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Sample records for nixt sounding rocket

  1. A Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope (NIXT) Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1996-01-01

    During the past year the changeover from the normal incidence X ray telescope (NIXT) program to the new TXI sounding rocket program was completed. The NIXT effort, aimed at evaluating the viability of the remaining portions of the NIXT hardware and design has been finished and the portions of the NIXT which are viable and flightworthy, such as filters, mirror mounting hardware, electronic and telemetry interface systems, are now part of the new rocket payload. The backup NIXT multilayer-coated X ray telescope and its mounting hardware have been completely fabricated and are being stored for possible future use in the TXI rocket. The h-alpha camera design is being utilized in the TXI program for real-time pointing verification and control via telemetry. Two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program were published this year.

  2. A Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope (NIXT) Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    The following two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program, are presented: (1) 'The Solar X-ray Corona,' - an introduction to the physics of the solar corona, with a major portion concerning a summary of results from the series of NIXT sounding rocket flights; and (2) 'Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure.'

  3. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of highly accurate and useful system.

  4. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of highly accurate and useful system.

  5. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place In the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is managed by personnel from Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, either from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia, Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico or from Canada, Norway and Sweden. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requi6ng considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. An inverse differential GPS system has been developed for Sounding Rocket. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of a high accurate and useful system.

  6. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place In the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is managed by personnel from Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, either from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia, Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico or from Canada, Norway and Sweden. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requi6ng considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. An inverse differential GPS system has been developed for Sounding Rocket. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of a high accurate and useful system.

  7. The Aries sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooling, D.

    1980-02-01

    A family of sounding rockets called Aries, using the motors from obsolete Minuteman ICBMs, is described. Payloads for Aries range from 1,500 to 3,500 lb (with a payload diameter of 44 in.) and include various instruments (magnetospheric tracers, X-ray and extreme ultraviolet astronomy and a large X-ray telescope). Prospects for future launching of a two and even three-stage Aries are discussed.

  8. Analysis of the 23 June 1988 flare using NIXT multilayer X-ray images. [normal incidence X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon; Herant, Marc

    1989-01-01

    Results obtained during the June 23, 1988 flight of the normal incidence X-ray telescope (NIXT) sounding rocket payload are reported. The telescope primary is 25 cm in diameter, in a 750 cm e.f.l. (f/30) Ritchey-Chretien configuration, with multilayer coatings on the optics designed to image the Fe XVI and Mg X coronal emission lines near 63.5 A. Images of the onset phase of a large (M8) Solar flare were recorded during the flight on a modified T-max 400 film manufactured by Kodak. Some of the results obtained by comparison of the NIXT data with ground-based observations of the sun obtained simultaneously to the flight are also reported.

  9. EUVS Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Alan S.

    1996-01-01

    During the first half of this year (CY 1996), the EUVS project began preparations of the EUVS payload for the upcoming NASA sounding rocket flight 36.148CL, slated for launch on July 26, 1996 to observe and record a high-resolution (approx. 2 A FWHM) EUV spectrum of the planet Venus. These preparations were designed to improve the spectral resolution and sensitivity performance of the EUVS payload as well as prepare the payload for this upcoming mission. The following is a list of the EUVS project activities that have taken place since the beginning of this CY: (1) Applied a fresh, new SiC optical coating to our existing 2400 groove/mm grating to boost its reflectivity; (2) modified the Ranicon science detector to boost its detective quantum efficiency with the addition of a repeller grid; (3) constructed a new entrance slit plane to achieve 2 A FWHM spectral resolution; (4) prepared and held the Payload Initiation Conference (PIC) with the assigned NASA support team from Wallops Island for the upcoming 36.148CL flight (PIC held on March 8, 1996; see Attachment A); (5) began wavelength calibration activities of EUVS in the laboratory; (6) made arrangements for travel to WSMR to begin integration activities in preparation for the July 1996 launch; (7) paper detailing our previous EUVS Venus mission (NASA flight 36.117CL) published in Icarus (see Attachment B); and (8) continued data analysis of the previous EUVS mission 36.137CL (Spica occultation flight).

  10. A Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope (NIXT) Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-01-01

    The solar corona, and the coronae of solar-type stars, consist of a low-density magnetized plasma at temperatures exceeding 10(exp 6) K. The primary coronal emission is therefore in the UV and soft X-ray range. The observed close connection between solar magnetic fields and the physical parameters of the corona implies a fundamental role for the magnetic field in coronal structuring and dynamics. Variability of the corona occurs on all temporal and spatial scales - at one extreme, as the result of plasma instabilities, and at the other extreme driven by the global magnetic flux emergence patterns of the solar cycle.

  11. Sounding rockets explore the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mendillo, M. )

    1990-08-01

    It is suggested that small, expendable, solid-fuel rockets used to explore ionospheric plasma can offer insight into all the processes and complexities common to space plasma. NASA's sounding rocket program for ionospheric research focuses on the flight of instruments to measure parameters governing the natural state of the ionosphere. Parameters include input functions, such as photons, particles, and composition of the neutral atmosphere; resultant structures, such as electron and ion densities, temperatures and drifts; and emerging signals such as photons and electric and magnetic fields. Systematic study of the aurora is also conducted by these rockets, allowing sampling at relatively high spatial and temporal rates as well as investigation of parameters, such as energetic particle fluxes, not accessible to ground based systems. Recent active experiments in the ionosphere are discussed, and future sounding rocket missions are cited.

  12. The United States sounding rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The United States sounding rocket program is discussed. The program is concerned with the fields of solar physics, galactic astronomy, fields and particles, ionospheric physics, aeronomy, and meteorology. Sounding rockets are described with respect to propulsion systems, gross weight, and capabilities. Instruments used to conduct ionospheric probing missions are examined. Results of previously conducted sounding rocket missions are included.

  13. NASA Sounding Rockets and Hi-C

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Sounding Rockets Program Office (SRPO), located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility, provides suborbital launch vehicles, payload development, and field operations sup...

  14. GREECE Sounding Rocket Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Bonnell, J. W.; Ogasawara, K.; Hampton, D. L.; Jahn, J. M.; Donovan, E.; Gustavsson, B.; Lanchester, B. S.; McHarg, M. G.; Spanswick, E.; Trondsen, T. S.; Valek, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    On 03 March 2014 at 11:09:50 UT the Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment (GREECE) sounding rocket successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska . It reached an apogee of approximately 335 km over the native village of Venetie during a dynamic post-midnight auroral event. A wide range of precipitating electrons were measured with the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) and Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP), cumulatively covering 300 ev to 200 keV in varying time resolutions. DC to low frequency electric and magnetic fields were measured at the same time and a langmuir probe was also employed. In addition to the on board instrumentation a suite of ground based imagers was deployed under apogee. We used several electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) with different filters and field of views imaging along magnetic zenith. This yielded multi-emission line information about the auroral brightness at the magnetic footprint of the rocket critical for our main goal of exploring the correlation of the sheer flows often observed in high resolution imagery during aurora and the in situ signatures of precipitating particles and waves. The instruments used will be discussed in further detail along with preliminary results of an event rich in particle and wave signatures.

  15. SHARPI/PICTURE Sounding Rocket Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, D.; Antonille, S.; Wallace, T.; Rabin, D.; Wake, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Solar High Angular Resolution Photometric Imager (SHARPI)/Planet Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Rocket Experiment (PICTURE) Sounding Rocket Telescope is described. The topics include: 1) Lightweight precision mirror development; 2) Two sounding rocket concepts sharing a telescope; 3) Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) overview; 4) PM development program; 5) PM figure testing; 6) Mirror coatings; 7) PM mount and verification; 8) Secondary Mirror (SM); and 9) OTA.

  16. The OGRESS Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Thomas; Zeiger, B.; McEntaffer, R. L.; Schultz, T.; Oakley, P.; Cash, W. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of the Off-plane Grating Rocket for Extended Source Spectroscopy (OGRESS) sounding rocket payload based at the University of Iowa and University of Colorado, Boulder. The payload has been launched three times before under the names CyXESS, EXOS, and CODEX and is scheduled to fly again in February 2014. The payload is designed to observe large diffuse soft X-ray sources between ~100 - 1000 eV. OGRESS will observe the Vela supernova remnant and achieve the highest spectral resolution ever taken of this object in our bandpass. OGRESS does not use the standard optical design of a grazing incidence Wolter telescope. Instead, OGRESS uses a wire-grid collimator to remove any nonconverging light. This optical design leads to poor sensitivity to point sources, but works very well for large extended sources, for which the telescope beam is fully illuminated. The light is dispersed by an array of off-plane parallel-groove sinusoidal gratings and focused onto Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors.

  17. The CODEX sounding rocket payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiger, B.; Shipley, A.; Cash, W.; Rogers, T.; Schultz, T.; McEntaffer, R.; Kaiser, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present the CODEX sounding rocket payload, a soft x-ray (0.1-1.0 keV) spectrometer designed to observe diffuse high-surface brightness astronomical sources. The payload is composed of two modules, each with a 3.25° x 3.25° field of view defined by a stack of wire grids that block light not coming to a 3.0 m focus and admit only nearly-collimated light onto an array of 67 diffraction gratings in an off-plane mount. After a 2.0 m throw, the spectrum is detected by offset large-format gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. CODEX will target the Vela supernova remnant later this year to measure the temperature and abundances and to determine the contributions of various soft x-ray emission mechanisms to the remnant's energy budget; resulting spectra will have resolution (E/▵E) ranging from 50 to 100 across the band. CODEX is the third-generation of similar payloads from the University of Colorado, with an increased bandpass, higher throughput, and a more robust mechanical structure than its predecessors.

  18. Aerodynamics of Sounding-Rocket Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical aerodynamics program TAD predicts aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding-rocket configurations. These slender, Axisymmetric finned vehicles have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high-speed armament. TAD calculates characteristics of separate portions of vehicle, calculates interference between portions, and combines results to form total vehicle solution.

  19. NASA sounding rockets, 1958 - 1968: A historical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    The development and use of sounding rockets is traced from the Wac Corporal through the present generation of rockets. The Goddard Space Flight Center Sounding Rocket Program is discussed, and the use of sounding rockets during the IGY and the 1960's is described. Advantages of sounding rockets are identified as their simplicity and payload simplicity, low costs, payload recoverability, geographic flexibility, and temporal flexibility. The disadvantages are restricted time of observation, localized coverage, and payload limitations. Descriptions of major sounding rockets, trends in vehicle usage, and a compendium of NASA sounding rocket firings are also included.

  20. Implementation of NASA's Sounding Rocket Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Dave

    2001-08-01

    NASA's Sounding Rocket Program was privatized in February 1999 at NASA Wallops Island, Virginia, USA. Litton/PRC* is the prime contractor on the 10-year NASA Sounding Rocket Contract (NSROC). The NSROC team is comprised of several teammates including Litton/PRC, Orbital Sciences, Arcata, RSS and Boeing. NSROC provides NASA's Sounding Rocket Office (SRPO) with all mission/vehicle planning, design, development, integration, test, launch and post-flight analysis. The NSROC team achieved ISO 9000 registration status in August 2000. NSROC launches an average of 20 vehicles/missions per year. Launches are performed from many world-wide launch ranges including Wallops Island Flight Facility Virginia, White Sands Missile Range New Mexico, Poker Flat Alaska, Esrange Sweden, Andøya Norway, Barking Sands Hawaii, Woomera Australia, Greenland, Svalbard Norway, Fortaleza Brazil, Vandeburg AFB California, Eastern Test Range Florida, Peru, Puerto Rico, amongst others.

  1. Sounding Rocket Launches Successfully from Alaska

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Caption: Time lapse photo of the NASA Oriole IV sounding rocket with Aural Spatial Structures Probe as an aurora dances over Alaska. All four stages of the rocket are visible in this image. Credit: NASA/Jamie Adkins More info: On count day number 15, the Aural Spatial Structures Probe, or ASSP, was successfully launched on a NASA Oriole IV sounding rocket at 5:41 a.m. EST on Jan. 28, 2015, from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. Preliminary data show that all aspects of the payload worked as designed and the principal investigator Charles Swenson at Utah State University described the mission as a “raging success.” “This is likely the most complicated mission the sounding rocket program has ever undertaken and it was not easy by any stretch," said John Hickman, operations manager of the NASA sounding rocket program office at the Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. "It was technically challenging every step of the way.” “The payload deployed all six sub-payloads in formation as planned and all appeared to function as planned. Quite an amazing feat to maneuver and align the main payload, maintain the proper attitude while deploying all six 7.3-pound sub payloads at about 40 meters per second," said Hickman. Read more: www.nasa.gov/content/assp-sounding-rocket-launches-succes... NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Sound from apollo rockets in space.

    PubMed

    Cotten, D; Donn, W L

    1971-02-12

    Low-frequency sound has been recorded on at least two occasions in Bermuda with the passage of Apollo rocket vehicles 188 kilometers aloft. The signals, which are reminiscent of N-waves from sonic booms, are (i) horizontally coherent; (ii) have extremely high (supersonic) trace velocities across the tripartite arrays; (iii) have nearly identical appearance and frequencies; (iv) have essentially identical arrival times after rocket launch; and (v) are the only coherent signals recorded over many hours. These observations seem to establish that the recorded sound comes from the rockets at high elevation. Despite this high elevation, the values of surface pressure appear to be explainable on the basis of a combination of a kinetic theory approach to shock formation in rarefied atmospheres with established gas-dynamics shock theory.

  3. The Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skatteboe, Rolf

    2001-08-01

    The status and recent developments of the Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program are presented with focus on national activities and recent achievements. The main part of the Norwegian program is sounding rocket launches conducted by Andøya Rocket Range from the launch facilities on Andøya and at Svalbard. For the majority of the programs, the scientific goal is investigation of processes in the middle and upper atmosphere. The in situ measurements are supplemented by a large number of ground-based support instruments located at the ALOMAR Observatory. The ongoing and planned projects are described and the highlights of the latest completed projects are given. The scientific program for the period 2001-2003 will be reviewed. Several new programs have been started to improve the services available to the international science comunity. The Hotel Payload project and MiniDusty are important examples that will be introduced in the paper. Available space related infrastructure is summarized.

  4. Sounding Rocket Launches Successfully from Alaska

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    A NASA Oriole IV sounding rocket with the Aural Spatial Structures Probe leaves the launch pad on Jan. 28, 2015, from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. Credit: NASA/Lee Wingfield More info: On count day number 15, the Aural Spatial Structures Probe, or ASSP, was successfully launched on a NASA Oriole IV sounding rocket at 5:41 a.m. EST on Jan. 28, 2015, from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. Preliminary data show that all aspects of the payload worked as designed and the principal investigator Charles Swenson at Utah State University described the mission as a “raging success.” “This is likely the most complicated mission the sounding rocket program has ever undertaken and it was not easy by any stretch," said John Hickman, operations manager of the NASA sounding rocket program office at the Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. "It was technically challenging every step of the way.” “The payload deployed all six sub-payloads in formation as planned and all appeared to function as planned. Quite an amazing feat to maneuver and align the main payload, maintain the proper attitude while deploying all six 7.3-pound sub payloads at about 40 meters per second," said Hickman. Read more: www.nasa.gov/content/assp-sounding-rocket-launches-succes... NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  6. NASA Sounding Rocket Program educational outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberspeaker, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Educational and public outreach is a major focus area for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA Sounding Rocket Program (NSRP) shares in the belief that NASA plays a unique and vital role in inspiring future generations to pursue careers in science, mathematics, and technology. To fulfill this vision, the NASA Sounding Rocket Program engages in a host of student flight projects providing unique and exciting hands-on student space flight experiences. These projects include single stage Orion missions carrying "active" high school experiments and "passive" Explorer School modules, university level Orion and Terrier-Orion flights, and small hybrid rocket flights as part of the Small-scale Educational Rocketry Initiative (SERI) currently under development. Efforts also include educational programs conducted as part of major campaigns. The student flight projects are designed to reach students ranging from Kindergarteners to university undergraduates. The programs are also designed to accommodate student teams with varying levels of technical capabilities - from teams that can fabricate their own payloads to groups that are barely capable of drilling and tapping their own holes. The program also conducts a hands-on student flight project for blind students in collaboration with the National Federation of the Blind. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is proud of its role in inspiring the "next generation of explorers" and is working to expand its reach to all regions of the United States and the international community as well.

  7. CODEX sounding rocket wire grid collimator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Ann; Zeiger, Ben; Rogers, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    CODEX is a sounding rocket payload designed to operate in the soft x-ray (0.1-1.0 kV) regime. The instrument has a 3.25 degree square field of view that uses a one meter long wire grid collimator to create a beam that converges to a line in the focal plane. Wire grid collimator performance is directly correlated to the geometric accuracy of actual grid features and their relative locations. Utilizing a strategic combination of manufacturing and assembly techniques, this design is engineered for precision within the confines of a typical rocket budget. Expected resilience of the collimator under flight conditions is predicted by mechanical analysis.

  8. Program Computes Sound Pressures at Rocket Launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogg, Gary; Heyman, Roy; White, Michael; Edquist, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Launch Vehicle External Sound Pressure is a computer program that predicts the ignition overpressure and the acoustic pressure on the surfaces and in the vicinity of a rocket and launch pad during launch. The program generates a graphical user interface (GUI) that gathers input data from the user. These data include the critical dimensions of the rocket and of any launch-pad structures that may act as acoustic reflectors, the size and shape of the exhaust duct or flame deflector, and geometrical and operational parameters of the rocket engine. For the ignition-overpressure calculations, histories of the chamber pressure and mass flow rate also are required. Once the GUI has gathered the input data, it feeds them to ignition-overpressure and launch-acoustics routines, which are based on several approximate mathematical models of distributed sources, transmission, and reflection of acoustic waves. The output of the program includes ignition overpressures and acoustic pressures at specified locations.

  9. NASA Sounding Rocket Program Educational Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosanova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Educational and public outreach is a major focus area for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA Sounding Rocket Program (NSRP) shares in the belief that NASA plays a unique and vital role in inspiring future generations to pursue careers in science, mathematics, and technology. To fulfill this vision, the NSRP engages in a variety of educator training workshops and student flight projects that provide unique and exciting hands-on rocketry and space flight experiences. Specifically, the Wallops Rocket Academy for Teachers and Students (WRATS) is a one-week tutorial laboratory experience for high school teachers to learn the basics of rocketry, as well as build an instrumented model rocket for launch and data processing. The teachers are thus armed with the knowledge and experience to subsequently inspire the students at their home institution. Additionally, the NSRP has partnered with the Colorado Space Grant Consortium (COSGC) to provide a "pipeline" of space flight opportunities to university students and professors. Participants begin by enrolling in the RockOn! Workshop, which guides fledgling rocketeers through the construction and functional testing of an instrumentation kit. This is then integrated into a sealed canister and flown on a sounding rocket payload, which is recovered for the students to retrieve and process their data post flight. The next step in the "pipeline" involves unique, user-defined RockSat-C experiments in a sealed canister that allow participants more independence in developing, constructing, and testing spaceflight hardware. These experiments are flown and recovered on the same payload as the RockOn! Workshop kits. Ultimately, the "pipeline" culminates in the development of an advanced, user-defined RockSat-X experiment that is flown on a payload which provides full exposure to the space environment (not in a sealed canister), and includes telemetry and attitude control capability. The RockOn! and Rock

  10. Peregrine 100-km Sounding Rocket Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Peregrine Sounding Rocket Program is a joint basic research program of NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Wallops, Stanford University, and the Space Propulsion Group, Inc. (SPG). The goal is to determine the applicability of this technology to a small launch system. The approach is to design, build, and fly a stable, efficient liquefying fuel hybrid rocket vehicle to an altitude of 100 km. The program was kicked off in October of 2006 and has seen considerable progress in the subsequent 18 months. This research group began studying liquifying hybrid rocket fuel technology more than a decade ago. The overall goal of the research was to gain a better understanding of the fundamental physics of the liquid layer entrainment process responsible for the large increase in regression rate observed in these fuels, and to demonstrate the effect of increased regression rate on hybrid rocket motor performance. At the time of this reporting, more than 400 motor tests were conducted with a variety of oxidizers (N2O, GOx, LOx) at ever increasing scales with thrust levels from 5 to over 15,000 pounds (22 N to over 66 kN) in order to move this technology from the laboratory to practical applications. The Peregrine program is the natural next step in this development. A number of small sounding rockets with diameters of 3, 4, and 6 in. (7.6, 10.2, and 15.2 cm) have been flown, but Peregrine at a diameter of 15 in. (38.1 cm) and 14,000-lb (62.3-kN) thrust is by far the largest system ever attempted and will be one of the largest hybrids ever flown. Successful Peregrine flights will set the stage for a wide range of applications of this technology.

  11. Sounding rocket study of auroral electron precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Measurement of energetic electrons in the auroral zone have proved to be one of the most useful tools in investigating the phenomena of auroral arc formation. This dissertation presents a detailed analysis of the electron data from two sounding rocket campaigns and interprets the measurements in terms of existing auroral models. The Polar Cusp campaign consisted of a single rocket launched from Cape Parry, Canada into the afternoon auroral zone at 1:31:13 UT on January 21, 1982. The results include the measurement of a narrow, magnetic field aligned electron flux at the edge of an arc. This electron precipitation was found to have a remarkably constant 1.2 eV temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field over a 200 to 900 eV energy range. The payload also made simultaneous measurements of both energetic electrons and 3-MHz plasma waves in an auroral arc. Analysis has shown that the waves are propagating in the upper hybrid band and should be generated by a positive slope in the parallel electron distribution. A correlation was found between the 3-MHz waves and small positive slopes in the parallel electron distribution but experimental uncertainties in the electron measurement were large enough to influence the analysis. The BIDARCA campaign consisted of two sounding rockets launched from Poker Flat and Fort Yukon, Alaska at 9:09:00 UT and 9:10:40 UT on February 7, 1984.

  12. A fluidic sounding rocket motor ignition system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, V. P.; Rakowsky, E. L.; Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fluidic sounding rocket motor ignition has been found to be feasible using a system without stored energy and with the complete absence of electrical energy and wiring. The fluidic ignitor is based on a two component aerodynamic resonance heating device called the pneumatic match. Temperatures in excess of 600 C were generated in closed resonance tubes which were excited by a free air jet from a simple convergent nozzle. Using nitrocellulose interface material, ignition of boron potassium nitrate was accomplished with air supply pressures as low as 45 psi. This paper describes an analytical and experimental program which established a fluidic rocket motor ignition system concept incorporating a pneumatic match with a simple hand pump as the only energy source.

  13. A fluidic sounding rocket motor ignition system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, V. P.; Rakowsky, E. L.; Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fluidic sounding rocket motor ignition has been found to be feasible using a system without stored energy and with the complete absence of electrical energy and wiring. The fluidic ignitor is based on a two component aerodynamic resonance heating device called the pneumatic match. Temperatures in excess of 600 C were generated in closed resonance tubes which were excited by a free air jet from a simple convergent nozzle. Using nitrocellulose interface material, ignition of boron potassium nitrate was accomplished with air supply pressures as low as 45 psi. This paper describes an analytical and experimental program which established a fluidic rocket motor ignition system concept incorporating a pneumatic match with a simple hand pump as the only energy source.

  14. The DXL and STORM sounding rocket mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Nicholas E.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chornay, Dennis J.; Collado-Vega, Yaireska M.; Collier, Michael R.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Kujawski, Joseph; Kuntz, K. D.; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Lepri, Susan T.; McCammon, Dan; Morgan, Kelsey; Porter, F. Scott; Prasai, Krishna; Read, Andy M.; Robertson, Ina P.; Sembay, Steve F.; Sibeck, David G.; Snowden, Steven L.; Uprety, Youaraj; Walsh, Brian M.

    2013-09-01

    The objective of the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket experiment is to distinguish the soft X-ray emission due to the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) from that produced via Solar Wind charge exchange (SWCX). Enhanced interplanetary helium density in the helium focusing cone provides a spatial variation to the SWCX that can be identified by scanning through the focusing cone using an X-ray instrument with a large grasp. DXL consists of two large proportional counters refurbished from the Aerobee payload used during the Wisconsin All Sky Survey. The counters utilize P-10 fill gas and are covered by a thin Formvar window (with Cyasorb UV-24 additive) supported on a nickel mesh. DXL's large grasp is 10 cm2 sr for both the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands. DXL was successfully launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico on December 12, 2012 using a Terrier Mk70 Black Brant IX sounding rocket. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) instrument is a prototype soft X-ray camera also successfully own on the DXL sounding rocket. STORM uses newly developed slumped micropore (`lobster eye') optics to focus X-rays onto a position sensitive, chevron configuration, microchannel plate detector. The slumped micropore optics have a 75 cm curvature radius and a polyimide/aluminum filter bonded to its surface. STORM's large field-of-view makes it ideal for imaging SWCX with exospheric hydrogen for future missions. STORM represents the first flight of lobster-eye optics in space.

  15. Field refurbishment of recoverable sounding rocket payloads.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needleman, H. C.; Tackett, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Sounding rocket payload field refurbishment has been shown to be an effective means for obtaining additional scientific data with substantial time and monetary savings. In a recent campaign three successful missions were flown using two payloads. Field refurbished hardware from two previously flown and recovered payloads were field integrated to form a third payload. Although this operational method may result in compromises in the refurbished system, it allows for quick turn around when the mission requires it. This paper describes the recent success of this approach with the Dudley Observatory Nike-Apache micrometeorite collection experiments launched from Kiruna, Sweden, in October 1972.

  16. Operation Argus. Sounding rocket measurements - Project Jason

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.L.; Allen, L.; Dennis, J.L.; Welch, J.A.; Walton, R.B.

    1984-08-31

    The general objective was to measure the distribution of beta particles originating from the Argus shots and subsequently trapped in the earth's magnetic field. This was accomplished with the aid of high-altitude sounding rockets containing radiation counters. The flux of high-energy electrons was measured as a function of: (1) magnetic latitude from 23 to 39 degrees; (2) altitude from sea level to 900 km; (3) electron energy; (4) time after the nuclear explosion; and (5) angular distribution with respect to magnetic field.

  17. Encyclopedia: Satellites and Sounding Rockets, August 1959 - December 1969

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Major space missions utilizing satellites or sounding rockets managed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center between August 1959 and December 1969 were documented. The information was presented in the following form: (1) description of each satellite project where Goddard was responsible for the spacecraft or the successful launch or both, with data such as launch characteristics, objectives, etc.; (2) description of each Goddard sounding rocket project, with the following data: sounding rocket type, vehicle number, experimental affiliation, and type of experiment; (3) brief description of current sounding rockets and launch vehicles; (4) table of tracking and data acquisition stations. Summary tables are also provided.

  18. Sounding rocket and balloon flight safety philosophy and methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyma, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    NASA's sounding rocket and balloon goal is to successfully and safely perform scientific research. This is reflected in the design, planning, and conduct of sounding rocket and balloon operations. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the sounding rocket and balloon scientific community with flight safety philosophy and methodologies, and how range safety affects their programs. This paper presents the flight safety philosophy for protecting the public against the risk created by the conduct of sounding rocket and balloon operations. The flight safety criteria used to implement this philosophy are defined and the methodologies used to calculate mission risk are described.

  19. Sounding rocket and balloon flight safety philosophy and methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyma, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    NASA's sounding rocket and balloon goal is to successfully and safely perform scientific research. This is reflected in the design, planning, and conduct of sounding rocket and balloon operations. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the sounding rocket and balloon scientific community with flight safety philosophy and methodologies, and how range safety affects their programs. This paper presents the flight safety philosophy for protecting the public against the risk created by the conduct of sounding rocket and balloon operations. The flight safety criteria used to implement this philosophy are defined and the methodologies used to calculate mission risk are described.

  20. Continued analysis of sounding rocket particle data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella, M. R.; Lynch, K. A.; Kintner, P. M.; Lundberg, E. T.; Lessard, M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Dahlgren, H.

    2010-12-01

    The sounding rocket Cascades-2 launched on 20 March 2009 from the Poker Flat Research Range at 11:04:00 UT through a series of poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs). The rocket initially crosses a diffuse arc, then crosses the equatorward extent of one PBI, and finally crosses the initiation of a separate PBI before entering the polar cap. In this poster we present a more detailed analysis of particle distribution functions and moments of the distribution function. In situ electron precipitation and ion signatures associated with each crossing of the aurora are analyzed. Conjugate THEMIS measurements from three satellites located at -10 Re downtail lay out the sequence of events between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Earthward plasma flows are observed at THEMIS for ten minutes prior to the aurora being seen to brighten in the ground cameras. After another half hour THEMIS observes a near-Earth dipolarization, at which point the flows are no longer seen. It is not until after these events that PBI activity is seen in the ground cameras, where it is observed by the rocket.

  1. SCORE - Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Moses, Dan; Romoli, Marco

    The Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment - SCORE - is a The Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment - SCORE - is a coronagraph for multi-wavelength imaging of the coronal Lyman-alpha lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and for the broad.band visible-light emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009 acquiring the first images of the HeII line-emission from the extended corona. The simultaneous observation of the coronal Lyman-alpha HI 121.6 nm, has allowed the first determination of the absolute helium abundance in the extended corona. This presentation will describe the lesson learned from the first flight and will illustrate the preparations and the science perspectives for the second re-flight approved by NASA and scheduled for 2016. The SCORE optical design is flexible enough to be able to accommodate different experimental configurations with minor modifications. This presentation will describe one of such configurations that could include a polarimeter for the observation the expected Hanle effect in the coronal Lyman-alpha HI line. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV) can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Thus, space-based UV spectro-polarimetry would provide an additional new tool for the diagnostics of coronal magnetism.

  2. Auroral Spatial Structures Probe sounding rocket mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, E. M.; Swenson, C.; Fish, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe (ASSP) is a NASA sounding rocket mission that, will be used to study both the spatial and temporal small scale variation of the E-fields during breakup aurora and geomagnetically active conditions. This will be accomplished through the use of a constellation of small payloads that separate relative to each other throughout a sounding rocket flight. The multiple baseline observations of the electric and magnetic fields will be used to observe variability of both the E-field and the Poynting flux. These observations will be placed in the context of available data, including winds, large scale E-fields, and proxy conductivity (airglow images) observations. In this way we will address the main scientific objective of this mission which is: What are the contributions of small spatial scale and rapid temporal scale fluctuations of electric fields relative to the larger-scale electrodynamic processes? The high altitude rocket will be launched along the magnetic field line and carry six sub-payloads to be ejected from the main payload at high velocity. The sub-payloads will be deployed both along the flight path and perpendicular to the flight path so that both spatial features and temporal-spatial ambiguities can be explored. The low-mass sub-payloads that, for a fixed ejection impulse will achieve at least a 50 km separation by the end of the flight are key to the observational success. Each sub-payload will carry a crossed pair of double-probe sensors to measure in-situ electric fields, a three axis magnetometer, a Langmuir probe and a GPS receiver. In this poster we review the ASSP science and mission concepts.

  3. Aerodynamics of sounding rockets at supersonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vira, N. R.

    This dissertation presents a practical and low cost method of computing the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles such as sounding rockets, high speed bombs, projectiles and guided missiles in supersonic flight. The vehicle configuration consists of a slender axisymmetric body with a conical or ogive noise, cylinders, shoulders and boattails, if any, and have sets of two, three or four fins. Geometry of the fin cross section can be single wedge, double wedge, modified single wedge or modified double wedge. First the aerodynamics of the fins and the body are analyzed separately; then fin body and fore and aft fin interferences are accounted for when they are combined to form the total vehicle. Results and formulas documented in this work are the basis of the supersonic portion of the Theoretical Aerodynamic Derivatives (TAD) computer program operating at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  4. Electronic timer for sounding rocket payload use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    An electronic timer has been developed for sounding rocket use. The timer uses CMOS technology for low power consumption and has a battery back-up to keep the timing circuit active in case of a dropout on the payload power bus. Time-event decoding is done by programming EPROM's which enable a +28 volt dc sourcing output. There are 32 discrete outputs which can provide +28 volt dc into a minimum load impedance of 150 ohms. Inputs are designed to operate on standard CMOS voltage levels, but they can withstand +28 volts dc without damage. The timer can be started by either 'G' or lift-off switch closure or umbilical release at lift-off.

  5. Electronic timer for sounding rocket payload use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    An electronic timer has been developed for sounding rocket use. The timer uses CMOS technology for low power consumption and has a battery back-up to keep the timing circuit active in case of a dropout on the payload power bus. Time-event decoding is done by programming EPROM's which enable a +28 volt dc sourcing output. There are 32 discrete outputs which can provide +28 volt dc into a minimum load impedance of 150 ohms. Inputs are designed to operate on standard CMOS voltage levels, but they can withstand +28 volts dc without damage. The timer can be started by either 'G' or lift-off switch closure or umbilical release at lift-off.

  6. The FOXSI Solar Sounding Rocket Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Christe, Steven; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is, in its initial form, a sounding rocket experiment designed to apply the technique of focusing hard X-ray (HXR) optics to the study of fundamental questions about the high-energy Sun. Solar HXRs arise via bremsstrahlung from energetic electrons and hot plasma produced in solar flares and thus are one of the most direct diagnostics of flare-accelerated electrons and the impulsive heating of the solar corona. Previous missions have always been limited in sensitivity and dynamic range by the use of indirect (Fourier) imaging due to the lack of availability of direct focusing optics, but technological advances now make direct focusing accessible in the HXR regime (as evidenced by the NuSTAR spacecraft and several suborbital missions). The FOXSI rocket experiment develops and optimizes HXR focusing telescopes for the unique scientific requirements of the Sun. To date, FOXSI has completed two successful flights on 2012 November 02 and 2014 December 11 and is funded for a third flight. This paper gives a brief overview of the experiment, which is sensitive to solar HXRs in the 4-20 keV range, describes its first two flights, and gives a preview of plans for FOXSI-3.

  7. The FOXSI solar sounding rocket campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm.; Christe, Steven; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Courtade, Sasha; Turin, Paul; McBride, Stephen; Shourt, Van; Hoberman, Jane; Foster, Natalie; Vievering, Juliana

    2016-07-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is, in its initial form, a sounding rocket experiment designed to apply the technique of focusing hard X-ray (HXR) optics to the study of fundamental questions about the high-energy Sun. Solar HXRs arise via bremsstrahlung from energetic electrons and hot plasma produced in solar flares and thus are one of the most direct diagnostics of are-accelerated electrons and the impulsive heating of the solar corona. Previous missions have always been limited in sensitivity and dynamic range by the use of indirect (Fourier) imaging due to the lack of availability of direct focusing optics, but technological advances now make direct focusing accessible in the HXR regime (as evidenced by the NuSTAR spacecraft and several suborbital missions). The FOXSI rocket experiment develops and optimizes HXR focusing telescopes for the unique scientific requirements of the Sun. To date, FOXSI has completed two successful flights on 2012 November 02 and 2014 December 11 and is funded for a third flight. This paper gives a brief overview of the experiment, which is sensitive to solar HXRs in the 4-20 keV range, describes its first two flights, and gives a preview of plans for FOXSI-3.

  8. Introduction to the Special Issue on Sounding Rockets and Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Zeiger, Ben; Pfaff, Rob; Garcia, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Rocket technology, originally developed for military applications, has provided a low-cost observing platform to carry critical and rapid-response scientific investigations for over 70 years. Even with the development of launch vehicles that could put satellites into orbit, high altitude sounding rockets have remained relevant. In addition to science observations, sounding rockets provide a unique technology test platform and a valuable training ground for scientists and engineers. Most importantly, sounding rockets remain the only way to explore the tenuous regions of the Earth’s atmosphere (the upper stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower ionosphere/thermosphere) above balloon altitudes (˜40km) and below satellite orbits (˜160km). They can lift remote sensing telescope payloads with masses up to 400kg to altitudes of 350km providing observing times of up to 6min above the blocking influence of Earth’s atmosphere. Though a number of sounding rocket research programs exist around the world, this article focuses on the NASA Sounding Rocket Program, and particularly on the astrophysical and solar sounding rocket payloads.

  9. Sounding Rocket Particle Sampling in the Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldemarsson, T.; Giovane, F.; Stroud, R. M.; Gumbel, J.; Hedin, J.; Blum, J.; Reissaus, P.; Siskind, D. E.; Stegman, J.; Khaplanov, M.

    Current estimates suggest that somewhere between 10 and 100 tons of meteoric material enters the Earth atmosphere each day It is well known that the ablation of this incoming material is the source of metal atoms and ions regularly observed in the upper atmosphere by remote sensing techniques such as lidar and satellite limb measurements What happens next is more uncertain but subsequent condensation and coagulation of the ablated material is thought to form nanometer-size particles also denoted meteoric smoke It has been suggested that meteoric smoke plays a key role in a number of mesospheric processes related to e g noctilucent clouds NLC and polar mesosphere summer echos PMSE We will present a recently developed instrument MAGIC Mesospheric Aerosol - Genesis Interaction and Composition designed for in situ sampling of smoke particles during a sounding rocket flight The MAGIC instrument has been built at the Naval Research Laboratory with particular emphasis on aerodynamic challenges imposed by the tiny size of the particles By sampling smoke particles and making them available for laboratory analysis their existence and properties can be studied Basic questions concern their number density size altitude distribution and composition The first flights of the MAGIC instrument took place at Esrange Sweden in January 2005 and at Wallops Island USA in May 2005 An overview of the campaigns will be presented together with preliminary results from the transmission electron microscopy analysis carried out on these first flown collection

  10. Recent sounding rocket highlights and a concept for melding sounding rocket and space shuttle activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, J. H.; Mayo, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Highlights include launching guided vehicles into the African Solar Eclipse, initiation of development of a Three-Stage Black Brant to explore the dayside polar cusp, large payload Aries Flights at White Sands Missile Range, and an active program with the Orion vehicle family using surplus motors. Sounding rocket philosophy and experience is being applied to the shuttle in a Get Away Special and Experiments of Opportunity Payloads Programs. In addition, an orbit selection and targeting software system to support shuttle pallet mounted experiments is under development.

  11. Terrier-Black Brant Sounding Rocket Microacceleration Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas; Acevedo, Julio

    1998-01-01

    On September 10, 1997 a Terrier-Black Brant Sounding Rocket was launched to support the Lewis Research Center DARTFire combustion experiment at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The sounding rocket also carried two microacceleration measurement systems to support the DARTFire experiment by measuring the microacceleration environment. The SAMS-FF system and a SAMS-type triaxial sensor head (TSH) were flown. The SAMS-FF system consisted of a variable frequency, digital output TSH and a roll rate sensor. Data from the two systems were analyzed and compared. Data will be presented from both systems in order to characterize the sounding rocket microacceleration environment. The data collected demonstrated that a sounding rocket is a viable vehicle for conducting space experiments that require a quiet, dedicated microacceleration environment.

  12. Launch of 2014 RockOn Sounding Rocket

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Students and teachers designed experiments which were included in the payload of the RockOn sounding rocket, seen here launching from NASA Wallops Flight Facility on June 26, 2014, at 7:21 a.m. EDT...

  13. Sounding rockets utilized to support Department of Defense programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, E. R.; Seaton, D. F.

    Sounding rocket technology is utilized in the truest sense in a successful flight test program to develop advanced technology optical sensors in support of ballistic missile defenses. Single and two stage sounding rockets have been flown ballistically to lift large sensor vehicle payloads to altitudes in excess of 100 nautical miles to demonstrate and evaluate sensor performance. This paper will describe the utility of sounding rockets in the development of a major Department of Defense program and the key role demonstrated on the Designating Optical Tracker (DOT) Flight Test Program. Flight test objectives and results are discussed. This paper also defines the transition into a larger sounding rocket system with increased payload carrying capability and boost phase guidance.

  14. Thermal Electron Results from the CAPER Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; Pollock, Craig J.; Moore, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The Cleft Accelerated Plasma Experiment Rocket (CAPER) sounding rocket launched on January 21, 1999 at 06:13:30 UT into the cusp. Ion outflows and strong electric fields were present. We will present the preliminary results of the thermal electron detector, TECHS that was on this payload.

  15. Compilation of weights, balance, CG, and moments of inertia for sounding rocket payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, J. J., Jr.; Fitz, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A compilation of weight, balance, center of gravity, and moments of inertia of various sounding rocket payloads are presented. A permanent record of the physical characteristics of sounding rocket payloads in one location is provided. Data for the weight of payloads which the sounding rockets can support are developed. Illustrations of various sounding rockets to show the space available for payloads are included.

  16. Performance of a Solidification Furnace Developed for Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Chen Y.; Boschetti, Cesar; Ribeiro, Manuel F.; Toledo, Rafael C.; Freitas, Filipe E.; Bandeira, Iraja N.

    2011-11-01

    Brazil has a Microgravity Program mainly based on experiments using sounding rockets. This paper presents a brief account of the Program and the experiments made on the Brazilian rockets. Up to now three missions carrying a total of 26 experiments were made. In all flights a fast solidification furnace, capable of producing temperatures up to 900°C, was tested with semiconductor and metal alloys. This paper describes the construction and the performance of that furnace during the last parabolic flight, occurred in 2010. The solidification furnace is now qualified and ready to be used by other institutions in sounding rocket flights.

  17. Collaborative Sounding Rocket launch in Alaska and Development of Hybrid Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Tomohisa; Tsutsumi, Akimasa; Ito, Toshiyuki; Kan, Yuji; Tohyama, Fumio; Nakashino, Kyouichi; Hawkins, Joseph

    Tokai University student rocket project (TSRP) was established in 1995 for a purpose of the space science and engineering hands-on education, consisting of two space programs; the one is sounding rocket experiment collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks and the other is development and launch of small hybrid rockets. In January of 2000 and March 2002, two collaborative sounding rockets were successfully launched at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. In 2001, the first Tokai hybrid rocket was successfully launched at Alaska. After that, 11 hybrid rockets were launched to the level of 180-1,000 m high at Hokkaido and Akita in Japan. Currently, Tokai students design and build all parts of the rockets. In addition, they are running the organization and development of the project under the tight budget control. This program has proven to be very effective in providing students with practical, real-engineering design experience and this program also allows students to participate in all phases of a sounding rocket mission. Also students learn scientific, engineering subjects, public affairs and system management through experiences of cooperative teamwork. In this report, we summarize the TSRP's hybrid rocket program and discuss the effectiveness of the program in terms of educational aspects.

  18. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program and space sciences.

    PubMed

    Gurkin, L W

    1992-10-01

    High altitude suborbital rockets (sounding rockets) have been extensively used for space science research in the post-World War II period; the NASA Sounding Rocket Program has been on-going since the inception of the Agency and supports all space science disciplines. In recent years, sounding rockets have been utilized to provide a low gravity environment for materials processing research, particularly in the commercial sector. Sounding rockets offer unique features as a low gravity flight platform. Quick response and low cost combine to provide more frequent spaceflight opportunities. Suborbital spacecraft design practice has achieved a high level of sophistication which optimizes the limited available flight times. High data-rate telemetry, real-time ground up-link command and down-link video data are routinely used in sounding rocket payloads. Standard, off-the-shelf, active control systems are available which limit payload body rates such that the gravitational environment remains less than 10(-4) g during the control period. Operational launch vehicles are available which can provide up to 7 minutes of experiment time for experiment weights up to 270 kg. Standard payload recovery systems allow soft impact retrieval of payloads. When launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, payloads can be retrieved and returned to the launch site within hours.

  19. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program and space sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurkin, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    High altitude suborbital rockets (sounding rockets) have been extensively used for space science research in the post-World War II period; the NASA Sounding Rocket Program has been on-going since the inception of the Agency and supports all space science disciplines. In recent years, sounding rockets have been utilized to provide a low gravity environment for materials processing research, particularly in the commercial sector. Sounding rockets offer unique features as a low gravity flight platform. Quick response and low cost combine to provide more frequent spaceflight opportunities. Suborbital spacecraft design practice has achieved a high level of sophistication which optimizes the limited available flight times. High data-rate telemetry, real-time ground up-link command and down-link video data are routinely used in sounding rocket payloads. Standard, off-the-shelf, active control systems are available which limit payload body rates such that the gravitational environment remains less than 10(-4) g during the control period. Operational launch vehicles are available which can provide up to 7 minutes of experiment time for experiment weights up to 270 kg. Standard payload recovery systems allow soft impact retrieval of payloads. When launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, payloads can be retrieved and returned to the launch site within hours.

  20. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program and space sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurkin, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    High altitude suborbital rockets (sounding rockets) have been extensively used for space science research in the post-World War II period; the NASA Sounding Rocket Program has been on-going since the inception of the Agency and supports all space science disciplines. In recent years, sounding rockets have been utilized to provide a low gravity environment for materials processing research, particularly in the commercial sector. Sounding rockets offer unique features as a low gravity flight platform. Quick response and low cost combine to provide more frequent spaceflight opportunities. Suborbital spacecraft design practice has achieved a high level of sophistication which optimizes the limited available flight times. High data-rate telemetry, real-time ground up-link command and down-link video data are routinely used in sounding rocket payloads. Standard, off-the-shelf, active control systems are available which limit payload body rates such that the gravitational environment remains less than 10(-4) g during the control period. Operational launch vehicles are available which can provide up to 7 minutes of experiment time for experiment weights up to 270 kg. Standard payload recovery systems allow soft impact retrieval of payloads. When launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, payloads can be retrieved and returned to the launch site within hours.

  1. National Report on the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberspeaker, Philip; Fairbrother, Debora

    2013-01-01

    The U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 30 to 40 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community and other users. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program supports the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payloads, and providing both the rocket vehicle and launch operations services. Activities since 2011 have included two flights from Andoya Rocket Range, more than eight flights from White Sands Missile Range, approximately sixteen flights from Wallops Flight Facility, two flights from Poker Flat Research Range, and four flights from Kwajalein Atoll. Other activities included the final developmental flight of the Terrier-Improved Malemute launch vehicle, a test flight of the Talos-Terrier-Oriole launch vehicle, and a host of smaller activities to improve program support capabilities. Several operational missions have utilized the new Terrier-Malemute vehicle. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program is currently engaged in the development of a new sustainer motor known as the Peregrine. The Peregrine development effort will involve one static firing and three flight tests with a target completion data of August 2014. The NASA Balloon Program supported numerous scientific and developmental missions since its last report. The program conducted flights from the U.S., Sweden, Australia, and Antarctica utilizing standard and experimental vehicles. Of particular note are the successful test flights of the Wallops Arc Second Pointer (WASP), the successful demonstration of a medium-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB), and most recently, three simultaneous missions aloft over Antarctica. NASA continues its successful incremental design qualification program and will support a science mission aboard WASP in late 2013 and a science mission aboard the SPB in early 2015. NASA has also embarked on an intra-agency collaboration to launch a rocket from a balloon to

  2. Dynamic Analysis of Sounding Rocket Pneumatic System Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, Jerald

    2010-01-01

    The recent fusion of decades of advancements in mathematical models, numerical algorithms and curve fitting techniques marked the beginning of a new era in the science of simulation. It is becoming indispensable to the study of rockets and aerospace analysis. In pneumatic system, which is the main focus of this paper, particular emphasis will be placed on the efforts of compressible flow in Attitude Control System of sounding rocket.

  3. Sounding rocket activities of Japan in 2003 and 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Nobuaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Nonaka, Satoshi; Nakajima, Takashi; Takumi, Abe; Yuichi, Tsuda; Yamagami, Takamasa

    2005-08-01

    In October 2003, a new space agency, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) was reorganized and started as a primary space agency to promote all space activities in Japan. The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) belonged to JAXA and continued to promote space science and technologies using unique scientific satellites, sounding rockets and balloons. This paper summarizes sounding rocket and ballooning activities of ISAS in the fiscal year of 2003 and 2004, associated with satellite launch programs. In this time period, three sounding rockets and nineteen balloons were launched by ISAS. One of the sounding rocket, S-310-35 was an international collaboration between Japan and Norway, which was launched from Andoya Rocket Range (ARR), Andenes, Norway, so as to study the upper atmospheric dynamics and energetics associated with the auroral energy in the polar lower thermosphere. Through the combination with the national researchers and the cooperation with international organizations, ISAS will keep its own flight opportunities and be able to obtain many new scientific findings.

  4. X-ray astronomy experiments from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Saul

    1987-01-01

    During the past fourteen years, the M.I.T. X-ray Astronomy sounding rocket group has designed, fabricated, and flown five different scientific sounding rocket payloads. These experiment payloads were launched on a total of twelve sounding rocket flights of which only one failed because of rocket problems. Eight of these flights yielded astronomical data that resulted in a total of twelve publications. The bulk of this research was supported by NASA Grant NGR 22-009-730 X-Ray Astronomy Experiments Sounding Rockets. The fifth and final experiment payload conceived and built under this Grant (the Wide Field Soft X-ray Camera: WFSXC) served as the prototype for the British Wide Field Camera (WFC) experiment to be launched on the ROSAT mission. The five experiment payloads and the results obtained from these experiments are briefly described. In the case of the WFSXC, which served principally as an engineering prototype for a major space mission, a number of papers written by British collaborators which describe the ROSAT Wide Field Camera are presented.

  5. Upper Atmosphere Sounding Rocket Projects at Esrange Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, Christian; Kemi, Stig; Sjolander, Krister; Abrahamsson, Mattias

    Swedish Space Corporation, SSC has a long tradition of developing and launching scientific sounding rockets from Esrange Space Center with the aim to study the different layers of the atmosphere and near space. Now a new era has started with an initiative from the Swedish National Space Board, SNSB. The sounding rocket and atmospheric balloon activities will be vitalised with a national program offering the scientific community yearly rocket launches and balloon flights. The three upcoming sounding rocket missions that have recently started are: O-STATES O STATES (Oxygen transformation in the thermosphere) is a research project at the Meteorological Institute of Stockholm University with Prof. Jörg Gumbel, as responsible researcher. The payload comprises two instrument modules with totally 7 instruments for studying oxygen in its various forms. The payload will be launched twice on two sounding rockets at the same launch campaign, in different atmospheric conditions. This provides a cost-effective mission with a large research exchange. The launches from Esrange Space Center are preliminary scheduled to take place in August 2014 with an apogee of approximately 250 km. SPIDER SPIDER (Small Payloads for Investigation of Disturbances in Electrojet by Rockets) is a research project at Space and Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm with Nicholay Ivchenko as responsible researcher. The mission includes up to 10 subsidiary payloads ejected from the main payload to measure the structure of the electrostatic turbulence in the ionosphere. The measurements take place entirely in the subsidiary payloads, which are completely autonomous and recovered individually after the flight. The launch from Esrange Space Center is preliminary scheduled to take place in March 2015 with a desired apogee of approximately 140 km. LEEWAVES LEEWAVES (Local Excitation and Effects of Waves on Atmospheric Vertical Structure) is a research project at the Meteorological

  6. The History of Sounding Rockets and Their Contribution to European Space Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Günther

    2006-11-01

    The report describes the history of rocket development before and during the Second World War and their use as sounding rockets in Europe, the USA and the USSR, and outlines the technical, operational and scientific features of sounding rockets. The major European national sounding-rocket activities and those of ESRO from the early 1960s to the early 1970s are described, a period when sounding rockets represented an important part of space research. Over that time span, several hundred sounding rockets (up to 500 per year around 1970) were launched worldwide each year.

  7. The role of wind tunnels in predicting sounding rocket aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of some cases of flow separation, flow-field interference, unusual vehicle shape or size, excessive deviations to high angular positions. Mach number induced effects, Reynolds number effects, and effects of protruberances on wind tunnel investigations of sounding rockets are illustrated.

  8. An Overview of the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberspeaker, Philip J.; Smith, Ira S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 50 to 60 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. These missions support investigations sponsored by NASA's Offices of Space Science, Life and Microgravity Sciences & Applications, and Earth Science. The Goddard Space Flight Center has management and implementation responsibility for these programs. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program provides the science community with payload development support, environmental testing, launch vehicles, and launch operations from fixed and mobile launch ranges. Sounding rockets continue to provide a cost-effective way to make in situ observations from 50 to 1500 km in the near-earth environment and to uniquely cover the altitude regime between 50 km and 130 km above the Earth's surface. New technology efforts include GPS payload event triggering, tailored trajectories, new vehicle configuration development to expand current capabilities, and the feasibility assessment of an ultra high altitude sounding rocket vehicle. The NASA Balloon Program continues to make advancements and developments in its capabilities for support of the scientific ballooning community. The Long Duration Balloon (LDB) is capable of providing flight durations in excess of two weeks and has had many successful flights since its development. The NASA Balloon Program is currently engaged in the development of the Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB), which will be capable of providing flight times up to 100-days. Additional development efforts are focusing on ultra high altitude balloons, station keeping techniques and planetary balloon technologies.

  9. Lyman alpha coronagraph research sounding rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Kohl, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The ultraviolet light coronagraph was developed and successfully flown on three rocket flights on 13 April 1979, 16 February 1980 and 20 July 1982. During each of these flights, the Ultraviolet Light Coronagraph was flown jointly with the White Light Coronagraph provided by the High Altitude Observatory. Ultraviolet diagnostic techniques and instrumentation for determining the basic plasma parameters of solar wind acceleration regions in the extended corona were developed and verified and the understanding of the physics of the corona through the performance, analysis and interpretation of solar observations advanced. Valuable UV diagnostics can be performed in the absence of a natural solar eclipse.

  10. An Overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, Bobby J.; Needleman, Harvey C.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a combined total of approximately fifty to sixty missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. These missions are provided in support of investigations sponsored by NASA'S Offices of Space Science, Life and Microgravity Sciences & Applications, and Earth Science. The Goddard Space Flight Center has management and implementation responsibility for these programs. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program has continued to su,pport the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payload and providing the rocket vehicle and launch operations necessary to provide the altitude/time required obtain the science objectives. The sounding rockets continue to provide a cost-effective way to make in situ observations from 50 to 1500 km in the near-earth environment and to uniquely cover the altitude regime between 50 km and 130 km above the Earth's surface, which is physically inaccessible to either balloons or satellites. A new architecture for providing this support has been introduced this year with the establishment of the NASA Sounding Rockets Contract. The Program has continued to introduce improvements into their operations and ground and flight systems. An overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets Program with special emphasis on the new support contract will be presented. The NASA Balloon Program continues to make advancements and developments in its capabilities for support of the scientific ballooning community. Long duration balloon (LDB) is a prominent aspect of the program with two campaigns scheduled for this calendar year. Two flights are scheduled in the Northern Hemisphere from Fairbanks, Alaska, in June and two flights are scheduled from McMurdo, Antarctica, in the Southern Hemisphere in December. The comprehensive balloon research and development (R&D) effort has continued with advances being made across the

  11. An Overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, Bobby J.; Needleman, Harvey C.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a combined total of approximately fifty to sixty missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. These missions are provided in support of investigations sponsored by NASA'S Offices of Space Science, Life and Microgravity Sciences & Applications, and Earth Science. The Goddard Space Flight Center has management and implementation responsibility for these programs. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program has continued to su,pport the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payload and providing the rocket vehicle and launch operations necessary to provide the altitude/time required obtain the science objectives. The sounding rockets continue to provide a cost-effective way to make in situ observations from 50 to 1500 km in the near-earth environment and to uniquely cover the altitude regime between 50 km and 130 km above the Earth's surface, which is physically inaccessible to either balloons or satellites. A new architecture for providing this support has been introduced this year with the establishment of the NASA Sounding Rockets Contract. The Program has continued to introduce improvements into their operations and ground and flight systems. An overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets Program with special emphasis on the new support contract will be presented. The NASA Balloon Program continues to make advancements and developments in its capabilities for support of the scientific ballooning community. Long duration balloon (LDB) is a prominent aspect of the program with two campaigns scheduled for this calendar year. Two flights are scheduled in the Northern Hemisphere from Fairbanks, Alaska, in June and two flights are scheduled from McMurdo, Antarctica, in the Southern Hemisphere in December. The comprehensive balloon research and development (R&D) effort has continued with advances being made across the

  12. Telemaxus: A telescience oriented sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, R.; Fortezza, R.; Desiderio, G.; Capuano, G.; Titomanlio, D.

    Following the success of the Texus 23 Campaign (November 1989), during which the Teletexus experiment was conducted a more ambitious Telescience experiment was accomodated on the 1991 MAXUS 1 Payload. The fluidynamic experiment on the oscillatory Marangoni flow was performed on board the rocket (launched at Kiruna, Sweden) using a modified TEM-06/4 module. The experiment was fully controlled by the PI (Professor Monti) directly from the Telescience Control Room located at MARS Center (Naples, Italy). The experiment was also aimed to demonstrate the capabilities of Telescience Service that ESA offers to the European Microgravity User Community. Respect to other experiments already tested and assessed during previous Texus missions (14b, 23), the Telescience operation mode included new state-of-art technologies and subsystems to demonstrate capabilities, flexibility and usefulness of this operation concept mainly in the perspective of Columbus utilization. Unfortunately due to a failure of the rocket system, the microgravity condition was not reached during the flight and the fluidynamic results were missed. However, in spite of the tumbling attitude of the rocket, the telescience link was successfully tested and the video/data/audio communication was correctly established between MARS and Esrange. This paper illustrates the technological aspects and gives an overview of the systems/equipments integrated and realized for the experiment control. In the first part the H/W configurations for the experiment monitoring and control, identified by the research team are illustrated. The relevant items of the H/W configuration include: the Telescience Work Stations architecture, the link channels used for the selection, transmission and reception of video/data/commands and the subsystems manufactured to improve the system versatility. The second part deals with the communication link used for transmission between Sweden and Italy of experimental data, facility status, voice

  13. Development of small solid rocket boosters for the ILR-33 sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Pawel; Okninski, Adam; Pakosz, Michal; Cieslinski, Dawid; Bartkowiak, Bartosz; Wolanski, Piotr

    2017-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the development of a 6000 Newton-class solid rocket motor for suborbital applications. The design configuration and results of interior ballistics calculations are given. The initial use of the motor as the main propulsion system of the H1 experimental in-flight test platform, within the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program, is presented. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental performance are shown. Both on-ground and in-flight tests are discussed. A novel composite-case manufacturing technology, which enabled to reach high propellant mass fractions, was validated and significant cost-reductions were achieved. This paper focuses on the process of adapting the design for use as the booster stage of the ILR-33 sounding rocket, under development at the Institute of Aviation in Warsaw, Poland. Parallel use of two of the flight-proven rocket motors along with the main stage is planned. The process of adapting the rocket motor for booster application consists of stage integration, aerothermodynamics and reliability analyses. The separation mechanism and environmental impact are also discussed within this paper. Detailed performance analysis with focus on propellant grain geometry is provided. The evolution of the design since the first flights of the H1 rocket is covered and modifications of the manufacturing process are described. Issues of simultaneous ignition of two motors and their non-identical performance are discussed. Further applications and potential for future development are outlined. The presented results are based on the initial work done by the Rocketry Group of the Warsaw University of Technology Students' Space Association. The continuation of the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program on a larger scale at the Institute of Aviation proves the value of the outcomes of the initial educational project.

  14. Error-free command link for sounding rockets and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringstrand, Hans

    2003-08-01

    The Swedish Space Corporation has developed an error-free command uplink system for sounding rockets and satellites. The system architecture allows for safe command transmission without any time penalties during normal operation, and it recovers fast and wholly transparent from transmission errors without any user or operator interaction. The implementation is partly based on the CCSDS recommendations regarding satellite uplinks, but modified to better suit the PCM-based downlink systems, normally used for sounding rockets systems and small satellites. The system has proven extremely efficient and reliable during several small- and micro satellite projects such as ODIN, TeleFoton and Astrid-2. This paper presents the system architecture and shows the details for the implementations used in the Swedish scientific satellites ODIN and Astrid-2.

  15. Fertilization of frog eggs on a sounding rocket in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubbels, G. A.; Berendsen, W.; Narraway, J.

    During the TEXUS-17 flight (April/May 1988) eggs of a higher organism, the anuran amphibian Xenopus laevis, have for the first time been successfully fertilized under microgravity on a Sounding Rocket. This result also implies that Life Sciences Experiments of Short Duration can be carried out on Sounding Rockets. The latter can therefore function as additional carriers for such experiments. Histological sections of the experimental material demonstrated the penetration of sperm into eggs, while SEM analysis revealed the differentiation of characteristic egg surface structures. Our TEXUS-17 experiment convincingly shows that the modified automatic experiment container, originally designed for experiment BR 52NL on the D1-mission, now functions flawlessly. Eight containers were flown in an airtight, well-isolated box (TEM 06-15), and a similar set was activated on Earth, two hours later. The analysis of the biological material is in progress.

  16. Fertilization of frog eggs on a Sounding Rocket in space.

    PubMed

    Ubbels, G A; Berendsen, W; Narraway, J

    1989-01-01

    During the TEXUS-17 flight (April/May 1988) eggs of a higher organism, the anuran amphibian Xenopus laevis, have for the first time been successfully fertilized under microgravity on a Sounding Rocket. This result also implies that Life Sciences Experiments of Short Duration can be carried out on Sounding Rockets. The latter can therefore function as additional carriers for such experiments. Histological sections of the experimental material demonstrated the penetration of sperm into eggs, while SEM analysis revealed the differentiation of characteristic egg surface structures. Our TEXUS-17 experiment convincingly shows that the modified automatic experiment container, originally designed for experimental BR 52NL on the D1-mission, now functions flawlessly. Eight containers were flown in an airtight, well-isolated box (TEM 06-15), and a similar set was activated on Earth, two hours later. The analysis of the biological material is in progress.

  17. Workshop on the Suborbital Science Sounding Rocket Program, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The unique characteristics of the sounding rocket program is described, with its importance to space science stressed, especially in providing UARS correlative measurements. The program provided opportunities to do innovative scientific studies in regions not other wise accessible; it was a testbed for developing new technologies; and its key attributes were flexibility, reliability, and economy. The proceedings of the workshop are presented in viewgraph form, including the objectives of the workshop and the workshop agenda.

  18. Description and Flight Performance Results of the WASP Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pauw, J. F.; Steffens, L. E.; Yuska, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    A general description of the design and construction of the WASP sounding rocket and of the performance of its first flight are presented. The purpose of the flight test was to place the 862-pound (391-kg) spacecraft above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) on free-fall trajectory for at least 6 minutes in order to study the effect of "weightlessness" on a slosh dynamics experiment. The WASP sounding rocket fulfilled its intended mission requirements. The sounding rocket approximately followed a nominal trajectory. The payload was in free fall above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) for 6.5 minutes and reached an apogee altitude of 134 nautical miles (248 km). Flight data including velocity, altitude, acceleration, roll rate, and angle of attack are discussed and compared to nominal performance calculations. The effect of residual burning of the second stage motor is analyzed. The flight vibration environment is presented and analyzed, including root mean square (RMS) and power spectral density analysis.

  19. On the relative need for satellite remote soundings and rocket soundings of the upper atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    A review of engineering and research data requirements for altitudes 30-100 km is made, indicating a variety of concrete data applications above 30 km (10 mb). The required data have in large measure been provided from meteorological rocket soundings, of which 18,000 have been taken, at considerable cost, since 1959. Remote vertical soundings based on satellite infrared radiation measurements have been obtained since 1969 with considerable success to an altitude of 25 km (30 mb). From developmental work in progress, it is expected that reliable temperature soundings may be obtained to 40-45 km. A discussion of the overall reliability and utility of the satellite data leads to several conclusions regarding the continuing need for rocket soundings.

  20. On the relative need for satellite remote soundings and rocket soundings of the upper atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    A review of engineering and research data requirements for altitudes 30-100 km is made, indicating a variety of concrete data applications above 30 km (10 mb). The required data have in large measure been provided from meteorological rocket soundings, of which 18,000 have been taken, at considerable cost, since 1959. Remote vertical soundings based on satellite infrared radiation measurements have been obtained since 1969 with considerable success to an altitude of 25 km (30 mb). From developmental work in progress, it is expected that reliable temperature soundings may be obtained to 40-45 km. A discussion of the overall reliability and utility of the satellite data leads to several conclusions regarding the continuing need for rocket soundings.

  1. Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) locomotion during a sounding rocket flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark S.; Keller, Tony S.

    2008-05-01

    The locomotor activity of young Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) was studied during a Nike-Orion sounding rocket flight, which included a short-duration microgravity exposure. An infrared monitoring system was used to determine the activity level, instantaneous velocity, and continuous velocity of 240 (120 male, 120 female) fruit flies. Individual flies were placed in chambers that limit their motion to walking. Chambers were oriented both vertically and horizontally with respect to the rocket's longitudinal axis. Significant changes in Drosophila locomotion patterns were observed throughout the sounding rocket flight, including launch, microgravity exposure, payload re-entry, and after ocean impact. During the microgravity portion of the flight (3.8 min), large increases in all locomotion measurements for both sexes were observed, with some measurements doubling compared to pad (1 G) data. Initial effects of microgravity were probably delayed due to large accelerations from the payload despining immediately before entering microgravity. The results indicate that short-duration microgravity exposure has a large effect on locomotor activity for both males and females, at least for a short period of time. The locomotion increases may explain the increased male aging observed during long-duration exposure to microgravity. Studies focusing on long-duration microgravity exposure are needed to confirm these findings, and the relationship of increased aging and locomotion.

  2. The Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) Sounding Rocket Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Glenn T.; Hassler, Donald M.; Deforest, Craig; Slater, David D.; Thomas, Roger J.; Ayres, Thomas; Davis, Michael; de Pontieu, Bart; Diller, Jed; Graham, Roy; Michaelis, Harald; Schuele, Udo; Warren, Harry

    2016-03-01

    We present a summary of the solar observing Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) sounding rocket program including an overview of the design and calibration of the instrument, flight performance, and preliminary chromospheric results from the successful November 2014 launch of the RAISE instrument. The RAISE sounding rocket payload is the fastest scanning-slit solar ultraviolet imaging spectrograph flown to date. RAISE is designed to observe the dynamics and heating of the solar chromosphere and corona on time scales as short as 100-200ms, with arcsecond spatial resolution and a velocity sensitivity of 1-2km/s. Two full spectral passbands over the same one-dimensional spatial field are recorded simultaneously with no scanning of the detectors or grating. The two different spectral bands (first-order 1205-1251Å and 1524-1569Å) are imaged onto two intensified Active Pixel Sensor (APS) detectors whose focal planes are individually adjusted for optimized performance. RAISE reads out the full field of both detectors at 5-10Hz, recording up to 1800 complete spectra (per detector) in a single 6-min rocket flight. This opens up a new domain of high time resolution spectral imaging and spectroscopy. RAISE is designed to observe small-scale multithermal dynamics in Active Region (AR) and quiet Sun loops, identify the strength, spectrum and location of high frequency waves in the solar atmosphere, and determine the nature of energy release in the chromospheric network.

  3. Development of the Hawk/Nike Hawk sounding rocket vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A new sounding rocket family, the Hawk and Nike-Hawk Vehicles, have been developed, flight tested and added to the NASA Sounding Rocket Vehicle Stable. The Hawk is a single-stage vehicle that will carry 35.6 cm diameter payloads weighing 45.5 kg to 91 kg to altitudes of 78 km to 56 km, respectively. The two-stage Nike-Hawk will carry payloads weighing 68 kg to 136 kg to altitudes of 118 km to 113 km, respectively. Both vehicles utilize the XM22E8 Hawk rocket motor which is available in large numbers as a surplus item from the U.S. Army. The Hawk fin and tail can hardware were designed in-house. The Nike tail can and fin hardware are surplus Nike-Ajax booster hardware. Development objectives were to provide a vehicle family with a larger diameter, larger volume payload capability than the Nike-Apache and Nike-Tomahawk vehicles at comparable cost. Both vehicles performed nominally in flight tests.

  4. The FOXSI sounding rocket: Latest analysis and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo Buitrago-Casas, Juan; Glesener, Lindsay; Christe, Steven; Krucker, Sam; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Ramsey, Brian; Han, Raymond

    2016-05-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) observations are a linchpin for studying particle acceleration and hot thermal plasma emission in the solar corona. Current and past indirectly imaging instruments lack the sensitivity and dynamic range needed to observe faint HXR signatures, especially in the presences of brighter sources. These limitations are overcome by using HXR direct focusing optics coupled with semiconductor detectors. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment is a state of the art solar telescope that develops and applies these capabilities.The FOXSI sounding rocket has successfully flown twice, observing active regions, microflares, and areas of the quiet-Sun. Thanks to its far superior imaging dynamic range, FOXSI performs cleaner hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy than previous instruments that use indirect imaging methods like RHESSI.We present a description of the FOXSI rocket payload, paying attention to the optics and semiconductor detectors calibrations, as well as the upgrades made for the second flight. We also introduce some of the latest FOXSI data analysis, including imaging spectroscopy of microflares and active regions observed during the two flights, and the differential emission measure distribution of the nonflaring corona.

  5. ARIM-1: The Atmospheric Refractive Index Measurements Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, B. Ian (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    A conceptual design study of the ARIM-1 sounding rocket mission, whose goal is to study atmospheric turbulence in the tropopause region of the atmosphere, is presented. The study was conducted by an interdisciplinary team of students at the University of Alaska Fairbanks who were enrolled in a Space Systems Engineering course. The implementation of the ARIM-1 mission will be carried out by students participating in the Alaska Student Rocket Program (ASRP), with a projected launch date of August 1997. The ARIM-1 vehicle is a single stage sounding rocket with a 3:1 ogive nose cone, a payload diameter of 8 in., a motor diameter of 7.6 in., and an overall height of 17.0 ft including the four fins. Emphasis is placed on standardization of payload support systems. The thermosonde payload will measure the atmospheric turbulence by direct measurement of the temperature difference over a distance of one meter using two 3.45-micron 'hot-wire' probes. The recovery system consists of a 6 ft. diameter ribless guide surface drogue chute and a 33 ft. diameter main cross parachute designed to recover a payload of 31 pounds and slow its descent rate to 5 m/s through an altitude of 15 km. This document discusses the science objectives, mission analysis, payload mechanical configuration and structural design, recovery system, payload electronics, ground station, testing plans, and mission implementation.

  6. NASA's Sounding Rocket Program NSROC, accomplishments and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, David J.

    2005-08-01

    Since the contract start in 1999, NSROC has completed 140 Sounding Rocket flights as of 23 May 2005. These missions have supported science disciplines in Geospace, Solar/Heliospheric, High Energy Astrophysics, UV/Optical Astrophysics, Solar System Exploration, Student Outreach and Technology Innovation demonstrations. The success of the NSROC program is due to our large talent pool of experienced engineers and technicians along with a large inventory of rocket motors/hardware and flight proven components, subsystems and systems. The NSROC program enjoys a rich heritage of many high fidelity subsystem designs. The NSROC Attitude Control Systems are an excellent example of high resolution, low cost and high reliability. Pointing accuracies of sub arc-second (0.2 arc-second) are common for the solar and celestial ACS systems flown on the NSROC Program. New developments within the NASA Sounding Rocket Program have increased inertial attitude control pointing system accuracies by 300%. The future is bright and well within a legitimate technological reach.

  7. Aerodynamic influences on atmospheric in situ measurements from sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbel, Jörg

    2001-06-01

    Sounding rockets are essential tools for studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. However, in situ measurements from rockets are potentially subject to a number of perturbations related to the gas flow around the vehicle. This paper reviews the aerodynamic principles behind these perturbations. With respect to both data analysis and experiment design, there is a substantial need for improved understanding of aerodynamic effects. Any such analysis is complicated by the different flow regimes experienced during a rocket flight through the rarefied environment of the mesosphere and thermosphere. Numerical studies are presented using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach, which is based on a tracing of individual molecules. Complementary experiments have been performed in a low-density wind tunnel. These experiments are crucial for the development of appropriate model parameterization. However, direct similarity between scaled wind tunnel results and arbitrary atmospheric flight conditions is usually difficult to achieve. Density, velocity, and temperature results are presented for different payload geometries and flow conditions. These illustrate a wide range of aerodynamic effects representative for rocket flights in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  8. A new sounding rocket payload for solar plasma studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.; Brown, William A.; Appert, Kevin L.

    1989-01-01

    A sounding rocket payload developed for studies of high-temperature plasmas associated with solar active regions and flares is described. The payload instruments will record both spectra and images in the UV, EUV, and soft X-ray regions of the spectrum. The instruments, including the Dual Range Spectrograph, the Flat Field Soft X-ray Spectrograph, the Normal Incidence Soft X-ray Imager, the UV Filtergraph, and the H-alpha Imaging system, are described. Attention is also given to the new structural system of the payload, based on a large optical table suspended within the payload cavity, which will support the optical elements in their correct positions and orientations and will maintain these alignments throughout the rocket launch environment.

  9. Sounding rocket observations of particle data in the cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella, M.; Lynch, K.; Kintner, P.; Lundberg, E.; Lessard, M.

    2008-12-01

    The winter 2008 Scifer-2 sounding rocket campaign studied ionospheric outflow in the cusp region. The rocket was launched on January 18, 2008 at 0730 UT from the Andoya Rocket Range in Norway, reaching an apogee of 1468 km over the Eiscat Svalbard Radar. The Scifer 2 campaign was designed as a joint case study, involving both ground and in situ observations, of the low altitude signatures of ionospheric outflow. In situ observations show a thermal ion population with temperatures around 0.6 - 0.8 eV, while ESR observes the temperature at lower altitudes to be ~0.2 eV. This difference is a result of calculating the average over all in situ look directions, which would artificially raise the temperature. In addition to the thermal ion population, there are several bursts of a hotter population of ions with temperatures ranging between 12 -20 eV, along with concurrent elevated wave activity. These hotter ions appear to have been accelerated to energies of several hundred eV, and show interesting velocity dispersion signatures with repeated bands at increasing energies. These two populations are not observed simultaneously, but rather are localized in different regions bordering one another. Additionally, the pitch angle distributions for each of these populations are different. Similar signatures have been seen by other nightside low altitude sounding rockets where upgoing low energy ions are seen adjacent to and coincident with higher energy ion precipitation. Neither observed ion population has a clear local relationship to the variations in the ambient electron temperature, which is a tracer for soft precipitation. We will continue to explore these populations and their boundaries as a case study of structuring in particle signatures in the cusp.

  10. Status of the Micro-X Sounding Rocket Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfinger, David; Adams, Joseph D.; Baker, Bob; Bandler, Simon; Danowski, Meredith E.; Doriese, Randy; Eckart, Megan; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Heine, Sarah N.; Hilton, Gene; Hubbard, Antonia; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline; Manzagol, Renée; McCammon, Dan; Okajima, Takashi; Porter, Frederick Scott; Reintsema, Carl; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Smith, Stephen J.; Wikus, Patrick; Micro-X Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Micro-X is a sounding rocket borne X-ray telescope that uses Transition Edge Sensor microcalorimeters to provide superior energy resolution. Micro-X has a variety of applications with plans to observe the Puppis A supernova remnant during its first flight, as well as future observations of the Milky Way to search for X-ray signals from decaying dark matter. Commissioning and functionality testing are complete and this project is now in the calibration and performance optimization phase. We present an overview of the instrument and an update on ongoing progress in preparation for the upcoming launch.

  11. Status of the Micro-X Sounding Rocket Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfinger, David; Micro-X Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Micro-X is a sounding rocket borne X-ray telescope that uses Transition Edge Sensor microcalorimeters to provide superior energy resolution. Micro-X has a variety of applications with plans to observe the Puppis A supernova remnant during its first flight, as well as future observations of the Milky Way to search for X-ray signals from decaying dark matter. Commissioning and functionality testing are complete and this project is now in the calibration and performance optimization phase. We present an overview of the instrument and an update on ongoing progress in preparation for the upcoming launch. NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  12. An Improved Theoretical Aerodynamic Derivatives Computer Program for Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J. S.; Fan, D. N.; Obosu, C. B.; Vira, N. R.; Yang, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper outlines a Theoretical Aerodynamic Derivatives (TAD) computer program for computing the aerodynamics of sounding rockets. TAD outputs include normal force, pitching moment and rolling moment coefficient derivatives as well as center-of-pressure locations as a function of the flight Mach number. TAD is applicable to slender finned axisymmetric vehicles at small angles of attack in subsonic and supersonic flows. TAD improvement efforts include extending Mach number regions of applicability, improving accuracy, and replacement of some numerical integration algorithms with closed-form integrations. Key equations used in TAD are summarized and typical TAD outputs are illustrated for a second-stage Tomahawk configuration.

  13. The role of wind tunnels in predicting sounding rocket aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of sounding rockets, in some cases, may be adequately determined by various estimating procedures, however, there are cases where these procedures fail and wind tunnel studies become necessary. The present paper deals with configurations of the latter type, for which the problems of concern include mismatched diameters between stages, mutual fin interference effects, fin alignment and orientation, body deflections between stages, boundary layer growth, and stability changes that occur as stages are dropped. Some characteristics related to separated flow, interference flow fields, and Reynolds number are examined.

  14. Flutter estimation of S-520 sounding rocket fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Masahisa; Onoda, Junjiro; Onojima, Noboru; Nakada, Atsushi; Isogai, Koji

    The flutter margin of the fins, which has been improved for S-520 sounding rocket of ISAS, is estimated by wind tunnel tests and numerical flutter analysis. Both methods require stiffness distribution of the fin. In this paper, a new approach of fitting of FEM model to the measured matrix of influence coefficient is applied in order to eliminate the errors in the measured stiffness data, which may otherwise make the mathematical model nonpositive definite. The results of the wind tunnel tests and numerical flutter analysis using the above fitted FEM model stiffness distribution are compared and discussed.

  15. Weak Equivalence Principle Test on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. D.; Patla, B. R.; Popescu, E. M.; Rocco, E.; Thapa, R.; Reasenberg, R. D.; Lorenzini, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    SR-POEM, our principle of equivalence measurement on a sounding rocket, will compare the free fall rate of two substances yielding an uncertainty of 10-16 in the estimate of η. During the past two years, the design concept has matured and we have been working on the required technology, including a laser gauge that is self aligning and able to reach 0.1 {pm/}√ {{Hz}} for periods up to 40 s. We describe the status and plans for this project.

  16. The Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation Sounding Rocket Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the unique optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. A sounding rocket payload has been developed to test the feasibility of magnetic field measurements in the Sun's transition region. The optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic sensitive lines formed in the transition region (CIV at 1550 A and MgII at 2800 A). This paper will concentrate on the polarization properties SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space (TVLS) gratings and its system level testing as we prepare to launch in the Summer of 2008.

  17. Development of the Astrobee F sounding rocket system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. B.; Taylor, J. P.; Honecker, H. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The development of the Astrobee F sounding rocket vehicle through the first flight test at NASA-Wallops Station is described. Design and development of a 15 in. diameter, dual thrust, solid propellant motor demonstrating several new technology features provided the basis for the flight vehicle. The 'F' motor test program described demonstrated the following advanced propulsion technology: tandem dual grain configuration, low burning rate HTPB case-bonded propellant, and molded plastic nozzle. The resultant motor integrated into a flight vehicle was successfully flown with extensive diagnostic instrumentation.-

  18. Sounding Rockets within Swedish National Balloon and Rocket Programme- Providing Access to Space from Esrange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjolander, K.; Karlsson, T.; Lockowandt, C.

    2015-09-01

    Initiated in 2012 by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), a new programme dedicated for Swedish scientists to gain access to space using balloons and sounding rockets was started. This programme promotes the possibility to ensure continuity in both the science and the technology used. The sounding rocket part of this national programme started with three possible missions. SPIDER (Small Payloads for Investigation of Disturbances in Electrojet by Rockets) from the Space and Plasma physics department of KTH, 0-STATES (Oxygen Species and Thermospheric Airglow in The Earth's Sky) from the Department of Meteorology Stockholm University (MISU) and LEEWAVES (Local Excitation and Effects of Waves on Atmospheric VErtical Structure) that is collaboration between KTH and MISU. These three missions were planned for launches in 2015 and 2016. SSc has been contracted on a launch ticket basis to provide the launch and service to the scientific instrumentation. This paper presents the SPIDER, 0-STATES and LEEWAVES missions focussing on a mission related technical solutions perspective.

  19. Scientific Experiences Using Argentinean Sounding Rockets in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Peña, Miguel

    2000-07-01

    Argentina in the sixties and seventies, had experience for developing and for using sounding rockets and payloads to perform scientific space experiments. Besides they have several bases in Antarctica with adequate premises and installations, also duly equipped aircrafts and trained crews to flight to the white continent. In February 1965, scientists and technical people from the "Instituto de Investigacion Aeronáutica y Espacial" (I.I.A.E.) with the cooperation of the Air Force and the Tucuman University, conducted the "Matienzo Operation" to measure X radiation and temperature in the upper atmosphere, using the Gamma Centauro rocket and also using big balloons. The people involved in the experience, the launcher, other material and equipment flew from the south tip of Argentina to the Matienzo base in Antarctica, in a C-47 aircraft equipped with skies an additional jet engine Marbore 2-C. Other experience was performed in 1975 in the "Marambio" Antartic Base, using the two stages solid propellent sounding rocket Castor, developed in Argentina. The payload was developed in cooperation with the Max Planck Institute of Germany. It consist of a special mixture including a shape charge to form a ionized cloud producing a jet of electrons travelling from Marambio base to the conjugate point in the Northern hemisphere. The cloud was observed by several ground stations in Argentina and also by a NASA aircraft with TV cameras, flying at East of New York. The objective of this experience was to study the electric and magnetic fields in altitude, the neutral points, the temperature and electrons profile. The objectives of both experiments were accomplished satisfactorily.

  20. The Skylark sounding rocket program and future launcher developments by British Aerospace (Space Systems) Ltd.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J. A.

    1989-06-01

    The past history of the Skylark sounding rocket, is reported. A background to the rationalization of the variations of rocket now available, is provided. The last two years launch program, with a summary of future scheduled programs, is listed. The future interests of British Aerospace in rocket launchers, in particular LittLEO (the small launcher for payloads into low earth orbit), are described.

  1. Launch summary for 1978 - 1982. [sounding rockets, space probes, and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hills, H. K.

    1984-01-01

    Data pertinent to the launching of space probes, soundings rockets, and satellites presented in tables include launch date, time, and site; agency rocket identification; sponsoring country or countries; instruments carried for experiments; the peak altitude achieved by the rockets; and the apoapsis and periapsis for satellites. The experimenter or institution involved in the launching is also cited.

  2. Summary of the 1957-1982 UK scientific research sounding rocket programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delury, J. T.

    1983-06-01

    The Skylark, Petrel, Fulmar and Skua sounding rockets are described and over 750 flights using these rockets are summarized. Astrophysical and solar-terrestrial physics phenomena; the magnetosphere; space plasmas; and neutral winds were studied. Rockets were also used for X-ray astronomy.

  3. Sounding Rockets as a Real Flight Platform for Aerothermodynamic Cfd Validation of Hypersonic Flight Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamminger, A.; Turner, J.; Hörschgen, M.; Jung, W.

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of sounding rockets to provide a platform for flight experiments in hypersonic conditions as a supplement to wind tunnel tests. Real flight data from measurement durations longer than 30 seconds can be compared with predictions from CFD calculations. This paper will regard projects flown on sounding rockets, but mainly describe the current efforts at Mobile Rocket Base, DLR on the SHarp Edge Flight EXperiment SHEFEX.

  4. Solar X-ray Astronomy Sounding Rocket Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Several broad objectives were pursued by the development and flight of the High Resolution Soft X-Ray Imaging Sounding Rocket Payload, followed by the analysis of the resulting data and by comparison with both ground based and space based observations from other investigators. The scientific objectives were: to study the thermal equilibrium of active region loop systems by analyzing the X-ray observations to determine electron temperatures, densities, and pressures; by recording the changes in the large scale coronal structures from the maximum and descending phases of Cycle 21 to the ascending phase of Cycle 22; and to extend the study of small scale coronal structures through the minimum of Cycle 21 with new emphasis on correlative observations.

  5. Sounding rocket flight report, MUMP 9 and MUMP 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grassl, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of the launching of two-Marshall-University of Michigan Probes (MUMP 9 and MUMP 10), Nike-Tomahawk sounding rocket payloads, are summarized. The MUMP is similar to the thermosphere probe, an ejectable instrument package for studying the variability of the earth's atmospheric parameters. The MUMP 9 payload included an omegatron mass analyzer, a molecular fluorescence densitometer, a mini-tilty filter, and a lunar position sensor. This complement of instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 143 to 297 km over Wallops Island, Virginia, during January 1971. The MUMP 10 payload included an omegatron mass analyzer, an electron temperature probe, a cryogenic densitometer, and a solar position sensor. These instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature and the charged particle density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 145 to 290 km over Wallops Island during the afternoon preceding the MUMP 9 launch.

  6. Tether dynamics investigations for the Canadian OEDIPUS sounding rocket program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, G.; Modi, V. J.; Han, R. P. S.; Misra, A. K.; Vigneron, F. R.; Berry, T. G.

    1992-08-01

    Results of an investigation of the postflight dynamics of the first flight of the Canadian Space Agency's OEDIPUS-A sounding rocket system launched in January 1989 are presented. The tether interaction with the subpayload was found to be the likely cause of the observed dynamic behavior. Based on these results and on the fact that tethered space systems of this configuration have not been previously studied, a comprehensive tether dynamics experiment has been included in the second OEDIPUS mission, scheduled for the winter of 1994. The various elements of this experiment, which include detailed analytical investigations, ground testing, development of instruments to obtain flight dynamics data, and postflight analyses, are discussed. The primary objective of this experiment is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of a momentum-stabilized, tethered, two-body system with flexible end bodies which will be useful in the development of future tethered space systems.

  7. Sounding Rocket Instrument Development at UAHuntsville/NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Savage, Sabrina; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergei; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Podgorski, William; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of solar sounding rocket instruments developed jointly by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) is an EUV (19.3 nm) imaging telescope which was flown successfully in July 2012. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a Lyman Alpha (121.6 nm) spectropolarimeter developed jointly with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and scheduled for launch in 2015. The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrograph is a soft X-ray (0.5-1.2 keV) stigmatic spectrograph designed to achieve 5 arcsecond spatial resolution along the slit.

  8. CANSAT: Design of a Small Autonomous Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Joshua; Duda, Michael; Garnand-Royo, Jeff; Jones, Alexa; Pickering, Todd; Tutko, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    CanSat is an international student design-build-launch competition organized by the American Astronautical Society (AAS) and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The competition is also sponsored by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), AGI, Orbital Sciences Corporation, Praxis Incorporated, and SolidWorks. Specifically, the 2009 Virginia Tech CanSat Team is funded by BAE Systems, Incorporated of Manassas, Virginia. The objective of the 2009 CanSat competition is to complete remote sensing missions by designing a small autonomous sounding rocket payload. The payload designed will follow and perform to a specific set of mission requirements for the 2009 competition. The competition encompasses a complete life-cycle of one year which includes all phases of design, integration, testing, reviews, and launch.

  9. First results from the OGRESS sounding rocket payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, T.; Schultz, T.; McCoy, J.; Miles, D.; Tutt, J.; McEntaffer, R.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first results from the Off-plane Grating Rocket for Extended Source Spectroscopy (OGRESS) sounding rocket payload based at the University of Iowa. OGRESS is designed to perform moderate resolution (R~10- 40) spectroscopy of diffuse celestial x-ray sources between 0.3 - 1.2 keV. A wire grid focuser constrains light from diffuse sources into a converging beam that feeds an array of off-plane diffraction gratings. The spectrum is focused onto Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. OGRESS launched on the morning of May 2, 2015 and collected data for ~5 minutes before returning via parachute. OGRESS observed the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant with the goal of obtaining the most accurate physical diagnostics thus far recorded. During the flight, OGRESS had an unexpectedly high count rate which manifested as a highly uniform signal across the active area of the detector, swamping the expected spectrum from Cygnus. Efforts are still in progress to identify the source of this uniform signal and to discover if a usable spectrum can be extracted from the raw flight data.

  10. Upper atmospheric research at Woomera: The Australian-built sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Kerrie

    2006-07-01

    Sounding rocket programs for upper atmospheric research (UAR) commenced at Woomera in 1957, with the British Skylark project and the Anglo-Australian HARP rockoon program. Shortly afterwards, the Weapons Research Establishment (WRE) inaugurated its own sounding rocket program with the first successful Australian-built sounding rocket, Long Tom, developed from surplus British motors. This research would eventually lead to the development of Australia's first satellite, WRESAT, launched in 1967. Long Tom became the first more than 10 Australian designed and built sounding rockets that would be employed at Woomera until the demise of the WRE upper atmosphere program in 1976, as the Range was winding down to the cessation of the Anglo-Australian Joint Project. Like Long Tom, most of the early Australian sounding rockets were constructed by the WRE from surplus British motors, but after 1967 the later vehicles had a much higher local content, based on combinations of British motors and/or rocket motors developed in Australia. These new motors were named after constellations of the southern sky, while the rockets themselves bore the names of Australian native birds. This paper will outline the technical and scientific history of the Australian sounding rocket program, examining its origins and the reasons for its demise. It will look at the sequential development of the various Australian rockets and consider the particular research projects with which they were associated, the relationship with the WRESAT project and the move to Australian production after 1967.

  11. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) sounding-rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidotti, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    An overall introduction to the NASA sounding rocket program as managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. The various sounding rockets, auxiliary systems (telemetry, guidance, etc.), launch sites, and services which NASA can provide are briefly described.

  12. World Data Center A (rockets and satellites) catalogue of data. Volume 1, part A: Sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A cumulative listing of all scientifically successful rockets that have been identified from various sources is presented. The listing starts with the V-2 rocket launched on 7 March 1947 and contains all rockets identified up to 31 December 1971.

  13. FIRE: Far-ultraviolet Imaging Rocket Experiment: a sounding rocket telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantner, Brennan; Green, James; Beasley, Matthew; Kane, Robert; Lairson, Bruce; Lopez, Heidi; Grove, David; Franetic, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    FIRE (Far-ultraviolet Imaging Rocket Experiment) is a sounding rocket payload telescope designed to image between 900-1100Å. It is scheduled to launch on January 29th, 2011 from the Poker Flats complex in northern Alaska. For its first flight, it will target G191B2B, a white dwarf calibration source, and M51 (the Whirlpool Galaxy), the science target, to help determine the number of hot, young O stars, as well as the intervening dust attenuation. FIRE primary consists of a single primary mirror coated in silicon carbide, a 2000Å thick indium filter and a micro-channel plate detector coated with rubidium bromide. Combined, these create a passband of 900-1100Å for the system and reject the hydrogen Lyman-α to approximately a factor of 10-4. To ensure that the filter survives the launch, a small vacuum chamber has been built around it to keep the pressure at 10-8 torr or lower.

  14. Initial Ion Results from the RENU2 Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, M.; Lessard, M.; Lynch, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    RENU2 (Rocket Experiment for Neutral Upwelling 2) is a multiple investigator sounding rocket campaign that was designed to transit the cusp region between 200 and 600 km and study particle processes during a neutral upwelling event. The RENU2 payload dayside observations will be compared with measurements made by the EISCAT Svalbard radars. This project aims to investigate the connection between ion upflows and outflows, and neutral upwelling from the topside ionosphere. Low-earth orbiting satellites are affected by these regions of enhanced neutral densities which decay their orbits due to satellite drag. Three electrostatic analyzers were flown to measure 2D ion distribution functions, providing observations of temperature enhancements, bulk velocity moments, anisotropy and conics. The thermal energy ion detector (HT) sweeps over an energy range of .12 to 22 eV and the medium energy detector (HM) has an energy range from 3.6 to 790 eV. The thermal mass ion detector (BPS) sweeps over the same energy range as the thermal energy detector, but also has a crude mass discriminator separating atomic oxygen from hydrogen. All of the detectors provide two dimensional phase space distributions; the thermal detectors have a cadence of 128 ms while the medium energy detector provides a distribution every 64 ms. These measurements of the upwelling process will be used as input for coupled models or be used as a metric to compare to what the models predict. During initial data analysis, we found nongyrotropy in the medium energy ions, a proton enhancement during an otherwise uneventful region, and three ion upflow events which will be further investigated.

  15. Auroral Microphysics Rocket (AMICIST) and Reflight of the Phaze Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy Roger L.

    1998-01-01

    This grant was originally awarded for the flight of the AMICIST sounding rocket. However, upon launch failure of the PHAZE rocket, additional resources were placed in this grant to cover the launch of the PHAZE II rocket. AMICIST was successfully launched from the Poker Flat Range on February 24, 1995, and the PHAZE II was successfully launched also from the Poker Flat Range on February 10, 1997. The major objective of the AMICIST flight was to investigate the bursts of transverse ion acceleration occurring during aurora, commonly known as Lower Hybrid Solitary Structures, with the flight of two scientific payloads to unravel space from time effects. The data clearly showed that the structures of ion acceleration were a spatial phenomena having a scale size transverse to the local magnetic field of about 100 m. On the other hand, structures in the auroral electrons were generally observed on this flight to be temporal features that occurred at the same time at the two payloads separated by a few kilometers. The primary objective of the PHAZE rocket flight was to further study the temporal features of auroral electron precipitation having many electron detectors, some fixed in energy, that could study the distribution function of the auroral electrons on time scales of a fraction of a millisecond. A important paper on this topic has just been submitted for publication which uses the PHAZE data to show that the potential structure (electric field parallel to the magnetic field) that accelerates the auroral electrons within one Earth radius of the ground, is not static, but rather fluctuates with frequencies close to the local proton and hydrogen gyrofrequencies. The fluctuation appears to be an actual turning on and off of the electric field at these frequencies. When the potential is turned off, ambient electrons can enter the region and be accelerated along B when the potential is on creating field- aligned bursts which manifest themselves as flickering aurora seen

  16. Physico-Chemical Research on the Sounding Rocket Maser 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, Christian; Kemi, Stig; Abrahamsson, Mattias; Florin, Gunnar

    MASER is a sounding rocket platform for short-duration microgravity experiments, providing the scientific community with an excellent microgravity tool. The MASER programme has been running by SSC from 1987 and has up to 2012 provided twelve successful flights for microgravity missions with 6-7 minutes of microgravity, the g-level is normally below 1x10-5 g. The MASER 13 is planned to be launched in spring 2015 from Esrange Space Center in Northern Sweden. The rocket will carry four ESA financed experiment modules. The MASER 13 vehicle will be propelled by the 2-stage solid fuel VSB-30 rocket motor, which provided the 390 kg payload with an apogee of 260 km and 6 and a half minutes of microgravity. Swedish Space Corporation carries out the MASER missions for ESA and the program is also available for other customers. The payload comprise four different experiment modules of which three could be defined as physic-chemical research; XRMON-SOL, CDIC-3, MEDI. It also comprises the Maser Service Module and the recovery system. The Service Module provided real-time 5 Mbps down-link of compressed experiment digital video data from the on-board cameras, as well as high-speed housekeeping telemetry data. XRMON-SOL In this experiment the influence of gravity on the formation of an equiaxed microstructure will be investigated. Special attention will be put on the aspect of nucleation, segregation and impingement. The experiment scope is to melt and solidify an AlCu-alloy sample in microgravity. The solidification will be performed in an isothermal environment. The solidification process will be monitored and recorded with X-ray image during the whole flight, images will also be down-linked to ground for real-time monitoring and possible interaction. CDIC-3 The goal is to study in migrogravity the spatio-temporal dynamics of a chemical front travelling in a thin solution layer open to the air and specifically the respective role of Marangoni and density-related hydrodynamic

  17. Fabrication of X-ray telescopes for sounding rocket flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two X-ray telescopes and two detector systems were fabricated, and one of the telescopes (15 in. diameter, Wolter type I telescope) was flown on two sounding rocket flights. The telescopes were fabricated using the diamond point technique which provided the accurate figure of the mirrors to about a focal plane blur of 0.5 arc minutes. The 15 in. telescope mirrors were polished using standard polishing techniques to remove tooling marks from the diamond turning, then chemically polished to bring the X-ray reflectivity up to nearly the theoretical values. The optical image formed by the 15 in. telescope was found to produce a blur of about 40 arc seconds for a parallel beam of incoming laser light. The first flight of the telescope produced an X-ray image of Capella which indicated that the X-ray image was blurred to the extent of about 2 arc minutes. This additional image degradation was due to a slight error in focusing the X-ray image onto the detector.

  18. Motor actuated vacuum door. [for photography from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, A. V.

    1986-01-01

    Doors that allow scientific instruments to record and retrieve the observed data are often required to be designed and installed as a part of sounding rocket hardware. The motor-actuated vacuum door was designed to maintain a medium vacuum of the order of 0.0001 torr or better while closed, and to provide an opening 15 inches long x 8.5 inches wide while open for cameras to image Halley's comet. When the electric motor receives the instruction to open the door through the payload battery, timer, and relay circuit, the first operation is to unlock the door. After unlatching, the torque transmitted by the motor to the main shaft through the links opens the door. A microswitch actuator, which rides on the linear motion conversion mechanism, is adjusted to trip the limit switch at the end of the travel. The process is repeated in the reverse order to close the door. 'O' rings are designed to maintain the seal. Door mechanisms similar to the one described have flown on Aerobee 17.018 and Black Brant 27.047 payloads.

  19. DAQ: Software Architecture for Data Acquisition in Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Tran, Thanh; Nichols, Heidi; Bowles-Martinez, Jessica N.

    2011-01-01

    A multithreaded software application was developed by Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) to collect a set of correlated imagery, Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and GPS data for a Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) sounding rocket flight. The data set will be used to advance Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) technology algorithms being researched at JPL. This paper describes the software architecture and the tests used to meet the timing and data rate requirements for the software used to collect the dataset. Also discussed are the challenges of using commercial off the shelf (COTS) flight hardware and open source software. This includes multiple Camera Link (C-link) based cameras, a Pentium-M based computer, and Linux Fedora 11 operating system. Additionally, the paper talks about the history of the software architecture's usage in other JPL projects and its applicability for future missions, such as cubesats, UAVs, and research planes/balloons. Also talked about will be the human aspect of project especially JPL's Phaeton program and the results of the launch.

  20. Atom Interferometry on Sounding Rockets with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Stephan T.; Becker, Dennis; Lachmann, Maike D.; Herr, Waldemar; Rasel, Ernst M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    One of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature is the universality of free fall, stating that the force exerted upon an object due to gravity is independent of its constitution. A precise test of this assumption is the comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry. Since the sensitivity of the measurement is proportional to the square of the propagation time in the interferometer, it can be increased by performing the experiments in microgravity. In order to fully utilize the potential of the experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate as the initial state is necessary, because it is characterized by a small initial size and a low expansion velocity. As a step towards the transfer of such a system into space three sounding rocket missions with atom interferometers are currently being prepared. The launch of the first mission, aimed at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate in space and an atom interferometer based on it is planned for 2016 from ESRANGE, Sweden. It will be followed by two more missions that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures and dual-species atom interferometry. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under Grant Number DLR 50 1131-37.

  1. Development of the S-520 single stage sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Kohno, M.; Onoda, J.; Kawashima, T.; Murakami, T.; Onojima, N.

    1981-09-01

    The S-520 single stage sounding rocket was developed by ISAS in an attempt to replace the two stage system, thereby increasing safety and operational reliability as well as reducing launch costs. The S-520 has a 0.52 m diameter and a weight of 2100 kg. A reduction in inert mass was achieved by using FRP nose fairing and fins. The S-520 thrust profile consists of two phases to maximize summit altitude: an initial high thrust phase and a following sustaining phase. This was achieved by a grain design which combined a wagon wheel forward section and a tubular aft section. Two static firing tests (1981) showed stable combustion without the instabilities due to longitudinal waves. A twisted-fin spin helped to prevent the lock-in phenomena and to maintain the exo-atmospheric attitude stability. In the most recent experiment, the S-520 lifted 260 kg of gross payload to a 320 km altitude at an 80 deg launch elevation angle. The spin rate history was similar to those programmed, and the final coning angle was reasonably small.

  2. Modified modular imaging system designed for a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veach, Todd J.; Scowen, Paul A.; Beasley, Matthew; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2012-09-01

    We present the design and system calibration results from the fabrication of a charge-coupled device (CCD) based imaging system designed using a modified modular imager cell (MIC) used in an ultraviolet sounding rocket mission. The heart of the imaging system is the MIC, which provides the video pre-amplifier circuitry and CCD clock level filtering. The MIC is designed with standard four-layer FR4 printed circuit board (PCB) with surface mount and through-hole components for ease of testing and lower fabrication cost. The imager is a 3.5k by 3.5k LBNL p-channel CCD with enhanced quantum efficiency response in the UV using delta-doping technology at JPL. The recently released PCIe/104 Small-Cam CCD controller from Astronomical Research Cameras, Inc (ARC) performs readout of the detector. The PCIe/104 Small-Cam system has the same capabilities as its larger PCI brethren, but in a smaller form factor, which makes it ideally suited for sub-orbital ballistic missions. The overall control is then accomplished using a PCIe/104 computer from RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. The design, fabrication, and testing was done at the Laboratory for Astronomical and Space Instrumentation (LASI) at Arizona State University. Integration and flight calibration are to be completed at the University of Colorado Boulder before integration into CHESS.

  3. Motor actuated vacuum door. [for photography from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, A. V.

    1986-01-01

    Doors that allow scientific instruments to record and retrieve the observed data are often required to be designed and installed as a part of sounding rocket hardware. The motor-actuated vacuum door was designed to maintain a medium vacuum of the order of 0.0001 torr or better while closed, and to provide an opening 15 inches long x 8.5 inches wide while open for cameras to image Halley's comet. When the electric motor receives the instruction to open the door through the payload battery, timer, and relay circuit, the first operation is to unlock the door. After unlatching, the torque transmitted by the motor to the main shaft through the links opens the door. A microswitch actuator, which rides on the linear motion conversion mechanism, is adjusted to trip the limit switch at the end of the travel. The process is repeated in the reverse order to close the door. 'O' rings are designed to maintain the seal. Door mechanisms similar to the one described have flown on Aerobee 17.018 and Black Brant 27.047 payloads.

  4. Towards a matter wave interferometer on a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zoest, Tim; Peters, Achim; Ahlers, Holger; Wicht, Andreas; Vogel, Anika; Wenzlawski, Anderas; Deutsch, Christian; Kajari, Endre; Gaaloul, Naceur; Dittus, Hansjürg; Hartwig, Jonas; Herr, Waldemar; Herrmann, Sven; Reichel, Jakob; Bongs, Kai; Koenemann, Thorben; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, Wojtek; Schiemangk, Max; Müntinga, Hauke; Meyer, Nadine; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Walser, Reinhold; Resch, Andreas; Rode, Christina; Seidel, Stephan; Sengstock, Klaus; Singh, Yeshpal; Schleich, Wolfgang; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rosenbusch, Peter; Wilken, Tobias; Goeklue, Ertan

    Applications of coherent matter waves are high resolution interferometers for measuring inertial and gravitational forces as well as testing fundamental physics, for which they may serve as a laser like source with mesoscopic quantum features. Out of possible applications, the test of the principle of equivalence in the quantum domain is selected as a target with the highest scientific interest on timescales of a microgravity experiment at the ISS or on a free flyer (ATV, FOTON or other satellites). The QUANTUS project demonstrated the technological feasibil-ity of coherent matter waves in microgravity. As a next step, the consortium will prepare and procure a sounding rocket mission to demonstrate technologies for matter wave interferome-try based on the broad experience of former developments with experiments in the droptower. Therefore, the experiment has to withstand strong requirements concerning environmental con-ditions (Temperature, shock, environmental pressure, etc.) and needs to be designed to fit in a 600 l volume (diameter 35 cm, length 160 cm). It is considered as an important step towards the technology required for the ISS and other platforms. These experiments will give further insights on the potential of inertial sensors based on atom interferometers and the technology is for example of interest for applications in earth observation and geodesy. They could replace classical techniques relying on test masses and promise a further improvement in the accuracy of such devices.

  5. A Sounding Rocket Payload to Test the Weak Equivalence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Phillips, James D.

    2014-03-01

    We are developing SR-POEM, a payload for detecting a possible violation of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) while on a sounding rocket's free-fall trajectory. We estimate an uncertainty of σ (η) <=10-17 from a single flight. The experiment consists of calibration maneuvers plus eight 120 s drops of the two test masses (TMs). The instrument orientation will be reversed between successive drops, which reverses the signal but leaves most systematic errors unchanged. Each TM comprises three bars and a Y-shaped connector. The six bars are in a hexagonal housing and stand in a plane perpendicular to the symmetry axis (Z axis) of the payload and close to its CM. At a distance of 0.3 m along the Z axis, there is a highly stable plate that holds six of our tracking frequency laser gauges (TFGs), which measure the distances to the bars. The TMs are surrounded by capacitance plates, which allow both measurement and control of TM position and orientation. A central theme of the design is the prevention and correction of systematic error. Temperature stability of the instrument is essential and, during the brief night-time flight, it is achieved passively. This work was supported in part by NASA grant NNX08AO04G.

  6. Sounding rocket flight report: MUMP 9 and MUMP 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grassl, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of the launching of two Marshall-University of Michigan Probes (MUMP 9 and MUMP 10), Nike-Tomahawk sounding rocket payloads, are summarized. The MUMP 9 paylaod included an omegatron mass analyzer, a molecular fluorescence densitometer, a mini-tilty filter, and a lunar position sensor. This complement of instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 143 to 297 km over Wallops Island, Virginia, during January 1971. The MUMP 10 payload included an omegatron mass analyzer, an electron temperature probe (Spencer, Brace, and Carignan, 1962), a cryogenic densitometer, and a solar position sensor. This complement of instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature and the charged particle density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 145 to 290 km over Wallops Island, Virginia, during the afternoon preceding the MUMP 9 launch in January 1971. A general description of the payload kinematics, orientation analysis, and the technique for the reduction and analysis of the data is given.

  7. The Study on Flexible Carbon Fiber Boom Research for Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Ma, X.; Zheng, L.; Guan, X.

    2015-09-01

    To accommodate the requirements of the sounding rocket that will be launched soon, this paper develops a new boom, which makes six new contributions: its deployment doesn't need proper centrifugal force generated by rocket anymore, suitable for the requirement that the sounding rocket is controlled not to rotate when rising; it is made by the flexible carbon fiber material and thus has a light weight; its deployment is driven by the bending elastic potential energy, more reliable and safer; due to its light weight, the effects on the rocket posture of its deployment are minor; its locking is done by itself but not by the rocket, which effectively avoids the interference of the separation of the rocket arrow and body with its deployment and enhances the reliability of its deployment; its unlocking is done by a fuse, more economic and more reliable.

  8. The resolution of temporal and spatial variations in auroral particle measurements from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, A. D.; Davis, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    The problems involved in the resolution of the temporal/spatial ambiguity in sounding rocket observations are discussed with reference to an experiment involving a mother-daughter rocket combination, together with a flashing light beacon on the rocket and television cameras on the ground. The ambiguity was successfully removed, enabling a proper interpretation of the observations of precipitating low energy electrons to be made.

  9. Ionospheric Results with Sounding Rockets and the Explorer VIII Satellite (1960 )

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourdeau, R. E.

    1961-01-01

    A review is made of ionospheric data reported since the IGY from rocket and satellite-borne ionospheric experiments. These include rocket results on electron density (RF impedance probe), D-region conductivity (Gerdien condenser), and electron temperature (Langmuir probe). Also included are data in the 1000 kilometer region on ion concentration (ion current monitor) and electron temperature from the Explorer VIII Satellite (1960 xi). The review includes suggestions for second generation experiments and combinations thereof particularly suited for small sounding rockets.

  10. Draft Environmental Statement For Physics and Astronomy Sounding Rocket, Balloon, and Airborne Research Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This document is a draft of an environmental impact statement, evaluating the effect on the environment of the use of sounding rockets, balloons and air borne research programs in studying the atmosphere.

  11. Mechanical and Thermal Design and Qualification of an Atom Interferometer Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, J.; Seidel, S. T.; Krutzik, M.; Wendrich, T.; Stamminger, A.; Scharringhausen, M.; Quantus Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The MAIUS-1 experiment is a pathfinder quantum optics experiment about to fly on a VSB-30 sounding rocket in November 2015. The scientific objective of the mission is to demonstrate the feasibility of creating a Bose-Einstein Condensate and performing atom interferometry aboard a sounding rocket with Rubidium 87atoms. This paper will summarize the thermal and mechanical design of the payload and its (sub)systems. Moreover the qualification procedures and the results of the qualification test will be presented.

  12. Test of Re-Entry Systems at Estrange Using Sounding Rockets and Stratospheric Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, C.; Abrahamsson, M.; Florin, G.

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets can provide an ideal in-flight platform for performing re-entry and other high speed tests off different types of vehicles and techniques. They are also ideal platforms for testing different types of recovery systems such as airbrakes and parachutes. This paper expands on some examples of platforms and missions for drop tests from balloons as well as sounding rockets launched from Esrange Space Center, a facility run by Swedish Space Corporation SSC in northern Sweden.

  13. A Low Cost GPS System for Real-Time Tracking of Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markgraf, M.; Montenbruck, O.; Hassenpflug, F.; Turner, P.; Bull, B.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to minimize the need for costly, complex, tracking radars, the German Space Operations Center has set up a research project for GPS based tracking of sounding rockets. As part of this project, a GPS receiver based on commercial technology for terrestrial applications has been modified to allow its use under the highly dynamical conditions of a sounding rocket flight. In addition, new antenna concepts are studied as an alternative to proven but costly wrap-around antennas.

  14. The O-STATES Sounding Rocket Project - First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, J.

    2015-12-01

    In October 2015, the sounding rocket project O-STATES was conducted from Esrange Space Center (67.9°N, 21.1°E) in northern Sweden. The acronym O-STATES stands for "Oxygen Species and Thermospheric Airglow in The Earth's Sky" and the basic idea is that comprehensive information on the composition, specifically atomic oxygen in the ground state O and first excited state O(1D), and temperature of the lower thermosphere can be obtained from a limited set of optical measurements. Starting point for the analysis are daytime measurements of the O2(b1∑g+ - X3∑g-) Atmospheric Band system in the spectral region 755-780 nm and the O(1D-3P) Red Line at 630 nm. In the daytime lower thermosphere O(1D) is produced by O2 photolysis and the excited O2(b) state is mainly produced by energy transfer from O(1D) to the O2(X) ground state. In addition to O2 photolysis, both electron impact on O and dissociative recombination of O2+ are major sources of O(1D) in the thermosphere. Recent laboratory studies at SRI demonstrate that the O2(b) production populates the vibrational levels v=1 and v=0 in a ratio of ~4. While O2(b, v=0) is essentially unquenched, O2(b, v=1) is subject to collisional quenching that is dominated by O at altitudes above 160 km. Hence, the ratio of the Atmospheric Band emission from O2(b, v=1) and O2(b, v=0) is a measure of the O density. Finally, the spectral shape of the O2 Atmospheric Band is temperature dependent and spectrally resolved measurements of the Atmospheric Bands thus provide a measure of atmospheric temperature. This O2 Atmospheric Band analysis has been advocated as a technique for thermospheric remote sensing under the name Global Oxygen and Temperature (GOAT) Mapping. With O-STATES we want to characterize the GOAT technique by in-situ analysis of the O2 Atmospheric Band airglow and the underlying excitation mechanisms. By performing this dayglow analysis from a rocket payload, detailed local altitude profiles of the relevant emissions and

  15. The "Rocket Experiment for Neutral Upwelling 2 (RENU2)" Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, M.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Clemmons, J. H.; Crowley, G.; Ellingsen, P. G.; Fritz, B.; Harrington, M. I.; Hatch, S.; Hecht, J. H.; Hysell, D. L.; Kenward, D. R.; Labelle, J. W.; Lynch, K. A.; Moen, J.; Oksavik, K.; Otto, A.; Partamies, N.; Powell, S. P.; Sadler, B.; Sigernes, F.; Syrjäsuo, M.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2016-12-01

    Thermospheric upwelling has been known to exist since the earliestdays of the space program, when observers noted increased satellite dragassociated with solar activity. Scientists quickly attributed the upwelling toJoule heating effects, explaining that increased solar activity results inincreased Joule heating, which can couple energy to the ambient neutral gasesto cause the upwelling. Observations by the CHAMP satellite, however, haveshown that neutral upwelling often occurs on much smaller scales and is highlycorrelated with small-scale field-aligned currents in the vicinity of the cuspregion. Several theories have since been put forward that seek to explain thisphenomenon. Motivated by these competing theories and outfitted with acomprehensive suite of instruments, the RENU2 sounding rocket was launched intoa Poleward Moving Auroral Form (PMAF) in the cusp region on December 13, 2015.In this highly successful mission, instruments on the payload did, in fact,record neutral atomic oxygen above the payload at 350 km as it passed throughthe PMAF. In addition, signatures of N2+ ions also appeared above the PMAF,evidence of so-called "sunlit aurora". In this presentation, initial resultswill be presented from this mission and discussed in the context describedabove.

  16. HESTIA Commodities Exchange Pallet and Sounding Rocket Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaparro, Javier

    2013-01-01

    During my Spring 2016 internship, my two major contributions were the design of the Commodities Exchange Pallet and the design of a test stand for a 100 pounds-thrust sounding rocket. The Commodities Exchange Pallet is a prototype developed for the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) program. Under the HESTIA initiative the Commodities Exchange Pallet was developed as a method for demonstrating multi-system integration thru the transportation of In-Situ Resource Utilization produced oxygen and water to a human habitat. Ultimately, this prototype's performance will allow for future evaluation of integration, which may lead to the development of a flight capable pallet for future deep-space exploration missions. For HESTIA, my main task was to design the Commodities Exchange Pallet system to be used for completing an integration demonstration. Under the guidance of my mentor, I designed, both, the structural frame and fluid delivery system for the commodities pallet. The fluid delivery system includes a liquid-oxygen to gaseous-oxygen system, a water delivery system, and a carbon-dioxide compressors system. The structural frame is designed to meet safety and transportation requirements, as well as the ability to interface with the ER division's Portable Utility Pallet. The commodities pallet structure also includes independent instrumentation oxygen/water panels for operation and system monitoring. My major accomplishments for the commodities exchange pallet were the completion of the fluid delivery systems and the structural frame designs. In addition, parts selection was completed in order to expedite construction of the prototype, scheduled to begin in May of 2016. Once the commodities pallet is assembled and tested it is expected to complete a fully integrated transfer demonstration with the ISRU unit and the Environmental Control and Life Support System test chamber in September of 2016. In addition to the development of

  17. Optical Design of the MOSES Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Roger J.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) is a sounding rocket payload now being developed by Montana State University in collaboration with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, and Mullard Space Science Laboratory. The instrument utilizes a unique optical design to provide solar EUV measurements with true 2-pixel resolutions of 1.0 arcsec and 60 mA over a full two-dimensional field of view of 1056 x 528 arcsec, all at a time cadence of 10 s. This unprecedented capability is achieved by means of an objective spherical grating 100 mm in diameter, ruled at 833 gr/mm. The concave grating focuses spectrally dispersed solar radiation onto three separate detectors, simultaneously recording the zero-order as well as the plus and minus first-spectral-order images. Data analysis procedures, similar to those used in X-ray tomography reconstructions, can then disentangle the mixed spatial and spectral information recorded by the multiple detectors. A flat folding mirror permits an imaging focal length of 4.74 m to be packaged within the payload's physical length of 2.82 m. Both the objective grating and folding flat have specialized, closely matched, multilayer coatings that strongly enhance their EUV reflectance while also suppressing off-band radiation that would otherwise complicate data inversion. Although the spectral bandpass is rather narrow, several candidate wavelength intervals are available to carry out truly unique scientific studies of the outer solar atmosphere. Initial flights of MOSES, scheduled to begin in 2004, will observe a 10 Angstrom band that covers very strong emission lines characteristic of both the sun's corona (Si XI 303 Angstroms) and transition-region (He II 304 Angstroms). The MOSES program is supported by a grant from NASA's Office of Space Science.

  18. Optical Design of the MOSES Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Kankelborg, C. C.

    2001-12-01

    The Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) is a sounding rocket payload now being developed by Montana State University in collaboration with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, and Mullard Space Science Laboratory. The instrument utilizes a unique optical design to provide solar EUV measurements with true 2-pixel resolutions of 1.0 arcsec and 60 mÅ over a full two-dimensional field of view of 1056 x 528 arcsec, all at a time cadence of 10 s. This unprecedented capability is achieved by means of an objective spherical grating 100 mm in diameter, ruled at 833 gr/mm. The concave grating focuses spectrally dispersed solar radiation onto three separate detectors, simultaneously recording the zero-order as well as the plus and minus first-spectral-order images. Data analysis procedures, similar to those used in X-ray tomography reconstructions, can then disentangle the mixed spatial and spectral information recorded by the multiple detectors. A flat folding mirror permits an imaging focal length of 4.74 m to be packaged within the payload's physical length of 2.82 m. Both the objective grating and folding flat have specialized, closely matched, multilayer coatings that strongly enhance their EUV reflectance while also suppressing off-band radiation that would otherwise complicate data inversion. Although the spectral bandpass is rather narrow, several candidate wavelength intervals are available to carry out truly unique scientific studies of the outer solar atmosphere. Initial flights of MOSES, scheduled to begin in 2004, will observe a 10 Å band that covers very strong emission lines characteristic of both the sun's corona (Si XI 303 Å) and transition-region (He II 304 Å). The MOSES program is supported by a grant from NASA's Office of Space Science.

  19. Stochastic Estimation Applied to the Land Speed of Sound Record Attempt by a Rocket Car.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    STOCHASTIC ESTIMATION APPLIED TO THE LAND SPEED OF SOUND RECORD ATTEMPT BY A ROCKET CAR THESIS David A. Reinholz Captain, USAF 0.-- AFIT/GAE/AA/83DZ24 I...ESTIMATION APPLIED TO THE LAND SPEED OF SOUND RECORD ATTEMPT BY A ROCKET CAR THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force...first to interest me in the Budweiser Rocket Car and helped provide guidance throughout my work. The person with the most "corporate knowledge" about

  20. Full load of ESA experiments on Maxus-2 sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    Maxus sounding rockets are built and commercialised by an industrial joint venture, a team comprising of the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) and DASA of Germany. ESA is fully funding the scientific payload for this mission. The payload comprises 8 experiments spanning the fields of fluid physics, electrophoresis and cell biology. Scientists from Belgium, France, Germany and Switzerland designed these experiments and the hardware was built by Swedish, German and Italian firms. The experiments are accommodated in 5 autonomous experiment modules and account for an overall mass of about 500 kg out of a total payload of about 800 kg. The first module contains an experiment which aims to check the static and dynamic behaviour of liquids at corners and edges. The second contains a biological experiment on two unicellular organisms (loxodes and paramecium). In their natural habitat (lakes), these organisms make use of the gravity vector for their orientation. Their swimming behaviour in microgravity will be observed on Earth in real time. The third module houses two other biology experiments. One examines the effect of microgravity on particle ingestion of gold beads by human macrophage cells (a type of white blood cell). Macrophage cells digest foreign particles, such as bacteria and viruses, thereby performing an important function in our immune system. The other experiment investigates the influence of weightlessness on the structure of lymphocytes (white blood cells). The fourth module accommodates three different experiments all dealing with convection phenomena due to surface-tension instabilities (Marangoni convection). Surface tension is that property of liquids which makes raindrops nearly spherical and allows insects to move on water surfaces. These phenomena, which are masked by the effect of gravity on Earth, can be easily studied in microgravity conditions. The fifth module contains an experiment that deals with electrophoresis, i.e. a process which is used to

  1. Ignition of sounding rocket motors with hand-pumped air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakowsky, E. L.; Marchese, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    Method demonstrates inexpensive, safe, and foolproof concept for solid propellant rocket motors, using simple handpump to deliver air. Flueric ignition was accomplished using system without stored energy and with complete absence of electrical energy and wiring.

  2. A Sequential Sounding Rocket Flight Through Nighttime Midlatitude Plasma Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddy, P. A.; Earle, G. D.; Larsen, M. F.; Bishop, R. L.; Swenson, C.; Carlson, C. G.; Bullett, T. W.

    2003-12-01

    A sequential rocket campaign launched out of NASA's Wallops Island Flight Facility (37.84N, 75.49W) sent four rockets though Sporadic-E and a suspected intermediate layer during one night in July of this year. The four payloads were launched between the hours of 3:19 and 7:07 GMT. Three of the rockets were mother-daughter payloads equipped with plasma impedance probes supplied by Utah State University and TMA chemical releases from Clemson University. The fourth rocket housed an electric field instrument, an ion mass spectrometer, and the new neutral wind instrument from the University of Texas Dallas along with a set of plasma impedance probes from Utah State University. An overview of the UTD instruments and the ionospheric conditions as derived from these data will be presented herein.

  3. Observations of the global structure of the stratosphere and mesosphere with sounding rockets and with remote sensing techniques from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Hilsenrath, E.; Krueger, A. J.; Nordberg, W.; Prabhakara, C.; Theon, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Brief descriptions are given of the techniques involved in determining the global structure of the mesosphere and stratosphere based on sounding rocket observations and satellite remotely sensed measurements.

  4. A Multiwavelength Study of Coronal Structure: A Simultaneous Observation from NIXT and YOHKOH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-01-01

    Solar soft X-ray images taken simultaneously by the Yohkoh and the Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope (NIXT) reveal significantly different coronal structures. Coronal loops are more clearly seen in the Yohkoh images, and the isolated island-like structures seen in the NIXT image have been found to correspond to the footpoints of the Yohkoh loops. The difference is due to the difference in the temperature response of the telescopes: NIXT is sensitive to temperatures ranging from 0.9 to 3 MK, while Yohkoh is more sensitive to temperatures above 2.5 MK. The morphological differences reflect the multi-temperature (1-5 MK) nature of the solar coronal plasmas.

  5. REM-RED Cosmic Radiation Monitoring Experiment On-Board the REXUS-17 Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabori, B.; Gerecs, A.; Hurtonyne Gyovai, A.; Benyei, D.; Naczi, F.; Hurtony, T.

    2015-09-01

    The cosmic radiation field is not well known up to the altitude of the lower orbiting spacecrafts. There are several ways to measure the cosmic radiation in this altitude; however it is not easy to apply them to a sounding rocket. The easiest way is to use Geiger-Muller (GM) counters to quantify the radiation level. The REMRED rocket experiment performed measurements with active radiation instruments (GM counters) in order to quantify the cosmic radiation field from the Earth's surface up to the maximum altitude of the REXUS rocket (about 90 km). The flight of the REM-RED experiment was carried out on the 1 7th of March 201 5 from the ESRANGE Space Center on-board the REXUS-17 student mission sounding rocket.

  6. A Low Cost GPS System for Real-Time Tracking of Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markgraf, M.; Montenbruck, O.; Hassenpflug, F.; Turner, P.; Bull, B.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development as well as the on-ground and the in-flight evaluation of a low cost Global Positioning System (GPS) system for real-time tracking of sounding rockets. The flight unit comprises a modified ORION GPS receiver and a newly designed switchable antenna system composed of a helical antenna in the rocket tip and a dual-blade antenna combination attached to the body of the service module. Aside from the flight hardware a PC based terminal program has been developed to monitor the GPS data and graphically displays the rocket's path during the flight. In addition an Instantaneous Impact Point (IIP) prediction is performed based on the received position and velocity information. In preparation for ESA's Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange, Kiruna, on 19 Feb. 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. In addition to the ORION receiver, an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver and a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver, both connected to a wrap-around antenna, have been flown on the same rocket as part of an independent experiment provided by the Goddard Space Flight Center. This allows an in-depth verification and trade-off of different receiver and antenna concepts.

  7. Modeling of vortex generated sound in solid propellant rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flandro, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    There is considerable evidence based on both full scale firings and cold flow simulations that hydrodynamically unstable shear flows in solid propellant rocket motors can lead to acoustic pressure fluctuations of significant amplitude. Although a comprehensive theoretical understanding of this problem does not yet exist, procedures were explored for generating useful analytical models describing the vortex shedding phenomenon and the mechanisms of coupling to the acoustic field in a rocket combustion chamber. Since combustion stability prediction procedures cannot be successful without incorporation of all acoustic gains and losses, it is clear that a vortex driving model comparable in quality to the analytical models currently employed to represent linear combustion instability must be formulated.

  8. Modeling of vortex generated sound in solid propellant rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flandro, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    There is considerable evidence based on both full scale firings and cold flow simulations that hydrodynamically unstable shear flows in solid propellant rocket motors can lead to acoustic pressure fluctuations of significant amplitude. Although a comprehensive theoretical understanding of this problem does not yet exist, procedures were explored for generating useful analytical models describing the vortex shedding phenomenon and the mechanisms of coupling to the acoustic field in a rocket combustion chamber. Since combustion stability prediction procedures cannot be successful without incorporation of all acoustic gains and losses, it is clear that a vortex driving model comparable in quality to the analytical models currently employed to represent linear combustion instability must be formulated.

  9. Near-simultaneous measurement of low-energy electrons by sounding rocket and satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rearwin, S.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An auroral sounding rocket was launched from Fort Churchill at 0453 UT on April 24, 1968. At the time of the rocket flight, the Vela 3B satellite was passing through the magnetotail plasma sheet at very nearly the same magnetic local time. Electron spectra obtained from experiments on these vehicles are well described by central Maxwell-Boltzmann populations, with indications of a high-energy tail; the satellite spectra also suggest the presence of a low-energy tail. The higher-temperature spectra measured on the rocket may be derived from the satellite spectra by adiabatic compression.

  10. Spatial and temporal turbulence evolution as inferred from the WADIS sounding rocket project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Asmus, Heiner; Latteck, Ralph; Strelnikova, Irina; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Baumgarten, Gerd; Hildebrand, Jens; Höffner, Josef; Wörl, Raimund; Rapp, Markus; Friedrich, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The WADIS project (Wave propagation and dissipation in the middle atmosphere: energy budget and distribution of trace constituents) aimed at studying waves, their dissipation, and effects on trace constituents. The project comprised two sounding rocket campaigns conducted at the Andøya Space Center (69 °N, 16 °E). One sounding rocket was launched in summer 2013 and one in winter 2015. The WADIS-1 sounding rocket was launched on 27 of June 2013 into Polar Mesosphere Summer Echo (PMSE). Ground based PMSE observations were conducted using the MAARSY VHF- and the EISCAT-Tromsø radars. IAP RMR-lidar observed NLC colocated with PMSE. The WADIS-2 sounding rocket was launched on 5 of March of 2015 and had the same instrumentation on board. ALOMAR RMR- and IAP Fe-lidars and SAURA-MF radar measured mesospheric temperatures and winds throughout the launch window. In-situ measurements delivered high resolution altitude-profiles of neutral and plasma densities, neutral air temperature and turbulence. Extensive turbulence measurements were conducted employing different techniques. In-situ measurements were done on both upleg and downleg, implying that two profiles of each quantity were near simultaneously measured with high altitude resolution at ˜30 km horizontal distance. The measurements with MAARSY cover both up- and downleg parts of the rocket trajectory and the EISCAT-Tromsø radar is located 100 km away of the launch site. We discuss these turbulence measurements and its spatial and time evolution.

  11. Sounding rocket thermal analysis techniques applied to GAS payloads. [Get Away Special payloads (STS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Simplified analytical techniques of sounding rocket programs are suggested as a means of bringing the cost of thermal analysis of the Get Away Special (GAS) payloads within acceptable bounds. Particular attention is given to two methods adapted from sounding rocket technology - a method in which the container and payload are assumed to be divided in half vertically by a thermal plane of symmetry, and a method which considers the container and its payload to be an analogous one-dimensional unit having the real or correct container top surface area for radiative heat transfer and a fictitious mass and geometry which model the average thermal effects.

  12. Making Ultraviolet Spectro-Polarimetry Polarization Measurements with the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program. This paper will concentrate on SUMI's VUV optics, and discuss their spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics. While SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria, there are several areas that will be improved for its second and third flights. This paper will emphasize the MgII linear polarization measurements and describe the changes that will be made to the sounding rocket and how those changes will improve the scientific data acquired by SUMI.

  13. Application of boost guidance to NASA sounding rocket launch operations at the White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, W. H.; Detwiler, D. F., Jr.; Hall, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the unique problems associated with launching the Black Brant V, VIII, and IX sounding rocket vehicles at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) and the significance of the introduction of the S19 to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility sounding rocket program in terms of launch flexibility, improved impact dispersion, higher flight reliability, and reduced program costs. This paper also discusses salient flight results from NASA 36.011UL (the first S19 guided Black Brant launched at WSMR) and the NASA Comet Halley missions (36.010DL and 36.017DL).

  14. Application of boost guidance to NASA sounding rocket launch operations at the White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, W. H.; Detwiler, D. F., Jr.; Hall, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the unique problems associated with launching the Black Brant V, VIII, and IX sounding rocket vehicles at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) and the significance of the introduction of the S19 to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility sounding rocket program in terms of launch flexibility, improved impact dispersion, higher flight reliability, and reduced program costs. This paper also discusses salient flight results from NASA 36.011UL (the first S19 guided Black Brant launched at WSMR) and the NASA Comet Halley missions (36.010DL and 36.017DL).

  15. The extreme ultraviolet spectrograph: A radial groove grating, sounding rocket-borne, astronomical instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Erik; Green, James C.; Cash, Webster

    1993-01-01

    The design, calibration, and sounding rocket flight performance of a novel spectrograph suitable for moderate-resolution EUV spectroscopy are presented. The sounding rocket-borne instrument uses a radial groove grating to maintain a high system efficiency while controlling the aberrations induced when doing spectroscopy in a converging beam. The instrument has a resolution of approximately 2 A across the 200-330 A bandpass with an average effective area of 2 sq cm. The instrument, called the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph, acquired the first EUV spectra in this wavelength region of the hot white dwarf G191-B2B and the late-type star Capella.

  16. Sounding rocket research Aries/Firewheel, series 22, issue 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozer, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    Rocket experiments in ionospheric particle and field research flow in seven programs during the last decade are summarized. Experimental techniques were developed and are discussed including the double-probe field technique. The auroral zone, polar cap, and equatorial spread F were studied.

  17. Observations of Poleward Moving Auroral Forms by the Rocket Experiment for Neutral Upwelling 2 (RENU2) Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, M.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Clemmons, J. H.; Cohen, I.; Ellingsen, P. G.; Farrugia, C. J.; Fritz, B.; Harrington, M.; Hatch, S.; Hecht, J. H.; Hysell, D. L.; Kenward, D. R.; Labelle, J. W.; Lynch, K. A.; Moen, J. I.; Oksavik, K.; Partamies, N.; Powell, S. P.; Sadler, B.; Sigernes, F.; Syrjäsuo, M.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2016-12-01

    Poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs) are thought to be associated with flux transfer events (FTEs), driven by pulsed reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. The RENU2 sounding rocket, hosting a comprehensive suite of plasma, field and optical instruments, was launched into a PMAF in the cusp region on December 13, 2015. In-situ measurements on the rocket were complemented with extensive ground-based observations from high-quality optical, radar and other instruments. Onboard the payload, the PMAF was characterized by occurrences of small-scale ( 1 km) soft electron precipitation, counter-streaming flow channels and other plasma dynamics; from the ground, optical and radar signatures show numerous thin (but elongated) dynamic auroral forms.

  18. Engineering aspect of the microwave ionosphere nonlinear interaction experiment (MINIX) with a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Makoto; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    The Microwave Ionosphere Nonlinear Interaction Experiment (MINIX) is a sounding rocket experiment to study possible effects of strong microwave fields in case it is used for energy transmission from the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) upon the Earth's atmosphere. Its secondary objective is to develop high power microwave technology for space use. Two rocket-borne magnetrons were used to emit 2.45 GHz microwave in order to make a simulated condition of power transmission from an SPS to a ground station. Sounding of the environment radiated by microwave was conducted by the diagnostic package onboard the daughter unit which was separated slowly from the mother unit. The main design drivers of this experiment were to build such high power equipments in a standard type of sounding rocket, to keep the cost within the budget and to perform a series of experiments without complete loss of the mission. The key technology for this experiment is a rocket-borne magnetron and high voltage converter. Location of position of the daughter unit relative to the mother unit was a difficult requirement for a spin-stabilized rocket. These problems were solved by application of such a low cost commercial products as a magnetron for microwave oven and a video tape recorder and camera.

  19. Loop models of low coronal structures observed by the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope (NIXT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peres, G.; Reale, F.; Golub, L.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray pictures obtained with the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope (NIXT), apart from the ubiquitous coronal loops well known from previous X-ray observations, show a new and peculiar morphology: in many active regions there are wide and apparently low-lying areas of intense emission which resemble H alpha plages. By means of hydrostatic models of coronal arches, we analyze the distribution of temperature, density, emission measure, and plasma emissivity in the spectral band to which NIXT is sensitive, and we show that the above morphology can be explained by the characteristics of high pressure loops having a thin region of high surface brightness at the base. We therefore propose that this finding might help to identify high-pressure X-ray emitting coronal regions in NIXT images, and it is in principle applicable to any imaging instrument which has high sensitivity to 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 6) K plasma within a narrow coronal-temperature passband. As a more general result of this study, we propose that the comparison of NIXT observations with models of stationary loops might provide a new diagnostic: the determination of the loop plasma pressure from measurements of brightness distribution along the loop.

  20. First results from the energetic particle instrument on the OEDIPUS-C sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, M. P.; Hardy, D. A.; James, H. G.

    The Canadian / US OEDIPUS-C rocket was flown from the Poker Flat Rocket Range November 6th 1995 as a mother-son sounding rocket. It was designed to study auroral ionospheric plasma physics using active wave sounding and prove tether technology. The payload separated into two sections reaching a separation of 1200m along the Earth's magnetic field. One section included a frequency stepped HF transmitter and the other included a synchronised HF receiver. Both sections included Energetic Particle Instruments, EPI, stepped in energy synchronously with the transmitter steps. On-board EPI particle processing in both payloads provided direct measurements of electron heating, wave-particle interactions via particle correlators, and a high resolution measurement of wave induced particle heating via transmitter synchronised fast sampling. Strong electron heating was observed at times when the HF transmitter frequency was equal to a harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency, f_ce, or equal to the upper hybrid frequency, f_uh.

  1. Space fireworks for upper atmospheric wind measurements by sounding rocket experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial meteor trains generated by chemical releases by using sounding rockets flown in upper atmosphere were successfully observed by multiple sites on ground and from an aircraft. We have started the rocket experiment campaign since 2007 and call it "Space fireworks" as it illuminates resonance scattering light from the released gas under sunlit/moonlit condition. By using this method, we have acquired a new technique to derive upper atmospheric wind profiles in twilight condition as well as in moonlit night and even in daytime. Magnificent artificial meteor train images with the surrounding physics and dynamics in the upper atmosphere where the meteors usually appear will be introduced by using fruitful results by the "Space firework" sounding rocket experiments in this decade.

  2. Status Update Report for the Peregrine 100km Sounding Rocket Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Jonny; Zilliac, Greg; Doran, Eric; Marzona, Mark Thadeus; Lohner, Kevin; Karlik, Evan; Cantwell, Brian; Karabeyoglu, Arif

    2008-01-01

    The Peregrine Sounding Rocket Program is a joint basic research program of NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Wallops, Stanford University and the Space Propulsion Group, Inc. (SPG). The goal is to determine the applicability of liquifying hybrid technology to a small launch system. The approach is to design, build, test and y a stable, efficient liquefying fuel hybrid rocket vehicle to an altitude of 100 km. The program was kicked o in October of 2006 and has seen considerable progress in the subsequent 18 months. Two virtually identical vehicles will be constructed and own out of the NASA Sounding Rocket Facility at Wallops Island. This paper presents the current status of the project as of June 2008. For background on the project, the reader is referred to last year's paper.

  3. 77 FR 61642 - National Environmental Policy Act; Sounding Rockets Program; Poker Flat Research Range

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Environmental Policy Act; Sounding Rockets Program; Poker Flat Research... Flat Research Range (PFRR), Alaska. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act, as... addressed to Joshua Bundick, Manager, Poker Flat Research Range EIS, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's...

  4. Spread Across Liquids: The World's First Microgravity Combustion Experiment on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Spread Across Liquids (SAL) experiment characterizes how flames spread over liquid pools in a low-gravity environment in comparison to test data at Earth's gravity and with numerical models. The modeling and experimental data provide a more complete understanding of flame spread, an area of textbook interest, and add to our knowledge about on-orbit and Earthbound fire behavior and fire hazards. The experiment was performed on a sounding rocket to obtain the necessary microgravity period. Such crewless sounding rockets provide a comparatively inexpensive means to fly very complex, and potentially hazardous, experiments and perform reflights at a very low additional cost. SAL was the first sounding-rocket-based, microgravity combustion experiment in the world. It was expected that gravity would affect ignition susceptibility and flame spread through buoyant convection in both the liquid pool and the gas above the pool. Prior to these sounding rocket tests, however, it was not clear whether the fuel would ignite readily and whether a flame would be sustained in microgravity. It also was not clear whether the flame spread rate would be faster or slower than in Earth's gravity.

  5. GPS Sounding Rocket Development at NASA with Simultaneous Multi-Payload Tracking Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Martel, Hugh

    2000-01-01

    An inverse differential GPS system has been developed for Sounding Rocket use which includes the flight unit and a ground station capable of extracting GPS data from sounding rocket telemetry, performing a real time differential solution and graphically displaying the rocket's path relative to a predicted trajectory plot. Accuracy has been proven to within less than 10 meters. Postprocessing has increased the precision to within 10 - 20 centimeters. The system has been successfully flown several times and delivered to the Sounding Program Office for routine field use. In addition to providing position, velocity and time GPS data has been used on sounding rockets for vehicle performance analysis, effecting a one hundred fold improvement in data time tagging, and steering an optical tracking device to intercept payloads launched from over the horizon. Precise velocity separation information and timing has been provided to multiple payload systems. Future plans include its use for Range Safety and enabling of interferometric techniques. The technology and software developed also has potential application to small satellite navigation and formation flying.

  6. Magnetic Bubble Memories for Data Collection in Sounding Rockets,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-29

    AD-AlI 106 NEW MEXICO STATE UIIV LAS CRUCES PHYSICAL SCIENCE LAS F/B 9/2 MAGNETIC BUBBLE MEMORIES FOR DATA COLLECTION IN SOUNDING ROCET -(ETC(UI JAN...awarded by the Department oif Defense and NASA , the project is to develop new bubble technologies for use i! mil itm.rv and space systems. In Japan

  7. Recovery system of sounding rocket S-520 type of ISAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinada, M.; Hayashi, T.; Matsuo, H.; Tsukamoto, S.; Ohshima, T.; Maeda, Y.; Kamata, Y.

    The design, performance, equipment, and initial flight test results for the S-520 solid fueled rocket are described. The S-520 carries a 408 kg payload, delivers 28,000 lb thrust, has a specific impulse of 29 sec, attains a velocity of 2.13 km/sec, and can reach 232 km altitude. The first S-520 was 9 m long and 0.524 m in diameter and had a three-stage configuration: engine, recovery test unit (RCU), and scientific instruments. The RTU contained parachute and flotation systems and a Loran-C locator beacon. The initial flight in September 1981 resulted in a splashdown 320 km downrange, with recovery accomplished within 4 hr of launch. Further flight tests and design upgrades are planned.

  8. Remote sensing of atmospheric oxygen from a sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Cotton, D. M.; Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Link, R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a rocket experiment to investigate mechanisms governing the interactions between two of the fundamental components of the solar-terrestrial system: the solar ionizing radiation and the earth's upper atmosphere. The aim is to characterize the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emissions resulting from these interactions in terms of physical parameters so that EUV remote sensing can be gainfully employed as a quantitative diagnostic of the terrestrial atmosphere and plasma environment. The payload consists of a high-resolution (about 0.5 A) spectrometer to measure the EUV emissions (980-1360 A) of the earth's dayglow, a moderate resolution (about 15 A) EUV spectrometer (250-1450 A) to measure the solar irradiation responsible for the photoelectron production, and a hydrogen Lyman Alpha photometer to monitor the solar irradiance and geocoronal emissions.

  9. A normal incidence X-ray telescope sounding rocket payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following major activities on the X-ray telescope: (1) complete design of the entire telescope assembly and fabrication of all front-end components was completed; (2) all rocket skin sections, including bulkheads, feedthroughs and access door, were specified; (3) fabrication, curing and delivery of the large graphite-epoxy telescope tube were completed; (4) an engineering analysis of the primary mirror vibration test was completed and a decision made to redesign the mirror attachment system to a kinematic three-point mount; (5) detail design of the camera control, payload and housekeeping electronics were completed; and (6) multilayer mirror plates with 2d spacings of 50 A and 60 A were produced.

  10. A normal incidence X-ray telescope sounding rocket payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, L.

    1985-09-01

    Progress is reported on the following major activities on the X-ray telescope: (1) complete design of the entire telescope assembly and fabrication of all front-end components was completed; (2) all rocket skin sections, including bulkheads, feedthroughs and access door, were specified; (3) fabrication, curing and delivery of the large graphite-epoxy telescope tube were completed; (4) an engineering analysis of the primary mirror vibration test was completed and a decision made to redesign the mirror attachment system to a kinematic three-point mount; (5) detail design of the camera control, payload and housekeeping electronics were completed; and (6) multilayer mirror plates with 2d spacings of 50 A and 60 A were produced.

  11. Development and demonstration of flueric sounding rocket motor ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is described which established a flueric rocket motor ignition system concept incorporating a pneumatic match with a simple hand pump as the only energy source. An evaluation was made of this concept to determine the margins of the operating range and capabilities of every component of the system. This evaluation included a determination of power supply requirements, ignitor geometry and alinement, ignitor/propellant interfacing and materials and the effects of ambient temperatures and pressure. It was demonstrated that an operator using a simple hand pump for 30 seconds could ignite BKNO3 at a standoff distance of 100 m (330 ft) with the only connection to the ignitor being a piece of plastic pneumatic tubing.

  12. A three-layer magnetic shielding for the MAIUS-1 mission on a sounding rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Kubelka-Lange, André Herrmann, Sven; Grosse, Jens; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Rasel, Ernst M.; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-06-15

    Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BECs) can be used as a very sensitive tool for experiments on fundamental questions in physics like testing the equivalence principle using matter wave interferometry. Since the sensitivity of these experiments in ground-based environments is limited by the available free fall time, the QUANTUS project started to perform BEC interferometry experiments in micro-gravity. After successful campaigns in the drop tower, the next step is a space-borne experiment. The MAIUS-mission will be an atom-optical experiment that will show the feasibility of experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in microgravity in a sounding rocket. The experiment will create a BEC of 10{sup 5} {sup 87}Rb-atoms in less than 5 s and will demonstrate application of basic atom interferometer techniques over a flight time of 6 min. The hardware is specifically designed to match the requirements of a sounding rocket mission. Special attention is thereby spent on the appropriate magnetic shielding from varying magnetic fields during the rocket flight, since the experiment procedures are very sensitive to external magnetic fields. A three-layer magnetic shielding provides a high shielding effectiveness factor of at least 1000 for an undisturbed operation of the experiment. The design of this magnetic shielding, the magnetic properties, simulations, and tests of its suitability for a sounding rocket flight are presented in this article.

  13. A three-layer magnetic shielding for the MAIUS-1 mission on a sounding rocket.

    PubMed

    Kubelka-Lange, André; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse, Jens; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Rasel, Ernst M; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-06-01

    Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BECs) can be used as a very sensitive tool for experiments on fundamental questions in physics like testing the equivalence principle using matter wave interferometry. Since the sensitivity of these experiments in ground-based environments is limited by the available free fall time, the QUANTUS project started to perform BEC interferometry experiments in micro-gravity. After successful campaigns in the drop tower, the next step is a space-borne experiment. The MAIUS-mission will be an atom-optical experiment that will show the feasibility of experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in microgravity in a sounding rocket. The experiment will create a BEC of 10(5) (87)Rb-atoms in less than 5 s and will demonstrate application of basic atom interferometer techniques over a flight time of 6 min. The hardware is specifically designed to match the requirements of a sounding rocket mission. Special attention is thereby spent on the appropriate magnetic shielding from varying magnetic fields during the rocket flight, since the experiment procedures are very sensitive to external magnetic fields. A three-layer magnetic shielding provides a high shielding effectiveness factor of at least 1000 for an undisturbed operation of the experiment. The design of this magnetic shielding, the magnetic properties, simulations, and tests of its suitability for a sounding rocket flight are presented in this article.

  14. Ram-wake measurements obtained from the ionospheric sounding rocket MAIMIK

    SciTech Connect

    Svenes, K.R.; Troim, J.; Maehlum, B.N.; Friedrich, M.; Torkar, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    Results of plasma measurements from the ionospheric sounding rocket MAIMIK are reported. Data obtained by high-resolution plasma probes show distinct classical wake signatures during the entire flight. That is, the electron temperature was enhanced behind the rocket in a region where both the electron and ion density were well below the ambient values. In addition, electron temperature enhancements were also detected in the ram (forward) direction on the downleg. The measurements are presented and discussed in relation to the prevailing ionospheric conditions.

  15. Sounding rocket attitude determination from on board magnetometer and telemetry signal polarisation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtagh, D. P.; Greer, R. G. H.; McDade, I. C.

    1983-06-01

    The attitude of Petrel sounding rockets was determined from on-board magnetometer information and p band telemetry signal strength data from a polarized ground station antenna. Sky background information from the photometric payloads was compared to backgrounds reconstructed from satellite maps to assess the accuracy of the method. The result is consistant with other information available (sky background modulation) within the experimental constraints such as magnetometer calibration and light tables, and does not require extra hardware on the rocket. Accuracy can be improved by machine computation of the phase angles and a closer analysis of the whole flight especially around turnover on reentry.

  16. Flight safety programs and enhancements for sounding rockets at Wallops Flight Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balach, Dean

    1995-01-01

    Sounding rocket programs are becoming larger and more complex, thus range safety personnel are required to be central to vehicle and mission design and operations planning. In response to this, the Wallops Flight Facility (VA), is upgrading range facilities, tracking systems, mobile systems and real-time safety systems. These enhancements will improve safety and reliability while augmenting mission success. Flight safety requirements and responsibilities are summarized, and the range safety's future upgrades for wind weighting, real-time analysis and displays, and the mobile safety systems for rocket programs, are considered.

  17. The sounding rocket as pedagogical tool: a report from ten years of experience with the S.P.I.R.T. undergraduate sounding rocket program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Timothy F.

    2005-08-01

    The Student Projects Involving Rocket Investigation Techniques (SPIRIT) program is a long-term, experimential learning, project-based program for undergraduates at Penn State University. Students in 5 functional teams design and build the experiments, but also the structure and rocket systems of a scientific payload. The payloads that emerge from three years of student work show extraordinary creativity. The scientific results, however, have been uneven. This suggests that the highest value of the program is in its educational impact and in the opportunity it provides for development of sounding rocket instruments and research techniques. In this paper, we review the goals and the results of the program from a teaching perspective. We report the results of past and ongoing assessments and present conclusions as to the value and limitations of the program. The SPIRIT program has been popular with students and the university administration. It is relatively inexpensive to run. The willingness of NASA Wallops Island personnel to mentor young students has been critical to the educational success of the program.

  18. Observations of LHR noise with banded structure by the sounding rocket S29 barium-GEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskinen, H. E. J.; Holmgren, G.; Kintner, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The measurement of electrostatic noise near the lower hybrid frequency made by the sounding rocket S29 barium-GEOS is reported. The noise is related to the spin of the rocket and reaches well below the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. Above the altitude of 300 km the noise shows banded structure roughly organized by the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. Simultaneously with the banded structure a signal near the hydrogen cyclotron frequency is detected. This signal is also spin modulated. The character of the noise strongly suggests that it is locally generated by the rocket payload disturbing the plasma. If this interpretation is correct, plasma wave experiments on other spacecrafts are expected to observe similar phenomena.

  19. A program of high resolution X-ray astronomy using sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Two Aerobee 170 sounding rocket payloads were flown at the White Sands Missile Range: (1) a focusing X-ray collector on 31 March 1972; and (2) a high resolution telescope on 4 August 1972. Data has been reduced from each of these flights. In the first flight both the rocket and the experiment instrumentation performed adequately, and it is clear that at least the minimum scientific objectives were attained. In the second flight the attitude control system failed to point the telescope at the target for a sufficient length of time. However examination of final preflight checkout data and some flight data indicate that the instrumentation for this rocket payload was functioning according to expectations.

  20. Flight Performance Evaluation of Three GPS Receivers for Sounding Rocket Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Diehl, James; Montenbruck, Oliver; Markgraf, Markus; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In preparation for the European Space Agency Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange,, near Kiruna, Sweden on February 19, 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. The receivers included an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver, a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver and a Mitel Orion receiver. All of them provide CIA code tracking on the L1 frequency to determine the user position and make use of Doppler measurements to derive the instantaneous velocity. Among the receivers, the G12 has been optimized for use under highly dynamic conditions and has earlier been flown successfully on NASA sounding rockets [Bull, ION-GPS-2000]. The Allstar is representative of common single frequency receivers for terrestrial applications and received no particular modification, except for the disabling of the common altitude and velocity constraints that would otherwise inhibit its use for space application. The Orion receiver, finally, employs the same Mitel chipset as the Allstar, but has received various firmware modifications by DLR to safeguard it against signal losses and improve its tracking performance [Montenbruck et al., ION-GPS-2000]. While the two NASA receivers were driven by a common wrap-around antenna, the DLR experiment made use of a switchable antenna system comprising a helical antenna in the tip of the rocket and two blade antennas attached to the body of the vehicle. During the boost a peak acceleration of roughly 17g's was achieved which resulted in a velocity of about 1100 m/s at the end of the burn. At apogee, the rocket reached a maximum altitude of over 80 km. A detailed analysis of the attained flight data will be given in the paper together with a evaluation of different receiver designs and antenna concepts.

  1. Flight Performance Evaluation of Three GPS Receivers for Sounding Rocket Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Diehl, James; Montenbruck, Oliver; Markgraf, Markus; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In preparation for the European Space Agency Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange, near Kiruna, Sweden on February 19, 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. The receivers included an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver, a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver and a Mitel Orion receiver. All of them provide C/A code tracking on the L1 frequency to determine the user position and make use of Doppler measurements to derive the instantaneous velocity. Among the receivers, the G12 has been optimized for use under highly dynamic conditions and has earlier been flown successfully on NASA sounding rockets. The Allstar is representative of common single frequency receivers for terrestrial applications and received no particular modification, except for the disabling of the common altitude and velocity constraints that would otherwise inhibit its use for space application. The Orion receiver, finally, employs the same Mitel chipset as the Allstar, but has received various firmware modifications by DLR to safeguard it against signal losses and improve its tracking performance. While the two NASA receivers were driven by a common wrap-around antenna, the DLR experiment made use of a switchable antenna system comprising a helical antenna in the tip of the rocket and two blade antennas attached to the body of the vehicle. During the boost a peak acceleration of roughly l7g's was achieved which resulted in a velocity of about 1100 m/s at the end of the burn. At apogee, the rocket reached an altitude of over 80 km. A detailed analysis of the attained flight data is given together with a evaluation of different receiver designs and antenna concepts.

  2. Flight Performance Evaluation of Three GPS Receivers for Sounding Rocket Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Diehl, James; Montenbruck, Oliver; Markgraf, Markus; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In preparation for the European Space Agency Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange,, near Kiruna, Sweden on February 19, 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. The receivers included an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver, a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver and a Mitel Orion receiver. All of them provide CIA code tracking on the L1 frequency to determine the user position and make use of Doppler measurements to derive the instantaneous velocity. Among the receivers, the G12 has been optimized for use under highly dynamic conditions and has earlier been flown successfully on NASA sounding rockets [Bull, ION-GPS-2000]. The Allstar is representative of common single frequency receivers for terrestrial applications and received no particular modification, except for the disabling of the common altitude and velocity constraints that would otherwise inhibit its use for space application. The Orion receiver, finally, employs the same Mitel chipset as the Allstar, but has received various firmware modifications by DLR to safeguard it against signal losses and improve its tracking performance [Montenbruck et al., ION-GPS-2000]. While the two NASA receivers were driven by a common wrap-around antenna, the DLR experiment made use of a switchable antenna system comprising a helical antenna in the tip of the rocket and two blade antennas attached to the body of the vehicle. During the boost a peak acceleration of roughly 17g's was achieved which resulted in a velocity of about 1100 m/s at the end of the burn. At apogee, the rocket reached a maximum altitude of over 80 km. A detailed analysis of the attained flight data will be given in the paper together with a evaluation of different receiver designs and antenna concepts.

  3. Utilization of sounding rockets and balloons in the German Space Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preu, Peter; Friker, Achim; Frings, Wolfgang; Püttmann, Norbert

    2005-08-01

    Sounding rockets and balloons are important tools of Germany's Space Programme. DLR manages these activities and promotes scientific experiments and validation programmes within (1) Space Science, (2) Earth Observation, (3) Microgravity Research and (4) Re-entry Technologies (SHEFEX). In Space Science the present focus is at atmospheric research. Concerning Earth Observation balloon-borne measurements play a key role in the validation of atmospheric satellite sounders (ENVISAT). TEXUS and MAXUS sounding rockets are successfully used for short duration microgravity experiments. The Sharp Edge Flight Experiment SHEFEX will deliver data from a hypersonic flight for the validation of a new Thermal Protection System (TPS), wind tunnel testing and numerical analysis of aerothermodynamics. Signing the Revised Esrange and Andøya Special Project (EASP) Agreement 2006-2010 in June 2004 Germany has made an essential contribution to the long-term availability of the Scandinavian ranges for the European science community.

  4. Temperature and turbulence measurements during the ECOMA sounding rocket campaign 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Rapp, Markus; Singer, Werner; Baumgarten, Gerd; Williams, Bifford

    Two instrumented rockets were launched at Andøya (69 ° N) during the ECOMA sounding rocket campaign in September 2006. A comprehensive set of different data was measured insitu and by ground-based instruments. Temperature measurements were done by rocketborne instruments (ionization gauge and two Pirani gauges on each payload) and the ALOMAR RMR- and Weber Na-lidars. Simultaneously, turbulence measurements were done both in-situ using ionization gauges and using remote soundings with the SAURA MF radar. Measurements show a pronounced temperature inversion of about 30 K in the region from 80 to 100 km which coincides with a broad layer of neutral turbulence. From the morphology of the turbulence layer it can be attributed as likely originating from a wind shear.

  5. Testing the Equivalence Principle 10,000 Times Better on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. D.; Reasenberg, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Sounding-Rocket Principle Of Equivalence Measurement (SR-POEM) will test the weak equivalence principle (WEP) to 2 × 10-17 g in an experiment launched into free fall by a sounding rocket. The high sensitivity is possible in a short time because: (1) our laser distance gauges measure to 0.1 pm in 1 second; (2) the high measurement speed allows us to keep the temperature of the critical region stable to within a few μK using two cascaded thermal low-pass filters; (3) the spacing between the physics package and the test masses is kept constant by virtue of a servo (but not a drag-free satellite); (4) the test masses (TMs) are unconstrained during drops, avoiding constraint-force imperfections; and (5) the position measurement is to a plate that is almost stationary with respect to the TMs (by virtue of the position servo and the initialization of the TMs).

  6. Qualification of the 4th stage propulsor of the Brazilian launcher. SLV: A new sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscov, Jayme; Toyama, Wilson Katsumi

    1989-06-01

    The development of the Satellite Launcher Vehicle (SLV) is presented. In particular, the attention is focused on the acquisition of the propulsion parameters of the 4th stage propulsor. The device feasibility analysis is considered. The system consists of a two staged sounding rocket. Its second stage contains the SVL, which can be launched by the 4th stage propulsor to a height range of about 50 to 60 km.

  7. Determination of sounding rocket position and attitude from radar and magnetometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongratz, M.

    1972-01-01

    The techniques are described that were used to determine the trajectories and orientations of three sounding rockets instrumented to study the aurora. The radar plot board data were fitted to a near earth expansion of the force of gravity to determine the trajectory. Only onboard magnetometer data were used to determine the attitude of the payload with respect to the earth's magnetic field. Computer programs in the FORTRAN language are available which generate the trajectory and attitude parameters.

  8. Ultraviolet astronomy instrumentation for sounding rocket and Shuttle/Spacelab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with an electrographic Schmidt camera for wide-field imaging and objective-spectrographic sky surveys, and with a nebula spectrograph designed to obtain slit spectra of nebulae and other diffuse sources. Each of these ultraviolet astronomy instruments has been successfully used in sounding rocket flights. It is seen that, with some minor modifications, both instruments should be readily adaptable to Spacelab missions.

  9. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  10. Wavefront sensing in space from the PICTURE-B sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Ewan S.; Mendillo, Christopher B.; Cook, Timothy A.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2016-07-01

    A NASA sounding rocket for high contrast imaging with a visible nulling coronagraph, the Planet Imaging Coronagraphic Technology Using a Reconfigurable Experimental Base (PICTURE-B) payload has made two suborbital attempts to observe the warm dust disk inferred around Epsilon Eridani. We present results from the November 2015 launch demonstrating active wavefront sensing in space with a piezoelectric mirror stage and a micromachine deformable mirror along with precision pointing and lightweight optics in space.

  11. Modulations of MLT turbulence by waves observed during the WADIS sounding rocket project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Latteck, Ralph; Strelnikova, Irina; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Baumgarten, Gerd; Rapp, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The WADIS project (WAve propagation and DISsipation in the middle atmosphere) aimed at studying waves, their dissipation, and effects on trace constituents. Among other things, it addressed the question of the variability of MLT turbulence, both in time and space. A unique feature of the WADIS project was multi-point turbulence sounding applying different measurement techniques including rocket-borne ionization gauges, VHF MAARSY radar, and VHF EISCAT radar in Tromsø. The project comprised two sounding rocket campaigns conducted at the Andøya Space Center (69 °N, 16 °E). One sounding rocket was launched in summer 2013 and one in winter 2015. The joint in-situ and ground-based observations showed horizontal variability of the turbulence field in the MLT at scales from a few to 100 km. We found that the turbulence dissipation rate varied in space in a wave-like manner both horizontally and in the vertical direction. This wave-like modulation reveals the same vertical wavelengths as those seen in gravity waves. We also found that vertical mean value of radar turbulence observations reveals wave-like modulation in time domain. This time variability results in up to two orders of magnitude change of the energy dissipation values with periods of 24 h. It also shows 12 h and shorter ( hours) modulations resulting in one decade variation. In this paper we present recent measurement results of turbulence-mean flow interaction and discuss possible reasons of the observed modulations.

  12. Design and qualification of an UHV system for operation on sounding rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Jens Braxmaier, Claus; Seidel, Stephan Tobias; Becker, Dennis; Lachmann, Maike Diana; Scharringhausen, Marco; Rasel, Ernst Maria

    2016-05-15

    The sounding rocket mission MAIUS-1 has the objective to create the first Bose–Einstein condensate in space; therefore, its scientific payload is a complete cold atom experiment built to be launched on a VSB-30 sounding rocket. An essential part of the setup is an ultrahigh vacuum system needed in order to sufficiently suppress interactions of the cooled atoms with the residual background gas. Contrary to vacuum systems on missions aboard satellites or the international space station, the required vacuum environment has to be reached within 47 s after motor burn-out. This paper contains a detailed description of the MAIUS-1 vacuum system, as well as a description of its qualification process for the operation under vibrational loads of up to 8.1 g{sub RMS} (where RMS is root mean square). Even though a pressure rise dependent on the level of vibration was observed, the design presented herein is capable of regaining a pressure of below 5 × 10{sup −10} mbar in less than 40 s when tested at 5.4 g{sub RMS}. To the authors' best knowledge, it is the first UHV system qualified for operation on a sounding rocket.

  13. National Report Switzerland: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Activities and Related Research in Switzerland 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    During the period from 2013 to 2015, many Swiss researchers conducted studies on research platforms such as balloons or sounding rockets, or at the high altitude research stations of Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat. Researchers ‘ increased interest in sounding rockets during the two-year period is especially noteworthy. The use of the high altitude research stations, in contrast, has a long tradition in Switzerland and is, thus, frequently occupied by scientists. An advantage of these stations is the ideal set-up for researchers interested in the long-term measurement of the upper atmosphere, for example. Therefore, numcrous experiments in this particular research field were conducted and published in scientific journals. After a pause, several Swiss scientists became engaged in sounding rocket experiments. RUAG Space in Nyon, for instance, in collaboration with the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) and University of Freiburg, is focusing on the effect of gravity on plant roots. In order to investigate a gravity-dependent influence, two experiments on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings are being planned for execution during the upcoming MASTER 1 3 campaign. A team of students from HES-SO Geneva were chosen to participate in the REXUS program with their experiment called CAESAR. A new concept of a propellant management device for space vehicles was introduced and tested on the REXUS 14 rocket by the team from Geneva in the spring of 20 1 3 . Last year, another student team, now from the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, was selected to fly their experiment on another REXUS rocket. Their proposed biological study is called CEMIOS and pertains to biochemical properties of the cell membrane. Once more the high altitude research stations of Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat welcomed many national—as well as international—scientists in the past two years. The hours that the researchers spent in either station reached a record high despite the poor weather conditions

  14. Nightside sounding rocket study of precipitating ions in a Poleward Boundary Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mella, M. R.; Lynch, K. A.; Lundberg, E. T.; Lessard, M.; Hampton, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The sounding rocket Cascades-2 launched on 20 March 2009 from the Poker Flat Research Range at 11:04:00 UT. The rocket initially crosses a diffuse arc, then crosses a streamer, which is the equatorward extent of one PBI (poleward boundary intensification), and finally crosses the initiation of a separate PBI before entering the polar cap. In this presentation we examine the in situ ion signatures at various times in the flight. At the poleward edge of the electron precipitation, as the rocket crosses the PBI, medium energy (between 10 eV and 800 eV), precipitating ions are observed. This population is not present at the time of the streamer or earlier in the flight. We hypothesize that the precipitating ions are drifting into the auroral region from the polar cap, which is why they are observed at the poleward boundary of the auroral oval. There they encounter the Alfvenic activity which is creating the soft electron precipitation of the PBI. This Alfvenic activity accelerates them down the field to the observation point, with dispersion signatures indicating wave-particle interactions at similar altitudes to those of the field-aligned electron bursts. The precipitating ion population is depleted in the poleward boundary region, and thus not observed in the more equatorward streamer. Similar signatures have been observed on previous nightside auroral sounding rockets at the poleward boundary by Lynch et al. [Annales Geophysicae, 2007]. In this presentation we examine the rocket data along with various scenarios for ion source regions to check the plausibility of our hypothesis. In particular we consider the scenario by which the source of these ions is the dayside cusp/cleft ion fountain upflow region.

  15. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schkolnik, V.; Hellmig, O.; Wenzlawski, A.; Grosse, J.; Kohfeldt, A.; Döringshoff, K.; Wicht, A.; Windpassinger, P.; Sengstock, K.; Braxmaier, C.; Krutzik, M.; Peters, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone toward space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology, is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 l and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technological maturity by remaining frequency stabilized throughout the mission including the rocket's boost phase.

  16. Numerical flow simulation of a reusable sounding rocket during nose-up rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuu, Kazuto; Kitamura, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Keiichiro; Shima, Eiji

    2010-11-01

    Flow around a reusable sounding rocket during nose-up rotation is simulated using unstructured compressible CFD code. While a reusable sounding rocket is expected to reduce the cost of the flight management, it is demanded that this rocket has good performance for wide range of flight conditions from vertical take-off to vertical landing. A rotating body, which corresponds to a vehicle's motion just before vertical landing, is one of flight environments that largely affect its aerodynamic design. Unlike landing of the space shuttle, this vehicle must rotate from gliding position to vertical landing position in nose-up direction. During this rotation, the vehicle generates massive separations in the wake. As a result, induced flow becomes unsteady and could have influence on aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle. In this study, we focus on the analysis of such dynamic characteristics of the rotating vehicle. An employed numerical code is based on a cell-centered finite volume compressible flow solver applied to a moving grid system. The moving grid is introduced for the analysis of rotating motion. Furthermore, in order to estimate an unsteady turbulence, we employed DDES method as a turbulence model. In this simulation, flight velocity is subsonic. Through this simulation, we discuss the effect on aerodynamic characteristics of a vehicle's shape and motion.

  17. Studying the Hot ISM with the X-ray Quantum Calorimeter Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kelsey; Jaeckel, Felix; McCammon, Dan; Wulf, Dallas; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Uprety, Youaraj

    2014-08-01

    The X-ray Quantum Calorimeter sounding rocket instrument is a 36-pixel microcalorimeter array with a 1 sr field of view and 8-10 eV FWHM resolution in the 0.1-1.5 keV energy range. XQC has made 6 flights from White Sands Missile Range between 1995 and 2013 to obtain high resolution spectra of the soft diffuse X-ray background. With these spectra we have gained insight into some of the key open questions about the hot interstellar medium in our Galaxy, such as the contribution of Solar Wind Charge Exchange to the observed diffuse background and the extent of iron depletion in the Local Cavity, and even placed constraints on certain types of dark matter. I will present results from previous flights, discuss the current state of data analysis from our most recent flight, and share our outlook for future rocket missions.

  18. A Real Time Differential GPS Tracking System for NASA Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads to several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including: chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices to be used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in these more expensive missions. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia; Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico and from a number of ranges outside the United States. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requiring considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. In order to support these missions, an inverse differential GPS system has been developed. The flight system consists of a small, inexpensive receiver, a preamplifier and a wrap-around antenna. A rugged, compact, portable ground station extracts GPS data from the raw payload telemetry stream, performs a real time differential solution and graphically displays the rocket's path relative to a predicted trajectory plot. In addition to generating a real time navigation solution, the system has been used for payload recovery, timing, data timetagging, precise tracking of multiple payloads and slaving of optical tracking systems for over the horizon acquisition. This paper discusses, in detail, the flight and ground hardware, as well as data processing and operational aspects of the system, and provides evidence of the system accuracy.

  19. Sounding rocket based investigations of HF waves in the auroral ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, Kristin Lynn

    1999-10-01

    The PHAZE II and Auroral Turbulence II sounding rockets were launched into active, pre-midnight aurora during the February 1997 sounding rocket campaign from Poker Flat, Alaska. Both rockets carried a full complement of plasma intruments including particle detectors and electric field instruments. The high frequency electric field instrument (HFE), flown on both rockets, was designed and built at Dartmouth College. This unusual instrument transmitted the full electric field waveform using a dedicated telemetry link. The unprecedented resolution in both frequency and time yielded the first identifiable observations of several HF wave phenomena. We investigated two of these phenomena, HF chirps in the region when fpe > fce and HF bands at higher altitudes where fpe < fce. HF chirps are extremely narrowband, short-lived emissions which occur when fpe > fce. We propose that these waves are created as Z-modes waves which are quasi- trapped in density cavities. HF bands have long durations and narrowband, constant frequency structure and are observed in regions where the local plasma density is varying. These emissions occur when fpe < fce and the whistler mode connects to the Langmuir mode. They are generated by an electron beam interaction which produces Langmuir waves which then move onto the whistler mode when the local plasma density increases. The HFE also provided a method for determining the local plasma density without relying on Langmuir probes or active plasma experiments. When the frequency cutoff of the background wideband emissions is evident, this cutoff is used as a track of the local plasma frequency, which is dependent on the plasma density. We used this technique to definitively correlate lower hybrid solitary structures with density gradients. The use of the HFE on both flights has allowed us to observe HF wave phenomena which have been inaccessible previously.

  20. A Real Time Differential GPS Tracking System for NASA Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads to several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including: chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices to be used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in these more expensive missions. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia; Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico and from a number of ranges outside the United States. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requiring considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. In order to support these missions, an inverse differential GPS system has been developed. The flight system consists of a small, inexpensive receiver, a preamplifier and a wrap-around antenna. A rugged, compact, portable ground station extracts GPS data from the raw payload telemetry stream, performs a real time differential solution and graphically displays the rocket's path relative to a predicted trajectory plot. In addition to generating a real time navigation solution, the system has been used for payload recovery, timing, data timetagging, precise tracking of multiple payloads and slaving of optical tracking systems for over the horizon acquisition. This paper discusses, in detail, the flight and ground hardware, as well as data processing and operational aspects of the system, and provides evidence of the system accuracy.

  1. The S19 guided sounding rocket S38 Trigger Optimized Repetition (TOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, L.; Forsell, T.

    The S38 sounding rocket guided by the SSC S19 guidance system measured the impact of sudden local artificial disturbance in the lower ionosphere. The payload consisted of diagnostic instruments, ejectable nosecone, boom systems, service modules, S19 guidance system and recovery system in the mother section, and 2 daughters containing cesium charges. The daughters were separated on the up-leg using high velocity separation systems. An eight-spring separation system was chosen to minimize the tip-off disturbances and the module length. Two artificial clouds were created by detonating the daughters on separate altitudes. The mother flew through the clouds giving measurement values outside and in the clouds.

  2. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1990-05-01

    Results are presented on the solar EUV irradiance measurements in the range 30-100 nm obtained in a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. The observed solar EUV irradiance was found to be about 20 percent less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux and its 81-day mean and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970s. The November 10 measurement of the solar EUV flux provides a good calibration reference spectrum for the solar EUV instruments on the San Marco satellite.

  3. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the solar EUV irradiance measurements in the range 30-100 nm obtained in a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. The observed solar EUV irradiance was found to be about 20 percent less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux and its 81-day mean and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970s. The November 10 measurement of the solar EUV flux provides a good calibration reference spectrum for the solar EUV instruments on the San Marco satellite.

  4. Simultaneous in-situ measurements of neutral temperature and oxygen in the mesosphere during the WADIS sounding rocket project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Rapp, Markus; Grygalashvyly, Mykhaylo; Löhle, Stefan; Eberhart, Martin; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Hedin, Jonas; Gumbel, Jörg; Khaplanov, Mikhail; Stegman, Jacek; Friedrich, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The WADIS project (Wave propagation and dissipation in the middle atmosphere: energy budget and distribution of trace constituents) aimed at studying waves, their dissipation, and effects on trace constituents. The project comprised two sounding rocket campaigns conducted at the Andøya Space Center (69 °N, 16 °E). One sounding rocket was launched in summer 2013 and one in winter 2015. In-situ measurements delivered high resolution altitude-profiles of neutral temperature and density, as well as plasma and oxygen densities. Atomic oxygen was measured by two different techniques. Airglow photometers operated by MISU measured emissions from excited molecular oxygen at 1.27 um (daytime summer launch) and 762 nm (night-time winter launch), both of which can be used to infer altitude profiles of atomic oxygen. This is a well-proven technique and has been applied to sounding rocket and satellite measurements in the past. Solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX) operated by IRS is a new technique for sounding rockets, which yielded atomic oxygen density profiles with a height resolution better than 10 m. The neutral air density and temperature was measured by the CONE instrument also with very heigh altitude resolution and precision. All these instruments were mounted on the same deck of the sounding rocket and, therefore delivered real common volume measurements. In this paper we present simultaneous in-situ temperature and oxygen density measurements and discuss how variability of these quantities may influence temperature derivations from OH airglow observations at mesopause heights.

  5. Turbulence measurements in the mesosphere during the WADIS-1 sounding rocket campaign: Insight into horizontal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Luebken, Franz-Josef; Rapp, Markus; Stober, Gunter; Szewczyk, Artur; Strelnikova, Irina; Chau, Jorge L.; Sommer, Svenja; Latteck, Ralph

    In the frame of the WADIS (Wave propagation and dissipation in the middle atmosphere: energy budget and distribution of trace constituents) project the first sounding rocket campaign was conducted at the Andøya Rocket Range (69 (°) N, 16 (°) E) during June/July 2013. During this campaign, among other things, extensive turbulence measurements were conducted employing different techniques. In situ measurements were done using two CONE instruments mounted on both front and rear decks of the payload, implying that two profiles of turbulence energy dissipation rates were near simultaneously measured with high altitude resolution at ˜30 km horizontal distance. Ground based measurements of the turbulence field were conducted using the MAARSY VHF-, the SAURA MF-, and the EISCAT-radars. The measurements with MAARSY allow to resolve turbulent structures not only vertically, but also horizontally at scales of several kilometers and cover both up- and downleg parts of the rocket trajectory. We discuss these turbulence measurements and estimate the horizontal variability of the turbulent structures.

  6. Mass spectrometric measurements of SF sub 6 chemical releases from sounding rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Hunton, D.E.; Viggiano, A.A.; Swider, W.; Paulson, J.F.; Sherman, C. )

    1987-08-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride was released from a small reservoir on the side of a sounding rocket equipped with a negative ion mass spectrometer. The effects of the release were observed only at altitudes between 100 km and the rocket's apogee at 128 km. Below these altitudes the SF{sub 6} was swept away by the flow of atmospheric gases past the rocket. The maximum ion signals were observed at 115-118 km, where the mean free path equaled the distance form the reservoir to the mass spectrometer. The negative ions that resulted from the SF{sub 6} release were SF{sub 6}{sup {minus}}, SF{sub 5}{sup {minus}}, and O{sup {minus}}. At 155 km the relative intensities of these ions were 1.0, 0.3, 0.07, and 0.06, respectively. A large fraction of the SF{sub 6}{sup {minus}}*, and ion-molecule reactions. The mass spectrometer sampled a nonequilibrium distribution of ions in the first milliseconds after they were formed. In addition, the large draw-in field of the mass spectrometer probably altered the identities and relative intensities of the ions. Laboratory measurements with a selected ion flow tube apparatus show that the reaction SF{sub 5}{sup {minus}} + O {yields} F{sup {minus}} + SF{sub 4}O proceeds with rate constant 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} at 300 K.

  7. The microphysics of particle acceleration in the auroral ionosphere: Why sounding rocket measurements are essential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, Roger L.

    1994-01-01

    Through the combination of attitude controlled, high altitude rockets (altitudes greater than 600 km), high telemetry rates (several megabits/sec), pitch angle imaging particle sensors and interferometric wave measurements giving wavelength in addition to frequency data, the series of TOPAZ flights have uncovered a low altitude acceleration mechanism by which ionospheric ions receive their initial energy transverse to B in order to leave the ionosphere and populate the trapped radiation. The transverse acceleration of oxygen and hydrogen ionospheric ions is the result of Landau resonance of these ions with intense (up to 400 mv/m) lower hybrid waves on the resonance cone within caviton structures. Future work is directed toward trying to measure the size of the solitary wave structures. From a statistical argument, they appear to be the order of 100 m across B and much longer in dimension along B. Important questions remain: are there other low altitude heating mechanisms acting as well; is the dayside ion outflow driven differently. To answer these questions, it is intended to make sounding rocket measurements in the cusp/cleft region. The proposed Norwegian rocket launch facility at Svalbard could play a very important role by providing easy access to the cusp/cleft region.

  8. The microphysics of particle acceleration in the auroral ionosphere: Why sounding rocket measurements are essential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, Roger L.

    1994-01-01

    Through the combination of attitude controlled, high altitude rockets (altitudes greater than 600 km), high telemetry rates (several megabits/sec), pitch angle imaging particle sensors and interferometric wave measurements giving wavelength in addition to frequency data, the series of TOPAZ flights have uncovered a low altitude acceleration mechanism by which ionospheric ions receive their initial energy transverse to B in order to leave the ionosphere and populate the trapped radiation. The transverse acceleration of oxygen and hydrogen ionospheric ions is the result of Landau resonance of these ions with intense (up to 400 mv/m) lower hybrid waves on the resonance cone within caviton structures. Future work is directed toward trying to measure the size of the solitary wave structures. From a statistical argument, they appear to be the order of 100 m across B and much longer in dimension along B. Important questions remain: are there other low altitude heating mechanisms acting as well; is the dayside ion outflow driven differently. To answer these questions, it is intended to make sounding rocket measurements in the cusp/cleft region. The proposed Norwegian rocket launch facility at Svalbard could play a very important role by providing easy access to the cusp/cleft region.

  9. Sounding Rocket Experiments to Investigate Thermal Electron Heating in the Sq Current Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Ishisaka, K.; Kumamoto, A.; Yoshikawa, A.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, M.

    2015-12-01

    Sounding rocket observations in the southern part of Japan suggest that the electron temperature profile occasionally exhibits the local increase by several hundred K at 100-110 km altitudes at 1100-1200 LT in winter. Detailed study of the temperature profiles indicates that such an increase is closely related to the existence of Sq current focus, because it becomes more significant when the measurement is made near the center of Sq focus. In order to understand a general feature of this unusual phenomena occurring in the Sq current focus, the sounding rocket experiment was conducted in Uchinoura of Japan. In this experiment, we launched "S-310-37" rocket equipped with a total of eight science instruments at 11:20 JST on January 16, 2007 after being convinced that the Sq current was approaching to the planned rocket trajectory. The geomagnetic activity had been successively quiet on that day so that we can estimate the position of Sq current focus. Our analysis of the obtained data indicates that the electron temperature was certainly increased by about 500-600 K at the altitude of 97-101 km with respect to the background. Strong electron density perturbation was also observed to exist above 97 km altitude, which corresponds to the lower boundary of the high electron temperatures. It is also noticeable that both the electric field and magnetic field data include unusual variation in the same altitude region as the temperature increase was observed, suggesting a possible connection between the thermal electron heating and variation of the electric and/or magnetic field. Thus, the first experiment in 2007 revealed a general feature of such unusual phenomena in the Sq current focus, and thereby our interest to the generation mechanism for increasing the electron temperature was more and more increased. We will conduct the second rocket experiment to investigate such unusual phenomena in the Sq current focus in January 2016. In this experiment, we will try to measure

  10. CWIS Experiment On Board REXUS-16 Sounding Rocket: Investigation of the Chemical Wave in Binary Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzevelecos, W.; Pugliese, A.; de Filippis, L.; Manzone, S.; Alfano, B.; Mancino, F.; Runge, W.; Desenfans, O.; Galand, Q.; Van Vaerenbergh, S.

    2015-09-01

    Chemical Wave in Soret Effect (CWIS) is an experiment launched in May 2014 on-board a REXUS sounding rocket from Esrange Space Center. The experiment was completely designed and assembled by students from different countries under an international collaboration between the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and the University of Naples Federico II. This student program called REXUS/BEXUS allows students to perform experiments in space science applications under the supervision of the European Space Agency (ESA). The objective of the CWIS Team was to visualize the Chemical Wave (CW) during the transient of the Soret effect. The CW is a concentration front that rapidly propagates under thermal gradient in a liquid mixture, and which marks the beginning of the chemical separation phenomenon by thermodiffusion (the separation process is itself named Soret effect, but is usually analyzed statically). The selected mixture was a solution of Ethylene Glycol in Water and concentration variation due to thermal gradients was recorded using a modified Fizeau interferometer, with modifications designed to enlarge a very small region of the test cell using cylindrical squeezing. We recorded more than 100 images with the chemical information and in this paper work we will show the final results of the sounding rocket experiment.

  11. Compact narrow linewidth diode laser modules for precision quantum optics experiments on board of sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohfeldt, Anja; Kürbis, Christian; Luvsandamdin, Erdenetsetseg; Schiemangk, Max; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-04-01

    We have realized a laser platform based on GaAs diode lasers that allows for an operation in mobile exper-imental setups in harsh environments, such as on sounding rockets. The platform comes in two versions: a master-oscillator-power-amplifier and an extended cavity diode laser. Our very robust micro-optical bench has a footprint of 80 x 25 mm2. It strictly omits any movable parts. Master-oscillator-power-amplifier systems based on distributed feedback master oscillators for 767 nm and 780 nm narrow linewidth emission have been implemented by now. A continuous wave optical output power of > 1 W with a power conversion efficiency of > 25% could be achieved. The continuous tuning range of these lasers is on the order of 100 GHz, the linewidth at 10 μs is about 1 MHz. For applications demanding a narrower linewidth we have developed an extended cavity diode laser that achieves a linewidth of 100 kHz at 10 μs. These lasers achieve a continuous spectral tuning range of about 50 GHz and an continuous wave optical power up to 30 mW. The modules have been successfully vibration tested up to 29 gRMS along all three axes and passed 1500 g shocks, again along all 3 axes. Both, master-oscillator-power-amplifiers and extended cavity diode lasers, have been employed in sounding rocket experiments.

  12. Modeling of "Stripe" Wave Phenomena Seen by the CHARM II and ACES Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; Labelle, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Two recent sounding-rocket missions—CHARM II and ACES—have been launched from Poker Flat Research Range, carrying the Dartmouth High-Frequency Experiment (HFE) among their primary instruments. The HFE is a receiver system which effectively yields continuous (100% duty cycle) E-field waveform measurements up to 5 MHz. The CHARM II sounding rocket was launched 9:49 UT on 15 February 2010 into a substorm, while the ACES mission consisted of two rockets, launched into quiet aurora at 9:49 and 9:50 UT on 29 January 2009. At approximately 350 km on CHARM II and the ACES High-Flyer, the HFE detected short (~2s) bursts of broadband (200-500 kHz) noise with a 'stripe' pattern of nulls imposed on it. These nulls have 10 to 20 kHz width and spacing, and many show a regular, non-linear frequency-time relation. These events are different from the 'stripes' discussed by Samara and LaBelle [2006] and Colpitts et al. [2010], because of the density of the stripes, the non-linearity, and the appearance of being an absorptive rather than emissive phenomenon. These events are similar to 'stripe' features reported by Brittain et al. [1983] in the VLF range, explained as an interference pattern between a downward-traveling whistler-mode wave and its reflection off the bottom of the ionosphere. Following their analysis method, we modeled our stripes as higher-frequency interfering whistlers reflecting off of a density gradient. This model predicts the near-hyperbolic frequency-time curves and high density of the nulls, and therefore shows promise at explaining the new observations.

  13. Sounding rocket/ground-based observation campaign to study Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Saito, A.; Otsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Abe, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ishisaka, K.; Saito, S.; Larsen, M.; Pfaff, R. F.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    An observation campaign is under preparation. It is to launch sounding rockets S-520-27 and S-310-42 from Uchinoura Space Center of JAXA while ground-based instruments measure waves in the ionosphere. It is scheduled in July/August 2013. The main purpose of the experiment is to reveal generation mechanism of Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (MSTID). The MSTID is the ionospheric wave with 1-2 hour periodicity, 100-200 km horizontal wavelength, and southwestward propagation. It is enhanced in the summer nighttime of the mid-latitude ionosphere. The MSTID is not only a simple atmospheric-wave modulation of the ionosphere, but shows similarity to characteristics of the Perkins instability. A problem is that growth rate of the Perkins instability is too small to explain the phenomena. We now hypothesize a generation mechanism that electromagnetic coupling of the F- and E-regions help rapid growth of the MSTID especially at its initial stage. In the observation campaign, we will use the sounding rocket S-520-27 for in-situ measurement of ionospheric parameters, i.e., electron density and electric fields. Wind velocity measurements in both F- and E-regions are very important as well. For the F-region winds, we will conduct Lithium-release experiment under the full-moon condition. This is a big technical challenge. Another rocket S-310-42 will be used for the E-region wind measurement with the TMA release. On the ground, we will use GEONET (Japanese vast GPS receiver network) to monitor horizontal distribution of GPS-TEC on the realtime bases. In the presentation we will show MSTID characteristics and the proposed generation mechanism, and discuss plan and current status of the project.

  14. Estimation of Electron Density profile Using the Propagation Characteristics of Radio Waves by S-520-29 Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itaya, K.; Ishisaka, K.; Ashihara, Y.; Abe, T.; Kumamoto, A.; Kurihara, J.

    2015-12-01

    S-520-29 sounding rocket experiment was carried out at Uchinoura Space Center (USC) at 19:10 JST on 17 August, 2014. The purpose of this sounding rocket experiments is observation of sporadic E layer that appears in the lower ionosphere at near 100km. Three methods were used in order to observe the sporadic E layer. The first method is an optical method that observe the light of metal ion emitted by the resonance scattering in sporadic E layer using the imager. The second method is observation of characteristic of radio wave propagation that the LF/MF band radio waves transmitted from the ground. The third method is measuring the electron density in the vicinity of sounding rocket using the fast Langmuir probe and the impedance probe. We analyze the propagation characteristics of radio wave in sporadic E layer appeared from the results of the second method observation. This rocket was equipped with LF/MF band radio receiver for observe the LF/MF band radio waves in rocket flight. Antenna of LF/MF band radio receiver is composed of three axis loop antenna. LF/MF band radio receiver receives three radio waves of 873kHz (JOGB), 666kHz (JOBK), 60kHz (JJY) from the ground. 873kHz and 60kHz radio waves are transmitting from north side, and 666kHz radio waves are transmitting from the east side to the trajectory of the rocket. In the sounding rocket experiment, LF/MF band radio receiver was working properly. We have completed the observation of radio wave intensity. We analyze the observation results using a Doppler shift calculations by frequency analysis. Radio waves received by the sounding rocket include the influences of Doppler shift by polarization and the direction of rocket spin and the magnetic field of the Earth. So received radio waves that are separate into characteristics waves using frequency analysis. Then we calculate the Doppler shift from the separated data. As a result, 873kHz, 666kHz radio waves are reflected by the ionosphere. 60kHz wave was able to

  15. NASA-funded sounding rocket to catch aurora in the act

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-21

    The NASA-funded Ground-to-Rocket Electron-Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment, or GREECE, wants to understand aurora. Specifically, it will study classic auroral curls that swirl through the sky like cream in a cup of coffee. The GREECE instruments travel on a sounding rocket that launches for a ten-minute ride right through the heart of the aurora reaching its zenith over the native village of Venetie, Alaska. To study the curl structures, GREECE consists of two parts: ground-based imagers located in Venetie to track the aurora from the ground and the rocket to take measurements from the middle of the aurora itself. At their simplest, auroras are caused when particles from the sun funnel over to Earth's night side, generate electric currents, and trigger a shower of particles that strike oxygen and nitrogen some 60 to 200 miles up in Earth's atmosphere, releasing a flash of light. But the details are always more complicated, of course. Researchers wish to understand the aurora, and movement of plasma in general, at much smaller scales including such things as how different structures are formed there. This is a piece of information, which in turn, helps paint a picture of the sun-Earth connection and how energy and particles from the sun interact with Earth's own magnetic system, the magnetosphere. GREECE is a collaborative effort between SWRI, which developed particle instruments and the ground-based imaging, and the University of California, Berkeley, measuring the electric and magnetic fields. The launch is supported by a sounding rocket team from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va. The Poker Flat Research Range is operated by the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Credit: NASA Goddard NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by

  16. NASA-funded sounding rocket to catch aurora in the act

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    The NASA-funded Ground-to-Rocket Electron-Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment, or GREECE, wants to understand aurora. Specifically, it will study classic auroral curls that swirl through the sky like cream in a cup of coffee. The GREECE instruments travel on a sounding rocket that launches for a ten-minute ride right through the heart of the aurora reaching its zenith over the native village of Venetie, Alaska. To study the curl structures, GREECE consists of two parts: ground-based imagers located in Venetie to track the aurora from the ground and the rocket to take measurements from the middle of the aurora itself. At their simplest, auroras are caused when particles from the sun funnel over to Earth's night side, generate electric currents, and trigger a shower of particles that strike oxygen and nitrogen some 60 to 200 miles up in Earth's atmosphere, releasing a flash of light. But the details are always more complicated, of course. Researchers wish to understand the aurora, and movement of plasma in general, at much smaller scales including such things as how different structures are formed there. This is a piece of information, which in turn, helps paint a picture of the sun-Earth connection and how energy and particles from the sun interact with Earth's own magnetic system, the magnetosphere. GREECE is a collaborative effort between SWRI, which developed particle instruments and the ground-based imaging, and the University of California, Berkeley, measuring the electric and magnetic fields. The launch is supported by a sounding rocket team from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va. The Poker Flat Research Range is operated by the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Credit: NASA Goddard NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing

  17. Hands-on Space Experiments from Cradle to Grave: The Role of the Sounding Rocket Program in Developing Human Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, S.

    2005-12-01

    Sounding rockets in university research provide a unique opportunity to train future space scientists and engineers. Besides fitting the typical schedule of a student, they allow a small group of students to be involved in all aspects of a space project from its inception through execution to a conclusion involving scientific discovery. Furthermore, universities with sounding rocket programs are cradles of innovations where the interdisciplinary nature of space experimentation is nurtured. These programs have formed the core research of many of the current Principal Investigators of NASA Space Science Missions. Additionally, they typically involve a large number of undergraduate students who gain in-depth experience into well-defined and critical components of a space mission. Researchers involved in sounding rocket experiments typically develop the science payload consisting of one or more instrument with the NASA Sounding Rocket Program Office (SRPO) providing all support necessary to make the science program a success. Unlike satellite missions, the sounding rocket experiments offer an opportunity to take more risks in terms of their science return. Some of these risks come in the form of new technology invention and development. Sounding rockets, with their flexible schedule and fewer formal procedural requirements, thus play an important role in maturing technology and developing new capabilities for satellite missions. The Student Launch Program was designed by NASA to provide a new opportunity where space science took a back seat to education and training. The program required that the proposing team provide components such as the nose cone, power and telemetry systems, which are typically provided to rocket experimenters by SRPO. The students involved in such programs thus gained invaluable experience with "mini-satellite" missions. We believe that they are essential for the long-term vitality of the space program and maintaining a technology

  18. The Extended Duration Sounding Rocket (EDSR): Low Cost Science and Technology Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruddace, R. G.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cash, W.; Eberspeaker, P.; Figer, D.; Figueroa, O.; Harris, W.; Kowalski, M.; Maddox, R.; Martin, C.; McCammon, D.; Nordsieck, K.; Polidan, R.; Sanders, W.; Wilkinson, E.; Asrat

    2011-12-01

    The 50-year old NASA sounding rocket (SR) program has been successful in launching scientific payloads into space frequently and at low cost with a 85% success rate. In 2008 the NASA Astrophysics Sounding Rocket Assessment Team (ASRAT), set up to review the future course of the SR program, made four major recommendations, one of which now called Extended Duration Sounding Rocket (EDSR). ASRAT recommended a system capable of launching science payloads (up to 420 kg) into low Earth orbit frequently (1/yr) at low cost, with a mission duration of approximately 30 days. Payload selection would be based on meritorious high-value science that can be performed by migrating sub-orbital payloads to orbit. Establishment of this capability is a essential for NASA as it strives to advance technical readiness and lower costs for risk averse Explorers and flagship missions in its pursuit of a balanced and sustainable program and achieve big science goals within a limited fiscal environment. The development of a new generation of small, low-cost launch vehicles (SLV), primarily the SpaceX Falcon 1 and the Orbital Sciences Minotaur I has made this concept conceivable. The NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF)conducted a detailed engineering concept study, aimed at defining the technical characteristics of all phases of a mission, from design, procurement, assembly, test, integration and mission operations. The work was led by Dr. Raymond Cruddace, a veteran of the SR program and the prime mover of the EDSR concept. The team investigated details such as, the "FAA licensed contract" for launch service procurement, with WFF and NASA SMD being responsible for mission assurance which results in a factor of two cost savings over the current approach. These and other creative solutions resulted in a proof-of-concept Class D mission design that could have a sustained launch rate of at least 1/yr, a mission duration of up to about 3 months, and a total cost of $25-30 million for each mission

  19. Heat Transfer by Thermo-Capillary Convection. Sounding Rocket COMPERE Experiment SOURCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Eckart; Dreyer, Michael

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a sounding rocket experiment which was partly dedicated to study the heat transfer from a hot wall to a cold liquid with a free surface. Natural or buoyancy-driven convection does not occur in the compensated gravity environment of a ballistic phase. Thermo-capillary convection driven by a temperature gradient along the free surface always occurs if a non-condensable gas is present. This convection increases the heat transfer compared to a pure conductive case. Heat transfer correlations are needed to predict temperature distributions in the tanks of cryogenic upper stages. Future upper stages of the European Ariane V rocket have mission scenarios with multiple ballistic phases. The aims of this paper and of the COMPERE group (French-German research group on propellant behavior in rocket tanks) in general are to provide basic knowledge, correlations and computer models to predict the thermo-fluid behavior of cryogenic propellants for future mission scenarios. Temperature and surface location data from the flight have been compared with numerical calculations to get the heat flux from the wall to the liquid. Since the heat flux measurements along the walls of the transparent test cell were not possible, the analysis of the heat transfer coefficient relies therefore on the numerical modeling which was validated with the flight data. The coincidence between experiment and simulation is fairly good and allows presenting the data in form of a Nusselt number which depends on a characteristic Reynolds number and the Prandtl number. The results are useful for further benchmarking of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as FLOW-3D and FLUENT, and for the design of future upper stage propellant tanks.

  20. Sounding rocket observations of precipitating ions in the morning auroral region

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmons, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of highly-structured ion fluxes measured by a sounding rocket launched into the morning auroral region on January 23, 1985 is investigated. The energy spectra of the precipitating ions exhibit an energy-time dependence in which particles of higher energies arrived at the rocket before those of lower energies. The spectra are interpreted as being due to the impulsive injection of particles onto high-altitude magnetic field lines, followed by their subsequent drift down the field lines to rocket altitudes. The dispersal to low energies with increasing time is explained as a time-of-flight effect in which the slower particles take longer times to traverse the distance. The ion signatures are used to constrain several possible physical models which characterize the source region. Source locations in the nightside magnetopause boundary layer are deduced through the examination of electron energy spectra and the use of a magnetospheric magnetic field model. The modeling efforts indicate that the data are consistent with sources located in the mid-latitude region of the flank boundary layer on the morning side of the magnetosphere, being in the range of 20-30 earth radii down the geomagnetic tail from the earth. Multiple injections of ions are observed, with a deduced quasi-periodicity of 100-200 s. Several candidate injection mechanisms are examined, with a mechanism related to the propagation of waves on the surface of the boundary layer found to be the most plausible explanation for the observations. Comparison is made to similar analyses by others and suggestions for future work are made.

  1. Status of the Micro-X Sounding Rocket X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, D. C.; Adams, J. S.; Baker, R.; Bandler, S. R.; Danowski, M. E.; Doriese, W. B.; Eckart, M. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubbard, A. J. F.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Micro-X is a sounding rocket borne X-ray telescope that utilizes transition edge sensors to perform imaging spectroscopy with a high level of energy resolution. Its 2.1m focal length X-ray optic has an effective area of 300 sq cm, a field of view of 11.8 arcmin, and a bandpass of 0.12.5 keV. The detector array has 128 pixels and an intrinsic energy resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM. The integration of the system has progressed with functional tests of the detectors and electronics complete, and performance characterization of the detectors is underway. We present an update of ongoing progress in preparation for the upcoming launch of the instrument.

  2. Status of the micro-X sounding rocket x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfinger, D. C.; Adams, J. S.; Baker, R.; Bandler, S. R.; Danowski, M. E.; Doriese, W. B.; Eckart, M. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubbard, A. J. F.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammon, D.; Okajima, T.; Porter, F. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Serlemitsos, P.; Smith, S. J.; Heine, S. N. T.; Wikus, P.

    2016-07-01

    Micro-X is a sounding rocket borne X-ray telescope that utilizes transition edge sensors to perform imaging spectroscopy with a high level of energy resolution. Its 2.1m focal length X-ray optic has an effective area of 300 cm2, a field of view of 11.8 arcmin, and a bandpass of 0.1-2.5 keV. The detector array has 128 pixels and an intrinsic energy resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM. The integration of the system has progressed with functional tests of the detectors and electronics complete, and performance characterization of the detectors is underway. We present an update of ongoing progress in preparation for the upcoming launch of the instrument.

  3. Plasma Impedance Probe: Simulations and Comparison to Sounding Rocket Mission Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, E. A.; Patra, S.

    2013-12-01

    The RF Impedance Probe is a powerful instrument for measurement of ionospheric space plasma properties. We present the theory of the instrument, data from sounding rocket missions, and their interpretation. We will also present some electronics schemes that are used for performing the measurements. A Plasma Fluid Finite Difference Time Domain code (PF-FDTD) is used to match measured data to the fluid theory. The results from the SAL mission and STORMS mission will be discussed. Some of the new data from STORMS suggest difficulties with the fluid based approach to the theory. I will discuss a hybrid kinetic approach that is currently being developed to address the difficulties. We will also present simulations of spacecraft wake and interactions with the surrounding ionospheric plasma that effect the measurements.

  4. Pool Boiling with Non-condensable Gas in Microgravity: Results of a Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannengieser, Olivier; Colin, Catherine; Bergez, Wladimir

    2010-09-01

    Pool boiling experiments in microgravity have been performed in the Sounding Rocket Maser 11. A heated plate of 1 cm 2 was located at the bottom of a small cylindrical tank partly filled with a refrigerant Novec HFE7000 pressurized with Nitrogen. Experiments were performed at different reservoir pressures and wall heat fluxes. The wall heat flux and wall temperature were simultaneously measured during the experiment and the behavior of the bubbles on the heater was filmed with a video camera through the transparent wall of the reservoir. The presence of Nitrogen dissolved inside the liquid led to a strong Marangoni convection around the bubble. The effect of Marangoni convection and evaporation on the wall heat transfer is analyzed in function of the relative values of the wall temperature and saturation temperature.

  5. ATLAS-M and Batt-M: development of flight hardware for MAPHEUS sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blochberger, G.; Drescher, J.; Neumann, C.; Penkert, P.; Griesche, A.; Kargl, F.; Meyer, A.

    2011-12-01

    Two modules ATLAS-M and Batt-M were especially developed for application in the MAPHEUS (MAterialPHysikalische Experimente Unter Schwerelosigkeit) sounding rocket campaign. They were manufactured and built at the Institute of Material Physics in Space at the German Aeropsace Center (DLR). ATLAS-M is a furnace for short time diffusion measurements achieving heating rates of 7K/s and cooling rates of 6K/s. Atlas-M is well suited for investigation of interdiffusion coefficients on a time scale of <200s. Batt-M is a rechargeable battery module, supplying a peak power of 12.6kW with a nominal capacity of 4.6 Ah for operation.

  6. Hard X-ray Detector Calibrations for the FOXSI Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A.; Glesener, L.; Buitrago Casas, J. C.; Han, R.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Christe, S.; Krucker, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the study of high-energy solar flares, detailed X-ray images and spectra of the Sun are required. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment is used to test direct-focusing X-ray telescopes and Double-sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSD) for solar flare study and to further understand coronal heating. The measurement of active region differential emission measures, flare temperatures, and possible quiet-Sun emission requires a precisely calibrated spectral response. This poster describes recent updates in the calibration of FOXSI's DSSDs based on new calibration tests that were performed after the second flight. The gain for each strip was recalculated using additional radioactive sources. Additionally, the varying strip sensitivity across the detectors was investigated and based on these measurements, the flight images were flatfielded. These improvements lead to more precise X-ray data for future FOXSI flights and show promise for these new technologies in imaging the Sun.

  7. Prospects for Sterile Neutrino Observations with the Micro-X Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Antonia; Micro-X Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Micro-X sounding rocket uses a Transition Edge Sensor (TES) array to make X-ray observations. The improved energy resolution of TESs compared to traditional space-based X-ray detectors brings new precision to both supernova observations and the X-ray search for sterile neutrino dark matter. Current X-ray observations disagree over the potential presence of a 3.5 keV X-ray line consistent with a sterile neutrino interaction, and Micro-X is in a unique position to establish or refute the presence of this line. We present the design considerations of the instrument and expectations for flight observations, with special emphasis given to the prospects of sterile neutrino studies.

  8. A Sounding Rocket Experiment for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, M.; Kano, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Tsuneta, S.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, S.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Goto, M.; Holloway, T.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Casini, R.; Auchère, F.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Manso Sainz, R.; Belluzzi, L.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Štěpán, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2014-10-01

    A sounding-rocket experiment called the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is presently under development to measure the linear polarization profiles in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha (Lyα) line at 121.567 nm. CLASP is a vacuum-UV (VUV) spectropolarimeter to aim for first detection of the linear polarizations caused by scattering processes and the Hanle effect in the Lyα line with high accuracy (0.1%). This is a fist step for exploration of magnetic fields in the upper chromosphere and transition region of the Sun. Accurate measurements of the linear polarization signals caused by scattering processes and the Hanle effect in strong UV lines like Lyα are essential to explore with future solar telescopes the strength and structures of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere and transition region of the Sun. The CLASP proposal has been accepted by NASA in 2012, and the flight is planned in 2015.

  9. Case Study of the Seeds and Evolution Auroral Ion Upflow From the SIERRA Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. A.; Labelle, J.; Samara, M.; Arnoldy, R.; MacDonald, E.; Klatt, E.; Kintner, P.

    2005-12-01

    The SIERRA nightside auroral sounding rocket made observations of the origins of ion upflow, at low altitudes (below 700 km), low scale height (densities above 20,000/cc), and low energies (10 eV.) Upflowing ions with bulk velocities up to 2 km/s are seen in conjunction with the poleward edge of a nightside substorm arc. The upflow is limited within the poleward edge to a region (a) of northward convection and (b) where Alfvenic and Pedersen conductivities are well-matched, leading to good ionospheric transmission of Alfvenic power. Also throughout the poleward edge, precipitation of moderate-energy (100s of eV) protons and oxygen is observed. This population is interpreted as reflection from a higher altitude field aligned potential of upgoing transversely heated ion conics. Details of this case study observation of the seeds and evolution of auroral ion outflow are presented as an example for testing of models of ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling.

  10. Assessment of the transition strip effect in the transonic flow over the sounding rocket Sonda III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão Filho, J. B. P.; Reis, M. L. C. C.; Francisco, C. P. F.; Silva, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of normalized pressure distribution are carried out over a 1:8 scale half-model of the Sonda III sounding rocket. The objective is to analyze the effect of the implementation of transition devices on the flow over the vehicle. Measurements show that the presence of the transition devices affect pressure distributions in different Mach numbers around the inter-stage region of Sonda III depending on its location and independently of the turbulent transition method employed. The study of these effects plays a significant role for future developments, since transition phenomena and the modification of the boundary layer behaviour due to the expansion can alter the load distributions and the turbulent structures of the flow. Furthermore, the experimental verification of such phenomena is crucial for the correct implementation of computational fluid dynamics calculations, as they might be able to capture the correct flow behaviour in these regions.

  11. The interaction of bubbles with solidification interfaces. [during coasting phase of sounding rocket flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of bubbles at a dendritic solidification interface was studied during the coasting phase of a sounding rocket flight. Sequential photographs of the gradient freeze experiment showed nucleation, growth and coalescence of bubbles at the moving interface during both the low-gravity and one-gravity tests. In the one-gravity test the bubbles were observed to detach from the interface and float to the top of the melt. However, in the low-gravity tests no bubble detachment from the interface or steady state bubble motion occurred and large voids were grown into the crystal. These observations are discussed in terms of the current theory of thermal migration of bubbles and in terms of their implications on the space processing of metals.

  12. Far-ultraviolet spectral images of comet Halley from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, R. P.; Carruthers, G. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Far-ultraviolet images of comet Halley obtained from sounding rockets launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on 24 February and 13 March, 1986, are presented. Direct electrographic images of the hydrogen coma of the comet were obtained at the Lyman-alpha wavelength along with objective spectra containing images of the coma at the oxygen, carbon, and sulfur resonance multiplets. Analysis of the Lyman-alpha images yields hydrogen atom production rates of 1.9 x 10 to the 30th/s and 1.4 x 120 to the 30th/s for the two observations. Images of oxygen, carbon, and sulfur emissions obtained with the objective grating spectrograph are presented for the first set of observations and preliminary production rates are derived for these elements.

  13. Trajectory Reconstruction of the ST-9 Sounding Rocket Experiment Using IMU and Landmark Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Ryan S.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Bordi, John J.; Cheng, Yang; Johnson, Andrew J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Lisano, Michael E.; Owen, William M.; Wolf, Aron A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents trajectory reconstruction of the ST-9 sounding rocket experiment using the onboard IMU data and descent imagery. The raw IMU accelerometer measurements are first converted into inertial acceleration and then used in trajectory integration. The descent images are pre-processed using a map-matching algorithm and unique landmarks for each image are created. Using the converted IMU data and descent images, the result from dead-reckoning and the kinematic-fix approaches are first compared with the GPS measurements. Then, both the IMU data and landmarks are processed together using a batch least-squares filter and the position, velocity, stochastic acceleration, and camera orientation of each image are estimated. The reconstructed trajectory is compared with the GPS data and the corresponding formal uncertainties are presented. The result shows that IMU data and descent images processed with a batch filter algorithm provide the trajectory accuracy required for pin-point landing.

  14. The swept angle retarding mass spectrometer: Initial results from the Michigan auroral probe sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Stone, N. H.; Sharp, W. E.; Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Data from a sounding rocket flight of the swept angle retarding ion mass spectrometer (SARIMS) are presented to demonstrate the capability of the instrument to make measurements of thermal ions which are differential in angle, energy, and mass. The SARIMS was flown on the Michigan auroral probe over regions characterized first by discrete auroral arcs and later by diffuse precipitation. The instrument measured the temperature, densities, and flow velocities of the ions NO(+) and O(+). Measured NO(+) densities ranged from 10 to the 5th power up to 3 x 10 to the 5th power ions/cu cm, while the measured O(+) densities were a factor of 5-10 less. Ion temperatures ranged from 0.15 up to 0.33 eV. Eastward ion flows approximately 0.5 km/sec were measured near the arcs, and the observed flow magnitude decreased markedly inside the arcs.

  15. A quick test of the WEP enabled by a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Patla, Biju R.; Phillips, James D.; Popescu, Eugeniu E.; Rocco, Emanuele; Thapa, Rajesh

    2011-05-01

    We describe SR-POEM, a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle (WEP), which is to be conducted during the free fall portion of a sounding rocket flight. This test of a single pair of substances is aimed at a measurement uncertainty of σ(η) < 10-16 after averaging the results of eight separate drops, each of 40 s duration. The WEP measurement is made with a set of four laser gauges that are expected to achieve 0.1 pm Hz-1/2. We address the two sources of systematic error that are currently of greatest concern: magnetic force and electrostatic (patch effect) force on the test mass assemblies. The discovery of a violation (η ≠ 0) would have profound implications for physics, astrophysics and cosmology.

  16. Design and characteristics of a WEP test in a sounding-rocket payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Patla, Biju R.; Phillips, James D.; Thapa, Rajesh

    2012-09-01

    We describe SR-POEM, a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle that is to be conducted during the free fall portion of the flight of a sounding rocket payload. This test of a single pair of substances will have a measurement uncertainty of σ(η) < 2×10-17 after averaging the results of eight separate drops, each of 120 s duration. The entire payload is inverted between successive drops to cancel potential sources of systematic error. The weak equivalence principle measurement is made with a set of four of the SAO laser gauges, which have achieved an Allan deviation of 0.04 pm for an averaging time of 30 s. We discuss aspects of the current design with an emphasis on those that bear on the accuracy of the determination of η. The discovery of a violation(η ≠ 0) would have profound implications for physics, astrophysics and cosmology.

  17. THE ADIABATIC DEMAGNETIZATION REFRIGERATOR FOR THE MICRO-X SOUNDING ROCKET TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Wikus, P.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Leman, S. W.; Rutherford, J. M.; Trowbridge, S. N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Doriese, W. B.; McCammon, D.

    2010-04-09

    The Micro-X Imaging X-ray Spectrometer is a sounding rocket payload slated for launch in 2011. An array of Transition Edge Sensors, which is operated at a bath temperature of 50 mK, will be used to obtain a high resolution spectrum of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) with a 75 gram Ferric Ammonium Alum (FAA) salt pill in the bore of a 4 T superconducting magnet provides a stable heat sink for the detector array only a few seconds after burnout of the rocket motors. This requires a cold stage design with very short thermal time constants. A suspension made from Kevlar strings holds the 255 gram cold stage in place. It is capable of withstanding loads in excess of 200 g. Stable operation of the TES array in proximity to the ADR magnet is ensured by a three-stage magnetic shielding system which consists of a superconducting can, a high-permeability shield and a bucking coil. The development and testing of the Micro-X payload is well underway.

  18. The Transition-Edge-Sensor Array for the Micro-X Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckart, M. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, Sarah Elizabeth; Chervenak J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porst, J. P.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Micro-X sounding rocket program will fly a 128-element array of transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters to enable high-resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. To match the angular resolution of the optics while maximizing the field-of-view and retaining a high energy resolution (< 4 eV at 1 keV), we have designed the pixels using 600 x 600 sq. micron Au/Bi absorbers, which overhang 140 x 140 sq. micron Mo/Au sensors. The data-rate capabilities of the rocket telemetry system require the pulse decay to be approximately 2 ms to allow a significant portion of the data to be telemetered during flight. Here we report experimental results from the flight array, including measurements of energy resolution, uniformity, and absorber thermalization. In addition, we present studies of test devices that have a variety of absorber contact geometries, as well as a variety of membrane-perforation schemes designed to slow the pulse decay time to match the telemetry requirements. Finally, we describe the reduction in pixel-to-pixel crosstalk afforded by an angle-evaporated Cu backside heatsinking layer, which provides Cu coverage on the four sidewalls of the silicon wells beneath each pixel.

  19. The Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for the Micro-X Sounding Rocket Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikus, P.; Adams, J. S.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Bandler, S. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Eckart, M. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leman, S. W.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Rutherford, J. M.; Trowbridge, S. N.

    2010-04-01

    The Micro-X Imaging X-ray Spectrometer is a sounding rocket payload slated for launch in 2011. An array of Transition Edge Sensors, which is operated at a bath temperature of 50 mK, will be used to obtain a high resolution spectrum of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) with a 75 gram Ferric Ammonium Alum (FAA) salt pill in the bore of a 4 T superconducting magnet provides a stable heat sink for the detector array only a few seconds after burnout of the rocket motors. This requires a cold stage design with very short thermal time constants. A suspension made from Kevlar strings holds the 255 gram cold stage in place. It is capable of withstanding loads in excess of 200 g. Stable operation of the TES array in proximity to the ADR magnet is ensured by a three-stage magnetic shielding system which consists of a superconducting can, a high-permeability shield and a bucking coil. The development and testing of the Micro-X payload is well underway.

  20. Status of the PICTURE Sounding Rocket to Image the Epsilon Eridani Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Ewan S.; Mendillo, Christopher Bernard; Hicks, Brian; Cook, Timothy; Martel, Jason; Finn, Susanna; Polidan, Ronald S.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2014-06-01

    The PICTURE (Planetary Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Rocket Experiment) sounding rocket will use a visible nulling interferometer to characterize the exozodiacal dust disk of Epsilon Eridani (K2V, 3.22 pc) in reflected visible light to an inner radius of 1.5 AU (0.5”) from the star. Launch is scheduled for Fall 2014 and the PICTURE payload is currently undergoing re-integration. The first launch of PICTURE suffered a science telemetry failure and the primary mirror was shattered upon landing, the second launch will fly a new SiC primary mirror and onboard data storage. PICTURE visible light observations will constrain scattering properties of the Epsilon Eridani exozodiacal dust disk from 600nm to 750 nm, measuring the background brightness which must be overcome for future exoplanet observations. Additionally, PICTURE will demonstrate operation of a MEMS deformable mirror and a visible nulling coronagraph in space. We will present the latest measurements of integrated telescope and interferometer performance.

  1. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.S.; McMullin, D.; Judge, D.L. ); Canfield, L.R. )

    1990-04-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme ultraviolet photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 {angstrom}. The detector was flown aboard a solar point sounding rocket launched from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on October 24, 1988. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 {times} 10{sup 10} photons cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. Based on a nominal probable error of 7% for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-{angstrom} region (5% on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 {angstrom}), and based on experimental errors associated with their rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of {approximately}14% is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  2. Second flight of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager sounding rocket [FOXSI-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago-Casas, J. C.; Krucker, S.; Christe, S.; Glesener, L.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Ramsey, B.; Foster, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket experiment that has flown twice to test a direct focusing method for measuring solar hard X-rays (HXRs). These HXRs are associated with particle acceleration mechanisms at work in powering solar flares and aid us in investigating the role of nanoflares in heating the solar corona. FOXSI-1 successfully flew for the first time on November 2, 2012. After some upgrades including the addition of extra mirrors to two optics modules and the inclusion of new fine-pitch CdTe strip detectors, in addition to the Si detectors from FOXSI-1, the FOXSI-2 payload flew successfully again on December 11, 2014. During the second flight four targets on the Sun were observed, including at least three active regions, two microflares, and ~1 minute of quiet Sun observation. This work is focused in giving an overview of the FOXSI rocket program and a detailed description of the upgrades for the second flight. In addition, we show images and spectra investigating the presence of no thermal emission for each of the flaring targets that we observed during the second flight.

  3. Post-launch analysis of the deployment dynamics of a space web sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Huina; Sinn, Thomas; Vasile, Massimiliano; Tibert, Gunnar

    2016-10-01

    Lightweight deployable space webs have been proposed as platforms or frames for a construction of structures in space where centrifugal forces enable deployment and stabilization. The Suaineadh project was aimed to deploy a 2 × 2m2 space web by centrifugal forces in milli-gravity conditions and act as a test bed for the space web technology. Data from former sounding rocket experiments, ground tests and simulations were used to design the structure, the folding pattern and control parameters. A developed control law and a reaction wheel were used to control the deployment. After ejection from the rocket, the web was deployed but entanglements occurred since the web did not start to deploy at the specified angular velocity. The deployment dynamics was reconstructed from the information recorded in inertial measurement units and cameras. The nonlinear torque of the motor used to drive the reaction wheel was calculated from the results. Simulations show that if the Suaineadh started to deploy at the specified angular velocity, the web would most likely have been deployed and stabilized in space by the motor, reaction wheel and controller used in the experiment.

  4. X-ray CCD Sounding Rocket Observation of the North Polar Spur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawley, L. J.; Burrows, D. N.; Garmire, G. P.; Mendenhall, J. A.

    1997-12-01

    A X-ray CCD camera aboard a sounding rocket was used to observe the North Polar Spur, an enhanced feature of the Soft X-ray Background. The flight took place on May 2, 1997 from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The target center was (l=20, b=+45) with a 60 x 20 degree field of view aligned along the North Polar Spur SXRB feature seen in 3/4 KeV maps of the Rosat All-Sky Survey. [Snowden et al. 1995] The goal was to examine the NPS with high spectral energy resolution. To that end, we utilized a three-phase CCD with thinned poly gates made by EEV. This device was designed to improve quantum efficiency in the soft X-ray band, i.e. below 1 KeV. We present trajectory and aspect solutions for this rocket flight. We discuss the amount of data contamination from cosmic rays, energetic particles and scattered solar X-rays, as well as atmospheric absorption corrections. We present our corrected spectrum for the NPS and the preliminary results of spectral fits with Raymond and Smith thermal plasma models. Finally we compare the results for the North Polar Spur with results from our previous observation of a similar enhanced feature of the SXRB in the galactic center. [Mendenhall, 1997

  5. An experimental study on the aerodynamic feasibility of a roll-controllable sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirouzu, M.; Soga, K.; Shibato, Y.

    1986-02-01

    The aerodynamic feasibility of a roll-controllable two-stage sounding rocket is investigated experimentally. The rocket has ailerons on front-fins to generate the rolling moment for the control and free-rolling tail-fins to prevent the induced rolling moment on the tail-fins from transmitting to the fuselage. Wind tunnel tests were made at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 and alpha = 0 deg, 4 deg, and 8 deg varying the deflection angle of the ailerons for the models with fixed tail-fins, with free-rolling tail-fins and without tail-fins. Aerodynamic characteristics were measured by using a six-component balance. The effectiveness of the free-rolling tail-fins for the elimination of the influence of the induced rolling moment is confirmed. It is concluded that the characteristics of the rolling moment generated by the ailerons are desirable for the control, and the rotation of the tail-fins would not raise mechanical and other aerodynamic problems.

  6. Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure Measured by Two SOunding Rockets in Flight Simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounds, Scott R.; Kaeppler, Steve; Kletzing, Craig; Lessard, Marc; Cohen, Ian J.; Jones, Sarah; Pfaff, Robert F.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Anderson, Brian Jay; Gjerloev, Jesper W.; Labelle, James W.; Dombrowski, Micah P.; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Heinselman, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    On January 29, 2009, two identically instrumented sounding rockets were launched into a sub-storm auroral arc from Poker Flat Alaska. Labeled the Auroral Currents and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) mission, the payloads were launched to different apogees (approx.350km and approx.120km) and staggered in time so as to optimize their magnetic conjunctions. The different altitudes provided simultaneous in-situ measurements of magnetospheric input and output to the ionosphere and the ionospheric response in the lower F and E region. Measurements included 3-axis magnetic field, 2-axis electric field nominally perpendicular to the magnetic field, energetic particles, electron and ion, up to 15keV, cold plasma temperature and density. In addition, PFISR was also operating in a special designed mode to measure electric field and density profiles in the plane defined by the rocket trajectories and laterally to either side of the trajectories. Observation of the measured currents and electrodynamics structure of the auroral form encountered are presented in the context of standard auroral models and the temporal/spatial limitations of mission designs.

  7. Quiet-sun and non-flaring active region measurements from the FOXSI-2 sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago-Casas, J. C.; Glesener, L.; Christe, S.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Narukage, N.; Krucker, S.; Bale, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    Solar hard X-ray (HXR) emissions are a cornerstone for understanding particle acceleration and energy release in the corona. These phenomena are present at different size scales and intensities, from large eruptive events down to the smallest flares. The presence of HXRs in small, unresolved flares would provide direct evidence of small reconnection events, i.e. nano-flares, that are thought to be be important for the unsolved coronal heating problem. Currently operating solar-dedicated instruments that observe HXRs from the Sun do not have the dynamic range, nor the sensitivity, crucial to observe the faintest solar HXRs. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload is a novel experiment that develops and applies direct focusing optics coupled with semiconductor detectors to observe faint HXRs from the Sun. The FOXSI rocket has successfully completed two flights, observing areas of the quiet-Sun, active regions and micro-flares. We present recent data analysis to test the presence of hot plasma in and outside of active regions observed during the two flights, focusing on the differential emission measure distribution of the non-flaring corona.

  8. The hydrogen coma of Comet P/Halley observed in Lyman-alpha using sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, R. P.; Meier, R. R.; Keller, H. U.; Opal, C. B.; Carruthers, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm) images of Comet P/Halley were obtained using sounding rockets launched from White Sands Missile Range on 24.5 February and 13.5 March 1986. The second rocket was launched 13 hours before the fly-by of the Giotto spacecraft. An electrographic camera on both flights provided Lyman-alpha images covering a 20 field of view with 3 arcmin resolution. The data from both flights have been compared with a time-dependent model of hydrogen kinetics. To match the measured isophote contours, hydrogen sources with velocity components of 8 km/s and 20 km/s (from OH and H2O respectively) as well as a low velocity component (about 2 km/s) are required. This low velocity component is thought to result from thermalization of fast hydrogen atoms within the collision zone, providing an important diagnostic of temperature and density near the nucleus. Hydrogen production rates of 3.8 x 10 exp 30/s and 1.7 x 10 exp 30/s have been obtained for the two observations.

  9. Kinetic modeling of auroral ion Outflows observed by the VISIONS sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarran, R. M.; Zettergren, M. D.; Rowland, D. E.; Klenzing, J.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    The VISIONS (VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm) sounding rocket was launched on Feb. 7, 2013 at 8:21 UTC from Poker Flat, Alaska, into an auroral substorm with the objective of identifying the drivers and dynamics of the ion outflow below 1000km. Energetic ion data from the VISIONS polar cap boundary crossing show evidence of an ion "pressure cooker" effect whereby ions energized via transverse heating in the topside ionosphere travel upward and are impeded by a parallel potential structure at higher altitudes. VISIONS was also instrumented with an energetic neutral atom (ENA) detector which measured neutral particles ( 50-100 eV energy) presumably produced by charge-exchange with the energized outflowing ions. Hence, inferences about ion outflow may be made via remotely-sensing measurements of ENAs. This investigation focuses on modeling energetic outflowing ion distributions observed by VISIONS using a kinetic model. This kinetic model traces large numbers of individual particles, using a guiding-center approximation, in order to allow calculation of ion distribution functions and moments. For the present study we include mirror and parallel electric field forces, and a source of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) wave heating, thought to be central to the transverse energization of ions. The model is initiated with a steady-state ion density altitude profile and Maxwellian velocity distribution characterizing the initial phase-space conditions for multiple particle trajectories. This project serves to advance our understanding of the drivers and particle dynamics in the auroral ionosphere and to improve data analysis methods for future sounding rocket and satellite missions.

  10. Observing soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium with X-ray calorimeter on a sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J.; Edwards, B.; Juda, M.; Mccammon, D.; Skinner, M.; Kelley, R.; Moseley, H.; Schoelkopf, R.; Szymkowiak, A.

    1990-01-01

    For an X-ray calorimeter working at 0.1 K, the energy resolution ideally can be as good as one eV for a practical detector. A detector with a resolution of 17 eV FWHM at 6 keV has been constructed. It is expected that this can be improved by a factor of two or more. With X-ray calorimeters flown on a sounding rocket, it should be possible to observe soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium over the energy range 0.07 to 1 keV. Here, a preliminary design for an X-ray calorimeter rocket experiment and the spectrum which might be observed from an equilibrium plasma are presented. For later X-ray calorimeter sounding rocket experiments, it is planned to add an aluminum foil mirror with collecting area of about 400 sq cm to observe line features from bright supernova remnants.

  11. University of Maryland-Republic Terrapin Sounding Rocket H121-2681-I(Terrapin) Model on the Launcher

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1956-10-21

    LAL 95,647 University of Maryland-Republic Terrapin sounding rocket mounted on special launcher, September 21, 1956. Photograph published in A New Dimension Wallops Island Flight Test Range: The First Fifteen Years by Joseph Shortal. A NASA publication. Page 506.

  12. Determination of the center of brightness of the lunar crescent. [through use of a sounding rocket payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, C.

    1975-01-01

    The operational characteristics of the lunar sensor which was used to point the sounding rocket are discussed briefly. The associated mathematical model of the system is developed and the computer programs which were written to implement the model are described. Data pertinent to the two launches is presented.

  13. Sounding-Rocket Studies of Langmuir-Wave Microphysics in the Auroral Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, Micah P.

    Since their discovery in laboratory plasmas in the 1920s, Langmuir waves have been observed to be ubiquitous in plasma environments, particularly in space plasmas. From the greater solar wind to planetary foreshocks and the auroral ionosphere, Langmuir waves are a key factor mediating electron temperature, and controlling electron beam propagation and beam-plasma energy transfer. Because they are so important, Langmuir waves in the space environment have been intensively investigated; however, there remain two challenging types of experiments that are relatively lacking: three-dimensional measurements of Langmuir-wave fields, and measurements of Langmuir wave-electron correlations. This thesis works on filling these two gaps, plus development of new Langmuir-wave instrumentation. The CHARM-II wave-particle Correlator instrument was designed to study the energy transfer between electron beams and plasmas via the sorting of incoming particles by concurrent Langmuir-wave phase, allowing for direct observation of electron bunching. Data from the CHARM-II sounding rocket comprises the first such observations with statistical levels of events, revealing an association between the polarity of the resistive component of the electron phase-bunching and changes in the electron flux at the associated energy, such that a negative resistive component goes with an increase in electron flux, and vice versa, effectively showing energy flow from the beam to the waves, and subsequent enhancements of wave damping. Surprisingly, the results also show comparable amounts of resistive and reactive activity. A test-particle simulation was developed to confirm the details of the theoretical explanation for the observed effect. A three-dimensional Langmuir-wave receiver flown on the TRICE sounding rocket mission reveals the beat signature of the amplitude-modulated 'bursty' form of Langmuir waves which has been observed in many environments. An analysis of the three-dimensional data shows

  14. Heat Transfer by Thermo-capillary Convection -Sounding Rocket COMPERE Experiment SOURCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Fuhrmann, Eckart

    The sounding rocket COMPERE experiment SOURCE was successfully flown on MASER 11, launched in Kiruna (ESRANGE), May 15th, 2008. SOURCE has been intended to partly ful-fill the scientific objectives of the European Space Agency (ESA) Microgravity Applications Program (MAP) project AO-2004-111 (Convective boiling and condensation). Three parties of principle investigators have been involved to design the experiment set-up: ZARM for thermo-capillary flows, IMFT (Toulouse, France) for boiling studies, EADS Astrium (Bremen, Ger-many) for depressurization. The topic of this paper is to study the effect of wall heat flux on the contact line of the free liquid surface and to obtain a correlation for a convective heat trans-fer coefficient. The experiment has been conducted along a predefined time line. A preheating sequence at ground was the first operation to achieve a well defined temperature evolution within the test cell and its environment inside the rocket. Nearly one minute after launch, the pressurized test cell was filled with the test liquid HFE-7000 until a certain fill level was reached. Then the free surface could be observed for 120 s without distortion. Afterwards, the first depressurization was started to induce subcooled boiling, the second one to start saturated boiling. The data from the flight consists of video images and temperature measurements in the liquid, the solid, and the gaseous phase. Data analysis provides the surface shape versus time and the corresponding apparent contact angle. Computational analysis provides information for the determination of the heat transfer coefficient in a compensated gravity environment where a flow is caused by the temperature difference between the hot wall and the cold liquid. The paper will deliver correlations for the effective contact angle and the heat transfer coefficient as a function of the relevant dimensionsless parameters as well as physical explanations for the observed behavior. The data will be used

  15. The NRL Solar Physics Sounding Rocket Program: Trailblazers for the Solar-C and Solar Orbiter Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, D. H.; Korendyke, C.; Vourlidas, A.; Moses, J.; Brown, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Space Science Division (SSD) sounding rocket program enables cutting-edge scientific research through the development of low-cost, short-schedule, highly advanced suborbital payloads. Each sounding rocket campaign provides a low-cost and accordingly low-risk test bed for the technology development of future flight projects. Our approach is to maintain a continuous hardware development program through a successful cycle of concept inception, competition in the NASA LCAS (Low-Cost Access to Space) program, instrument development, launch, and science analysis. Currently, SSD has three active sounding rocket programs. HERSCHEL (HElium Resonance Scattering in the Corona & HELio-sphere) was successfully flown in 2010 and measured the global helium absolute abundance in the solar corona for the first time, linking solar surface and in-situ abundance. The HERSCHEL experiment served as the pathfinder for the METIS coronagraph that will fly on Solar Orbiter. VERIS (VEry high Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) is scheduled for launch in August 2013 and will provide the first spectroscopic observations of the solar atmosphere at spatial scales not yet observed by previous EUV spectrographs. VERIS is the test bed for a flight hardware concept to be proposed to NASA for the upcoming JAXA Solar-C mission. VAULT (Very high Angular resolution Ultraviolet Telescope), scheduled for re-flight in Fall 2013, will provide ultra high-resolution images of the Lyman-alpha layer of the upper chromosphere where much of the energy required for explosive events is stored. Previous VAULT sounding rocket flights provided the first sub-arcsecond solar images from space and led to the development of a Lyman-alpha telescope for the Solar Orbiter mission. Through these next sounding rocket flights NRL SSD will provide scientific leadership in the budding field of upper chromospheric research.

  16. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly

  17. ROCKETMAS: A sounding-rocket-based remote sensing measurement of mesospheric water vapor and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croskey, C. L.; Olivero, J. J.; Puliafito, S. E.; Mitchell, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The ROCKETMAS rocketborne technique, based on the shuttle-borne millimeter wave atmospheric sounder (MAS), to obtain water vapor and ozone measurements with vertical resolution, is described. The concentrations of mesospheric water vapor and ozone are not well known, yet both contribute significantly to the chemical and radiative structure of that region. In situ measurements of water vapor are difficult to make because water that was absorbed on the instrument surfaces outgasses in space and contaminates the local environment of the payload. However, a remote sensing technique that uses a long pathlength through the atmosphere greatly reduces the effect of such local contamination. The 183.3 GHz line of water vapor and 184.4 GHz line of ozone are good choices for spaceborne radiometer measurements because one front-end mixer assembly can be used to simultaneously observe both gases. The design of a sounding rocket based millimeter wave radiometer for measuring water vapor and ozone with a height resolution not possible by either ground based or limb sounding techniques is described.

  18. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 - 75 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, S.; Gausa, M. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 75 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on the two sounding rockets of the CHAMPS (CHarge And mass of Meteoritic smoke ParticleS) rocket campaign which were launched into the mesosphere in October 2011 from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void beneath an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed above an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened on the downleg to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region below. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ~75 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  19. Use of a personal computer for the real-time reception and analysis of data from a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, W. D.; Penegor, G. T.; Cotton, D. M.; Kaplan, G. C.; Chakrabarti, S.

    1990-01-01

    In September 1988 the Earth and Planetary Atmospheres Group of the Space Sciences Laboratory of the University of California at Berkeley flew an experiment on a high-altitude sounding rocket launched from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The experiment, BEARS (Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer), was designed to obtain spectroscopic data on the composition and structure of the earth's upper atmosphere. Consideration is given to the objectives of the BEARS experiment; the computer interface and software; the use of remote data transmission; and calibration, integration, and flight operations.

  20. Use of a personal computer for the real-time reception and analysis of data from a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, W. D.; Penegor, G. T.; Cotton, D. M.; Kaplan, G. C.; Chakrabarti, S.

    1990-01-01

    In September 1988 the Earth and Planetary Atmospheres Group of the Space Sciences Laboratory of the University of California at Berkeley flew an experiment on a high-altitude sounding rocket launched from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The experiment, BEARS (Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer), was designed to obtain spectroscopic data on the composition and structure of the earth's upper atmosphere. Consideration is given to the objectives of the BEARS experiment; the computer interface and software; the use of remote data transmission; and calibration, integration, and flight operations.

  1. Coordinated Sounding Rocket, HST, and SPICAV Observations of Venus in Nov. 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, J. T.; Bertaux, J.; Carveth, C. J.; Chaufray, J.; Gladstone, R.; Darling, N.

    2013-12-01

    A coordinated set of observations of Venus in Nov. 2013 will address the escape of water from the upper atmosphere as related to measurements of the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen at various altitude levels. The observations will be performed by the Venus Spectral Rocket (VeSpR) sounding rocket experiment, the HST Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), and the SPICAV/SOIR instruments on Venus Express. The VeSpR experiment is a high spectral resolution system designed specifically to resolve the D and H Ly alpha emissions from planetary atmospheres. The present version of this payload will measure the D/H ratio at the level above CO2 photo-absorption, or above roughly 110 km altitude. Similar observations are now permitted using the HST/STIS in echelle mode, where previously HST observations of Venus were not allowed. The SOIR instrument has previously measured the ratio of HDO/H2O in the middle atmosphere between 70-110 km, and found a variation with altitude in the D/H ratio. New observations will be made for comparison with the other instruments. The goal is to understand the path that both D and H atoms take as water is photodissociated, and the atoms move to the top of the atmosphere where they can escape into space. The detailed physical processes must be understood to know how to relate the measured tow order of magnitude enhancement in the Venusian D/H ratio to the historic escape of a volume of water from the early atmosphere. We expect to present the initial scientific results from these combined observations.

  2. Study of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTID) with sounding rockets and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Abe, Takumi; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Bernhardt, Paul; Watanabe, Shigeto; Yamamoto, Masa-yuki; Larsen, Miguel; Saito, Susumu; Tsugawa, Takuya; Ishisaka, Keigo; Iwagami, Naomoto; Nishioka, Michi; Kato, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Takao; Tanaka, Makoto; Mr

    Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID) is an interesting phenomenon in the F-region. The MSTID is frequent in summer nighttime over Japan, showing wave structures with wavelengths of 100-200 km, periodicity of about 1 hour, and propagation toward the southwest. The phenomena are observed by the total electron content (TEC) from GEONET, Japanese dense network of GPS receivers, and 630 nm airglow imagers as horizontal pattern. It was also measured as Spread-F events of ionograms or as field-aligned echoes of the MU radar. MSTID was, in the past, explained by Perkins instability (Perkins, 1973) while its low growth rate was a problem. Recently 3D simulation study by Yokoyama et al (2009) hypothesized a generation mechanism of the MSTID, which stands on electromagnetic E/F-region coupling of the ionosphere. The hypothesis is that the MSTID first grows with polarization electric fields from sporadic-E, then show spatial structures resembling to the Perkins instability. We recently conducted a observation campaign to check this hypothesis. We launched JASA ISAS sounding rockets S-310-42 and S-520-27 at 23:00 JST and 23:57JST on July 20, 2013 while an MSTID event was monitored in real-time by the GPS-TEC from GEONET. We found 1-5mV/m northeastward/eastward electric fields during the flight. Variation of electric fileds were associated with horizontal distribution of plasma density. Wind velocity was measured by the TME and Lithium releases from S-310-42 and S-520-27 rockets, respectively, showing southward wind near the sporadic-E layer heights. These results are consistent to the expected generation mechanism shown above. In the presentation we will discuss electric-field results and its relationship with plasma density variability together with preliminary results from the neutral-wind observations.

  3. Midlatitude daytime wind measurements in the dynamo region with a sounding rocket chemical release technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, M. F.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Abe, T.; Habu, H.; Yamamoto, M. Y.; Kakinami, Y.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-12-01

    The sounding rocket chemical release technique can provide wind measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere with excellent height resolution and extended altitude coverage, but such measurements are generally limited to nighttime conditions. Lithium trails, however, have a sufficiently bright resonant emission in sunlight to be detected with cameras or photometers using very narrow-band filters tuned to the emission wavelength. This type of measurement was attempted successfully a few times in the 1970's. We present the results of a recent experiment that represents the first use of the technique since those early attempts. Specifically, a rocket launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, on July 4, 2013, at 1031 LT, released a series of three lithium trails covering the altitude range from 95 to 125 km. The trails were observed with cameras equipped with 2-nm telecentric filter lenses on a NASA aircraft at an altitude of 28,000 feet, above the majority of the lower-level haze layer. The wind profile obtained from the observations showed maximum wind speeds of approximately 150 m/s in the altitude range where the strongest dynamo currents are expected. A large shear was evident below the altitude of the wind maximum, and the turbopause transition could be seen in the trail within the region of the large shear. In addition, there were large changes in the wind speed and wind direction during the 10 to 15 minute observing period. The results are of interest in terms of the technique development, which improves significantly on the measurements from the 1970's by using modern filter lens systems and sensitive digital cameras. In addition, the observed wind profiles show the characteristics of the winds and their time variations in daytime conditions across this critical altitude range.

  4. Evidence for Nanoflare Heating of the Solar Corona from the EUNIS Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosius, J. W.; Daw, A. N.; Rabin, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present spatially resolved EUV spectroscopic measurements ofpervasive, faint Fe XIX 592.2 A line emission in AR 11726,observed during the 2013 April 23 flight of the Extreme UltravioletNormal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS-13) sounding rocket instrument. With cooled detectors, high sensitivity, and high spectralresolution, EUNIS-13 resolves the lines of Fe XIX at 592.2 A (formedat temperature T around 8.9 MK) and Fe XII at 592.6 A (T around 1.6MK). The Fe XIX line emission, observed over an area in excess of4920 square arcsec (2.58x10^9 square km, more than 60% of the activeregion), provides strong evidence for the nanoflare heating model ofthe solar corona. No GOES events occurred in the region less than 2hours before the rocket flight, but a microflare was observed northand east of the region with RHESSI and EUNIS during the flight. Theabsence of significant upward velocities anywhere in the region,particularly the microflare, indicates that the pervasive Fe XIXemission is not propelled outward from the microflare site, but ismost likely attributed to localized heating (due to reconnection,wave dissipation, or some other mechanism) consistent with thenanoflare heating model of the solar corona. We measure average FeXIX/Fe XII intensity ratios of 0.070 outside the AR core, 0.22 inarea of bright coronal emission (the area in which the Fe XIIintensity exceeds half its maximum observed value), and 0.55 in theregion's hot core. Using the CHIANTI atomic physics database andassuming ionization equilibrium, we estimate corresponding Fe XIX/FeXII emission measure ratios of about 0.076, 0.23 and 0.59. Theemission measure ratios must be viewed with caution in light oflingering uncertainties in the Fe XII contribution functions.EUNIS-13 was supported by the NASA Heliophysics Division through itsLow Cost Access to Space program.

  5. Surface Deformation by Thermo-capillary Convection -Sounding Rocket COMPERE Experiment SOURCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Eckart; Dreyer, Michael E.

    The sounding rocket COMPERE experiment SOURCE was successfully flown on MASER 11, launched in Kiruna (ESRANGE), May 15th, 2008. SOURCE has been intended to partly ful-fill the scientific objectives of the European Space Agency (ESA) Microgravity Applications Program (MAP) project AO-2004-111 (Convective boiling and condensation). Three parties of principle investigators have been involved to design the experiment set-up: ZARM for thermo-capillary flows, IMFT (Toulouse, France) for boiling studies, EADS Astrium (Bremen, Ger-many) for depressurization. The scientific aims are to study the effect of wall heat flux on the contact line of the free liquid surface and to obtain a correlation for a convective heat transfer coefficient. The experiment has been conducted along a predefined time line. A preheating sequence at ground was the first operation to achieve a well defined temperature evolution within the test cell and its environment inside the rocket. Nearly one minute after launch, the pressurized test cell was filled with the test liquid HFE-7000 until a certain fill level was reached. Then the free surface could be observed for 120 s without distortion. Afterwards, the first depressurization was started to induce subcooled boiling, the second one to start saturated boiling. The data from the flight consists of video images and temperature measurements in the liquid, the solid, and the gaseous phase. Data analysis provides the surface shape versus time and the corresponding apparent contact angle. Computational analysis provides information for the determination of the heat transfer coefficient in a compensated gravity environment where a flow is caused by the temperature difference between the hot wall and the cold liquid. Correlations for the effective contact angle and the heat transfer coefficient shall be delivered as a function of the relevant dimensionsless parameters. The data will be used for benchmarking of commercial CFD codes and the tank design

  6. An observation of LHR noise with banded structure by the sounding rocket S29 Barium-GEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskinen, H. E. J.; Holmgren, G.; Kintner, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of electrostatic and obviously locally produced noise near the lower hybrid frequency made by the sounding rocket S29 Barium-GEOS is reported. The noise is strongly related to the spin of the rocket and reaches well below the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. Above the altitude of 300 km the noise shows banded structure roughly organized by the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. Simultaneously with the banded structure, a signal near the hydrogen cyclotron frequency is detected. This signal is also spin related. The characteristics of the noise suggest that it is locally generated by the rocket payload disturbing the plasma. If this interpretation is correct we expect plasma wave experiments on other spacecrafts, e.g., the space shuttle to observe similar phenomena.

  7. Comparison of particle results from a sounding rocket and a geosynchronous satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, A. D.

    1973-01-01

    Auroral data from the ATS 5 geosynchronous satellite and an auroral rocket are compared with the purpose of illustrating some problems which will arise in comparison of data from the GEOS satellite and coordinated rocket experiments. It is recommended that all sky cameras be used in such studies and that since conjugacy between satellite and rocket cannot be guaranteed, the difference should be measured.

  8. The Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph Sounding Rocket Payload: Recent Modifications for Planetary Observations in the EUV/FUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Stern, S. Alan; Scherrer, John; Cash, Webster; Green, James C.; Wilkinson, Erik

    1995-01-01

    We report on the status of modifications to an existing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescope/spectrograph sounding rocket payload for planetary observations in the 800 - 1200 A wavelength band. The instrument is composed of an existing Wolter Type 2 grazing incidence telescope, a newly built 0.4-m normal incidence Rowland Circle spectrograph, and an open-structure resistive-anode microchannel plate detector. The modified payload has successfully completed three NASA sounding rocket flights within 1994-1995. Future flights are anticipated for additional studies of planetary and cometary atmospheres and interstellar absorption. A detailed description of the payload, along with the performance characteristics of the integrated instrument are presented. In addition, some preliminary flight results from the above three missions are also presented.

  9. A TRANSITION REGION EXPLOSIVE EVENT OBSERVED IN He II WITH THE MOSES SOUNDING ROCKET

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J. Lewis; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Thomas, Roger J. E-mail: kankel@solar.physics.montana.ed

    2010-08-20

    Transition region explosive events (EEs) have been observed with slit spectrographs since at least 1975, most commonly in lines of C IV (1548 A, 1550 A) and Si IV (1393 A, 1402 A). We report what we believe to be the first observation of a transition region EE in He II 304 A. With the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) sounding rocket, a novel slitless imaging spectrograph, we are able to see the spatial structure of the event. We observe a bright core expelling two jets that are distinctly non-collinear, in directions that are not anti-parallel. The jets have sky-plane velocities of order 75 km s{sup -1} and line-of-sight velocities of +75 km s{sup -1} (blue) and -30 km s{sup -1} (red). The core is a region of high non-thermal Doppler broadening, characteristic of EEs, with maximal broadening 380 km s{sup -1} FWHM. It is possible to resolve the core broadening into red and blue line-of-sight components of maximum Doppler velocities +160 km s{sup -1} and -220 km s{sup -1}. The event lasts more than 150 s. Its properties correspond to the larger, long-lived, and more energetic EEs observed in other wavelengths.

  10. Harmonic H(+) gyrofrequency structures in auroral hiss observed by high-altitude auroral sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Vago, J.; Scales, W.; Yau, A.; Whalen, B.; Arnoldy, R.; Moore, T.

    1991-01-01

    Two recent sounding rocket experiments have yielded VLF wave data with spectral structures ordered by the hydrogen gyrofrequency. The spectral structures occur near and above the lower hybrid frequency in association with auroral hiss. These structures are observed within and near regions of auroral electron precipitation and transverse ion acceleration. They are accompanied by auroral hiss but are anticorrelated with spectral peaks at the lower hybrid frequency. They are typically found above 500 km altitude, have no measurable magnetic component, and are at least occasionally short wavelength. Because the spectral structures appear to be electrostatic, are ordered by the hydrogen gyrofrequency, and are short wavelength, the structures are interpreted as modes which connect the lower hybrid mode with the hydrogen Bernstein modes. A study of the plasma wave mode structure in the vicinity of the lower hybrid frequency is presented to substantiate this interpretation. These results imply that these waves are a common feature of the auroral zone ionsphere above 500 km altitude and exist any time that auroral hiss exists. The absence of previous satellite observations of this phenomenon can be explained by Doppler broadening.

  11. Narrow-band EUV Multilayer Coating for the MOSES Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Scott M.; Gum, Jeffery S.; Tarrio, Charles; Dvorak, Joseph; Kjornrattanawanich, Benjawan; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Thomas, Roger J.; Kankelborg, Charles C.

    2005-01-01

    The Multi-order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) is a slitless spectrograph designed to study solar He II emission at 303.8 Angstroms, to be launched on a sounding rocket payload. One difference between MOSES and other slitless spectrographs is that the images are recorded simultaneously at three spectral orders, m = -1,0, +l. Another is the addition of a narrow-band multilayer coating on both the grating and the fold flat, which will reject out-of-band lines that normally contaminate the image of a slitless instrument. The primary metrics f a the mating were high peak reflectivity and suppression of Fe XV and XVI emission lines at 284 Angstroms and 335 Angstroms, respectively. We chose B4C/Mg2Si for our material combination since it provides better values for all three metrics together than the other leading candidates Si/Ir, Si/B4C or Si/SiC. Measurements of witness flats at NIST indicate the peak reflectivity at 303.6 is 38.5% for a 15 bilayer stack, while the suppression at 284 Angstroms, is 4.5x and at 335 Angstroms is 18.3x for each of two reflections in the instrument. We present the results of coating the MOSES flight gratings and fold flat, including the spectral response of the fold flat and grating as measured at NIST's SURF III and Brookhaven's X24C beamline.

  12. Subcooled Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Microgravity: Terrier-improved Orion Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Benton, John; Kucner, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A microscale heater array was used to study boiling in earth gravity and microgravity. The heater array consisted of 96 serpentine heaters on a quartz substrate. Each heater was 0.27 square millimeters. Electronic feedback loops kept each heater's temperature at a specified value. The University of Maryland constructed an experiment for the Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket that was delivered to NASA Wallops and flown. About 200 s of high quality microgravity and heat transfer data were obtained. The VCR malfunctioned, and no video was acquired. Subsequently, the test package was redesigned to fly on the KC-135 to obtain both data and video. The pressure was held at atmospheric pressure and the bulk temperature was about 20 C. The wall temperature was varied from 85 to 65 C. Results show that gravity has little effect on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble was surrounded by smaller bubbles, which eventually merged with the primary bubble. This bubble was formed by smaller bubbles coalescing, but had a constant size for a given superheat, indicating a balance between evaporation at the base and condensation on the cap. Most of the heaters under the bubble indicated low heat transfer, suggesting dryout at those heaters. High heat transfer occurred at the contact line surrounding the primary bubble. Marangoni convection formed a "jet" of fluid into the bulk fluid that forced the bubble onto the heater.

  13. Two recently developed guidance and control systems for sounding rockets and similar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunge, Lars

    2003-08-01

    Saab Ericsson Space has continued its development of digital control systems, based on its previous experiences from the Maxus GCS and DS19. Two new systems now exist: The S19D guidance and control system, which uses DS19 hardware to execute S19 type guidance and control. The GCS/DMARS guidance, navigation and control system, which is a modernisation of the GCS/RIINS. The family of guidance systems provided by Saab Ericsson Space now includes: The analog S19 and the digital S19D for constant attitude guidance during the first part of a sounding rocket's powered flight. The DS19, that controls the attitude throughout the motor burn phase and navigates the vehicle to a pre-set impact point. The (Maxus) GCS with the same function as the DS19, but using thrust vector control via moveable nozzles instead of canard control. The SPINRAC and the RACS, providing exo-atmospheric impact point and attitude control by on-board thrusters.

  14. CLASP: A UV Spectropolarimeter on a Sounding Rocket for Probing theChromosphere-Corona Transition Regio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Ryohko; Kano, Ryouhei; Winebarger, Amy; Auchere, Frederic; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Bando, Takamasa; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Ken; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Giono, Gabriel; Tsuneta, Saku; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Sakao, Taro; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Cirtain, Jonathan; De Pontieu, Bart; Casini, Roberto; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca

    2015-08-01

    The wish to understand the energetic phenomena of the outer solar atmosphere makes it increasingly important to achieve quantitative information on the magnetic field in the chromosphere-corona transition region. To this end, we need to measure and model the linear polarization produced by scattering processes and the Hanle effect in strong UV resonance lines, such as the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line. A team consisting of Japan, USA, Spain, France, and Norway has been developing a sounding rocket experiment called the Chromospheric Lyman-alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP). The aim is to detect the scattering polarization produced by anisotropic radiation pumping in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line (121.6 nm), and via the Hanle effect to try to constrain the magnetic field vector in the upper chromosphere and transition region. In this talk, we will present an overview of our CLASP mission, its scientific objectives, ground tests made, and the latest information on the launch planned for the Summer of 2015.

  15. Pulsating Heat pipe Only for Space (PHOS): results of the REXUS 18 sounding rocket campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Guidi, G. M.; Belfi, F.; Cicero, G.; Fioriti, D.; Di Prizio, D.; Piacquadio, S.; Becatti, G.; Orlandini, G.; Frigerio, A.; Fontanesi, S.; Nannipieri, P.; Rognini, M.; Morganti, N.; Filippeschi, S.; Di Marco, P.; Fanucci, L.; Baronti, F.; Mameli, M.; Manzoni, M.; Marengo, M.

    2015-11-01

    Two Closed Loop Pulsating Heat Pipes (CLPHPs) are tested on board REXUS 18 sounding rocket in order to obtain data over a relatively long microgravity period (approximately 90 s). The CLPHPs are partially filled with FC-72 and have, respectively, an inner tube diameter larger (3 mm) and slightly smaller (1.6 mm) than the critical diameter evaluated in static Earth gravity conditions. On ground, the small diameter CLPHP effectively works as a Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP): the characteristic slug and plug flow pattern forms inside the tube and the heat exchange is triggered by thermally driven self-sustained oscillations of the working fluid. On the other hand, the large diameter CLPHP works as a two- phase thermosyphon in vertical position and doesn't work in horizontal position: in this particular condition, the working fluid stratifies within the device as the surface tension force is no longer able to balance buoyancy. Then, the idea to test the CLPHPs in reduced gravity conditions: as the gravity reduces the buoyancy forces becomes less intense and it is possible to recreate the typical PHP flow pattern also for larger inner tube diameters. This allows to increase the heat transfer rate and, consequently, to decrease the overall thermal resistance. Even though it was not possible to experience low gravity conditions due to a failure in the yoyo de-spin system, the thermal response to the peculiar acceleration field (hyper-gravity) experienced on board are thoroughly described.

  16. Analysis of Particle Detectors in Plasma Sheaths on Sounding Rockets and in Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Lisa; Lynch, Kristina

    2013-10-01

    The influence of plasma sheaths on particle measurements is a well-known problem. Improvements in computational speed and memory have made the use of particle-in-cell codes, attainable on a laptop. These codes can calculate complex sheath structures and include most of the relevant physics. We will discuss how the use of one such code, SPIS, has been integrated into our data processing for the MICA sounding rocket. This inclusion of sheath physics has allowed us to describe the current-voltage signature of an ion retarding potential analyzer, called the PIP, to measure the ambient ionospheric temperature, as well as to examine the possibility of ion upflow. These results will be compared with the other instrumentation on MICA, which use traditional thin-sheath approximations. This comparison will emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of these other data analysis methods and call attention to the need to include sheath physics when measuring very low energy populations. Additionally, these instruments have also been tested in the Dartmouth College plasma facility. This provides another set of plasma conditions for testing and extrapolating our method to a future low-orbit mission.

  17. Sulfur dioxide in the atmosphere of Venus 1 sounding rocket observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, William E.; Barth, Charles A.; Kohnert, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present ultraviolet reflectance spectra obtained during two sounding rocket observations of Venus made during September 1988 and March 1991. We describe the sensitivity of the derived reflectance to instrument calibration and show that significant artifacts can appear in that spectrum as a result of using separate instruments to observe both the planetary radiance and the solar irradiance. We show that sulfur dioxide is the primary spectral absorber in the 190 - 230 nm region and that the range of altitudes probed by these wavelengths is very sensitive to incidence and emission angles. In a following paper Na et. al. (1994) show that sulfur monoxide features are also present in these data. Accurate identification and measurement of additional species require observations in which both the planetary radiance and the solar irradiance are measured with the same instrument. The instrument used for these observations is uniquely suited for obtaining large phase angle coverage and for studying transient atmospheric events on Venus because it can observe targets within 18 deg of the sun while earth orbiting instruments are restricted to solar elongation angles greater than or equal to 45 deg.

  18. Sulfur dioxide in the atmosphere of Venus. 1: Sounding rocket observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, William E.; Barth, Charles A.; Kohnert, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present ultraviolet reflectance spectra obtained during two sounding rocket observations of Venus made during September 1988 and March 1991. We describe the sensitivity of the derived reflectance to instrument calibration and show that significant artifacts can appear in the spectrum as a result of using separate instruments to observe both the planetary radiance and the solar irradiance. We show that sulfur dioxide is the primary special absorber in the 190-230 nm region and that the range of altitudes probed by these wavelengths is very sensitive to incidence and emission angles. In a following paper Na et al. (1994) show that sulfur monixide features are also present intese data. Accurate identification and measurement of additional species require observations in which both the planetary radiance and the solar irradiance are measured with the same instrument. The instrument used for these observations is uniquely suited for obtaining large phase angle coverage and for studying transient atmospheric events on Venus because it can observe targents within 18 deg of the Sun while Earth-orbiting instruments are restricted to solar elongation angles greater than or equal to 45 deg.

  19. A Sounding Rocket Experiment for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubo, M.; Kano, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, S.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H.; Tsuneta, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Casini, R.; Auchere, F.; Trujillo, Bueno J.; Manso, Sainz R.; Ramos, Asensio A.; Stepan, J.; Belluzi, L.; Carlsson, M.

    2014-01-01

    A sounding-rocket experiment called the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is presently under development to measure the linear polarization profiles caused by scattering processes and the Hanle effect in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line (121.567nm). Accurate measurements of the linear polarization signals caused by scattering processes and the Hanle effect are essential to explore the strength and structures of weak magnetic fields. The primary target of future solar telescopes is to measure the weak magnetic field in outer solar atmospheres (from the chromosphere to the corona through the transition region). The hydrogen Lyman-alpha-line is one of the best lines for the diagnostics of magnetic fields in the outer solar atmospheres. CLASP is to be launched in 2015, and will provide, for the first time, the observations required for magnetic field measurements in the upper chromosphere and transition region. CLASP is designed to have a polarimetric sensitivity of 0.1% and a spectral resolution of 0.01nm for the Lyman-alpha line. CLASP will measure two orthogonal polarizations simultaneously for about 5-minute flight. Now the integration of flight mirrors and structures is in progress. In addition to our strategy to realize such a high-precision spectro-polarimetry in the UV, we will present a progress report on our pre-launch evaluation of optical and polarimetric performances of CLASP.

  20. Harmonic H sup + gyrofrequency structures in auroral hiss observed by high-altitude auroral sounding rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Kintner, P.M.; Vago, J. ); Scales, W. ); Yau, A.; Whalen, B. ); Arnoldy, R. ); Moore, T. )

    1991-06-01

    Two recent sounding rocket experiments have yielded VLF wave data with spectral structures ordered by the hydrogen gyrofrequency. The spectral structures occur near and above the lower hybrid frequency in association with auroral hiss. These structures are observed within and near regions of auroral electron precipitation and transverse ion acceleration. They are accompanied by auroral hiss but are anticorrelated with spectral peaks at the lower hybrid frequency. They are typically found above 500 km altitude, have no measureable magnetic component, and are at least occasionally short wavelength (k{rho}{sub i}{ge}1). Because the spectral structures appear to be electrostatic, are ordered by the hydrogen gyrofrequency, and are short wavelength, the authors interpret the structures as modes which connect the lower hybrid mode with the hydrogen Bernstein modes. A study of the plasma wave mode structure in the vicinity of the lower hybrid frequency is presented to substantiate this interpretation. The results imply that these waves are a common feature of the auroral zone ionosphere above 500 km altitude and exist any time that auroral hiss exists. The absence of previous satellite abservations of this phenomenon can be explained by Doppler broadening.

  1. Investigations on transient directional solidification under microgravity on sounding rocket missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturz, L.; Zimmermann, G.

    2006-09-01

    Transient growth conditions are common to a variety of technical solidification processes and lead to modified materials properties. In directional solidification the microstructure at the solid-liquid interface of an alloy is a result of the interaction of diffusive and convective heat and mass transport in the bulk and of interface and thermophysical properties. We have carried out experiments under diffusive conditions without convection in microgravity during the sounding rocket missions TEXUS-36 and 40. The used transparent alloy succinonitrile-acetone freezes like metals and the solidification process was observed in-situ. Within a gradient furnace the solid-liquid interface is forced to move accelerated and to transform from planar into cellular and dendritic structures. The dynamics of the planar interface and of the spacing and the amplitude of diffusive grown cells and dendrites were observed directly with cameras and analyzed. A comparison of the TEXUS-40 results to predictions taken from a macroscopic thermal model, a coupled heat-mass transfer model and a phase-field model was carried out. A good agreement is found for the planar interface dynamics for the coupled heat-mass transfer model and the phase-field model, when using additional information from the thermal modelling. In the cellular and dendritic growth regime typical microstructure features can be reproduced by the phase-field model. The experimental results thus serve as important bench-marks for the validation of numerical models describing time-dependent solidification processes.

  2. A Transition Region Explosive Event Observed in He II with the MOSES Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. Lewis; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Thomas, Roger J.

    2010-08-01

    Transition region explosive events (EEs) have been observed with slit spectrographs since at least 1975, most commonly in lines of C IV (1548 Å, 1550 Å) and Si IV (1393 Å, 1402 Å). We report what we believe to be the first observation of a transition region EE in He II 304 Å. With the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) sounding rocket, a novel slitless imaging spectrograph, we are able to see the spatial structure of the event. We observe a bright core expelling two jets that are distinctly non-collinear, in directions that are not anti-parallel. The jets have sky-plane velocities of order 75 km s-1 and line-of-sight velocities of +75 km s-1 (blue) and -30 km s-1 (red). The core is a region of high non-thermal Doppler broadening, characteristic of EEs, with maximal broadening 380 km s-1 FWHM. It is possible to resolve the core broadening into red and blue line-of-sight components of maximum Doppler velocities +160 km s-1 and -220 km s-1. The event lasts more than 150 s. Its properties correspond to the larger, long-lived, and more energetic EEs observed in other wavelengths.

  3. Results of the measurement of the vertical profile of ozone up to a height of 70 km by means of the MR-12 and M-100 sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezgin, N. I.; Kuznetsov, G. I.; Chizhov, A. F.; Shtyrkov, O. V.

    1979-01-01

    The photometers used and methods of calculation of the vertical ozone concentration profile are described. The results obtained in several series of MR-12 and M-100 sounding rocket launchings are presented and discussed.

  4. Development of a Low Energy Particle Electron Spectrum Analyzer (LEP-ESA) onboard the ICI-2 sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, M.; Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Saito, M.; Asamura, K.; Kasahara, S.

    2008-12-01

    Strong HF radar backscatter echoes are well-known characteristics of the polar cusp region by the ground- based observation of HF radar in the polar ionosphere. The gradient drift instability is regarded as a dominant mode for producing backscatter targets. According to Moen et al. [2002], decameter scale measurement that cannot be achieved by ground-based and satellite observations is required to understand the generation mechanism. Norwegian sounding rocket experiment ICI-2(Investigation of Cusp Irregularities) is proposed in order to single out the mechanism(s) running cusp ionospheric plasma unstable and facilitate backscatter targets for HF radars. The ICI-2 rocket will be launched into cusp ionosphere from Svalbard, Norway in Nov/Dec 2008. We are responsible for developing a low energy particle electron spectrum analyzer (LEP-ESA) that is one of the science payloads onboard the ICI-2 sounding rocket. LEP-ESA covers the energy range between 10eV and 10keV. We designed LEP-ESA to achieve high spatial resolution of ~10m/energy spectrum (16 energy steps). We have confirmed the performance of LEP-ESA by experiments as well as numerical simulations. In order to realize the high spatial resolution, high time resolution is required. For the purpose of high time resolution measurement of low energy electrons we have newly developed an electron detector that consists of Z-stack MCPs (Micro Channel Pates) and 64-channel multi-anode. An ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) with 64-channel fast preamplifiers and counters are installed on the backside of the anode. Since the detected electrons are independently counted by 64 separated anodes, multi-anode can achieve the higher time resolution than any other position sensitive anodes. One of the most severe problems in using a multi- anode is the size of the required electronics that becomes unacceptably large for the sounding rocket / satellite instrument when the number of the channels is large. By using the

  5. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 to 80 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Shannon; Gausa, Michael; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 80 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on two sounding rockets to the mesosphere. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void behind (relative to the direction of motion) an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed forward of an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened during flight to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region behind it. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ∼80 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  6. National Report Germany: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Research Activities Supported by the German Space Programme in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, R.; Gritzner, C.; Friedrichs, D.

    2015-09-01

    Mainly sounding rockets but also stratospheric balloons have played a crucial role in implementing the German Space Programme since many years. Research activities were conducted in the fields of Microgravity Research, Space Science, Earth Observation, Space Technology Development, and Education. Currently, the mesosphere and ionosphere of the Earth and the photosphere and chromosphere of the Sun are in the focus of German research activities in the field of Space Science. Microgravity related topics are studied in the disciplines of Life and Physical Sciences during ballistic TEXUS and MAPHEUS rocket flights. A lot of student activities are currently supported by the agencies SNSB and DLR under the auspices of the Swedish-German programme REXUS/BEXUS.

  7. Measurements from the Daytime Dynamo Sounding Rocket missions: Altitude Profiles of Neutral Temperature, Density, Winds, and Con Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmons, J. H.; Bishop, R. L.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Rowland, D. E.; Larsen, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Results from the two Daytime Dynamo sounding rocket missions launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, in July 2011 and July 2013 are presented and discussed. Measurements returned by the rockets' multiple-sensor ionization gauge instrumentation are used to derive profiles vs. altitude of neutral temperature, density, and, using a new technique, winds. The techniques used are described in detail and the resulting profiles discussed in the context of the daytime atmospheric dynamo. The profiles are also compared to those of established models. Also presented are measurements returned by the high-speed ion mass spectrometer on the 2011 flight. The measurements show the dominance of NO+ ions up to apogee at 160 km, but also reveal a significant admixture of O2+ ions below an intense daytime sporadic-E layer observed at 100.5 km.

  8. Autonomous frequency stabilization of two extended-cavity diode lasers at the potassium wavelength on a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinkelaker, Aline N.; Schiemangk, Max; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Kenyon, Andrew; Lampmann, Kai; Wenzlawski, André; Windpassinger, Patrick; Hellmig, Ortwin; Wendrich, Thijs; Rasel, Ernst M.; Giunta, Michele; Deutsch, Christian; Kürbis, Christian; Smol, Robert; Wicht, Andreas; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2017-02-01

    We have developed, assembled, and flight-proven a stable, compact, and autonomous extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) system designed for atomic physics experiments in space. To that end, two micro-integrated ECDLs at 766.7 nm were frequency stabilized during a sounding rocket flight by means of frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) of 39^K and offset locking techniques based on the beat note of the two ECDLs. The frequency stabilization as well as additional hard- and software to test hot redundancy mechanisms were implemented as part of a state-machine, which controlled the experiment completely autonomously throughout the entire flight mission.

  9. Preliminary Results of the VLFE Quadrupole Instrumentation From The PARX Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinleitner, L. A.; Holzworth, R. H.; Meadows, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    The NASA Pulsating Auroral Rocket eXperiment (PARX - March '97 from Poker Flat, AK) was equipped with 4 electric field probes oriented (X and Y) perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, and one probe (along the Z axis) to obtain the parallel electric field. The rocket also included a three-axis VLF search coil magnetometer. The VLF measurements for both instruments were from 100 Hz - 8 KHz. Additionally, the electric field information was used onboard the rocket to obtain the "quadrupole" electric field, defined to be {(V1+V2) - (V3+V4)}/2d, which shows significant response only to short wavelength waves. This instrumentation clearly shows the long wavelength nature of features tentatively described as auroral hiss, and the shorter wavelength nature of the electrostatic and/or quasi-electrostatic waves.

  10. MEDUSA- Measurements of the D-Region Plasma Using Active Falling Plasma Probes on Board of the REXUS 15 Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, H.; Baumann, C.; Staszak, T.; Karow, N.; Schunemann, P.; Mainz, R. E.; Fencik, A.; Jeglorz, E.; Strelnikov, B.

    2015-09-01

    A rocket borne experiment was designed to measure the ion density and its relative fluctuations in the lower Dregion of the Earth's ionosphere. It was launched on the 29th of May in 2014 at 12 LT during the REXUS 15/16 (Rocket Experiments for University Students) sounding rocket campaign aboard of the REXUS 15 sounding rocket from ESRANGE, Kiruna in northern Sweden. This experiment included two identical FFU's (free falling units) which were ejected on the upper upleg part of the rocket flight and conducted the measurement independently. One of the two FFUs was successfully recovered. It was shown that the developed deployment technique and the FFU framework made by a selective laser sintering process are very suitable for sounding rocket flights and could be the carrier system for any kind of small scientific instrument. The results of the measurement of the fixed-biased probe showed reasonable ion densities for the up- and downleg phase of the FFU flight. A spectral analysis of the data showed no significant turbulence.

  11. Study for application of a sounding rocket experiment to spacelab/shuttle mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Code, A. D.

    1975-01-01

    An inexpensive adaptation of rocket-size packages to Spacelab/Shuttle use was studied. A two-flight project extending over two years was baselined, requiring 80 man-months of effort. It was concluded that testing should be held to a minimum since rocket packages seem to be able to tolerate shuttle vibration and noise levels. A standard, flexible control and data collection language such as FORTH should be used rather than a computation language such as FORTRAN in order to hold programming costs to a minimum.

  12. Proposal to National Aeronautics and Space Administration for continuation of a grazing incidence imaging telescope for X-ray astronomy using sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, B.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of a high resolution imaging telescope experiment payload suitable for launch on an Astrobee F sounding rocket was proposed. Also integration, launch, and subsequent data analysis effort were included. The payload utilizes major component subassemblies from the HEAO-B satellite program which were nonflight development units for that program. These were the X ray mirror and high resolution imager brassboard detector. The properties of the mirror and detector were discussed. The availability of these items for a sounding rocket experiment were explored with the HEAO-B project office.

  13. Sounding rocket wave electric field measurements with a new all-digital, ultra-low noise receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpitts, C.; Labelle, J.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S.

    2007-05-01

    In February/March of 2007 the sounding rocket CHARM (Correlations of High-frequencies and Auroral Roar Measurements) will be launched from Poker Flat, Alaska. This rocket will carry the standard Dartmouth High- Frequency wave Electric field receiver (HFE), a wave-particle correlator to correlate the Langmuir waves with the auroral electrons and a new all-digital, ultra-low noise, precise-bandwidth wave electric field receiver (RX-DSP) which will attempt the first modern rocket-borne measurements of auroral roar. The RX-DSP will feature a high speed 66 MHz, 16-bit analog to digital conversion at the input and flexible programmable all-digital processing. For CHARM, two of these receivers will be flown, using mutually perpendicular double probe antennas which are both perpendicular to the rocket's spin axis, which is aligned with the earth's magnetic field. Each receiver will be tuned with an extremely sharp band pass filter to the typical frequency range of auroral roar observed at ground level in northern alaska, 2.6-2.9 MHz. These instruments will measure two components of both the wave electric and magnetic field, allowing estimation of the polarization and direction of arrival of the roar, as well as its amplitude along all points of the rocket's trajectory. Using these measurements, together with electron distribution functions and wave measurements from a ground station, this rocket experiment will serve to answer several outstanding questions about auroral HF emissions. Among these is the question of whether the intermittent nature of auroral roar observed on the ground is due to ionospheric effects or to actual temporal or spatial variations of the auroral roar source. Because ionospheric absorption of these waves is significant, accurate direct measurements with rockets are required to estimate the global power level of these emissions. The direction-finding capability of the CHARM measurements will allow ray tracing to determine the source location, which

  14. Test of a life support system with Hirudo medicinalis in a sounding rocket.

    PubMed

    Lotz, R G; Baum, P; Bowman, G H; Klein, K D; von Lohr, R; Schrotter, L

    1972-01-01

    Two Nike-Tomahawk rockets each carrying two Biosondes were launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, the first on 10 December 1970 and the second on 16 December 1970. The primary objective of both flights was to test the Biosonde life support system under a near weightless environment and secondarily to subject the Hirudo medicinalis to the combined stresses of a rocket flight. The duration of the weightless environment was approximately 6.5 minutes. Data obtained during the flight by telemetry was used to ascertain the operation of the system and the movements of the leeches during flight. Based on the information obtained, it has been concluded that the operation of the Biosondes during the flight was similar to that observed in the laboratory. The experiment and equipment are described briefly and the flight results presented.

  15. Chemical Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) program archiving and Puerto Rican sounding rocket campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, George P.

    1992-01-01

    The tasks undertaken as part of this contract included the continued coordination and documentation of the CRRES program and the development of an archive that details, in easily accessible form, the experimental results obtained by the CRRES Program. Details of the work undertaken and results achieved are summarized in the following sections. The achievement of this goal is clearly demonstrated in the appendices attached to this report and the success, in both scientific and public relation terms, of the El Coqui rocket campaign.

  16. ExFiT Flight Design and Structural Modeling for FalconLAUNCH VIII Sounding Rocket

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    number, mass distribution, total mass, structural stiffness, and system dynamics, once flutter is initiated on a wing or fin it usually leads to failure... wing tip structures will not succumb to flutter or divergence. A more detailed look at the analysis as well as the results from this program will be...rocket. From these results, neither section of the test specimen would undergo flutter . Table 7 AeroFinSim Flutter Results Altitude Main Wing Section

  17. The Polar Summer MLT Plasma Environment as Seen by the DROPPS Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assis, Michael P.; Goldberg, Richard A.; Webb, Phillip A.; Pesnell, William D.; Voss, H. D.

    2006-01-01

    During early July, 1999, the DROPPS (Distribution and Role of Particles in the Polar Summer Mesosphere) campaign launched two rocket payloads whose purpose was to study the polar summer MLT (mesosphere and lower thermosphere), particularly PMSEs (polar mesospheric summer echoes) and PMCs (polar mesospheric clouds). The rockets were launched from the Anderya Rocket Range in Norway the nights of the 5th and 14th of July. Both payloads included a front-mounted PID (Particle Impact Detector) consisting of charge and mass telescopes to measure aerosol and dust mass distributions. Ice particles of nanometer size are believed to be responsible for PMSEs through the process of electron scavenging. Evidence for this process is suggested, for example, by the presence of an electron "biteout" simultaneously measured by several instruments at an altitude of approx. 82 - 87km during the first DROPPS launch. This presentation will characterize similarities and differences between both flights as seen by the charge and mass telescopes, starting at launch until the loss of data on the downleg of each flight. Various stages of the flights will be considered in detail, such as the PMSE layer and the apogee at 117 km, as well as the calibration of the data before launch.

  18. The Polar Summer MLT Plasma Environment as seen by the DROPPS Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assis, Michael P.; Goldberg, Richard A.; Webb, Phillip; Pesnell, W. Dean; Voss, Henry D.

    2006-01-01

    During early July, 1999, the DROPPS (Distribution and Role of Particles in the Polar Summer Mesosphere) campaign launched two rocket payloads whose purpose was to study the polar summer MLT (mesosphere and lower thermosphere), particularly PMSEs (polar mesospheric summer echoes) and PMCs (polar mesospheric clouds). The rockets were launched from the And(\\o)ya Rocket Range in Norway the nights of the 5th and 14th of July. Both payloads included a front-mounted PID (Particle Impact Detector) consisting of charge and mass telescopes to measure aerosol and dust mass distributions. Ice particles of nanometer size are believed to be responsible for PMSEs through the process of electron scavenging. Evidence for this process is suggested, for example, by the presence of an electron "biteout" simultaneously measured by several instruments at an altitude of $\\sim$82-87 km during the first DROPPS launch. This presentation will characterize similarities and differences between both flights as seen by the charge and mass telescopes, starting at launch until the loss of data on the downleg of each flight. Various stages of the flights will be considered in detail, such as the PMSE layer and the apogee at 117 km, as well as the calibration of the data before launch.

  19. Fertilization and development of eggs of the South African clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, on sounding rockets in space.

    PubMed

    Ubbels, G A; Berendsen, W; Kerkvliet, S; Narraway, J

    1992-01-01

    Egg rotation and centrifugation experiments strongly suggest a role for gravity in the determination of the spatial structure of amphibian embryos. Decisive experiments can only be made in Space. Eggs of Xenopus laevis, the South African clawed toad, were the first vertebrate eggs which were successfully fertilized on Sounding Rockets in Space. Unfixed, newly fertilized eggs survived reentry, and a reasonable number showed a seemingly normal gastrulation but died between gastrulation and neurulation. Only a few reached the larval stage, but these developed abnormally. In the future, we intend to test whether this abnormal morphogenesis is due to reentry perturbations, or due to a real microgravity effect, through perturbation of the reinitiation of meiosis and other processes, or started by later sperm penetration.

  20. X-Ray Radiographic Observation of Directional Solidification Under Microgravity: XRMON-GF Experiments on MASER12 Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, G.; NguyenThi, H.; Bogno, A.; Billia, B.; Houltz, Y.; Loth, K.; Voss, D.; Verga, A.; dePascale, F.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Zimmermann, G.

    2012-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) - Microgravity Application Promotion (MAP) programme entitled XRMON (In situ X-Ray MONitoring of advanced metallurgical processes under microgravity and terrestrial conditions) aims to develop and perform in situ X-ray radiography observations of metallurgical processes in microgravity and terrestrial environments. The use of X-ray imaging methods makes it possible to study alloy solidification processes with spatio-temporal resolutions at the scales of relevance for microstructure formation. XRMON has been selected for MASER 12 sounding rocket experiment, scheduled in autumn 2011. Although the microgravity duration is typically six minutes, this short time is sufficient to investigate a solidification experiment with X-ray radiography. This communication will report on the preliminary results obtained with the experimental set-up developed by SSC (Swedish Space Corporation). Presented results dealing with directional solidification of Al-Cu confirm the great interest of performing in situ characterization to analyse dynamical phenomena during solidification processes.

  1. FAR-ULTRAVIOLET DUST ALBEDO MEASUREMENTS IN THE UPPER SCORPIUS CLOUD USING THE SPINR SOUNDING ROCKET EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N. K.; Cook, T. A.; Wilton, K. P.; Chakrabarti, S.; France, K.; Gordon, K. D. E-mail: Kevin.France@colorado.ed

    2009-11-20

    The Spectrograph for Photometric Imaging with Numeric Reconstruction sounding rocket experiment was launched on 2000 August 4 to record far-ultraviolet (912-1450 A) spectral and spatial information for the giant reflection nebula in the Upper Scorpius region. The data were divided into three arbitrary bandpasses (912-1029 A, 1030-1200 A, and 1235-1450 A) for which stellar and nebular flux levels were derived. These flux measurements were used to constrain a radiative transfer model and to determine the dust albedo for the Upper Scorpius region. The resulting albedos were 0.28 +- 0.07 for the 912-1029 A bandpass, 0.33 +- 0.07 for the 1030-1200 A bandpass, and 0.77 +- 0.13 for the 1235-1450 A bandpass.

  2. Fertilization and development of eggs of the South African clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, on sounding rockets in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubbels, Geertje A.; Berendsen, Willem; Kerkvliet, Sonja; Narraway, Jenny

    Egg rotation and centrifugation experiments strongly suggest a role for gravity in the determination of the spatial structure of amphibian embryos. Decisive experiments can only be made in Space. Eggs of Xenopus laevis, the South African clawed toad, were the first vertebrate eggs which were successfully fertilized on Sounding Rockets in Space. Unfixed, newly fertilized eggs survived reentry, and a reasonable number showed a seemingly normal gastrulation but died between gastrulation and neurulation. Only a few reached the larval stage, but these developed abnormally. In the future, we inted to test whether this abnormal morphogenesis is due to reentry perturbations, or due to a real microgravity effect, through perturbation of the reinitiation of meiosis and other processes, or started by later sperm penetration.

  3. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission with the DXL Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Robertson, I.; Snowden, S.; Thomas, N. E.; Uprety, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket is a NASA approved mission with a scheduled first launch in December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission of the SWCX from that of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) to improve our understanding of both. To separate the SWCX contribution from the LHB. DXL will use the SWCX signature due to the helium focusing cone at 1=185 deg, b=-18 deg, DXL uses large area propostionai counters, with an area of 1.000 sq cm and grasp of about 10 sq cm sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keY bands. Thanks to the large grasp, DXL will achieve in a 5 minule flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  4. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission with the DXL Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket is a NASA approved mission with a scheduled first launch in December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission of the SWCX from that of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) to improve our understanding of both. To separate the SWCX contribution from the LHB. DXL will use the SWCX signature due to the helium focusing cone at 1=185 deg, b=-18 deg, DXL uses large area propostionai counters, with an area of 1.000 sq cm and grasp of about 10 sq cm sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keY bands. Thanks to the large grasp, DXL will achieve in a 5 minule flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  5. Electromagnetic Wave-filled Cavities Observed by the GEODESIC Sounding Rocket: A Direct Encounter with VLF Saucer Source Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirzadeh, Rasoul

    The GEODESIC sounding rocket encountered hundreds of localized, VLF-wave-filled density depletions in an auroral return current region at altitudes between 900--1000 km. While these are similar to well-studied lower-hybrid "spikelets", which are electrostatic, many of the GEODESIC events exhibited strong VLF magnetic field enhancements as well. In the present study we show that these magnetic field fluctuations can be interpreted as the result of geomagnetic field-aligned electron currents driven by fluctuating electric fields parallel to the geomagnetic field lines. This observation suggests that the electromagnetic wave-filled cavities are signatures of unstable filaments of return current fluctuating at VLF frequencies. We argue that the cavities' spatial dimensions, their location inside the return current region and their total radiated power are consistent with the properties of VLF saucer source regions inferred from earlier satellite observations taken at higher altitudes.

  6. [Build and Demonstrate a X-Ray Interferometer and Build and Fly a High Resolution Telescope on a Sounding Rocket}

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report is written with eight months still go on the 36 month period of the grant. This grant, as originally proposed three years ago, was two pronged - to build and demonstrate a practical x-ray interferometer, and to build and fly a high resolution telescope on a sounding rocket. As we started into these projects, we received community feedback that led to our giving priority to the interferometer., The rocket would achieve O.2-arcsecond resolution that, while better, than that of Chandra, would, because of the limited signal of a sub-orbital flight, not be of substantially greater scientific use. The interferometry, on the other hand, shows the potential for many orders of magnitude improvement. For this reason we gave priority to the lab interferometry, and the building of the telescope lagged behind. With our new understanding (and practical demonstration) of how to build an interferometer, we changed the telescope design from spherical surfaces in the Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration, to an interferometer with resolution between .005 and .05 arcseconds.

  7. Main Characteristics of the VLF Magnetic Field Waves Recorded by the Search Coil Magnetometer Experiment Onboard the CUSP Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinçon, J.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; de Feraudy, H.; Rezeau, L.; Robert, P.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2003-12-01

    The CUSP rocket is a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket dedicated to the exploration of the electrodynamic coupling, pulsations, and acceleration processes in the dayside cusp and the boundary layer interface. The launch occured on December 14, 2002, from Ny Åleysund, Spitzbergen (79° N) during Bz negative conditions. We present the magnetic field waves measurement collected in the frequency range [10 Hz - 10 kHz] by the three axis Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) experiment onboard CUSP. The observations reveal the presence of intense field fluctuations corresponding to ELF hiss which is only seen on closed field lines and hence can be used to define the magnetic boundary of the cusp. Several data analysis techniques were applied to the 3 components of the magnetic field fluctuations associated with the ELF hiss to obtain information regarding the wave polarization and the wave vector directions. The magnetic field wave data are compared with simultaneous observations of electric field wave data to further enhance our understanding of these wave phenomena. The main results coming from this detailed study are presented and discussed.

  8. Measurement of DC Electric Field in the Midlatitude Ionosphere by S-520-23 Sounding Rocket Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishisaka, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Okada, T.; Abe, T.; Kumamoto, A.

    2014-12-01

    S-520-23 sounding rocket experiments are carried out at Uchinoura Space Center (USC) in Japan at 19:20 LT on 2 September, 2007. The purpose of this experiment is the investigation of the process of momentum transportation between the atmospheres and the plasma in the thermosphere during the summer evening time at mid latitudes. The S-520-23 payload was equipped with a two set of orthogonal double probes to measure both DC and AC less than 40Hz electric fields in the spin plane of the payload. One of the double probe is the inflatable structure antenna, called the SPINAR, with a length of 5m tip-to-tip. The SPINAR was the first successful use of an inflatable structure as a flight antenna. It extended and worked without any problems. Another one is the NEI type antenna with a length of 2m tip-to-tip. The electrodes of two double probe antennas were used to gather the potentials which were detected with high impedance pre-amplifiers using the floating (unbiased) double probe technique. The potential differences on the two main orthogonal axes were digitized on-board using 16-bit analog-digital converters, sampled at 400 samples/sec with low pass filters at cut-off frequency of 40Hz. We have investigated the DC electric field during the rocket ascent. And it was able to obtain the electric field vector in a geographic-coordinates system. The direction of DC electric field vector at altitude from 140km to 170km is seems to be dependent on the direction of a neutral wind in the ionosphere. And intensity of DC electric field is increasing at altitude more than 260km. Its direction is east. It is thought that the polarization electric field was observed in the region where the difference of the electron density was large after sunset. In this presentation, we will describe the result of investigation of the relationship between an electric field and ionospheric plasma in detail. Especially the dependence of the direction of electric field and the direction of the neutral

  9. Sounding rocket observations of ionospheric feedback in the Alfvén resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Lessard, M.; Streltsov, A. V.; Kaeppler, S. R.; Bounds, S. R.; Lynch, K. A.; Fernandes, P. A.; Dombrowski, M. P.; Miceli, R. J.; Powell, S.; Pfaff, R. F.; Michell, R. G.; Bekkeng, T.

    2012-12-01

    The hypothesis that low-altitude density cavities in the downward current channels can be caused by small-scale, intense shear Alfvén waves has been investigated numerically by Streltsov and Lotko [2008] and Sydorenko et al. [2008]. In particular, Streltsov and Lotko [2008] showed numerical results based on a reduced two-fluid MHD model that self-consistently describes shear Alfvén waves, ion parallel dynamics, and effects of ionospheric E-region activity and ionospheric feedback instability (IFI). Data from the high-altitude rocket of the Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) mission, launched from Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) in Alaska in January 2009, show indications of these small-scale electromagnetic Alfvén waves in the downward field-aligned current (FAC) region. We present data from the ACES-High rocket, which reached an altitude of 360 km, along with analysis and new model results. We will also highlight electron temperature data from the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfvén resonator (MICA) mission, launched from PFRR in February 2012, and accompanying optical imaging that supported that mission.

  10. Searches for Decaying Sterile Neutrinos with the X-Ray Quantum Calorimeter Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfinger, David; XQC Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Rocket borne X-ray spectrometers can produce high-resolution spectra for wide field-of-view observations. This is useful in searches for dark matter candidates that produce X-ray lines in the Milky Way, such as decaying keV scale sterile neutrinos. In spite of exposure times and effective areas that are significantly smaller than satellite observatories, similar sensitivity to decaying sterile neutrinos can be attained due to the high spectral resolution and large field of view. We present recent results of such a search analyzing the telemetered data from the 2011 flight of the X-Ray Quantum Colorimeter instrument as well as ongoing progress in expanding the data set to include the more complete onboard data over additional flights.

  11. Undergraduate Student-built Experiments in Sounding-Rocket and Balloon Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Christian, J. A.; Keesee, A. M.; Lindon, M.; Lusk, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Space physics and aerospace engineering experiments are becoming readily accessible to STEM undergraduates. A number of ionospheric physics experiments and guidance and navigation components were designed, built, integrated, and tested by STEM students at West Virginia University in the 2013-2014 academic year. A main payload was flown on NASA's annual RockSat-C two-stage rocket launched from Wallops Flight Facility in Chincoteague, VA on the morning of June 26, 2014. A high-altitude balloon with a reduced payload was released from Bruceton Mills, WV, prior to the rocket and reached 30,054 m. The geographic distance between the two launch points is small compared to the footprint of geomagnetic and solar-terrestrial disturbances. Aerospace sensors provided flight profiles for each of the two platforms. Daytime E region electron density was measured via a Langmuir probe as a function of altitude from 90 km to the apogee of 117 km. Geomagnetic activity was low (Dst>-7 nT, AE<500 nT) so geomagnetic disturbances were probably due to solar quiet (Sq) currents. Earlier solar wind activity included two high-plasma-density regions measured by NASA's ACE which impacted the magnetosphere producing two sudden impulses at midlatitudes (Dst=+19 and +13 nT). In an airglow experiment, the altitude range of the sodium layer was estimated to be 75-110 km based on in situ measurements of the D2emission line intensity. Acceleration, rotation-rate, and magnetic-field data are useful in reconstructing the trajectory and flight dynamics of the two vehicles and comparing with video from onboard cameras. Participation in RockSat and similar programs is useful in ushering space science and spaceflight concepts in the classroom and lab experience of STEM undergraduates. Lectures, homework, and progress reports were used to connect advanced topics of Earth's space environment and spaceflight to the students' core courses. In several cases the STEM students were guided by graduate students

  12. Snapshot imaging spectroscopy of the solar transition region: The Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) sounding rocket mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, James Lewis

    We have developed a revolutionary spectroscopic technique for solar research in the extreme ultraviolet. This slitless spectrographic technique allows snapshot imaging spectroscopy with data exactly cotemporal and cospectral. I have contributed to the successful realization of an application of this technique in the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph, MOSES . This instrument launched 2006 Feb 8 as a NASA sounding rocket payload and successfully returned remarkable data of the solar transition region in the He II 304Å spectral line. The unique design of this spectrometer allows the study of transient phenomena in the solar atmosphere, with spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution heretofore unachievable in concert, over a wide field of view. The fundamental concepts behind the MOSES spectrometer are broadly applicable to many solar spectral lines and phenomena and the instrument thus represents a new instrumentation technology. The early fruits of this labor are here reported: the first scientific discovery with the MOSES sounding rocket instrument, our observation of a transition region explosive event, phenomena observed with slit spectrographs since at least 1975, most commonly in lines of C IV (1548Å 1550Å) and Si IV (1393Å, 1402Å). This explosive event is the first seen in He II 304Å. With our novel slitless imaging spectrograph, we are able to see the spatial structure of the event. We observe a bright core expelling two jets that are distinctly non-collinear, in directions that are not anti-parallel, in contradiction to standard models of explosive events, which give collinear jets. The jets have sky-plane velocities of order 75 km s -1 and line-of-sight velocities of +75 km s-1 (blue) and -30 km s-1 (red). The core is a region of high non-thermal doppler broadening, characteristic of explosive events, with maximal broadening 380 km s-1 FWHM. It is possible to resolve the core broadening into red and blue line-of-sight components of maximum doppler

  13. Guidance, navigation & control systems for sounding rockets - flight results, current status and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunge, Lars

    2005-08-01

    At the 16th ESA Symposium on European Rockets and Balloons, two newly developed guidance and control systems by Saab Ericsson Space were presented: The S19D guidance and control system, which uses DS19 hardware to execute S19 type guidance and control. The GCS/DMARS guidance, navigation and control system, which is a modernisation of the GCS/RIINS. These two and the third recent system, the DS19, were developed as replacements for the analog S19 and the GCS/RIINS, both of which use very old technology. The design drivers or the DS19, the S19D and the GCS/DMARS are: User requirements. New technology with improved performance capability becoming available. Current technology becoming old and replacement parts hard to come by. This paper first lists some guidance related user requirements, and then discusses the performance that has been achieved in the various guidance systems, including the S19, for comparison. This is first done from a theoretical point of view and then by analyzing actual flight data. The ability of the systems to fulfil the user requirements is also discussed and finally, a look is taken into the future.

  14. Investigation of sounding rocket observations of field-aligned currents and electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Lessard, M.; Zettergren, M. D.; Moen, J.; Lynch, K. A.; Heavisides, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Strangeway et al. [2005] and other authors have concluded that the establishment of the ambipolar field by the deposition of energy from soft electron precipitation is a significant driver of type-2 ion upflows. Likewise, Clemmons et al. [2008] and Zhang et al. [2012] proposed processes by which soft electron precipitation may play a role in heating neutrals and contribute to neutral upwelling. In both situations the thermal ionospheric electron population plays a crucial role in both generation of the ambipolar field and in collisional energy exchange with the atmosphere through a variety of processes. In this study we examine the dynamics of the electron population, specifically the temperature, in a slightly different context - focusing on the auroral downward current region (DCR). In many cases auroral DCRs may be depleted of plasma, which sets up interesting conditions involving thermoelectric heat fluxes (which flow upward - in the opposite direction from the current), adiabatic expansion due to the high (upward) speed of the electrons carrying the downward current, heat exchange from ions which have elevated temperatures due to frictional heating, and direct frictional heating of the electrons. A detailed understanding of the electron temperature in auroral DCRs is necessary to make quantitative statements about recombination, upflow, cavitation and a host of other processes relevant to ion outflow. In this study, we compare in situ rocket observations of electron temperature, density, and current densities with predictions from the Zettergren and Semeter [2012] model in an attempt to better understand the dynamics and relationships between these parameters in DCRs.

  15. Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra and Temperature Analyses based on Sounding Rocket Measurements from the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), - a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, Leonid V.; Wieman, Seth; Woods, Thomas N.; Jones, Andrew; Moore, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Some initial results of soft x-ray spectral (0.5 to 3.0 nm) observations of active regions (AR11877 and AR11875) from a sounding rocket flight NASA 36.290 on 21 October 2013 at about 18:30 UT are reported. These observations were made by a Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a rocket version of the EUV Variability Experiment’s (EVE) channel, a pinhole camera modified for EVE rocket suite of instruments to include a free-standing transmission grating (200 nm period), which provided spectrally-resolved images of the solar disk. Intensity ratios for strong emission lines extracted from temporally averaged SAM spectral profiles of the ARs were compared to appropriately convolved modeled CHIANTI spectra. These ratios represent the AR’s temperature structures, which are compared to the structures derived from some other observations and temperature models.

  16. Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra as Observed Using Sounding Rocket Measurements from the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), - a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Woods, T. N.; Jones, A. R.; Caspi, A.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of solar active regions (ARs) in the soft x-ray spectral range (0.5 to 3.0 nm) were made on sounding rocket flight NASA 36.290 using a modified Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a pinhole camera on the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) sounding rocket instrument. The suite of EVE rocket instruments is designed for under-flight calibrations of the orbital EVE on SDO. While the sounding rocket EVE instrument is for the most part a duplicate of the EVE on SDO, the SAM channel on the rocket version was modified in 2012 to include a free-standing transmission grating so that it could provide spectrally resolved images of the solar disk with the best signal to noise ratio for the brightest features on it, such as ARs. Calibrations of the EVE sounding rocket instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (NIST SURF) have provided a measurement of the SAM absolute spectral response function and a mapping of wavelength separation in the grating diffraction pattern. For solar observations, this spectral separation is on a similar scale to the spatial size of the AR on the CCD, so dispersed AR images associated with emission lines of similar wavelength tend to overlap. Furthermore, SAM shares a CCD detector with MEGS-A, a separate EVE spectrometer channel, and artifacts of the MEGS-A signal (a set of bright spectral lines) appear in the SAM images. For these reasons some processing and analysis of the solar images obtained by SAM must be performed in order to determine spectra of the observed ARs. We present a method for determining AR spectra from the SAM rocket images and report initial soft X-ray spectra for two of the major active regions (AR11877 and AR11875) observed on flight 36.290 on 21 October 2013 at about 18:30 UT. We also compare our results with concurrent measurements from other solar soft x-ray instrumentation.

  17. Evaluation of payload performance for a sounding rocket vacuum ultraviolet spatial heterodyne spectrometer to observe C IV lambdalambda1550 emissions from the Cygnus Loop.

    PubMed

    Watchorn, Steven; Roesler, Fred L; Harlander, John; Jaehnig, Kurt P; Reynolds, Ronald J; Sanders, Wilton T

    2010-06-10

    The results of a project to develop a spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) for a sounding rocket mission to study the Cygnus Loop, a prototypical middle-aged supernova remnant, are discussed. The goal was to obtain a radial velocity-resolved spectrum of the C IV lambdalambda1550 emission line from bright features of the Cygnus Loop, as a test for mapping the diffuse hot interstellar medium (ISM). A full Fourier-transform analysis of Cygnus Loop emission data is presented, showing lack of velocity-resolved C IV emission detection. Optics contamination is shown to be the most likely problem, and ways to eliminate this contamination for future SHS sounding rocket and satellite missions are discussed.

  18. Estimate of size distribution of charged MSPs measured in situ in winter during the WADIS-2 sounding rocket campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, Heiner; Staszak, Tristan; Strelnikov, Boris; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Friedrich, Martin; Rapp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    We present results of in situ measurements of mesosphere-lower thermosphere dusty-plasma densities including electrons, positive ions and charged aerosols conducted during the WADIS-2 sounding rocket campaign. The neutral air density was also measured, allowing for robust derivation of turbulence energy dissipation rates. A unique feature of these measurements is that they were done in a true common volume and with high spatial resolution. This allows for a reliable derivation of mean sizes and a size distribution function for the charged meteor smoke particles (MSPs). The mean particle radius derived from Schmidt numbers obtained from electron density fluctuations was ˜ 0.56 nm. We assumed a lognormal size distribution of the charged meteor smoke particles and derived the distribution width of 1.66 based on in situ-measured densities of different plasma constituents. We found that layers of enhanced meteor smoke particles' density measured by the particle detector coincide with enhanced Schmidt numbers obtained from the electron and neutral density fluctuations. Thus, we found that large particles with sizes > 1 nm were stratified in layers of ˜ 1 km thickness and lying some kilometers apart from each other.

  19. In-situ exploration of planetary upper atmospheres with balloons ejected from sounding rockets and space probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielides, Michael; Griebel, Hannes; Bayler, Klaus; Herholz, J.

    Balloon missions have been used extensively on Earth to study a large variety of atmospheric characteristics and phenomena. Of primary interest are in situ temperature, pressure and density profiles and wind velocities. The first planetary balloons were flown in the mid 1980s with the Vega 1 and 2 missions to Venus. Since then, balloons have been further developed and planed for, e.g., Mars and Titan. Testing those technologies first on Earth made sense because Earths upper (neutral) atmosphere provides many similarities to Mars atmosphere. The aim of this presentation is to provide a brief overview of the current state in scientific ballooning, and in particular report on the expertise obtained through the MIRIAM (Main Inflated Re-entry Into the Atmosphere Mission Test) Mars balloon near space deployment experiments. The test ballute MIRIAM was flown on board a REXUS 4 sounding rocket from ESRANGE in northern Sweden on October 22nd, 2008. The balloon was deployed at about 140 km altitude. On board were optical instruments, magnetometers, temperature sensors and barometers for atmospheric studies. The data gathered during decent was used to validate inflation, deployment concepts and planetary balloon technologies. Based on those results a new ballute probe MIRIAM-2 is under construction. Its aim is the recording atmospheric parameters which will be then compared to Earth upper atmospheric models. Finally, we address and discuss future prospects for balloon in situ exploration of Mars atmosphere.

  20. Analysis of Microflares from the Second Sounding Rocket Flight of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vievering, J. T.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Christe, S.; Buitrago-Casas, J. C.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Ramsey, B.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2016-12-01

    Observations of the sun in hard x-rays can provide insight into many solar phenomena which are not currently well-understood, including the mechanisms behind particle acceleration in flares. Currently, RHESSI is the only solar-dedicated spacecraft observing in the hard x-ray regime. Though RHESSI has greatly added to our knowledge of flare particle acceleration, the method of rotation modulation collimators is limited in sensitivity and dynamic range. By instead using a direct imaging technique, the structure and evolution of even small flares and active regions can be investigated in greater depth. FOXSI (Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager), a hard x-ray instrument flown on two sounding rocket campaigns, seeks to achieve these improved capabilities by using focusing optics for solar observations in the 4-20 keV range. During the second of the FOXSI flights, flown on December 11, 2014, two microflares were observed, estimated as GOES class A0.5 and A2.5 (upper limits). Preliminary analysis of these two flares will be presented, including imaging spectroscopy, light curves, and photon spectra. Through this analysis, we investigate the capabilities of FOXSI in enhancing our knowledge of smaller-scale solar events.

  1. Validation of the radiation pattern of the VHF MST radar MAARSY by scattering off a sounding rocket's payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renkwitz, T.; Schult, C.; Latteck, R.; Stober, G.

    2015-11-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) is a monostatic radar with an active phased array antenna designed for studies of phenomena in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Its design, in particular the flexible beam forming and steering capability, makes it a powerful instrument to perform observations with high angular and temporal resolution. For the configuration and analysis of experiments carried out with the radar it is essential to have knowledge of the actual radiation pattern. Therefore, during the time since the radar was put into operation various active and passive experiments have been performed to gain knowledge of the radiation pattern. With these experiments the beam pointing accuracy, the beam width and phase distribution of the antenna array were investigated. Here, the use of a sounding rocket and its payload as a radar target is described which was launched in the proximity of the radar. The analysis of these observations allows the detailed investigation of the two-way radiation pattern for different antenna array sizes and beam pointing positions.

  2. In-situ detection of noctilucent cloud particles by the Colorado Dust Detectors onboard the PHOCUS sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Robertson, S.; Dickson, S.; Gumbel, J.; Hedin, J.; Strelnikov, B.; Asmus, H.; Havnes, O.

    2014-10-01

    The Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer mesosphere (PHOCUS) sounding rocket campaign is a payload that carried multiple in-situ instruments for the detection of charged icy particles of noctilucent clouds (NLCs). The PHOCUS payload was launched on July 21st, 2011 and carried 18 scientific instruments. Three of these instruments were dedicated to the detection of the charged aerosol particles. All three instruments detected a narrow ice layer at around 81.5 km altitude. The Colorado Dust Detectors (CDDs) collected the net charge from the impact of aerosol particles on two graphite surfaces mounted flush with the payload skin. A combination of a small bias potential and permanent magnets were used to suppress the collection of plasma particles. The efficiency of the magnetic shielding improves with increasing altitude where there are fewer scattering collisions with neutrals. The data analysis shows that the net collected current can be decomposed into contributions from photoelectron emission, plasma electrons and ions, and the aerosol particles. The results show that the current corresponding to the collection of aerosol particles is positive, which is due to secondary charging effects.

  3. Successful demonstration of a compact laser-pumped vector helium magnetometer on the Daytime Dynamo sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, N.; Angelopoulos, V.; Pierce, D.; Dawson, O.; Bernal, I.; Leinweber, H. K.; Shaffer, C.; Plaschke, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Daytime Dynamo sounding rocket mission is a Goddard Space Flight Center led experiment (PI, Rob Pfaff) to study the dayside ionospheric dynamo with a suite of instruments that measure electromagnetic fields, upper atmospheric winds, and the ambient charged and neutral particle populations. Two Dynamo launches have taken place, the first on July 10th, 2011, the second on July 4th 2013. The primary objective of the mission is to determine the constituents of the dynamo current equation and to determine the degree to which the dynamo current is sustained via neutral winds, DC electric fields, or both. Dynamo carries a magnetometer developed by a JPL/UCLA collaboration that measures the vector magnetic field, and from its variation with altitude, allows us to deduce the horizontal current density. The low-mass instrument uses a laser pumped helium sensor developed at JPL, combined with digital electronics based on recent developments in fluxgate magnetometer electronics at UCLA. We will present an overview of the magnetometer design and the instrument performance.

  4. High-Reflectivity Multi-Layer Coatings for the CLASP Sounding Rocket Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kubo, Masahito; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kobiki, Toshihiko; Giono, Gabriel; Auchere, Frederic; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are planning an international rocket experiment Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is (2015 planned) that Lyman alpha line (Ly alpha line) polarization spectroscopic observations from the sun. The purpose of this experiment, detected with high accuracy of the linear polarization of the Ly alpha lines to 0.1% by using a Hanle effect is to measure the magnetic field of the chromosphere-transition layer directly. For polarization photometric accuracy achieved that approximately 0.1% required for CLASP, it is necessary to realize the monitoring device with a high throughput. On the other hand, Ly alpha line (vacuum ultraviolet rays) have a sensitive characteristics that is absorbed by the material. We therefore set the optical system of the reflection system (transmission only the wavelength plate), each of the mirrors, subjected to high efficiency of the multilayer coating in accordance with the role. Primary mirror diameter of CLASP is about 30 cm, the amount of heat about 30,000 J is about 5 minutes of observation time is coming mainly in the visible light to the telescope. In addition, total flux of the sun visible light overwhelmingly large and about 200 000 times the Ly alpha line wavelength region. Therefore, in terms of thermal management and 0.1% of the photometric measurement accuracy achieved telescope, elimination of the visible light is essential. We therefore, has a high reflectivity (greater than 50%) in Ly alpha line, visible light is a multilayer coating be kept to a low reflectance (less than 5%) (cold mirror coating) was applied to the primary mirror. On the other hand, the efficiency of the polarization analyzer required chromospheric magnetic field measurement (the amount of light) Conventional (magnesium fluoride has long been known as a material for vacuum ultraviolet (MgF2) manufactured ellipsometer; Rs = 22%) about increased to 2.5 times were high efficiency reflective polarizing element analysis. This device, Bridou et al

  5. Atomic oxygen and temperature in the lower thermosphere from the O-STATES sounding rocket project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Jonas; Gumbel, Jörg; Megner, Linda; Stegman, Jacek; Seo, Mikael; Khaplanov, Mikhail; Slanger, Tom; Kalogerakis, Konstantinos; Friedrich, Martin; Torkar, Klaus; Eberhart, Martin; Löhle, Stefan; Fasoulas, Stefanos

    2016-04-01

    In October 2015 the O-STATES payload was launched twice from Esrange Space Center (67.9° N, 21.1° E) in northern Sweden, first into moderately disturbed and then into calm geomagnetic conditions. The basic idea of O-STATES ("Oxygen Species and Thermospheric Airglow in The Earth's Sky") is that comprehensive information on the composition, specifically atomic oxygen in the ground state O(3P) and first excited state O(1D), and temperature of the lower thermosphere can be obtained from a limited set of optical measurements. Starting point for the analysis are daytime measurements of the O2(b1 ∑ g+ - X3 ∑ g-) Atmospheric Band system in the spectral region 755-780 nm and the O(1D-3P) Red Line at 630 nm. In the daytime lower thermosphere, O(1D) is produced by O2 photolysis and the excited O2(b) state is mainly produced by energy transfer from O(1D) to the O2(X) ground state. In addition to O2 photolysis, both electron impact on O(3P) and dissociative recombination of O2+ are major sources of O(1D) in the thermosphere. Laboratory studies at SRI International have shown that O2(b) production in vibrational level v=1 dominates. While O2(b, v=0) is essentially unquenched, O2(b, v=1) is subject to collisional quenching that is dominated by O at altitudes above 160 km. Hence, the ratio of the Atmospheric Band emission from O2(b, v=1) and O2(b, v=0) is a measure of the O density at sufficiently high altitudes. In addition, the spectral shape of the O2 Atmospheric Band is temperature dependent and spectrally resolved measurements of the Atmospheric Bands thus provide a measure of atmospheric temperature. This O2 Atmospheric Band analysis has been suggested as a new technique for thermospheric remote sensing under the name Global Oxygen and Temperature (GOAT) Mapping. With O-STATES we want to characterize the GOAT technique by in-situ analysis of the O2 Atmospheric Band airglow and the underlying excitation mechanisms. By performing this dayglow analysis from a rocket

  6. Expression of transcription factors after short-term exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures to hyper-g, and to simulated and sounding rocket micro-g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, R.; Babbick, M.

    Previous microarray studies with cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cv Columbia have shown responses in gene expression which were partly specific to exposure to microgravity sounding rocket experiment TEXUS In order to get access to early responses upon changes in gravitational fields we used exposure times as short as 2 min For this purpose we selected a range of genes which code for different groups of transcription factors WRKY ERF MYB MADS Samples were taken in 5-min clinorotation 2- and 3-dimensional hypergravity 8g and 2-min intervals sounding rocket experiment Amounts of transcripts were determined by quantitative RT PCR Most transcripts showed a significant transient change in content within a time frame of up to 30 min after changing the external gravitational field strength They could be grouped into 1 basic stress responses which occurred under all conditions 2 clinorotation-related effects which were either identical or opposite between 2D 60 rpm 4x10 -2 g and 3D clinorotation random positioning machine and 3 alterations specific to the microgravity exposure under sounding rocket conditions MAXUS The data are discussed in relation to gravitation-dependent signalling chains and with regard to the simulation of microgravity by means of clinorotation Supported by a grant from the Deutsches Zentrum f u r Luft- und Raumfahrt e V grant no 50 WB 0143

  7. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  8. Cosmic X-ray Physics: Sounding rocket investigations of the diffuse X-ray background, including instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, Dan

    We propose an investigation to improve our understanding of the Galactic diffuse X-ray background. The ultimate purpose of this is to determine the role of hot phases of the interstellar medium in mediating stellar feedback in star formation, in transport of metals, and in determining the structure and evolution of the Galaxy. It directly addresses SMD's astrophysics goal No. 2, to explore the origin and evolution of the galaxies, stars and planets that make up our universe. This work will involve a flight of an existing payload with small modifications in Woomera, South Australia, to observe the Galactic soft X-ray bulge and attempt to determine its nature and emission mechanisms. This flight should also either confirm or put strict upper limits on the "sterile neutrino" model for the 3.5 keV signal observed near the Galactic Center by XMM-Newton. Our investigation includes the development of thermal detectors with superconducting transition edge thermometers capable of 1-2 eV FWHM energy resolution in the 100-400 eV range with the intent of obtaining a scientifically useful spectrum on a sounding rocket flight of the emission from one million degree gas in this energy range. This will require a total area of 1-2 square centimeters for the detector array. To enable routine testing of such detectors in the lab and for necessary in-flight gain and resolution monitoring, we are trying to develop a pulsed-UV laser calibration source. In collaboration with Goddard Space Flight Center, we are investigating the practicality of waveguide-below-cutoff filters to provide the necessary attenuation of infrared radiation for these detectors while still allowing good x-ray transmission below 150 eV. The detectors, calibration source, filters, optimal high-rate pulse analysis and flight experience with the detector readouts are all relevant to future NASA major missions. The detectors we're working on for a low-energy sounding rocket flight would be an excellent match to what is

  9. Far-ultraviolet observations of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with a sounding-rocket-borne instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, P.; McCandliss, S.; Weaver, H.; Fleming, B.; Redwine, K.; Li, M.; Kutyrev, A.; Moseley, S.

    2014-07-01

    We report on a far-ultraviolet observation of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) made from a Black Brant IX sounding rocket that was launched on 20 November 2013 at 04:40 MST from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, when the comet was 0.44 au from the Sun, 0.86 au from the Earth, and at a solar elongation of 26.3 degrees pre-perihelion. At the time of launch the comet was 0.1 degrees below ground horizon. The payload reached an apogee of 279 km and the total time pointed at the comet was 353 s. The sounding rocket borne instrument was our wide-field multi-object spectro-telescope called FORTIS (Far-UV Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy), which is a Gregorian telescope (concave primary and secondary optics) with a triaxial figured diffractive secondary that provides an on-axis imaging channel and two off-axis spectral channels in a common focal plane. A multi-object spectroscopic capability is provided by an array of microshutters placed at the prime focus of the telescope. Our microshutter array (MSA) is based on prototype devices of the large area arrays developed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for use in the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The imaging channel on FORTIS has a field-of-view (FOV) of 0.5 degrees square. The MSA allows selection of up to 43 individual regions, each with a solid angle of 12.4'' × 36.9'', for spectral acquisition over the 800--1950 Ångstroms bandpass at a resolution of 6 Ångstroms. However a problem with addressing the MSA prevented the acquisition of spectra through individual slits. Nonetheless spectrally confused images, dominated by Lyman-alpha emission from the comet, were acquired in both off-axis spectral channels. The imaging channel uses a CaF_2/MgF_2 cylindrical doublet to correct for astigmatism introduced by the triaxial secondary, which restricts the bandpass to wavelengths longward of 1280 Ångstroms. The corrected imaging resolution is

  10. Measuring the seeds of ion outflow: auroral sounding rocket observations of low-altitude ion heating and circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M.; Hampton, D. L.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Cohen, I. J.; Conde, M.; Fisher, L. E.; Horak, P.; Lessard, M. R.; Miceli, R. J.; Michell, R. G.; Moen, J.; Powell, S. P.

    2016-01-25

    Here, we present an analysis of in situ measurements from the MICA (Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfvén Resonator) nightside auroral sounding rocket with comparisons to a multifluid ionospheric model. MICA made observations at altitudes below 325 km of the thermal ion kinetic particle distributions that are the origins of ion outflow. Late flight, in the vicinity of an auroral arc, we observe frictional processes controlling the ion temperature. Upflow of these cold ions is attributed to either the ambipolar field resulting from the heated electrons or possibly to ion-neutral collisions. We measure ExB convection away from the arc (poleward) and downflows of hundreds of m s-1 poleward of this arc, indicating small-scale low-altitude plasma circulation. In the early flight we observe DC electromagnetic Poynting flux and associated ELF wave activity influencing the thermal ion temperature in regions of Alfvénic aurora. We observe enhanced, anisotropic ion temperatures which we conjecture are caused by transverse heating by wave-particle interactions (WPI) even at these low altitudes. Throughout this region we observe several hundred m s-1 upflow of the bulk thermal ions colocated with WPI; however, the mirror force is negligible at these low energies; thus, the upflow is attributed to ambipolar fields (or possibly neutral upwelling drivers). Moreover, the low-altitude MICA observations serve to inform future ionospheric modeling and simulations of (a) the need to consider the effects of heating by WPI at altitudes lower than previously considered viable and (b) the occurrence of structured and localized upflows/downflows below where higher-altitude heating rocesses are expected.

  11. Measuring the seeds of ion outflow: auroral sounding rocket observations of low-altitude ion heating and circulation

    DOE PAGES

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M.; ...

    2016-01-25

    Here, we present an analysis of in situ measurements from the MICA (Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfvén Resonator) nightside auroral sounding rocket with comparisons to a multifluid ionospheric model. MICA made observations at altitudes below 325 km of the thermal ion kinetic particle distributions that are the origins of ion outflow. Late flight, in the vicinity of an auroral arc, we observe frictional processes controlling the ion temperature. Upflow of these cold ions is attributed to either the ambipolar field resulting from the heated electrons or possibly to ion-neutral collisions. We measure E→xB→ convection away from the arc (poleward) andmore » downflows of hundreds of m s-1 poleward of this arc, indicating small-scale low-altitude plasma circulation. In the early flight we observe DC electromagnetic Poynting flux and associated ELF wave activity influencing the thermal ion temperature in regions of Alfvénic aurora. We observe enhanced, anisotropic ion temperatures which we conjecture are caused by transverse heating by wave-particle interactions (WPI) even at these low altitudes. Throughout this region we observe several hundred m s-1 upflow of the bulk thermal ions colocated with WPI; however, the mirror force is negligible at these low energies; thus, the upflow is attributed to ambipolar fields (or possibly neutral upwelling drivers). Moreover, the low-altitude MICA observations serve to inform future ionospheric modeling and simulations of (a) the need to consider the effects of heating by WPI at altitudes lower than previously considered viable and (b) the occurrence of structured and localized upflows/downflows below where higher-altitude heating rocesses are expected.« less

  12. Structure and dynamics of auroral electron precipitation: sounding rocket and groundbased observations of tall rays at the nightside poleward boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. A.; Hampton, D. L.; Mella, M. R.; Lundberg, E. T.; Dahlgren, H.; Kintner, P. M.; Lessard, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Cascades2 auroral sounding rocket provides a case study for comparing multipoint in situ ionospheric observations of a nightside auroral poleward boundary intensification (PBI) event with groundbased optical studies of the same event. Cascades2 was launched northward from Poker Flat Alaska on 20 Mar 2009 at 11:04 UT. The 12 minute 43 second flight reached an apogee of 564 km over the northern coast of Alaska. The experiment array included a 5-payload suite of in situ instrumentation, ground cameras with various fields of view at three different points under the trajectory, multiple ground magnetometers, the PFISR radar at the launch site, and the THEMIS spacecraft in the magnetotail. We present parameterization of the PBI Alfvenic auroral signature as seen by the ground optics, the in situ electron data, and the in situ electric field data. Tall rayed structures in the visible PBI curtain have an along-arc spacing of 16 km and an along-arc velocity of 8 km/s in both directions along the arc. The structures are seen in the in situ data as field-aligned bursts of accelerated thermal ionospheric electrons with energies up to a few keV. The electron bursts have modulated peak electron energies (and therefore modulated energy fluxes) corresponding to the spatial structure of the visible rays. The electron precipitation is additionally modulated at a higher frequency, and velocity dispersion analysis of these 8Hz signatures shows the Alfvenic wave-particle acceleration occurring only a few hundred km above the observation point. These observations are used to construct a model of the curtain of Alfvenic activity above the PBI event, both in the dispersive ionosphere and in the presumed magnetotail driver region. We are investigating the plausibility that magnetospheric drivers in the tail reconnection region control the parameterization of this along-arc PBI Alvenic auroral structure and dynamics.

  13. Measuring the seeds of ion outflow: Auroral sounding rocket observations of low-altitude ion heating and circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M.; Hampton, D. L.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Cohen, I. J.; Conde, M.; Fisher, L. E.; Horak, P.; Lessard, M. R.; Miceli, R. J.; Michell, R. G.; Moen, J.; Powell, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analysis of in situ measurements from the MICA (Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfvén Resonator) nightside auroral sounding rocket with comparisons to a multifluid ionospheric model. MICA made observations at altitudes below 325 km of the thermal ion kinetic particle distributions that are the origins of ion outflow. Late flight, in the vicinity of an auroral arc, we observe frictional processes controlling the ion temperature. Upflow of these cold ions is attributed to either the ambipolar field resulting from the heated electrons or possibly to ion-neutral collisions. We measure E→×B→ convection away from the arc (poleward) and downflows of hundreds of m s-1 poleward of this arc, indicating small-scale low-altitude plasma circulation. In the early flight we observe DC electromagnetic Poynting flux and associated ELF wave activity influencing the thermal ion temperature in regions of Alfvénic aurora. We observe enhanced, anisotropic ion temperatures which we conjecture are caused by transverse heating by wave-particle interactions (WPI) even at these low altitudes. Throughout this region we observe several hundred m s-1 upflow of the bulk thermal ions colocated with WPI; however, the mirror force is negligible at these low energies; thus, the upflow is attributed to ambipolar fields (or possibly neutral upwelling drivers). The low-altitude MICA observations serve to inform future ionospheric modeling and simulations of (a) the need to consider the effects of heating by WPI at altitudes lower than previously considered viable and (b) the occurrence of structured and localized upflows/downflows below where higher-altitude heating rocesses are expected.

  14. Alterations in protein expression of Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures during hyper- , simulated and sounding rocket micro-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Ruediger; Barjaktarović, Žarko; Babbick, Maren; Magel, Elisabeth; Nordheim, Alfred; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Hampp, Ruediger

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to hypergravity (8g), 2D clinorotation and random positioning exhibit changes in gene expression (Martzivanou et al., Protoplasma 229:155-162, 2003). In a recent investigation we could show that after 2 hrs of exposure also the protein complement shows treatment-related changes. These are indicative for reactive oxygen species being involved in the perception of / response to changes in the gravitational field. In the present study we have extended these investigations for a period of up to 16 hrs of exposure. We report on changes in abundance of 28 proteins which have been identified by nano HPLC-ESI-MS/MS, and which were altered in amount after 2 hrs of treatment. According to changes between 2 and 16 hrs we could distinguish four groups of proteins which either declined, increased from down-regulated to control levels, showed a transient decline or a transient increase. With regard to function, our data indicate stress relief or adaption to a new gravitational steady state under prolonged exposure. The latter assumption is supported by the appearance of a new set of 19 proteins which is changed in abundance after 8 hrs of hypergravity. A comparative analysis of the different treatments showed some similarities in response between 8g centrifugation and 2D clinorotation, while random positioning showed the least responses. In addition, we report on the impact of reduced gravitation on the phospho proteom. Cell cultures exposed to 12 min of microgravity as obtained on board of sounding rockets do not respond with alterations in total protein but in the degree of phosphorylation as demonstrated after 2D SDS PAGE separation and sequencing. On this basis we give evidence for signaling cascades involved in the transduction of gravitational signals.

  15. A Statistical Analysis of Langmuir Wave-Electron Correlations Observed by the CHARM II Auroral Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; Labelle, J. W.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Kaeppler, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Langmuir-mode electron plasma waves are frequently observed by spacecraft in active plasma environments such as the ionosphere. Ionospheric Langmuir waves may be excited by the bump-on-tail instability generated by impinging beams of electrons traveling parallel to the background magnetic field (B). The Correlation of High-frequencies and Auroral Roar Measurement (CHARM II) sounding rocket was launched into a substorm at 9:49 UT on 17 February 2010, from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. The primary instruments included the University of Iowa Wave-Particle Correlator (WPC), the Dartmouth High-Frequency Experiment (HFE), several charged particle detectors, low-frequency wave instruments, and a magnetometer. The HFE is a receiver system which effectively yields continuous (100% duty cycle) electric-field waveform measurements from 100 kHz to 5 MHz, and which had its detection axis aligned nominally parallel to B. The HFE output was fed on-payload to the WPC, which uses a phase-locked loop to track the incoming wave frequency with the most power, then sorting incoming electrons at eight energy levels into sixteen wave-phase bins. CHARM II encountered several regions of strong Langmuir wave activity throughout its 15-minute flight, and the WPC showed wave-lock and statistically significant particle correlation distributions during several time periods. We show results of an in-depth analysis of the CHARM II WPC data for the entire flight, including statistical analysis of correlations which show evidence of direct interaction with the Langmuir waves, indicating (at various times) trapping of particles and both driving and damping of Langmuir waves by particles. In particular, the sign of the gradient in particle flux appears to correlate with the phase relation between the electrons and the wave field, with possible implications for the wave physics.

  16. Observed and modelled effects of auroral precipitation on the thermal ionospheric plasma: comparing the MICA and Cascades2 sounding rocket events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. A.; Gayetsky, L.; Fernandes, P. A.; Zettergren, M. D.; Lessard, M.; Cohen, I. J.; Hampton, D. L.; Ahrns, J.; Hysell, D. L.; Powell, S.; Miceli, R. J.; Moen, J. I.; Bekkeng, T.

    2012-12-01

    Auroral precipitation can modify the ionospheric thermal plasma through a variety of processes. We examine and compare the events seen by two recent auroral sounding rockets carrying in situ thermal plasma instrumentation. The Cascades2 sounding rocket (March 2009, Poker Flat Research Range) traversed a pre-midnight poleward boundary intensification (PBI) event distinguished by a stationary Alfvenic curtain of field-aligned precipitation. The MICA sounding rocket (February 2012, Poker Flat Research Range) traveled through irregular precipitation following the passage of a strong westward-travelling surge. Previous modelling of the ionospheric effects of auroral precipitation used a one-dimensional model, TRANSCAR, which had a simplified treatment of electric fields and did not have the benefit of in situ thermal plasma data. This new study uses a new two-dimensional model which self-consistently calculates electric fields to explore both spatial and temporal effects, and compares to thermal plasma observations. A rigorous understanding of the ambient thermal plasma parameters and their effects on the local spacecraft sheath and charging, is required for quantitative interpretation of in situ thermal plasma observations. To complement this TRANSCAR analysis we therefore require a reliable means of interpreting in situ thermal plasma observation. This interpretation depends upon a rigorous plasma sheath model since the ambient ion energy is on the order of the spacecraft's sheath energy. A self-consistent PIC model is used to model the spacecraft sheath, and a test-particle approach then predicts the detector response for a given plasma environment. The model parameters are then modified until agreement is found with the in situ data. We find that for some situations, the thermal plasma parameters are strongly driven by the precipitation at the observation time. For other situations, the previous history of the precipitation at that position can have a stronger

  17. DXL: A Sounding Rocket Mission for the Study of Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Prasai, K.; Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S.; Cravens, T.; Robertson, I.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy (DXL) mission is an approved sounding rocket project with a first launch scheduled around December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission generated by solar wind charge exchange from that of the local hot bubble to improve our understanding of both. With 1,000 square centimeters proportional counters and grasp of about 10 square centimeters sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands, DXL will achieve in a 5-minute flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  18. Simultaneous Observations of Electric Fields, Current Density, Plasma Density, and Neutral Winds During Two Sounding Rocket Experiments Launched from Wallops Island into Strong Daytime Dynamo Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Rowland, D. E.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Martin, S. C.; Abe, T.; Habu, H.; Yamamoto, M. Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Kakinami, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.; Larsen, M. F.; Hurd, L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Bishop, R. L.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Fish, C. S.; Bullett, T. W.; Mabie, J. J.; Murphy, N.; Angelopoulos, V.; Leinweber, H. K.; Bernal, I.; Chi, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the ion-neutral coupling that creates the global electrical daytime "dynamo" currents in the mid-latitude, lower ionosphere, NASA carried out two multiple sounding rocket experiments from Wallops Island, VA on July 10, 2011 (14:00 UT, 10:00 LT) and July 4, 2013 (14:31 UT, 10:31 LT). The rockets were launched in the presence of well-defined, westward Hall currents observed on the ground with ΔH values of ­-25 nT and -30 nT, respectively, as well as a well-defined, daytime ionospheric density observed by the VIPIR ionosonde at Wallops. During the 2011 experiment, a narrow, intense sporadic-E layer was observed near 102 km. Each experiment consisted of a pair of rockets launched 15 sec apart. The first rocket of each pair carried instruments to measure DC electric and magnetic fields, as well as the ambient plasma and neutral gases and attained apogees of 158 km and 135 km in the 2011 and 2013 experiments, respectively. The second rocket of each pair carried canisters which released a lithium vapor trail along the upleg to illuminate neutral winds in the upper atmosphere. This daytime vapor trail technology was developed jointly by researchers at JAXA and Clemson University. In the second experiment, the lithium release was clearly visible in cameras with infrared filters operated by US and Japanese researchers in a NASA airplane at 9.6 km altitude. The observed wind profiles reached speeds of 100 m/s with strong shears with respect to altitude and were consistent with an independent derivation of the wind from the ionization gauge sensor suite on the instrumented rocket. The "vapor trail" rockets, which also included a falling sphere, attained apogees of 150 km and 143 km in the 2011 and 2013 experiments, respectively. By measuring the current density, conductivity, DC electric fields, and neutral winds, we solve the dynamo equation as a function of altitude, revealing the different contributions to the lower E-region currents. We find that the DC

  19. Sounding Rocket Observations of Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra Between 0.5 and 2.5 nm Using a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Seth; Didkovsky, Leonid; Woods, Thomas; Jones, Andrew; Moore, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Spectrally resolved measurements of individual solar active regions (ARs) in the soft X-ray (SXR) range are important for studying dynamic processes in the solar corona and their associated effects on the Earth's upper atmosphere. They are also a means of evaluating atomic data and elemental abundances used in physics-based solar spectral models. However, very few such measurements are available. We present spectral measurements of two individual ARs in the 0.5 to 2.5 nm range obtained on the NASA 36.290 sounding rocket flight of 21 October 2013 (at about 18:30 UT) using the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a channel of the Extreme Ultaviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) payload designed for underflight calibrations of the orbital EVE on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The EVE rocket instrument is a duplicate of the EVE on SDO, except the SAM channel on the rocket version was modified in 2012 to include a freestanding transmission grating to provide spectrally resolved images of the solar disk with the best signal to noise ratio for the brightest features, such as ARs. Calibrations of the EVE sounding rocket instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (NIST/SURF) have provided a measurement of the SAM absolute spectral response function and a mapping of wavelength separation in the grating diffraction pattern. We discuss techniques (incorporating the NIST/SURF data) for determining SXR spectra from the dispersed AR images as well as the resulting spectra for NOAA ARs 11877 and 11875 observed on the 2013 rocket flight. In comparisons with physics-based spectral models using the CHIANTI v8 atomic database we find that both AR spectra are in good agreement with isothermal spectra (4 MK), as well as spectra based on an AR differential emission measure (DEM) included with the CHIANTI distribution, with the exception of the relative intensities of strong Fe xvii lines associated with 2p6-2p53{s} and 2p6-2p

  20. The Properties of the Diffuse X-ray Background from the DXL sounding rocket mission (plus ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Suzaku data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the properties of the different components of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) is made particularly difficult by their similar spectral signature.The University of Miami has been working on disentangling the different DXB components for many years, using a combination of proprietary and archival data from XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra, and a sounding rocket mission (DXL) specifically designed to study the properties of Local Hot Bubble (LHB) and Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) using their spatial signature. In this talk we will present:(a) Results from the DXL mission, specifically launch #2, to study the properties of the SWCX and LHB (and GH) and their contribution to the ROSAT All Sky Survey Bands(b) Results from a Suzaku key project to characterize the SWCX and build a semi-empirical model to predict the SWCX line emission for any time, any direction. A publicly available web portal for the model will go online by the end of the year(c) Results from XMM-Newton deep surveys to study the angular correlation of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) in the direction of the Chandra Deep Field South.DXL launch #3, schedule for January 2018 and the development of the DXG sounding rocket mission to characterize the GH-CGM emission using newly developed micropore optics will also be discussed.

  1. In-situ observations of mesospheric aerosol particles and their impact on the D-region charge balance: Highlights from the ECOMA sounding rocket program (2006 - 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, M.; Friedrich, M.; Strelnikov, B.; Hoppe, U.; Plane, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Over the years 2006 - 2010 a total of 9 sounding rockets was successfully launched in the scope of the Norwegian-German ECOMA (= Existence and Charge state Of Meteoric smoke particles in the middle Atmosphere) project. While the primary target of these observations was the characterization of the properties of meteoric smoke particles (MSP), both MSP and mesospheric ice particles in the vicinity of the cold polar summer mesopause were investigated. This presentation gives an overview of the major results of this project covering subjects such as the charging properties of MSP and ice particles, the impact of this charging process on the D-region charge balance, and the microphysical properties of the MSP. Concerning the latter, emphasis is spent on the most recent results from a campaign in December 2010 during which two sounding rockets were launched with improved particle detectors that were designed to provide constraints on the photoelectric work function of the particles. These experimental results are further discussed on the basis of quantum mechanical calculations of the electronic structure of cluster molecules which are likely candidates for MSP. These calculations allow a tentative interpretation of the observations in terms of MSP size and altitude variations as well as their photoelectric properties.

  2. On the normal force and the rolling moment due to wing-tail interference of a sounding rocket model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirouzu, M.; Soga, K.

    The induced normal force and rolling moment due to wing-tail interference is studied experimentally. Wind tunnel tests of TT-500A rocket model and a roll-controllable rocket model were performed at the NAL 2 m x 2 m Transonic Wind Tunnel and the 1 m x 1 m Blowdown Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Characteristics of normal-force-induced normal force and rolling moment, and rolling-moment-induced rolling moment on the tail-fins are obtained by varying flow Mach number, angle of attack and bank angle. The results are compared with theoretical results based on the strip-theory.

  3. Principal investigators data package for Project Initiation Conference (PIC): EUVS sounding rocket no. 36.117CL. Target: Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1993-01-01

    The region of the UV between 500 and 1200 A is a rich one for the study of planetary and astrophysical targets. EUV atmospheric spectroscopy opens up an important window on ion and neutral nitrogen, oxygen, and noble gas emissions. In this document we describe the specific scientific background and motivations for this Venus EUV rocket observation along with experiment design and mission parameters.

  4. Development of an Ion Mass Spectrometer and Sounding Rocket System for D-Region Cluster-Ion Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-27

    IbM. DI NbOl Preface The preparation of this report was possible only because of the manifold extra contributions of the following: R. Sukys ...is to assure tracking of their ratios as a function of environment. Corning CYR glass capacitors are specified. 8. Rochefort, J.S., and Sukys , R. (1978...A Digital Control Unit for a Rocket- borne Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer, AFGL-TR-78-0106, ADA 057251. 9. Rochefort, J. S., and Sukys , R. (1978

  5. Winds and Ion Drifts Measured in the Thermospheric Footprint of Earth's Northern Magnetic Cusp During the C-REX Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, M.; Larsen, M. F.; Hampton, D.; Dhadly, M. S.; Ahrns, M. J.; Aruliah, A. L.; Kakinami, Y.; Barker, B.; Kiene, A.; Sigernes, F.; Lorentzen, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    We report here on neutral wind and ion drift measurements recorded during the November 24, 2014, "C-REX" sounding rocket mission into the thermosphere beneath Earth's northern geomagnetic cusp. The rocket released ten tracer clouds, each comprised of a mixture of barium and strontium, at altitudes between 190 and 400 km. The clouds were created by launching rocket-propelled "grenades" at high velocity out from the parent payload, and were dispersed across a 3D volume extending over many tens of km around the main trajectory. Cameras located at Longyearbyen, Ny-Alesund, and aboard an aircraft stationed north of Bear Island were used to image the tracer clouds and to triangulate on their position and 3D motion. Sunlight striking the clouds ionized the barium within a few tens of seconds, whereas the strontium remained neutral. We were thus able to independently measure the flow velocity of both neutrals and ions at the release locations. Here we will present high-resolution maps of the tracer cloud motion, along with the resulting estimates of neutral and ion flow velocities. These results show very substantial ion-neutral velocity differences: the ions' drift direction was roughly perpendicular to that of the neutrals, while the magnitude of their velocity difference was of order 500 meters per second. Combining these data with ground-based measurements of temperature and electron density allows us to estimate that the specific power density for Joule heating at heights above 200 km was very substantial during the time of this experiment. If such Joule heating is typical, it is very likely to play a major role in establishing the (currently poorly understood) permanent enhancements in the neutral mass density of Earth's thermosphere in the geomagnetic cusp regions at altitudes of around 400 km.

  6. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp During IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1997-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 N reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  7. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF BZ North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Bounds, S.; Acuna, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Maseide, K.; Sandholt, P. E.; Soraas, F.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79degN reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind (interplanetary magnetic field) IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  8. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, W.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 deg N reaching altitudes of about 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP Fl 3 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  9. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF BZ North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Bounds, S.; Acuna, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Maseide, K.; Sandholt, P. E.; Soraas, F.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79degN reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind (interplanetary magnetic field) IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  10. A digital-type fluxgate magnetometer using a sigma-delta digital-to-analog converter for a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Kyosuke; Matsuoka, Ayako

    2014-07-01

    One of the design challenges for future magnetospheric satellite missions is optimizing the mass, size, and power consumption of the instruments to meet the mission requirements. We have developed a digital-type fluxgate (DFG) magnetometer that is anticipated to have significantly less mass and volume than the conventional analog-type. Hitherto, the lack of a space-grade digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with good accuracy has prevented the development of a high-performance DFG. To solve this problem, we developed a high-resolution DAC using parts whose performance was equivalent to existing space-grade parts. The developed DAC consists of a 1-bit second-order sigma-delta modulator and a fourth-order analog low-pass filter. We tested the performance of the DAC experimentally and found that it had better than 17-bits resolution in 80% of the measurement range, and the linearity error was 2-13.3 of the measurement range. We built a DFG flight model (in which this DAC was embedded) for a sounding rocket experiment as an interim step in the development of a future satellite mission. The noise of this DFG was 0.79 nTrms at 0.1-10 Hz, which corresponds to a roughly 17-bit resolution. The results show that the sigma-delta DAC and the DFG had a performance that is consistent with our optimized design, and the noise was as expected from the noise simulation. Finally, we have confirmed that the DFG worked successfully during the flight of the sounding rocket.

  11. Statistical Analysis of Bursty Langmuir Waves, Alfvén and Whistler Waves, and Precipitating Electrons Seen by the CHARM II Nightside Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; Labelle, J. W.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Kaeppler, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Bursty Langmuir waves have been interpreted as the result of the superposition of multiple Langmuir normal-mode waves, with the resultant modulation being the beat pattern between waves with e.g. 10 kHz frequency differences. The normal-mode waves could be generated either through wave-wave interactions with VLF waves, or through independent linear processes. The CHARM II sounding rocket was launched into a substorm at 9:49 UT on 15 February 2010, from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. The primary instruments included the Dartmouth High-Frequency Experiment (HFE), a receiver system which effectively yields continuous (100% duty cycle) E-field waveform measurements up to 5 MHz, as well as a number of charged particle detectors, including a wave-particle correlator. The payload also included a magnetometer and several low-frequency wave instruments. CHARM II encountered several regions of strong Langmuir wave activity throughout its 15-minute flight, including several hundred discrete Langmuir-wave bursts. We show results of a statistical analysis of CHARM II data for the entire flight, comparing HFE data with the other payload instruments, specifically looking at timings and correlations between bursty Langmuir waves, Alfvén and whistler-mode waves, and electrons precipitating parallel to the magnetic field. Following a similar analysis on TRICE dayside sounding rocket data, we also calculate the fraction of correlated waves with VLF waves at appropriate frequencies to support the wave-wave interaction bursty Langmuir wave generation mechanism, and compare to results from CHARM II nightside data.

  12. The Global Coronal Structure Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-01-01

    During the past year we have completed the changeover from the NIXT program to the new TXI sounding rocket program. The NIXT effort, aimed at evaluating the viability of the remaining portions of the NIXT hardware and design, has been finished and the portions of the NIXT which are viable and flightworthy, such as filters, mirror mounting hardware, electronics and telemetry interface systems, are now part of the new rocket payload. The backup NIXT multilayer-coated x-ray telescope and its mounting hardware have been completely fabricated and are being stored for possible future use in the TXI rocket. The H-alpha camera design is being utilized in the TXI program for real-time pointing verification and control via telemetry. A new H-alpha camera has been built, with a high-resolution RS170 CCD camera output. Two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program, have been written and published this year: 1. "The Solar X-ray Corona," by L. Golub, Astrophysics and Space Science, 237, 33 (1996). 2. "Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure," Keynote Paper, Proceedings STEPWG1 Workshop on Measurements and Analyses of the Solar 3D Magnetic Field, Solar Physics, 174, 99 (1997).

  13. A Sounding Rocket Investigation of the Fine Structure in the Mesopause Region in Conjunction with High Spatial Resolution Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.

    2003-01-01

    The grant funds were provided to carry out chemical tracer wind and turbulence measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere as part of the Turbulent Oxygen Mixing Experiment (TOMEX) for which Dr. James Hecht of the Aerospace Corp. was the Principal Investigator. Clemson University designed, built, and tested two chemical tracer release payload sections for the 21.126 and 21.127 payloads which, in addition, had photometer and ionization gauge instrumentation. The tracer chemical was trimethyl aluminum (TMA). The experiment was carried out at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on October 26,2000. The location was chosen because of the proximity to the Starfire Optical Range (SOR) which hosted the powerful University of Illinois sodium lidar for an extended period prior to and also during the launch window. Since the SOR telescope is fully steerable, lidar measurements in the same volume sampled by the rocket were possible. The primary objective of the experiment was to measure the turbulent diffusion and mixing in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, especially in layers characterized by convective and/or dynamical instabilities. The lidar, which is capable of measuring the sodium density, temperatures, and winds with good range and time resolution, provided the launch criteria, as well as context measurements for the in situ rocket observations.

  14. Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capstick, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    1. The nature of sound; 2. Elasticity and vibrations; 3. Transverse waves; 4. Longitudinal waves; 5. Velocity of longitudinal waves; 6. Reflection and refraction. Doppler's principle; 7. Interference. Beats. Combination tones; 8. Resonance and forced vibrations; 9. Quality of musical notes; 10. Organ pipes; 11. Rods. Plates. Bells; 12. Acoustical measurements; 13. The phonograph, microphone and telephone; 14. Consonance; 15. Definition of intervals. Scales. Temperament; 16. Musical instruments; 17. Application of acoustical principles to military purposes; Questions; Answers to questions; Index.

  15. Ground and flight test program of a Stokes-flow parachute: Packaging, deployment, and sounding rocket integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederer, P. G.; Mihora, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The current design and hardware components of the patented 14 sqm Stokes flow parachute are described. The Stokes-flow parachute is a canopy of open mesh material, which is kept deployed by braces. Because of the light weight of its mesh material, and the high drag on its mesh elements when they operate in the Stokes-flow flight regime, this parachute has an extremely low ballistic coefficient. It provides a stable aerodynamic platform superior to conventional nonporous billowed parachutes, is exceptionally packable, and is easily contained within the canister of the Sidewinder Arcas or the RDT and E rockets. Thus, it offers the potential for gathering more meteorological data, especially at high altitudes, than conventional billowed parachutes. Methods for packaging the parachute are also recommended. These methods include schemes for folding the canopy and for automatically releasing the pressurizing fluid as the packaged parachute unfolds.

  16. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  17. Small-scale plasma turbulence and intermittency in the high latitude F region based on the ICI-2 sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicher, A.; Miloch, W.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L. B. N.

    2015-12-01

    Small-scale plasma irregularities and turbulence are common phenomena in the F layer of the ionosphere, both in the equatorial and polar regions. A common approach in analyzing data from experiments on space and ionospheric plasma irregularities are power spectra. Power spectra give no information about the phases of the waveforms, and thus do not allow to determine whether some of the phases are correlated or whether they exhibit a random character. The former case would imply the presence of nonlinear wave-wave interactions, while the latter suggests a more turbulent-like process. Discerning between these mechanisms is crucial for understanding high latitude plasma irregularities and can be addressed with bispectral analysis and higher order statistics. In this study, we use higher order spectra and statistics to analyze electron density data observed with the ICI-2 sounding rocket experiment at a meter-scale resolution. The main objective of ICI-2 was to investigate plasma irregularities in the cusp in the F layer ionosphere. We study in detail two regions intersected during the rocket flight and which are characterized by large density fluctuations: a trailing edge of a cold polar cap patch, and a density enhancement subject to cusp auroral particle precipitation. While these two regions exhibit similar power spectra, our analysis reveals that their internal structure is different. The structures on the edge of the polar cap patch are characterized by significant coherent mode coupling and intermittency, while the plasma enhancement associated with precipitation exhibits stronger random characteristics. This indicates that particle precipitation may play a fundamental role in ionospheric plasma structuring by creating turbulent-like structures.

  18. Development of a Low-cost, FPGA-based, Delay Line Particle Detector for Satellite and Sounding Rocket Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, M.; Kujawski, J. T.; Adrian, M. L.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Electrons are, by definition, a fundamental, chemical and electromagnetic constituent of any plasma. This is especially true within the partially ionized plasmas of Earth's ionosphere where electrons are a critical component of a vast array of plasma processes. Siena College is working on a novel method of processing information from electron spectrometer anodes using delay line techniques and inexpensive COTS electronics to track the movement of high-energy particles. Electron spectrometers use a variety of techniques to determine where an amplified electron cloud falls onto a collecting surface. One traditional method divides the collecting surface into sectors and uses a single detector for each sector. However, as the angular and spatial resolution increases, so does the number of detectors, increasing power consumption, cost, size, and weight of the system. An alternative approach is to connect each sector with a delay line built within the PCB material which is shielded from cross talk by a flooded ground plane. Only one pair of detectors (e.g., one at each end of the chain) are needed with the delay line technique which is different from traditional delay line detectors which use either Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) or very fast clocks. In this paper, we report on the implementation and testing of a delay line detector using a low-cost Xilinx FPGA and a thirty-two sector delay system. This Delay Line Detector has potential satellite and rocket flight applications due to its low cost, small size and power efficiency

  19. An investigation of the unexpected attitude dynamics experienced by the OEDIPUS-A tethered sounding rocket payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tye, G.; Han, R. P. S.; Berry, T. G.

    1991-05-01

    On 30 January 1989, the OEDIPUS-A Canadian scientific research rocket was launched. The payload, weighing some 265 kg, actually consisted of two payloads, referred to as the forward and aft payloads, each with their own complement of scientific instruments, control, power, and telemetry systems. An essential scientific requirement was to precisely align the payload with the Earth's magnetic field and separate the two subpayloads along the magnetic field line to a distance of one kilometer while an electrically conducting tether connects the two payloads. During the flight of OEDIPUS-A, all scientific instruments and payload support systems functioned normally and the tethered subpayloads separated to a distance of 960 meters. However, the flight data indicated that although there was virtually no coning increase in the forward payload after separation, the coning in the aft payload increased to approximately 40 deg, which far exceeds the predicted value. In an attempt to understand what may have caused this unexpected dynamic behavior, an investigation was conducted by Bristol Aerospace. This investigation is the subject of this paper. The analysis seems to support the theory that the tether connecting the aft and fore payloads was the cause of the unexpected rapid increase in coning experienced by the aft paylaod. It appears that there are two mechanisms associated with the tether that have influenced the aft payload dynamics. The first is the tether tension which acts as an external force acting on the aft payload and the second is the added energy dissipation. More detailed analysis is needed to fully understand the complex dynamics of this tethered two-body elastic system.

  20. ALTAIR Radar Plasma Drifts and in situ Electric and Magnetic Field Measurements on Two Sounding Rockets and the C/NOFS Satellite in the Low Latitude Ionosphere at Sunset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudeki, Erhan; Pfaff, Robert; Rowland, Douglas; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry

    2016-07-01

    We present ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar plasma drifts and in situ electric field, magnetic field, and plasma density measurements made simultaneously with probes on two sounding rockets and the C/NOFS satellite in the low latitude ionosphere in the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll. The coincident data were gathered during sunset conditions prior to a spread-F event during the NASA EVEX Campaign. The sounding rocket apogees were 180 km and 330 km, while the C/NOFS altitude in this region was ~ 390 km. Electric field data from all three platforms display upwards vertical plasma drifts, while the zonal drifts change direction as a function of altitude and/or local time. The variable drifts provide evidence of a dynamic plasma environment which may contribute to the unstable conditions necessary for spread-F instabilities to form.

  1. Development of Propulsion System for Microsatellite Based on Effective COTS, and Its Demonstration in S-310-36 Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara, Hironori; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    The University of Tokyo, Kobe University and Vienna University of Technology conducted a set of experiments including large membrane “Furoshiki Satellite” extension and active phased array antenna operation in January 2006, by using ISAS/JAXA sounding rocket S-310-36, one of their purposes was to demonstrate a cold gasjet propulsion system for microsatellites which makes use of effective COTS. A series of verification tests concerning the propulsion were conducted on ground before the launch, and it resulted in confirmation of 70 seconds of specific impulse at 250mN of thrust with little leakage for 4 months and good resistance to vibration and shock environment of the launcher. Although specific impulse of the propulsion in orbit was not determined, the propulsion system worked very well and we acquired pressure history of its tank, and established the basis of moderate-priced propulsion system for microsatellites and are ready to salute the coming era of microsatellites equipped with propulsion.

  2. Mode identification of whistler mode, Z-mode, and Langmuir/Upper Hybrid mode waves observed in an auroral sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpitts, C. A.; Labelle, J.

    2008-04-01

    The SIERRA (Sounding of the Ion Energization Region - Resolving Ambiguities) rocket was launched to 735 km over an active auroral substorm from Poker Flat, Alaska, on 14 January 2002. A wealth of wave modes at frequencies from below 100 kHz to above 2000 kHz were detected with a dipole electric field antenna that was alternately parallel and perpendicular to Earth's magnetic field. At least two types of whistler mode waves were detected: unstructured broadband whistler waves commonly referred to as auroral hiss occurring at frequencies from <100 kHz up to 1000 kHz, and structured narrowband features in the whistler mode at frequencies of 100 kHz to 600 kHz (Samara and LaBelle, 2006a). Other waves detected in the frequency range 1200 to 2000 kHz were interpreted as Langmuir-upper hybrid waves and Z-mode waves. For the unstructured whistler mode waves, comparison of the observed spin dependence of the wave electric fields with Monte Carlo simulations of the expected spin dependence for various polarizations suggests that these waves propagate on or near the resonance cone, which is consistent with previous measurements. Similar analyses of the presumed Langmuir and Z-mode waves show their electric fields are preferentially parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, respectively. These characteristics, together with the relation of the wave frequencies to the Z cutoff frequency, serve to confirm the mode identification of these waves.

  3. Solar Lyman-Alpha Polarization Observation of the Chromosphere and Transition Region by the Sounding Rocket Experiment CLASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kubo, Masahito; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Shinnosuke; Hara, Hiroshi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Giono, Gabriel; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are planning an international rocket experiment Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is (2015 planned) that Lyman a line (Ly(alpha) line) polarization spectroscopic observations from the sun. The purpose of this experiment, detected with high accuracy of the linear polarization of the Ly(alpha) lines to 0.1% by using a Hanle effect is to measure the magnetic field of the chromosphere-transition layer directly. For polarization photometric accuracy achieved that approx. 0.1% required for CLASP, it is necessary to realize the monitoring device with a high throughput. On the other hand, Ly(alpha) line (vacuum ultraviolet rays) have a sensitive characteristics that is absorbed by the material. We therefore set the optical system of the reflection system (transmission only the wavelength plate), each of the mirrors, subjected to high efficiency of the multilayer coating in accordance with the role. Primary mirror diameter of CLASP is about 30 cm, the amount of heat about 30,000 J is about 5 minutes of observation time is coming mainly in the visible light to the telescope. In addition, total flux of the sun visible light overwhelmingly large and about 200 000 times the Ly(alpha) line wavelength region. Therefore, in terms of thermal management and 0.1% of the photometric measurement accuracy achieved telescope, elimination of the visible light is essential. We therefore, has a high reflectivity (> 50%) in Lya line, visible light is a multilayer coating be kept to a low reflectance (<5%) (cold mirror coating) was applied to the primary mirror. On the other hand, the efficiency of the polarization analyzer required chromospheric magnetic field measurement (the amount of light) Conventional (magnesium fluoride has long been known as a material for vacuum ultraviolet (MgF2) manufactured ellipsometer; Rs = 22%) about increased to 2.5 times were high efficiency reflective polarizing element analysis. This device, Bridou et al. (2011) is proposed "that is

  4. Rocket noise - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerny, S. A.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reviews what is known about far-field rocket noise from the controlled studies of the late 1950s and 1960s and from launch data. The peak dimensionless frequency, the dependence of overall sound power on exhaust parameters, and the directivity of the overall sound power of rockets are compared to those of subsonic jets and turbo-jets. The location of the dominant sound source in the rocket exhaust plume and the mean flow velocity in this region are discussed and shown to provide a qualitative explanation for the low peak Strouhal number, fD(e)/V(e), and large angle of maximum directivity. Lastly, two empirical prediction methods are compared with data from launches of a Titan family vehicle (two, solid rocket motors of 5.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust each) and the Saturn V (five, liquid oxygen/rocket propellant engines of 6.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust, each). The agreement is favorable. In contrast, these methods appear to overpredict the far-field sound pressure levels generated by the Space Shuttle.

  5. Structure and dynamics of the nightside poleward boundary: Sounding rocket and ground-based observations of auroral electron precipitation in a rayed curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. A.; Hampton, D.; Mella, M.; Zhang, Binzheng; Dahlgren, H.; Disbrow, M.; Kintner, P. M.; Lessard, M.; Lundberg, E.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    2012-11-01

    The Cascades2 auroral sounding rocket provides a case study for comparing multipoint in situ ionospheric observations of a nightside auroral poleward boundary intensification with ground-based optical observations of the same event. Cascades2 was launched northward from Poker Flat Alaska on 20 March 2009 at 11:04 UT. The 13 min flight reached an apogee of 564 km over the northern coast of Alaska. The experiment included a five-payload array of in situ instrumentation, ground cameras at three different points under the trajectory, multiple ground magnetometers, the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) radar, and the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft in the magnetotail. The rays of the poleward boundary intensification (PBI) curtain have along-arc motions of 8.5 km/s and along-arc spacings of 16 km. Modulated maximum energy envelopes and energy fluxes of the associated electron precipitation correspond to this spatial structure of the visible rays. The electron precipitation is additionally modulated at a higher frequency, and velocity dispersion analysis of these 8 Hz signatures implies Alfvénic wave-particle acceleration of an ambient ionospheric electron source occurring a few hundred km above the observation point. These observations parameterize the curtain of Alfvénic activity above the PBI event, both in the dispersive ionosphere and in the magnetotail reconnection region. The along-arc variations in brightness correspond to variations in precipitating electron energy flux interpreted as an along-arc modulation of the maximum energy of the Alfvénic wave-particle acceleration process; this is a new interpretation of the formation of rayed structures in auroral curtains. We consider the various possible magnetospheric and ionospheric drivers for the control of the observed along-arc structuring and motions.

  6. MICA sounding rocket observations of conductivity-gradient-generated auroral ionospheric responses: Small-scale structure with large-scale drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. A.; Hampton, D. L.; Zettergren, M.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Conde, M.; Fernandes, P. A.; Horak, P.; Lessard, M.; Miceli, R.; Michell, R.; Moen, J.; Nicolls, M.; Powell, S. P.; Samara, M.

    2015-11-01

    A detailed, in situ study of field-aligned current (FAC) structure in a transient, substorm expansion phase auroral arc is conducted using electric field, magnetometer, and electron density measurements from the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfvén Resonator (MICA) sounding rocket, launched from Poker Flat, AK. These data are supplemented with larger-scale, contextual measurements from a heterogeneous collection of ground-based instruments including the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar and nearby scanning doppler imagers and filtered all-sky cameras. An electrostatic ionospheric modeling case study of this event is also constructed by using available data (neutral winds, electron precipitation, and electric fields) to constrain model initial and boundary conditions. MICA magnetometer data are converted into FAC measurements using a sheet current approximation and show an up-down current pair, with small-scale current density and Poynting flux structures in the downward current channel. Model results are able to roughly recreate only the large-scale features of the field-aligned currents, suggesting that observed small-scale structures may be due to ionospheric feedback processes not encapsulated by the electrostatic model. The model is also used to assess the contributions of various processes to total FAC and suggests that both conductance gradients and neutral dynamos may contribute significantly to FACs in a narrow region where the current transitions from upward to downward. Comparison of Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar versus in situ electric field estimates illustrates the high sensitivity of FAC estimates to measurement resolution.

  7. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Sir William Congreve developed a rocket with a range of about 9,000 feet. The incendiary rocket used black powder, an iron case, and a 16-foot guide stick. In 1806, British used Congreve rockets to attack Napoleon's headquarters in France. In 1807, Congreve directed a rocket attack against Copenhagen.

  8. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  9. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1940-01-01

    The Hermes A-1 rocket was designed by the U. S. Army after capturing the V-2 rocket from the German army at the conclusion of the Second World War. The Hermes A-1 is a modified V-2 rocket; it utilized the German aerodynamic configuration; however, internally it was a completely new design. This rocket was the first designed by the German Rocket Team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, AL.

  10. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Goddard rocket with four rocket motors. This rocket attained an altitude of 200 feet in a flight, November 1936, at Roswell, New Mexico. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  11. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812. As a result Francis Scott Key coined the phrase the "rocket's red glare." Congreve had used a 16-foot guide stick to help stabilize his rocket. William Hale, another British inventor, invented the stickless rocket in 1846. The U.S. Army used the Hale rocket more than 100 years ago in the war with Mexico. Rockets were also used to a limited extent by both sides in the American Civil War.

  12. Congreve Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812. As a result Francis Scott Key coined the phrase the 'rocket's red glare.' Congreve had used a 16-foot guide stick to help stabilize his rocket. William Hale, another British inventor, invented the stickless rocket in 1846. The U.S. Army used the Hale rocket more than 100 years ago in the war with Mexico. Rockets were also used to a limited extent by both sides in the American Civil War.

  13. Congreve Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812. As a result Francis Scott Key coined the phrase the 'rocket's red glare.' Congreve had used a 16-foot guide stick to help stabilize his rocket. William Hale, another British inventor, invented the stickless rocket in 1846. The U.S. Army used the Hale rocket more than 100 years ago in the war with Mexico. Rockets were also used to a limited extent by both sides in the American Civil War.

  14. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    During the period March 1977 through May 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center and three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at the Churchill Research Range. One additional flight was conducted at Wallops Flight Center in support of Nimbus 4 SBUV. Data results and flight profiles for the period covered are presented.

  15. Direct observation of spatially isothermal equiaxed solidification of an Al-Cu alloy in microgravity on board the MASER 13 sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. G.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Houltz, Y.; Li, J.; Lockowandt, C.; Henriksson, K.; Melville, N.; Browne, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, isothermal equiaxed solidification of a metallic alloy has been observed in situ in space, providing unique benchmark experimental data. The experiment was completed on board the MASER 13 sounding rocket, launched in December 2015, using a newly developed isothermal solidification furnace. A grain-refined Al-20 wt%Cu sample was fully melted and solidified during 360 s of microgravity and the solidification sequence was recorded using time-resolved X-radiography. Equiaxed nucleation, dendritic growth, solutal impingement, and eutectic transformation were thus observed in a gravity-free environment. Equiaxed nucleation was promoted through application of a controlled cooling rate of -0.05 K/s producing a 1D grain density of 6.5 mm-1, uniformly distributed throughout the field of view (FOV). Primary growth slowed to a visually imperceptible level at an estimated undercooling of 7 K, after which the cooling rate was increased to -1.0 K/s for the remainder of solidification and eutectic transformation, ensuring the sample was fully solidified inside the microgravity time window. The eutectic transformation commenced at the centre of the FOV proceeding radially outwards covering the entire FOV in 3 s Microgravity-based solidification is compared to an identical pre-flight ground-based experiment using the same sample and experiment timeline. The ground experiment was designed to minimise gravity effects, by choice of a horizontal orientation for the sample, so that any differences would be subtle. The first equiaxed nucleation occurred at an apparent undercooling of 0.6 K less than the equivalent event during microgravity. During primary equiaxed solidification, as expected, no buoyant grain motion was observed during microgravity, compared to modest grain rotation and reorientation observed during terrestrial-based solidification. However, when the cooling rate was increased from -0.05 K/s to -1.0 K/s during the latter stages of solidification, in

  16. Preliminary Observations of Ionospheric Response to an Auroral Driver from the MICA (Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfvén Resonator) Sounding Rocket Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.; Hysell, D. L.; Powell, S.; Miceli, R.; Hampton, D. L.; Ahrns, J.; Lessard, M.; Cohen, I. J.; Moen, J. I.; Bekkeng, T.

    2012-12-01

    The nightside sounding rocket MICA (Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfvén Resonator) launched from Poker Flat, AK, on February 19, 2012, and reached an apogee of 325km. MICA was launched into several discrete, localized arcs in the wake of a westward traveling surge. The MICA instrumentation included both in situ and ground based instruments, and was designed to measure the response of the ionosphere to an auroral driver. More specifically, the science goal was to measure response of the ionosphere to a feedback instability in the ionospheric Alfvén resonator. The MICA payload included in situ particle, electric and magnetic field, and GPS instruments. The ground-based array consisted of a multitude of imagers, coherent and incoherent scatter radars, and a Fabry-Perot interferometer. We present observational characteristics of the response of the ionospheric plasma to the auroral drivers inferred from inverting camera data. We compare the measured precipitating electron population to inversions of camera images, which use a transport model to infer a 2D map of the precipitation. Comparisons show that as the payload passes through what appears to be an Alfvénic auroral arc, the in situ electron instrument shows dispersions indicative of Alfvénic activity. We then introduce measurements of the thermal ion distribution, to examine how the auroral arcs drive a response in the ionosphere. The thermal ion data show that the payload potential strengthens as the payload passes through the arc. When including electron density, temperature, and electric field data, we observe times in which the ionospheric environment changes as the precipitation changes, and times during which there is no measured response by the ionosphere. Future work will compare how the ion bulk flow as measured by the thermal ion instrument compares to the ExB drift as measured by the electric field instrument and to the neutral wind measurements from the Fabry-Perot interferometer

  17. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    World War I enlisted rockets once again for military purposes. French pilots rigged rockets to the wing struts of their airplanes and aimed them at enemy observation balloons filled with highly inflammable hydrogen.

  18. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    All through the 13th to the 15th Centuries there were reports of many rocket experiments. For example, Joanes de Fontana of Italy designed a surface-rurning, rocket-powered torpedo for setting enemy ships on fire

  19. Rocket Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  20. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  1. Torpedo Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    All through the 13th to the 15th Centuries there were reports of many rocket experiments. For example, Joanes de Fontana of Italy designed a surface-rurning, rocket-powered torpedo for setting enemy ships on fire

  2. Rocket Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  3. Torpedo Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    All through the 13th to the 15th Centuries there were reports of many rocket experiments. For example, Joanes de Fontana of Italy designed a surface-rurning, rocket-powered torpedo for setting enemy ships on fire

  4. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1940-01-01

    The cutaway drawing of the A-4 (Aggregate-4) rocket. Later renamed the V-2 (Vengeance Weapon-2), The rocket was developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the German rocket team at Peenemuende, Germany on the Baltic Sea. At the end of World War II, the team of German engineers and scientists came to the United States and continued rocket research for the Army at Fort Bliss, Texas, and Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama.

  5. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    During the 19th century, rocket enthusiasts and inventors began to appear in almost every country. Some people thought these early rocket pioneers were geniuses, and others thought they were crazy. Claude Ruggieri, an Italian living in Paris, apparently rocketed small animals into space as early as 1806. The payloads were recovered by parachute. As depicted here by artist Larry Toschik, French authorities were not always impressed with rocket research. They halted Ruggieri's plans to launch a small boy using a rocket cluster. (Reproduced from a drawing by Larry Toschik and presented here courtesy of the artist and Motorola Inc.)

  6. Air-Breathing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  7. The STORM and CuPID soft X-ray cameras on the DXL sounding rocket mission: Employment of slumped micropore optics to image solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission in the magnetosheath.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.

    2016-12-01

    The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) and the Cusp Plasma Imaging Detector (CuPID) instruments are soft X-ray cameras the utilize slumped micropore ('lobster-eye') optics. These lobster-eye optics, developed by the University of Leicester and the Photonis Corporation, provide for wide field-of-view imaging of X-ray line emission produced via charge exchange between hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and heavy ions in the solar wind. Both instruments have position sensitize, chevron configuration, microchannel plate detectors in their respective focal planes. STORM possess two, 4 cm by 4 cm, lobster-eye optics, each with a focal length of 37.5 cm. It flew as a piggy back payload on the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket mission which was launched in December of 2012 from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. STORM operated successfully during this mission and represents the first use of lobster-eye optics in space. A future version of STORM, in high orbit, could image a significant portion of the magnetosheath to infer the locations of the magnetopause and the bow shock. CuPID is a 3U CubeSat variant of STORM that uses a single optic with a 27.5 cm focal length. A sounding rocket borne CuPID flew as a science payload with DXL from White Sands in December of 2015 with results forthcoming.

  8. The four INTA-300 rocket prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calero, J. S.

    1985-03-01

    A development history and performance capability assessment is presented for the INTA-300 'Flamenco' sounding rocket prototype specimens. The Flamenco is a two-stage solid fuel rocket, based on British sounding rocket technology, that can lift 50 km payloads to altitudes of about 300 km. The flight of the first two prototypes, in 1974 and 1975, pointed to vibration problems which reduced the achievable apogee, and the third prototype's flight was marred by a premature detonation that destroyed the rocket. The fourth Flamenco flight, however, yielded much reliable data.

  9. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1940-03-21

    Goddard rocket in launching tower at Roswell, New Mexico, March 21, 1940. Fuel was injected by pumps from the fueling platform at left. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  10. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1958-01-31

    Juno I, a slightly modified Jupiter-C launch vehicle, shortly before the January 31, 1958 launch of America's first satellite, Explorer I. The Jupiter-C, developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, consisted of a modified version of the Redstone rocket's first stage and two upper stages of clustered Baby Sergeant rockets developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  11. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1940-01-01

    This German cutaway drawing of the Aggregate-4 (A-4) illustrates the dimensions and internal workings of the rocket. Later renamed the V-2, the rocket was developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the German Rocket Team at Peenemuende on the Baltic Sea. At the end of World War II, the team of German engineers and scientists came to the United States to work for the Army at Fort Bliss, Texas, and Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama.

  12. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1940-01-01

    This drawing illustrates the vital dimensions of the A-4 (Aggregate-4). Later renamed the V-2 (Vengeance Weapon-2), the rocket was developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the German rocket team at Peenemuende, Germany on the Baltic Sea. At the end of World War II, the team of German engineers and scientists came to the United States and continued rocket research for the Army at Fort Bliss, Texas, and Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama.

  13. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1926-03-16

    Dr. Goddard's 1926 rocket configuration. Dr. Goddard's liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Massachusetts. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  14. Super Soaker: A Sounding Rocket Mission to Study Transport, Chemistry, and Energetics of Water in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere and Implications for Polar Mesospheric Cloud Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, S. I.; Collins, R. L.; Larsen, M. F.; Stevens, M. H.; Taylor, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Water deposition in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) from space traffic can lead to significant variations in the composition and dynamics of the region. Stevens et al., 2005 and Kelley et al., 2010, for example, showed that the fast global-scale plume transport from NASA's Space Shuttle launches can lead to the formation of PMCs. This is an important finding because PMCs have been implicated as possible indicators of long-term climate change [e.g. Thomas and Olivero, 2001 and references therein]. The water plume phenomenon raises a number of important questions about lower thermospheric and mesospheric processes, ranging from dynamics and chemistry to PMC formation and climatology. The Super Soaker rocket mission, funded by the NASA Heliophysics Technology and Instrument Development for Science (H-TIDes) program, seeks to investigate the time-dependent neutral chemistry and transport of water in the MLT and to determine the resultant impact on the local temperature and ice cloud formation. Super Soaker is tentatively scheduled for launch in April 2018 from the Poker Flat Rocket Range (PFRR), Alaska. The mission is designed to release a plume of water vapor from a rocket payload and observe how the atmosphere responds both during and after the release. The rocket experiment will be supported on the ground by lidar observations of temperature and PMCs, temperature maps using the Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM), ground-based wind observations using TMA releases, PFISR observations of electron density, and data from the NASA AIM and TIMED satellites. In this paper we review the Super Soaker rocket mission and describe initial numerical modeling results to provide a semi-quantitative view of the response of chemistry and energetic to the water plume deposition in the lower thermosphere.

  15. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    By 1870, American and British inventors had found other ways to use rockets. For example, the Congreve rocket was capable of carrying a line over 1,000 feet to a stranded ship. In 1914, an estimated 1,000 lives were saved by this technique.

  16. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    One of the earliest recorded instances of the use of rockets was as military weapons against the Mongols by the Chinese at the siege of Kai Fung Foo in 1232 A.D. An arrow with a tube of gunpowder produced an arrow of flying fire. The Mongol attackers fled in terror, even though the rockets were inaccurate and relatively harmless.

  17. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    In the 19th Century, experiments in America, Europe, and elsewhere attempted to build postal rockets to deliver mail from one location to another. The idea was more novel than successful. Many stamps used in these early postal rockets have become collector's items.

  18. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1947-01-01

    A V-2 rocket is hoisted into a static test facility at White Sands, New Mexico. The German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and continued rocket testing under the direction of the U. S. Army, launching more than sixty V-2s.

  19. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1946-01-01

    A V-2 rocket takes flight at White Sands, New Mexico, in 1946. The German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and continued rocket testing under the direction of the U. S. Army, launching more than sixty V-2s.

  20. Rocket/Nimbus Sounder Comparison (RNSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The experimental results for radiance and temperature differences in the Wallops Island comparisons indicate that the differences between satellite and rocket systems are of the same order of magnitude as the differences among the various satellite and rocket sounders. The Arcasondes produced usable data to about 50 km, while the Datasondes require design modification. The SIRS and IRIS soundings provided usable data to 30 mb; extension of these soundings was also investigated.

  1. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1926-03-16

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  2. Design of a simple Gerdien condenser for ionospheric D-region charged particle density and mobility measurements. [for Arcas rocket sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrokh, H.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of a Gerdien condenser operating in a collision controlled medium is reviewed. Design and electronics of a Gerdien condenser probe suitable for flying on the Arcas rocket is presented. Aerodynamics properties of the instrument in continuous flow are discussed. The method of data reduction and experimental results of one successful flight at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico, on 11 January 1974 are reported. This investigation shows positive ions in two relatively distinct mobility groups between 47 and 65 km and a more continuous distribution of mobilities between 38 and 47 km.

  3. Rockets Away!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaahaaina, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a project that involved a rocket-design competition where students played the roles of McDonnell Douglas employees competing for NASA contracts. Provides a real world experience involving deadlines, design and performance specifications, and budgets. (JRH)

  4. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1958-01-31

    Launch of Jupiter-C/Explorer 1 at Cape Canaveral, Florida on January 31, 1958. After the Russian Sputnik 1 was launched in October 1957, the launching of an American satellite assumed much greater importance. After the Vanguard rocket exploded on the pad in December 1957, the ability to orbit a satellite became a matter of national prestige. On January 31, 1958, slightly more than four weeks after the launch of Sputnik.The ABMA (Army Ballistic Missile Agency) in Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama, in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, launched a Jupiter from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The rocket consisted of a modified version of the Redstone rocket's first stage and two upper stages of clustered Baby Sergeant rockets developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and later designated as Juno boosters for space launches

  5. Rockets Away!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaahaaina, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a project that involved a rocket-design competition where students played the roles of McDonnell Douglas employees competing for NASA contracts. Provides a real world experience involving deadlines, design and performance specifications, and budgets. (JRH)

  6. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1953-08-30

    U.S. Army Redstone Rocket: The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone rocket was also known as "Old Reliable" because of its many diverse missions. The first Redstone Missile was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida on August 30, 1953.

  7. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1957-10-03

    America’s first scientific satellite, the Explorer I, carried the radiation detection experiment designed by Dr. James Van Allen and discovered the Van Allen Radiation Belt. It was launched aboard a modified redstone rocket known as the Jupiter C, developed by Dr. von Braun’s rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The satellite launched on January 31, 1958, just 3 months after the the von Braun team received the go-ahead.

  8. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1958-01-31

    Explorer 1 atop a Jupiter-C in gantry. Jupiter-C carrying the first American satellite, Explorer 1, was successfully launched on January 31, 1958. The Jupiter-C launch vehicle consisted of a modified version of the Redstone rocket's first stage and two upper stages of clustered Baby Sergeant rockets developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and later designated as Juno boosters for space launches

  9. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1950-02-24

    Bumper Wac liftoff at the Long Range Proving Ground located at Cape Canaveral, Florida. At White Sands, New Mexico, the German rocket team experimented with a two-stage rocket called Bumper Wac, which intended to provide data for upper atmospheric research. On February 24, 1950, the Bumper, which employed a V-2 as the first stage with a Wac Corporal upper stage, obtained a peak altitude of more than 240 miles.

  10. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard loading a 1918 version of the Bazooka of World War II. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  11. Television observations of artificial aurora and analyses of flight data from NASA payload 12.18 NE. [onboard the Strypi sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.

    1974-01-01

    An accelerator nominally capable of ejecting pulses of electrons up to 6 sec in length, current to 500 ma and energy to 20 keV was flown on a rocket at 1500 October 15, 1972. The Strypi rocket was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Kauai, Hawaii. The intent was to eject electron pulses of various characteristics upwards along the magnetic field so as to produce artificial auroras in the conjugate (Southern Hemisphere) atmosphere and possibly to produce weaker auroras in the nearby atmosphere as a consequence of backscattered electrons. The accelerator package included a gas jet actuated attitude control system controlled by gyros. Attitude sensing also was accomplished by a two-axis fluxgate magnetometer, and a large foil was deployed to collect ambient electrons to neutralize the accelerator when it ejected high-energy electrons. Scientific instrumentation contained on the flight package included retarding potential analyzers, energetic electron detectors, and detectors to sense very low frequency radio noise. Image orthicon television systems and other optical sensors were operated in the conjugate region aboard two NC-135 jet aircrafts based in Samoa. Similar devices were operated at Haleakala, Hawaii, to attempt detection of auroras caused by backscattered electrons.

  12. Rocket Ozone Data Recovery for Digital Archival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, S. H.; Krueger, A. J.; Hilsenrath, E.; Haffner, D. P.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Ozone distributions in the photochemically-controlled upper stratosphere and mesosphere were first measured using spectrometers on V-2 rockets after WWII. The IGY(1957-1958) spurred development of new optical and chemical instruments for flight on meteorological and sounding rockets. In the early 1960's, the US Navy developed an Arcas rocket-borne optical ozonesonde and NASA GSFC developed chemiluminescent ozonesonde onboard Nike_Cajun and Arcas rocket. The Navy optical ozone program was moved in 1969 to GSFC where rocket ozone research was expanded and continued until 1994 using Super Loki-Dart rocket at 11 sites in the range of 0-65N and 35W-160W. Over 300 optical ozone soundings and 40 chemiluminescent soundings were made. The data have been used to produce the US Standard Ozone Atmosphere, determine seasonal and diurnal variations, and validate early photochemical models. The current effort includes soundings conducted by Australia, Japan, and Korea using optical techniques. New satellite ozone sounding techniques were initially calibrated and later validated using the rocket ozone data. As satellite techniques superseded the rocket methods, the sponsoring agencies lost interest in the data and many of those records have been discarded. The current task intends to recover as much of the data as possible from the private records of the experimenters and their publications, and to archive those records in the WOUDC (World Ozone and Ultraviolet Data Centre). The original data records are handwritten tabulations, computer printouts that are scanned with OCR techniques, and plots digitized from publications. This newly recovered digital rocket ozone profile data from 1965 to 2002 could make significant contributions to the Earth science community in atmospheric research including long-term trend analysis.

  13. Aircraft Rockets,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-16

    largest power stations, which lead industrial arsas, etc. The prominent representatives cf American and English VVS confirm that strategic aviatic best...rocket engine; IRD - turbcjet angine; * - no data . REFERENCES : B H. 1VeA0oCbe, r. B. CHHt up es. BeeAere a paeTHylo TexHHKy. OdoporH, 1956. A. C. A 0 K K...UNEDITED MACHINE TRANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T-1954-80 J 16 Octobe’ 1981 MICROFICHE NR: FTD-81-C-000931 ( . IRCRAFT ROCKETS) By/>B. T./Surikov English pages: 138

  14. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Engine for the Jupiter rocket. The Jupiter vehicle was a direct derivative of the Redstone. The Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, continued Jupiter development into a successful intermediate ballistic missile, even though the Department of Defense directed its operational development to the Air Force. ABMA maintained a role in Jupiter RD, including high-altitude launches that added to ABMA's understanding of rocket vehicle operations in the near-Earth space environment. It was knowledge that paid handsome dividends later.

  15. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1957-03-01

    The Jupiter rocket was designed and developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA). ABMA launched the Jupiter-A at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on March 1, 1957. The Jupiter vehicle was a direct derivative of the Redstone. The Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, continued Jupiter development into a successful intermediate ballistic missile, even though the Department of Defense directed its operational development to the Air Force. ABMA maintained a role in Jupiter RD, including high-altitude launches that added to ABMA's understanding of rocket vehicle operations in the near-Earth space environment. It was knowledge that paid handsome dividends later.

  16. Air-Powered Rockets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Charley; Raynovic, Jim

    This document describes methods for designing and building two types of rockets--rockets from paper and rockets from bottles. Devices used for measuring the heights that the rockets obtain are also discussed. (KHR)

  17. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    By the end of the 19th Century, a Russian theorist, Konstantian Tsiolkovsky, was examining the fundamental scientific theories behind rocketry. He made some pioneering studies in liquid chemical rocket concepts and recommended liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen as the optimum propellants. In the 1920's, Tsiolkovsky analyzed and mathematically formulated the technique for staged vehicles to reach escape velocities from Earth.

  18. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-07-25

    An Atlas Centaur rocket (AC-S9) was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station complex 36B carrying into orbit the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) spacecraft. CRRES was a joint NASA/Air Force mission to study the effects of chemical release on the Earth’s atmosphere and magnetosphere.

  19. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-05-28

    On May 28, 1959, a Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by a U.S. Army team in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, A South American squirrel monkey and Able, An American-born rhesus monkey. This photograph shows Able after recovery of the nose cone of the Jupiter rocket by U.S.S. Kiowa.

  20. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-08-14

    The Juno II launch vehicle, shown here, was a modified Jupiter Intermediate-Range Ballistic missionile, developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Between December 1958 and April 1961, the Juno II launched space probes Pioneer III and IV, as well as Explorer satellites VII, VIII and XI.

  1. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1958-01-31

    This illustration shows the main characteristics of the Jupiter C launch vehicle and its payload, the Explorer I satellite. The Jupiter C, America's first successful space vehicle, launched the free world's first scientific satellite, Explorer 1, on January 31, 1958. The four-stage Jupiter C measured almost 69 feet in length. The first stage was a modified liquid fueled Redstone missile. This main stage was about 57 feet in length and 70 inches in diameter. Fifteen scaled down SERGENT solid propellant motors were used in the upper stages. A "tub" configuration mounted on top of the modified Redstone held the second and third stages. The second stage consisted of 11 rockets placed in a ring formation within the tub. Inserted into the ring of second stage rockets was a cluster of 3 rockets making up the third stage. A fourth stage single rocket and the satellite were mounted atop the third stage. This "tub", all upper stages, and the satellite were set spirning prior to launching. The complete upper assembly measured 12.5 feet in length. The Explorer I carried the radiation detection experiment designed by Dr. James Van Allen and discovered the Van Allen Radiation Belt.

  2. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1940-01-01

    In this undated file photo, probably from World War II, a V-2 rocket emerges from its camouflaged shelter. The team of German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States after World War II and worked for the U. S. Army at Fort Bliss, Texas and Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama.

  3. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1944-01-01

    German technicians stack the various stages of the V-2 rocket in this undated photograph. The team of German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and worked for the U. S. Army at Fort Bliss, Texas, and Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama.

  4. ISRO's solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagappa, R.; Kurup, M. R.; Muthunayagam, A. E.

    1989-08-01

    Solid rocket motors have been the mainstay of ISRO's sounding rockets and the first generation satellite launch vehicles. For the new launch vehicle under development also, the solid rocket motors contribute significantly to the vehicle's total propulsive power. The rocket motors in use and under development have been developed for a variety of applications and range in size from 30 mm dia employing 450 g of solid propellant—employed for providing a spin to the apogee motors—to the giant 2.8 m dia motor employing nearly 130 tonnes of solid propellant. The initial development, undertaken in 1967 was of small calibre motor of 75 mm dia using a double base charge. The development was essentially to understand the technological elements. Extruded aluminium tubes were used as a rocket motor casing. The fore and aft closures were machined from aluminium rods. The grain was a seven-pointed star with an enlargement of the port at the aft end and was charged into the chamber using a polyester resin system. The nozzle was a metallic heat sink type with graphite throat insert. The motor was ignited with a black powder charge and fired for 2.0 s. Subsequent to this, further developmental activities were undertaken using PVC plastisol based propellants. A class of sounding rockets ranging from 125 to 560 mm calibre were realized. These rocket motors employed improved designs and had delivered lsp ranging from 2060 to 2256 Ns/kg. Case bonding could not be adopted due to the higher cure temperatures of the plastisol propellants but improvements were made in the grain charging techniques and in the design of the igniters and the nozzle. Ablative nozzles based on asbestos phenolic and silica phenolic with graphite inserts were used. For the larger calibre rocket motors, the lsp could be improved by metallic additives. In the early 1970s designs were evolved for larger and more efficient motors. A series of 4 motors for the country's first satellite launch vehicle SLV-3 were

  5. An Analysis of Ionospheric Thermal Ions Using a SIMION-based Forward Instrument Model: In Situ Observations of Vertical Thermal Ion Flows as Measured by the MICA Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M. D.; Hampton, D. L.; Fisher, L. E.; Powell, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The MICA sounding rocket launched on 19 Feb. 2012 into several discrete, localized arcs in the wake of a westward traveling surge. In situ and ground-based observations provide a measured response of the ionosphere to preflight and localized auroral drivers. In this presentation we focus on in situ measurements of the thermal ion distribution. We observe thermal ions flowing both up and down the auroral field line, with upflows concentrated in Alfvénic and downward current regions. The in situ data are compared with recent ionospheric modeling efforts (Zettergren et al., this session) which show structured patterns of ion upflow and downflow consistent with these observations. In the low-energy thermal plasma regime, instrument response to the measured thermal ion population is very sensitive to the presence of the instrument. The plasma is shifted and accelerated in the frame of the instrument due to flows, ram, and acceleration through the payload sheath. The energies associated with these processes are large compared to the thermal energy. Rigorous quantitative analysis of the instrument response is necessary to extract the plasma properties which describe the full 3D distribution function at the instrument aperture. We introduce an instrument model, developed in the commercial software package SIMION, to characterize instrument response at low energies. The instrument model provides important insight into how we would modify our instrument for future missions, including fine-tuning parameters such as the analyzer sweep curve, the geometry factor, and the aperture size. We use the results from the instrument model to develop a forward model, from which we can extract anisotropic ion temperatures, flows, and density of the thermal plasma at the aperture. Because this plasma has transited a sheath to reach the aperture, we must account for the acceleration due to the sheath. Modeling of this complex sheath is being conducted by co-author Fisher, using a PIC code

  6. Air-breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie depicts the Rocketdyne static test of an air-breathing rocket. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's advanced Transportation Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  7. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This photograph is of the engine for the Redstone rocket. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and the production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of its versatility, the Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile.

  8. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    According to one ancient legend, a Chinese official named Wan Hoo attempted a flight to the moon using a large wicker chair to which were fastened 47 large rockets. Forty seven assistants, each armed with a torch, rushed forward to light the fuses. In a moment, there was a tremendous roar accompanied by billowing clouds of smoke. When the smoke cleared, the flying chair and Wan Hoo were gone.

  9. Rocket Tablet,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-12

    is a vast and desolate world, this is a strip of mir- aculous land! How many struggling dramas full of power and * grandeur were cheered, resisted and...rocket officers and men, a group enormous and powerful , marched into this land soaked with the fresh blood of our ancestors. This place is about to...and tough pestering said he wanted an American aircraft ob- tained on the battlefield to transport goods from Lanzhou, Xian, Beijing, Guangzhou and

  10. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1958-05-28

    On May 28, 1958, Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by U.S. Army team in Huntsville, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, a South American squirrel monkey and Able, an American-born rhesus monkey. Baker, pictured here and commonly known as "Miss Baker", was later given a home at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center until her death on November 29, 1984. Able died in 1958. (Photo - Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  11. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1957-10-04

    The Army Ballistic Missile Agency incorporated the von Braun team in key positions with Dr. von Braun as a head of the Development Operations Division. On October 4, 1957, the Nation was shocked when the Russians launched Sputnik, the world's first artificial satellite. Two months later, the United States suffered disappointment when a Navy Vanguard rocket, with its satellite payload, failed to develop sufficient thrust and toppled over on the launch pad.

  12. Infrared Imagery of Solid Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Robert P.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test program consisted of a series of 18 solid rocket motor static firings, simulating the liftoff conditions of the Ares I five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Vehicle. Primary test objectives included acquiring acoustic and pressure data which will be used to validate analytical models for the prediction of Ares 1 liftoff acoustics and ignition overpressure environments. The test article consisted of a 5% scale Ares I vehicle and launch tower mounted on the Mobile Launch Pad. The testing also incorporated several Water Sound Suppression Systems. Infrared imagery was employed during the solid rocket testing to support the validation or improvement of analytical models, and identify corollaries between rocket plume size or shape and the accompanying measured level of noise suppression obtained by water sound suppression systems.

  13. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1955-09-01

    Launch of a three-stage Vanguard (SLV-7) from Cape Canaveral, Florida, September 18, 1959. Designated Vanguard III, the 100-pound satellite was used to study the magnetic field and radiation belt. In September 1955, the Department of Defense recommended and authorized the new program, known as Project Vanguard, to launch Vanguard booster to carry an upper atmosphere research satellite in orbit. The Vanguard vehicles were used in conjunction with later booster vehicle such as the Thor and Atlas, and the technique of gimbaled (movable) engines for directional control was adapted to other rockets.

  14. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Legendary characters used the power of mythology to fly through the heavens. About 200 BC, a Greek inventor known as Hero of Alexandria came up with a new invention that depended on the mechanical interaction of heat and water. He invented a rocket-like device called an aeolipile. It used steam for propulsion. Hero mounted a sphere on top of a water kettle. A fire below the kettle turned the water into steam, and the gas traveled through the pipes to the sphere. Two L-shaped tubes on opposite sides of the sphere allowed the gas to escape, and in doing so gave a thrust to the sphere that caused it to rotate.

  15. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1958-05-15

    Redstone missile No. 1002 on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on May 16, 1958. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of the versatility, Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile

  16. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The image depicts Redstone missile being erected. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and the production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of the versatility, Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile

  17. Development Status of Reusable Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takada, Satoshi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Niu, Kenichi

    A 30-kN rocket engine, a pilot engine, is being developed in Japan. Development of this pilot engine has been initiated in relation to a reusable sounding rocket, which is also being developed in Japan. This rocket takes off vertically, reaches an altitude of 100 km, lands vertically at the launch site, and is launched again within several days. Due to advantage of reusability, successful development of this rocket will mean that observation missions can be carried out more frequently and economically. In order to realize this rocket concept, the engines installed on the rocket should be characterized by reusability, long life, deep throttling and health monitoring, features which have not yet been established in Japanese rocket engines. To solve the engineering factors entitled by those features, a new design methodology, advanced engine simulations and engineering testing are being focused on in the pilot engine development stage. Especially in engineering testing, limit condition data is acquired to facilitate development of new diagnostic techniques, which can be applied by utilizing the mobility of small-size hardware. In this paper, the development status of the pilot engine is described, including fundamental design and engineering tests of the turbopump bearing and seal, turbine rig, injector and combustion chamber, and operation and maintenance concepts for one hundred flights by a reusable rocket are examined.

  18. Dispersion Control System for Sounding Rockets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-04

    activates the Interrupt Start which delivers a clock pulse approximately every 10 ms to the TDY-52B interrupt line. Every 10 ms the TDY-52B will increment...out- puts every 10 ms and provide an output to the canards via the Pitch & Yaw Command A&B signals. At 20 sec the 2nd State Initiate line will be...Figure 13 provides the TDY- 52B with an approximate 10 ms interrupt and a system clear signal (SYSCLR). This circuit also provides the PCM and dehounce

  19. Aeroelastic Optimization of Sounding Rocket Fins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    nose 25 3.2.2 FEMAP v9.31. FEMAP is a finite element pre and post-processor that comes bundled with NX Nastran, produced by Siemens PLM Software. FEMAP...Integration, ZONA Technology, and Siemens PLM for providing copies of their software to the Air Force Institute of Technology for use in its research...bundled copy of NX Nastran or another finite analysis package of their choice by writing out an appropriate input file. Finally, the results of the analysis

  20. Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) for Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, H. K.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2013-11-01

    Problems associated with Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA), which can be used to measure ion temperature/and density in the lower E region where ion temperature is 200-300 K, are discussed. Two major factors which need to be taken care of to get accurate ion temperature of extremely low values are the effect of mesh size of the grids to be used and the effect of electrode contamination. An electrode baking and vacuum sealing mechanisms are designed to keep the electrode surface clean. The effect of mesh sizes on the calculation of ion temperature is discussed by using simulation studies as well as laboratory experiments. The study suggests that the uniformity of the electric field in the RPA sensor is critical. The manuscript describes the principle of the RPA, the effect of the mesh size using computer simulation studies, and the mechanical design of the sensor sealing to remove electrode contamination.

  1. Flutter analysis of a sounding rocket fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natori, M.; Onoda, J.; Kitamura, T.

    The procedures used to characterize the flutter behavior of the fin of the ISAS M-3S II launch vehicle (capable of launching 750 kg to LEO) are described. Consideration is given to supersonic flutter computations, single-point-excitation and vibration testing, construction of flutter models, and transonic wind-tunnel tests. Tables, graphs, diagrams, and photographs are provided.

  2. Far-ultraviolet rocket astronomy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The launch of sounding rocket 26.056 DG on 29 October 1976 is described and quick-look results from that mission are given. Also further work on data obtained by 13.118 DG, launched 5 December 1975 is reported.

  3. The ultimate limits of the relativistic rocket equation. The Planck photon rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, Espen Gaarder

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we look at the ultimate limits of a photon propulsion rocket. The maximum velocity for a photon propulsion rocket is just below the speed of light and is a function of the reduced Compton wavelength of the heaviest subatomic particles in the rocket. We are basically combining the relativistic rocket equation with Haug's new insight on the maximum velocity for anything with rest mass. An interesting new finding is that in order to accelerate any subatomic ;fundamental; particle to its maximum velocity, the particle rocket basically needs two Planck masses of initial load. This might sound illogical until one understands that subatomic particles with different masses have different maximum velocities. This can be generalized to large rockets and gives us the maximum theoretical velocity of a fully-efficient and ideal rocket. Further, no additional fuel is needed to accelerate a Planck mass particle to its maximum velocity; this also might sound absurd, but it has a very simple and logical solution that is explained in this paper.

  4. NASA Launches Rocket Into Active Auroras

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    A test rocket is launched the night of Feb. 17 from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. Test rockets are launched as part of the countdown to test out the radar tracking systems. NASA is launching five sounding rockets from the Poker Range into active auroras to explore the Earth's magnetic environment and its impact on Earth’s upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The launch window for the four remaining rockets runs through March 3. Credit: NASA/Terry Zaperach NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Preliminary guided rocket feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, M. B.; Celmer, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of actively guiding sounding rockets to reduce impact dispersion has been investigated. The theoretical probability of range safety thrust termination for several high performance rockets was combined with the cost of acquiring the extended range at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) to establish a guidance system price ceiling of $20K per flight. Guiding the Black Brant VC (BBVC) for the first five seconds of flight results in sufficient dispersion reduction to impact within the standard range boundaries at WSMR. The guidance system thrust level required to statically control the vehicle to a nominal-wind weighted trajectory for five seconds is between 150-200 pounds. A six-degree-of-freedom trajectory program with guidance simulation capability has been developed and the equations are presented.

  6. Preliminary guided rocket feasibility study.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, M. B.; Celmer, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of actively guiding sounding rockets to reduce impact dispersion has been investigated. The theoretical probability of Range Safety thrust termination for several high performance rockets was combined with the cost of acquiring the extended range at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) to establish a guidance system price ceiling of $20K per flight. Guiding the Black Brant VC for the first five seconds of flight results in sufficient dispersion reduction to impact within the standard range boundaries at WSMR. The guidance system thrust level required to statically control the vehicle to a nominal-wind weighted trajectory for five seconds is between 150-200 pounds. A six-degree-of-freedom trajectory program with guidance simulation capability has been developed and the equations are delineated in this paper.

  7. Air-Breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  8. Air-Breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  9. Designing the SSTO rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payton, Gary; Sponable, Jess M.

    1991-04-01

    A review is presented of single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) rocket vehicle structures fabricated with off-the-shelf technology. The parallel development of the Advanced Launch Development Program (ALDP) and NASP technology gave many spinoffs required for supportable, robust SSTO rockets. The advanced materials, structures, subsystems, cryogenic tanks, rockets, CFDs, and design tools are well suited to SSTO rockets. Developments include lightweight thermoplastic tanks for hydrogen fuel, lightweight carbon-carbon panels able to withstand 3,000 F reentry temperatures, and the CFD analysis of linear rocket thrusters installed on a ballistic rocket. The ALDP has also provided operations concepts, manufacturing technologies, and materials such as aluminum-lithium.

  10. Solar Thermal Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Paper analyzes potential of solar thermal rockets as means of propulsion for planetary spacecraft. Solar thermal rocket uses concentrated Sunlight to heat working fluid expelled through nozzle to produce thrust.

  11. American Rocket Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  12. ROBOTS TO ROCKET CITY

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-06

    HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM NORTH ALABAMA GATHER AT THE U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER'S DAVIDSON CENTER FOR THE "ROBOTS TO ROCKET CITY" EVENT SHOWCASING THEIR INDIVIDUAL ROBOTS PRIOR TO LATER COMPETITIONS.

  13. Environmentally sound manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. They have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and to reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this problem. As our ability to gather data on the state of the Earth's environmental health increases, environmentally sound manufacturing must become an integral part of the business decision making process.

  14. Environmentally sound manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    The NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. They have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and to reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this problem. As our ability to gather data on the state of the Earth's environmental health increases, environmentally sound manufacturing must become an integral part of the business decision making process.

  15. Rocket Observations of IC 405

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, K.; McCandliss, S. R.; Feldman, P. D.; Burgh, E. B.

    2001-12-01

    We present the preliminary results from a NASA/JHU sounding rocket mission (36.198 UG), launched on 09 February 2001 at 21:00 MST, to obtain a long slit (200\\arcsec x 12\\arcsec) spectrum of the reflection nebula IC 405 in the 900 -- 1400 Å wavelength region. Several pointings within the nebula were obtained, including a high quality (S/N ≈ 10-15 at R = 300) spectrum of the central star, HD 34078, which clearly shows absorption from molecular hydrogen (H2). Observations of the nebula reveal a surface brightness to stellar flux ratio that rises by two orders of magnitude between 1400 and 900 Å. This is in contrast with the relatively flat nebular dust scattering observed during a prior sounding rocket observation of the reflection nebula NGC 2023. We will also present additional nebular pointings within IC 405, including a region observed by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope showing evidence of H2 fluorescent emission. These observations were supported by NASA grant NAG5-5122 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  16. Rockets for spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of rockets as an auxiliary means for an aircraft to effect recovery from spins was investigated. The advances in rocket technology produced by the space effort suggested that currently available systems might obviate many of the problems encountered in earlier rocket systems. A modern fighter configuration known to exhibit a flat spin mode was selected. An analytical study was made of the thrust requirements for a rocket spin recovery system for the subject configuration. These results were then applied to a preliminary systems study of rocket components appropriate to the problem. Subsequent spin tunnel tests were run to evaluate the analytical results.

  17. Rocket nozzle snubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoever, Jeffrey P.; Reginato, Richard L.; Bay, Frederick M.; Rolon, Claudia E.; Bazigos, Michael

    1991-10-01

    Stress from the ignition of a rocket is transferred from the rocket nozzle to the actuators and flexible joint seal which move the nozzle causing potential failure of the actuators. This stress can be relieved by using a snubber in the form of a flexible hollow conical toroidal bladder filled with incompressible fluid fitted snugly between the nozzle and the main body of the rocket. Such a snubber transfers the stress to the main body of the rocket through the snubber while deforming to allow the rocket nozzle to slew in response to control commands.

  18. Rocket pollution reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Geisler, R.L.

    1994-01-04

    A system is provided for reducing the emissions of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from solid fuel rockets, especially during ground disposal. An aqueous solution of an alkali metal hydroxide is injected as a mist into the rocket chamber as the rocket fuel is burned. The reaction of the alkali metal with hydrogen chloride (HCl) produces a salt and thereby minimizes the presence of hydrochloric acid in the rocket exhaust. An injected neutralizing material which reduces hydrochloric acid, but which produces less thrust than an equal weight of rocket fuel, can be injected into an operating rocket which carries a payload high above the earth, with the injected material being injected only while the rocket is at a lower altitude when hydrochloric acid is most undesirable. The injected material can be produced by a small auxiliary rocket device whose exhaust is delivered directly to the main rocket chamber, and with the exhaust of the auxiliary rocket device including a high proportion of magnesium to react with the hydrochloric acid with minimal degradation of rocket performance. 4 figs.

  19. Rocket and Laboratory Studies in Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG5-5122 and covers the period from March 1, 1997 to February 28, 2001. This grant was a continuation of a program in rocket and laboratory studies in ultraviolet astronomy that was supported by NASA grant NAG5-619. As of March 1, 2001, this program is continuing under grant NAG5-5315. During the period of the grant, annual status reports have been submitted detailing the scientific achievements and current objectives of each report period. These will not be repeated here. Among the highlights of the program are four successful rocket launches including participation in the campaign to study comet Hale-Bopp in April 1997. We have continued our emphasis on long-slit spectroscopy of extended sources in the shorter wavelength far-ultraviolet, necessitating the development of evacuated telescope/spectrograph payloads. Finally, we also note the use of our ultraviolet calibration facilities in support of other sounding rocket investigators and for other space missions such as the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We include a list of the sounding rocket launches performed under NASA sponsorship during this period, a list of Ph.D. degrees awarded to students who worked in this program, and a summary bibliography of publications between 1997 and 2001.

  20. Antares Rocket Test Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-21

    The Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket is seen as it launches from Pad-0A of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, Sunday, April 21, 2013. The test launch marked the first flight of Antares and the first rocket launch from Pad-0A. The Antares rocket delivered the equivalent mass of a spacecraft, a so-called mass simulated payload, into Earth's orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Engineers demonstrate the pocket rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Part of Stennis Space Center's mission with its traveling exhibits is to educate the younger generation on how propulsion systems work. A popular tool is the 'pocket rocket,' which demonstrates how a hybrid rocket works. A hybrid rocket is a cross breed between a solid fuel rocket and a liquid fuel rocket.

  2. Engineers demonstrate the pocket rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Part of Stennis Space Center's mission with its traveling exhibits is to educate the younger generation on how propulsion systems work. A popular tool is the 'pocket rocket,' which demonstrates how a hybrid rocket works. A hybrid rocket is a cross breed between a solid fuel rocket and a liquid fuel rocket.

  3. Rocket astronomy - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, H.

    The history of rocket astronomy is retold, with emphasis on solar investigations. The use of captured V-2 rockets after World War II was followed by the Aerobee, which exceeded the V-2's altitude and was more reliable. The V-2 has made first-generation investigations in X-ray and UV photometry, which was followed by studies of the solar cycle X-ray variablity, the X-ray corona, and solar flares. Nike rockets played an important role in these investigations. The role of rockets in galactic X-ray astronomy is briefly described.

  4. Ejectable underwater sound source recovery assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irick, S. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An underwater sound source is described that may be ejectably mounted on any mobile device that travels over water, to facilitate in the location and recovery of the device when submerged. A length of flexible line maintains a connection between the mobile device and the sound source. During recovery, the sound source is located be particularly useful in the recovery of spent rocket motors that bury in the ocean floor upon impact.

  5. Gasdynamic propagation of rocket exhaust products in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, A. G.; Platov, Yu. V.

    2011-12-01

    The dispersion of exhaust products of rocket fuel in the direction perpendicular to the motion of a rocket is investigated in this work. A comparison of the results of numerical calculations with a self-similar approximation of a strong cylindrically symmetric explosion is fulfilled. It is shown that at sufficiently high rocket velocity V ∞, which exceeds the sum of gas exhaust velocity V e from the nozzle and sound speed V s ( V ∞ > V e + V s ), a gasdynamic hole can arise around the rocket trajectory in the upper atmosphere, inside which the total concentration of gas becomes less than the equilibrium concentration of gas at a given altitude. The dynamics of the profiles of density and temperature of the exhaust products inside a rocket plume is calculated.

  6. CAMUI Type Hybrid Rocket as Small Scale Ballistic Flight Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Harunori; Uematsu, Tsutomu; Ito, Kenichi

    The authors have been developing CAMUI (Cascaded Multistage Impinging-jet) type hybrid rockets, explosive-flee small rocket motors. This is to downsize the scale of suborbital flight experiments on space related technology development. A key idea is a new fuel grain design to increase gasification rates of a solid fuels. By the new fuel grain design, the combustion gas repeatedly impinges on fuel surfaces to hasten the heat transfer to the fuel. Suborbital flight experiments by sounding rockets provide variety of test beds to accumulate basic technologies common to the next step of space development in Japan. By using hybrid rockets one can take the cost advantage of small-scale rocket experiments. This cost advantage improves robustness of space technology development projects by dispersion of risk.

  7. Rocket calibration of the Nimbus 6 solar constant measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. H.; Harrison, R. G.; Hickey, J. R.; Kendall, J. M., Jr.; Thekaekara, M. P.; Willson, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Total solar irradiance was observed simultaneously outside the earth's atmosphere by three types of absolute cavity radiometers and duplicates of four of the Nimbus 6 Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) solar channels in a June 1976 sounding rocket experiment. The preliminary average solar constant result from the cavity radiometers is 1367 Wm (-2) with an uncertainty of less than + or - 0.5% in S.I. units. The duplicate ERB channel 3 on the rocket gave a value of 1389 Wm (-2) which agreed exactly with the Nimbus 6 ERB channel 3 measurement made simultaneously with the rocket flight.

  8. Rocket and laboratory studies in aeronomy and astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.

    1983-01-01

    Data extracted from semi-annual status reports presented include: a list of all sounding rocket launches performed under NASA sponsorship; a list of Ph.D. and M.A. degrees awarded to students who worked in these programs; a summary bibliography of all publications through 1983; the most recent list of the publications from the IUE program; a summary of instrument development supported by the Johns Hopkins sounding rocket program; and a list of faculty and post-doctoral research associates whose work was supported by this grant.

  9. Effects of high combustion chamber pressure on rocket noise environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The acoustical environment for a high combustion chamber pressure engine was examined in detail, using both conventional and advanced theoretical analysis. The influence of elevated chamber pressure on the rocket noise environment was established, based on increase in exit velocity and flame temperature, and changes in basic engine dimensions. Compared to large rocket engines, the overall sound power level is found to be 1.5 dB higher, if the thrust is the same. The peak Strouhal number shifted about one octave lower to a value near 0.01. Data on apparent sound source location and directivity patterns are also presented.

  10. "Rocket Park" - exhibits

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-12-20

    Overall view at JSC lookin west from atop of Bldg. 1 showing rockets, parking lot and all threee stages of Saturn V. first stage of Saturn V exhibit in "Rocket Park" on west side of center little joe and mercury models are seen 1. JSC- Aerials

  11. Model Rockets and Microchips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Points out the instructional applications and program possibilities of a unit on model rocketry. Describes the ways that microcomputers can assist in model rocket design and in problem calculations. Provides a descriptive listing of model rocket software for the Apple II microcomputer. (ML)

  12. The Rocket Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winemiller, Jake; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes an extra credit science project in which students compete to see who can build the most efficient water rocket out of a two-liter pop bottle. Provides instructions on how to build a demonstration rocket and launching pad. (MDH)

  13. Rockets -- Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

  14. Rockets -- Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

  15. Measuring Model Rocket Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Randy A.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an experiment that measures the acceleration and velocity of a model rocket. Lift-off information is transmitted to a computer that creates a graph of the velocity. Discusses the analysis of the computer-generated data and differences between calculated and experimental velocity and acceleration of several rocket types. (MDH)

  16. Measuring Model Rocket Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Randy A.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an experiment that measures the acceleration and velocity of a model rocket. Lift-off information is transmitted to a computer that creates a graph of the velocity. Discusses the analysis of the computer-generated data and differences between calculated and experimental velocity and acceleration of several rocket types. (MDH)

  17. Life Saving Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    By 1870, American and British inventors had found other ways to use rockets. For example, the Congreve rocket was capable of carrying a line over 1,000 feet to a stranded ship. In 1914, an estimated 1,000 lives were saved by this technique.

  18. Model Rockets and Microchips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Points out the instructional applications and program possibilities of a unit on model rocketry. Describes the ways that microcomputers can assist in model rocket design and in problem calculations. Provides a descriptive listing of model rocket software for the Apple II microcomputer. (ML)

  19. Life Saving Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    By 1870, American and British inventors had found other ways to use rockets. For example, the Congreve rocket was capable of carrying a line over 1,000 feet to a stranded ship. In 1914, an estimated 1,000 lives were saved by this technique.

  20. Colorado Hydrogen Imaging Rocket Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgh, Eric B.; France, K.

    2009-01-01

    We present the design for a rocket-borne narrow-band far-ultraviolet imaging telescope. It will measure the spatial distribution of photo-excited molecular hydrogen emission nearby hot stars by utilizing multi-layer reflection coatings, similar to those used in previous NASA experiments, to obtain two images during a flight: one with a narrow-band filter that captures the 1575/1608A emission features (the "on-band" filter), and a second one that measures the dust-scattered stellar continuum at 1800A (the "off-band" filter). The difference image will then isolate the molecular hydrogen emission by subtracting the underlying scattered-light background. This would be a large improvement over existing studies at ultraviolet wavelengths for which many individual pointings with spectroscopic apertures are required to map the region of interest. These data will complete the picture, combined with far-ultraviolet spectra and near-infrared observations of vibrational emission that we will obtain from ground-based instrumentation, of the physical conditions in sites of recent and on-going star formation. A sounding rocket payload such as this provides the opportunity to perform niche science that other facilities cannot as well as advances the readiness of junior researchers to assume leadership roles on future NASA space flight missions.

  1. Highlights of 50 years of Aerojet, a pioneering American rocket company, 1942-1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Frank H.; James, George S.

    1995-05-01

    The "pre-history" of Aerojet is recalled, followed by a survey of Aerojet's solid-fuel and liquid-fuel JATOs (Jet-Assisted Take-Off) to aircraft prime powerplants, missile sustainer motors, boosters, sounding rocket engines and, finally, nuclear powered rocket engines (NERVA).

  2. Sound Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne, Ed.; And Others

    Sound symbolism is the study of the relationship between the sound of an utterance and its meaning. In this interdisciplinary collection of new studies, 24 leading scholars discuss the role of sound symbolism in a theory of language. Contributions and authors include the following: "Sound-Symbolic Processes" (Leanne Hinton, Johanna…

  3. Sound Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne, Ed.; And Others

    Sound symbolism is the study of the relationship between the sound of an utterance and its meaning. In this interdisciplinary collection of new studies, 24 leading scholars discuss the role of sound symbolism in a theory of language. Contributions and authors include the following: "Sound-Symbolic Processes" (Leanne Hinton, Johanna…

  4. Antares Rocket Test Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-21

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and other guests react after having watched the successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, Sunday, April 21, 2013. The test launch marked the first flight of Antares and the first rocket launch from Pad-0A. The Antares rocket delivered the equivalent mass of a spacecraft, a so-called mass simulated payload, into Earth's orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Antares Rocket Test Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-21

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and other guests react after having watched the successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, Sunday, April 21, 2013. The test launch marked the first flight of Antares and the first rocket launch from Pad-0A. The Antares rocket delivered the equivalent mass of a spacecraft, a so-called mass simulated payload, into Earth's orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Liquid propellant rockets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipprey, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    A brief overview of the state of knowledge in liquid rocket technology is presented and examples are provided of instances where some fundamental principles of chemistry, fluid mechanics, and mathematics can be applied. A liquid propellant rocket classification is discussed together with rocket system performance, applications for liquid propellants, the effective exhaust velocity, aspects of simplified nozzle expansion, questions about theoretical propellant performance, the effect of chamber pressure on equilibrium performance, and the kinetic recombination in nozzles. Details of propellant combustion are examined, giving attention to propellant injection, evaporation-controlled combustion, combustion instability, and monopropellant decomposition.

  7. ASTRID rocket flight test

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.; Pittenger, L.C.; Colella, N.J.

    1994-07-01

    On February 4, 1994, we successfully flight tested the ASTRID rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base. The technology for this rocket originated in the Brilliant Pebbles program and represents a five-year development effort. This rocket demonstrated how our new pumped-propulsion technology-which reduced the total effective engine mass by more than one half and cut the tank mass to one fifth previous requirements-would perform in atmospheric flight. This demonstration paves the way for potential cost-effective uses of the new propulsion system in commercial aerospace vehicles, exploration of the planets, and defense applications.

  8. Antares Rocket Test Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-21

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden congratulates the Orbital Sciences Corporation launch team and management in the Range Control Center at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility after the successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Antares rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) in Virginia, Sunday, April 21, 2013. The test launch marked the first flight of Antares and the first rocket launch from Pad-0A. The Antares rocket delivered the equivalent mass of a spacecraft, a so-called mass simulated payload, into Earth's orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Rocket exhaust probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is a rocket exhaust probe for collecting particulates from a rocket exhaust plume. The probe comprises a tungsten nose tip, a tip holder, a probe body, and a tail section. Rocket exhaust gas enters the probe at the nose tip inlet and passes into a mixing chamber where the exhaust gas mixes with an inert cooling gas that cools and decelerates the exhaust gas. The mixture of exhaust gas and inert gas then passes into a diffusion chamber where it further cools and decelerates before passsing through a submicron particle collection filter.

  10. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  11. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  12. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  13. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  14. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-02-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors1,2 that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the experimentally measured rocket height. Baking soda and vinegar rockets present fewer safety concerns and require a smaller launch area than rapid combustion chemical rockets. Both kits were of nearly identical design, costing ˜20. The rockets required roughly 30 minutes of assembly time consisting of mostly taping the soft plastic fuselage to the Styrofoam nose cone.

  15. Antares Rocket Preparation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-08

    An Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket is seen on launch Pad-0A during sunrise at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wednesday, January 8, 2014, Wallops Island, VA. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Rocketing into Adaptive Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Dowling, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    Defines adaptive inquiry and argues for employing this method which allows lessons to be shaped in response to student needs. Illustrates this idea by detailing an activity in which teams of students build rockets. (DDR)

  17. First Arcas Meteorological Rocket

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-07-31

    First Arcas meteorological rocket, shown at Wallops prior to flight test, July 31, 1959. Photograph published in A New Dimension Wallops Island Flight Test Range: The First Fifteen Years by Joseph Shortal. A NASA publication. Page 696.

  18. Antares Rocket Preparation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-08

    White-tailed deer graze near the Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket, launch Pad-0A, at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wednesday, January 8, 2014, Wallops Island, VA. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Rocket University at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    "Rocket University" is an exciting new initiative at Kennedy Space Center led by NASA's Engineering and Technology Directorate. This hands-on experience has been established to develop, refine & maintain targeted flight engineering skills to enable the Agency and KSC strategic goals. Through "RocketU", KSC is developing a nimble, rapid flight engineering life cycle systems knowledge base. Ongoing activities in RocketU develop and test new technologies and potential customer systems through small scale vehicles, build and maintain flight experience through balloon and small-scale rocket missions, and enable a revolving fresh perspective of engineers with hands on expertise back into the large scale NASA programs, providing a more experienced multi-disciplined set of systems engineers. This overview will define the Program, highlight aspects of the training curriculum, and identify recent accomplishments and activities.

  20. Russian Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA engineers successfully tested a Russian-built rocket engine on November 4, 1998 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Engine Test Facility, which had been used for testing the Saturn V F-1 engines and Space Shuttle Main engines. The MSFC was under a Space Act Agreement with Lockheed Martin Astronautics of Denver to provide a series of test firings of the Atlas III propulsion system configured with the Russian-designed RD-180 engine. The tests were designed to measure the performance of the Atlas III propulsion system, which included avionics and propellant tanks and lines, and how these components interacted with the RD-180 engine. The RD-180 is powered by kerosene and liquid oxygen, the same fuel mix used in Saturn rockets. The RD-180, the most powerful rocket engine tested at the MSFC since Saturn rocket tests in the 1960s, generated 860,000 pounds of thrust.