anhydrase 9 were elevated maximally nearly 61-fold and 200-fold, respectively (p < 0.05). Noted in two cell lines (LNCaP and C4-2B) and independent of the oxygen levels, HURP expression assessed at both mRNA and protein levels was reduced. However, the decrease was more pronounced in cells cultured under hypoxia (p < 0.05). Interestingly, the analysis of patients’ specimens by Western blot revealed a marked increase of HURP protein (fivefold), when compared to control (cystoprostatectomy) tissue (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry analysis showed an increase in the immunostaining intensity of HURP and the hypoxia-sensitive molecules, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α), VEGF, and heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60) in association with tumor grade. The data also suggested a redistribution of subcellular localization for HURP and HIF-1α from the nucleus to the cytoplasmic compartment in relation to increasing tumor grade. Analysis of HURP Promoter for HIF-1-binding sites revealed presence

  18. NFAT5 Is Up-Regulated by Hypoxia: Possible Implications in Preeclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Dobierzewska, Aneta; Palominos, Macarena; Irarrazabal, Carlos E; Sanchez, Marianela; Lozano, Mauricio; Perez-Sepulveda, Alejandra; Monteiro, Lara J; Burmeister, Yara; Figueroa-Diesel, Horacio; Rice, Gregory E; Illanes, Sebastian E

    2015-07-01

    During gestation, low oxygen environment is a major determinant of early placentation process, while persistent placental hypoxia leads to pregnancy-related complications such as preeclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). PE affects 5%-8% of all pregnancies worldwide and is a cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. During placental development, persistent hypoxia due to poor trophoblast invasion and reduced uteroplacental perfusion leads to maternal endothelial dysfunction and clinical manifestation of PE. Here we hypothesized that nuclear factor of activated T cells-5 (NFAT5), a well-known osmosensitive renal factor and recently characterized hypoxia-inducible protein, is also activated in vivo in placentas of PE and IUGR complications as well as in the in vitro model of trophoblast hypoxia. In JAR cells, low oxygen tension (1% O2) induced NFAT5 mRNA and increased its nuclear abundance, peaking at 16 h. This increase did not occur in parallel with the earlier HIF1A induction. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis confirmed up-regulation of NFAT5 mRNA and NFAT5 nuclear content in human preeclamptic placentas and in rabbit placentas of an experimentally induced IUGR model, as compared with the control groups. In vitro lambda protein phosphatase (lambda PPase) treatment revealed that increased abundance of NFAT5 protein in nuclei of either JAR cells (16 h of hypoxia) or PE and IUGR placentas is at least partially due to NFAT5 phosphorylation. NFAT5 downstream targets aldose reductase (AR) and sodium-myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT; official symbol SLC5A3) were not significantly up-regulated either in JAR cells exposed to hypoxia or in placentas of PE- and IUGR-complicated pregnancies, suggesting that hypoxia-dependent activation of NFAT5 serves as a separate function to its tonicity-dependent stimulation. In conclusion, we propose that NFAT5 may serve as a novel marker of placental hypoxia and ischemia independently of HIF1A. PMID

  19. Effect of hypoxia on cerebrovascular and cognitive function during moderate intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Babcock, Matthew C; Tiss, Matthew J; Ives, Stephen J; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-10-15

    Exercise in hypoxia places added demands on the brain and cerebrovasculature that can impact cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hypoxia on cerebrovascular hemodynamics, markers of neuro-steroidal modulation and brain-blood barrier (BBB) integrity, and cognition during exercise. Thirty healthy participants (21±4yrs., BMI 24.0±2.6kg∙m(-2); 15 men) were randomized to both a≈2.5h normoxic (FiO2 20.0%) and hypoxic (FiO2 12.5%) condition on two separate days. After 1.25h, participants underwent 10min of exercise-alone (cycling at 55% HRmax) and 15min of exercise+cognitive testing. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) tissue oxygenation and middle cerebral artery (MCA) mean blood velocity (MnV) were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler respectively at rest, during exercise-alone, and during exercise+cognitive testing. Salivary levels of dehydroepiandosterone [DHEA], DHEA-sulfate [DHEAS]) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) were measured pre and post exercise. Cognition was assessed using standard metrics of accuracy and reaction time (RT), and advanced metrics from drift-diffusion modeling across memory recognition, N-Back and Flanker tasks. MCA MnV increased from rest to exercise (p<0.01) and was unchanged with addition of cognitive testing during exercise in both normoxia and hypoxia. PFC oxygenation increased during exercise (p<0.05) and was further increased with addition of cognitive challenge in normoxia but decreased during exercise in hypoxia (p<0.05) with further reductions occurring with addition of cognitive tasks (p<0.05). DHEA and NSE increased and decreased post-exercise, respectively, in both normoxia and hypoxia (p<0.01). Accuracy on cognitive tasks was similar in normoxia compared to hypoxia, while RT was slower in hypoxia vs normoxia across memory recognition (p<0.01) and Flanker tasks (p=0.04). Drift-diffusion modeling suggested changes in memory RT were due to increases in caution

  20. Effect of hypoxia on cerebrovascular and cognitive function during moderate intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Babcock, Matthew C; Tiss, Matthew J; Ives, Stephen J; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-10-15

    Exercise in hypoxia places added demands on the brain and cerebrovasculature that can impact cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hypoxia on cerebrovascular hemodynamics, markers of neuro-steroidal modulation and brain-blood barrier (BBB) integrity, and cognition during exercise. Thirty healthy participants (21±4yrs., BMI 24.0±2.6kg∙m(-2); 15 men) were randomized to both a≈2.5h normoxic (FiO2 20.0%) and hypoxic (FiO2 12.5%) condition on two separate days. After 1.25h, participants underwent 10min of exercise-alone (cycling at 55% HRmax) and 15min of exercise+cognitive testing. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) tissue oxygenation and middle cerebral artery (MCA) mean blood velocity (MnV) were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler respectively at rest, during exercise-alone, and during exercise+cognitive testing. Salivary levels of dehydroepiandosterone [DHEA], DHEA-sulfate [DHEAS]) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) were measured pre and post exercise. Cognition was assessed using standard metrics of accuracy and reaction time (RT), and advanced metrics from drift-diffusion modeling across memory recognition, N-Back and Flanker tasks. MCA MnV increased from rest to exercise (p<0.01) and was unchanged with addition of cognitive testing during exercise in both normoxia and hypoxia. PFC oxygenation increased during exercise (p<0.05) and was further increased with addition of cognitive challenge in normoxia but decreased during exercise in hypoxia (p<0.05) with further reductions occurring with addition of cognitive tasks (p<0.05). DHEA and NSE increased and decreased post-exercise, respectively, in both normoxia and hypoxia (p<0.01). Accuracy on cognitive tasks was similar in normoxia compared to hypoxia, while RT was slower in hypoxia vs normoxia across memory recognition (p<0.01) and Flanker tasks (p=0.04). Drift-diffusion modeling suggested changes in memory RT were due to increases in caution

  1. Hypoxia and the pharmaceutical diclofenac influence the circadian responses of three-spined stickleback.

    PubMed

    Prokkola, Jenni M; Nikinmaa, Mikko; Lubiana, Pedro; Kanerva, Mirella; McCairns, R J Scott; Götting, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Pollution with low concentrations of pharmaceuticals, especially when combined with low-oxygen conditions (hypoxia), is a threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac is commonly detected in wastewater effluents, and has potential to accumulate in the bile of fish. Diclofenac has been shown to activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which induces transcription in the metabolic enzyme cytochrome P450 1a (cyp1a). Previously, crosstalk has been shown to occur between AHR and hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). In addition, both of these transcription factors interact with the proteins regulating circadian (24-h) rhythms in vertebrates. Yet little is known about the significance of these interactions during simultaneous exposure to chemicals and hypoxia in fish in vivo. We exposed wild-caught three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to diclofenac (1 μg/L, 14 days), hypoxia (2.0 mg/L, up to 24h) and the combination of both. We then analyzed markers of chemical biotransformation (EROD activity, cyp1a and ahr mRNA levels), glycolysis (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme activity, ldh and enolase 1a mRNA levels), and the transcription of core circadian clock genes clock and period 1 in liver tissue. Samples were taken at three time points during the light period in order to address disturbances in the circadian variation of metabolic processes. The results show that mRNA levels and LDH activity tended to be lowest before the dark period, but this pattern was disturbed by hypoxia and diclofenac. Diclofenac and hypoxia co-exposure induced EROD activity more strongly than diclofenac exposure alone, while cyp1a mRNA level was increased also by hypoxia and diclofenac alone. LDH activity and mRNA expression showed a clear time-dependent response during hypoxia, which is consistent with the previously suggested decreased accumulation of HIF-1 during the dark period. Furthermore, LDH activity and transcription was

  2. Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Virginia H

    2010-01-01

    Since 1985, scientists have been documenting a hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico each year. The hypoxic zone, an area of low dissolved oxygen that cannot support marine life, generally manifests itself in the spring. Since marine species either die or flee the hypoxic zone, the spread of hypoxia reduces the available habitat for marine species, which are important for the ecosystem as well as commercial and recreational fishing in the Gulf. Since 2001, the hypoxic zone has averaged 16,500 km{sup 2} during its peak summer months, an area slightly larger than the state of Connecticut, and ranged from a low of 8,500 km{sup 2} to a high of 22,000 km{sup 2}. To address the hypoxia problem, the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force (or Task Force) was formed to bring together representatives from federal agencies, states, and tribes to consider options for responding to hypoxia. The Task Force asked the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to conduct a scientific assessment of the causes and consequences of Gulf hypoxia through its Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (CENR). In 2000 the CENR completed An Integrated Assessment: Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (or Integrated Assessment), which formed the scientific basis for the Task Force's Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Action Plan, 2001). In its Action Plan, the Task Force pledged to implement ten management actions and to assess progress every 5 years. This reassessment would address the nutrient load reductions achieved, the responses of the hypoxic zone and associated water quality and habitat conditions, and economic and social effects. The Task Force began its reassessment in 2005. In 2006 as part of the reassessment, USEPA's Office of Water, on behalf of the Task Force, requested that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) convene an independent panel to

  3. Functional genomics approach to hypoxia signaling.

    PubMed

    Seta, Karen A; Millhorn, David E

    2004-02-01

    Mammalian cells require a constant supply of oxygen to maintain energy balance, and sustained hypoxia can result in cell death. It is therefore not surprising that sophisticated adaptive mechanisms have evolved that enhance cell survival during hypoxia. During the past few years, there have been a growing number of reports on hypoxia-induced transcription of specific genes. In this review, we describe a unique experimental approach that utilizes focused cDNA libraries coupled to microarray analyses to identify hypoxia-responsive signal transduction pathways and genes that confer the hypoxia-tolerant phenotype. We have used the subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH) method to create a cDNA library enriched in hypoxia-regulated genes in oxygen-sensing pheochromocytoma cells and have used this library to create microarrays that allow us to examine hundreds of genes at a time. This library contains over 300 genes and expressed sequence tags upregulated by hypoxia, including tyrosine hydroxylase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and junB. Hypoxic regulation of these and other genes in the library has been confirmed by microarray, Northern blot, and real-time PCR analyses. Coupling focused SSH libraries with microarray analyses allows one to specifically study genes relevant to a phenotype of interest while reducing much of the biological noise associated with these types of studies. When used in conjunction with high-throughput, dye-based assays for cell survival and apoptosis, this approach offers a rapid method for discovering validated therapeutic targets for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and tumors. PMID:14715686

  4. Evaluation of the combination of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with sweeping and cation selective exhaustive injection for the determination of 5-nitroimidazoles in egg samples.

    PubMed

    Airado-Rodríguez, Diego; Hernández-Mesa, Maykel; García-Campaña, Ana M; Cruces-Blanco, Carmen

    2016-12-15

    A methodology is presented for the sensitive determination of nitromidazole residues in egg by means of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography in combination with cation selective exhaustive injection and ultraviolet detection. Six compounds have been considered and the separation has been achieved in less than 12min in a 61.5-cm effective length capillary with 50-μm internal diameter. Phosphate buffer 44mM pH 2.5, containing 8% tetrahydrofurane and 123mM sodium dodecyl sulfate was employed as running buffer. Solid phase extraction has been employed for sample clean-up. The methodology has been successfully validated in hen eggs, obtaining method detection limits in the range of 2.1-5.0ng/g. Precision was studied in terms of repeatability and intermediate precision, with relative standard deviations lower than 18.0%. Recoveries were calculated in quail eggs and a commercial pasteurized egg white product, reaching over 70% for most of the considered 5-nitroimidazoles. PMID:27451174

  5. DYT-40, a novel synthetic 2-styryl-5-nitroimidazole derivative, blocks malignant glioblastoma growth and invasion by inhibiting AEG-1 and NF-κB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Meijuan; Duan, Yongtao; Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Rui; Chen, Xuguan; Ou, Yingwei; Liang, Mingxing; Wang, Zhongchang; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Li; Zhu, Hailiang

    2016-01-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) has been explored as a novel target for human glioma therapy, thus reflecting its potential contribution to gliomagenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DYT-40, a novel synthetic 2-styryl-5-nitroimidazole derivative, on cell growth and invasion in glioblastoma (GBM) and uncovered the underlying mechanisms of this molecule. DYT-40 induces the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis and inhibits the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion of GBM cell lines. Furthermore, DYT-40 deactivates PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways, suppresses AEG-1 expression, and inhibits NF-κB nuclear translocation. DYT-40 reduced the tumor volumes in a rat C6 glioma model by apoptotic induction. Moreover, HE staining demonstrated that the glioma rat model treated with DYT-40 exhibited better defined tumor margins and fewer invasive cells to the contralateral striatum compared with the vehicle control and temozolomide-treated rats. Microscopic examination showed a decrease in AEG-1-positive cells in DYT-40-treated rats compared with the untreated controls. DYT-40-treatment increases the in vivo apoptotic response of glioma cells to DYT-40 treatment by TUNEL staining. In conclusion, the inhibitory effects of DYT-40 on growth and invasion in GBM suggest that DYT-40 might be a potential AEG-1 inhibitor to prevent the growth and motility of malignant glioma. PMID:27251589

  6. NADPH oxidases and reactive oxygen species at different stages of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Kathleen E; Aschner, J L; Milatovic, D; Schmidt, J W; Aschner, M; Kaplowitz, M R; Zhang, Y; Fike, Candice D

    2009-10-01

    Recently, we reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidase (NOX) contribute to aberrant responses in pulmonary resistance arteries (PRAs) of piglets exposed to 3 days of hypoxia (Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 295: L881-L888, 2008). An objective of the present study was to determine whether NOX-derived ROS also contribute to altered PRA responses at a more advanced stage of pulmonary hypertension, after 10 days of hypoxia. We further wished to advance knowledge about the specific NOX and antioxidant enzymes that are altered at early and later stages of pulmonary hypertension. Piglets were raised in room air (control) or hypoxia for 3 or 10 days. Using a cannulated artery technique, we found that treatments with agents that inhibit NOX (apocynin) or remove ROS [an SOD mimetic (M40403) + polyethylene glycol-catalase] diminished responses to ACh in PRAs from piglets exposed to 10 days of hypoxia. Western blot analysis showed an increase in expression of NOX1 and the membrane fraction of p67phox. Expression of NOX4, SOD2, and catalase were unchanged, whereas expression of SOD1 was reduced, in arteries from piglets raised in hypoxia for 3 or 10 days. Markers of oxidant stress, F(2)-isoprostanes, measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were increased in PRAs from piglets raised in hypoxia for 3 days, but not 10 days. We conclude that ROS derived from some, but not all, NOX family members, as well as alterations in the antioxidant enzyme SOD1, contribute to aberrant PRA responses at an early and a more progressive stage of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets. PMID:19592458

  7. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  8. Effects of hypoxia on vertebrate blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Russell, Michael J; Dombkowski, Ryan A; Olson, Kenneth R

    2008-03-01

    Hypoxia contracts mammalian respiratory vessels and increases vascular resistance in respiratory tissues of many vertebrates. In systemic vessels these responses vary, hypoxia relaxes mammalian vessels and contracts systemic arteries from cyclostomes. It has been proposed that hypoxic vasoconstriction in cyclostome systemic arteries is the antecedent to mammalian hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, however, phylogenetic characterization of hypoxic responses is lacking. In this study, we characterized the hypoxic response of isolated systemic and respiratory vessels from a variety of vertebrates using standard myography. Pre-gill/respiratory (ventral aorta, afferent branchial artery, pulmonary artery) and post-gill/systemic (dorsal and thoracic aortas, efferent branchial artery) from lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus), chicken (Gallus domesticus) and rat (Rattus norvegicus) were exposed to hypoxia at rest or during pre-stimulation (elevated extracellular potassium, epinephrine or norepinephrine). Hypoxia produced a relaxation or transient contraction followed by relaxation in all pre-gill vessels, except for contraction in lamprey, and vasoconstriction or tri-phasic constriction-dilation-constriction in all pulmonary vessels. Hypoxia contracted systemic vessels from all animals except shark and rat and in pre-contracted rat aortas it produced a transient contraction followed by relaxation. These results show that while the classic "systemic hypoxic vasodilation and pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction" may occur in the microcirculation, the hypoxic response of the vertebrate macrocirculation is quite variable. These findings also suggest that hypoxic vasoconstriction is a phylogenetically ancient response. PMID:18214862

  9. Analysis of hypoxia-induced metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chendong; Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Huafeng; Shimoda, Larissa A; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Semenza, Gregg L

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common finding in advanced human tumors and is often associated with metastatic dissemination and poor prognosis. Cancer cells adapt to hypoxia by utilizing physiological adaptation pathways that promote a switch from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism. This promotes the conversion of glucose into lactate while limiting its transformation into acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). The uptake of glucose and the glycolytic flux are increased under hypoxic conditions, mostly owing to the upregulation of genes encoding glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes, a process that depends on hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). The reduced delivery of acetyl-CoA to the tricarboxylic acid cycle leads to a switch from glucose to glutamine as the major substrate for fatty acid synthesis in hypoxic cells. In addition, hypoxia induces (1) the HIF-1-dependent expression of BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) and BNIP3-like (BNIP3L), which trigger mitochondrial autophagy, thereby decreasing the oxidative metabolism of both fatty acids and glucose, and (2) the expression of the sodium-hydrogen exchanger NHE1, which maintains an alkaline intracellular pH. Here, we present a compendium of methods to study hypoxia-induced metabolic alterations.

  10. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor in Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Natalie; Babur, Muhammad; Resch, Julia; Williams, Kaye J.; Brabant, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Intratumoural hypoxia (low oxygen tension) is associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 is a transcription factor activated by hypoxia that regulates the expression of genes that promote tumour cell survival, progression, metastasis, and resistance to chemo/radiotherapy. In addition to hypoxia, HIF-1 can be activated by growth factor-signalling pathways such as the mitogen-activated protein kinases- (MAPK-) and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinases- (PI3K-) signalling cascades. Mutations in these pathways are common in thyroid carcinoma and lead to enhanced HIF-1 expression and activity. Here, we summarise current data that highlights the potential role of both hypoxia and MAPK/PI3K-induced HIF-1 signalling in thyroid carcinoma progression, metastatic characteristics, and the potential role of HIF-1 in thyroid carcinoma response to radiotherapy. Direct or indirect targeting of HIF-1 using an MAPK or PI3K inhibitor in combination with radiotherapy may be a new potential therapeutic target to improve the therapeutic response of thyroid carcinoma to radiotherapy and reduce metastatic burden. PMID:21765994

  11. Distinct physiological strategies are used to cope with constant hypoxia and intermittent hypoxia in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Brittney G; Darcy, Kimberly L; Gillette, Danielle M; Scott, Graham R

    2015-04-15

    Many fish encounter hypoxia on a daily cycle, but the physiological effects of intermittent hypoxia are poorly understood. We investigated whether acclimation to constant (sustained) hypoxia or to intermittent diel cycles of nocturnal hypoxia (12 h normoxia:12 h hypoxia) had distinct effects on hypoxia tolerance or on several determinants of O2 transport and O2 utilization in estuarine killifish. Adult killifish were acclimated to normoxia, constant hypoxia, or intermittent hypoxia for 7 or 28 days in brackish water (4 ppt). Acclimation to both hypoxia patterns led to comparable reductions in critical O2 tension and resting O2 consumption rate, but only constant hypoxia reduced the O2 tension at loss of equilibrium. Constant (but not intermittent) hypoxia decreased filament length and the proportion of seawater-type mitochondrion-rich cells in the gills (which may reduce ion loss and the associated costs of active ion uptake), increased blood haemoglobin content, and reduced the abundance of oxidative fibres in the swimming muscle. In contrast, only intermittent hypoxia augmented the oxidative and gluconeogenic enzyme activities in the liver and increased the capillarity of glycolytic muscle, each of which should facilitate recovery between hypoxia bouts. Neither exposure pattern affected muscle myoglobin content or the activities of metabolic enzymes in the brain or heart, but intermittent hypoxia increased brain mass. We conclude that the pattern of hypoxia exposure has an important influence on the mechanisms of acclimation, and that the optimal strategies used to cope with intermittent hypoxia may be distinct from those for coping with constant hypoxia.

  12. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C; Selfridge, Andrew C; Keogh, Ciara E; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C; Nolan, Karen A; Rocha, Liliane M A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; Cheong, Alex

    2016-08-17

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia.

  13. Rat reaction to hypokinesia after prior adaptation to hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barashova, Z. I.; Tarakanova, O. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prior hypoxia adaptation on body tolerance to hypokinesia was investigated. Rats trained to a 50 day period of hypokinesia and hypoxia with a preliminary month of adaptation to hypoxia showed less weight loss, higher indices for red blood content, heightened reactivity of the overall organism and the central nervous system to acute hypoxia, and decreased modification of the skeletal muscles compared to rats subjected to hypokinesia alone.

  14. Withanolide A Prevents Neurodegeneration by Modulating Hippocampal Glutathione Biosynthesis during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Baitharu, Iswar; Jain, Vishal; Deep, Satya Narayan; Shroff, Sabita; Sahu, Jayanta Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC) activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)–related factor 2 (Nrf2) were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone dependenet manner

  15. Hypoxia: a window into Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency.

    PubMed

    Rustad, Tige R; Sherrid, Ashley M; Minch, Kyle J; Sherman, David R

    2009-08-01

    Tuberculosis is a massive public health problem on a global scale and the success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is linked to its ability to persist within humans for long periods without causing any overt disease symptoms. Hypoxia is predicted to be a key host-induced stress limiting growth of the pathogen in vivo. However, multiple studies in vitro and in vivo indicate that M. tuberculosis adapts to oxygen limitation by entering into a metabolically altered state, while awaiting the opportunity to reactivate. Molecular signatures of bacteria adapted to hypoxia in vitro are accumulating, although correlations to human disease are only now being established. Similarly, defining the mechanisms that control this adaptation is an active area of research. In this review we discuss the historical precedents linking hypoxia and latency, and the gathering knowledge of M. tuberculosis hypoxic responses. We also examine the role of these responses in tuberculosis latency, and identify promising avenues for future studies.

  16. The blood-brain barrier in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lataste, X

    1992-10-01

    The concept of blood-brain barrier has moved over the past years from a passive and relatively immutable structure to a more dynamic interface between blood and brain tissue. The transport mechanisms regulating this adaptative interface might be considered as the most sensitive elements to change such as hypoxia. Among various carrier mediated transports existing at the blood-brain barrier, glucose transport seems to play a predominant role. In severe hypoxia, progressive changes in glucose transport are occurring. These modifications associated with hypoxia can lead to deleterious events when reaching critical threshold. In addition the appearance of vasogenic edema due to changes in cerebral-blood flow, can possibly be prevented by some pharmacological interaction such as the use of selective brain calcium channel blockers.

  17. Hypoxia as a therapy for mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, Isha H; Zazzeron, Luca; Goli, Rahul; Alexa, Kristen; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Dhillon, Harveen; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Shalem, Ophir; Sanjana, Neville E; Zhang, Feng; Goessling, Wolfram; Zapol, Warren M; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-04-01

    Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) underlie a spectrum of human conditions, ranging from devastating inborn errors of metabolism to aging. We performed a genome-wide Cas9-mediated screen to identify factors that are protective during RC inhibition. Our results highlight the hypoxia response, an endogenous program evolved to adapt to limited oxygen availability. Genetic or small-molecule activation of the hypoxia response is protective against mitochondrial toxicity in cultured cells and zebrafish models. Chronic hypoxia leads to a marked improvement in survival, body weight, body temperature, behavior, neuropathology, and disease biomarkers in a genetic mouse model of Leigh syndrome, the most common pediatric manifestation of mitochondrial disease. Further preclinical studies are required to assess whether hypoxic exposure can be developed into a safe and effective treatment for human diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Roland H; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Scholz, Carsten C; Marti, Hugo H; Hoogewijs, David

    2015-01-01

    “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. PMID:27774480

  19. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  20. Hypoxia as a Therapy for Mitochondrial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Isha H.; Zazzeron, Luca; Goli, Rahul; Alexa, Kristen; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Dhillon, Harveen; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Shalem, Ophir; Sanjana, Neville E.; Zhang, Feng; Goessling, Wolfram; Zapol, Warren M.; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) underlie a spectrum of human conditions, ranging from devastating inborn errors of metabolism to aging. We performed a genome-wide, Cas9-mediated screen to identify factors that are protective during RC inhibition. Our results highlight the hypoxia response, an endogenous program evolved to adapt to limiting oxygen availability. Genetic or small molecule activation of the hypoxia response is protective against mitochondrial toxicity in cultured cells and zebrafish models. Chronic hypoxia leads to a marked improvement in survival, body weight, body temperature, behavior, neuropathology and disease biomarkers in a genetic mouse model of Leigh syndrome, the most common pediatric manifestation of mitochondrial disease. Further preclinical studies are required to assess whether hypoxic exposure can be developed into a safe and effective treatment for human diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26917594

  1. In Brief: Report finds hypoxia increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of hypoxia is increasing in coastal waters worldwide and represents a significant threat to the health and economy of U.S. coasts and the Great Lakes, according to a 3 September report issued by the U.S. Interagency Working Group on Harmful Algal Blooms, Hypoxia, and Human Health. The report found that the incidence of hypoxia—low dissolved oxygen that can negatively affect fish and other aquatic species—has increased tenfold globally in the past 50 years and almost thirtyfold in the United States since 1960. Noting that federal research programs are addressing many aspects of eutrophication, enrichment, and hypoxia, the report indicates, “Despite decades of research, however, management efforts to reduce nutrients—particularly from nonpoint sources—and their adverse impacts on coastal ecosystems have not made significant headway, in part due to increased development and population in coastal watersheds.”

  2. Temperature regulation in lizards: effects of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hicks, J W; Wood, S C

    1985-05-01

    Temperature regulation during external (lowered lung PO2) and internal hypoxia (anemia) was examined in four species of lizards. Exposure to a hypoxic gas mixture in a thermogradient resulted in the animals lowering their selected (preferred) body temperature. A 50% reduction in the O2 carrying capacity of the blood also reduced the selected body temperature. Lizards "shuttle" when forced to select a temperature either above or below their normal selected temperature. Exposure to hypoxia decreases the upper and lower exit temperatures during shuttling. Furthermore, a decrease in the inspired O2 causes the rate of heating to no longer exceed the rate of cooling as is normal. The behavioral reduction of body temperature and the altered neural and physiological aspects of temperature regulation appear to be generalized responses to impaired O2 transport and not PO2 per se. The reduced body temperature, by lowering metabolic demand, provides an effective, even life-saving, adaptation to hypoxia.

  3. Individual variation in whole-animal hypoxia tolerance is associated with cardiac hypoxia tolerance in a marine teleost

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, William; Ozolina, Karlina; Mauduit, Florian; Ollivier, Hélène; Claireaux, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pervasive problem in coastal environments and is predicted to have enduring impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Intraspecific variation in hypoxia tolerance is well documented in fish; however, the factors underlying this variation remain unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the heart in individual hypoxia tolerance of the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). We found individual whole-animal hypoxia tolerance is a stable trait in sea bass for more than 18 months (duration of study). We next examined in vitro cardiac performance and found myocardial muscle from hypoxia-tolerant individuals generated greater force, with higher rates of contraction and relaxation, than hypoxic-sensitive individuals during hypoxic exposure. Thus, whole-animal hypoxia tolerance is associated with cardiac hypoxia tolerance. As the occurrence of aquatic hypoxia is expected to increase in marine ecosystems, our experimental data suggest that cardiac performance may influence fish survival and distribution. PMID:26740561

  4. Hypoxia inducible factor pathway inhibitors as anticancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Sarah K; Kaluz, Stefan; Wang, Danzhu; Wang, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a significant feature of solid tumor cancers. Hypoxia leads to a more malignant phenotype that is resistant to chemotherapy and radiation, is more invasive and has greater metastatic potential. Hypoxia activates the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which mediates the biological effects of hypoxia in tissues. The HIF complex acts as a transcription factor for many genes that increase tumor survival and proliferation. To date, many HIF pathway inhibitors indirectly affect HIF but there have been no clinically approved direct HIF inhibitors. This can be attributed to the complexity of the HIF pathway, as well as to the challenges of inhibiting protein–protein interactions. PMID:23573973

  5. Effect of hypobaric hypoxia on immune function in albino rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SaiRam, M.; Sharma, S. K.; Dipti, P.; Pauline, T.; Kain, A. K.; Mongia, S. S.; Bansal, Anju; Patra, B. D.; Ilavazhagan, G.; Devendra, K.; Selvamurthy, W.

    The effect of exposure to hypoxia on macrophage activity, lymphocyte function and oxidative stress was investigated. Hypoxia enhanced peritoneal macrophage activity as revealed by enhanced phagocytosis and free radical production. There was no significant change in antibody titres to sheep red blood cells in either serum or spleen during hypoxia. However, there was a considerable reduction in the delayed-type hypersensitivity response to sheep red blood cells, indicating the impairment of T-cell activity. Hypoxia decreased the blood glutathione (reduced) level and increased plasma malondialdehyde by a factor of about 2. It is therefore speculated that hypoxia imposes an oxidative stress leading to decreased T-cell acivity.

  6. Photoreceptor cell apoptosis induced by the 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer, CI-1010, is mediated by p53-linked activation of caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Miller, Terry J; Schneider, Randal J; Miller, James A; Martin, Brad P; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R; Agarwal, Neeraj; Dethloff, Lloyd A; Philbert, Martin A

    2006-01-01

    The nitroimidazole radiosensitizer CI-1010 ((R)-alpha-[[(2-bromoethyl)-amino]methyl]-2-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol monohydrobromide) causes selective, irreversible, retinal photoreceptor apoptosis in vivo. The mouse 661 W photoreceptor cell line was used as a neuronotypic model of CI-1010-mediated retinal degeneration. Exposure to CI-1010 for 24 h induced apoptosis in 661 W cells, as determined by ultrastructural analysis, agarose electrophoresis and analysis of TUNEL-positive nuclei. CI-1010 caused a loss of viability in 661 W cells, as measured by the reduction of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). A clear link was established between the onset of apoptosis and activity of caspase-3 and caspase-8, prior to poly[ADP-ribose]polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Pretreatment with caspase inhibitors, ZVAD.fmk or DEVD-CHO, prevented morphological changes in most CI-1010-treated cells. Evaluation of mitochondrial inner membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)) in live 661 W cells using the fluorescent dye, tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester revealed retention of (Deltapsi(m)) until after caspase activation. Absence of cytochrome c in the cytoplasm in treated cells further supports the hypothesis of a mitochondrial-independent mechanism of cell death. Significant increase in DNA crosslinks observed in 661 W cells correlates with induction and phosphorylation of p53 at multiple serine sites. Cell cycle analysis of 661 W cells reveals a G(2) arrest in response to CI-1010-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death. Increased protein expression of Bax, Fas, and FasL, concomitant to the loss of Bcl-xL in treated 661 W cells may be modulated by p53. This study evaluates in vitro mechanisms of CI-1010-induced cell death in photoreceptors and provides evidence in support of a p53-linked activation of caspase-3 in response to DNA damage caused by CI-1010.

  7. Binding of imidazole, 1-methylimidazole and 4-nitroimidazole to yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) and the distal histidine mutant, CcP(H52L).

    PubMed

    Erman, James E; Chinchilla, Diana; Studer, Jason; Vitello, Lidia B

    2015-08-01

    Imidazole, 1-methylimidazole and 4-nitroimidazole bind to yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (yCcP) with apparent equilibrium dissociation constants (KD(app)) of 3.3±0.4, 0.85±0.11, and ~0.2M, respectively, at pH7. This is the weakest imidazole binding to a heme protein reported to date and it is about 120 times weaker than imidazole binding to metmyoglobin. Spectroscopic changes associated with imidazole and 1-methylimidazole binding to yCcP suggest partial ionization of bound imidazole to imidazolate. The pKa for ionization of bound imidazole is estimated to be 7.4±0.2, about 7 units lower than that of free imidazole and about 3 units lower than imidazole bound to metmyoglobin. Equilibrium binding of imidazole to CcP(H52L) is biphasic with low- and high-affinity phases having KD(app) values of 9.5±4.5 and 0.13±0.04M, respectively. CcP(H52L) binding of 1-methylimidazole is monophasic with an affinity similar to those of yCcP and rCcP. Binding of 1-methylimidazole to rCcP is associated with two kinetic phases, the initial binding complete within 10s, followed by a process that is consistent with 1-methylimidazole binding to a cavity created by movement of Trp-191 from the interior of the protein to the surface. Both the equilibrium binding and kinetics of 1-methylimidazole binding to yCcP are pH dependent. yCcP has a four-fold increase in 1-methylimidazole binding affinity on decreasing the pH from 7.5 to 4.0, an observation that is unique among the many studies on binding of imidazole and imidazole derivatives to heme proteins. PMID:25907133

  8. Binding of imidazole, 1-methylimidazole and 4-nitroimidazole to yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) and the distal histidine mutant, CcP(H52L)

    PubMed Central

    Erman, James E.; Chinchilla, Diana; Studer, Jason; Vitello, Lidia B.

    2015-01-01

    Imidazole, 1-methylimidazole and 4-nitroimidazole bind to yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (yCcP) with apparent equilibrium dissociation constants (KDapp) of 3.3 ± 0.4, 0.85 ± 0.11, and ~0.2 M, respectively, at pH 7. This is the weakest imidazole binding to a heme protein reported to date and it is about 120 times weaker than imidazole binding to metmyoglobin. Spectroscopic changes associated with imidazole and 1-methylimidazole binding to yCcP suggest partial ionization of bound imidazole to imidazolate. The pKa for ionization of bound imidazole is estimated to be 7.4 ± 0.2, about 7 units lower than that of free imidazole and about 3 units lower than imidazole bound to metmyoglobin. Equilibrium binding of imidazole to CcP(H52L) is biphasic with low- and high-affinity phases having KDapp values of 9.5 ± 4.5 and 0.13 ± 0.04 M, respectively. CcP(H52L) binding of 1-methylimidazole is monophasic with an affinity similar to those of yCcP and rCcP. Binding of 1-methylimidazole to rCcP is associated with two kinetic phases, the initial binding complete within 10 s, followed by a process that is consistent with 1-methylimidazole binding to a cavity created by movement of Trp-191 from the interior of the protein to the surface. Both the equilibrium binding and kinetics of 1-methylimidazole binding to yCcP are pH dependent. yCcP has a four-fold increase in 1-methylimidazole binding affinity on decreasing the pH from 7.5 to 4.0, an observation that is unique among the many studies on binding of imidazole and imidazole derivatives to heme proteins. PMID:25907133

  9. Nobiletin inhibited hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of lung cancer cells by inactivating of Notch-1 signaling and switching on miR-200b.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue-Jun; Liu, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Qing-Guang; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Xu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Hong-Jian

    2015-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an early step in the process of tumor metastasis. It is well known that tumor microenvironment affects malignancy in various carcinomas; in particular, that hypoxia induces EMT. Deregulated notch signaling also contributes a lot to the development of EMT in lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the use of Notch-1-inhibiting compound as novel therapeutic candidates to regulate hypoxia-induced EMT in lung cancer cells. According to previous screening, nobiletin was selected as a Notch-1 inhibitor. Hypoxia-induced EMT was characteristic of increased N-cadherin & vimentin expressions and decreased E-cadherin expressions. Treatment with nobiletin notably attenuated hypoxia-induced EMT, invasion and migration in H1299 cells, accompanied with reduced Notch-1, Jagged1/2 expressions and its downstream genes Hey-1 and Hes-1. Nobiletin treatment also promoted tumorsuppressive miR-200b level. Moreover, notch-1 siRNA prevented hypoxia-mediated cell migration and decreased Twist1, Snail1, and ZEB1/2 expressions, which are key EMT markers. Re-expression of miR-200b blocked hypoxia-induced EMT and cell invasion. Our findings suggest that downregulation of Notch-1 and reexpression of miR-200b by nobiletin might be a novel remedy for the therapy of lung cancer.

  10. Fetal exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment resulted in a failure of cord blood endothelial progenitor cell adaptation against chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dincer, U Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has long-term health consequences, and fetal exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment increases cardiovascular risk for her adult offspring. Some part of this could be related to their endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Understanding the vessel-forming ability of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB)-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) against pathological stress such as GDM response to hypoxia could generate new therapeutic strategies. This study aims to investigate the role of chronic hypoxia in EPCs functional and vessel-forming ability in GDM subjects. Each ECFC was expressed in endothelial and pro-angiogenic specific markers, namely endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), platelet (PECAM-1) endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, vascular endothelial-cadherin CdH5 (Ca-dependent cell adhesion molecule), vascular endothelial growth factor A, (VEGFA) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). Chronic hypoxia did not affect CdH5, but PECAM1 MRNA expressions were increased in control and GDM subjects. Control hypoxic and GDM normoxic VEGFA MRNA expressions and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1α) protein expressions were significantly increased in HUCB ECFCs. GDM resulted in most failure of HUCB ECFC adaptation and eNOS protein expressions against chronic hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia resulted in an overall decline in HUCB ECFCs’ proliferative ability due to reduction of clonogenic capacity and diminished vessel formation. Furthermore, GDM also resulted in most failure of cord blood ECFC adaptation against chronic hypoxic environment. PMID:25565870

  11. Cerebral Oxygenation in Awake Rats during Acclimation and Deacclimation to Hypoxia: An In Vivo Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad N.; Hou, Huagang G.; Merlis, Jennifer; Abajian, Michelle A.; Demidenko, Eugene; Grinberg, Oleg Y.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Dunn, J. F., N. Khan, H. G. Hou, J. Merlis, M. A. Abajian, E. Demidenko, O.Y. Grinberg, and H. M. Swartz. Cerebral oxygenation in awake rats during acclimation and deacclimation to hypoxia: an in vivo EPR study. High Alt. Med. Biol. 12:71–77, 2011.— Exposure to high altitude or hypobaric hypoxia results in a series of metabolic, physiologic, and genetic changes that serve to acclimate the brain to hypoxia. Tissue Po2 (Pto2) is a sensitive index of the balance between oxygen delivery and utilization and can be considered to represent the summation of such factors as cerebral blood flow, capillary density, hematocrit, arterial Po2, and metabolic rate. As such, it can be used as a marker of the extent of acclimation. We developed a method using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to measure Pto2 in unanesthetized subjects with a chronically implanted sensor. EPR was used to measure rat cortical tissue Pto2 in awake rats during acute hypoxia and over a time course of acclimation and deacclimation to hypobaric hypoxia. This was done to simulate the effects on brain Pto2 of traveling to altitude for a limited period. Acute reduction of inspired O2 to 10% caused a decline from 26.7 ± 2.2 to 13.0 ± 1.5 mmHg (mean ± SD). Addition of 10% CO2 to animals breathing 10% O2 returned Pto2 to values measured while breathing 21% O2, indicating that hypercapnia can reverse the effects of acute hypoxia. Pto2 in animals acclimated to 10% O2 was similar to that measured preacclimation when breathing 21% O2. Using a novel, individualized statistical model, it was shown that the T1/2 of the Pto2 response during exposure to chronic hypoxia was approximately 2 days. This indicates a capacity for rapid adaptation to hypoxia. When subjects were returned to normoxia, there was a transient hyperoxygenation, followed by a return to lower values with a T1/2 of deacclimation of 1.5 to 3 days. These data indicate that exposure to hypoxia results in significant

  12. SWI/SNF regulates the cellular response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Mudie, Sharon; van Uden, Patrick; Rocha, Sonia

    2009-02-13

    Hypoxia induces a variety of cellular responses such as cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy. Most of these responses are mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. To induce target genes, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha requires a chromatin environment conducive to allow binding to specific sequences. Here, we have studied the role of the chromatin-remodeling complex SWI/SNF in the cellular response to hypoxia. We find that SWI/SNF is required for several of the cellular responses induced by hypoxia. Surprisingly, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha is a direct target of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. SWI/SNF components are found associated with the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha promoter and modulation of SWI/SNF levels results in pronounced changes in hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression and its ability to transactivate target genes. Furthermore, impairment of SWI/SNF function renders cells resistant to hypoxia-induced cell cycle arrest. These results reveal a previously uncharacterized dependence of hypoxia signaling on the SWI/SNF complex and demonstrate a new level of control over the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha system.

  13. Pre- and Perinatal Ischemia-Hypoxia, the Ischemia-Hypoxia Response Pathway, and ADHD Risk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Taylor F; Schmidt-Kastner, Rainald; McGeary, John E; Kaczorowski, Jessica A; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on how measured pre- and perinatal environmental and (epi)genetic risk factors are interrelated and potentially influence one, of many, common developmental pathway towards ADHD. Consistent with the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis, lower birth weight is associated with increased ADHD risk. Prenatal ischemia-hypoxia (insufficient blood and oxygen supply in utero) is a primary pathway to lower birth weight and produces neurodevelopmental risk for ADHD. To promote tissue survival in the context of ischemia-hypoxia, ischemia-hypoxia response (IHR) pathway gene expression is altered in the developing brain and peripheral tissues. Although altered IHR gene expression is adaptive in the context of ischemia-hypoxia, lasting IHR epigenetic modifications may lead to increased ADHD risk. Taken together, IHR genetic vulnerability to ischemia-hypoxia and IHR epigenetic alterations following prenatal ischemia-hypoxia may result in neurodevelopmental vulnerability for ADHD. Limitations of the extant literature and future directions for genetically-informed research are discussed. PMID:26920003

  14. The hypoxia signaling pathway and hypoxic adaptation in fishes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wuhan

    2015-02-01

    The hypoxia signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved cellular signaling pathway present in animals ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. The pathway is crucial for oxygen homeostasis maintenance. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) are master regulators in the hypoxia signaling pathway. Oxygen concentrations vary a lot in the aquatic environment. To deal with this, fishes have adapted and developed varying strategies for living in hypoxic conditions. Investigations into the strategies and mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation in fishes will allow us to understand fish speciation and breed hypoxia-tolerant fish species/strains. This review summarizes the process of the hypoxia signaling pathway and its regulation, as well as the mechanism of hypoxia adaptation in fishes.

  15. Multimodality imaging of hypoxia in preclinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Ralph P.; Zhao, Dawen; Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; Cui, Weina; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Gulaka, Praveen K.; Hao, Guiyang; Thorpe, Philip; Hahn, Eric W.; Peschke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia has long been recognized to influence solid tumor response to therapy. Increasingly, hypoxia has also been implicated in tumor aggressiveness, including growth, development and metastatic potential. Thus, there is a fundamental, as well as a clinical interest, in assessing in situ tumor hypoxia. This review will examine diverse approaches focusing on the pre-clinical setting, particularly, in rodents. The strategies are inevitably a compromise in terms of sensitivity, precision, temporal and spatial resolution, as well as cost, feasibility, ease and robustness of implementation. We will review capabilities of multiple modalities and examine what makes them particularly suitable for investigating specific aspects of tumor pathophysiology. Current approaches range from nuclear imaging to magnetic resonance and optical, with varying degrees of invasiveness and ability to examine spatial heterogeneity, as well as dynamic response to interventions. Ideally, measurements would be non-invasive, exploiting endogenous reporters to reveal quantitatively local oxygen tension dynamics. A primary focus of this review is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based techniques, such as 19F MRI oximetry, which reveals not only hypoxia in vivo, but more significantly, spatial distribution of pO2 quantitatively, with a precision relevant to radiobiology. It should be noted that pre-clinical methods may have very different criteria for acceptance, as compared with potential investigations for prognostic radiology or predictive biomarkers suitable for use in patients. PMID:20639813

  16. GULF OF MEXICO HYPOXIA MONITORING AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greene, Richard M. and Russell G. Kreis. In press. Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Monitoring and Modeling (Abstract). To be presented at the EPA Science Forum: Healthy Communities and Ecosystems, 1-3 June 2004, Washington, DC. 1 p. (ERL,GB R990).

    Oxygen-depleted or hypoxic bottom...

  17. Acridine-intercalator based hypoxia selective cytotoxins

    DOEpatents

    Papadopoulou-Rosenzweig, M.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1994-03-15

    Hypoxia selective cytotoxins of the general formula STR1 wherein n is from 1 to 5, and NO[sub 2] is in at least one of the 2, 4 or 5-positions of the imidazole are developed. Such compounds have utility as radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers. 9 figs.

  18. Acridine-intercalator based hypoxia selective cytotoxins

    DOEpatents

    Papadopoulou-Rosenzweig, Maria; Bloomer, William D.; Bloomer, William D.

    1994-01-01

    Hypoxia selective cytotoxins of the general formula ##STR1## wherein n is from 1 to 5, and NO.sub.2 is in at least one of the 2, 4 or 5-positions of the imidazole. Such compounds have utility as radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers.

  19. Imaging Hypoxia in Xenografted and Murine Tumors With {sup 18}F-Fluoroazomycin Arabinoside: A Comparative Study Involving MICROPET, Autoradiography, PO{sub 2}-Polarography, and Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Busk, Morten Horsman, Michael R.; Jakobsen, Steen; Keiding, Susanne; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Bussink, Johan; Overgaard, Jens

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) allows noninvasive assessment of tumor hypoxia; however the combination of low resolution and slow tracer clearance from nonhypoxic tissue is problematic. The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo hypoxia selectivity of fluoroazomycin arabinoside ([{sup 18}F]-FAZA), a promising tracer with improved washout kinetics from oxygenated tissue. Methods and Materials: Three squamous cell carcinomas and one fibrosarcoma with widely differing spatial patterns of vascularization, hypoxia, and necrosis were grown in mice and evaluated with PET and complementary methods. Results: Eppendorf electrode measurements consistently demonstrated median PO{sub 2} values <1 mm Hg. In accordance with that, PET revealed that all tumors accumulated [{sup 18}F]-FAZA in excess of reference tissue. Next the two-dimensional spatial distribution of [{sup 18}F]-FAZA (from autoradiography) was compared with fluorescence images of the same tumor sections showing localization of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. Pixel-by-pixel analysis of co-registered images showed a highly significant co-localization between the two hypoxia markers and an inverse correlation (except for the fibrosarcoma) between the distribution of [{sup 18}F]-FAZA and Hoechst dye. Moreover intratumoral heterogeneity in tracer distribution was clearly visible on autoradiograms, with a [{sup 18}F]-FAZA concentration approximately six times higher in poorly oxygenated areas than in vascular hot spots. Conclusions: The distribution of [{sup 18}F]-FAZA is consistent with hypoxia as the key driving force for tracer tissue retention in a selection of tumors with widely differing physiology.

  20. N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) ameliorates the hypoxia-reduced osteoblast differentiation via inhibiting the NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Rui; Zhao, Jianmin; Lu, Quanli

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic-hypoxic condition for local osteoblasts and bone mesenchymal stem cells during bone fracture inhibits bone repairing. N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) has been approved as a safe and biologically inactive small chemical molecule, and might be useful for bone fracture repairing. In the present study, we investigated the effect of NMP on the hypoxia-reduced cellular viability and the expression of differentiation-associated markers, such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), propeptide of type I procollagen I (PINP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) or runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) in the osteoblasts, and then we examined the molecular mechanism underlining such effect in the human osteoblastic hFOB 1.19 cells. Our results demonstrated that NMP significantly blocked the hypoxia-induced cell viability reduction and inhibited the hypoxia-caused expression downregulation of BMP-2, PINP, ALP and Runx2 in hFOB 1.19 cells. Then we confirmed the involvement of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway in the regulation by NMP on the hypoxia-mediated the reduction of osteoblast differentiation. The upregulated expression and transcriptional activity of NF-κB, while the downregulated inhibitory κB expression by the hypoxia treatment was reversed by the treatment with 10 mM NMP. In conclusion, our study found a protective role of NMP in osteoblast differentiation in response to hypoxia, and such protection was through inhibiting the NF-κB signaling. This suggests that NMP might be a protective agent in bone fracture repairing. PMID:27665779

  1. Pancreatic Fibroblasts Stimulate the Motility of Pancreatic Cancer Cells through IGF1/IGF1R Signaling under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Toshiki; Yashiro, Masakazu; Doi, Yosuke; Kinoshita, Haruhito; Morisaki, Tamami; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by its hypovascularity, with an extremely poor prognosis because of its highly invasive nature. PDAC proliferates with abundant stromal cells, suggesting that its invasive activity might be controlled by intercellular interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts. Using four PDAC cell lines and two pancreas cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) was evaluated by RT-PCR, FACScan, western blot, or ELISA. Correlation between IGF1R and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) was examined by immunohistochemical staining of 120 pancreatic specimens. The effects of CAFs, IGF1, and IGF1R inhibitors on the motility of cancer cells were examined by wound-healing assay or invasion assay under normoxia (20% O2) and hypoxia (1% O2). IGF1R expression was significantly higher in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells than in Panc-1 cells. Hypoxia increased the expression level of IGF1R in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells. CA9 expression was correlated with IGF1R expression in pancreatic specimens. CAFs produced IGF1 under hypoxia, but PDAC cells did not. A conditioned medium from CAFs, which expressed αSMA, stimulated the migration and invasion ability of MiaPaCa-2, RWP-1, and OCUP-AT cells. The motility of all PDAC cells was greater under hypoxia than under normoxia. The motility-stimulating ability of CAFs was decreased by IGF1R inhibitors. These findings might suggest that pancreas CAFs stimulate the invasion activity of PDAC cells through paracrine IGF1/IGF1R signaling, especially under hypoxia. Therefore the targeting of IGF1R signaling might represent a promising therapeutic approach in IGF1R-dependent PDAC. PMID:27487118

  2. Cyclosporine Treatment Reduces Oxygen Free Radical Generation and Oxidative Stress in the Brain of Hypoxia-Reoxygenated Newborn Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiang-Qin; Chaudhary, Hetal; Brocks, Dion R.; Bigam, David L.; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1–4 d, 1.4–2.5 kg) were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation)(n = 8/group). At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls) or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus) in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4) underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe), cerebral cortical H2O2 production (electrochemical sensor), cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA) and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot) levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40–48% of baseline), hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27–31 mmHg) and acidosis (pH 7.04) at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg), significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H2O2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H2O2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia

  3. Hypoxia in Head and Neck Cancer in Theory and Practice: A PET-Based Imaging Approach

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Harriss-Phillips, Wendy M.; Filip, Sanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in tumour recurrence among head and neck cancer patients. The identification and quantification of hypoxic regions are therefore an essential aspect of disease management. Several predictive assays for tumour oxygenation status have been developed in the past with varying degrees of success. To date, functional imaging techniques employing positron emission tomography (PET) have been shown to be an important tool for both pretreatment assessment and tumour response evaluation during therapy. Hypoxia-specific PET markers have been implemented in several clinics to quantify hypoxic tumour subvolumes for dose painting and personalized treatment planning and delivery. Several new radiotracers are under investigation. PET-derived functional parameters and tracer pharmacokinetics serve as valuable input data for computational models aiming at simulating or interpreting PET acquired data, for the purposes of input into treatment planning or radio/chemotherapy response prediction programs. The present paper aims to cover the current status of hypoxia imaging in head and neck cancer together with the justification for the need and the role of computer models based on PET parameters in understanding patient-specific tumour behaviour. PMID:25214887

  4. HIF-1α Promotes A Hypoxia-Independent Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Liyuan; Madu, Chikezie O; Lu, Andrew; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is known as a transactivator for VEGF gene promoter. It can be induced by hypoxia. However, no study has been done so far to dissect HIF-1α-mediated effects from hypoxia or VEGF-mediated effects. By using a HIF-1α knockout (HIF-1α KO) cell system in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, this study analyzes cell migration and HIF-1α, hypoxia and VEGF activation. A hypoxia-mediated HIF-1α induction and VEGF transactivation were observed: both HIF-1α WT lines had significantly increased VEGF transactivation, as an indicator for HIF-1α induction, in hypoxia compared to normoxia; in contrast, HIF-1α KO line had no increased VEGF transactivation under hypoxia. HIF-1α promotes cell migration: HIF-1α-KO cells had a significantly reduced migration compared to that of the HIF-1α WT cells under both normoxia and hypoxia. The significantly reduced cell migration in HIF-1α KO cells can be partially rescued by the restoration of WT HIF-1α expression mediated by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Interestingly, hypoxia has no effect on cell migration: the cells had a similar cell migration rate under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for both HIF-1α WT and HIF-1α KO lines, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in MEF cell migration that is independent from hypoxia-mediated effects.

  5. HIF-1α Promotes A Hypoxia-Independent Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liyuan; Madu, Chikezie O.; Lu, Andrew; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is known as a transactivator for VEGF gene promoter. It can be induced by hypoxia. However, no study has been done so far to dissect HIF-1α-mediated effects from hypoxia or VEGF-mediated effects. By using a HIF-1α knockout (HIF-1α KO) cell system in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, this study analyzes cell migration and HIF-1α, hypoxia and VEGF activation. A hypoxia-mediated HIF-1α induction and VEGF transactivation were observed: both HIF-1α WT lines had significantly increased VEGF transactivation, as an indicator for HIF-1α induction, in hypoxia compared to normoxia; in contrast, HIF-1α KO line had no increased VEGF transactivation under hypoxia. HIF-1α promotes cell migration: HIF-1α-KO cells had a significantly reduced migration compared to that of the HIF-1α WT cells under both normoxia and hypoxia. The significantly reduced cell migration in HIF-1α KO cells can be partially rescued by the restoration of WT HIF-1α expression mediated by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Interestingly, hypoxia has no effect on cell migration: the cells had a similar cell migration rate under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for both HIF-1α WT and HIF-1α KO lines, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in MEF cell migration that is independent from hypoxia-mediated effects. PMID:20882121

  6. Regulation and clinical significance of the hypoxia-induced expression of ANGPTL4 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    KUBO, HIROSHI; KITAJIMA, YOSHIHIKO; KAI, KEITA; NAKAMURA, JUN; MIYAKE, SHUUSUKE; YANAGIHARA, KAZUYOSHI; MORITO, KIYOTO; TANAKA, TOMOKAZU; SHIDA, MASAAKI; NOSHIRO, HIROKAZU

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors are often exposed to hypoxia. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α upregulates numerous target genes associated with the malignant behavior of hypoxic cancer cells. A member of the angiopoietin family, angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is a hypoxia-inducible gene. The present study aimed to clarify whether ANGPTL4 is regulated by HIF-1α in gastric cancer cells. The study also assessed whether ANGPTL4 expression is associated with clinicopathological factors or HIF-1α expression in gastric cancer tissues. Hypoxia-induced ANGPTL4 expression was quantitatively analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in 10 gastric cancer cell lines. RT-qPCR was further employed to investigate the HIF-1α dependency of ANGPTL4 expression using HIF-1α-knockdown transfectant 58As9-KD and control 58As9-SC gastric cancer cells. The HIF-1α and ANGPTL4 expression levels were immunohistochemically analyzed in 170 gastric cancer tissue specimens and were assessed for any correlations with the clinicopathological factors and/or patient survival. Subsequently, hypoxia-induced ANGPTL4 expression was observed in 7 out of 10 gastric cancer cell lines. The hypoxic induction of ANGPTL4 was almost preserved in the 58As9-KD cells compared with that observed in the 58As9-SC cells, while the induction of known HIF-1α target gene, carbonic anhydrase 9, was completely suppressed in the 58As9-KD cells. In the gastric cancer tissues, ANGPTL4 expression was inversely correlated with the tumor depth, whereas HIF-1α expression was positively correlated with venous invasion. A survival analysis revealed that the expression of ANGPTL4 was significantly correlated with a longer survival time, whereas that of HIF-1α was correlated with a shorter survival time. In conclusion, the present findings indicate that hypoxia-induced ANGPTL4 expression is independent of HIF-1α in hypoxic gastric cancer cells. ANGPTL4 may be a favorable marker for predicting

  7. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1{alpha} is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1{alpha} induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1{alpha} induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  8. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1α induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M; Hinson, Jack A; James, Laura P

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1α is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1α. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1α in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1α in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10mg/kg) reduced HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1α induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  9. The ergogenics of hypoxia training in athletes.

    PubMed

    Loffredo, Brett M; Glazer, James L

    2006-06-01

    Hypoxia elicits hematopoiesis, which ultimately improves oxygen transport to peripheral tissues. In part because of this, altitude training has been used in the conditioning of elite endurance athletes for decades, despite equivocal evidence that such training benefits subsequent sea level performance. Recently, traditional live high-train high athletic conditioning has been implicated in a number of deleterious effects on training intensity, cardiac output, muscle composition, and fluid and metabolite balance--effects that largely offset hematopoietic benefits during sea level performance. Modified live high-train low conditioning regimens appear to capture the beneficial hematopoietic effects of hypoxic training while avoiding many of the deleterious effects of training at altitude. Because of the logistical and financial barriers to living high and training low, various methods to simulate hypoxia have been developed and studied. The data from these studies suggest a threshold requirement for hypoxic exposure to meaningfully augment hematopoiesis, and presumably improve athletic performance.

  10. Psychomotor skills learning under chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bouquet, C A; Gardette, B; Gortan, C; Abraini, J H

    1999-09-29

    Psychomotor deficits are a prominent feature in subjects exposed to hypoxia. Eight subjects exposed to chronic hypoxia during a simulated climb to 8848 m (Everest-Comex 97) were investigated using both a simple psychomotor task (Purdue pegboard) and two complex psychomotor tasks including a recognition task of either a color stimulus (high semantic level) or an abstract sign (low semantic level). Exposure to hypoxic stress mainly produced psychomotor skills learning deficits compared to control study, with greater deficits in the complex psychomotor task. The pattern of results suggests disruptions of motor strategic process. Our data further suggest that the relative strength of implicit or automatic memory processes associated with semantic information processing may increase when disturbances occur in brain functions.

  11. Hypoxia and glucose independently regulate the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase system in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, K J; Honbo, N Y; Karliner, J S

    1991-01-01

    cellular ATP levels during both hypoxia and reoxygenation; and (d) glucose prevents hypoxia-induced LDH release, a marker of cell injury. PMID:1647415

  12. Novel cation selective exhaustive injection-sweeping procedure for 5-nitroimidazole determination in waters by micellar electrokinetic chromatography using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mesa, Maykel; Airado-Rodríguez, Diego; Cruces-Blanco, Carmen; García-Campaña, Ana M

    2014-05-01

    A novel method consisting of cation-selective exhaustive injection and sweeping (CSEI-sweeping) as on-line preconcentration followed by a micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separation has been developed for the determination of 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NDZ) in environmental waters. Moreover, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) has been proposed for first time as sample treatment technique prior to CSEI-sweeping-MEKC. DLLME was applied to 5mL of sample. Dibromomethane (1156μL) and 2-butanol (1363μL) were employed as extractant and dispersive solvents, respectively. Salting-out effect was achieved by the addition of 16% (w/v) NaCl to the samples. After DLLME and organic solvent evaporation, the residue was redissolved in a low conductivity solvent (5mM phosphoric acid with 5% of methanol) and electrokinetically injected at 9.8kV for 632s in a bare fused-silica capillary (57.2cm, 50μm I.D.). Prior to the injection, the capillary was rinsed with 50mM phosphate buffer pH 2.5, followed by a plug of a higher conductivity buffer (100mM phosphate pH 2.5, 50mbar, 264s) and a plug of water (50mbar, 2s). Separation was carried out applying -30kV at 20°C in 44mM phosphate buffer pH 2.5, containing 8% tetrahydrofuran and 123mM sodium dodecyl sulfate. Analytical signals were monitored at 276nm. Validation was performed in river and well waters, obtaining satisfactory results in terms of linearity, precision (% RSD generally lower than 10%) and trueness (recoveries higher than 70% in almost all cases). LODs ranged from 0.61 to 2.44ng/mL. The combination of this microextraction technique with the proposed capillary electrophoresis methodology supposes a simple, sensitive and cheap alternative for 5-NDZ analyses, in accordance with the aims of green chemistry.

  13. Tumor hypoxia as a driving force in genetic instability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sub-regions of hypoxia exist within all tumors and the presence of intratumoral hypoxia has an adverse impact on patient prognosis. Tumor hypoxia can increase metastatic capacity and lead to resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Hypoxia also leads to altered transcription and translation of a number of DNA damage response and repair genes. This can lead to inhibition of recombination-mediated repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Hypoxia can also increase the rate of mutation. Therefore, tumor cell adaptation to the hypoxic microenvironment can drive genetic instability and malignant progression. In this review, we focus on hypoxia-mediated genetic instability in the context of aberrant DNA damage signaling and DNA repair. Additionally, we discuss potential therapeutic approaches to specifically target repair-deficient hypoxic tumor cells. PMID:24152759

  14. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems.

  15. Humans In Hypoxia: A Conspiracy Of Maladaptation?!

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    We address adaptive vs. maladaptive responses to hypoxemia in healthy humans and hypoxic-tolerant species during wakefulness, sleep, and exercise. Types of hypoxemia discussed include short-term and life-long residence at high altitudes, the intermittent hypoxemia attending sleep apnea, or training regimens prescribed for endurance athletes. We propose that hypoxia presents an insult to O2 transport, which is poorly tolerated in most humans because of the physiological cost. PMID:26136544

  16. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  17. Humans In Hypoxia: A Conspiracy Of Maladaptation?!

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jerome A; Morgan, Barbara J

    2015-07-01

    We address adaptive vs. maladaptive responses to hypoxemia in healthy humans and hypoxic-tolerant species during wakefulness, sleep, and exercise. Types of hypoxemia discussed include short-term and life-long residence at high altitudes, the intermittent hypoxemia attending sleep apnea, or training regimens prescribed for endurance athletes. We propose that hypoxia presents an insult to O2 transport, which is poorly tolerated in most humans because of the physiological cost. PMID:26136544

  18. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Cowie, G.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2013-03-01

    The predicted future of the global marine environment, as a combined result of forcing due to climate change (e.g. warming and acidification) and other anthropogenic perturbation (e.g. eutrophication), presents a challenge to the sustainability of ecosystems from tropics to high latitudes. Among the various associated phenomena of ecosystem deterioration, hypoxia can cause serious problems in coastal areas as well as oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean (Diaz and Rosenberg 2008 Science 321 926-9, Stramma et al 2008 Science 320 655-8). The negative impacts of hypoxia include changes in populations of marine organisms, such as large-scale mortality and behavioral responses, as well as variations of species distributions, biodiversity, physiological stress, and other sub-lethal effects (e.g. growth and reproduction). Social and economic activities that are related to services provided by the marine ecosystems, such as tourism and fisheries, can be negatively affected by the aesthetic outcomes as well as perceived or real impacts on seafood quality (STAP 2011 (Washington, DC: Global Environment Facility) p 88). Moreover, low oxygen concentration in marine waters can have considerable feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth system, like the emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, and can affect the global biogeochemical cycles of nutrients and trace elements. It is of critical importance to prediction and adaptation strategies that the key processes of hypoxia in marine environments be precisely determined and understood (cf Zhang et al 2010 Biogeosciences 7 1-24).

  19. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent∕phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique. PMID:21198195

  20. Structural integration in hypoxia-inducible factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Lu, Jingping; Kim, Youngchang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2015-08-20

    The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) coordinate cellular adaptations to low oxygen stress by regulating transcriptional programs in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and metabolism. These programs promote the growth and progression of many tumours, making HIFs attractive anticancer targets. Transcriptionally active HIFs consist of HIF-alpha and ARNT (also called HIF-1 beta) subunits. Here we describe crystal structures for each of mouse HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT heterodimers in states that include bound small molecules and their hypoxia response element. A highly integrated quaternary architecture is shared by HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT, wherein ARNT spirals around the outside of each HIF-alpha subunit. Five distinct pockets are observed that permit small-molecule binding, including PAS domain encapsulated sites and an interfacial cavity formed through subunit heterodimerization. The DNA-reading head rotates, extends and cooperates with a distal PAS domain to bind hypoxia response elements. HIF-alpha mutations linked to human cancers map to sensitive sites that establish DNA binding and the stability of PAS domains and pockets.

  1. Nutrient Enrichment Drives Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, Donald F.; Boynton, Walter R.; Crowder, Larry B.; Diaz, Robert J.; Howarth, Robert W.; Mee, Laurence D.; Nixon, Scott W.; Rabalais, Nancy N.; Rosenberg, Rutger; Sanders, James G.; Scavia, Donald; Turner, R. Eugene

    2009-04-01

    During most summers over the past 30 years, bottom dissolved oxygen across a large area of the Louisiana and upper Texas continental shelf declined to concentrations too low (hypoxia) for most fish and large invertebrate animals to survive. This area is one of the best known “dead zones” proliferating around the world [Diaz and Rosenberg, 2008]. During July 2008, hypoxic bottom waters extended across 20,720 square kilometers (Figure 1), but they were probably even more extensive because winds from Hurricane Dolly mixed the waters off Texas before the survey could be completed. Increased inputs of nutrients (principally nitrogen and phosphorus) from the U.S. agricultural heartland within the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) are implicated in the development and spread of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. Consequently, the causes of, and solutions for, hypoxia have been subjects of extensive debate and analysis. An integrated scientific assessment led to a 2001 Action Plan [Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, 2001] with a goal of reducing the area of the hypoxic zone to less than 5000 square kilometers by reducing nitrogen loading [Rabalais et al., 2007].

  2. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  3. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E

    1993-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated in the carotid body, sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla by hypoxia. We found that a reduction in oxygen tension from 21% to 10% caused a substantial increase (200% at 1 hour and 500% at 6 hours exposure) in the concentration of TH mRNA in carotid body type I cells but not in either the sympathetic ganglia or adrenal gland. In addition, we found that hypercapnia, another natural stimulus of carotid body activity, failed to enhance TH mRNA in type I cells. Removal of the sensory and sympathetic innervation of the carotid body failed to prevent the induction of TH mRNA by hypoxia in type I cells. Our results show that TH gene expression is regulated by hypoxia in the carotid body but not in other peripheral catecholamine synthesizing tissue and that the regulatory mechanism is intrinsic to type I cells. PMID:7909954

  4. Imaging hypoxia using 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The objective is to develop a multivariate in vivo hemodynamic model of tissue oxygenation (MiHMO2) based on 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: Low oxygen levels, or hypoxia, deprives cancer cells of oxygen and confers resistance to irradiation, some chemotherapeutic drugs, and oxygen-dependent therapies (phototherapy) leading to treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival. For example, clinical studies of patients with breast carcinomas, cervical cancer, and head and neck carcinomas (HNC) are more likely to suffer local reoccurrence and metastasis if their tumors are hypoxic. A novel method to non invasively measure tumor hypoxia, identify its type, and monitor its heterogeneity is devised by measuring tumor hemodynamics, MiHMO2. Material and Methods: Simulations are performed to compare tumor pO2 levels and hypoxia based on physiology - perfusion, fractional plasma volume, fractional cellular volume - and its hemoglobin status - oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration - based on in vivo measurements of breast, prostate, and ovarian tumors. Simulations of MiHMO2 are performed to assess the influence of scanner resolutions and different mathematic models of oxygen delivery. Results: Sensitivity of pO2 and hypoxic fraction to photoacoustic scanner resolution and dependencies on model complexity will be presented using hemodynamic parameters for different tumors. Conclusions: Photoacoustic CT spectroscopy provides a unique ability to monitor hemodynamic and cellular physiology in tissue, which can be used to longitudinally monitor tumor oxygenation and its response to anti-angiogenic therapies.

  5. Hypoxia enhances aggressiveness of cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seubwai, Wunchana; Kraiklang, Ratthaphol; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Wongkham, Sopit

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, plays a significant role in determining tumor phenotype and tumor progression. In this study, using an in-house PCR-array, we investigated phenotypic changes and differentially expressed hypoxia related genes in the KKU-M213 CCA cell line, cultured under hypoxic (1% O2) condition. Trefoil factor-1 (TFF1), a disintegrin, and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM12), integrin-alpha 5 (ITGA5) and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5/survivin), proteins involved with cell proliferation, metastasis and apoptosis resistance, were up-regulated whereas uridine 5'-monophosphate synthase (UMPS) and S100 calcium binding protein P (S100P), involved with chemosensitivity and cell adhesion, were down-regulated. Growth arrest, apoptosis resistance to UV-irradiation and chemotherapeutic drugs (5- flourouracil, cisplatin, doxorubicin) as well as cell adhesion were thus significantly enhanced upon exposure to hypoxic condition. These findings emphasize the significance of a hypoxic state in the induction of an aggressive phenotype and suggest the potential of targeting hypoxia regulated genes to enhance the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drug against CCA.

  6. Effects of hypoxia on sympathetic neural control in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. L.; Muenter, N. K.

    2000-01-01

    This special issue is principally focused on the time domain of the adaptive mechanisms of ventilatory responses to short-term, long-term and intermittent hypoxia. The purpose of this review is to summarize the limited literature on the sympathetic neural responses to sustained or intermittent hypoxia in humans and attempt to discern the time domain of these responses and potential adaptive processes that are evoked during short and long-term exposures to hypoxia.

  7. AI-02HYPOXIA AS A MEASURE OF FUNCTIONAL STATUS OF GLIOBLASTOMA VASCULATURE

    PubMed Central

    Alamsahebpour, Amirhassan; Jalali, Shahrzad; Singh, Sanjay; Burrell, Kelly; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Glioblastoma (GBMs) exhibit distinct histopathological features including microvascular hyperplasia and heterogenous hypoxia within the tumor microenvironment. Newly formed vessels are often leaky/dysfunctional with intravascular thrombosis and potentially contribute to the hypoxic/necrotic foci seen throughout GBMs. By analyzing orthotopic xenograft models of GBM, we have established the correlation between tumor blood vessel and oxygen diffusion gradient. Additionally, we have established the effect of anti-angiogenic therapies (AATx) such as VEGF-Trap on this correlation. METHOD: Patient derived GSCs and established GBM cell line (U87) with or without VEGF-Trap were injected orthotopically in forebrains of NOD/SCID mice. Following 3-4 weeks of cell implantation, the mice were sacrificed and brains were harvested and imbedded in paraffin blocks. The sections were then stained for CD31 (endothelial marker) and CAIX (hypoxia marker). Images were scanned and quantified; using ImageJ (http://imagej.nih.gov/ij/), measurements include distance from tumor blood vessels to nearest hypoxic foci, total percent hypoxia, and cell proliferation. RESULTS: In literature it has been shown that any functional micro-vessel in normal tissue allows oxygen diffusion up to 100 µm radius. Using this as a guideline, we have defined the functional state of microvessels in our orthoptic tumor. We found that approximately 13% of the tumor blood vessels were dysfunctional, as their distance from immediate hypoxic cells was less than 20 µm. Upon treatment with AATx, we observed significant decrease in numbers of functional tumor blood vessels and cell prolliferation with concomitant increase in hypoxic areas within the tumor. CONCLUSIONS: AATx results in a significant decrease in the number of functional blood vessels - as measured by their proximity to the nearest hypoxic cells - and cell proliferation. We have provided a quantitative measure - distinct histopathological

  8. Prolonged lobar hypoxia in vivo enhances the responsivity of isolated pulmonary veins to hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, D. W.; Farhi, L. E.; Russell, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The hypoxic response of pulmonary vessels isolated from eight sheep whose right apical lobes (RAL) had inspired 100% N2 for 20 h was studied. The RAL of these conscious sheep inspired hypoxic gas and the remainder of the lung inspired air. During hypoxia, RAL perfusion was 33 +/- 3% of its air value, carotid arterial PO2 averaged 86 +/- 3 mm Hg and pulmonary perfusion pressure was not significantly different from the initial control period when the RAL inspired air. At the end of the hypoxic exposure, the sheep were killed, and pulmonary artery and vein rings (0.5 to 2 mm inner diameter) were isolated from both the RAL and the right cardiac lobe, which served as the control lobe (CL). Arteries from the RAL and CL did not contract in response to 6% O2/6% CO2/88% N2 (hypoxia). In contrast, RAL veins did contract vigorously in response to hypoxia, whereas CL veins did not contract or contracted only minimally. Rubbing of the endothelium or prior incubation of RAL veins with catalase (1,200 units/ml), indomethacin (10(-5) M), or the thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TxA2/PGH2) receptor antagonist, SQ 29,548 (3 X 10(-6) M) each significantly reduced the response to hypoxia. RAL veins were also found to be more reactive than CL veins to the prostaglandin endoperoxide analogue U46619. We conclude that prolonged lobar hypoxia in vivo increases the responsivity of isolated pulmonary veins to hypoxia. These contractions may result from an increase in reactive O2 species, which in turn modify production of, metabolism of, and/or tissue responsivity to TxA2/PGH2.

  9. Repeated acute hypoxia temporarily attenuates the ventilatory respiratory response to hypoxia in conscious newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, T; Yoda, T; Ushikubo, S; Matsuzawa, S; Sasano, T; Komiyama, A

    1999-07-01

    We asked whether repeated hypoxic exposures during the early neonatal periods could affect the ventilatory control, such as the lung volume-dependent ventilatory inhibition (HBR), pulmonary ventilation (VE), and CO2 production (VCO2). Within each litter of rats, one group of pups (experimental group H) was exposed to 6% O2 (30-min duration twice a day from postnatal d 1 to 4). The other group (control group C) was exposed to air. At 5 d after birth, the HBR was triggered by lung inflation via negative body surface pressure (10 cm H2O). Measurements of VE and VCO2 were done by plethysmography and the inflow-outflow CO2 difference, respectively. At 2 wk of age, VE and VCO2 measurements were repeated by the barometric technique and the inflow-outflow CO2 difference, respectively. Each conscious pup was breathing normoxia (21% O2) and then hypoxia (10% O2). Results were as follows: 1) during normoxia, HBR was stronger and both VE and VCO2 were higher in H pups than in C pups; 2) during hypoxia, the HBR of C was as in normoxia, whereas that of H was increased above the normoxic value; 3) during hypoxia, C maintained VE, whereas H decreased it; 4) in hypoxia, VCO2 was reduced significantly in both groups; 5) at 2 wk of age, VE and VCO2 did not differ between H and C during normoxia or in response to 10% hypoxia. We conclude that in rat pups, repeated hypoxic episodes can modify the HBR and, at least temporarily, reduce the VE response to hypoxia with a decrease in VCO2. The findings are in agreement with the view that repeated hypoxic exposures in the neonatal period could interfere with the development of respiratory control and could possibly be involved in the mechanisms of neonatal apnea or sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:10400145

  10. Prognostic Cell Biological Markers in Cervical Cancer Patients Primarily Treated With (Chemo)radiation: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Eijsink, Jasper J.H.; Roossink, Frank; Graeff, Pauline de; Pras, Elisabeth; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Zee, Ate G.J. van der

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the prognostic and predictive significance of cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation. A PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane literature search was performed. Studies describing a relation between a cell biological marker and survival in {>=}50 cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation were selected. Study quality was assessed, and studies with a quality score of 4 or lower were excluded. Cell biological markers were clustered on biological function, and the prognostic and predictive significance of these markers was described. In total, 42 studies concerning 82 cell biological markers were included in this systematic review. In addition to cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) levels, markers associated with poor prognosis were involved in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling (EGFR and C-erbB-2) and in angiogenesis and hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase 9 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}). Epidermal growth factor receptor and C-erbB-2 were also associated with poor response to (chemo)radiation. In conclusion, EGFR signaling is associated with poor prognosis and response to therapy in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation, whereas markers involved in angiogenesis and hypoxia, COX-2, and serum SCC-ag levels are associated with a poor prognosis. Therefore, targeting these pathways in combination with chemoradiation may improve survival in advanced-stage cervical cancer patients.

  11. Declining threshold for hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Stow, Craig A; Qian, Song S; Craig, J Kevin

    2005-02-01

    The northwestern Gulf of Mexico shelf has been nicknamed "The Dead Zone" due to annual summertime (May-September) bottom-water hypoxia (dissolved oxygen < or =2 mg L(-1)) that can be extensive (>20 000 km2) and last for several months. Hypoxia has been attributed to eutrophication caused by increasing nitrogen loads, although directly linking hypoxia to nitrogen is difficult. While the areal extent of hypoxia has been shown to increase with Mississippi River flow, it is unclear whether this increase results from enhanced vertical water-column stratification or from eutrophication caused by river-borne nutrients. Disentangling the relative contributions of eutrophication versus stratification has important management consequences. Our analysis indicates that the top:bottom salinity difference is an important predictor of hypoxia, exhibiting a threshold, where the probability of hypoxia increases rapidly, at approximately 4.1 ppt. Using a Bayesian change-point model, we show that this stratification threshold decreased from 1982 to 2002, indicating the degree of stratification needed to induce hypoxia has gone down. Although this declining threshold does not link hypoxia and nitrogen, it does implicate a long-term factor transcending yearly flow-induced stratification differences. Concurrently, we show that surface temperature increased, while surface dissolved oxygen decreased, suggesting that factors in addition to nitrogen may be influencing the incidence of hypoxia in the bottom water.

  12. The effects of hypoxia on the stemness properties of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nermeen El-Moataz Bellah; Murakami, Masashi; Kaneko, Satoru; Nakashima, Misako

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that culture under hypoxia has beneficial effects on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, there are limitations to achieving a stable condition in conventional hypoxic CO2 incubators. DPSCs are a unique type of MSCs which are promising in many regenerative therapies. In this study, we investigated the ideal hypoxic culture environment for DPSCs using a new system that can provide controlled O2 environment. The effects of hypoxia (3%, 5%) on the stemness properties of DPSCs. Their morphology, proliferation rate, expression of stem cell markers, migration ability, mRNA expression of angiogenic/neurotrophic factors and immunomodulatory genes were evaluated and compared. Additionally, the effect of the discrete secretome on proliferation, migration, and neurogenic induction was assessed. Hypoxic DPSCs were found to be smaller in size and exhibited larger nuclei. 5% O2 significantly increased the proliferation rate, migration ability, expression of stem cell markers (CXCR4 and G-CSFR), and expression of SOX2, VEGF, NGF, and BDNF genes of DPSCs. Moreover, secretome collected from 5%O2 cultures displayed higher stimulatory effects on proliferation and migration of NIH3T3 cells and on neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells. These results demonstrate that 5%O2 may be ideal for enhancing DPSCs growth, stem cell properties, and secretome trophic effect. PMID:27739509

  13. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients. PMID:27187355

  14. Hypoxia-Mediated Soluble Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 1 Increase Is Not Attenuated in Interleukin 6-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Turnwald, Eva-Maria; Ankerne, Janina; Wohlfarth, Maria; Appel, Jan; Rother, Eva; Janoschek, Ruth; Alejandre Alcazar, Miguel A.; Schnare, Markus; Meißner, Udo; Dötsch, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1), known to be increased in the serum of preeclamptic patients, is a relevant factor in causing maternal symptoms like hypertension and proteinuria. In this study, we aimed to reveal whether hypoxia is a cause of increased sFlt-1 levels and inflammation markers in vivo and whether these symptoms can be attenuated by interleukin 6 (IL-6) depletion. For this purpose, pregnant wild-type (wt) mice or IL-6−/− mice on embryonic day 16 were placed under either normoxic (20.9% oxygen) or hypoxic (6% oxygen) conditions for 6 hours. This led to a rise of sFlt-1 levels in maternal serum, independent of the IL-6 status of the dam. Increased maternal sFlt-1 serum levels were, however, not due to an increase in sFlt-1 messenger RNA levels in the placenta. Moreover, there was no increase in inflammatory markers in neither wt mice nor IL-6−/− mice. This suggests that hypoxia alone does not contribute to the induction of an inflammatory placenta. Also, the hypoxia-induced rise in sFlt-1 levels seems not to be mediated by IL-6 in vivo. PMID:25415335

  15. Hypoxia-Mediated Soluble Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 1 Increase Is Not Attenuated in Interleukin 6-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Appel, Sarah; Turnwald, Eva-Maria; Ankerne, Janina; Wohlfarth, Maria; Appel, Jan; Rother, Eva; Janoschek, Ruth; Alejandre Alcazar, Miguel A; Schnare, Markus; Meißner, Udo; Dötsch, Jörg

    2015-06-01

    The soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1), known to be increased in the serum of preeclamptic patients, is a relevant factor in causing maternal symptoms like hypertension and proteinuria. In this study, we aimed to reveal whether hypoxia is a cause of increased sFlt-1 levels and inflammation markers in vivo and whether these symptoms can be attenuated by interleukin 6 (IL-6) depletion. For this purpose, pregnant wild-type (wt) mice or IL-6(-/-) mice on embryonic day 16 were placed under either normoxic (20.9% oxygen) or hypoxic (6% oxygen) conditions for 6 hours. This led to a rise of sFlt-1 levels in maternal serum, independent of the IL-6 status of the dam. Increased maternal sFlt-1 serum levels were, however, not due to an increase in sFlt-1 messenger RNA levels in the placenta. Moreover, there was no increase in inflammatory markers in neither wt mice nor IL-6(-/-) mice. This suggests that hypoxia alone does not contribute to the induction of an inflammatory placenta. Also, the hypoxia-induced rise in sFlt-1 levels seems not to be mediated by IL-6 in vivo.

  16. Phase I/II study of the hypoxia-activated prodrug PR104 in refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Konopleva, Marina; Thall, Peter F.; Yi, Cecilia Arana; Borthakur, Gautam; Coveler, Andrew; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Benito, Juliana; Konoplev, Sergej; Gu, Yongchuan; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Faderl, Stefan; Thomas, Deborah; Cortes, Jorge; Kadia, Tapan; Kornblau, Steven; Daver, Naval; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Nguyen, Hoang Q.; Feliu, Jennie; Lu, Hongbo; Wei, Caimiao; Wilson, William R.; Melink, Teresa J.; Gutheil, John C.; Andreeff, Michael; Estey, Elihu H.; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated vast expansion of hypoxic areas in the leukemic microenvironment and provided a rationale for using hypoxia-activated prodrugs. PR104 is a phosphate ester that is rapidly hydrolyzed in vivo to the corresponding alcohol PR-104A and further reduced to the amine and hydroxyl-amine nitrogen mustards that induce DNA cross-linking in hypoxic cells under low oxygen concentrations. In this phase I/II study, patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (n=40) after 1 or 2 prior treatments or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=10) after any number of prior treatments received PR104; dose ranged from 1.1 to 4 g/m2. The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were myelosuppression (anemia 62%, neutropenia 50%, thrombocytopenia 46%), febrile neutropenia (40%), infection (24%), and enterocolitis (14%). Ten of 31 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (32%) and 2 of 10 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (20%) who received 3 g/m2 or 4 g/m2 had a response (complete response, n=1; complete response without platelet recovery, n=5; morphological leukemia-free state, n=6). The extent of hypoxia was evaluated by the hypoxia tracer pimonidazole administered prior to a bone marrow biopsy and by immunohistochemical assessments of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha and carbonic anhydrase IX. A high fraction of leukemic cells expressed these markers, and PR104 administration resulted in measurable decrease of the proportions of hypoxic cells. These findings indicate that hypoxia is a prevalent feature of the leukemic microenvironment and that targeting hypoxia with hypoxia-activated prodrugs warrants further evaluation in acute leukemia. The trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01037556. PMID:25682597

  17. Short-term supplementation with alpha-ketoglutaric acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural does not prevent the hypoxia induced decrease of exercise performance despite attenuation of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gatterer, H; Greilberger, J; Philippe, M; Faulhaber, M; Djukic, R; Burtscher, M

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are thought to partly be responsible for the hypoxia induced performance decrease. The present study evaluated the effects of a broad based antioxidant supplementation or the combined intake of alpha-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) on the performance decrease at altitude. 18 healthy, well-trained males (age: 25±3 years; height: 179±6 cm; weight: 76.4±6.8 kg) were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to a placebo group (PL), a α-KG and 5-HMF supplementation group (AO1) or a broad based antioxidant supplementation group (AO2). Participants performed 2 incremental exercise tests to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer; the first test under normoxia and the second under hypoxia conditions (simulated altitude, FiO2=13% ~ 4 300 m). Supplementation started 48 h before the hypoxia test. Maximal oxygen uptake, maximal power output, power output at the ventilatory and lactate threshold and the tissue oxygenation index (NIRS) were measured under both conditions. Oxidative stress markers were measured before the supplementation and after the hypoxia test. Under hypoxia conditions all performance parameters decreased in the range of 19-39% with no differences between groups. A significant change from normoxia to hypoxia (p<0.001) and between groups (p=0.038) were found for the tissue oxygenation index. Post hoc test revealed significant differences between the PL and both, the AO1 and the AO2 group. The oxidative stress parameter carbonyl protein changed from normoxia to hypoxia in all participants and 4-hydroxynonenal decreased in the AO1 group only. In conclusion the results suggest that short-term supplementation with an antioxidant does not prevent the performance decrease at altitude. However, positive effects on muscle oxygen extraction, as indicated by the tissue oxygenation index, might indicate that mitochondrial functioning was actually influenced by the supplementation. PMID:22893323

  18. Ischaemic Markers in Acute Hepatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Sushanta Kumar; Nanda, Rachita; Mangaraj, Manaswini; Nayak, Parsuram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatic injury of varied aetiology may progress to Acute Liver Failure (ALF). Compromised microcirculation is thought to be a deciding factor of hepatic hypoxia may be involved in disease progression that needs early detection. Ischaemia markers like serum Ischaemia- modified albumin (IMA), ALT-LDH ratio and ALT-LDH index have been suggested for its detection at early stage. Aim To find out the association of Ischaemia markers like serum IMA, ALT-LDH ratio and ALT-LDH index in acute hepatic injury cases. Materials and Methods Forty one diagnosed acute liver injury cases of varied aetiology admitted in Department of Medicine, and Gastroenterology of SCB Medical College, Cuttack were enrolled in the study along with 30 age and sex matched healthy controls. Blood collected at time of admission and at time of discharge (1st day and 7th day) were evaluated for FPG, RFT, LFT, Serum Albumin along with serum LDH, IMA, PT-INR and platelet count. Result Serum bilirubin, hepatic enzymes, IMA, PT-INR was more markedly raised in cases than controls on the 1st day of admission. ALT-LDH ratio and index were significantly low in complicated cases. However, on responding to treatment the ALT-LDH index on 7th day registered a rise in comparison to the 1st day, while serum IMA revealed an insignificant decline showing improvement in hepatic hypoxia. ALT-LDH ratio remains more or less same on response to treatment. Conclusion Serum IMA and ALT-LDH Index reveals association with disease process in Acute Hepatic Injury cases both clinically and biochemically and can be used as supportive parameters for the diagnosis of disease process. PMID:27190791

  19. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  20. Effect of temperature on hypoxia tolerance and its underlying biochemical mechanism in two juvenile cyprinids exhibiting distinct hypoxia sensitivities.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2015-09-01

    It is increasingly important to investigate the effect of temperature on hypoxia tolerance in fish species, as worldwide hypoxia worsens with increases in global warming. We selected the hypoxia-tolerant crucian carp (Carassius carassius) and the hypoxia-sensitive Chinese bream (Parabramis pekinensis) as model fish and investigated their hypoxia tolerance based on the critical oxygen tension of the routine metabolic rate (M˙O2rout) (Pcrit), aquatic surface respiration (ASRcrit) and loss of equilibrium (LOEcrit) after two weeks of acclimation at either 10, 20 or 30 °C. We also measured the tissue substrate (glycogen and glucose of muscle and liver) and lactate levels of both normoxia- and hypoxia-treated fish (post-LOE). Crucian carp exhibited significantly lower Pcrit and LOEcrit but not ASRcrit. Crucian carp possessed higher hypoxia tolerance, partially due to a higher tissue glycogen reserve, which provides cellular fuel under severe hypoxia, as well as higher lactate tolerance and clearance ability than Chinese bream. The hypoxia tolerance was maintained in crucian carp but was decreased in Chinese bream as the temperature increased. The difference between the two species is based on the greater recruitment of tissue glycogen, resulting in an increased level of cellular fuel during hypoxia in crucian carp than in Chinese bream. In addition, crucian carp possessed the greater liver lactate clearance capacity, and the smaller increase in the M˙O2rout at higher temperatures compared to Chinese bream. Furthermore, substrate shortage and decreased lactate tolerance at high temperatures in Chinese bream might also contribute to the difference in hypoxia tolerance between the two species. PMID:24853206

  1. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, Christopher; Hinkelbein, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots. PMID:25419162

  2. Regulation of Proliferation-Survival Decisions during Tumor Cell Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Schmaltz, Cornelius; Hardenbergh, Patricia Harrigan; Wells, Audrey; Fisher, David E.

    1998-01-01

    Hypoxia may influence tumor biology in paradoxically opposing ways: it is lethal as a direct stress trigger, yet hypoxic zones in solid tumors harbor viable cells which are particularly resistant to treatment and contribute importantly to disease relapse. To examine mechanisms underlying growth-survival decisions during hypoxia, we have compared genetically related transformed and untransformed fibroblast cells in vitro for proliferation, survival, clonogenicity, cell cycle, and p53 expression. Hypoxia induces G0/G1 arrest in primary fibroblasts but triggers apoptosis in oncogene-transformed derivatives. Unexpectedly, the mechanism of apoptosis is seen to require accumulated acidosis and is rescued by enhanced buffering. The direct effect of hypoxia under nonacidotic conditions is unique to transformed cells in that they override the hypoxic G0/G1 arrest of primary cells. Moreover, when uncoupled from acidosis, hypoxia enhances tumor cell viability and clonogenicity relative to normoxia. p53 is correspondingly upregulated in response to hypoxia-induced acidosis but downregulated during hypoxia without acidosis. Hypoxia may thus produce both treatment resistance and a growth advantage. Given strong evidence that hypoxic regions in solid tumors are often nonacidotic (G. Helmlinger, F. Yuan, M. Dellian, and R. K. Jain, Nat. Med. 3:177–182, 1997), this behavior may influence relapse and implicates such cells as potentially important therapeutic targets. PMID:9566903

  3. Blockade of processing/activation of caspase-3 by hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Moonil; Park, Kyoungsook; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Seol, Dai-Wu

    2008-10-31

    Tumor hypoxia, which is caused by the rapid proliferation of tumor cells and aberrant vasculature in tumors, results in inadequate supplies of oxygen and nutrients to tumor cells. Paradoxically, these unfavorable growth conditions benefit tumor cell survival, although the mechanism is poorly understood. We have demonstrated for the first time that hypoxia inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis by blocking translocation of Bax from cytosol to the mitochondria in tumor cells. However, it is largely unknown how hypoxia-inhibited Bax translocation attenuates TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate that despite its inhibitory activity in TRAIL-induced apoptosis, hypoxia does not affect TRAIL-triggered proximal apoptotic signaling events, including caspase-8 activation and Bid cleavage. Instead, hypoxia inhibited processing of caspase-3, leading to incomplete activation of the caspase. Importantly, hypoxia-blocked translocation of Bax to the mitochondria significantly inhibited releasing the mitochondrial factors, such as cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO, to the cytosol in response to TRAIL. It is well-known that complete processing/activation of caspase-3 requires Smac/DIABLO released from mitochondria. Therefore, our data indicate that an engagement of the apoptotic mitochondrial events leading to caspase-3 activation is blocked by hypoxia. Our data shed new light on understanding of the apoptotic signal transduction and targets regulated by tumor hypoxia.

  4. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C; Selfridge, Andrew C; Keogh, Ciara E; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C; Nolan, Karen A; Rocha, Liliane M A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  5. NO-dependent mechanisms of adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, I Y; Zenina, T A; Golubeva, L Y; Saltykova, V A; Manukhina, E B; Mikoyan, V D; Kubrina, L N; Vanin, A F

    1999-01-01

    In studying NO-dependent mechanisms of resistance to hypoxia, it was shown that (1) acute hypoxia induces NO overproduction in brain and leaves unaffected NO production in liver of rats; (2) adaptation to hypoxia decreases NO production in liver and brain; and (3) adaptation to hypoxia prevents NO overproduction in brain and potentiates NO synthesis in liver in acute hypoxia. Dinitrosyl iron complex (DNIC, 200 microg/kg, single dose, iv), a NO donor, decreases the resistance of animals to acute hypoxia by 30%. Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 50 mg/kg, single dose, ip), a NO synthase inhibitor, and diethyl dithiocarbamate (DETC, 200 mg/kg, single dose, iv), a NO trap, increases this parameter 1.3 and 2 times, respectively. Adaptation to hypoxia developed against a background of accumulation of heat shock protein HSP70 in liver and brain. A course of DNIC reproduced the antihypoxic effect of adaptation. A course of L-NNA during adaptation hampered both accumulation of HSP70 and development of the antihypoxic effect. Therefore, NO and the NO-dependent activation of HSP70 synthesis play important roles in adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:10369180

  6. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C.; Selfridge, Andrew C.; Keogh, Ciara E.; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C.; Nolan, Karen A.; Rocha, Liliane M. A.; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J.; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  7. Efficient utilization of aerobic metabolism helps Tibetan locusts conquer hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Responses to hypoxia have been investigated in many species; however, comparative studies between conspecific geographical populations at different altitudes are rare, especially for invertebrates. The migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, is widely distributed around the world, including on the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau (TP) and the low-altitude North China Plain (NP). TP locusts have inhabited Tibetan Plateau for over 34,000 years and thus probably have evolved superior capacity to cope with hypoxia. Results Here we compared the hypoxic responses of TP and NP locusts from morphological, behavioral, and physiological perspectives. We found that TP locusts were more tolerant of extreme hypoxia than NP locusts. To evaluate why TP locusts respond to extreme hypoxia differently from NP locusts, we subjected them to extreme hypoxia and compared their transcriptional responses. We found that the aerobic metabolism was less affected in TP locusts than in NP locusts. RNAi disruption of PDHE1β, an entry gene from glycolysis to TCA cycle, increased the ratio of stupor in TP locusts and decreased the ATP content of TP locusts in hypoxia, confirming that aerobic metabolism is critical for TP locusts to maintain activity in hypoxia. Conclusions Our results indicate that TP and NP locusts have undergone divergence in hypoxia tolerance. These findings also indicate that insects can adapt to hypoxic pressure by modulating basic metabolic processes. PMID:24047108

  8. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Trigger Hypoxia-Induced Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, N. S.; Maltepe, E.; Goldwasser, E.; Mathieu, C. E.; Simon, M. C.; Schumacker, P. T.

    1998-09-01

    Transcriptional activation of erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, and vascular endothelial growth factor occurs during hypoxia or in response to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in Hep3B cells. However, neither the mechanism of cellular O2 sensing nor that of cobalt is fully understood. We tested whether mitochondria act as O2 sensors during hypoxia and whether hypoxia and cobalt activate transcription by increasing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results show (i) wild-type Hep3B cells increase ROS generation during hypoxia (1.5% O2) or CoCl2 incubation, (ii) Hep3B cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA (ρ 0 cells) fail to respire, fail to activate mRNA for erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, or vascular endothelial growth factor during hypoxia, and fail to increase ROS generation during hypoxia; (iii) ρ 0 cells increase ROS generation in response to CoCl2 and retain the ability to induce expression of these genes; and (iv) the antioxidants pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and ebselen abolish transcriptional activation of these genes during hypoxia or CoCl2 in wild-type cells, and abolish the response to CoCl2 in ρ 0 cells. Thus, hypoxia activates transcription via a mitochondria-dependent signaling process involving increased ROS, whereas CoCl2 activates transcription by stimulating ROS generation via a mitochondria-independent mechanism.

  9. Thermoregulatory and metabolic responses of Japanese quail to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Atchley, Dylan S.; Foster, Jennifer A.; Bavis, Ryan W.

    2008-01-01

    Common responses to hypoxia include decreased body temperature (Tb) and decreased energy metabolism. In this study, the effects of hypoxia and hypercapnia on Tb and metabolic oxygen consumption (V̇o2) were investigated in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). When exposed to hypoxia (15, 13, 11 and 9% O2), Tb decreased only at 11% and 9% O2 compared to normoxia; quail were better able to maintain Tb during acute hypoxia after a one-week acclimation to 10% O2. V̇o2 also decreased during hypoxia, but at 9% O2 this was partially offset by increased anaerobic metabolism. Tb and V̇o2 responses to 9% O2 were exaggerated at lower ambient temperature (Ta), reflecting a decreased lower critical temperature during hypoxia. Conversely, hypoxia had little effect on Tb or V̇o2 at higher Ta (36°C). We conclude that Japanese quail respond to hypoxia in much the same way as mammals, by reducing both Tb and V̇o2. No relationship was found between the magnitudes of decreases in Tb and V̇o2 during 9% O2, however. Since metabolism is the source of heat generation, this suggests that Japanese quail increase thermolysis to reduce Tb. During hypercapnia (3, 6 and 9% CO2), Tb was reduced only at 9% CO2 while V̇o2 was unchanged. PMID:18727957

  10. WSB1: from homeostasis to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Haque, Moinul; Kendal, Joseph Keith; MacIsaac, Ryan Matthew; Demetrick, Douglas James

    2016-01-01

    The wsb1 gene has been identified to be important in developmental biology and cancer. A complex transcriptional regulation of wsb1 yields at least three functional transcripts. The major expressed isoform, WSB1 protein, is a substrate recognition protein within an E3 ubiquitin ligase, with the capability to bind diverse targets and mediate ubiquitinylation and proteolytic degradation. Recent data suggests a new role for WSB1 as a component of a neuroprotective pathway which results in modification and aggregation of neurotoxic proteins such as LRRK2 in Parkinson's Disease, via an unusual mode of protein ubiquitinylation.WSB1 is also involved in thyroid hormone homeostasis, immune regulation and cellular metabolism, particularly glucose metabolism and hypoxia. In hypoxia, wsb1 is a HIF-1 target, and is a regulator of the degradation of diverse proteins associated with the cellular response to hypoxia, including HIPK2, RhoGDI2 and VHL. Major roles are to both protect HIF-1 function through degradation of VHL, and decrease apoptosis through degradation of HIPK2. These activities suggest a role for wsb1 in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. As well, recent work has identified a role for WSB1 in glucose metabolism, and perhaps in mediating the Warburg effect in cancer cells by maintaining the function of HIF1. Furthermore, studies of cancer specimens have identified dysregulation of wsb1 associated with several types of cancer, suggesting a biologically relevant role in cancer development and/or progression.Recent development of an inducible expression system for wsb1 could aid in the further understanding of the varied functions of this protein in the cell, and roles as a potential oncogene and neuroprotective protein. PMID:27542736

  11. Effect of Acute Exposure to Moderate Altitude on Muscle Power: Hypobaric Hypoxia vs. Normobaric Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch- Góngora, Juan G.; Galilea, Pedro A.; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest Pmean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to Pmax (∼3%) and maximal strength (1RM) (∼6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on Pmean and Ppeak in the middle-high part of the curve (≥60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press. PMID:25474104

  12. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan G; Galilea, Pedro A; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest P(mean) obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max) (∼ 3%) and maximal strength (1 RM) (∼ 6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean) and P(peak) in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press.

  13. 2013 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 7,316 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 18,900 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 13,400 to 24,200), the 7th largest reported and about the size of New Jersey. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 74.5 km3 (95% credible interval, 51.5 to 97.0), also the 7th largest on record.

  14. 2014 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 4,761 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 14,000 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 8,000 to 20,000) – an “average year”. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 50 km3 (95% credible interval, 20 to 77).

  15. TRAIL restores DCA/metformin-mediated cell death in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; An, Sungkwan; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Lee, Jin Kyung; Hong, Jungil; Kim, Jong-Il; Noh, Woo Chul; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, In-Chul

    2016-09-23

    Previous studies have shown that hypoxia can reverse DCA/metformin-induced cell death in breast cancer cells. Therefore, targeting hypoxia is necessary for therapies targeting cancer metabolism. In the present study, we found that TRAIL can overcome the effect of hypoxia on the cell death induced by treatment of DCA and metformin in breast cancer cells. Unexpectedly, DR5 is upregulated in the cells treated with DCA/metformin, and sustained under hypoxia. Blocking DR5 by siRNA inhibited DCA/metformin/TRAIL-induced cell death, indicating that DR5 upregulation plays an important role in sensitizing cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Furthermore, we found that activation of JNK and c-Jun is responsible for upregulation of DR5 induced by DCA/metformin. These findings support the potential application of combining TRAIL and metabolism-targeting drugs in the treatment of cancers under hypoxia. PMID:27569287

  16. c-MYC inhibition impairs hypoxia response in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Mongiardi, Maria Patrizia; Savino, Mauro; Falchetti, Maria Laura; Illi, Barbara; Bozzo, Francesca; Valle, Cristiana; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Nasi, Sergio; Levi, Andrea

    2016-05-31

    The c-MYC oncoprotein is a DNA binding transcription factor that enhances the expression of many active genes. c-MYC transcriptional signatures vary according to the transcriptional program defined in each cell type during differentiation. Little is known on the involvement of c-MYC in regulation of gene expression programs that are induced by extracellular cues such as a changing microenvironment. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of c-MYC in glioblastoma multiforme cells blunts hypoxia-dependent glycolytic reprogramming and mitochondria fragmentation in hypoxia. This happens because c-MYC inhibition alters the cell transcriptional response to hypoxia and finely tunes the expression of a subset of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1-regulated genes. We also show that genes whose expression in hypoxia is affected by c-MYC inhibition are able to distinguish the Proneural subtype of glioblastoma multiforme, thus potentially providing a molecular signature for this class of tumors that are the least tractable among glioblastomas. PMID:27119353

  17. Hypoxia causes transgenerational impairments in reproduction of fish

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Simon Yuan; Lau, Karen; Lai, Keng-Po; Zhang, Jiang-Wen; Tse, Anna Chung-Kwan; Li, Jing-Woei; Tong, Yin; Chan, Ting-Fung; Wong, Chris Kong-Chu; Chiu, Jill Man-Ying; Au, Doris Wai-Ting; Wong, Alice Sze-Tsai; Kong, Richard Yuen-Chong; Wu, Rudolf Shiu-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is amongst the most widespread and pressing problems in aquatic environments. Here we demonstrate that fish (Oryzias melastigma) exposed to hypoxia show reproductive impairments (retarded gonad development, decrease in sperm count and sperm motility) in F1 and F2 generations despite these progenies (and their germ cells) having never been exposed to hypoxia. We further show that the observed transgenerational reproductive impairments are associated with a differential methylation pattern of specific genes in sperm of both F0 and F2 coupled with relevant transcriptomic and proteomic alterations, which may impair spermatogenesis. The discovered transgenerational and epigenetic effects suggest that hypoxia might pose a dramatic and long-lasting threat to the sustainability of fish populations. Because the genes regulating spermatogenesis and epigenetic modifications are highly conserved among vertebrates, these results may also shed light on the potential transgenerational effects of hypoxia on other vertebrates, including humans. PMID:27373813

  18. Hypoxia causes transgenerational impairments in reproduction of fish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Simon Yuan; Lau, Karen; Lai, Keng-Po; Zhang, Jiang-Wen; Tse, Anna Chung-Kwan; Li, Jing-Woei; Tong, Yin; Chan, Ting-Fung; Wong, Chris Kong-Chu; Chiu, Jill Man-Ying; Au, Doris Wai-Ting; Wong, Alice Sze-Tsai; Kong, Richard Yuen-Chong; Wu, Rudolf Shiu-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is amongst the most widespread and pressing problems in aquatic environments. Here we demonstrate that fish (Oryzias melastigma) exposed to hypoxia show reproductive impairments (retarded gonad development, decrease in sperm count and sperm motility) in F1 and F2 generations despite these progenies (and their germ cells) having never been exposed to hypoxia. We further show that the observed transgenerational reproductive impairments are associated with a differential methylation pattern of specific genes in sperm of both F0 and F2 coupled with relevant transcriptomic and proteomic alterations, which may impair spermatogenesis. The discovered transgenerational and epigenetic effects suggest that hypoxia might pose a dramatic and long-lasting threat to the sustainability of fish populations. Because the genes regulating spermatogenesis and epigenetic modifications are highly conserved among vertebrates, these results may also shed light on the potential transgenerational effects of hypoxia on other vertebrates, including humans. PMID:27373813

  19. Hypoxia: developments in basic science, physiology and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Ward, D S; Karan, S B; Pandit, J J

    2011-12-01

    Airway management is primarily designed to avoid hypoxia, yet hypoxia remains the main ultimate cause of anaesthetic-related death and morbidity. Understanding some of the physiology of hypoxia is therefore essential as part of a 'holistic' approach to airway management. Furthermore, it is strategically important that national specialist societies dedicated to airway management do not only focus upon the technical aspects of airway management, but also embrace some of the relevant scientific questions. There has been a great deal of research into causation of hypoxia and the body's natural protective mechanisms and responses to it. This enables us to think of ways in which we might manipulate the cellular and molecular responses to confer greater protection against hypoxia-induced tissue injury. This article reviews some of those aspects. PMID:22074075

  20. [Influence of hypoxia on the human auditory system].

    PubMed

    Lucertini, M; Urbani, L

    1997-02-01

    The present paper presents a review of the literature on "hypoxia and human auditory mechanisms". It examines and discusses, above all, the results obtained in the various studies using pure tone audiometry and auditory evoked potentials. At the present time, the two areas which appear most sensitive to hypoxia are the cochlea and, above all, the telencephalic auditory cortex (specifically those sectors dedicated to cognitive processing of auditory stimulation). However, many other areas which are sensitive to hypoxia, but to a lesser extent, have also been identified, even in other sectors of the auditory pathway. Particularly worthy of note is the effectiveness of the metabolic compensatory mechanisms which come into play upon hypoxic stress. These mechanisms include vasodilation and the presence of metabolic reservoirs. Nevertheless, there are still a number of open questions regarding how the auditory pathway functions in the case of hypoxia; thus the experimental study of hypoxic hypoxia is still an interesting, fruitful research field in audiology.

  1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and erythropoietin expression in the hippocampus of neonatal rats following hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junjie; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Huan; Zhang, Long; Wang, Ting

    2014-08-01

    In some regions of the hippocampus, neurogenesis persists throughout life and is upregulated following hypoxia/ischemia. The mechanisms underlying the upregulation of neurogenesis, however, are not known. Here we examined the expression of two factors thought to be involved in hypoxia-related neurogenesis, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and brain-derived erythropoietin (EPO), in the hippocampus of neonatal rats following hypoxia-ischemia. Sprague-Dawley rat pups were exposed to hypoxia-ischemia conditions or hypoxia conditions only. For the hypoxia-ischemia experiment, the left common carotid artery of Sprague-Dawley rat pups was ligated on postnatal day 7. The pups were exposed to hypoxic conditions and then returned to normoxia for re-oxygenation. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to evaluate EPO and HIF-1α expression at various time points after re-oxygenation (1 h, 6 h, 16 h, 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d). EPO expression in the hippocampus was verified using Western blot studies. For the hypoxia-only experiment, postnatal day 7 rat pups were continuously exposed to hypoxic conditions for different durations (0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, and 5 h). HIF-1α expression in the hippocampus was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. In the hypoxia-ischemia group, EPO expression was significantly altered. The EPO expression increased during re-oxygenation, peaked at 16 h, and decreased thereafter. In the hypoxia-only group, the EPO protein was not detectable. When the rat pups were returned to normoxia for re-oxygenation, there was no HIF-1α expression. HIF-1α immunoreactivity was present in the hypoxia-only group and peaked in rats exposed to continuous hypoxic conditions for 3 h. In addition, endogenous EPO increased in the neonatal rats after the hypoxia-ischemia event. Furthermore, HIF-1α was induced as a result of hypoxia. We postulate that disruption of homeostasis triggers and enhances hippocampal neurogenesis. Thus, HIF-1α/EPO hypoxic signal

  2. News about VDAC1 in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Mazure, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main interface between the cytosol and mitochondria of cells. It plays a crucial role in both mitochondrial metabolism and cell death. The main basic function of this channel is to mediate and gate the flux of small ions, metabolites, and adenosine triphosphate. Changes in its structure, and thus conformation, are expected to affect its activity and modulate the ability of cancer cells to expand. In this review, we describe a novel mechanism by which mitochondria of cells in hypoxia, a low level of oxygen, protects from apoptosis. In hypoxia, some mitochondria become enlarged due to hyperfusion. These mitochondria possess a truncated form of VDAC1 (VDAC1-ΔC), which is linked to the higher metabolic capacity and the greater resistance to cell death of hypoxic cells. However, not all of the VDAC1 protein is truncated, but the amount of the full-length form is diminished compared to the amount in normoxic cells. First, we describe how such a decrease effects cell proliferation, respiration, glycolysis, and other processes. Second, we report on a novel mitochondrial-endolysosomal crosstalk that leads to VDAC1 truncation. By pharmacological targeting of VDAC1-ΔC, the production of energy could be turned off and the sensitivity to cell death restored. This could counteract the favorable microenvironment that gives cancer cells a growth advantage and thereby disrupts the balance between life and death, which is controlled by VDAC1. PMID:27625993

  3. News about VDAC1 in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Mazure, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main interface between the cytosol and mitochondria of cells. It plays a crucial role in both mitochondrial metabolism and cell death. The main basic function of this channel is to mediate and gate the flux of small ions, metabolites, and adenosine triphosphate. Changes in its structure, and thus conformation, are expected to affect its activity and modulate the ability of cancer cells to expand. In this review, we describe a novel mechanism by which mitochondria of cells in hypoxia, a low level of oxygen, protects from apoptosis. In hypoxia, some mitochondria become enlarged due to hyperfusion. These mitochondria possess a truncated form of VDAC1 (VDAC1-ΔC), which is linked to the higher metabolic capacity and the greater resistance to cell death of hypoxic cells. However, not all of the VDAC1 protein is truncated, but the amount of the full-length form is diminished compared to the amount in normoxic cells. First, we describe how such a decrease effects cell proliferation, respiration, glycolysis, and other processes. Second, we report on a novel mitochondrial-endolysosomal crosstalk that leads to VDAC1 truncation. By pharmacological targeting of VDAC1-ΔC, the production of energy could be turned off and the sensitivity to cell death restored. This could counteract the favorable microenvironment that gives cancer cells a growth advantage and thereby disrupts the balance between life and death, which is controlled by VDAC1.

  4. News about VDAC1 in Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mazure, N M

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main interface between the cytosol and mitochondria of cells. It plays a crucial role in both mitochondrial metabolism and cell death. The main basic function of this channel is to mediate and gate the flux of small ions, metabolites, and adenosine triphosphate. Changes in its structure, and thus conformation, are expected to affect its activity and modulate the ability of cancer cells to expand. In this review, we describe a novel mechanism by which mitochondria of cells in hypoxia, a low level of oxygen, protects from apoptosis. In hypoxia, some mitochondria become enlarged due to hyperfusion. These mitochondria possess a truncated form of VDAC1 (VDAC1-ΔC), which is linked to the higher metabolic capacity and the greater resistance to cell death of hypoxic cells. However, not all of the VDAC1 protein is truncated, but the amount of the full-length form is diminished compared to the amount in normoxic cells. First, we describe how such a decrease effects cell proliferation, respiration, glycolysis, and other processes. Second, we report on a novel mitochondrial-endolysosomal crosstalk that leads to VDAC1 truncation. By pharmacological targeting of VDAC1-ΔC, the production of energy could be turned off and the sensitivity to cell death restored. This could counteract the favorable microenvironment that gives cancer cells a growth advantage and thereby disrupts the balance between life and death, which is controlled by VDAC1. PMID:27625993

  5. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) contains hypoxia response elements: relevance to lytic induction by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Haque, Muzammel; Davis, David A; Wang, Victoria; Widmer, Isabelle; Yarchoan, Robert

    2003-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8, is an etiologic agent of KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. We recently demonstrated that hypoxia can induce lytic replication of KSHV in PEL cell lines. Hypoxia induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), and we hypothesized that the KSHV genome may respond to hypoxia through functional hypoxia response elements (HREs). Here, we demonstrate the presence of at least two promoters within the KSHV genome that are activated by hypoxia or hypoxia mimics. One is in the promoter region of the gene for Rta, the main lytic switch gene, and the other is within the promoter region of ORF34, a lytic gene of unknown function. The ORF34 promoter contains three putative consensus HREs oriented in the direction of the gene. Dissection and site-directed mutagenesis studies confirmed that one of the HREs of the ORF34 promoter is functional. Under conditions of hypoxia, the ORF34 promoter was strongly upregulated by HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha. By contrast, the promoter of the gene for Rta appeared to be preferentially upregulated by HIF-2 alpha. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that specific messages for ORF34 and ORF50 are upregulated in BCBL-1 cells exposed to hypoxia. An HIF-1 binding and competition assay demonstrated that the HRE sequence from the ORF34 promoter can compete for HIF-1 alpha binding to an erythropoietin HRE oligonucleotide while a mutant sequence cannot. Thus, we demonstrated that a viral gene can be activated by hypoxia through activation of a functional viral HRE. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a functional HRE in a viral promoter. PMID:12767996

  6. Hypoxia inhibits Moloney murine leukemia virus expression in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Maura; Bosco, Maria Carla; Federico, Maurizio; Pastorino, Sandra; Varesio, Luigi

    2007-02-01

    Hypoxia, a local decrease in oxygen tension, occurring in many pathological processes, modifies macrophage (Mphi) gene expression and function. Here, we provide the first evidence that hypoxia inhibits transgene expression driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus-long terminal repeats (MoMLV-LTR) in IFN-gamma-activated Mphi. Hypoxia silenced the expression of several MoMLV-LTR-driven genes, including v-myc, enhanced green fluorescence protein, and env, and was effective in different mouse Mphi cell lines and on distinct MoMLV backbone-based viruses. Down-regulation of MoMLV mRNA occurred at the transcriptional level and was associated with decreased retrovirus production, as determined by titration experiments, suggesting that hypoxia may control MoMLV retroviral spread through the suppression of LTR activity. In contrast, genes driven by the CMV or the SV40 promoter were up-regulated or unchanged by hypoxia, indicating a selective inhibitory activity on the MoMLV promoter. It is interesting that hypoxia was ineffective in suppressing MoMLV-LTR-controlled gene expression in T or fibroblast cell lines, suggesting a Mphi lineage-selective action. Finally, we found that MoMLV-mediated gene expression in Mphi was also inhibited by picolinic acid, a tryptophan catabolite with hypoxia-like activity and Mphi-activating properties, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this molecule in viral resistance and its possible use as an antiviral agent.

  7. Resveratrol attenuates hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity through inhibiting microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Qingrui; Gao, Yan; Liu, Guangheng; Xiu, Meng; Wei, Xiang; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Dexiang

    2015-09-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol enriched in Polygonum cuspidatum and has been found to afford neuroprotective effects against neuroinflammation in the brain. Activated microglia can secrete various pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic mediators, which may contribute to hypoxic brain injuries. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential role of resveratrol in attenuating hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity via its anti-inflammatory actions through in vitro models of the BV-2 microglial cell line and primary microglia. We found that resveratrol significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced microglial activation and reduced subsequent release of pro-inflammatory factors. In addition, resveratrol inhibited the hypoxia-induced degradation of IκB-alpha and phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB protein. Hypoxia-induced ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation was also strongly inhibited by resveratrol, whereas resveratrol had no effect on hypoxia-stimulated p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Importantly, treating primary cortical neurons with conditioned medium (CM) from hypoxia-stimulated microglia induced neuronal apoptosis, which was reversed by CM co-treated with resveratrol. Taken together, resveratrol exerts neuroprotection against hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity through its anti-inflammatory effects in microglia. These effects were mediated, at least in part, by suppressing the activation of NF-ĸB, ERK and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:26225925

  8. Acute hypoxia produces a superoxide burst in cells.

    PubMed

    Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Alicia; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Ramos, Elena; Villa-Piña, Tamara; Lamas, Santiago; Bogdanova, Anna; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen is a key molecule for cell metabolism. Eukaryotic cells sense the reduction in oxygen availability (hypoxia) and trigger a series of cellular and systemic responses to adapt to hypoxia, including the optimization of oxygen consumption. Many of these responses are mediated by a genetic program induced by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs), regulated by a family of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD or EGLN) that use oxygen as a substrate producing HIF hydroxylation. In parallel to these oxygen sensors modulating gene expression within hours, acute modulation of protein function in response to hypoxia is known to occur within minutes. Free radicals acting as second messengers, and oxidative posttranslational modifications, have been implied in both groups of responses. Localization and speciation of the paradoxical increase in reactive oxygen species production in hypoxia remain debatable. We have observed that several cell types respond to acute hypoxia with a transient increase in superoxide production for about 10 min, probably originating in the mitochondria. This may explain in part the apparently divergent results found by various groups that have not taken into account the time frame of hypoxic ROS production. We propose that this acute and transient hypoxia-induced superoxide burst may be translated into oxidative signals contributing to hypoxic adaptation and preconditioning.

  9. Evolutionary Genetics of Hypoxia Tolerance in Cetaceans during Diving

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ran; Wang, Zhengfei; Niu, Xu; Zhou, Kaiya; Xu, Shixia; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia was a major challenge faced by cetaceans during the course of secondary aquatic adaptation. Although physiological traits of hypoxia tolerance in cetaceans have been well characterized, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the sequences of 17 hypoxia-tolerance-related genes in representative cetaceans to provide a comprehensive insight into the genetic basis of hypoxia tolerance in these animals. Genes involved in carrying and transporting oxygen in the blood and muscle (hemoglobin-α and β, myoglobin), and genes involved in the regulation of vasoconstriction (endothelin-1, -2, and -3; endothelin receptor type A and B; adrenergic receptor α-1D; and arginine vasopressin) appear to have undergone adaptive evolution, evidence for positive selection on their particular sites, and radical physiochemical property changes of selected condons. Interestingly, “long-diving” cetaceans had relatively higher ω (dN/dS) values than “short-diving” cetaceans for the hemoglobin β gene, indicating divergent selective pressure presented in cetacean lineages with different diving abilities. Additionally, parallel positive selection or amino acid changes (ADRA1D: P50A, A53G, AVPR1B: I/V270T) among animals exposed to different hypoxia habitats reflect functional convergence or similar genetic mechanisms of hypoxia tolerance. In summary, positive selection, divergent selective pressures, and parallel evolution at the molecular level provided some new insights into the genetic adaptation of hypoxia tolerance. PMID:26912402

  10. Role of nitric oxide in cardiovascular adaptation to intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Mallet, Robert T

    2006-04-01

    Hypoxia is one of the most frequently encountered stresses in health and disease. The duration, frequency, and severity of hypoxic episodes are critical factors determining whether hypoxia is beneficial or harmful. Adaptation to intermittent hypoxia has been demonstrated to confer cardiovascular protection against more severe and sustained hypoxia, and, moreover, to protect against other stresses, including ischemia. Thus, the direct and cross protective effects of adaptation to intermittent hypoxia have been used for treatment and prevention of a variety of diseases and to increase efficiency of exercise training. Evidence is mounting that nitric oxide (NO) plays a central role in these adaptive mechanisms. NO-dependent protective mechanisms activated by intermittent hypoxia include stimulation of NO synthesis as well as restriction of NO overproduction. In addition, alternative, nonenzymic sources of NO and negative feedback of NO synthesis are important factors in optimizing NO concentrations. The adaptive enhancement of NO synthesis and/or availability activates or increases expression of other protective factors, including heat shock proteins, antioxidants and prostaglandins, making the protection more robust and sustained. Understanding the role of NO in mechanisms of adaptation to hypoxia will support development of therapies to prevent and treat hypoxic or ischemic damage to organs and cells and to increase adaptive capabilities of the organism. PMID:16565431

  11. Ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia occurs in serotonin-depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Olson, E B

    1987-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that serotonin mediated respiratory activity is involved in ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia, rats were treated with parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a potent, long-acting inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of serotonin. In normoxia, a single, intraperitoneal injection of 300 mg PCPA/kg body weight decreased the Paco2 from a control level at 39.1 +/- 0.6 Torr (mean +/- 95% confidence limits) to 34.0 +/- 0.6 Torr measured during a period from 1 to 48 h following PCPA treatment. This PCPA-produced hyperventilation corresponds to an increase of 3.7 +/- 0.5 in the VA (BTPS)/Vco2 (STPD) ratio. Hyperventilation during ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia (PIO2 approximately equal to 90 Torr) was superimposed in an additive fashion on the underlying hyperventilation due to PCPA pretreatment. Specifically, PCPA pretreatment caused an average 3.5 +/- 1.2 increase in the VA/VCO2 ratio determined in acute (1 h) hypoxia, chronic (24 h) hypoxia and acute return to normoxia following chronic hypoxia. Since ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia occurred in rats treated with PCPA, the prolonged, serotonin mediated respiratory activity described by Millhorn et al. (1980b) is probably not important in ventilatory acclimatization to - or deacclimatization from - hypoxia. PMID:2957766

  12. Regulation of CREB by moderate hypoxia in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Hsieh, T; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms by which excitable cells adapt and respond to changes in O2 levels remain largely unknown. We have investigated the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. PC12 cells were exposed to moderate levels of hypoxia (5% O2) for various times between 20 min and 6 hr. We found that hypoxia rapidly and persistently induced ser133 phosphorylation of CREB. This effect was more robust than that produced by exposing PC12 cells to either forskolin, KCl, or NGF. This effect was not due to activation of any of the previously known CREB kinases, including PKA, CaMK, PKC, p70s6k, or MAPKAP kinase-2. Thus, hypoxia may induce activation of a novel CREB kinase. To test whether phosphorylation of CREB was associated with an activation of CRE-dependent gene expression, cells were transfected with wild type and mutated regions of the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene fused to a CAT reporter gene. Mutation of the CRE element in a TH reporter gene reduced, but did not abolish, the effects of hypoxia on TH gene expression. However, hypoxia did not induce transactivation of a GAL4-luciferase reporter by a GAL4-CREB fusion protein. Thus, the mechanism by which hypoxia regulates CREB is distinct, and more complex, than that induced by forskolin, depolarization, or nerve growth factor. PMID:10849656

  13. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability.

  14. Myocardial metabolism during hypoxia: Maintained lactate oxidation during increased glycolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mazer, C.D.; Stanley, W.C.; Hickey, R.F.; Neese, R.A.; Cason, B.A.; Demas, K.A.; Wisneski, J.A.; Gertz, E.W. )

    1990-09-01

    In the intact animal, myocardial lactate utilization and oxidation during hypoxia are not well understood. Nine dogs were chronically instrumented with flow probes on the left anterior descending coronary artery and with a coronary sinus sampling catheter. ({sup 14}C)lactate and ({sup 13}C)glucose tracers, or ({sup 13}C)lactate and ({sup 14}C)glucose were administered to quantitate lactate and glucose oxidation, lactate conversion to glucose, and simultaneous lactate extraction and release. The animals were anesthetized and exposed to 90 minutes of severe hypoxia (PO2 = 25 +/- 4 torr). Hypoxia resulted in significant increases in heart rate, cardiac output and myocardial blood flow, but no significant change in myocardial oxygen consumption. The arterial/coronary sinus differences for glucose and lactate did not change from normoxia to hypoxia; however, the rate of glucose uptake increased significantly due to the increase in myocardial blood flow. Tracer-measured lactate extraction did not decrease with hypoxia, despite a 250% increase in lactate release. During hypoxia, 90% +/- 4% of the extracted {sup 14}C-lactate was accounted for by the appearance of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the coronary sinus, compared with 88% +/- 4% during normoxia. Thus, in addition to the expected increase in glucose uptake and lactate production, we observed an increase in lactate oxidation during hypoxia.

  15. Hypoxia-related processes in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Conley, Daniel J; Björck, Svante; Bonsdorff, Erik; Carstensen, Jacob; Destouni, Georgia; Gustafsson, Bo G; Hietanen, Susanna; Kortekaas, Marloes; Kuosa, Harri; Meier, H E Markus; Müller-Karulis, Baerbel; Nordberg, Kjell; Norkko, Alf; Nürnberg, Gertrud; Pitkänen, Heikki; Rabalais, Nancy N; Rosenberg, Rutger; Savchuk, Oleg P; Slomp, Caroline P; Voss, Maren; Wulff, Fredrik; Zillén, Lovisa

    2009-05-15

    Hypoxia, a growing worldwide problem, has been intermittently present in the modern Baltic Sea since its formation ca. 8000 cal. yr BP. However, both the spatial extent and intensity of hypoxia have increased with anthropogenic eutrophication due to nutrient inputs. Physical processes, which control stratification and the renewal of oxygen in bottom waters, are important constraints on the formation and maintenance of hypoxia. Climate controlled inflows of saline water from the North Sea through the Danish Straits is a critical controlling factor governing the spatial extent and duration of hypoxia. Hypoxia regulates the biogeochemical cycles of both phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in the water column and sediments. Significant amounts of P are currently released from sediments, an order of magnitude larger than anthropogenic inputs. The Baltic Sea is unique for coastal marine ecosystems experiencing N losses in hypoxic waters below the halocline. Although benthic communities in the Baltic Sea are naturally constrained by salinity gradients, hypoxia has resulted in habitat loss over vast areas and the elimination of benthic fauna, and has severely disrupted benthic food webs. Nutrient load reductions are needed to reduce the extent, severity, and effects of hypoxia. PMID:19544833

  16. Glycolysis determines dichotomous regulation of T cell subsets in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Zhang, Ming; Savoldo, Barbara; Metelitsa, Leonid S.; Rodgers, John; Yustein, Jason T.; Neilson, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia occurs in many pathological conditions, including chronic inflammation and tumors, and is considered to be an inhibitor of T cell function. However, robust T cell responses occur at many hypoxic inflammatory sites, suggesting that functions of some subsets are stimulated under low oxygen conditions. Here, we investigated how hypoxic conditions influence human T cell functions and found that, in contrast to naive and central memory T cells (TN and TCM), hypoxia enhances the proliferation, viability, and cytotoxic action of effector memory T cells (TEM). Enhanced TEM expansion in hypoxia corresponded to high hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) expression and glycolytic activity compared with that observed in TN and TCM. We determined that the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH negatively regulates HIF1A expression by binding to adenylate-uridylate–rich elements in the 3′-UTR region of HIF1A mRNA in glycolytically inactive TN and TCM. Conversely, active glycolysis with decreased GAPDH availability in TEM resulted in elevated HIF1α expression. Furthermore, GAPDH overexpression reduced HIF1α expression and impaired proliferation and survival of T cells in hypoxia, indicating that high glycolytic metabolism drives increases in HIF1α to enhance TEM function during hypoxia. This work demonstrates that glycolytic metabolism regulates the translation of HIF1A to determine T cell responses to hypoxia and implicates GAPDH as a potential mechanism for controlling T cell function in peripheral tissue. PMID:27294526

  17. Transcriptome analysis of the plateau fish (Triplophysa dalaica): Implications for adaptation to hypoxia in fishes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Liandong; Wu, Bo; Song, Zhaobin; He, Shunping

    2015-07-10

    Triplophysa dalaica, endemic species of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, is informative for understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to hypoxic conditions of high altitude habitats. Here, a comprehensive gene repertoire for this plateau fish was generated using the Illumina deep paired-end high-throughput sequencing technology. De novo assembly yielded 145, 256 unigenes with an average length of 1632 bp. Blast searches against GenBank non-redundant database annotated 74,594 (51.4%) unigenes encoding for 30,047 gene descriptions in T. dalaica. Functional annotation and classification of assembled sequences were performed using Gene Ontology (GO), clusters of euKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis. After comparison with other fish transcriptomes, including silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and mud loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus), 2621 high-quality orthologous gene alignments were constructed among these species. 61 (2.3%) of the genes were identified as having undergone positive selection in the T. dalaica lineage. Within the positively selected genes, 13 genes were involved in hypoxia response, of which 11 were listed in HypoxiaDB. Furthermore, duplicated hif-α (hif-1αA/B and hif-2αA/B), EGLN1 and PPARA candidate genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia were identified in T. dalaica transcriptome. Branch-site model in PAML validated that hif-1αB and hif-2αA genes have undergone positive selection in T.dalaica. Finally, 37,501 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 19,497 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in T. dalaica. The identified SSR and SNP markers will facilitate the genetic structure, population geography and ecological studies of Triplophysa fishes.

  18. Failure of anti tumor-derived endothelial cell immunotherapy depends on augmentation of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pezzolo, Annalisa; Marimpietri, Danilo; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Cocco, Claudia; Pistorio, Angela; Gambini, Claudio; Cilli, Michele; Horenstein, Alberto; Malavasi, Fabio; Pistoia, Vito

    2014-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that Tenascin-C (TNC)(+) human neuroblastoma (NB) cells transdifferentiate into tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDEC), which have been detected both in primary tumors and in tumors formed by human NB cell lines in immunodeficient mice. TDEC are genetically unstable and may favor tumor progression, suggesting that their elimination could reduce tumor growth and dissemination. So far, TDEC have never been targeted by antibody-mediated immunotherapy in any of the tumor models investigated. To address this issue, immunodeficient mice carrying orthotopic NB formed by the HTLA-230 human cell line were treated with TDEC-targeting cytotoxic human (h)CD31, that spares host-derived endothelial cells, or isotype-matched mAbs. hCD31 mAb treatment did not affect survival of NB-bearing mice, but increased significantly hypoxia in tumor microenvironment, where apoptotic and proliferating TDEC coexisted, indicating the occurrence of vascular remodeling. Tumor cells from hCD31 mAb treated mice showed i) up-regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related and vascular mimicry (VM)-related gene expression, ii) expression of endothelial (i.e. CD31 and VE-cadherin) and EMT-associated (i.e. Twist-1, N-cadherin and TNC) immunophenotypic markers, and iii) up-regulation of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) expression. In vitro experiments with two NB cell lines showed that hypoxia was the common driver of all the above phenomena and that human recombinant HMGB-1 amplified EMT and TDEC trans-differentiation. In conclusion, TDEC targeting with hCD31 mAb increases tumor hypoxia, setting the stage for the occurrence of EMT and of new waves of TDEC trans-differentiation. These adaptive responses to the changes induced by immunotherapy in the tumor microenvironment allow tumor cells to escape from the effects of hCD31 mAb.

  19. Regulation of wound healing and fibrosis by hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor-1.

    PubMed

    Ruthenborg, Robin J; Ban, Jae-Jun; Wazir, Anum; Takeda, Norihiko; Kim, Jung-Whan

    2014-09-01

    Wound healing is a complex multi-step process that requires spatial and temporal orchestration of cellular and non-cellular components. Hypoxia is one of the prominent microenvironmental factors in tissue injury and wound healing. Hypoxic responses, mainly mediated by a master transcription factor of oxygen homeostasis, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), have been shown to be critically involved in virtually all processes of wound healing and remodeling. Yet, mechanisms underlying hypoxic regulation of wound healing are still poorly understood. Better understanding of how the wound healing process is regulated by the hypoxic microenvironment and HIF-1 signaling pathway will provide insight into the development of a novel therapeutic strategy for impaired wound healing conditions such as diabetic wound and fibrosis. In this review, we will discuss recent studies illuminating the roles of HIF-1 in physiologic and pathologic wound repair and further, the therapeutic potentials of HIF-1 stabilization or inhibition.

  20. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika; Asp, Julia; Synnergren, Jane; Johansson, Cecilia Thalen; Palmqvist, Lars; Jeppsson, Anders; Hulten, Lillemor Mattsson

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 in the ischemic heart. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incubation of human muscle cells in hypoxia showed a 22-fold upregulation of ALOX15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed increased levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggesting a link between ischemia and inflammation in ischemic heart biopsies. -- Abstract: A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield

  1. Investigation of the combined effects of bedrest and mild hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Bungo, M. W.; Conkin, J.

    1982-01-01

    Subjects were exposed to an 8-h mild hypoxia exposure (8000 ft. equivalent, 2438 m) with and without a 28-h period of 6 deg headdown bedrest. Anticipated responses to the bedrest and the hypoxia were observed. There was no indication that bedrest affected the arterial oxygenation or the oxygen gradient across the lungs of the subjects undergoing mild hypoxia. It is concluded that there is no evidence that would preclude an alveolar O2 pressure as low as 69 torr during contingency spacecraft operation.

  2. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha and multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Bhupendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth creates a state of hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment and results in release of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HiF-1α) in the local milieu. Hypoxia inducible factor activity is deregulated in many human cancers, especially those that are highly hypoxic. In multiple myeloma (MM) in initial stages of disease establishment, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment supports the initial survival and growth of the myeloma cells. Hypoxic tumour cells are usually resistant to radiotherapy and most conventional chemotherapeutic agents, rendering them highly aggressive and metastatic. Therefore, HIF is an attractive, although challenging, therapeutic target in MM directly or indirectly in recent years. PMID:26900575

  3. Modulation of human sinus node function by systemic hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, D. L.; Bastow, H., III; Scruby, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether bradycardia develops during systemic hypoxia in supine conscious human volunteers when respiratory frequency and tidal volume are maintained at constant levels. The obtained results suggest that mild hypoxia provokes cardioacceleration in humans, independent of changes of ventilation or baroreflex responsiveness. The earliest cardioacceleration is more prominent in the inspiratory than in the expiratory phase of respiration, and occurs with very small reductions of arterial oxygen saturation. Moderate systemic hypoxia dampens fluctuations of heart rate during the respiratory cycle.

  4. Developing vascular and hypoxia based theranostics in solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koonce, Nathan A.

    Tissue hypoxia was recognized for its biological attenuating effects on ionizing radiation over a century ago and is a characteristic feature of many solid tumors. Clinical and experimental evidence indicates tumor hypoxia plays diverse and key roles in tumor progression, angiogenesis, and resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy. Hypoxia has known effects on progression and resistance to several standard treatment approaches and the significant history of study might suggest diagnostic imaging and therapeutic interventions would be routine in oncological practice. Curiously, this is not the case and the research results involved in this report will attempt to better understand and contribute to why this gap in knowledge exists and a rationale for harnessing the potential of detecting and targeting hypoxia. Despite the addition of oxygen and reversal of hypoxia being known as the best radiosensitizer, hypoxia remains unexploited in clinical cancer therapy. The studies reported herein detail development of a novel imaging technique to detect a subtype of tumor hypoxia, vascular hypoxia or hypoxemia, with a 17-fold increase (p<0.05) in uptake of pimonidazole targeted microbubbles observed compared to controls. This technique creates the potential to study the role of hypoxemia in progression and therapeutic response. Additionally, description of a nanoparticle-based therapy that targets tumor areas associated with tumor hypoxia and the tumor microenvironment in general is reported. TNF-loaded nanoparticles combined with radiotherapy resulted in a 5.25-fold growth delay that was found to be synergistic (p<0.05) and suggests clinical evaluation is warranted. An additional study to evaluate an approach to use thermal ablation of intratumoral hypoxia by an image-guided technique developed in our group is described along with a sequence dependence of radiation preceding ablation. A final study on the use of galectin-1 antagonist to significantly decrease (p<0.05) hypoxia

  5. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters ventilatory and metabolic responses to acute hypoxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Barbara J; Adrian, Russell; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bates, Melissa L; Dopp, John M

    2016-05-15

    We determined the effects of chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on chemoreflex control of ventilation in conscious animals. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH [nadir oxygen saturation (SpO2), 75%; 15 events/h; 10 h/day] or normoxia (NORM) for 21 days. We assessed the following responses to acute, graded hypoxia before and after exposures: ventilation (V̇e, via barometric plethysmography), V̇o2 and V̇co2 (analysis of expired air), heart rate (HR), and SpO2 (pulse oximetry via neck collar). We quantified hypoxia-induced chemoreceptor sensitivity by calculating the stimulus-response relationship between SpO2 and the ventilatory equivalent for V̇co2 (linear regression). An additional aim was to determine whether CIH causes proliferation of carotid body glomus cells (using bromodeoxyuridine). CIH exposure increased the slope of the V̇e/V̇co2/SpO2 relationship and caused hyperventilation in normoxia. Bromodeoxyuridine staining was comparable in CIH and NORM. Thus our CIH paradigm augmented hypoxic chemosensitivity without causing glomus cell proliferation. PMID:26917692

  6. Low-O₂ acclimation shifts the hypoxia avoidance behaviour of snapper (Pagrus auratus) with only subtle changes in aerobic and anaerobic function.

    PubMed

    Cook, Denham G; Iftikar, Fathima I; Baker, Daniel W; Hickey, Anthony J R; Herbert, Neill A

    2013-02-01

    It was hypothesised that chronic hypoxia acclimation (preconditioning) would alter the behavioural low-O(2) avoidance strategy of fish as a result of both aerobic and anaerobic physiological adaptations. Avoidance and physiological responses of juvenile snapper (Pagrus auratus) were therefore investigated following a 6 week period of moderate hypoxia exposure (10.2-12.1 kPa P(O(2)), 21 ± 1 °C) and compared with those of normoxic controls (P(O(2))=20-21 kPa, 21 ± 1 °C). The critical oxygen pressure (P(crit)) limit of both groups was unchanged at ~7 kPa, as were standard, routine and maximum metabolic rates. However, hypoxia-acclimated fish showed increased tolerances to hypoxia in behavioural choice chambers by avoiding lower P(O(2)) levels (3.3 ± 0.7 vs 5.3 ± 1.1 kPa) without displaying greater perturbations of lactate or glucose. This behavioural change was associated with unexpected physiological adjustments. For example, a decrease in blood O(2) carrying capacity was observed after hypoxia acclimation. Also unexpected was an increase in whole-blood P(50) following acclimation to low O(2), perhaps facilitating Hb-O(2) off-loading to tissues. In addition, cardiac mitochondria measured in situ using permeabilised fibres showed improved O(2) uptake efficiencies. The proportion of the anaerobic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, at least relative to the aerobic marker enzyme citrate synthase, also increased in heart and skeletal red muscle, indicating enhanced anaerobic potential, or in situ lactate metabolism, in these tissues. Overall, these data suggest that a prioritization of O(2) delivery and O(2) utilisation over O(2) uptake during long-term hypoxia may convey a significant survival benefit to snapper in terms of behavioural low-O(2) tolerance.

  7. STAT3 is a key transcriptional regulator of cancer stem cell marker CD133 in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Sarani; Fuchs, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) marker CD133 was found to be upregulated in many cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular mechanism of CD133 regulation in the liver tumor microenvironment has remained elusive. In this study Won and colleagues report that interleukin-6 (IL-6) mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) signaling and hypoxia enhance the expression of CD133 and promote the progression of HCC. PMID:27275460

  8. Mitochondrial physiology and reactive oxygen species production are altered by hypoxia acclimation in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Du, Sherry N N; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Borowiec, Brittney G; Scott, Graham R

    2016-04-15

    Many fish encounter hypoxia in their native environment, but the role of mitochondrial physiology in hypoxia acclimation and hypoxia tolerance is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of hypoxia acclimation on mitochondrial respiration, O2kinetics, emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidant capacity in the estuarine killifish ( ITALIC! Fundulus heteroclitus). Killifish were acclimated to normoxia, constant hypoxia (5 kPa O2) or intermittent diel cycles of nocturnal hypoxia (12 h:12 h normoxia:hypoxia) for 28-33 days and mitochondria were isolated from liver. Neither pattern of hypoxia acclimation affected the respiratory capacities for oxidative phosphorylation or electron transport, leak respiration, coupling control or phosphorylation efficiency. Hypoxia acclimation also had no effect on mitochondrial O2kinetics, but ITALIC! P50(the O2tension at which hypoxia inhibits respiration by 50%) was lower in the leak state than during maximal respiration, and killifish mitochondria endured anoxia-reoxygenation without any impact on mitochondrial respiration. However, both patterns of hypoxia acclimation reduced the rate of ROS emission from mitochondria when compared at a common O2tension. Hypoxia acclimation also increased the levels of protein carbonyls and the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver tissue (the latter only occurred in constant hypoxia). Our results suggest that hypoxia acclimation is associated with changes in mitochondrial physiology that decrease ROS production and may help improve hypoxia tolerance. PMID:26896545

  9. Nitric oxide synthase and NADPH-diaphorase after acute hypobaric hypoxia in the rat caudate putamen.

    PubMed

    Encinas, Juan Manuel; Fernández, Ana Patricia; Salas, Eduardo; Castro-Blanco, Susana; Muñoz, Priscila; Rodrigo, José; Serrano, Julia

    2004-03-01

    Changes in the production system of nitric oxide (NO), a multifunctional biological messenger known to participate in blood-flow regulation, neuromodulation, and neuroprotection or neurotoxicity, were investigated in the caudate putamen of adult rats submitted to hypobaric hypoxia. Employing immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, enzymatic assay, and NADPH-diaphorase staining, we demonstrate that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression and constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) activity were transiently activated by 7 h of exposure to a simulated altitude of 8325 m (27,000 ft). In addition, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) immunoreactivity and blood vessel NADPH-diaphorase staining peaked immediately after the hypoxic stimulus, whereas inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and activity remained unaltered. Nitrotyrosine formation, a marker of protein nitration, was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, and was found to increase parallel to nitric oxide synthesis. We conclude that the nitric oxide system undergoes significant transient alterations in the caudate putamen of adult rats submitted to acute hypobaric hypoxia.

  10. Placental hypoxia: the lesions of maternal malperfusion.

    PubMed

    Parks, W Tony

    2015-02-01

    The placental lesions classically ascribed to placental hypoxia, here denoted maternal malperfusion (MMP), are among the more significant that a placental pathologist may encounter. Yet the appearance of these lesions may be subtle, and the clinical implication of their diagnosis is frequently unclear. The aim of this review is to provide a more nuanced perspective on the clinical utility of placental pathology for the detection of MMP. The review will first detail MMP lesions in the placenta and discuss their associations with pregnancy complications. The review will then delve into the diagnostic and interpretive difficulties of these lesions. Finally, recent research findings that may aid in the development of better diagnostic tools will be briefly discussed.

  11. Heart Rhythm Genomic Fabric in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, Dumitru A; Iacobas, Sanda; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which chronic hypoxia, whether constant (CCH) or intermittent (CIH), alters the heart rhythm are still under debate. Expression level, control, maturational profile and intercoordination of 54 genes encoding heart rhythm determinants (HRDs) were analyzed in 36 mice subjected for one, two or four weeks of their early life to normal atmospheric conditions or to CCH or CIH. Our analysis revealed a complex network of genes encoding various heart rate, inotropy and development controllers, receptors, ion channels and transporters, ankyrins, epigenetic modulators and intercalated disc components (adherens, cadherins, catenins, desmosomal, gap and tight junction proteins). The network is remodeled during maturation and substantially and differently altered by CIH and CCH. Gene Prominence Analysis that ranks the genes according to their expression stability and networking within functional gene webs, confirmed the HRD status of certain epigenetic modulators and components of the intercalated discs not yet associated with arrhythmia. PMID:20044980

  12. An Exploratory Study Into the Role of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Perfusion Computed Tomography for Detection of Intratumoral Hypoxia in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Newbold, Kate Castellano, Isabel; Charles-Edwards, Elizabeth; Mears, Dorothy; Sohaib, Aslam; Leach, Martin; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Clarke, Peter; Fisher, Cyril; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC) is well established and known to cause radiation resistance and treatment failure in the management of HNC. This study examines the role of parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) as surrogate markers of intratumoral hypoxia, defined by using the exogenous marker of hypoxia pimonidazole and the endogenous marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9). Methods and Materials: Patients with HNC underwent preoperative DCE-MRI, perfusion CT, and pimonidazole infusion. Imaging parameters were correlated with pimonidazole and CA9 staining. The strength of correlations was tested by using a two-tailed Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Twenty-three regions of interest were analyzed from the 7 patients who completed the DCE-MRI studies. A number of statistically significant correlations were seen between DCE-MRI parameters (volume transfer between blood plasma and extracellular extravascular space [EES], volume of EES, rate constant between EES and blood plasma, time at arrival of contrast inflow, time to peak, average gradient, and time to onset) and areas with a pimonidazole score of 4. In the case of CA9 staining, only a weak correlation was shown with wash-in rate. There were no significant correlations between perfusion CT parameters and pimonidazole staining or CA9 expression. Conclusion: Intratumoral hypoxia in patients with HNC may be predicted by using DCE-MRI; however, perfusion CT requires further investigation.

  13. The Effect of Prenatal Hypoxia on Brain Development: Short- and Long-Term Consequences Demonstrated in Rodent Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golan, Hava; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-01-01

    Hypoxia (H) and hypoxia-ischemia (HI) are major causes of foetal brain damage with long-lasting behavioral implications. The effect of hypoxia has been widely studied in human and a variety of animal models. In the present review, we summarize the latest studies testing the behavioral outcomes following prenatal hypoxia/hypoxia-ischemia in rodent…

  14. Hypoxia-Responsive Copolymer for siRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Perche, Federico; Biswas, Swati; Patel, Niravkumar R; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of nanomedicine has been designed for cancer therapy. Herein, we describe the synthesis and evaluation of a hypoxia-responsive copolymer for siRNA delivery (Perche et al., Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 53:3362-3366, 2014). The synthesis is achieved using established coupling chemistry and accessible purification procedures. A polyelectrolyte-lipid conjugate (polyethyleneimine 1.8 kDa-dioleyl-phosphatidylinositol, PEI-PE) and polyethylene glycol 2000 (PEG) were assembled via the hypoxia-sensitive azobenzene (Azo) unit to obtain the PEG-Azo-PEI-DOPE copolymer. This copolymer can condense siRNA and shows hypoxia-induced cellular internalization and reporter gene downregulation in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo after parenteral administration (Perche et al., Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 53:3362-3366, 2014). We also detail procedures to evaluate hypoxia-targeted polymers both in monolayer cultures, cancer cell spheroids and in tumor xenografts murine models. PMID:26530922

  15. DUBs, New Members in the Hypoxia Signaling clUb

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Amelie S.; Berra, Edurne

    2016-01-01

    Cellular protein homeostasis is tightly regulated by ubiquitination. Responsible for target protein ubiquitination is a class of enzymes, the so-called ubiquitin E3 ligases. They are opposed to a second class of enzymes, called deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which can remove polyubiquitin chains from their specific target proteins. The coaction of the two sets of enzymes allows the cell to adapt its overall protein content and the abundance of particular proteins to a variety of cellular and environmental stresses, including hypoxia. In recent years, DUBs have been highlighted to play major roles in many diseases, including cancer, both as tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Therefore, DUBs are emerging as promising targets for cancer-cell specific treatment. Here, we will review the current understanding of DUBs implicated in the control of hypoxia-inducible factor, the regulation of DUBs by hypoxia, and the use of DUB-specific drugs to target tumor hypoxia-signaling. PMID:27014628

  16. Rearing of silkworm under hypobaric and hypoxia conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Shin; Yamashita, Masamichi; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    In order to investigate of a possibility of utilizing silkworm for the space agriculture, rearing of silkworms was examined under hypobaric and hypoxia conditions. In terms of structural mechanics, the lower inner pressure of Martian greenhouse has advantage to reduce requirements on physical properties of mechanical member of the pressurized structure. The main objective of this study is to know the influence of lower total pressure and hypoxia condition on silkworm. Silkworms are reared under following four hypobaric and hypoxia conditions, 10kPa pure oxygen, 20kPa pure oxygen, 10kPa oxygen and 10kPa nitrogen, and 10kPa oxygen and 90kPa nitrogen. After rearing them to pupa stage, growth of silkworms was found poor under all hypobaric hypoxia conditions compared to those grown under the normal atmospheric condition; the control group. The growth under total pressure of 20kPa is slightly fast.

  17. A New Device to Mimic Intermittent Hypoxia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, Luc; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Kerkhofs, Myriam; Legros, J. L.; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Van Meerhaeghe, Alain; Coussement, Gregory; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Legrand, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (hypoxia-reoxygenation) is often associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We describe a new device which can be used to submit cohorts of mice to controlled and standardised hypoxia-normoxia cycles at an individual level. Mice were placed in individual compartments to which similar gas flow parameters were provided using an open loop strategy. Evaluations made using computational fluid dynamics were confirmed by studying changes in haemoglobin oxygen saturation in vivo. We also modified the parameters of the system and demonstrated its ability to generate different severities of cyclic hypoxemia very precisely, even with very high frequency cycles of hypoxia-reoxygenation. The importance of the parameters on reoxygenation was shown. This device will allow investigators to assess the effects of hypoxia–reoxygenation on different pathological conditions, such as obstructive sleep apnoea or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:23565179

  18. Implications of Hypoxia in Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, Daniele M.

    2016-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain regions of hypoxia in which increased cell proliferation promotes increased oxygen consumption and the condition is further exacerbated as cancer cells become localized far from a functional blood vessel, further decreasing the oxygen supply. An important mechanism that promotes cell adaptation to hypoxic conditions is the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Hypoxia-inducible factors transcriptionally regulate many genes involved in the invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Patients, whose primary tumor biopsies show high HIF expression levels, have a greater risk of metastasis. The current review will highlight the potential role of hypoxia in breast cancer metastasis to the bone by considering the regulation of many steps in the metastatic process that include invasion, migration, margination and extravasation, as well as homing signals and regulation of the bone microenvironment. PMID:27706047

  19. Role of posterior hypothalamus in hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Choudhary, R C; Reddy, M K; Ray, A; Ravi, K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of posterior hypothalamus and central neurotransmitters in the pulmonary edema due to hypobaric hypoxia, rats were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure-294.4 mmHg) for 24 h. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increases in mean arterial blood pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity, right ventricular systolic pressure, lung wet to dry weight ratio and Evans blue dye leakage. There was a significant attenuation in these responses to hypobaric hypoxia (a) after lesioning posterior hypothalamus and (b) after chronic infusion of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into posterior hypothalamus. No such attenuation was evident with the chronic infusion of the nitric oxide donor SNAP into the posterior hypothalamus. It is concluded that in hypobaric hypoxia, there is over-activity of posterior hypothalamic neurons probably due to a local decrease in GABA-ergic inhibition which increases the sympathetic drive causing pulmonary hypertension and edema. PMID:25448396

  20. Distribution of hypoxia and pycnocline off the Changjiang Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianrong; Zhu, Zhuoyi; Lin, Jun; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of hypoxia and the pycnocline off the Changjiang Estuary were investigated by making several field observations from June 2 to 11, from July 18 to 23, from August 20 to 30, from October 3 to 13, 2006, and from August 27 to September 3, 2009. The observations from July 18 to 23, 2006, mainly focused on analyzing the relationship between hypoxia and the extension of the river plume and vertical stratification. In July, the Changjiang diluted water (CDW) was influenced by the easterly typhoon winds, causing it to extend northward rather than northeastward. By using the maximum vertical density gradient as a stratification intensity index, we found that the area of low (< 3 mg/L) dissolved oxygen (DO) was similar to the area of the pycnocline (> 2.0 kg/m4), which indicated that the summer pycnocline can effectively block vertical DO exchange and maintain hypoxia near the bottom. The observed hypoxic area was 500 km2, which was much smaller than the hypoxic areas observed in previous studies, and occurred because of the enhanced mixing that resulted from Typhoon Bill. During the observation period of August 20-30, 2006, the maximum density gradient was weaker due to distinct low river discharge. No hypoxia was observed in the eastern and southeastern sea off the Changjiang Estuary where hypoxia often occurs. However, hypoxia occurred over a large area of 15,400 km2 in the northern observation domain where hypoxia rarely occurs. During June 2-11 and October 3-13, 2006, the maximum density gradient was weaker, and the area with low DO was smaller than in July 2006. This finding resulted from relatively low river discharge and weaker solar heating. Consequently, no hypoxia occurred in the bottom layer. The area of low DO was similar to that of the maximum vertical density gradient. From August 27 to September 3, 2009, high river discharge and strong solar heating produced a larger and more intense pycnocline. The hypoxic area reached 3735 km2 and was very

  1. International hypoxia symposium XVIII: 26 February–02 March 2013

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 18th International Hypoxia Symposia, Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada, February 26–March 02, 2013, covered molecular basis of hypoxic responses (e.g., hypoxia inducible factor, nitrite, nitrate, and hemoglobin) and integrative physiology (e.g., exercise physiology, cerebral blood flow responses, live-high train-low, and population genetics). Free communications and poster sessions covered scientific areas from controlled lab settings to field settings of high altitudes (Andes to Himalayas). PMID:24229461

  2. Circulatory responses to hypoxia in experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroll, M.; Robison, S. C.; Harrison, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three levels of decreased arterial oxygen saturation elicited a graded circulatory response in dogs, manifested by stepwise increases in cardiac output, left ventricular dp/dt, and stroke volume, and decreases in systemic vascular resistance. Responses to similar hypoxia challenges after experimental myocardial infarction were qualitatively similar but quantitatively less. Although the circulatory compensation for hypoxia was less effective after myocardial infarction, no further deterioration of the haemodynamics was noted.

  3. Upregulated Copper Transporters in Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zimnicka, Adriana M.; Tang, Haiyang; Guo, Qiang; Kuhr, Frank K.; Oh, Myung-Jin; Wan, Jun; Chen, Jiwang; Smith, Kimberly A.; Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Choudhury, Moumita S. R.; Levitan, Irena; Machado, Roberto F.; Kaplan, Jack H.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu) plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX), a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2) also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness. PMID:24614111

  4. Micro Regional Heterogeneity of 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG Uptake in Canine Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Relation to Cell Proliferation, Hypoxia and Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zornhagen, Kamilla Westarp; Hansen, Anders E.; Oxboel, Jytte; Clemmensen, Andreas E.; El Ali, Henrik H.; Kristensen, Annemarie T.; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Tumour microenvironment heterogeneity is believed to play a key role in cancer progression and therapy resistance. However, little is known about micro regional distribution of hypoxia, glycolysis and proliferation in spontaneous solid tumours. The overall aim was simultaneous investigation of micro regional heterogeneity of 64Cu-ATSM (hypoxia) and 18F-FDG (glycolysis) uptake and correlation to endogenous markers of hypoxia, glycolysis, proliferation and angiogenesis to better therapeutically target aggressive tumour regions and prognosticate outcome. Methods Exploiting the different half-lives of 64Cu-ATSM (13h) and 18F-FDG (2h) enabled simultaneous investigation of micro regional distribution of hypoxia and glycolysis in 145 tumour pieces from four spontaneous canine soft tissue sarcomas. Pairwise measurements of radioactivity and gene expression of endogenous markers of hypoxia (HIF-1α, CAIX), glycolysis (HK2, GLUT1 and GLUT3), proliferation (Ki-67) and angiogenesis (VEGFA and TF) were performed. Dual tracer autoradiography was compared with Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Results Micro regional heterogeneity in hypoxia and glycolysis within and between tumour sections of each tumour piece was observed. The spatial distribution of 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG was rather similar within each tumour section as reflected in moderate positive significant correlations between the two tracers (ρ = 0.3920–0.7807; p = 0.0180 –<0.0001) based on pixel-to-pixel comparisons of autoradiographies and gamma counting of tumour pieces. 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG correlated positively with gene expression of GLUT1 and GLUT3, but negatively with HIF-1α and CAIX. Significant positive correlations were seen between Ki-67 gene expression and 64Cu-ATSM (ρ = 0.5578, p = 0.0004) and 18F-FDG (ρ = 0.4629–0.7001, p = 0.0001–0.0151). Ki-67 gene expression more consistently correlated with 18F-FDG than with 64Cu-ATSM. Conclusions Micro regional heterogeneity of hypoxia and glycolysis

  5. Effects of acute hypoxia/acidosis on intracellular pH in differentiating neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Tommy; Jansson, Linda C; Louhivuori, Lauri M; Akerman, Karl E O

    2012-06-21

    The response of differentiating mouse neural progenitor cells, migrating out from neurospheres, to conditions simulating ischemia (hypoxia and extracellular or intracellular acidosis) was studied. We show here, by using BCECF and single cell imaging to monitor intracellular pH (pH(i)), that two main populations can be distinguished by exposing migrating neural progenitor cells to low extracellular pH or by performing an acidifying ammonium prepulse. The cells dominating at the periphery of the neurosphere culture, which were positive for neuron specific markers MAP-2, calbindin and NeuN had lower initial resting pH(i) and could also easily be further acidified by lowering the extracellular pH. Moreover, in this population, a more profound acidification was seen when the cells were acidified using the ammonium prepulse technique. However, when the cell population was exposed to depolarizing potassium concentrations no alterations in pH(i) took place in this population. In contrast, depolarization caused an increase in pH(i) (by 0.5 pH units) in the cell population closer to the neurosphere body, which region was positive for the radial cell marker (GLAST). This cell population, having higher resting pH(i) (pH 6.9-7.1) also responded to acute hypoxia. During hypoxic treatment the resting pH(i) decreased by 0.1 pH units and recovered rapidly after reoxygenation. Our results show that migrating neural progenitor cells are highly sensitive to extracellular acidosis and that irreversible damage becomes evident at pH 6.2. Moreover, our results show that a response to acidosis clearly distinguishes two individual cell populations probably representing neuronal and radial cells.

  6. Stress-induced salivary cortisol secretion during hypobaric hypoxia challenge and in vivo urinary thromboxane production in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Simona; Biselli, Roberto; D'Amelio, Raffaele; Rocca, Bianca; Lattanzio, Stefano; Mucci, Luciana; Davì, Giovanni; Patacchioli, Francesca Romana

    2011-05-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of stress on in vivo platelet activation. In the present study, hypobaric hypoxia induced by rapid decompression during high-altitude simulated flight in a hypobaric chamber was used to evaluate the effects of environmental stress on salivary cortisol and urinary thromboxane metabolite (TXM) excretion, a noninvasive marker of in vivo platelet function. Twenty-one male aviators (mean ± SD age = 36 ± 7 years) experiencing hypoxia by removing their oxygen mask for 4-5 min during a simulated flight to 25,000 ft (7,620 m; pO(2) = 59.17 mmHg) and a matched control group of thirteen flying instructors wearing oxygen masks during the challenge, were studied. Hypobaric hypoxia induced a transient significant increase (P < 0.001) in the aviators' salivary cortisol concentration; the overall pattern of diurnal cortisol fluctuation was maintained in both groups. Urinary TXM showed a significant ∼30% reduction (P < 0.01) after the chamber session in aviators exposed to hypobaric hypoxia, but not in controls. A significant inverse correlation was found between salivary cortisol and urinary TXM in aviators (r = - 0.64, P = 0.0015). Salivary cortisol was a significant predictor (P < 0.001) for urinary TXM concentrations in aviators. In conclusion, here we observed that an acute stress-induced salivary cortisol increase was associated with reduced urinary thromboxane biosynthesis, providing the first indirect evidence for an inhibitory effect of acute stress on in vivo platelet function. PMID:21434833

  7. Carbonic anhydrase IX, a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the pH regulating machinery in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sedlakova, Olga; Svastova, Eliska; Takacova, Martina; Kopacek, Juraj; Pastorek, Jaromir; Pastorekova, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Acidic tissue microenvironment contributes to tumor progression via multiple effects including the activation of angiogenic factors and proteases, reduced cell-cell adhesion, increased migration and invasion, etc. In addition, intratumoral acidosis can influence the uptake of anticancer drugs and modulate the response of tumors to conventional therapy. Acidification of the tumor microenvironment often develops due to hypoxia-triggered oncogenic metabolism, which leads to the extensive production of lactate, protons, and carbon dioxide. In order to avoid intracellular accumulation of the acidic metabolic products, which is incompatible with the survival and proliferation, tumor cells activate molecular machinery that regulates pH by driving transmembrane inside-out and outside-in ion fluxes. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the bicarbonate import arm of this machinery. Through its catalytic activity, CA IX directly participates in many acidosis-induced features of tumor phenotype as demonstrated by manipulating its expression and/or by in vitro mutagenesis. CA IX can function as a survival factor protecting tumor cells from hypoxia and acidosis, as a pro-migratory factor facilitating cell movement and invasion, as a signaling molecule transducing extracellular signals to intracellular pathways (including major signaling and metabolic cascades) and converting intracellular signals to extracellular effects on adhesion, proteolysis, and other processes. These functional implications of CA IX in cancer are supported by numerous clinical studies demonstrating the association of CA IX with various clinical correlates and markers of aggressive tumor behavior. Although our understanding of the many faces of CA IX is still incomplete, existing knowledge supports the view that CA IX is a biologically and clinically relevant molecule, exploitable in anticancer strategies aimed at targeting adaptive responses to hypoxia and/or acidosis

  8. Influence of sustained hypoxia on the sensation of dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Chonan, T; Okabe, S; Hida, W; Satoh, M; Kikuchi, Y; Takishima, T; Shirato, K

    1998-08-01

    We assessed the effect of sustained isocapnic hypoxia (PCO2 = 40 Torr, SaO2 = 80%) on the sensation of dyspnea in 16 normal healthy males. Subjects rated the sensation of dyspnea (c) on 15 cm visual analog scales during 20 min of sustained hypoxia. Following this hypoxic period, 8 subjects undertook mild exercise (10-50 W on a bicycle ergometer for 3 min) under the continuation of hypoxia. During sustained hypoxia, psi increased initially with ventilation from 0.6 +/- 0.2 (n = 16, mean +/- SE) to 2.9 +/- 0.6 at peak ventilation, but it decreased with ventilatory depression to 1.6 +/- 0.4. Dyspnea intensity during hypoxic exercise was significantly smaller than that at peak ventilation in the resting hypoxic period (2.3 +/- 0.7 vs. 3.9 +/- 1.0), although the ventilation was greater during exercise (24.0 +/- 3.0 vs. 19.7 +/- 1.4 l/min). These results indicate that sustained hypoxia has a biphasic, i.e., initial stimulatory and delayed depressant, effect on dyspnea and on ventilation. It is suggested that the dyspnea sensing mechanism is suppressed during mild exercise under sustained hypoxia.

  9. Carotid body oxygen sensing and adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    López-Barneo, José; Macías, David; Platero-Luengo, Aida; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; Pardal, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the principal arterial chemoreceptor that mediates the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia. Our understanding of CB function and its role in disease mechanisms has progressed considerably in the last decades, particularly in recent years. The sensory elements of the CB are the neuron-like glomus cells, which contain numerous transmitters and form synapses with afferent sensory fibers. The activation of glomus cells under hypoxia mainly depends on the modulation of O2-sensitive K(+) channels which leads to cell depolarization and the opening of Ca(2+) channels. This model of sensory transduction operates in all mammalian species studied thus far, including man. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of ion channel function by changes in the O2 level are as yet unknown. The CB plays a fundamental role in acclimatization to sustained hypoxia. Mice with CB atrophy or patients who have undergone CB resection due to surgical treatments show a marked intolerance to even mild hypoxia. CB growth under hypoxia is supported by the existence of a resident population of neural crest-derived stem cells of glia-like phenotype. These stem cells are not highly affected by exposure to low O2 tension; however, there are abundant synapse-like contacts between the glomus cells and stem cells (chemoproliferative synapses), which may be needed to trigger progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation under hypoxia. CB hypo- or hyper-activation may also contribute to the pathogenesis of several prevalent human diseases.

  10. The Effect of Hypoxia on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Ejtehadifar, Mostafa; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin; Dehdilani, Nima; Abbasi, Parvaneh; Molaeipour, Zahra; Saleh, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    Although physiological and pathological role of hypoxia have been appreciated in mammalians for decades however the cellular biology of hypoxia more clarified in the past 20 years. Discovery of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1, in the 1990s opened a new window to investigate the mechanisms behind hypoxia. In different cellular contexts HIF-1 activation show variable results by impacting various aspects of cell biology such as cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation and etc. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are unique cells which take important role in tissue regeneration. They are characterized by self-renewal capacity, multilineage potential, and immunosuppressive property. Like so many kind of cells, hypoxia induces different responses in MSCs by HIF- 1 activation. The activation of this molecule changes the growth, multiplication, differentiation and gene expression profile of MSCs in their niche by a complex of signals. This article briefly discusses the most important effects of hypoxia in growth kinetics, signalling pathways, cytokine secretion profile and expression of chemokine receptors in different conditions. PMID:26236651

  11. Hypoxia and adipose tissue function and dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Trayhurn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The rise in the incidence of obesity has led to a major interest in the biology of white adipose tissue. The tissue is a major endocrine and signaling organ, with adipocytes, the characteristic cell type, secreting a multiplicity of protein factors, the adipokines. Increases in the secretion of a number of adipokines occur in obesity, underpinning inflammation in white adipose tissue and the development of obesity-associated diseases. There is substantial evidence, particularly from animal studies, that hypoxia develops in adipose tissue as the tissue mass expands, and the reduction in Po(2) is considered to underlie the inflammatory response. Exposure of white adipocytes to hypoxic conditions in culture induces changes in the expression of >1,000 genes. The secretion of a number of inflammation-related adipokines is upregulated by hypoxia, and there is a switch from oxidative metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis. Glucose utilization is increased in hypoxic adipocytes with corresponding increases in lactate production. Importantly, hypoxia induces insulin resistance in fat cells and leads to the development of adipose tissue fibrosis. Many of the responses of adipocytes to hypoxia are initiated at Po(2) levels above the normal physiological range for adipose tissue. The other cell types within the tissue also respond to hypoxia, with the differentiation of preadipocytes to adipocytes being inhibited and preadipocytes being transformed into leptin-secreting cells. Overall, hypoxia has pervasive effects on the function of adipocytes and appears to be a key factor in adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity.

  12. Wnt Pathway Activation Increases Hypoxia Tolerance during Development

    PubMed Central

    Gersten, Merril; Zhou, Dan; Azad, Priti; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to hypoxia, defined as a condition of inadequate oxygen supply, has enabled humans to successfully colonize high altitude regions. The mechanisms attempted by organisms to cope with short-term hypoxia include increased ATP production via anaerobic respiration and stabilization of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α). However, less is known about the means through which populations adapt to chronic hypoxia during the process of development within a life time or over generations. Here we show that signaling via the highly conserved Wnt pathway impacts the ability of Drosophila melanogaster to complete its life cycle under hypoxia. We identify this pathway through analyses of genome sequencing and gene expression of a Drosophila melanogaster population adapted over >180 generations to tolerate a concentration of 3.5–4% O2 in air. We then show that genetic activation of the Wnt canonical pathway leads to increased rates of adult eclosion in low O2. Our results indicate that a previously unsuspected major developmental pathway, Wnt, plays a significant role in hypoxia tolerance. PMID:25093834

  13. Mild hypoxia affects synaptic connectivity in cultured neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Mulder, Alex T B; Farinha, Ana C; van Putten, Michel J A M; le Feber, Joost

    2014-04-01

    Eighty percent of patients with chronic mild cerebral ischemia/hypoxia resulting from chronic heart failure or pulmonary disease have cognitive impairment. Overt structural neuronal damage is lacking and the precise cause of neuronal damage is unclear. As almost half of the cerebral energy consumption is used for synaptic transmission, and synaptic failure is the first abrupt consequence of acute complete anoxia, synaptic dysfunction is a candidate mechanism for the cognitive deterioration in chronic mild ischemia/hypoxia. Because measurement of synaptic functioning in patients is problematic, we use cultured networks of cortical neurons from new born rats, grown over a multi-electrode array, as a model system. These were exposed to partial hypoxia (partial oxygen pressure of 150Torr lowered to 40-50Torr) during 3 (n=14) or 6 (n=8) hours. Synaptic functioning was assessed before, during, and after hypoxia by assessment of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses to electrical stimulation. Action potential heights and shapes and non-synaptic stimulus responses were used as measures of individual neuronal integrity. During hypoxia of 3 and 6h, there was a statistically significant decrease of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses, whereas direct responses and action potentials remained unchanged. These changes were largely reversible. Our results indicate that in cultured neuronal networks, partial hypoxia during 3 or 6h causes isolated disturbances of synaptic connectivity.

  14. Molecular Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia: Existing Problems and Their Potential Model-Based Solutions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kuangyu; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Vaupel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging of tissue hypoxia generates contrast in hypoxic areas by applying hypoxia-specific tracers in organisms. In cancer tissue, the injected tracer needs to be transported over relatively long distances and accumulates slowly in hypoxic regions. Thus, the signal-to-background ratio of hypoxia imaging is very small and a non-specific accumulation may suppress the real hypoxia-specific signals. In addition, the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment makes the assessment of the tissue oxygenation status more challenging. In this study, the diffusion potential of oxygen and of a hypoxia tracer for 4 different hypoxia subtypes: ischemic acute hypoxia, hypoxemic acute hypoxia, diffusion-limited chronic hypoxia and anemic chronic hypoxia are theoretically assessed. In particular, a reaction-diffusion equation is introduced to quantitatively analyze the interstitial diffusion of the hypoxia tracer [(18)F]FMISO. Imaging analysis strategies are explored based on reaction-diffusion simulations. For hypoxia imaging of low signal-to-background ratio, pharmacokinetic modelling has advantages to extract underlying specific binding signals from non-specific background signals and to improve the assessment of tumor oxygenation. Different pharmacokinetic models are evaluated for the analysis of the hypoxia tracer [(18)F]FMISO and optimal analysis model were identified accordingly. The improvements by model-based methods for the estimation of tumor oxygenation are in agreement with experimental data. The computational modelling offers a tool to explore molecular imaging of hypoxia and pharmacokinetic modelling is encouraged to be employed in the corresponding data analysis. PMID:27526129

  15. HYPOXIA IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO: DOES THE SCIENCE SUPPORT THE PLAN TO REDUCE, MITIGATE, AND CONTROL HYPOXIA?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We update and reevaluate the scientific information on the distribution, history and causes of continental shelf hypoxia that supports the 2001 "Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxiain the Northern Gulf of Mexico," incorporating data, publications, and res...

  16. Protective effect of nicotine through nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 on hypoxia-induced membrane disintegration and DNA fragmentation of cultured PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tohgi, H; Utsugisawa, K; Nagane, Y

    2000-05-12

    To investigate the effect of nicotine on hypoxic neuronal damage, cultured PC12 cells were exposed to hypoxia for 9 h and then reoxygenated for 72 h. The cells were stained by propidium iodide (PI), a marker of cell membrane disintegration and the TUNEL method, which indicates DNA fragmentation. In control cultures, the ratio of PI-positive cells to total cells progressively increased during and after exposure to hypoxia, constituting 39% of total cells at 72 h posthypoxia. This increase in PI-positive cells was completely inhibited by nicotine until 12 h posthypoxia, and was partially and dose-dependently inhibited thereafter. The ratio of TUNEL-positive cells to total cells started to increase at 24 h posthypoxia and reached 36% at 72 h in control cultures. This ratio was also dose-dependently inhibited by nicotine. These inhibitory effects of nicotine on the increase in PI-positive and TUNEL-positive cells were abolished by the addition to the medium of alpha-bungarotoxin, an antagonistic ligand for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) alpha7. These findings suggest that nicotine inhibits, through AChR alpha7, hypoxia-induced cell membrane disintegration and DNA fragmentation of cultured PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia.

  17. Carbonic anhydrase IX induction defines a heterogeneous cancer cell response to hypoxia and mediates stem cell-like properties and sensitivity to HDAC inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wigfield, Simon; Buffa, Francesca; McGowan, Simon; Baban, Dilair; Li, Ji-liang; Harris, Adrian L.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is strongly induced by hypoxia and its overexpression is associated with poor therapeutic outcome in cancer. Here, we report that hypoxia promotes tumour heterogeneity through the epigenetic regulation of CAIX. Based on hypoxic CAIX expression we identify and characterize two distinct populations of tumour cells, one that has inducible expression of CAIX and one that does not. The CAIX+ve population is enriched with cells expressing cancer stem cell markers and which have high self-renewal capacity. We show that differential CAIX expression is due to differences in chromatin structure. To further investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and hypoxic induction of CAIX expression we investigated the effect of JQ1 an inhibitor of BET bromodomain proteins and A366 a selective inhibitor of the H3K9 methyltransferase G9a/GLP. We identified that these drugs were able to modulate hypoxic CAIX expression induction. This further highlights the role of epigenetic modification in adaption to hypoxia and also in regulation of heterogeneity of cells within tumours. Interestingly, we identified that the two subpopulations show a differential sensitivity to HDAC inhibitors, NaBu or SAHA, with the CAIX positive showing greater sensitivity to treatment. We propose that drugs modulating chromatin regulation of expression may be used to reduce heterogeneity induced by hypoxia and could in combination have significant clinical consequences. PMID:26305601

  18. Concentrated Hypoxia-Preconditioned Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium Improves Wounds Healing in Full-Thickness Skin Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Biao; Guo, Shilei; Xu, Fei; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiujuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the bioactive factors were utilized in exercise and athletic skin injuries. In this research, the concentrated conditioned medium of hypoxia-preconditioned adipose mesenchymal stem cells, which is rich in bioactive factor, is applied in full-thickness skin defect model to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells were harvested from the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissues. The surface markers and the potential of differentiation were analyzed. The conditioned medium of hypoxia-preconditioned stem cells was collected and freeze-dried and then applied on the rat full-thickness skin defect model, and the healing time of each group was recorded. Haematoxylin and eosin staining of skin was assessed by microscope. The characteristics of adipose mesenchymal stem cells were similar to those of other mesenchymal stem cells. The concentration of protein in freeze-dried conditioned medium in 1 mL water was about 15 times higher than in the normal condition medium. In vivo, the concentrated hypoxia-preconditioned conditioned medium can reduce the wound size and accelerate the skin wound healing. The concentrated hypoxia-preconditioned adipose mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium has great effect on rat model of wound healing, and it would be an ideal agent for wound care in clinical application. PMID:27433483

  19. CYP2E1 Potentiates Ethanol-induction of Hypoxia and HIF-1α in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaodong; Wu, Defeng; Yang, Lili; Gan, Lixia; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol induces hypoxia and elevates HIF-1α in the liver. CYP2E1 plays a role in the mechanisms by which ethanol generates oxidative stress, fatty liver and liver injury. The current study evaluated whether CYP2E1 contributes to ethanol-induced hypoxia and activation of HIF-1α in vivo and whether HIF-1α protects against or promotes CYP2E1-dependent toxicity in vitro. Wild type (WT), CYP2E1-knockin (KI) and CYP2E1 knockout (KO) mice were fed ethanol chronically; pair fed controls received isocaloric dextrose. Ethanol produced liver injury in the KI mice to a much greater extent than in the WT and KO mice. Protein levels of HIF-1α and downstream targets of HIF-1α activation were elevated in the ethanol-fed KI mice compared to the WT and KO mice. Levels of HIF prolylhydroxlase 2 which promotes HIF-1α degradation were decreased in the ethanol-fed KI mice in association with the increases in HIF-1α. Hypoxia occurred in the ethanol-fed CYP2E1 KI mice as shown by an increased area of staining using the hypoxia-specific marker pimonidazole. Hypoxia was lower in the ethanol-fed WT mice and lowest in the ethanol fed KO mice and all the dextrose-fed mice. In situ double staining showed that pimonidazole and CYP2E1 were co-localized to the same area of injury in the hepatic centrilobule. Increased protein levels of HIF-1α were also found after acute ethanol treatment of KI mice. Treatment of HepG2 E47 cells which express CYP2E1 with ethanol plus arachidonic (AA) acid or ethanol plus buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) which depletes GSH caused loss of cell viability to greater extent than in HepG2 C34 cells which do not express CYP2E1. These treatments elevated protein levels of HIF-1α to a greater extent in E47 cells than C34 cells. 2-Methoxyestradiol, an inhibitor of HIF-1α, blunted the toxic effects of ethanol plus AA and ethanol plus BSO in the E47 cells in association with inhibition of HIF-1α. The HIF-1α inhibitor also blocked the elevated oxidative stress produced

  20. Intermittent Hypoxia Influences Alveolar Bone Proper Microstructure via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and VEGF Expression in Periodontal Ligaments of Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Shuji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Hosomichi, Jun; Kuma, Yoichiro; Maeda, Hideyuki; Nagai, Hisashi; Usumi-Fujita, Risa; Kaneko, Sawa; Shibutani, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ono, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) recapitulates morphological changes in the maxillofacial bones in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Recently, we found that IH increased bone mineral density (BMD) in the inter-radicular alveolar bone (reflecting enhanced osteogenesis) in the mandibular first molar (M1) region in the growing rats, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we focused on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway to assess the effect of IH by testing the null hypothesis of no significant differences in the mRNA-expression levels of relevant factors associated with the HIF pathway, between control rats and growing rats with IH. To test the null hypothesis, we investigated how IH enhances mandibular osteogenesis in the alveolar bone proper with respect to HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in periodontal ligament (PDL) tissues. Seven-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to IH for 3 weeks. The microstructure and BMD in the alveolar bone proper of the distal root of the mandibular M1 were evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Expression of HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA in PDL tissues were measured, whereas osteogenesis was evaluated by measuring mRNA levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). The null hypothesis was rejected: we found an increase in the expression of all of these markers after IH exposure. The results provided the first indication that IH enhanced osteogenesis of the mandibular M1 region in association with PDL angiogenesis during growth via HIF-1α in an animal model. PMID:27695422

  1. Intermittent Hypoxia Influences Alveolar Bone Proper Microstructure via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and VEGF Expression in Periodontal Ligaments of Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Shuji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Hosomichi, Jun; Kuma, Yoichiro; Maeda, Hideyuki; Nagai, Hisashi; Usumi-Fujita, Risa; Kaneko, Sawa; Shibutani, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ono, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) recapitulates morphological changes in the maxillofacial bones in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Recently, we found that IH increased bone mineral density (BMD) in the inter-radicular alveolar bone (reflecting enhanced osteogenesis) in the mandibular first molar (M1) region in the growing rats, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we focused on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway to assess the effect of IH by testing the null hypothesis of no significant differences in the mRNA-expression levels of relevant factors associated with the HIF pathway, between control rats and growing rats with IH. To test the null hypothesis, we investigated how IH enhances mandibular osteogenesis in the alveolar bone proper with respect to HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in periodontal ligament (PDL) tissues. Seven-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to IH for 3 weeks. The microstructure and BMD in the alveolar bone proper of the distal root of the mandibular M1 were evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Expression of HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA in PDL tissues were measured, whereas osteogenesis was evaluated by measuring mRNA levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). The null hypothesis was rejected: we found an increase in the expression of all of these markers after IH exposure. The results provided the first indication that IH enhanced osteogenesis of the mandibular M1 region in association with PDL angiogenesis during growth via HIF-1α in an animal model.

  2. Today's oxidative stress markers.

    PubMed

    Czerska, Marta; Mikołajewska, Karolina; Zieliński, Marek; Gromadzińska, Jolanta; Wąsowicz, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress represents a situation where there is an imbalance between the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the availability and the activity of antioxidants. This balance is disturbed by increased generation of free radicals or decreased antioxidant activity. It is very important to develop methods and find appropriate biomarkers that may be used to assess oxidative stress in vivo. It is significant because appropriate measurement of such stress is necessary in identifying its role in lifestyle-related diseases. Previously used markers of oxidative stress, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) or malondialdehyde (MDA), are progressively being supplemented by new ones, such as isoprostanes (IsoPs) and their metabolites or allantoin. This paper is focusing on the presentation of new ones, promising markers of oxidative stress (IsoPs, their metabolites and allantoin), taking into account the advantage of those markers over markers used previously. PMID:26325052

  3. Distinct regulatory mechanisms of the human ferritin gene by hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo-Wen; Miyazawa, Masaki; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-01

    Cobalt chloride has been used as a hypoxia mimetic because it stabilizes hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and activates gene transcription through a hypoxia responsive element (HRE). However, differences between hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride in gene regulation remain elusive. Expression of ferritin, the major iron storage protein, is regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels through DNA and RNA regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia and cobalt chloride regulate ferritin heavy chain (ferritin H) expression by two distinct mechanisms. Both hypoxia and cobalt chloride increased HIF1-α but a putative HRE in the human ferritin H gene was not activated. Instead, cobalt chloride but not hypoxia activated ferritin H transcription through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE), to which Nrf2 was recruited. Intriguingly, cobalt chloride downregulated ferritin H protein expression while it upregulated other ARE-regulated antioxidant genes in K562 cells. Further characterization demonstrated that cobalt chloride increased interaction between iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and iron responsive element (IRE) in the 5'UTR of ferritin H mRNA, resulting in translational block of the accumulated ferritin H mRNA. In contrast, hypoxia had marginal effect on ferritin H transcription but increased its translation through decreased IRP1-IRE interaction. These results suggest that hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride employ distinct regulatory mechanisms through the interplay between DNA and mRNA elements at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  4. URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by modulation of E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Rui; Huang, Chen; Bi, Qian; Zhai, Ying; Xia, Lin; Liu, Jie; Sun, Shiren; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), recently identified as a new HBx-upregulated gene that may activate {beta}-catenin and Wnt signaling, was found to be upregulated in a human tubule cell line under low oxygen. Here, we investigated the potential role of URG11 in hypoxia-induced renal tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT). Overexpression of URG11 in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK2) promoted a mesenchymal phenotype accompanied by reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and {alpha}-SMA, while URG11 knockdown by siRNA effectively reversed hypoxia-induced EMT. URG11 promoted the expression of {beta}-catenin and increased its nuclear accumulation under normoxic conditions through transactivation of the {beta}-catenin promoter. This in turn upregulated {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) and its downstream effector genes, vimentin, and {alpha}-SMA. In vivo, strong expression of URG11 was observed in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and a Western blot analysis demonstrated a close correlation between HIF-1{alpha} and URG11 protein levels. Altogether, our results indicate that URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through the suppression of E-cadherin and the activation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF pathway.

  5. [Biological markers of alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Marcos Martín, M; Pastor Encinas, I; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2005-09-01

    Diagnosis of alcoholism is very important, given its high prevalence and possibility of influencing the disease course. For this reason, the so-called biological markers of alcoholism are useful. These are analytic parameters that alter in the presence of excessive alcohol consumption. The two most relevant markers are the gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and carbohydrate deficient transferrin. With this clinical comment, we aim to contribute to the knowledge of these tests and promote its use in the clinical practice. PMID:16194480

  6. Quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides: hypoxia-selective therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Diab-Assef, Mona; Haddadin, Makhluf J; Yared, Pierre; Assaad, Chafika; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala U

    2002-04-01

    A problem that confronts clinicians in the treatment of cancer is the resistance of hypoxic tumors to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Thus, the development of new drugs that are toxic to hypoxic cells found in solid tumors is an important objective for effective anticancer chemotherapy. We recently showed that the heterocyclic aromatic N-oxides, quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides (QdNOs), are cytotoxic to tumor cells cultured under hypoxia. In this study, we evaluated the hypoxia-selective toxicity of four diversely substituted QdNOs and determined their effect on the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1alpha in the human colon cancer cell line T-84. The various QdNOs were found to possess a 50- to 100-fold greater cytotoxicity to T-84 cells cultured under hypoxia compared with oxia. Interestingly, the hypoxia cytotoxicity ratio (HCR), the ratio of equitoxic concentrations of the drug under aerobic/anoxic conditions, was highly structure related and depended on the nature of the substituents on the QdNO heterocycle. The most cytotoxic 2-benzoyl-3-phenyl-6,7-dichloro derivative of QdNO (DCQ) was potent at a dose of 1 microM with an HCR of 100 and significantly reduced the levels of HIF-1alpha transcript and protein. The 2-benzoyl-3-phenyl derivative (BPQ) had a hypoxia potency of 20 microM and an HCR of 40. By contrast, the 2-aceto-3-methyl and the 2,3-tetramethylene (TMQ) derivatives of QdNO were much less cytotoxic under hypoxia (HCRs of 8.5 and 6.5, respectively) and reduced the expression of HIF-1alpha mRNA to a much lesser extent. Because the nonchlorinated analogue BPQ did not demonstrate behavior similar to that of DCQ, we hypothesize that the C-6, C-7-chlorine of DCQ might play a significant role in the selective hypoxic cytotoxicity of the drug.

  7. [Serological markers of fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Varo, Guillermo

    2012-12-01

    Liver biopsy has classically been considered the gold standard to evaluate the degree of fibrosis, since it allows direct measurement of this entity. However, this technique carries an inherent risk of complications and observer variability and technical limitations can provoke sampling errors, all of which has prompted the search for alternative, noninvasive methods. The use of routine clinical laboratory tests has been investigated and various indexes that combine indirect serological markers have been developed and validated. These indexes are useful, low-cost, noninvasive tests to detect significant fibrosis or cirrhosis. Direct serological markers are those that reflect changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix. Several studies have analyzed the utility of these markers (either individually or combined with other direct and indirect markers) in the detection of the severity and progression of liver fibrosis and in the follow-up of changes related to antiviral therapy. In the last few years, imaging tests based on the measurement of liver stiffness, such as FibroScan or acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI), have been found to be rapid and reproducible methods to evaluate liver fibrosis. Recently, the results obtained by combining distinct serological markers and imaging techniques have shown a higher diagnostic yield and this strategy seems promising. The present article reviews the most widely discussed noninvasive markers, the most recent alternatives, and the perspectives for their use in clinical practice. PMID:23298654

  8. PH2O and simulated hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Conkin, Johnny

    2011-12-01

    Some manufacturers of reduced oxygen (O2) breathing devices claim a comparable hypobaric hypoxia (HH) training experience by providing F1O2 < 0.209 at or near sea level pressure to match the ambient oxygen partial pressure (iso-PO2) of the target altitude. I conclude after a review of literature from investigators and manufacturers that these devices may not properly account for the 47 mmHg of water vapor partial pressure that reduces the inspired partial pressure of oxygen (P1O2), which is substantial at higher altitude relative to sea level. Consequently, some devices claiming an equivalent HH experience under normobaric conditions would significantly overestimate the HH condition, especially when simulating altitudes above 10,000 ft (3048 m). At best, the claim should be that the devices provide an approximate HH experience since they only duplicate the ambient PO2 at sea level as at altitude. An approach to reduce the overestimation and standardize the operation is to at least provide machines that create the same P1O2 conditions at sea level as at the target altitude, a simple software upgrade. PMID:22195399

  9. Hypoxia Adjacent to the Mississippi River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabalais, N. N.; Turner, R. E.

    2005-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico receives the freshwater and constituent flux from the Mississippi River, which integrates 40% of the lower 48 United States. In the last half of the 20th century, the flux of nitrogen tripled, phosphorus concentration appears to have increased, and silicate concentration decreased. These changes result from landscape alterations over two centuries with an intensification of human activities that increased the flux of nitrogen and phosphorus particularly in the 1960s to 1980s. Evidence for eutrophication in the coastal ecosystem includes an increase in algal biomass, carbon accumulation from nutrient-enhanced production, worsening oxygen deficiency in the lower water column, and shifts in food web structure. The extent of the oxygen deficiency reaches 20,000 km2 of the inner continental shelf over long periods in summer with the potential for affecting commercially important fisheries in the Gulf. There is daily, weekly and seasonal variability in currents and stratification on the shelf and, therefore, no simple description of the couplings between nutrient delivery, carbon production in surface waters and delivery to and cycling in bottom waters. There are, however, multiple lines of evidence to implicate changes in riverine nutrient loads with overall primary and secondary production, carbon accumulation at the seabed, and low oxygen conditions on the shelf. The change in nutrient loads and responses of the northern Gulf coastal ecosystem, including widespread, severe seasonal hypoxia, parallel similar conditions in the coastal ocean on a global scale.

  10. The cerebral venous system and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Imray, Christopher H E

    2016-01-15

    Most hypobaric hypoxia studies have focused on oxygen delivery and therefore cerebral blood inflow. Few have studied venous outflow. However, the volume of blood entering and leaving the skull (∼700 ml/min) is considerably greater than cerebrospinal fluid production (0.35 ml/min) or edema formation rates and slight imbalances of in- and outflow have considerable effects on intracranial pressure. This dynamic phenomenon is not necessarily appreciated in the currently taught static "Monro-Kellie" doctrine, which forms the basis of the "Tight-Fit" hypothesis thought to underlie high altitude headache, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema. Investigating both sides of the cerebral circulation was an integral part of the 2007 Xtreme Everest Expedition. The results of the relevant studies performed as part of and subsequent to this expedition are reviewed here. The evidence from recent studies suggests a relative venous outflow insufficiency is an early step in the pathogenesis of high altitude headache. Translation of knowledge gained from high altitude studies is important. Many patients in a critical care environment develop hypoxemia akin to that of high altitude exposure. An inability to drain the hypoxemic induced increase in cerebral blood flow could be an underappreciated regulatory mechanism of intracranial pressure.

  11. Multi-class method for the determination of nitroimidazoles, nitrofurans, and chloramphenicol in chicken muscle and egg by dispersive-solid phase extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Wu, Yuping; Li, Xiaowei; Wang, Yingyu; Li, Hui; Fu, Qin; Shan, Yawen; Liu, Tianhe; Xia, Xi

    2017-02-15

    This study describes the development of a multiresidue method for the efficient identification and quantification of nitroimidazoles, nitrofurans, and chloramphenicol in chicken and egg. After derivatization of nitrofuran metabolites, dispersive-solid phase extraction was used for the extraction of target analytes. An optimization strategy involved the selection of sorbents and extraction solutions for dispersive-solid phase extraction in order to achieve acceptably high recoveries and reduce co-extractives in the final extracts. Analytes were determined by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, in one single injection with a chromatographic run time of 7.5min. Mean recoveries ranged from 86.4% to 116.7% and interday precision was lower than 18%. The limits of quantification were between 0.1 and 0.5μg/kg, which were satisfactory to support surveillance monitoring. Finally, the method was applied to real samples, and metabolite of furazolidone, metronidazole and its metabolite, dimetridazole and its metabolite were detected in both chicken and egg samples. PMID:27664624

  12. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen induction by hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors.

    PubMed

    Veeranna, Ravindra P; Haque, Muzammel; Davis, David A; Yang, Min; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) play an important role in the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) life cycle. In particular, hypoxia can activate lytic replication of KSHV and specific lytic genes, including the replication and transcription activator (RTA), while KSHV infection in turn can increase the levels and activity of HIFs. In the present study, we show that hypoxia increases the levels of mRNAs encoding KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines and also increases the levels of LANA protein. Luciferase reporter assays in Hep3B cells revealed a moderate activation of the LANA promoter region by hypoxia as well as by cotransfection with degradation-resistant HIF-1α or HIF-2α expression plasmids. Computer analysis of a 1.2-kb sequence upstream of the LANA translational start site identified six potential hypoxia-responsive elements (HRE). Sequential deletion studies revealed that much of this activity was mediated by one of these HREs (HRE 4R) oriented in the 3' to 5' direction and located between the constitutive (LTc) and RTA-inducible (LTi) mRNA start sites. Site-directed mutation of this HRE substantially reduced the response to both HIF-1α and HIF-2α in a luciferase reporter assay. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated binding of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α to this region. Also, HIF-1α was found to associate with RTA, and HIFs enhanced the activation of LTi by RTA. These results provide evidence that hypoxia and HIFs upregulate both latent and lytic KSHV replication and play a central role in the life cycle of this virus. PMID:22090111

  13. Ventilatory response to acute hypoxia in transgenic mice over-expressing erythropoietin: effect of acclimation to 3-week hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Cárdenas-Alayza, Rosa; Macarlupú, José Luis; Monge-C, Carlos; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2007-09-30

    We used transgenic mice constitutively over-expressing erythropoietin ("tg6" mice) and wild-type (wt) mice to investigate whether the high hematocrit (hct), consequence of Epo over-expression affected: (1) the normoxic ventilation (V (E)) and the acute hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and decline (HVD), (2) the increase in ventilation observed after chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (430mmHg for 21 days), (3) the respiratory "blunting", and (4) the erythrocythemic response induced by chronic hypoxia exposure. V (E) was found to be similar in tg6 and wt mice in normoxia (FIO2=0.21). Post-acclimation V (E) was significantly elevated in every time point in wt mice at FIO2=0.10 when compared to pre-acclimation values. In contrast, tg6 mice exhibited a non-significant increase in V (E) throughout acute hypoxia exposure. Changes in V (E) are associated with adjustments in tidal volume (V(T)). HVR and HVD were independent of EE in tg6 and wt mice before chornic hypoxia exposure. HVR was significantly greater in wt than in tg6 mice after chronic hypoxia. After acclimation, HVD decreased in tg6 mice. Chronic hypoxia exposure caused hct to increase significantly in wt mice, while only a marginal increase occurred in the tg6 group. Although pre-existent EE does not appear to have an effect on HVR, the observation of alterations on V(T) suggests that it may contribute to time-dependent changes in ventilation and in the acute HVR during exposure to chronic hypoxia. In addition, our results suggest that EE may lead to an early "blunting" of the ventilatory response.

  14. Modelling macrofaunal biomass in relation to hypoxia and nutrient loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermann, Karen; Norkko, Joanna; Janas, Urszula; Norkko, Alf; Gustafsson, Bo G.; Bonsdorff, Erik

    2012-12-01

    Nutrient loading of aquatic ecosystems results in more food for benthic macrofaunal communities but also increases the risk of hypoxia, resulting in a reduction or complete loss of benthic biomass. This study investigates the interaction between eutrophication, hypoxia and benthic biomass with emphasis on the balance between gains and loss of benthic biomass due to changes in nutrient loadings. A physiological fauna model with 5 functional groups was linked to a 3D coupled hydrodynamic-ecological Baltic Sea model. Model results revealed that benthic biomass increased between 0 and 700% after re-oxygenating bottom waters. Nutrient reduction scenarios indicated improved oxygen concentrations in bottom waters and decreased sedimentation of organic matter up to 40% after a nutrient load reduction following the Baltic Sea Action Plan. The lower food supply to benthos reduced the macrofaunal biomass up to 35% especially in areas not currently affected by hypoxia, whereas benthic biomass increased up to 200% in areas affected by eutrophication-induced hypoxia. The expected changes in benthic biomass resulting from nutrient load reductions and subsequent reduced hypoxia may not only increase the food supply for benthivorous fish, but also significantly affect the biogeochemical functioning of the ecosystem.

  15. Hypoxia increases intensity of epidermal papillomatosis in roach Rutilus rutilus.

    PubMed

    Korkea-aho, Tiina L; Partanen, Janne M; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Taskinen, Jouni

    2008-01-24

    Hypoxia, which occurs frequently in aquatic ecosystems and is mainly due to increasing eutrophication can cause severe environmental stress in fish. We investigated experimentally the hypothesis that hypoxia could be one of the environmental stress factors that can induce papillomatosis in fish. Male roach Rutilus rutilus exposed to periodic oxygen deficiency and accompanied temperature increases (OT group) showed the highest increase in the intensity of papillomatosis, as measured by the number of scales covered by papillomatosis tumors. The second highest increase in disease intensity was among male roach exposed to periodical temperature increases. The incidence of such tumors was lowest in the control group, which was exposed to neither hypoxia nor increased temperature. The mortality of fish during the 17 d experiment was highest and the condition factor was lowest in the OT group, indicating this group experienced a higher level of stress. The apparent interaction of hypoxia and temperature suggests that these environmental stressors are among the multifactorial elements leading to papillomatosis in roach. Furthermore, these results provide experimental evidence to indicate that hypoxia may contribute to tumor development in fish. PMID:18380222

  16. Intermittent hypoxia induces functional recovery following cervical spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Vinit, Stéphane; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory-related complications are the leading cause of death in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Few effective SCI treatments are available after therapeutic interventions are performed in the period shortly after injury (e.g. spine stabilization and prevention of further spinal damage). In this review we explore the capacity to harness endogenous spinal plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia to optimize function of surviving (spared) neural pathways associated with breathing. Two primary questions are addressed: 1) does intermittent hypoxia induce plasticity in spinal synaptic pathways to respiratory motor neurons following experimental SCI? and 2) can this plasticity improve respiratory function? In normal rats, intermittent hypoxia induces serotonin-dependent plasticity in spinal pathways to respiratory motor neurons. Early experiments suggest that intermittent hypoxia also enhances respiratory motor output in experimental models of cervical SCI, (cervical hemisection) and that the capacity to induce functional recovery is greater with longer durations post-injury. Available evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia-induced spinal plasticity has considerable therapeutic potential to treat respiratory insufficiency following chronic cervical spinal injury. PMID:19651247

  17. Heart disease link to fetal hypoxia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Giussani, Dino A; Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A; Richter, Hans G; Camm, Emily J; Thakor, Avnesh S; Kane, Andrew D; Hansell, Jeremy A; Brain, Kirsty L; Skeffington, Katie L; Itani, Nozomi; Wooding, F B Peter; Cross, Christine M; Allison, Beth J

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the intrauterine environment interacts with our genetic makeup to shape the risk of developing disease in later life. Fetal chronic hypoxia is a common complication of pregnancy. This chapter reviews how fetal chronic hypoxia programmes cardiac and endothelial dysfunction in the offspring in adult life and discusses the mechanisms via which this may occur. Using an integrative approach in large and small animal models at the in vivo, isolated organ, cellular and molecular levels, our programmes of work have raised the hypothesis that oxidative stress in the fetal heart and vasculature underlies the mechanism via which prenatal hypoxia programmes cardiovascular dysfunction in later life. Developmental hypoxia independent of changes in maternal nutrition promotes fetal growth restriction and induces changes in the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine systems of the adult offspring, which are normally associated with disease states during ageing. Treatment with antioxidants of animal pregnancies complicated with reduced oxygen delivery to the fetus prevents the alterations in fetal growth, and the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine dysfunction in the fetal and adult offspring. The work reviewed offers both insight into mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for clinical intervention against the early origin of cardiometabolic disease in pregnancy complicated by fetal chronic hypoxia.

  18. Could mild hypoxia impair pilot decision making in emergencies?

    PubMed

    Legg, Stephen; Hill, Stephen; Mundel, Toby; Gilbey, Andrew; Schlader, Zac; Raman, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The decreased pressure in the cabin of a pressurised aircraft (typically equivalent to ~8000 ft) reduces the oxygen level so that the blood oxygen saturation of all occupants falls from >97% (normoxia) at sea-level to below 92% (mild hypoxia). Although exposure to mild hypoxia does not affect well-learned cognitive and motor performance of aircrew, it has been proposed that it can affect the performance of some complex cognitive performance tasks involving multiple demands typical of emergency tasks that may have to be performed by pilots. In order to simulate some of these complex cognitive demands, 25 student volunteers participated in an experiment which assessed performance of complex logical reasoning and and multiple memory tasks before and after 2 hours of exposure to normoxia and mild hypoxia. Performance for the more difficult components of the complex reasoning task, especially involving conflict decisions, were marginally significantly degraded by mild hypoxia. Since the effects were only marginally significant future studies should investigate the effects of mild hypoxia on more subtle complex decision-making tasks. PMID:22316722

  19. Vitamin C supplementation does not improve hypoxia-induced erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Bello, Vladimir E; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Martinez-Bello, Daniel; Olaso-Gonzalez, Gloria; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Viña, Jose

    2012-12-01

    Hypoxia induces reactive oxygen species production. Supplements with antioxidant mixtures can compensate for the decline in red cell membrane stability following intermittent hypobaric hypoxia by decreasing protein and lipid oxidation. We aimed to determine whether supplementation with vitamin C is implicated in the regulation of erythropoiesis and in the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, and also whether antioxidant supplementation prevents the oxidative stress associated to intermittent hypoxia. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups: normoxia control (n=6), normoxia + vitamin C (n=6), hypoxia control (12 h pO(2) 12%/12 h pO(2) 21%) (n=6), and hypoxia + vitamin C (n=6). Animals were supplemented with vitamin C at a dose of 250 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) for 21 days. Red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, and oxidative stress parameters such as malondialdehyde and protein oxidation in plasma were analyzed at two different time points: basal sample (day zero) and final sample (day 21). Similar RBC, Hb, Hct, and Epo increments were observed in both hypoxic groups regardless of the vitamin C supplementation. There was no change on MDA levels after intermittent hypoxic exposure in any experimental group. However, we found an increase in plasma protein oxidation in both hypoxic groups. Vitamin C does not affect erythropoiesis and protein oxidation in rats submitted to intermittent hypoxic exposure. PMID:23270444

  20. Circulating factors are involved in hypoxia-induced hepcidin suppression.

    PubMed

    Ravasi, Giulia; Pelucchi, Sara; Greni, Federico; Mariani, Raffaella; Giuliano, Andrea; Parati, Gianfranco; Silvestri, Laura; Piperno, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Hepcidin transcription is strongly down-regulated under hypoxic conditions, however whether hypoxia inhibits hepcidin directly or indirectly is still unknown. We investigated the time course of hypoxia-mediated hepcidin down-regulation in vivo in healthy volunteers exposed to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude and, based on the hypothesis that circulating factors are implicated in hepcidin inhibition, we analyzed the effect of sera of these volunteers exposed to normoxia and hypoxia on hepcidin expression in Huh-7 cell lines. Hypoxia led to a significant hepcidin down-regulation in vivo that was almost complete within 72h of exposure and followed erythropoietin induction. This delay in hepcidin down-regulation suggests the existence of soluble factor/s regulating hepcidin production. We then stimulated HuH-7 cells with normoxic and hypoxic sera to analyze the effects of sera on hepcidin regulation. Hypoxic sera had a significant inhibitory effect on hepcidin promoter activity assessed by a luciferase assay, although the amount of such decrease was not as relevant as that observed in vivo. Cellular mRNA analysis showed that a number of volunteers' sera inhibited hepcidin expression, concurrently with ID1 inhibition, suggesting that inhibitory factor(s) may act through the SMAD-pathway. PMID:25065484

  1. Effect of chronic hypoxia on penile erectile function in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, D P; Liu, X H; Wei, A Y

    2015-09-08

    We examined the relationship between chronic hypoxia and erectile dysfunction in rat and its possible pathogenic mechanism. Forty-eight white male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a test group and a control group. In accordance with the experimental time (2, 6, and 10 weeks), each group was divided into 3 subgroups, with 8 rats in each subgroup. Rats in the test group were fed in an airtight hypoxia cabin, while rats in the control group were maintained in a normal environment, with other conditions kept the same. At 2, 6, and 10 weeks, the rats in each group were observed for erectile function. Affinity purification was used to detect neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive nerve fibers and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression. After hypoxia, erectile frequency decreased significantly compared to before hypoxia (P < 0.001). Comparison of the test group and control group revealed a significant difference in the quantity of nNOS-positive nerve fiber and eNOS protein expression (P < 0.01). Hypoxia may influence erectile function and nNOS and eNOS expression in rats. The decrease in the quantity of nNOS nerve fibers and expression of eNOS may contribute to erectile dysfunction under hypoxic conditions in rats.

  2. Hypoxia Alters Gene Expression in the Gonads of Zebrafish (Danio Rerio) Oral Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproduction is affected by hypoxia via direct modulation of expression of steroidogenic genes, but also via multiple indirect mechanisms involved in responding th hypoxia. The concern over the expansion of hypoxic environments has led to resurfacing of interest in understanding...

  3. Hypoxia Alters Gene Expression in the Gonads of Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproduction is affected by hypoxia via direct modulation of expression of steroidogenic genes, but also via multiple indirect mechanisms involved in responding to hypoxia. The concern over the expansion of hypoxic environments has led to resurfacing of interest in understanding...

  4. Effect of Organic Enrichment and Hypoxia on the Biodiversity of Benthic Communities in Narragansett Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excessive input of nitrogen to coastal waters leads to eutrophication and hypoxia that reduce biodiversity and impair key ecosystem services provided by benthic communities; for example, fish and shellfish production, bioturbation, nutrient cycling, and water filtration. Hypoxia ...

  5. Effects of Hypoxia on Animal Burrow Construction and Consequent Effects on Sediment Redox Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies investigating the effects of hypoxia on benthic infauna and consequent effects on sediment chemistry provide only correlative results from the field. In order to establish causation and isolate effects of hypoxia on individual species, we conducted a laboratory ...

  6. The effects of diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation on the hypoxia tolerance, swimming capacity and growth performance of southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis).

    PubMed

    Yang, Han; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effects of diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation on the hypoxia tolerance, swimming and growth performance of juvenile southern catfish, we initially measured the critical oxygen tension (P(crit)), oxygen thresholds of aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and loss of equilibrium (LOE) of diel-cycling hypoxia-acclimated (15 d, 7:00-21:00, dissolved oxygen level (DO) = 7.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1); 21:00-7:00, DO = 3.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1)) and non-acclimated (15 d, DO = 7.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1)) southern catfish at 25 °C. We then measured the critical swimming speed (U(crit)) and metabolic rate (MR) of hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated fish (under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions). The feeding rate (FR), feeding efficiency (FE) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish in hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated groups were also measured. The P(crit), ASR and LOE of hypoxia-acclimated fish were significantly lower than those of non-acclimated fish. Hypoxia acclimation resulted in a significantly higher U(crit) when the individuals swam in hypoxia. The U(crit), maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and metabolic scope (MS) of both the hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated fish all decreased with the decrease of DO. However, the U(crit), MMR and MS decreased by 31, 43 and 54%, respectively, in non-acclimated fish, whereas these values decreased by 15, 28 and 29%, respectively, in hypoxia-acclimated fish, which suggests that hypoxia-acclimated fish were less sensitive to the DO decrease. The FR, FE and SGR all decreased by 21, 20 and 45%, respectively, in the hypoxia-acclimated group compared to the non-acclimated group. This result suggests that diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation improved the hypoxia tolerance and aerobic swimming performance of southern catfish, whereas impaired the growth performance. The high hypoxia tolerance and physiological plasticity to hypoxia-acclimated southern catfish may be related to its lower maintenance energy expenditure, sit-and-wait lifestyle and

  7. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26475217

  8. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

  9. Hypoxia Alters Progression of the Erythroid Program

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Heather M.; Yu, Xiaobing; Wen, Jie; Smith, Reginald; Fibach, Eitan; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia can induce erythropoiesis through regulated increase of erythropoietin (Epo) production. We investigated the direct influence of oxygen tension (pO2) in the physiologic range (2–8%) on erythroid progenitor cell differentiation using cultures of adult human hematopoietic progenitor cells exposed to decreasing (20 – 2%) pO2 and independent of variation in Epo levels. Decreases in Hb-containing cells were observed at the end of the culture period with decreasing pO2. This is due in part to a reduction in cell growth, and at 2% O2 a marked increase in cell toxicity. Analysis of the kinetics of cell differentiation showed an increase in the proportion of cells with glycophorin A expression and Hb accumulation at physiologic pO2. The cells were characterized by an early induction of γ-globin expression and a delay and reduction in peak levels of β-globin expression. Overall, fetal Hb and γ-globin expression were increased at physiologic pO2 but the increases were reduced at 2% O2 as cultures become cytotoxic. At reduced pO2, induction of EPO-receptor (EPO-R) by Epo was decreased and delayed, analogous to the delay in β-globin induction. The oxygen dependent reduction of EPO-R can account for the associated cytotoxicity at 2% O2. Epo induction of erythroid transcription factors, EKLF, GATA-1 and SCL/Tal-1, was also delayed and decreased at reduced pO2, consistent with lower levels of EPO-R and resultant Epo signaling. These changes in EPO-R and globin gene expression raise the possibility that the early increase of γ-globin is a consequence of reduced Epo signaling and a delay in induction of erythroid transcription factors. PMID:17936496

  10. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Ryohei; Cui, Zheng-Guo; Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko; Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  11. Intermittent hypoxia and respiratory plasticity in humans and other animals: does exposure to intermittent hypoxia promote or mitigate sleep apnoea?

    PubMed Central

    Mateika, Jason H.; Narwani, Gunjan

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on two phenomena that are initiated during and after exposure to intermittent hypoxia. The two phenomena are referred to as long-term facilitation and progressive augmentation of respiratory motor output. Both phenomena are forms of respiratory plasticity. Long-term facilitation is characterized by a sustained elevation in respiratory activity after exposure to intermittent hypoxia. Progressive augmentation is characterized by a gradual increase in respiratory activity from the initial to the final hypoxic exposure. There is much speculation that long-term facilitation may have a significant role in individuals with sleep apnoea because this disorder is characterized by periods of upper airway collapse accompanied by intermittent hypoxia, one stimulus known to induce long-term facilitation. It has been suggested that activation of long-term facilitation may serve to mitigate apnoea by facilitating ventilation and, more importantly, upper airway muscle activity. We examine the less discussed but equally plausible situation that exposure to intermittent hypoxia might ultimately lead to the promotion of apnoea. There are at least two scenarios in which apnoea might be promoted following exposure to intermittent hypoxia. In both scenarios, long-term facilitation of upper airway muscle activity is initiated but ultimately rendered ineffective because of other physiological conditions. Thus, one of the primary goals of this review is to discuss, with support from basic and clinical studies, whether various forms of respiratory motor neuronal plasticity have a beneficial and/or a detrimental impact on breathing stability in individuals with sleep apnoea. PMID:19060117

  12. Progressive multicystic encephalopathy: is there more than hypoxia-ischemia?

    PubMed

    Garten, Lars; Hueseman, Dieter; Stoltenburg-Didinger, Gisela; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Weizsaecker, Katharina; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen; Obladen, Michael

    2007-05-01

    Progressive multicystic encephalopathy following prenatal or perinatal hypoxia-ischemia is a well-described phenomenon in the literature. The authors report on a term infant with a devastating encephalopathy and severe neuronal dysfunction immediately after delivery without a known antecedent of prenatal or perinatal hypoxia or distress. Clinical and paraclinical findings in the patient are compared with those described in the literature. The authors focus on the specific results guiding to the final diagnosis of progressive multicystic encephalopathy and the timing of morphologic changes. As in this case, if the criteria of an acute hypoxic event sufficient to cause neonatal encephalopathy are not met, then factors other than hypoxia-ischemia may be leading to progressive multicystic encephalopathy.

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea and cancer: effects of intermittent hypoxia?

    PubMed

    Kukwa, Wojciech; Migacz, Ewa; Druc, Karolina; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by pauses in regular breathing. Apneic episodes lead to recurrent hypoxemia-reoxygenation cycles with concomitant cellular intermittent hypoxia. Studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia in OSA may influence tumorigenesis. This review presents recent articles on the potential role of OSA in cancer development. Relevant research has focused on: molecular pathways mediating the influence of intermittent hypoxia on tumor physiology, animal and epidemiological human studies linking OSA and cancer. Current data relating OSA to risk of neoplastic disease remain scarce, but recent studies reveal the potential for a strong relation. More work is, therefore, needed on the impact of OSA on many cancer-related aspects. Results may offer enlightenment for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26562000

  14. Hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shu-Ching; Claffey, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying oxygen sensing in mammalian cells has been extensively investigated in the areas of glucose transport, glycolysis, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and catecholamine metabolism. Expression of functionally operative representative proteins in these specific areas, such as the glucose transporter 1, glycolytic enzymes, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor and tyrosine hydroxylase are all induced by hypoxia. Recent studies demonstrated that both transcriptional activation and post-transcriptional mechanisms are important to the hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression. In this article, the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in the transcriptional activation of gene expression will be reviewed. In addition, the mechanisms of post-transcriptional mRNA stabilization will also be addressed. We will discuss whether these two processes of regulation of hypoxia-responsive genes are mechanistically linked and co-operative in nature. PMID:10319016

  15. Calcium-dependent activation of Pyk2 by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Ferguson, Tsuneo; Rust, Randy T; Kobayashi, Shuichi; Millhorn, David E

    2002-02-01

    The Pyk2 tyrosine kinase can be activated by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent mechanisms. Exposure to moderate hypoxia (5% O(2)) induced a rapid and persistent tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Hypoxia and KCl-depolarization increased the phosphotyrosine content of Pyk2 by twofold and fourfold, respectively. Both of these effects were abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium. There was a modest activation of MAPK in parallel with the onset of Pyk2 phosphorylation. However, there was no detectable activation of either JNK or c-src, two other known downstream targets of Pyk2. Thus, exposure to hypoxia may selectively target specific subsets of Pyk2 signalling pathways. PMID:11781137

  16. Relationships between Cycling Hypoxia, HIF-1, Angiogenesis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    This Failla Lecture focused on the inter-relationships between tumor angiogenesis, HIF-1 expression and radiotherapy responses. A common thread that bonds all of these factors together is microenvironmental stress caused by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formed during tumor growth and angiogenesis or in response to cytotoxic treatment. In this review we focus on one aspect of the crossroad between oxidative stress and angiogenesis, namely cycling hypoxia. Understanding of the relative importance of this feature of the tumor microenvironment has recently expanded; it influences tumor biology in ways that are separate from chronic hypoxia. Cycling hypoxia can influence angiogenesis, treatment responses and metastatic behavior. It represents an important and relatively less well understood feature of tumor biology that requires additional research. PMID:19929412

  17. Metabolic and locomotor responses of juvenile paddlefish Polyodon spathula to hypoxia and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypoxia is an increasing problem in the natural habitats that the paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) has historically inhabited, and a potential problem in managed culture conditions. However, the effects of hypoxia on paddlefish are not well understood. In order to understand the effects of hypoxia on ...

  18. Aging, Tolerance to High Altitude, and Cardiorespiratory Response to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Lhuissier, François J

    2015-06-01

    Richalet, Jean-Paul, and François J. Lhuissier. Aging, tolerance to high altitude, and cardiorespiratory response to hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 16:117-124, 2015.--It is generally accepted that aging is rather protective, at least at moderate altitude. Some anecdotal reports even mention successful ascent of peaks over 8000 m and even Everest by elderly people. However, very few studies have explored the influence of aging on tolerance to high altitude and prevalence of acute high altitude related diseases, taking into account all confounding factors such as speed of ascent, altitude reached, sex, training status, and chemo-responsiveness. Changes in physiological responses to hypoxia with aging were assessed through a cross-sectional 20-year study including 4675 subjects (2789 men, 1886 women; 14-85 yrs old) and a longitudinal study including 30 subjects explored at a mean 10.4-year interval. In men, ventilatory response to hypoxia increased, while desaturation was less pronounced with aging. Cardiac response to hypoxia was blunted with aging in both genders. Similar results were found in the longitudinal study, with a decrease in cardiac and an increase in ventilatory response to hypoxia with aging. These adaptive responses were less pronounced or absent in post-menopausal untrained women. In conclusion, in normal healthy and active subjects, aging has no deleterious effect on cardiac and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, at least up to the eighth decade. Aging is not a contraindication for high altitude, as far as no pathological condition interferes and physical fitness is compatible with the intensity of the expected physical demand of one's individual. Physiological evaluation through hypoxic exercise testing before going to high altitude is helpful to detect risk factors of severe high altitude-related diseases.

  19. Ventilation during simulated altitude, normobaric hypoxia and normoxic hypobaria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Icenogle, M.; Scotto, P.; Robergs, R.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Roach, R. C.; Leoppky, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the possible effect of hypobaria on ventilation (VE) at high altitude, we exposed nine men to three conditions for 10 h in a chamber on separate occasions at least 1 week apart. These three conditions were: altitude (PB = 432, FIO2 = 0.207), normobaric hypoxia (PB = 614, FIO2 = 0.142) and normoxic hypobaria (PB = 434, FIO2 = 0.296). In addition, post-test measurements were made 2 h after returning to ambient conditions at normobaric normoxia (PB = 636, FIO2 = 0.204). In the first hour of exposure VE was increased similarly by altitude and normobaric hypoxia. The was 38% above post-test values and end-tidal CO2 (PET(CO2) was lower by 4 mmHg. After 3, 6 and 9 h, the average VE in normobaric hypoxia was 26% higher than at altitude (p < 0.01), resulting primarily from a decline in VE at altitude. The difference between altitude and normobaric hypoxia was greatest at 3 h (+ 39%). In spite of the higher VE during normobaric hypoxia, the PET(CO2) was higher than at altitude. Changes in VE and PET(CO2) in normoxic hypobaria were minimal relative to normobaric normoxia post-test measurements. One possible explanation for the lower VE at altitude is that CO2 elimination is relatively less at altitude because of a reduction in inspired gas density compared to normobaric hypoxia; this may reduce the work of breathing or alveolar deadspace. The greater VE during the first hour at altitude, relative to subsequent measurements, may be related to the appearance of microbubbles in the pulmonary circulation acting to transiently worsen matching. Results indicate that hypobaria per se effects ventilation under altitude conditions.

  20. Impaired response of mature adipocytes of diabetic mice to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seok Jong Jin, Da P.; Buck, Donald W.; Galiano, Robert D.; Mustoe, Thomas A.

    2011-10-01

    Adipose tissue contains various cells such as infiltrated monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells, preadipocytes, and adipocytes. Adipocytes have an endocrine function by secreting adipokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, leptin, and adiponectin. Dysregulation of adipokines in adipose tissues leads to a chronic low-grade inflammation which could result in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. A sustained inflammatory state, which is characterized by prolonged persistence of macrophages and neutrophils, is found in diabetic wounds. In addition, subcutaneous adipocytes are enormously increased in amount clinically in type 2 diabetes. However, the function of subcutaneous adipocytes, which play an important role in injured tissue subjected to hypoxia, has not been well characterized in vitro due to the difficulty of maintaining mature adipocytes in culture using conventional methods because of their buoyancy. In this study, we established a novel in vitro culture method of mature adipocytes by enclosing them in a hyaluronan (HA) based hydrogel to study their role in response to stress such as hypoxia. BrdU labeling and Ki67 immunostaining experiments showed that hydrogel enclosed mature adipocytes proliferate in vitro. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses for hypoxia regulated genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), showed that mature adipocytes of wild type mice respond to hypoxia. In contrast, mature adipocytes of diabetic db/db and TallyHo mice did not efficiently respond to hypoxia. Our studies suggest that mature adipocytes are functionally active cells, and their abnormal function to hypoxia can be one of underlining mechanisms in type 2 diabetes.

  1. Periodic breathing in healthy humans at exercise in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hermand, Eric; Pichon, Aurélien; Lhuissier, François J; Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Periodic breathing is frequent in heart failure or ventilatory disorders during sleep, and common during sleep at high altitude, but has been rarely studied in wakefulness and during exercise. A retrospective analysis of ventilation from hypoxia exercise tests was realized in 82 healthy subjects separated into two groups with either high or low ventilatory response to hypoxia at exercise (HVRe). A fast Fourier transform spectral analysis of the breath-by-breath ventilation (V̇e) signal, O2 saturation, and end-tidal PCO2 evidenced a periodic pattern with a period of 11.1 to 12.0 s. The peak power of the V̇e spectrum was higher in the high HVRe group (P < 0.001). A prospective study (25 subjects) was performed to evaluate the influence of cardiorespiratory factors on the amplitude and period of oscillations in various conditions of exercise (20 to 40% maximal aerobic power) and hypoxia (0 to 4,000 m altitude). The period of V̇e was shorter at exercise (vs. rest, P < 0.001) and hypoxia (vs. normoxia, P < 0.001), and inversely related with cardiac output and V̇e (P < 0.001). V̇e peak power was higher at exercise (P < 0.001) and hypoxia (P < 0.001), and was positively related with cardiac output and V̇e (P < 0.001). V̇e peak power in hypoxia was positively related with the ventilatory response to CO2 (HCVR). This novel observation suggests that healthy subjects demonstrate a spontaneous periodic breathing, not clearly observable at rest and in normoxia, but triggered by hypoxic exercise. The periodic pattern is enhanced in subjects with high HVRe and high HCVR, suggesting that oxygen and CO2 play synergistic roles in the modulation of these oscillations.

  2. Hypoxia silences retrotrapezoid nucleus respiratory chemoreceptors via alkalosis.

    PubMed

    Basting, Tyler M; Burke, Peter G R; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Daniel S; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-14

    In conscious mammals, hypoxia or hypercapnia stimulates breathing while theoretically exerting opposite effects on central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs). We tested this theory by examining how hypoxia and hypercapnia change the activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a putative CRC and chemoreflex integrator. Archaerhodopsin-(Arch)-transduced RTN neurons were reversibly silenced by light in anesthetized rats. We bilaterally transduced RTN and nearby C1 neurons with Arch (PRSx8-ArchT-EYFP-LVV) and measured the cardiorespiratory consequences of Arch activation (10 s) in conscious rats during normoxia, hypoxia, or hyperoxia. RTN photoinhibition reduced breathing equally during non-REM sleep and quiet wake. Compared with normoxia, the breathing frequency reduction (Δf(R)) was larger in hyperoxia (65% FiO2), smaller in 15% FiO2, and absent in 12% FiO2. Tidal volume changes (ΔV(T)) followed the same trend. The effect of hypoxia on Δf(R) was not arousal-dependent but was reversed by reacidifying the blood (acetazolamide; 3% FiCO2). Δf(R) was highly correlated with arterial pH up to arterial pH (pHa) 7.5 with no frequency inhibition occurring above pHa 7.53. Blood pressure was minimally reduced suggesting that C1 neurons were very modestly inhibited. In conclusion, RTN neurons regulate eupneic breathing about equally during both sleep and wake. RTN neurons are the first putative CRCs demonstrably silenced by hypocapnic hypoxia in conscious mammals. RTN neurons are silent above pHa 7.5 and increasingly active below this value. During hyperoxia, RTN activation maintains breathing despite the inactivity of the carotid bodies. Finally, during hypocapnic hypoxia, carotid body stimulation increases breathing frequency via pathways that bypass RTN.

  3. Hypoxia reduces the hypothalamic thermogenic threshold and thermosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Glenn J; Milsom, William K

    2009-11-01

    Hypoxia is well known to reduce the body temperature (T(b)) of mammals, although the neural origins of this response remain uncertain. Short-term hypoxic exposure causes a reduction in the lower critical temperature of the thermal neutral zone and a reduction in whole body thermal conductance of rodents, providing indirect support that hypoxia lowers T(b) in a regulated manner. In this study, we examined directly the potential for changes in central thermosensitivity to evoke the hypoxic metabolic response by heating and cooling the preoptic area of the hypothalamus (the area which integrates thermoreceptor input and regulates thermoeffector outputs) using chronic, indwelling thermodes in ground squirrels during normoxia and hypoxia (7, 10 and 12% O(2)). We found that the threshold hypothalamic temperature for the metabolic response to cooling (T(th)) of approximately 38 degrees C in normoxia was proportionately reduced in hypoxia (down to 28-31 degrees C at 7% O(2)) and that the metabolic thermosensitivity (alpha; the change in metabolic rate for any given change in hypothalamic temperature below the lower critical temperature) was comparatively reduced by 5 to 9 times. This provides strong support for the hypothesis that the fall in temperature that occurs during hypoxia is the result of a reduction in the activation of thermogenic mechanisms. The decrease in the central thermosensitivity in hypoxia, however, appears to be a critical factor in the alteration of mammalian T(b). We suggest, therefore, that an altered central thermosensitivity may provide a proximate explanation of how low oxygen and similar stressors reduce normal fluctuations in T(b) (i.e. circadian), in addition to the depression in regulated T(b).

  4. Evaluation of CT Perfusion Biomarkers of Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qi; Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Lee, Ting-Yim; Bauman, Glenn; Crukley, Cathie; Morrison, Laura; Hoffman, Lisa; Yartsev, Slav

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor hypoxia is associated with treatment resistance to cancer therapies. Hypoxia can be investigated by immunohistopathologic methods but such procedure is invasive. A non-invasive method to interrogate tumor hypoxia is an attractive option as such method can provide information before, during, and after treatment for personalized therapies. Our study evaluated the correlations between computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters and immunohistopathologic measurement of tumor hypoxia. Methods Wistar rats, 18 controls and 19 treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), implanted with the C6 glioma tumor were imaged using CT perfusion on average every five days to monitor tumor growth. A final CT perfusion scan and the brain were obtained on average 14 days (8–22 days) after tumor implantation. Tumor hypoxia was detected immunohistopathologically with pimonidazole. The tumor, necrotic, and pimonidazole-positive areas on histology samples were measured. Percent necrotic area and percent hypoxic areas were calculated. Tumor volume (TV), blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability-surface area product (PS) were obtained from the CT perfusion studies. Correlations between CT perfusion parameters and histological parameters were assessed by Spearman’s ρ correlation. A Bonferroni-corrected P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results BF and BV showed significant correlations with percent hypoxic area ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.81, P < 0.001, respectively, for control animals and ρ = -0.7, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.6, P = 0.003, respectively, for all animals, while TV and BV were correlated (ρ = -0.64, P = 0.01 and ρ = -0.43, P = 0.043, respectively) with percent necrotic area. PS was not correlated with either percent necrotic or percent hypoxic areas. Conclusions Percent hypoxic area provided significant correlations with BF and BV, suggesting that CT perfusion parameters are potential non-invasive imaging biomarkers of tumor

  5. Quantifying hypoxia-induced chemoreceptor sensitivity in the awake rodent.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Barbara J; Adrian, Russell; Bates, Melissa L; Dopp, John M; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated several methods for characterizing hypoxic chemosensitivity in the conscious rat. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30) were exposed to normobaric hypoxia [inspired oxygen fraction (Fio2) 0.15, 0.12, and 0.09]. We measured ventilation (V̇e; barometric plethysmography), arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2; pulse oximeter), and oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production (V̇o2 and V̇co2; analysis of expired air). Linear regression analysis was used to define stimulus-response relationships. Testing was performed on 2 days to assess day-to-day reproducibility. Exposure to graded, steady-state hypoxia caused progressive reductions in SpO2 that were, for any given Fio2, quite variable (SpO2 range, 20-30%) among individuals. Hypoxia produced progressive increases in V̇e caused by increases in both tidal volume (VT) and breathing frequency. Hypoxia also increased the VT:inspiratory time (Ti) ratio, an indicator of central respiratory "drive." Hypoxia caused consistent, progressive declines in V̇o2, V̇co2, and core temperature (>20% at the lowest SpO2). We propose that optimal quantification of carotid chemoreceptor hypoxic sensitivity in the unanesthetized rodent should employ SpO2 [a surrogate for arterial Po2 (PaO2 )] as the stimulus variable and the ventilatory equivalent for V̇co2 (V̇e/V̇co2) and/or mean inspiratory flow rate (VT/Ti) normalized for V̇co2 as the response variables. Both metrics take into account not only the important influence of a falling metabolic rate, but also SpO2, which represents the hypoxic stimulus at the carotid body. Because of the somewhat curvilinear nature of these responses, exposure to multiple levels of graded hypoxia provides the most complete characterization of hypoxic chemosensitivity. PMID:25080926

  6. Glycomics and Disease Markers

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyun Joo; Kronewitter, Scott R.; de Leoz, Maria Lorna A.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Glycomics is the comprehensive study of all glycans expressed in biological systems. The biosynthesis of glycan relies on a number of highly competitive processes involving glycosyl transferase. Glycosylation is therefore highly sensitive to the biochemical environment and has been implicated in many diseases including cancer. Recently, interest in profiling the glycome has increased due to the potential of glycans for disease markers. In this regard, mass spectrometry is emerging as a powerful technique for profiling the glycome. Global glycan profiling of human serum based on mass spectrometry has already led to several potentially promising markers for several types of cancer and diseases. PMID:19775929

  7. Past Occurrences of Hypoxia in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillen, L.; Conley, D. J.; Bjorck, S.

    2007-12-01

    The hypoxic zone in the Baltic Sea has increased in area by about four times since 1950. Widespread oxygen deficiency below the halocline has severely reduced macro benthic communities in the Baltic Proper and the Gulf of Finland over the past decades and negatively effected food chain dynamics, fish habitats and fisheries in the entire Baltic Sea. In addition, hypoxia alters nutrient biogeochemical cycles. The cause of the increased hypoxia is believed to be enhanced eutrophication through increased anthropogenic input of nutrients, such as phosphorous and nitrogen. Conditions prior to the 1950s are considered as the benchmark and some authors suggest that the earlier Baltic Sea was an oligothrophic, clear-water body with oxygenated deep waters. By contrast, studies of short sediment cores reveal that hypoxia has been present in some of the deepest basins for at least the last 100-200 years. In addition, long sediment cores suggest that hypoxia in the Baltic Sea has occurred intermittently in deep basins over the last c. 8500 years. Thus, the occurrence of present day hypoxia in the deeper basins need not necessarily be attributed to human activity but rather to natural oceanographic, geologic and climate conditions. We present a compilation of previous publications that reported the occurrence of laminated sediments (i.e. a palaeo-proxy for hypoxia) in the Baltic Sea. This review shows that the deeper parts of the Baltic Sea have experienced either intermittent or more regular hypoxia during most of the Holocene and that more continuous laminations started to form c. 7800-8500 cal. yr BP ago, in association with the establishment of a permanent halocline during the transition from the Ancylus Lake to the Littorina Sea. Laminated sediments were more common during the early and late Holocene and coincided with intervals of high organic productivity (high TOC content) and high salinity during the Holocene Thermal Maximum and the Medieval Climate Optimum. This study

  8. [EFFECT OF HYPOXIA ON THE CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMAN AUDITORY PERCEPTION].

    PubMed

    Ogorodnikova, E A; Stolvaroya, E I; Pak, S P; Bogomolova, G M; Korolev, Yu N; Golubev, V N; Lesova, E M

    2015-12-01

    The effect of normobaric hypoxic hypoxia (single and interval training) on the characteristics of human hearing was investigated. The hearing thresholds (tonal audiograms), reaction time of subjects in psychophysical experiments (pause detection, perception of rhythm and target words), and short-term auditory memory were measured before and after hypoxia. The obtained data revealed improvement of the auditory sensitivity and characteristics of working memory, and increasing of response speed. It was demonstrated that interval hypoxic training had positive effect on the processes of auditory perception. PMID:26987233

  9. Hypoxia tolerance in elasmobranchs. I. Critical oxygen tension as a measure of blood oxygen transport during hypoxia exposure.

    PubMed

    Speers-Roesch, Ben; Richards, Jeffrey G; Brauner, Colin J; Farrell, Anthony P; Hickey, Anthony J R; Wang, Yuxiang S; Renshaw, Gillian M C

    2012-01-01

    The critical O(2) tension of whole-animal O(2) consumption rate (M(O2)), or P(crit), is the water P(O2) (Pw(O(2))) at which an animal transitions from an oxyregulator to an oxyconformer. Although P(crit) is a popular measure of hypoxia tolerance in fishes because it reflects the capacity for O(2) uptake from the environment at low Pw(O(2)), little is known about the interrelationships between P(crit) and blood O(2) transport characteristics and increased use of anaerobic metabolism during hypoxia exposure in fishes, especially elasmobranchs. We addressed this knowledge gap using progressive hypoxia exposures of two elasmobranch species with differing hypoxia tolerance. The P(crit) of the hypoxia-tolerant epaulette shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum, 5.10±0.37 kPa) was significantly lower than that of the comparatively hypoxia-sensitive shovelnose ray (Aptychotrema rostrata, 7.23±0.40 kPa). Plasma [lactate] was elevated above normoxic values at around P(crit) in epaulette sharks, but increased relative to normoxic values at Pw(O(2)) below P(crit) in shovelnose rays, providing equivocal support for the hypothesis that P(crit) is associated with increased anaerobic metabolism. The M(O2), arterial P(O2) and arterial blood O(2) content (Ca(O(2))) were similar between the two species under normoxia and decreased in both species with progressive hypoxia, but as Pw(O(2)) declined, epaulette sharks had a consistently higher M(O2) and Ca(O(2)) than shovelnose rays, probably due to their significantly greater in vivo haemoglobin (Hb)-O(2) binding affinity (in vivo Hb-O(2) P(50)=4.27±0.57 kPa for epaulette sharks vs 6.35±0.34 kPa for shovelnose rays). However, at Pw(O(2)) values representing the same percentage of each species' P(crit) (up to ∼175% of P(crit)), Hb-O(2) saturation and Ca(O(2)) were similar between species. These data support the hypothesis that Hb-O(2) P(50) is an important determinant of P(crit) and suggest that P(crit) can predict Hb-O(2) saturation and Ca

  10. Modulation of small intestinal homeostasis along with its microflora during acclimatization at simulated hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Adak, Atanu; Ghosh; Mondal, Keshab Chandra

    2014-11-01

    At high altitude (HA) hypobaric hypoxic environment manifested several pathophysiological consequences of which gastrointestinal (GI) disorder are very common phenomena. To explore the most possible clue behind this disorder intestinal flora, the major player of the GI functions, were subjected following simulated hypobaric hypoxic treatment in model animal. For this, male albino rats were exposed to 55 kPa (approximately 4872.9 m) air pressure consecutively for 30 days for 8 h/day and its small intestinal microflora, their secreted digestive enzymes and stress induced marker protein were investigated of the luminal epithelia. It was observed that population density of total aerobes significantly decreased, but the quantity of total anaerobes and Escherichia coli increased significantly after 30 days of hypoxic stress. The population density of strict anaerobes like Bifidobacterium sp., Bacteroides sp. and Lactobacillus sp. and obligate anaerobes like Clostridium perfringens and Peptostreptococcus sp. were expanded along with their positive growth direction index (GDI). In relation to the huge multiplication of anaerobes the amount of gas formation as well as content of IgA and IgG increased in duration dependent manner. The activity of some luminal enzymes from microbial origin like a-amylase, gluco-amylase, proteinase, alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase were also elevated in hypoxic condition. Besides, hypoxia induced in formation of malondialdehyde along with significant attenuation of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase activity and lowered GSH/GSSG pool in the intestinal epithelia. Histological study revealed disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier with higher infiltration of lymphocytes in lamina propia and atrophic structure. It can be concluded that hypoxia at HA modified GI microbial imprint and subsequently causes epithelial barrier dysfunction which may relate to the small intestinal dysfunction at HA.

  11. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  12. FemHab: The effects of bed rest and hypoxia on oxidative stress in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Debevec, Tadej; Pialoux, Vincent; Ehrström, Sabine; Ribon, Alexandra; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B; Millet, Grégoire P

    2016-04-15

    Independently, both inactivity and hypoxia augment oxidative stress. This study, part of the FemHab project, investigated the combined effects of bed rest-induced unloading and hypoxic exposure on oxidative stress and antioxidant status. Healthy, eumenorrheic women were randomly assigned to the following three 10-day experimental interventions: normoxic bed rest (NBR;n= 11; PiO2 = 133 mmHg), normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR;n= 12; PiO2 = 90 mmHg), and ambulatory hypoxic confinement (HAMB;n= 8: PiO2 = 90 mmHg). Plasma samples, obtained before (Pre), during (D2, D6), immediately after (Post) and 24 h after (Post+1) each intervention, were analyzed for oxidative stress markers [advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitrotyrosine], antioxidant status [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and uric acid (UA)], NO metabolism end-products (NOx), and nitrites. Compared with baseline, AOPP increased in NBR and HBR on D2 (+14%; +12%;P< 0.05), D6 (+19%; +15%;P< 0.05), and Post (+22%; +21%;P< 0.05), respectively. MDA increased at Post+1 in NBR (+116%;P< 0.01) and D2 in HBR (+114%;P< 0.01) and HAMB (+95%;P< 0.05). Nitrotyrosine decreased (-45%;P< 0.05) and nitrites increased (+46%;P< 0.05) at Post+1 in HAMB only. Whereas SOD was higher at D6 (+82%) and Post+1 (+67%) in HAMB only, the catalase activity increased on D6 (128%) and Post (146%) in HBR and HAMB, respectively (P< 0.05). GPX was only reduced on D6 (-20%;P< 0.01) and Post (-18%;P< 0.05) in HBR. No differences were observed in FRAP and NOx. UA was higher at Post in HBR compared with HAMB (P< 0.05). These data indicate that exposure to combined inactivity and hypoxia impairs prooxidant/antioxidant balance in healthy women. Moreover, habitual activity levels, as opposed to inactivity, seem to blunt hypoxia-related oxidative stress via antioxidant system upregulation. PMID:26796757

  13. Recent changes in hypoxia training at the Royal Air Force Centre of Aviation Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, A

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia training at the Royal Air Force Centre of Aviation Medicine (RAF CAM) has traditionally involved the use of a hypobaric chamber to induce hypoxia. While giving the student experience of both hypoxia and decompression, hypobaric chamber training is not without risks such as decompression sickness and barotrauma. This article describes the new system for hypoxia training known as Scenario-Based Hypoxia Training (SBHT), which involves the subject sitting in an aircraft simulator and wearing a mask linked by hose to a Reduced Oxygen Breathing Device (ROBD). The occupational requirements to be declared fit for this new training method are also discussed. PMID:26867422

  14. Progress toward overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance to solid tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Karakashev, Sergey V; Reginato, Mauricio J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic tumors are associated with poor clinical outcome for multiple types of human cancer. This may be due, in part, to hypoxic cancer cells being resistant to anticancer therapy, including radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Hypoxia inducible factor 1, a major regulator of cellular response to hypoxia, regulates the expression of genes that are involved in multiple aspects of cancer biology, including cell survival, proliferation, metabolism, invasion, and angiogenesis. Here, we review multiple pathways regulated by hypoxia/hypoxia inducible factor 1 in cancer cells and discuss the latest advancements in overcoming hypoxia-mediated tumor resistance. PMID:26316817

  15. Assessment of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α mRNA expression in mantis shrimp as a biomarker of environmental hypoxia exposure.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Keita; Rahman, Md Saydur; Horiguchi, Toshihiro; Thomas, Peter

    2012-04-23

    Efforts to assess the ecological impacts of the marked increase in coastal hypoxia worldwide have been hampered by a lack of biomarkers of hypoxia exposure in marine benthic organisms. Here, we show that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) transcript levels in the heart and cerebral ganglion of mantis shrimp (Oratosquilla oratoria) collected from hypoxic sites in Tokyo Bay are elevated several-fold over those in shrimp collected from normoxic sites. Upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in the heart after exposure to sub-lethal hypoxia was confirmed in controlled laboratory experiments. HIF-1α transcript levels were increased at approximately threefold after 7 and 14 days of hypoxia exposure and declined to control levels within 24 h of restoration to normoxic conditions. The results provide the first evidence for upregulation of HIF-1α transcript levels in two hypoxia-sensitive organs, heart and cerebral ganglion, in a marine invertebrate exposed to environmental hypoxia. These results suggest that upregulation of HIF-1α transcript levels is an important component in adaptation of mantis shrimp to chronic hypoxia and is a potentially useful biomarker of environmental hypoxia exposure. PMID:22031724

  16. The molecular basis of O2-sensing and hypoxia tolerance in pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Conforti, L; Kobayashi, S; Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Yuan, Y; Kim, H W; Kim, R H; Seta, K; Millhorn, D E

    2001-02-01

    Hypoxia is a common environmental stimulus. However, very little is known about the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to changes in oxygen. Our laboratory has utilized the PC12 cell line in order to study the biophysical and molecular response to hypoxia. The current review summarizes our results. We demonstrate that the O2-sensitive K(+) channel, Kv1.2, is present in PC12 cells and plays a critical role in the hypoxia-induced depolarization of PC12 cells. Previous studies have shown that PC12 cells secrete a variety of autocrine/paracrine factors, including dopamine, norepinephrine, and adenosine during hypoxia. We investigated the mechanisms by which adenosine modulates cell function and the effect of chronic hypoxia on this modulation. Finally, we present results identifying the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and SAPKs) as hypoxia-regulated protein kinases. Specifically, we show that p38 and an isoform, p38gamma, are activated by hypoxia. In addition, our results demonstrate that the p42/p44 MAPK protein kinases are activated by hypoxia. We further show that p42/p44 MAPK is critical for the hypoxia-induced transactivation of endothelial PAS-domain protein 1 (EPAS1), a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor. Together, these results provide greater insight into the mechanisms by which cells sense and adapt to hypoxia. PMID:11207433

  17. Development and validation of a highly sensitive LC-MS/MS-ESI method for quantification of IIIM-019-A novel nitroimidazole derivative with promising action against Tuberculosis: Application to drug development.

    PubMed

    Kour, Gurleen; Chandan, Bal Krishan; Khullar, Mowkshi; Munagala, Gurunadham; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Bhagat, Asha; Gupta, Ajai Prakash; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Ahmed, Zabeer

    2016-05-30

    The study aims to illustrate an analytical validation of a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) and electrospray ionization (ESI) method for quantification of IIIM-019 (a novel nitroimidazole derivative with potential activity against Tuberculosis) in mice plasma. The extraction of the analyte and the internal standard (Tolbutamide) from the plasma samples involves protein precipitation using acetonitrile. The chromatographic separation was accomplished using a gradient mode and the mobile phase comprised of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid in water. The flow rate used was 0.7 ml/min on a C18e high performance Chromolith column. IIIM-019 and Tolbutamide (IS) were analyzed by combined reversed-phase LC/MS-MS with positive ion electrospray ionization. The MS-MS ion transitions used were 533>170.1, 533>198 for IIIM-019 and 271>74, 271>155 for internal standard (IS) respectively. The method was linear over a concentration range of 0.5-1000 ng/ml and the lower limit of quantification was 0.50 ng/ml. The entire study was validated for accuracy, precision, linearity, range, selectivity, lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), recovery, and matrix effect in accordance with the FDA guidelines of method validation. Acceptable precision and accuracy were obtained for concentrations over the standard curve range. The intra and inter-day precisions were in the range of 0.51-11.18% and 0.51-7.55%. The pharmacokinetics was performed on male Balb/c mice by oral (2.5mg/kg), intraperitoneal (2.5mg/kg) and intravenous (1mg/kg) routes. The oral bioavailability of IIIM-019 was 51.6%. The method was also applied successfully in determining microsomal stability wherein the compound was found to be very slightly metabolized by rat liver microsomes.

  18. Transcriptomic responses of marine medaka's ovary to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Keng Po; Li, Jing Woei; Tse, Anna Chung Kwan; Cheung, Angela; Wang, Simon; Chan, Ting Fung; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong; Wu, Rudolf Shiu Sun

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia, an endocrine disruptor, is pressing global problem affecting marine organisms in over 400 "Dead Zones" worldwide. There is growing evident demonstrated the disruptive effect of hypoxia on reproductive systems of marine fish through the impairments of steroidogenic gene expression, leading to the alteration of sex hormone production in gonads. But the detailed molecular mechanism underlying the responses of female reproductive systems to hypoxic stress remains largely unknown. In the present report, we used marine medaka Oryzias melastigma as a model, together with high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, aiming to determine the changes in transcriptional signature in the ovary of marine fish under hypoxic stress. Our result discovered over two hundred differential expressed genes in ovary in response to hypoxia. The bioinformatics analysis together with quantitative RT-PCR validation on the deregulated genes highlighted the dysregulations of a number of female reproductive functions including interruptions of ovarian follicle development, gonad development and steroid metabolic process. Additionally, we revealed that these deregulations are through the modulation of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). The result of this work complements previous studies and provides additional insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of hypoxia-induced impairment of female reproductive system. PMID:27423118

  19. Hypoxia impacts large adults first: consequences in a warming world.

    PubMed

    Clark, Melody S; Husmann, Gunnar; Thorne, Michael A S; Burns, Gavin; Truebano, Manuela; Peck, Lloyd S; Abele, Doris; Philipp, Eva E R

    2013-07-01

    Future oceans are predicted to contain less oxygen than at present. This is because oxygen is less soluble in warmer water and predicted stratification will reduce mixing. Hypoxia in marine environments is thus likely to become more widespread in marine environments and understanding species-responses is important to predicting future impacts on biodiversity. This study used a tractable model, the Antarctic clam, Laternula elliptica, which can live for 36 years, and has a well-characterized ecology and physiology to understand responses to hypoxia and how the effect varied with age. Younger animals had a higher condition index, higher adenylate energy charge and transcriptional profiling indicated that they were physically active in their response to hypoxia, whereas older animals were more sedentary, with higher levels of oxidative damage and apoptosis in the gills. These effects could be attributed, in part, to age-related tissue scaling; older animals had proportionally less contractile muscle mass and smaller gills and foot compared with younger animals, with consequential effects on the whole-animal physiological response. The data here emphasize the importance of including age effects, as large mature individuals appear to be less able to resist hypoxic conditions and this is the size range that is the major contributor to future generations. Thus, the increased prevalence of hypoxia in future oceans may have marked effects on benthic organisms' abilities to persist and this is especially so for long-lived species when predicting responses to environmental perturbation.

  20. Acetazolamide and chronic hypoxia: effects on haemorheology and pulmonary haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Aurélien; Connes, Philippe; Quidu, Patricia; Marchant, Dominique; Brunet, Julien; Levy, Bernard I; Vilar, José; Safeukui, Innocent; Cymbalista, Florence; Maignan, Maxime; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Favret, Fabrice

    2012-12-01

    We tested the effect of acetazolamide on blood mechanical properties and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) during chronic hypoxia. Six groups of rats were either treated or not treated with acetazolamide (curative: treated after 10 days of hypoxic exposure; preventive: treated before hypoxic exposure with 40 mg · kg(-1) · day(-1)) and either exposed or not exposed to 3 weeks of hypoxia (at altitude >5,500 m). They were then used to assess the role of acetazolamide on pulmonary artery pressure, cardiac output, blood volume, haematological and haemorheological parameters. Chronic hypoxia increased haematocrit, blood viscosity and PVR, and decreased cardiac output. Acetazolamide treatment in hypoxic rats decreased haematocrit (curative by -10% and preventive by -11%), PVR (curative by -36% and preventive by -49%) and right ventricular hypertrophy (preventive -20%), and increased cardiac output (curative by +60% and preventive by +115%). Blood viscosity was significantly decreased after curative acetazolamide treatment (-16%) and was correlated with PVR (r=0.87, p<0.05), suggesting that blood viscosity could influence pulmonary haemodynamics. The fall in pulmonary vascular hindrance (curative by -27% and preventive by -45%) after treatment suggests that acetazolamide could decrease pulmonary vessels remodelling under chronic hypoxia. The effect of acetazolamide is multifactorial by acting on erythropoiesis, pulmonary circulation, haemorheological properties and cardiac output, and could represent a pertinent treatment of chronic mountain sickness. PMID:22523353

  1. LETHAL LEVELS OF HYPOXIA FOR GULF COAST ESTUARINE ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing concern about eutrophication and subsequent hypoxia problems in estuaries. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed Water Quality Criteria (WQC) for dissolved oxygen (DO) in saltwater for Cape Cod, MA to Cape Hatteras, NC but inadequate data exis...

  2. The influence of altitude hypoxia on uroflowmetry parameters in women.

    PubMed

    Verratti, Vittore; Paulesu, Luana; Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Doria, Christian; Di Giulio, Camillo; Aloisi, Anna Maria

    2016-09-01

    There is scientific evidence to suggest a correlation between hypoxia and the physiology of micturition. During a Himalayan Scientific and Mountaineering Expedition, we performed tests to investigate the functional interactions between altitude hypoxia and uroflowmetry parameters in women. The tests were carried out in seven women (36.3 ± 7.1 yr) from normoxic [1,340 meters above sea level (m a.s.l.)] to hypoxic conditions (up to 5,050 m a.s.l.) and during the return descent. The following measures were determined: uroflowmetry parameters and saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2 ). As expected, SpO2 decreased from 97.7 to 77.8% with increasing altitude. Micturition flow time, flow volume, and voiding time increased with altitude (P < 0.04 for all), indicating a negative correlation with SpO2 In conclusion, in young adult women, micturition physiological parameters were affected during adaptation to hypoxia; the correlation with SpO2 strongly suggests a role of hypoxia in these changes. These data could help to support the design of new strategies for both prevention and medical treatment. An example of the latter might be hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which in some studies has proved able to reduce the symptoms in patients with hypoxic bladder. PMID:27358054

  3. The problem of hypoxia, hyperoxia and hypercapnia in space physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Gramenitskiy, P. M.; Kovalenko, Y. A.; Dvorzhak, I. I.; Moravek, M.; Palash, L.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamics of basic functional systems and behavioral reactions depend on the oxygen regime of the human body when confined in pressurized compartments during space flight. Permissible concentrations of oxygen, carbon dioxide and other gases to avoid symptoms of hypoxia, hyperoxia and hypercapnia are discussed in relation to numerous human tolerance studies.

  4. Visual Deficits and Improvements in Children after Perinatal Hypoxia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groenendaal, F.; Van Hof-Van Duin, J.

    1992-01-01

    Study of the visual development of 38 infants, children, and youths who were neurologically impaired following perinatal hypoxia found that all children showed impairments of 1 or more visual functions, though visual development continued and visual improvements were demonstrated up to age 16. (Author/JDD)

  5. Human Skin Hypoxia Modulates Cerebrovascular and Autonomic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Olivia; Qualls, Clifford; Battisti-Charbonney, Anne; Balaban, Dahlia Y.; Fisher, Joe A.; Duffin, Jim; Appenzeller, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Because the skin is an oxygen sensor in amphibians and mice, we thought to confirm this function also in humans. The human upright posture, however, introduces additional functional demands for the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in which cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system (ANS) function may also be involved. We examined nine males and three females. While subjects were breathing ambient air, at sea level, we changed gases in a plastic body-bag during two conditions of the experiment such as to induce skin hypoxia (with pure nitrogen) or skin normoxia (with air). The subjects performed a test of hypoxic ventilatory drive during each condition of the experiment. We found no differences in the hypoxic ventilatory drive tests. However, ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities were modulated by skin hypoxia and the effect was significantly greater on the left than right middle cerebral arteries. We conclude that skin hypoxia modulates ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities and this might impact life styles and tolerance to ambient hypoxia at altitude. Thus the skin in normal humans, in addition to its numerous other functions, is also an oxygen sensor. PMID:23056597

  6. Antenatal Hypoxia and Pulmonary Vascular Function and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G.; Blood, Arlin B.; Kim, Joon H.; Wilson, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides evidence that antenatal hypoxia, which represents a significant and worldwide problem, causes prenatal programming of the lung. A general overview of lung development is provided along with some background regarding transcriptional and signaling systems of the lung. The review illustrates that antenatal hypoxic stress can induce a continuum of responses depending on the species examined. Fetuses and newborns of certain species and specific human populations are well acclimated to antenatal hypoxia. However, antenatal hypoxia causes pulmonary vascular disease in fetuses and newborns of most mammalian species and humans. Disease can range from mild pulmonary hypertension, to severe vascular remodeling and dangerous elevations in pressure. The timing, length, and magnitude of the intrauterine hypoxic stress are important to disease development, however there is also a genetic-environmental relationship that is not yet completely understood. Determining the origins of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension and their associated effects is a challenging task, but is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for pulmonary hypertension in the newborn due to antenatal hypoxia that can both treat the symptoms and curtail or reverse disease progression. PMID:24063380

  7. Serotoninergic modulation of cortical and respiratory responses to episodic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Biphasic respiratory response to hypoxia in anesthetized animals is accompanied by changes in the EEG mostly in the low EEG frequency bands. Serotonin is a potent modulator of cortical and respiratory activity through 5-HT2 receptors. Present study investigated whether 5-HT2 receptors might be involved in the EEG and respiratory relationship during normoxic and hypoxic respiration assessed from integrated phrenic (Phr) and hypoglossal (HG) nerve activities. EEG signal recorded from the frontal cortex was subjected to power spectral analysis in delta, theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands. Systemic administration of 5-HT2 agonist DOI (1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane) enhanced tonic and lowered peak phasic respiratory activity, and increased frequency of bursts of Phr and HG activity. At the same time, EEG activity became desynchronized and arterial blood pressure (ABP) increased. Following DOI pretreatment, 11% hypoxia induced an augmented respiratory response in comparison with the response in the baseline condition. ABP fell less then in the control hypoxia. EEG pattern changed less than in the baseline state. Subsequent administration of ketanserin, a 5-HT2 antagonist increased respiratory activity, elicited a synchronization of EEG activity and hypotension. The respiratory response to hypoxia was attenuated and cortical response was more potent in comparison with that after DOI injection. Arterial blood pressure decreased more then during baseline hypoxic response. The results suggest that modulation of cortical synchronization and desynchronization through 5-HT2 receptor active agents may impact to hypoxic respiratory response. PMID:20156721

  8. Antenatal hypoxia and pulmonary vascular function and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Blood, Arlin B; Kim, Joon H; Wilson, Sean M

    2013-09-01

    This review provides evidence that antenatal hypoxia, which represents a significant and worldwide problem, causes prenatal programming of the lung. A general overview of lung development is provided along with some background regarding transcriptional and signaling systems of the lung. The review illustrates that antenatal hypoxic stress can induce a continuum of responses depending on the species examined. Fetuses and newborns of certain species and specific human populations are well acclimated to antenatal hypoxia. However, antenatal hypoxia causes pulmonary vascular disease in fetuses and newborns of most mammalian species and humans. Disease can range from mild pulmonary hypertension, to severe vascular remodeling and dangerous elevations in pressure. The timing, length, and magnitude of the intrauterine hypoxic stress are important to disease development, however there is also a genetic-environmental relationship that is not yet completely understood. Determining the origins of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension and their associated effects is a challenging task, but is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for pulmonary hypertension in the newborn due to antenatal hypoxia that can both treat the symptoms and curtail or reverse disease progression.

  9. Hypoxia impairs visual acuity in snapper (Pagrus auratus).

    PubMed

    Robinson, Esme; Jerrett, Alistair; Black, Suzanne; Davison, William

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the effect of environmental hypoxia on vision in snapper (Pagrus auratus). Juvenile snapper inhabit estuarine environments where oxygen conditions fluctuate on a seasonal basis. Optomotor experiments demonstrated that visual acuity is impaired by environmental hypoxia, but not until levels approach the critical oxygen tension (P crit) of this species (around 25% air-saturated seawater). In 100, 80, and 60% air-saturated seawater, a positive optomotor response was present at a minimum separable angle (M SA) of 1°. In 40% air-saturated seawater, vision was partially impaired with positive responses at M SAs of 2° and above. However, in 25% air-saturated seawater, visual acuity was seriously impaired, with positive responses only present at M SAs of 6° and above. Snapper were found to possess a choroid rete, facilitating the maintenance of high ocular oxygen partial pressures (PO2) during normoxia and moderate hypoxia (PO2, between 269 and 290 mmHg). However, at 40 and 25% water oxygen saturation, ocular PO2 was reduced to below 175 mmHg, which is perhaps linked to impairment of visual acuity in these conditions. The ability to preserve visual function during moderate hypoxia is beneficial for the maintenance of a visual lifestyle in the fluctuating oxygen environments of estuaries.

  10. Progressive hypoxia decouples activity and aerobic performance of skate embryos

    PubMed Central

    Di Santo, Valentina; Tran, Anna H.; Svendsen, Jon C.

    2016-01-01

    Although fish population size is strongly affected by survival during embryonic stages, our understanding of physiological responses to environmental stressors is based primarily on studies of post-hatch fishes. Embryonic responses to acute exposure to changes in abiotic conditions, including increase in hypoxia, could be particularly important in species exhibiting long developmental time, as embryos are unable to select a different environment behaviourally. Given that oxygen is key to metabolic processes in fishes and aquatic hypoxia is becoming more severe and frequent worldwide, organisms are expected to reduce their aerobic performance. Here, we examined the metabolic and behavioural responses of embryos of a benthic elasmobranch fish, the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), to acute progressive hypoxia, by measuring oxygen consumption and movement (tail-beat) rates inside the egg case. Oxygen consumption rates were not significantly affected by ambient oxygen levels until reaching 45% air saturatio