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Sample records for nk hacia los

  1. El Proyecto Sismico "LARSE" - Trabajando Hacia un Futuro con Mas Seguridad para Los Angeles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henyey, Thomas L.; Fuis, Gary S.; Benthien, Mark L.; Burdette, Thomas R.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Clayton, Robert W.; Criley, Edward E.; Davis, Paul M.; Hendley, James W.; Kohler, Monica D.; Lutter, William J.; McRaney, John K.; Murphy, Janice M.; Okaya, David A.; Ryberg, Trond; Simila, Gerald W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    La region de Los Angeles contiene una red de fallas activas, incluyendo muchas fallas por empuje que son profundas y no rompen la superficie de la tierra. Estas fallas ocultas incluyen la falla anteriormente desconocida que fue responsable por la devastacion que ocurrio durante el terremoto de Northridge en enero de 1994, el terremoto mas costoso en la historia de los Estados Unidos. El Experimento Sismico en la Region de Los Angeles (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, LARSE), esta localizando los peligros ocultos de los terremotos debajo de la region de Los Angeles para mejorar la construccion de las estructuras que pueden apoyar terremotos que son inevitables en el futuro, y que ayudaran a los cientificos determinar donde occurira el sacudimento mas fuerte y poderoso.

  2. Chicken NK cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Straub, Christian; Neulen, Marie-Luise; Sperling, Beatrice; Windau, Katharina; Zechmann, Maria; Jansen, Christine A; Viertlboeck, Birgit C; Göbel, Thomas W

    2013-11-01

    Natural killer cells are innate immune cells that destroy virally infected or transformed cells. They recognize these altered cells by a plethora of diverse receptors and thereby differ from other lymphocytes that use clonally distributed antigen receptors. To date, several receptor families that play a role in either activating or inhibiting NK cells have been identified in mammals. In the chicken, NK cells have been functionally and morphologically defined, however, a conclusive analysis of receptors involved in NK cell mediated functions has not been available. This is partly due to the low frequencies of NK cells in blood or spleen that has hampered their intensive characterization. Here we will review recent progress regarding the diverse NK cell receptor families, with special emphasis on novel families identified in the chicken genome with potential as chicken NK cell receptors.

  3. Tetrahydroindolizinone NK1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianming; Lu, Huagang; Morriello, Gregori J; Carlson, Emma J; Wheeldon, Alan; Chicchi, Gary G; Kurtz, Marc M; Tsao, Kwei-Lan C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Mills, Sander G; DeVita, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    A new class of potent NK(1) receptor antagonists with a tetrahydroindolizinone core has been identified. This series of compounds demonstrated improved functional activities as compared to previously identified 5,5-fused pyrrolidine lead structures. SAR at the 7-position of the tetrahydroindolizinone core is discussed in detail. A number of compounds displayed high NK(1) receptor occupancy at both 1 h and 24 h in a gerbil foot tapping model. Compound 40 has high NK(1) binding affinity, good selectivity for other NK receptors and promising in vivo properties. It also has clean P(450) inhibition and hPXR induction profiles. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. NK cells and interferons.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Rossella; Bernardini, Giovanni; Molfetta, Rosa; Santoni, Angela

    2015-04-01

    The role of Natural Killer cells in host defense against infections as well as in tumour surveillance has been widely appreciated for a number of years. Upon recognition of "altered" cells, NK cells release the content of cytolytic granules, leading to the death of target cells. Moreover, NK cells are powerful producers of chemokines and cytokines, particularly Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), of which they are the earliest source upon a variety of infections. Despite being armed to fight against pathogens, NK cells become fully functional upon an initial phase of activation that requires the action of several cytokines, including type I IFNs. Type I IFNs are now recognized as key players in antiviral defense and immune regulation, and evidences from both mouse models of disease and in vitro studies support the existence of an alliance between type I IFNs and NK cells to ensure effective protection against viral infections. This review will focus on the role of type I IFNs in regulating NK cell functions to elicit antiviral response and on NK cell-produced IFN-γ beneficial and pathological effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. NK Cells and Cancer Immunoediting.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells (ILC) known for their ability to recognize and rapidly eliminate infected or transformed cells. Consequently, NK cells are fundamental for host protection against virus infections and malignancies. Even though the critical role of NK cells in cancer immunosurveillance was suspected years ago, the underlying mechanisms took time to be unraveled. Today, it is clear that anti-tumor functions of NK cells are tightly regulated and expand far beyond the simple killing of malignant cells. In spite of tremendous steps made in understanding the NK cell biology, further work is warranted to fully exploit the anticancer potential of these cells. Indeed, tumor-mediated immune suppression hampers NK cell activity, thus complicating their stimulation for therapeutic purposes. Herein, we review the current knowledge of NK cell functions in anti-tumor immunity . We discuss NK cell activity in the cancer immunoediting process with particular emphasis on the elimination and escape phases.

  6. NK Cells in HIV Disease.

    PubMed

    Scully, Eileen; Alter, Galit

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in viral immunity. In the setting of HIV infection, epidemiologic and functional evidence support a role for NK cells in both protection from new infection and in viral control. Specifically, NK cells directly mediate immune pressure leading to virus evolution, and NK cell receptor genotypic profiles, clonal repertoires, and functional capacity have all been implicated in virus containment. In addition, indirect NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity has been linked to vaccine-induced protective immunity against HIV infection. With recent advances in our understanding of NK cell deficiency, development, memory-like responses, and editing of the adaptive immune system, the opportunities to direct and exploit NK cell antiviral immunity to target HIV have exponentially grown. In this review, we seek to highlight the intersections between discoveries in basic NK cell biology and the challenges of HIV chronic infection, vaccine development, and cure/eradication strategies.

  7. Equipping NK Cells with CARs.

    PubMed

    2017-09-06

    Adding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to natural killer (NK) cells is garnering interest as a therapeutic strategy because this immune cell type doesn't cause graft-versus-host disease, making its widespread, off-the-shelf use feasible. Based on promising preclinical data, a phase I/II trial of one such CAR NK-cell therapy is under way, targeting CD19 in hematologic malignancies. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Signalling through NK1.1 triggers NK cells to die but induces NK T cells to produce interleukin-4.

    PubMed Central

    Asea, A; Stein-Streilein, J

    1998-01-01

    In vivo inoculation of specific antibody is an accepted protocol for elimination of specific cell populations. Except for anti-CD3 and anti-CD4, it is not known if the depleted cells are eliminated by signalling through the target molecule or through a more non-specific mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with anti-natural killer (NK1.1) monoclonal antibody (mAb). Thereafter spleen cells were harvested, stained for both surface and intracellular markers, and analysed by flow cytometry. As early as 2 hr post inoculation, NK cells were signalled to become apoptotic while signalling through the NK1.1 molecule activated NK1.1+ T-cell receptor (TCR)+ (NK T) cells to increase in number, and produce interleukin-4 (IL-4). Anti NK1.1 mAb was less efficient at signalling apoptosis in NK cells when NK T-cell deficient [beta 2-microglobulin beta 2m-deficient] mice were used compared with wild type mice. Efficient apoptotic signalling was restored when beta 2m-deficient mice were reconstituted with NK T cells. NK-specific antibody best signals the apoptotic process in susceptible NK cells when resistant NK T cells are present, activated, and secrete IL-4. Images Figure 4 PMID:9616382

  9. Role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in mouse gastric mechanical activity.

    PubMed

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Serio, Rosa

    2006-02-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in the control of mechanical activity of mouse stomach. In this view, the motor effects induced by NK1 and NK2 receptor agonists and antagonists were analyzed, measuring motility as intraluminal pressure changes in mouse-isolated stomach preparations. In parallel, immunohistochemical studies were performed to identify the location of NK1 and NK2 receptors on myenteric neurons and smooth muscle cells. 2. Substance P (SP) induced biphasic effects: a contraction followed by relaxation; neurokinin A (NKA) and [beta-Ala8]-NKA(4-10), selective agonist of NK2 receptors, evoked concentration-dependent contractions, whereas [Sar9, Met(O2)11]-SP, selective agonist of NK1 receptors, induced concentration-dependent relaxation. 3. SR48968, NK2 receptor antagonist, did not modify the spontaneous activity and reduced the contractile effects induced by tachykinins without affecting the relaxation. SR140333, NK1 receptor antagonist, did not modify the spontaneous activity and antagonized the relaxant response to tachykinins, failing to affect the contractile effects. 4. The relaxation to SP or to [Sar9, Met(O2)11]-SP was abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX) and significantly reduced by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). 5. NK2-immunoreactivity (NK2-IR) was seen at the level of the smooth muscle cells of both circular and longitudinal muscle layers. NK1-immunoreactive (NK1-IR) neurons were seen in the myenteric ganglia and NK1/nNOS double labeling revealed that some neurons were both NK1-IR and nNOS-IR. 6. These results suggest that, in mouse stomach, NK1 receptors, causing relaxant responses, are present on nitrergic inhibitory myenteric neurons, whereas NK2 receptors, mediating contractile responses, are present at muscular level.

  10. Role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in mouse gastric mechanical activity

    PubMed Central

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Serio, Rosa

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the role of NK1 and NK2 receptors in the control of mechanical activity of mouse stomach. In this view, the motor effects induced by NK1 and NK2 receptor agonists and antagonists were analyzed, measuring motility as intraluminal pressure changes in mouse-isolated stomach preparations. In parallel, immunohistochemical studies were performed to identify the location of NK1 and NK2 receptors on myenteric neurons and smooth muscle cells.Substance P (SP) induced biphasic effects: a contraction followed by relaxation; neurokinin A (NKA) and [β-Ala8]-NKA(4−10), selective agonist of NK2 receptors, evoked concentration-dependent contractions, whereas [Sar9, Met(O2)11]-SP, selective agonist of NK1 receptors, induced concentration-dependent relaxation.SR48968, NK2 receptor antagonist, did not modify the spontaneous activity and reduced the contractile effects induced by tachykinins without affecting the relaxation. SR140333, NK1 receptor antagonist, did not modify the spontaneous activity and antagonized the relaxant response to tachykinins, failing to affect the contractile effects.The relaxation to SP or to [Sar9, Met(O2)11]-SP was abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX) and significantly reduced by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME).NK2-immunoreactivity (NK2-IR) was seen at the level of the smooth muscle cells of both circular and longitudinal muscle layers. NK1-immunoreactive (NK1-IR) neurons were seen in the myenteric ganglia and NK1/nNOS double labeling revealed that some neurons were both NK1-IR and nNOS-IR.These results suggest that, in mouse stomach, NK1 receptors, causing relaxant responses, are present on nitrergic inhibitory myenteric neurons, whereas NK2 receptors, mediating contractile responses, are present at muscular level. PMID:16402037

  11. Tissue-resident natural killer (NK) cells are cell lineages distinct from thymic and conventional splenic NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Yang, Liping; Pak-Wittel, Melissa A; Artyomov, Maxim N; Ivanova, Yulia; Zhong, Chao; Chase, Julie M; Rothman, Paul B; Yu, Jenny; Riley, Joan K; Zhu, Jinfang; Tian, Zhigang; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system; they can control virus infections and developing tumors by cytotoxicity and producing inflammatory cytokines. Most studies of mouse NK cells, however, have focused on conventional NK (cNK) cells in the spleen. Recently, we described two populations of liver NK cells, tissue-resident NK (trNK) cells and those resembling splenic cNK cells. However, their lineage relationship was unclear; trNK cells could be developing cNK cells, related to thymic NK cells, or a lineage distinct from both cNK and thymic NK cells. Herein we used detailed transcriptomic, flow cytometric, and functional analysis and transcription factor-deficient mice to determine that liver trNK cells form a distinct lineage from cNK and thymic NK cells. Taken together with analysis of trNK cells in other tissues, there are at least four distinct lineages of NK cells: cNK, thymic, liver (and skin) trNK, and uterine trNK cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01659.001 PMID:24714492

  12. NK Cells: Uncertain Allies against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Asia-Sophia; Sherratt, Samuel; Riley, Eleanor M.

    2017-01-01

    Until recently, studies of natural killer (NK) cells in infection have focused almost entirely on their role in viral infections. However, there is an increasing awareness of the potential for NK cells to contribute to the control of a wider range of pathogens, including intracellular parasites such as Plasmodium spp. Given the high prevalence of parasitic diseases in the developing world and the devastating effects these pathogens have on large numbers of vulnerable people, investigating interactions between NK cells and parasitized host cells presents the opportunity to reveal novel immunological mechanisms with the potential to aid efforts to eradicate these diseases. The capacity of NK cells to produce inflammatory cytokines early after malaria infection, as well as a possible role in direct cytotoxic killing of malaria-infected cells, suggests a beneficial impact of NK cells in this disease. However, NK cells may also contribute to overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the consequent immunopathology. As comparatively little is known about the role of NK cells later in the course of infection, and growing evidence suggests that heterogeneity in NK cell responses to malaria may be influenced by KIR/HLA interactions, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which NK cells might directly interact with parasitized cells may reveal a new role for these cells in the course of malaria infection. PMID:28337195

  13. NK cell subsets in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-03-09

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system. They not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells or infected cells, but also play regulatory role through promoting or suppressing functions of other immune cells by secretion of cytokines and chemokines. However, overactivation or dysfunction of NK cells may be associated with pathogenesis of some diseases. NK cells are found to act as a two edged weapon and play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activity in autoimmune diseases. Though the precise mechanisms for the opposite effects of NK cells has not been fully elucidated, the importance of NK cells in autoimmune diseases might be associated with different NK cell subsets, different tissue microenvironment and different stages of corresponding diseases. The local tissue microenvironment, unique cellular interactions and different stages of corresponding diseases shape the properties and function of NK cells. In this review, we focus on recent research on the features and function of different NK cell subsets, particularly tissue-resident NK cells in different tissues, and their potential role in autoimmune diseases.

  14. NK activity in carrageenan-treated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Quan, P C; Kolb, J P; Lespinats, G

    1980-01-01

    NK activity was determined by measuring 51chromium released from Yac-1 target cells incubated with spleen cells from normal or carrageenan (Car)-treated mice. Intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of i-Car (3 mg) provoked splenomegaly in mice. This splenomegaly accompanied during the first days (2-3), a marked increase of NK activity, then a decrease of this activity at day 8-9. It was returned to normal level at day 30. The modulation of NK activity in Car-treated mice is not due to the variation of the number of NK cells, since the frequency of target-binding cells (TBC) was not modified. The increase in NK activity during the first days may be due to the presence of interferon induced by carrageenan. Concomitant injection of an anti-mouse interferon globulin with carrageenan abolished the boosting of NK activity. NK activity of spleen cells from Car-treated mice at day 8 could not be stimulated by interferon in vitro as it could with the normal spleen cells. No decrease of NK activity was observed in Car-treated mice at day 8, when indomethacin was administered. Hence the decrease of this activity in Car-8 mice might be partially due to the alteration of NK effector cells induced by prostaglandins. PMID:6159311

  15. NK Cells: Uncertain Allies against Malaria.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Asia-Sophia; Sherratt, Samuel; Riley, Eleanor M

    2017-01-01

    Until recently, studies of natural killer (NK) cells in infection have focused almost entirely on their role in viral infections. However, there is an increasing awareness of the potential for NK cells to contribute to the control of a wider range of pathogens, including intracellular parasites such as Plasmodium spp. Given the high prevalence of parasitic diseases in the developing world and the devastating effects these pathogens have on large numbers of vulnerable people, investigating interactions between NK cells and parasitized host cells presents the opportunity to reveal novel immunological mechanisms with the potential to aid efforts to eradicate these diseases. The capacity of NK cells to produce inflammatory cytokines early after malaria infection, as well as a possible role in direct cytotoxic killing of malaria-infected cells, suggests a beneficial impact of NK cells in this disease. However, NK cells may also contribute to overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the consequent immunopathology. As comparatively little is known about the role of NK cells later in the course of infection, and growing evidence suggests that heterogeneity in NK cell responses to malaria may be influenced by KIR/HLA interactions, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which NK cells might directly interact with parasitized cells may reveal a new role for these cells in the course of malaria infection.

  16. NK-2. 1: an NK-associated antigen detected with NZB anti-BALB/c serum

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.; Emmons, S.L.

    1982-11-01

    NZB/B1NJ mice immunized with BALB/c spleen cells produced antibodies to an NK-associated antigen(s). Antisera without detectable autoantibody lysed fewer than 5% of BALB/c spleen cells (SC) but mediated C-dependent depletion of Nk cell activity, as measured in a /sup 51/Cr-released assay with YAC-1 targets. To determine if NZB anti-BALB/c antibodies recognized an allele of the previously described locus NK-1, 136 (BALB/c x NZB)F/sub 2/ progeny were screened for sensitivity to NZB anti-BALB/c serum and anti-NK 1.1 (BALB/c x C3H F/sub 1/ anti-CE serum) and C. Segregation analysis of anti-sera sensitivity and coat color phenotype of 63 (BALB/c x NZB)F/sub 2/ indicated that sensitivity to NZB anti-BALB/c serum was linked to the agouti(a) locus on chromosome 2. Based on these data, the authors designate the antigen detected by NZB anti-BALB/c serum as NK-2 and the activity of the serum as anti-NK-2.1. Eighteen strains were tested for reactivity with anti-NK 2.1 and anti-NK-1.1. Nine were NK-1.1/sup +/, NK-2.1/sup -/, six were NK-1.1/sup -/, NK-2.1/sup +/. NK-2.1/sup +/ cells, selected with the fluorescene-activated cell sorter, were enriched in NK activity compared to NK-2.1/sup -/ SC.

  17. Genetic Causes of Human NK Cell Deficiency and Their Effect on NK Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells play critical roles in human host defense, particularly the control of viral infection and malignancy, and patients with congenital immunodeficiency affecting NK cell function or number can suffer from severe illness. The importance of NK cell function is particularly underscored in patients with primary immunodeficiency in which NK cells are the primary or sole affected population (NK cell deficiency, NKD). While NKD may lead to the absence of NK cells, we are also gaining an increasing appreciation of the effect that NKD may have on the generation of specific NK cell subsets. In turn, this leads to improved insights into the requirements for human NK cell subset generation, as well as their importance in immune homeostasis. The presence of inherently abnormally developed or functionally impaired NK cells, in particular, appears to be problematic in the way of interfering with normal human host defense and may be more impactful than low numbers of NK cells alone. Here, we review the known genetic causes of NKD and the insight that is derived by these into the requirements for human subset generation and, by extension, for NK cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27994588

  18. Genetic Causes of Human NK Cell Deficiency and Their Effect on NK Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Mace, Emily M; Orange, Jordan S

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells play critical roles in human host defense, particularly the control of viral infection and malignancy, and patients with congenital immunodeficiency affecting NK cell function or number can suffer from severe illness. The importance of NK cell function is particularly underscored in patients with primary immunodeficiency in which NK cells are the primary or sole affected population (NK cell deficiency, NKD). While NKD may lead to the absence of NK cells, we are also gaining an increasing appreciation of the effect that NKD may have on the generation of specific NK cell subsets. In turn, this leads to improved insights into the requirements for human NK cell subset generation, as well as their importance in immune homeostasis. The presence of inherently abnormally developed or functionally impaired NK cells, in particular, appears to be problematic in the way of interfering with normal human host defense and may be more impactful than low numbers of NK cells alone. Here, we review the known genetic causes of NKD and the insight that is derived by these into the requirements for human subset generation and, by extension, for NK cell-mediated immunity.

  19. Immunomodulatory activity of chicken NK-lysin peptides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chicken NK-lysin (cNK-lysin), the chicken homologue of human granulysin, is a cationic amphiphilic antimicrobial peptide (AMP) produced by cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells. We have previously demonstrated that cNK-lysin and cNK-2, which is a synthetic peptide incorporating core alpha-helic...

  20. Type I IFN promotes NK cell expansion during viral infection by protecting NK cells against fratricide.

    PubMed

    Madera, Sharline; Rapp, Moritz; Firth, Matthew A; Beilke, Joshua N; Lanier, Lewis L; Sun, Joseph C

    2016-02-08

    Type I interferon (IFN) is crucial in host antiviral defense. Previous studies have described the pleiotropic role of type I IFNs on innate and adaptive immune cells during viral infection. Here, we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells from mice lacking the type I IFN-α receptor (Ifnar(-/-)) or STAT1 (which signals downstream of IFNAR) are defective in expansion and memory cell formation after mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Despite comparable proliferation, Ifnar(-/-) NK cells showed diminished protection against MCMV infection and exhibited more apoptosis compared with wild-type NK cells. Furthermore, we show that Ifnar(-/-) NK cells express increased levels of NK group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands during viral infection and are susceptible to NK cell-mediated fratricide in a perforin- and NKG2D-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of Ifnar(-/-) NK cells into NK cell-deficient mice reverses the defect in survival and expansion. Our study reveals a novel type I IFN-dependent mechanism by which NK cells evade mechanisms of cell death after viral infection.

  1. Type I IFN promotes NK cell expansion during viral infection by protecting NK cells against fratricide

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Sharline; Rapp, Moritz; Firth, Matthew A.; Beilke, Joshua N.; Lanier, Lewis L.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is crucial in host antiviral defense. Previous studies have described the pleiotropic role of type I IFNs on innate and adaptive immune cells during viral infection. Here, we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells from mice lacking the type I IFN-α receptor (Ifnar−/−) or STAT1 (which signals downstream of IFNAR) are defective in expansion and memory cell formation after mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Despite comparable proliferation, Ifnar−/− NK cells showed diminished protection against MCMV infection and exhibited more apoptosis compared with wild-type NK cells. Furthermore, we show that Ifnar−/− NK cells express increased levels of NK group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands during viral infection and are susceptible to NK cell–mediated fratricide in a perforin- and NKG2D-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of Ifnar−/− NK cells into NK cell–deficient mice reverses the defect in survival and expansion. Our study reveals a novel type I IFN–dependent mechanism by which NK cells evade mechanisms of cell death after viral infection. PMID:26755706

  2. Ionomycin Treatment Renders NK Cells Hyporesponsive

    PubMed Central

    Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Thomas, L. Michael; Lopez-Cobo, Sheila; García-Cuesta, Eva M.; Long, Eric O.; Reyburn, Hugh T.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes important in immune responses to cancer and multiple pathogens. However, chronic activation of NK cells can induce a hyporesponsive state. The molecular basis of the mechanisms underlying the generation and maintenance of this hyporesponsive condition are unknown, thus an easy and reproducible mechanism able to induce hyporesponsiveness on human NK cells would be very useful to gain understanding of this process. Human NK cells treated with ionomycin lose their ability to degranulate and secrete IFN-γ in response to a variety of stimuli, but IL-2 stimulation can compensate these defects. Apart from reductions in the expression of CD11a/CD18, no great changes were observed in the activating and inhibitory receptors expressed by these NK cells, however their transcriptional signature is different to that described for other hyporesponsive lymphocytes. PMID:27007115

  3. Murine peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived NK cells.

    PubMed

    Pinhas, Nissim; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Chiossone, Laura; Shahaf, Gitit; Walzer, Thierry; Vivier, Eric; Mehr, Ramit

    2016-05-01

    Murine NK cells can be divided by the expression of two cell surface markers, CD27 and Mac-1 (a.k.a. CD11b), into four separate subsets. These subsets suggest a linear development model: CD27(-) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(+) → CD27(-) Mac-1(+) . Here, we used a combination of BrdU labeling experiments and mathematical modeling to gain insights regarding NK-cell development in mouse bone marrow (BM), spleen and liver. The modeling results that best fit the experimental data show that the majority of NK cells already express CD27 upon entering the NK-cell developmental pathway. Additionally, only a small fraction of NK cells exit the BM to other sites, suggesting that peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived mature NK cells.

  4. NK cell-based immunotherapy for malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Min; Chen, Yongyan; Xiao, Weihua; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in host immunity against cancer. In response, cancers develop mechanisms to escape NK cell attack or induce defective NK cells. Current NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy aims to overcome NK cell paralysis using several approaches. One approach uses expanded allogeneic NK cells, which are not inhibited by self histocompatibility antigens like autologous NK cells, for adoptive cellular immunotherapy. Another adoptive transfer approach uses stable allogeneic NK cell lines, which is more practical for quality control and large-scale production. A third approach is genetic modification of fresh NK cells or NK cell lines to highly express cytokines, Fc receptors and/or chimeric tumor-antigen receptors. Therapeutic NK cells can be derived from various sources, including peripheral or cord blood cells, stem cells or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and a variety of stimulators can be used for large-scale production in laboratories or good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities, including soluble growth factors, immobilized molecules or antibodies, and other cellular activators. A list of NK cell therapies to treat several types of cancer in clinical trials is reviewed here. Several different approaches to NK-based immunotherapy, such as tissue-specific NK cells, killer receptor-oriented NK cells and chemically treated NK cells, are discussed. A few new techniques or strategies to monitor NK cell therapy by non-invasive imaging, predetermine the efficiency of NK cell therapy by in vivo experiments and evaluate NK cell therapy approaches in clinical trials are also introduced. PMID:23604045

  5. A phenotypic and functional characterization of NK cells in adenoids.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Sa'ar; Yefenof, Eitan; Gross, Menahem; Attal, Pierre; Ben Yaakov, Avraham; Goldman-Wohl, Debra; Maly, Bella; Stern, Noam; Katz, Gil; Gazit, Roi; Sionov, Ronit Vogt; Mandelboim, Ofer; Chaushu, Stella

    2007-11-01

    Adenoids are part of the MALT. In the present study, we analyzed cell surface markers and cytolytic activity of adenoidal NK (A-NK) cells and compared them with NK cells derived from blood of the same donors (B-NK). NK cells comprised 0.67% (0.4-1.2%) of the total lymphoid population isolated from adenoids. The majority (median=92%) of the A-NK cells was CD56(bright)CD16(-). A-NK cells were characterized by the increased expression of activation-induced receptors. NKp44 was detected on >60%, CD25 on >40%, and HLA-DR on >50% of freshly isolated A-NK cells. Functional assays indicated that the cytotoxic machinery of A-NK is intact, and sensitive target cells are killed via natural cytotoxicity receptors, such as NKG2D. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66) expression was up-regulated in 23% (median) of the A-NK cells by IL-2 activation but unchanged in B-NK cells. CEACAM1 inhibited the A-NK killing of target cells. CXCR4 was expressed on more than 40% A-NK cells prior to activation. Its ligand, CXCL12, was found in endothelial cells of the capillaries within the adenoid and in cells of the epithelial lining. In addition, A-NK cells migrated in vitro toward a gradient of CXCL12 in a dose-responsive manner, suggesting a role for this chemokine in A-NK cell recruitment and trafficking. We conclude that the A-NK cells are unique in that they display an activated-like phenotype and are different from their CD16(-) B-NK cell counterparts. This phenotype presumably reflects the chronic interaction of A-NK cells with antigens penetrating the body through the nasal route.

  6. Exogenous activated NK cells enhance trafficking of endogenous NK cells to endometriotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Mary Lourdes; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Basse, Per H

    2015-08-29

    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of endometrial glands and stroma at ectopic locations. Although the prevalence of endometriosis is as high as 35%-50%, its pathogenesis remains controversial. An increasing number of studies suggest that changes in immune reactivity may be primarily involved in the development of endometriosis development. In this sense, it has been strongly suggested that a fundamental part of immunologic system, the natural killer cells (NK cells), are an important part of this process. NK cells, a component of the innate immune system, have been extensively studied for their ability to defend the organism against infections and malignancy. Recent studies have shown that IL-2-activated NK (A-NK) cells are able to attack and destroy tumors in lungs and livers of mice, demonstrating the therapeutic potential of these cells. Similarly to metastatic tumor cells, endometrial cells are able to adhere, infiltrate and proliferate at ectopic locations. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the ability of adoptively transferred and endogenous NK cells to infiltrate endometriosis lesions. As NK cells donors were used C57BL/6 B6. PL- Thy 1.1 female mice. As uterine horns donors were used C57/BL6+GFP female mice and as endometriosis recipients C57BL/6 Thy1.2 female mice. Endometriosis induction was made by injection of endometrial tissue fragments. After 4 weeks, necessary for endometriosis lesions establishment the animals were divided in 3 experimental groups with 10 animals each. Group 1 received i.v doses of 5x106 A-NK in 200μl RPMI; Group 2 received i.p dose of 5x106 A-NK in 200μl RPMI and Group 3 received i.p dose of IL2 (0.5 mL RPMI containing 5.000U of IL2). Our data show that exogenous A-NK cells injected via ip combined with endogenous A-NK cells seems to be the most efficient way for activated NK cells track and infiltrate endometriosis. For the first time, it was shown that both endogenous as exogenous A-NK cells are able to track

  7. The utility of flow cytometry in differentiating NK/T cell lymphoma from indolent and reactive NK cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    de Mel, Sanjay; Li, Jenny Bei; Abid, Muhammad Bilal; Tang, Tiffany; Tay, Hui Ming; Ting, Wen Chang; Poon, Li Mei; Chung, Tae Hoon; Mow, Benjamin; Tso, Allison; Ong, Kiat Hoe; Chng, Wee Joo; Liu, Te Chih

    2017-04-21

    The WHO defines three categories of NK cell malignancies; extra nodal NK/T cell lymphoma (NKTCL), aggressive NK cell leukemia, and the provisional entity chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells (CLPD-NK). Although the flow cytometric (FC) phenotype of CLPD-NK has been described, studies on FC phenotype of NKTCL are limited. To the best of our knowledge ours is the first study to compare the phenotype of NKTCL, CLPD-NK, reactive NK lymphocytosis (RNKL), and normal NK cells using eight color (8C) FC. Specimens analyzed using the Euroflow8C NK Lymphoproliferative Disorder (NKLPD) panel between 2011 and 2014 were identified from our database. All samples were analyzed on the FACSCantoII cytometer. NK cells were identified as CD45+, smCD3-, CD19-, CD56+ and normal T-cells served as internal controls. The majority of NKTCL were CD56 bright, CD16 dim, CD57-, and CD94+. CLPD-NK and RNKL were predominantly CD56+ or dim with positive expression of CD16 and CD57 and weak CD94 expression. Antigen based statistical analyses showed robust division of samples along the NKTCL/normal CD56 bright NK cell and CLPD-NK/RNKL/normal CD56 positive NK cell groups. It was concluded that FC can reliably distinguish NKTCL from CLPD-NK, normal NK cells of CD56+ phenotype, and RNKL. It was proposed that the typical phenotype for NKTCL is: CD56 bright, CD16 dim with positive CD2, CD7, CD94, HLADR, CD25, CD26, and absent CD57. This resembles the phenotype of the CD56 bright immunoregulatory subset of NK cells which we therefore hypothesize is the cell of origin of NKTCL. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  8. Natural Killer Cells for Immunotherapy - Advantages of the NK-92 Cell Line over Blood NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Klingemann, Hans; Boissel, Laurent; Toneguzzo, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are potent cytotoxic effector cells for cancer therapy and potentially for severe viral infections. However, there are technical challenges to obtain sufficient numbers of functionally active NK cells from a patient's blood since they represent only 10% of the lymphocytes and are often dysfunctional. The alternative is to obtain cells from a healthy donor, which requires depletion of the allogeneic T cells to prevent graft-versus-host reactions. Cytotoxic cell lines have been established from patients with clonal NK-cell lymphoma. Those cells can be expanded in culture in the presence of IL-2. Except for the NK-92 cell line, though, none of the other six known NK cell lines has consistently and reproducibly shown high antitumor cytotoxicity. Only NK-92 cells can easily be genetically manipulated to recognize specific tumor antigens or to augment monoclonal antibody activity through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. NK-92 is also the only cell line product that has been infused into patients with advanced cancer with clinical benefit and minimal side effects.

  9. Homotypic NK cell-to-cell communication controls cytokine responsiveness of innate immune NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Miju; Kim, Hye Mi; Lim, Seon Ah; Kim, Eun-Ok; Kim, Kwanghee; Song, Kwang Hoon; Kim, Jiyoung; Kumar, Vinay; Yee, Cassian; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2014-12-05

    While stationary organ cells are in continuous contact with neighboring cells, immune cells circulate throughout the body without an apparent requirement for cell-cell contact to persist in vivo. This study challenges current convention by demonstrating, both in vitro and in vivo, that innate immune NK cells can engage in homotypic NK-to-NK cell interactions for optimal survival, activation, and proliferation. Using a specialized cell-laden microwell approach, we discover that NK cells experiencing constant NK-to-NK contact exhibit a synergistic increase in activation status, cell proliferation, and anti-tumor function in response to IL-2 or IL-15. This effect is dependent on 2B4/CD48 ligation and an active cytoskeleton, resulting in amplification of IL-2 receptor signaling, enhanced CD122/CD132 colocalization, CD25 upregulation, and Stat3 activation. Conversely, 'orphan' NK cells demonstrate no such synergy and fail to persist. Therefore, our data uncover the existence of homotypic cell-to-cell communication among mobile innate lymphocytes, which promotes functional synergy within the cytokine-rich microenvironment.

  10. PREJUICIO Y DISTANCIA SOCIAL HACIA PERSONAS HOMOSEXUALES POR PARTE DE JÓVENES UNIVERSITARIOS

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Rodríguez, María del C.; Squiabro, José Calderón

    2014-01-01

    Se realizó un estudio descriptivo transversal con el propósito de explorar actitudes de rechazo y distancia social hacia las personas gays y lesbianas (GL) en 565 universitarios. Se utilizó una escala para medir Prejuicio y otra escala para medir Distancia Social. Los participantes reflejaron niveles moderados de prejuicio y distancia social (DS) hacia las personas gays y lesbianas. Los varones (M=104.5, DT= 27.47) mostraron significativamente más prejuicio que las mujeres (M=98.8, DT= 23.41). Los hombres (M=22.7, DT= 7.00) mostraron significativamente mayor DS que las mujeres (M=21.1, DT= 5.41). Las personas que asisten con regularidad a la iglesia mostraron más prejuicio y DS que los que no asisten. Se analiza importancia de incluir el tema de la diversidad sexual a través del currículo para desmontar prejuicios hacia la comunidad homosexual. PMID:25606066

  11. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited.

  12. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

    PubMed

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2015-12-15

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56(low) NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56(low) NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94(hi)/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

  13. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  14. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited. PMID:28074895

  15. NK Cell-derived Exosomes From NK Cells Previously Exposed to Neuroblastoma Cells Augment the Antitumor Activity of Cytokine-activated NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Behfar, Maryam; Mohseni, Rashin; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed A; Asgharzadeh, Shahab

    2017-09-01

    Immune cell-derived exosomes can increase immunity against tumors. In contrast, tumor-derived exosomes can reduce the immunity and can change the tumor microenvironment to further develop and provide metastasis. These effects take place by an alteration in the innate and adaptive immune cell functions. In this experiment, we studied the natural killer (NK) cells' effectiveness on tumor cells after expansion and thereafter incubated it with exosomes. The exosomes were derived from 2 populations of NK cells: (1) naive NK cells and, (2) NK cells previously exposed to neuroblastoma (NB) cells. Moreover, we have studied the NB-derived exosomes on NK cell function. The molecular load of the characterized exosomes (by means of nanoparticle-tracking analysis, flow cytometry, scanning electron microscopy, and western blot) from NK cells exposed to the NB cell revealed their expression of natural killer cell receptors in addition to CD56, NKG2D, and KIR2DL2 receptors. These exosomes were used to treat NK cells and thereafter administered to NB tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed some kind of NK cells' education by the exosomes. This education from NK cells previously exposed to NB cell-derived exosomes caused efficient and greater cytotoxicity against NB tumors, but NB-derived exosomes act as tumor promoters by providing a tumor supporting niche. Hence, this method of preparing the exosomes has a dramatic effect on activation of anti-NK cells against NB cells.

  16. Natural killer (NK) and mitogen (OKT3) augmented NK activity in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.; Schwartz, S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors examined NK and OKT3 augmented NK activity in 14 IDDM patients and 15 age matched controls (28 +/- 6 vs 28.5 +/- 6 yrs respectively) to evaluate this aspect of antigen nonspecific immunity. NK and augmented NK function were examined at various target to effector cell ratios (E/T) using the K562 cell line (as target) in a 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assay. Islet cell antibodies (ICA) were determined by standard methods. All of the diabetics (mean duration of disease 16 yrs) and controls were ICA (-). Their observations indicate that there is no significant difference between diabetic and control subjects in NK activity. The ability of OKT3 to augment NK activity (by a T-cell mediated process) is also not significantly different between the two groups. An abnormal immune response to beta cells has a central role in the pathogenesis of IDDM. The nature of this autoimmune defect is unclear. The authors' present observations indicate that antigen nonspecific immune function may be normal in patients with IDDM. They propose that IDDM is a disease only of abnormal antigen specific immunoregulation.

  17. Location and cellular stages of NK cell development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianhua; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    The identification of distinct tissue-specific natural killer (NK) cell populations that apparently mature from local precursor populations has brought new insight into the diversity and developmental regulation of this important lymphoid subset. NK cells provide a necessary link between the early (innate) and late (adaptive) immune responses to infection. Gaining a better understanding of the processes that govern NK cell development should allow us to better harness NK cell functions in multiple clinical settings as well as to gain further insight into how these cells undergo malignant transformation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding sites and cellular stages of NK cell development in humans and mice. PMID:24055329

  18. Bystander cells enhance NK cytotoxic efficiency by reducing search time

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Renping; Schwarz, Karsten; Mangeat, Matthieu; Schwarz, Eva C.; Hamed, Mohamed; Bogeski, Ivan; Helms, Volkhard; Rieger, Heiko; Qu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a central role during innate immune responses by eliminating pathogen-infected or tumorigenic cells. In the microenvironment, NK cells encounter not only target cells but also other cell types including non-target bystander cells. The impact of bystander cells on NK killing efficiency is, however, still elusive. In this study we show that the presence of bystander cells, such as P815, monocytes or HUVEC, enhances NK killing efficiency. With bystander cells present, the velocity and persistence of NK cells were increased, whereas the degranulation of lytic granules remained unchanged. Bystander cell-derived H2O2 was found to mediate the acceleration of NK cell migration. Using mathematical diffusion models, we confirm that local acceleration of NK cells in the vicinity of bystander cells reduces their search time to locate target cells. In addition, we found that integrin β chains (β1, β2 and β7) on NK cells are required for bystander-enhanced NK migration persistence. In conclusion, we show that acceleration of NK cell migration in the vicinity of H2O2-producing bystander cells reduces target cell search time and enhances NK killing efficiency. PMID:28287155

  19. Bystander cells enhance NK cytotoxic efficiency by reducing search time.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Renping; Schwarz, Karsten; Mangeat, Matthieu; Schwarz, Eva C; Hamed, Mohamed; Bogeski, Ivan; Helms, Volkhard; Rieger, Heiko; Qu, Bin

    2017-03-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a central role during innate immune responses by eliminating pathogen-infected or tumorigenic cells. In the microenvironment, NK cells encounter not only target cells but also other cell types including non-target bystander cells. The impact of bystander cells on NK killing efficiency is, however, still elusive. In this study we show that the presence of bystander cells, such as P815, monocytes or HUVEC, enhances NK killing efficiency. With bystander cells present, the velocity and persistence of NK cells were increased, whereas the degranulation of lytic granules remained unchanged. Bystander cell-derived H2O2 was found to mediate the acceleration of NK cell migration. Using mathematical diffusion models, we confirm that local acceleration of NK cells in the vicinity of bystander cells reduces their search time to locate target cells. In addition, we found that integrin β chains (β1, β2 and β7) on NK cells are required for bystander-enhanced NK migration persistence. In conclusion, we show that acceleration of NK cell migration in the vicinity of H2O2-producing bystander cells reduces target cell search time and enhances NK killing efficiency.

  20. Cognate HLA absence in trans diminishes human NK cell education

    PubMed Central

    Landtwing, Vanessa; Raykova, Ana; Pezzino, Gaetana; Béziat, Vivien; Graf, Claudine; Moretta, Alessandro; Capaul, Riccarda; Zbinden, Andrea; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Chijioke, Obinna; Münz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are innate lymphocytes with protective functions against viral infections and tumor formation. Human NK cells carry inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs), which recognize distinct HLAs. NK cells with KIRs for self-HLA molecules acquire superior cytotoxicity against HLA– tumor cells during education for improved missing-self recognition. Here, we reconstituted mice with human hematopoietic cells from donors with homozygous KIR ligands or with a mix of hematopoietic cells from these homozygous donors, allowing assessment of the resulting KIR repertoire and NK cell education. We found that co-reconstitution with 2 KIR ligand–mismatched compartments did not alter the frequency of KIR-expressing NK cells. However, NK cell education was diminished in mice reconstituted with parallel HLA compartments due to a lack of cognate HLA molecules on leukocytes for the corresponding KIRs. This change in NK cell education in mixed human donor–reconstituted mice improved NK cell–mediated immune control of EBV infection, indicating that mixed hematopoietic cell populations could be exploited to improve NK cell reactivity against leukotropic pathogens. Taken together, these findings indicate that leukocytes lacking cognate HLA ligands can disarm KIR+ NK cells in a manner that may decrease HLA– tumor cell recognition but allows for improved NK cell–mediated immune control of a human γ-herpesvirus. PMID:27571408

  1. CD19-CAR engineered NK-92 cells are sufficient to overcome NK cell resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Romanski, Annette; Uherek, Christoph; Bug, Gesine; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans; Wels, Winfried S; Ottmann, Oliver G; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    Many B-cell acute and chronic leukaemias tend to be resistant to killing by natural killer (NK) cells. The introduction of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) into T cells or NK cells could potentially overcome this resistance. Here, we extend our previous observations on the resistance of malignant lymphoblasts to NK-92 cells, a continuously growing NK cell line, showing that anti-CD19-CAR (αCD19-CAR) engineered NK-92 cells can regain significant cytotoxicity against CD19 positive leukaemic cell lines and primary leukaemia cells that are resistant to cytolytic activity of parental NK-92 cells. The 'first generation' CAR was generated from a scFv (CD19) antibody fragment, coupled to a flexible hinge region, the CD3ζ chain and a Myc-tag and cloned into a retrovirus backbone. No difference in cytotoxic activity of NK-92 and transduced αCD19-CAR NK-92 cells towards CD19 negative targets was found. However, αCD19-CAR NK-92 cells specifically and efficiently lysed CD19 expressing B-precursor leukaemia cell lines as well as lymphoblasts from leukaemia patients. Since NK-92 cells can be easily expanded to clinical grade numbers under current Good Manufactoring Practice (cGMP) conditions and its safety has been documented in several phase I clinical studies, treatment with CAR modified NK-92 should be considered a treatment option for patients with lymphoid malignancies.

  2. [Laryngotracheal NK/T lymphoma: clinical case].

    PubMed

    de la Rosa Astacio, Falening; Barberá Durbán, Rafael; Vaca González, Miguel; Cobeta Marco, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    NK/T-cell lymphoma is a rare condition with an aggressive course and poor prognosis. Historically known as «lethal midline granuloma», it generally appears in a midfacial location. We describe the case of a 22-year-old Colombian woman with laryngotracheal affectation, presenting with hoarseness and hemoptysis. CT scan and MRI showed severe laryngeal and tracheal destruction. The biopsy showed a polymorphic, lymphoid cell infiltrate with angiocentric and angiodestructive pattern. The immunohistochemical study confirmed the immunophenotype of the NK/T-cells: CD2+, CD56+ and cytoplasmic CD3+. The in situ hybridization and flow cytometry findings were: EBER+, TIA-1+ and perforin+. The patient died from complications of her disease, before undergoing oncologic treatment. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Control of Metastasis by NK Cells.

    PubMed

    López-Soto, Alejandro; Gonzalez, Segundo; Smyth, Mark J; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2017-08-14

    The metastatic spread of malignant cells to distant anatomical locations is a prominent cause of cancer-related death. Metastasis is governed by cancer-cell-intrinsic mechanisms that enable neoplastic cells to invade the local microenvironment, reach the circulation, and colonize distant sites, including the so-called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Moreover, metastasis is regulated by microenvironmental and systemic processes, such as immunosurveillance. Here, we outline the cancer-cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors that regulate metastasis, discuss the key role of natural killer (NK) cells in the control of metastatic dissemination, and present potential therapeutic approaches to prevent or target metastatic disease by harnessing NK cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tachykinins activate guinea-pig alveolar macrophages: involvement of NK2 and NK1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brunelleschi, S.; Vanni, L.; Ledda, F.; Giotti, A.; Maggi, C. A.; Fantozzi, R.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) were evaluated on superoxide anion (O2-.) production by guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AM). 2. SP dose-dependently (ED50 = 0.7 nM) evoked O2-. production from guinea-pig AM; the N-terminal heptapeptide, SP(1-7), was ineffective. In the presence of thiorphan (10(-5) M), an enkephalinase inhibitor, the stimulating effects of SP were not significantly modified. NKA and NKB were both able to induce O2-. production from guinea-pig AM, ED50 values being 0.1 and 1.3 nM, respectively. Therefore, the rank order of activity of natural tachykinins was NKA greater than SP greater than NKB. Tachykinin-evoked effects were quantitatively similar to those elicited by the autacoid mediator PAF-acether and less than those induced by the synthetic peptide N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). 3. The NK2 receptor agonist [beta-Ala8]-NKA (4-10) dose-dependently evoked O2-. production from guinea-pig AM; the NK1 receptor agonist [Pro9]-SP sulphone acted only at high concentrations, while the NK3 receptor agonist [Me,Phe7]-NKB was ineffective. 4. These findings indicate that guinea-pig AM possess NK2 and possibly some NK1 tachykinin receptors and further suggest tachykinin involvement in lung pathophysiology. PMID:1697194

  5. Tricking the balance: NK cells in anti-cancer immunity.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2017-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are classically considered innate immune effector cells involved in the first line of defense against infected and malignant cells. More recently, NK cells have emerged to acquire properties of adaptive immunity in response to certain viral infections such as expansion of specific NK cell subsets and long-lasting virus-specific responses to secondary challenges. NK cells distinguish healthy cells from abnormal cells by measuring the net input of activating and inhibitory signals perceived from target cells through NK cell surface receptors. Acquisition of activating ligands in combination with reduced expression of MHC class I molecules on virus-infected and cancer cells activates NK cell cytotoxicity and release of immunostimulatory cytokines like IFN-γ. In the cancer microenvironment however, NK cells become functionally impaired by inhibitory factors produced by immunosuppressive immune cells and cancer cells. Here we review recent progress on the role of NK cells in cancer immunity. We describe regulatory factors of the tumor microenvironment on NK cell function which determine cancer cell destruction or escape from immune recognition. Finally, recent strategies that focus on exploiting NK cell anti-cancer responses for immunotherapeutic approaches are outlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Salivary Gland NK Cells Are Phenotypically and Functionally Unique

    PubMed Central

    Brossay, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+ T cells play vital roles in containing and eliminating systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV). However, CMV has a tropism for the salivary gland acinar epithelial cells and persists in this organ for several weeks after primary infection. Here we characterize a distinct NK cell population that resides in the salivary gland, uncommon to any described to date, expressing both mature and immature NK cell markers. Using RORγt reporter mice and nude mice, we also show that the salivary gland NK cells are not lymphoid tissue inducer NK-like cells and are not thymic derived. During the course of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, we found that salivary gland NK cells detect the infection and acquire activation markers, but have limited capacity to produce IFN-γ and degranulate. Salivary gland NK cell effector functions are not regulated by iNKT or Treg cells, which are mostly absent in the salivary gland. Additionally, we demonstrate that peripheral NK cells are not recruited to this organ even after the systemic infection has been controlled. Altogether, these results indicate that viral persistence and latency in the salivary glands may be due in part to the presence of unfit NK cells and the lack of recruitment of peripheral NK cells. PMID:21249177

  7. NK cell phenotypic modulation in lung cancer environment.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shi; Deng, Yi; Hao, Jun-Wei; Li, Yang; Liu, Bin; Yu, Yan; Shi, Fu-Dong; Zhou, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Nature killer (NK) cells play an important role in anti-tumor immunotherapy. But it indicated that tumor cells impacted possibly on NK cell normal functions through some molecules mechanisms in tumor microenvironment. Our study analyzed the change about NK cells surface markers (NK cells receptors) through immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and real-time PCR, the killed function from mouse spleen NK cell and human high/low lung cancer cell line by co-culture. Furthermore we certificated the above result on the lung cancer model of SCID mouse. We showed that the infiltration of NK cells in tumor periphery was related with lung cancer patients' prognosis. And the number of NK cell infiltrating in lung cancer tissue is closely related to the pathological types, size of the primary cancer, smoking history and prognosis of the patients with lung cancer. The expression of NK cells inhibitor receptors increased remarkably in tumor micro-environment, in opposite, the expression of NK cells activated receptors decrease magnificently. The survival time of lung cancer patient was positively related to NK cell infiltration degree in lung cancer. Thus, the down-regulation of NKG2D, Ly49I and the up-regulation of NKG2A may indicate immune tolerance mechanism and facilitate metastasis in tumor environment. Our research will offer more theory for clinical strategy about tumor immunotherapy.

  8. Models to Study NK Cell Biology and Possible Clinical Application.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Anthony E; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Aguilar, Ethan G; Murphy, William J

    2015-08-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes of the innate immune system, responsible for direct targeting and killing of both virally infected and transformed cells. NK cells rapidly recognize and respond to abnormal cells in the absence of prior sensitization due to their wide array of germline-encoded inhibitory and activating receptors, which differs from the receptor diversity found in B and T lymphocytes that is due to the use of recombination-activation gene (RAG) enzymes. Although NK cells have traditionally been described as natural killers that provide a first line of defense prior to the induction of adaptive immunity, a more complex view of NK cells is beginning to emerge, indicating they may also function in various immunoregulatory roles and have the capacity to shape adaptive immune responses. With the growing appreciation for the diverse functions of NK cells, and recent technological advancements that allow for a more in-depth understanding of NK cell biology, we can now begin to explore new ways to manipulate NK cells to increase their clinical utility. In this overview unit, we introduce the reader to various aspects of NK cell biology by reviewing topics ranging from NK cell diversity and function, mouse models, and the roles of NK cells in health and disease, to potential clinical applications. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma and aggressive NK cell leukaemia: evidence for their origin on CD56+bright CD16-/+dim NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-10-01

    Mature natural killer (NK) cell neoplasms are classified by the World Health Organization into extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) and aggressive NK cell leukaemia (ANKL). In order to propose their normal NK cell counterparts, we reviewed the literature on the phenotype of the neoplastic NK cells from five series of patients with ENKTL (n = 411) and seven series of patients with ANKL (n = 114) and compared with that of the normal and activated mature CD56 NK cell subsets. The tumour NK cells usually express brightly the CD56 adhesion molecule and CD94 lectin type killer receptor, and have an activation-related (cytoplasmic CD3ε, CD7, CD45RO, HLA-DR) phenotype; in contrast, CD16 and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are frequently negative, and CD57 expression is almost never observed. These phenotypic features would suggest that ENKTL and ANKL cells do represent the neoplastic counterpart of the mature CD56 NK cells, which undergo activation and malignant transformation after Epstein-Barr virus infection.

  10. NK cell-derived IL-10 is critical for DC-NK cell dialogue at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Blois, Sandra M; Freitag, Nancy; Tirado-González, Irene; Cheng, Shi-Bin; Heimesaat, Markus M; Bereswill, Stefan; Rose, Matthias; Conrad, Melanie L; Barrientos, Gabriela; Sharma, Surendra

    2017-05-19

    DC-NK cell interactions are thought to influence the development of maternal tolerance and de novo angiogenesis during early gestation. However, it is unclear which mechanism ensures the cooperative dialogue between DC and NK cells at the feto-maternal interface. In this article, we show that uterine NK cells are the key source of IL-10 that is required to regulate DC phenotype and pregnancy success. Upon in vivo expansion of DC during early gestation, NK cells expressed increased levels of IL-10. Exogenous administration of IL-10 was sufficient to overcome early pregnancy failure in dams treated to achieve simultaneous DC expansion and NK cell depletion. Remarkably, DC expansion in IL-10(-/-) dams provoked pregnancy loss, which could be abrogated by the adoptive transfer of IL-10(+/+) NK cells and not by IL-10(-/-) NK cells. Furthermore, the IL-10 expressing NK cells markedly enhanced angiogenic responses and placental development in DC expanded IL-10(-/-) dams. Thus, the capacity of NK cells to secrete IL-10 plays a unique role facilitating the DC-NK cell dialogue during the establishment of a healthy gestation.

  11. Neurokinin NK1 and NK3 receptors as targets for drugs to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders and pain

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Gareth J

    2004-01-01

    NK1 and NK3 receptors do not appear to play significant roles in normal GI functions, but both may be involved in defensive or pathological processes. NK1 receptor antagonists are antiemetic, operating via vagal sensory and motor systems, so there is a need to study their effects on other gastro-vagal functions thought to play roles in functional bowel disorder's. Interactions between NK1 receptors and enteric nonadrenergic, noncholinergic motorneurones suggest a need to explore the role of this receptor in disrupted colonic motility. NK1 receptor antagonism does not exert consistent analgesic activity in humans, but similar studies have not been carried out against pain of GI origin, where NK1 receptors may have additional influences on mucosal inflammatory or ‘irritant' processes. NK3 receptors mediate certain disruptions of intestinal motility. The activity may be driven by tachykinins released from intrinsic primary afferent neurones (IPANs), which induce slow EPSP activity in connecting IPANs and hence, a degree of hypersensitivity within the enteric nervous system. The same process is also proposed to increase C-fibre sensitivity, either indirectly or directly. Thus, NK3 receptor antagonists inhibit intestinal nociception via a ‘peripheral' mechanism that may be intestine-specific. Studies with talnetant and other selective NK3 receptor antagonists are, therefore, revealing an exciting and novel pathway by which pathological changes in intestinal motility and nociception can be induced, suggesting a role for NK3 receptor antagonism in irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:15023866

  12. Human NK cells in acute myeloid leukaemia patients: analysis of NK cell-activating receptors and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Morgado, Sara; Gayoso, Inmaculada; Bergua, Juan M; Casado, Javier G; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bengochea, Maria Luisa; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael; Tarazona, Raquel

    2011-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activation is strictly regulated to ensure that healthy cells are preserved, but tumour-transformed or virus-infected cells are recognized and eliminated. To carry out this selective killing, NK cells have an ample repertoire of receptors on their surface. Signalling by inhibitory and activating receptors by interaction with their ligands will determine whether the NK cell becomes activated and kills the target cell. Here, we show reduced expression of NKp46, NKp30, DNAM-1, CD244 and CD94/NKG2C activating receptors on NK cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients. This reduction may be induced by chronic exposure to their ligands on leukaemic blasts. The analysis of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors showed that leukaemic blasts from the majority of patients express ligands for NK cell-activating receptors. DNAM-1 ligands are frequently expressed on blasts, whereas the expression of the NKG2D ligand MICA/B is found in half of the patients and CD48, a ligand for CD244, in only one-fourth of the patients. The decreased expression of NK cell-activating receptors and/or the heterogeneous expression of ligands for major receptors on leukaemic blasts can lead to an inadequate tumour immunosurveillance by NK cells. A better knowledge of the activating receptor repertoire on NK cells and their putative ligands on blasts together with the possibility to modulate their expression will open new possibilities for the use of NK cells in immunotherapy against leukaemia.

  13. Natural killer cell (NK) subsets and NK-like T-cell populations in acute myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, N; Swerdlow, S H; TenEyck, S P; Boyiadzis, M; Felgar, R E

    2016-07-01

    The impact of the immune microenvironment on the behavior and therapeutic strategies for hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms is being increasingly recognized. Many functional studies of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic responses in myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) exist, but with limited data on these lymphocyte proportions and related T-cell subsets. The proportions of these cells and their prognostic implications were therefore investigated in 89 AML, 51 MDS, and 20 control marrows by flow cytometry. The median proportion of NK cells (relative to the total lymphocytes) was lower in AML versus controls (P = 0.01). Among AML, a lower proportion of NK cells predicted better survival, whereas a higher NK cell proportion was associated with the poor prognostic AML category (P = 0.002). NK cell proportions were similar in MDS, MDS subgroups, and control marrows. The relative proportion of the mature NK cell subset (CD56(dim) CD16/57(bright) ) was lower in AML and MDS versus controls (P = 0.006, P = 0.0002, respectively). The proportion of mature NK cells was not a prognostic indicator although fewer were seen in poor prognosis AML. In contrast, a lower proportion of mature NK cells correlated with worse survival in MDS (P = 0.027). A higher proportion of NK-like T-cells (of total lymphoid cells) was found in MDS compared to controls (P = 0.01). A lower proportion of NK-like T-cells predicted better survival in AML but not in MDS. Thus, the proportions of NK, NK-cell subsets, and NK-like T-cells vary in myeloid neoplasms, may potentially impact immunomodulatory therapies, and may impact outcome. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  14. Studying NK cell responses to ectromelia virus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Sigal, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe methods for the in vivo study of antiviral NK cell responses using the mouse Orthopoxvirus ectromelia virus as a model, the agent of mousepox. The methods include those specific for the preparation and use of ectromelia virus such as the production of virus stocks in tissue culture and in live mice, the purification of virus stocks, the titration of virus stocks and virus loads in organs, and the infection of mice. The chapter also includes methods for the specific study of NK cell responses in infected mice such as the preparation of organs (lymph nodes, spleen, and liver) for analysis, the study of NK cell responses by flow cytometry, the adoptive transfer of NK cells, the measurement of NK cell cytolytic activity ex vivo and in vivo, and the determination of NK cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine loading or by dilution of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE).

  15. "Natural Regulators": NK Cells as Modulators of T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Iona S; Coudert, Jerome D; Andoniou, Christopher E; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known as frontline responders capable of rapidly mediating a response upon encountering transformed or infected cells. Recent findings indicate that NK cells, in addition to acting as innate effectors, can also regulate adaptive immune responses. Here, we review recent studies on the immunoregulatory function of NK cells with a specific focus on their ability to affect the generation of early, as well as long-term antiviral T cell responses, and their role in modulating immune pathology and disease. In addition, we summarize the current knowledge of the factors governing regulatory NK cell responses and discuss origin, tissue specificity, and open questions about the classification of regulatory NK cells as classical NK cells versus group 1 innate lymphoid cells.

  16. NK cells: immune cross-talk and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Anshu; Shanker, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Increased evidence of cross-talk between NK cells and other immune cells has enhanced the possibilities of exploiting the interplay between the activation and inhibition of NK cells for immunotherapeutic purposes. The battery of receptors possessed by NK cells help them to efficiently detect aberrant and infected cells and embark on the signaling pathways necessary to eliminate them. Endogenous expansion of NK cells and their effector mechanisms are under exploration for enhancing adoptive immunotherapy prospects in combination with immunostimulatory and cell-death-sensitizing treatments against cancer, viral infections and other pathophysiological autoimmune conditions. Various modes of NK cell manipulation are being undertaken to overcome issues such as relapse and graft rejections associated with adoptive immunotherapy. While tracing the remarkable properties of NK cells and the major developments in this field, we highlight the role of immune cooperativity in the betterment of current immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:21995569

  17. A simple method to measure NK cell cytotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saudemont, Aurore; Burke, Shannon; Colucci, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered in the 1970 s and named after their naturally occurring cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. It has recently become clear that NK cells are not just killers and that malignancy is unlikely to be the selective pressure driving the evolution of NK cells. Indeed, NK cells secrete a host of cytokines and chemokines that contribute to tissue remodeling at the feto-maternal interface and to both innate and adaptive immunity during infection. Moreover, in certain conditions, they cannot deliver functions cell autonomously, as they require priming from other cells, namely dendritic cells. Nevertheless, natural cytotoxicity is still considered an important parameter used to evaluate NK cell biology, both in the clinic and in the research lab. In this chapter we describe a simple method to quantify spontaneous NK cell cytotoxicity in vivo.

  18. PILRα binds an unknown receptor expressed primarily on CD56bright and decidual-NK cells and activates NK cell functions.

    PubMed

    Ophir, Yael; Duev-Cohen, Alexandra; Yamin, Rachel; Tsukerman, Pini; Bauman, Yoav; Gamliel, Moriya; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-07-05

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate immune lymphocytes specializing in recognition and killing of tumors and pathogens, using an array of activating and inhibitory receptors. NK inhibition is mediated by a large repertoire of inhibitory receptors, whereas a limited number of activating NK cell receptors execute NK cell activation. The ligands recognized by the activating receptors are stress-induced, pathogen derived, tumor specific and even self ligands. However, the full spectrum of NK cell receptors and ligands that control NK cell activity remains uncharacterized. Here we demonstrate that Paired Ig-Like type 2 Receptor Alpha (PILRα), binds a distinct human NK cell sub-population present in the peripheral blood and also in the decidua. We further demonstrate that the interaction of NK cells with PILRα expressing targets lead to elevated IFNγ secretion and cytotoxicity. In conclusion, we present here a novel NK activating ligand which binds and activates an unknown NK receptor expressed on a unique NK cell subset.

  19. Heparin induces dimerization and confers proliferative activity onto the hepatocyte growth factor antagonists NK1 and NK2

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent epithelial mitogen whose actions are mediated through its receptor, the proto-oncogene c-Met. Two truncated variants of HGF known as NK1 and NK2 have been reported to be competitive inhibitors of HGF binding to c-Met, and to function as HGF antagonists (Lokker, N.A., and P.J. Godowski. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268: 17145-17150; Chan, A.M., J.S. Rubin, D.P. Bottaro, D.W. Hirschfield, M. Chedid, and S.A. Aaronson. 1991. Science (Wash. DC). 254:1382-1387). We show here, however, that NK1 acts as a partial agonist in mink lung cells. Interestingly, NK1, which is an HGF antagonist in hepatocytes in normal conditions, was converted to a partial agonist by adding heparin to the culture medium. The interaction of NK1 and heparin was further studied in BaF3 cells, which express little or no cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In BaF3 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding human c-Met, heparin and NK1 synergized to stimulate DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. There was no effect of heparin on the IL-3 sensitivity of BaF3-hMet cells, and no effect of NK1 plus heparin in control BaF3 cells, indicating that the response was specific and mediated through c-Met. The naturally occurring HGF splice variant NK2 also stimulated DNA synthesis in mink lung cells and exerted a heparin-dependent effect on BaF3-hMet cells, but not on BaF3-neo cells. The activating effect of heparin was mimicked by a variety of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Mechanistic studies revealed that heparin increased the binding of NK1 to BaF3-hMet cells, stabilized NK1, and induced dimerization of NK1. Based on these studies, we propose that the normal agonist activity of NK1 and NK2 in mink lung cells is due to an activating interaction with an endogenous glycosaminoglycan. Consistent with that model, a large portion of the NK1 binding to mink lung cells could be blocked by heparin. Moreover, a preparation of glycosaminoglycans from the surface of mink lung

  20. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Zunino, S.; Hudig, D.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function.

  1. Redefining Memory: Building the Case for Adaptive NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Paust, Silke; Blish, Catherine A; Reeves, R Keith

    2017-10-15

    Classically, natural killer (NK) cells have been defined by nonspecific innate killing of virus-infected and tumor cells. However, burgeoning evidence suggests that the functional repertoire of NK cells is far more diverse than has been previously appreciated, thus raising the possibility that there may be unexpected functional specialization and even adaptive capabilities among NK cell subpopulations. Some of the first evidence that NK cells respond in an antigen-specific fashion came from experiments revealing that subpopulations of murine NK cells were able to respond to a specific murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) protein and that in the absence of T and B cells, murine NK cells also mediated adaptive immune responses to a secondary challenge with specific haptens. These data have been followed by demonstrations of NK cell memory of viruses and viral antigens in mice and primates. Herein, we discuss different forms of NK cell antigen specificity and how these responses may be tuned to specific viral pathogens, and we provide assessment of the current literature that may explain molecular mechanisms of the novel phenomenon of NK cell memory. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Role for coronin 1 in mouse NK cell function.

    PubMed

    Tchang, Vincent Sam Yong; Stiess, Michael; Siegmund, Kerstin; Karrer, Urs; Pieters, Jean

    2017-02-01

    Coronin 1, a member of the evolutionary conserved WD repeat protein family of coronin proteins is expressed in all leukocytes, but a role for coronin 1 in natural killer (NK) cell homeostasis and function remains unclear. Here, we have analyzed the number and functionality of NK cells in the presence and absence of coronin 1. In coronin 1-deficient mice, absolute NK cell numbers and phenotype were comparable to wild type mice in blood, spleen and liver. Following in vitro stimulation of the activating NK cell receptors NK1.1, NKp46, Ly49D and NKG2D, coronin 1-deficient NK cells were functional with respect to interferon-γ production, degranulation and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. Also, both wild type as well as coronin 1-deficient NK cells showed comparable cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, activation and functionality of NK cells following Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) infection was similar between wild type and coronin 1-deficient mice. Taken together these data suggest that coronin 1 is dispensable for mouse NK cell homeostasis and function.

  3. A lack of functional NK1 receptors explains most, but not all, abnormal behaviours of NK1R-/- mice1

    PubMed Central

    Porter, A J; Pillidge, K; Tsai, Y C; Dudley, J A; Hunt, S P; Peirson, S N; Brown, L A; Stanford, S C

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking functional neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1R-/-) display abnormal behaviours seen in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattentiveness). These abnormalities were evident when comparing the behaviour of separate (inbred: ‘Hom’) wildtype and NK1R-/- mouse strains. Here, we investigated whether the inbreeding protocol could influence their phenotype by comparing the behaviour of these mice with that of wildtype (NK1R+/+) and NK1R-/- progeny of heterozygous parents (‘Het’, derived from the same inbred strains). First, we recorded the spontaneous motor activity of the two colonies/genotypes, over 7 days. This continuous monitoring also enabled us to investigate whether the diurnal rhythm in motor activity differs in the two colonies/genotypes. NK1R-/- mice from both colonies were hyperactive compared with their wildtypes and their diurnal rhythm was also disrupted. Next, we evaluated the performance of the four groups of mice in the 5-Choice Serial Reaction-Time Task (5-CSRTT). During training, NK1R-/- mice from both colonies expressed more impulsive and perseverative behaviour than their wildtypes. During testing, only NK1R-/- mice from the Hom colony were more impulsive than their wildtypes, but NK1R-/- mice from both colonies were more perseverative. There were no colony differences in inattentiveness. Moreover, a genotype difference in this measure depended on time of day. We conclude that the hyperactivity, perseveration and, possibly, inattentiveness of NK1R-/- mice is a direct consequence of a lack of functional NK1R. However, the greater impulsivity of NK1R-/- mice depended on an interaction between a functional deficit of NK1R and other (possibly environmental and/or epigenetic) factors. PMID:25558794

  4. NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Cantoni, Claudia; Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Alessandro; Sparatore, Bianca; Gonzalez, Segundo; Olive, Daniel; Bottino, Cristina; Castriconi, Roberta; Vitale, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that NK cells can patrol the body and eliminate tumors in their initial phases but may hardly control established solid tumors. Multiple factors, including the transition of tumor cells towards a proinvasive/prometastatic phenotype, the immunosuppressive effect of the tumor microenvironment, and the tumor structure complexity, may account for limited NK cell efficacy. Several putative mechanisms of NK cell suppression have been defined in these last years; conversely, the cross talk between NK cells and tumor cells undergoing different transitional phases remains poorly explored. Nevertheless, recent in vitro studies and immunohistochemical analyses on tumor biopsies suggest that NK cells could not only kill tumor cells but also influence their evolution. Indeed, NK cells may induce tumor cells to change the expression of HLA-I, PD-L1, or NKG2D-L and modulate their susceptibility to the immune response. Moreover, NK cells may be preferentially located in the borders of tumor masses, where, indeed, tumor cells can undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) acquiring prometastatic phenotype. Finally, the recently highlighted role of HMGB1 both in EMT and in amplifying the recruitment of NK cells provides further hints on a possible effect of NK cells on tumor progression and fosters new studies on this issue.

  5. The role of natural killer (NK) cells and NK cell receptor polymorphisms in the assessment of HIV-1 neutralization.

    PubMed

    Brown, Bruce K; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Kijak, Gustavo; Lombardi, Kara; Currier, Jeffrey; Wesberry, Maggie; Kappes, John C; Ngauy, Viseth; Marovich, Mary; Michael, Nelson; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Montefiori, David C; Polonis, Victoria R

    2012-01-01

    The importance of innate immune cells in HIV-1 pathogenesis and protection has been highlighted by the role of natural killer (NK) cells in the containment of viral replication. Use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in immunologic studies provides both HIV-1 target cells (ie. CD4+ T cells), as well as anti-HIV-1 effector cells, such as NK cells. In this study, NK and other immune cell populations were analyzed in HIV-negative donor PBMC for an impact on the anti-HIV activity of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. NK cell percentages were significantly higher in donor PBMC that supported lower levels of viral replication. While the percentage of NK cells was not directly associated with neutralization titers, NK cell-depletion significantly diminished the antiviral antibody activity by up to three logs, and polymorphisms in NK killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) and FcγRIIIa alleles appear to be associated with this affect. These findings demonstrate that NK cells and NK cell receptor polymorphisms may influence assessment of traditional HIV-1 neutralization in a platform where antibody is continuously present. This format appears to simultaneously assess conventional entry inhibition (neutralization) and non-neutralizing antibody-dependent HIV inhibition, which may provide the opportunity to delineate the dominant antibody function(s) in polyclonal vaccine responses.

  6. IL-27 stimulates human NK-cell effector functions and primes NK cells for IL-18 responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Ziblat, Andrea; Domaica, Carolina I; Spallanzani, Raúl G; Iraolagoitia, Ximena L Raffo; Rossi, Lucas E; Avila, Damián E; Torres, Nicolás I; Fuertes, Mercedes B; Zwirner, Norberto W

    2015-01-01

    IL-27, a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines, is produced by APCs, and displays pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. How IL-27 affects human NK cells still remains unknown. In this study, we observed that mature DCs secreted IL-27 and that blockade of IL-27R (CD130) reduced the amount of IFN-γ produced by NK cells during their coculture, showing the importance of IL-27 during DC-NK-cell crosstalk. Accordingly, human rIL-27 stimulated IFN-γ secretion by NK cells in a STAT1-dependent manner, induced upregulation of CD25 and CD69 on NK cells, and displayed a synergistic effect with IL-18. Preincubation experiments demonstrated that IL-27 primed NK cells for IL-18-induced IFN-γ secretion, which was associated with an IL-27-driven upregulation of T-bet expression. Also, IL-27 triggered NKp46-dependent NK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity against Raji, T-47D, and HCT116 cells, and IL-18 enhanced this cytotoxic response. Such NK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity involved upregulation of perforin, granule exocytosis, and TRAIL-mediated cytotoxicity but not Fas-FasL interaction. Moreover, IL-27 also potentiated Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against mAb-coated target cells. Taken together, IL-27 stimulates NK-cell effector functions, which might be relevant in different physiological and pathological situations.

  7. NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Sparatore, Bianca; Gonzalez, Segundo; Olive, Daniel; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that NK cells can patrol the body and eliminate tumors in their initial phases but may hardly control established solid tumors. Multiple factors, including the transition of tumor cells towards a proinvasive/prometastatic phenotype, the immunosuppressive effect of the tumor microenvironment, and the tumor structure complexity, may account for limited NK cell efficacy. Several putative mechanisms of NK cell suppression have been defined in these last years; conversely, the cross talk between NK cells and tumor cells undergoing different transitional phases remains poorly explored. Nevertheless, recent in vitro studies and immunohistochemical analyses on tumor biopsies suggest that NK cells could not only kill tumor cells but also influence their evolution. Indeed, NK cells may induce tumor cells to change the expression of HLA-I, PD-L1, or NKG2D-L and modulate their susceptibility to the immune response. Moreover, NK cells may be preferentially located in the borders of tumor masses, where, indeed, tumor cells can undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) acquiring prometastatic phenotype. Finally, the recently highlighted role of HMGB1 both in EMT and in amplifying the recruitment of NK cells provides further hints on a possible effect of NK cells on tumor progression and fosters new studies on this issue. PMID:27294158

  8. The Role of Natural Killer (NK) Cells and NK Cell Receptor Polymorphisms in the Assessment of HIV-1 Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bruce K.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Kijak, Gustavo; Lombardi, Kara; Currier, Jeffrey; Wesberry, Maggie; Kappes, John C.; Ngauy, Viseth; Marovich, Mary; Michael, Nelson; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Montefiori, David C.; Polonis, Victoria R.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of innate immune cells in HIV-1 pathogenesis and protection has been highlighted by the role of natural killer (NK) cells in the containment of viral replication. Use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in immunologic studies provides both HIV-1 target cells (ie. CD4+ T cells), as well as anti-HIV-1 effector cells, such as NK cells. In this study, NK and other immune cell populations were analyzed in HIV-negative donor PBMC for an impact on the anti-HIV activity of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. NK cell percentages were significantly higher in donor PBMC that supported lower levels of viral replication. While the percentage of NK cells was not directly associated with neutralization titers, NK cell-depletion significantly diminished the antiviral antibody activity by up to three logs, and polymorphisms in NK killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) and FcγRIIIa alleles appear to be associated with this affect. These findings demonstrate that NK cells and NK cell receptor polymorphisms may influence assessment of traditional HIV-1 neutralization in a platform where antibody is continuously present. This format appears to simultaneously assess conventional entry inhibition (neutralization) and non-neutralizing antibody-dependent HIV inhibition, which may provide the opportunity to delineate the dominant antibody function(s) in polyclonal vaccine responses. PMID:22509241

  9. Cytokine-Mediated Activation of NK Cells during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Bailey E.; Raué, Hans-Peter; Hill, Ann B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells provide a first line of defense against infection via the production of antiviral cytokines and direct lysis of target cells. Cytokines such as interleukin 12 (IL-12) and IL-18 are critical regulators of NK cell activation, but much remains to be learned about how cytokines interact to regulate NK cell function. Here, we have examined cytokine-mediated activation of NK cells during infection with two natural mouse pathogens, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Using a systematic screen of 1,849 cytokine pairs, we identified the most potent combinations capable of eliciting gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production in NK cells. We observed that NK cell responses to cytokine stimulation were reduced 8 days after acute LCMV infection but recovered to preinfection levels by 60 days postinfection. In contrast, during MCMV infection, NK cell responses to cytokines remained robust at all time points examined. Ly49H-positive (Ly49H+) NK cells recognizing viral ligand m157 showed preferential proliferation during early MCMV infection. A population of these cells was still detected beyond 60 days postinfection, but these divided cells did not demonstrate enhanced IFN-γ production in response to innate cytokine stimulation. Instead, the maturation state of the NK cells (as determined by CD11b or CD27 surface phenotype) was predictive of responsiveness to cytokines, regardless of Ly49H expression. These results help define cytokine interactions that regulate NK cell activation and highlight variations in NK cell function during two unrelated viral infections. IMPORTANCE Natural killer cells play an important role in immunity to many viral infections. From an initial screen of 1,849 cytokine pairs, we identified the most stimulatory cytokine combinations capable of inducing IFN-γ production by NK cells. Ly49H+ NK cells, which can be directly activated by MCMV protein m157, preferentially proliferated

  10. Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Activity of the Chicken NK-Lysin-Derived Peptide cNK-2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo H.; Lillehoj, Hyun S.; Min, Wongi

    2017-01-01

    Chicken NK-lysin (cNK-lysin), the chicken homologue of human granulysin, is a cationic amphiphilic antimicrobial peptide (AMP) that is produced by cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells. We previously demonstrated that cNK-lysin and cNK-2, a synthetic peptide incorporating the core α-helical region of cNK-lysin, have antimicrobial activity against apicomplexan parasites such as Eimeria spp., via membrane disruption. In addition to the antimicrobial activity of AMPs, the immunomodulatory activity of AMPs mediated by their interactions with host cells is increasingly recognized. Thus, in this study, we investigated whether cNK-lysin derived peptides modulate the immune response in the chicken macrophage cell line HD11 and in chicken primary monocytes by evaluating the induction of chemokines, anti-inflammatory properties, and activation of signalling pathways. cNK-2 induced the expression of CCL4, CCL5 and interleukin(IL)-1β in HD11 cells and CCL4 and CCL5 in primary monocytes. We also determined that cNK-2 suppresses the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response by abrogating IL-1β expression. The immunomodulatory activity of cNK-2 involves the mitogen-activated protein kinases-mediated signalling pathway, including p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, as well as the internalization of cNK-2 into the cells. These results indicate that cNK-2 is a potential novel immunomodulating agent rather than an antimicrobial agent. PMID:28332637

  11. Biallelic IRF8 Mutations Causing NK Cell Deficiency.

    PubMed

    López-Soto, Alejandro; Lorenzo-Herrero, Seila; Gonzalez, Segundo

    2017-03-01

    Human primary immunodeficiencies result in an exacerbated susceptibility to contracting infectious diseases. Recent work by Mace et al., published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, unveils a novel genetic cause for the development of familial natural killer (NK) cell deficiency: a biallelic compound heterozygous mutation in IRF8, which leads to impaired NK cell development and cytotoxic activity.

  12. Identification of Human Memory-Like NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Elena I; Streltsova, Maria A; Kanevskiy, Leonid M; Erokhina, Sophia A; Telford, William G

    2017-01-05

    Our understanding of NK biology is increased dramatically, a product of improved flow-cytometric techniques for analyzing these cells. NK cells undergo significant changes in repertoire during differentiation. A repeating stimulus, such as a cytomegalovirus infection, may result in accumulation of certain types of highly differentiated NK cells designated as memory-like, or adaptive NK cells. Adaptive NK cells are capable of rapid expansion and effective response to the recall stimulus. These cells differ significantly from conventional NK cells both functionally and phenotypically. Here we describe an approach for identification and analysis of adaptive NK cells in human peripheral blood. CD57-positive cells with high expression of activating-receptor NKG2C, increased expression of KIR receptors, lack of co-expression with inhibitory receptor NKG2A, and decreased expression of activating receptor NCR3 (NKp30) all characterize this cell type. The flow-cytometric method described below can identify this NK cell subset on a relatively simple flow cytometer. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Involvement of NK cells against tumors and parasites.

    PubMed

    Papazahariadou, M; Athanasiadis, G I; Papadopoulos, E; Symeonidou, I; Hatzistilianou, M; Castellani, M L; Bhattacharya, K; Shanmugham, L N; Conti, P; Frydas, S

    2007-01-01

    Host resistance against pathogens depends on a complex interplay of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Acting as an early line of defence, the immune system includes activation of neutrophils, tissue macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, eosinophils and natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are lymphoid cells that can be activated without previous stimulation and are therefore like macrophages in the first line of defence against tumor cells and a diverse range of pathogens. NK cells mediate significant activity and produce high levels of proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection. Their cytotoxicity production is induced principally by monocyte-, macrophage- and dendritic cell-derived cytokines, but their activation is also believed to be cytokine-mediated. Recognition of infection by NK cells is accomplished by numerous activating and inhibitory receptors on the NK cells' surface that selectively trigger the cytolytic activity in a major histocompability complex-independent manner. NK cells have trypanocidal activity of fibroblast cells and mediate direct destruction of extracellular epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi and T. lewisi in vitro; moreover, they kill plasmodia-infected erythrocytes directly through cell-cell interaction. This review provides a more detailed analysis of how NK cells recognize and respond to parasites and how they mediate cytotoxicity against tumor cells. Also the unique role of NK cells in innate immunity to infection and the relationship between parasites and carcinogenesis are discussed.

  14. NK-DC Crosstalk in Immunity to Microbial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rony

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between natural killer (NK) cell and dendritic cell (DC), two important cellular components of innate immunity, started to be elucidated in the last years. The crosstalk between NK cells and DC, which leads to NK cell activation, DC maturation, or apoptosis, involves cell-cell contacts and soluble factors. This interaction either in the periphery or in the secondary lymphoid organs acts as a key player linking innate and adaptive immune responses to microbial stimuli. This review focuses on the mechanisms of NK-DC interaction and their relevance in antimicrobial responses. We specifically aim to emphasize the ability of various microbial infections to differently influence NK-DC crosstalk thereby contributing to distinct adaptive immune response. PMID:28097157

  15. Use of allogeneic NK cells for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Melissa A; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Controversy exists as to the role that the immune system plays in cancer therapy. While the immune system has been proposed to scavenge the body to prevent microscopic transformation from forming cancer, it has been difficult to mount its potential of shrinking established tumors. NK cells are components of the innate immune system. They can recognize targets without prior sensitization, making them ideal candidates to manipulate for therapeutic use against cancer. Initially, autologous NK cells were directed against tumors but it was realized that NK cells that recognize self cells are inhibited. More encouraging advances have been made with allogeneic NK cell therapy in clinical trials to overcome this limitation. In this article, we present developments in NK cell adoptive immunotherapy for hematologic and solid tumor malignancies. PMID:22091681

  16. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Primary Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Mei, Qibing; Huyan, Ting; Xie, Li; Che, Su; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Mingjie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The deleterious effects of microgravity on lymphocytes have been demonstrated in previous studies. However, research on the effects of microgravity on human natural killer (NK) cells remains exceedingly limited. In this study, we demonstrated that NK cell cytotoxicity was significantly decreased under simulated microgravity (SMG) conditions (p<0.05). Several processes, including apoptosis, receptor expression, and cytokine secretion, were investigated in human NK cells under SMG. We observed decreased cytotoxicity, concurrent with increased apoptosis and necrosis, in NK cells after exposure to SMG (p<0.05). Additionally, interferon (IFN)-γ and perforin expression decreased significantly, and the expression of granzyme-B was only slightly reduced. Meanwhile, SMG selectively inhibited the expression of certain surface receptors on NK cells. Specifically, the expression of NKG2A and NKG2D were significantly downregulated under SMG, but the expression of NKp30 and NKp44 was not affected. We also found that interleukin (IL)–15 alone or in combination with IL-12 could counteract the inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity under SMG. Our findings indicate that human NK cells were sensitive to SMG, as reflected by their decreased cytotoxicity. Factors such as increased early apoptosis and late apoptosis/necrosis and the decreased expression of INF-γ, cytolytic proteins, and cell surface receptors may be responsible for the loss of cytotoxicity in human NK cells under SMG. A combination of IL-12 and IL-15 may be useful as a therapeutic strategy for overcoming the effects of microgravity on human NK cells during long space missions. Key Words: Simulated microgravity (SMG)—Natural killer (NK) cells—Cytotoxicity. Astrobiology 13, 703–714. PMID:23919749

  17. Rhizopus oryzae hyphae are damaged by human natural killer (NK) cells, but suppress NK cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Tramsen, Lars; Perkhofer, Susanne; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Hanisch, Mitra; Röger, Frauke; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koehl, Ulrike; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Mucormycosis has a high mortality and is increasingly diagnosed in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. In this setting, there is a growing interest to restore host defense to combat infections by adoptively transferring donor-derived immunocompetent cells. Natural killer (NK) cells exhibit antitumor and antiinfective activity, but the interaction with Mucormycetes is unknown. Our data demonstrate that both unstimulated and IL-2 prestimulated human NK cells damage Rhizopus oryzae hyphae, but do not affect resting conidia. The damage of the fungus is mediated, at least in part, by perforin. R. oryzae hyphae decrease the secretion of immunoregulatory molecules by NK cells, such as IFN-γ and RANTES, indicating an immunosuppressive effect of the fungus. Our data indicate that NK cells exhibit activity against Mucormycetes and future research should evaluate NK cells as a potential tool for adoptive immunotherapy in HSCT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. ACTITUDES HACIA LA COMUNICACIÓN SEXUAL ENTRE PADRES/MADRES Y ADOLESCENTES EN PUERTO RICO*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ana Michelle; McFarlane, Melvin Negrón; González, Ricardo; Díaz, Leslie; Betancourt-Díaz, Elba; Cintrón-Bou, Francheska; Varas-Díaz, Nelson; Villarruel, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    RESUMEN La comunicación sobre sexualidad entre padres/madres y adolescentes enfrenta dificultades particulares producto de factores socioculturales. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo documentar las actitudes de padres/madres y adolescentes hacia la comunicación sobre temas de sexualidad. Los resultados emanan de la medición inicial del Proyecto Cuídalos. Los datos de este estudio forman parte de un estudio amplio que evaluó un módulo interactivo basado en la web para mejorar comunicación sobre temas de salud entre padres/madres y adolescentes entre 13–17 años. En este artículo, reportamos datos basales que contestaron los/as participantes sobre comodidad al hablar sobre temas de salud sexual. La muestra, de los datos aquí expuestos, estuvo compuesta por 458 diadas de madres/padres y sus hijos/as adolescentes (n=916). Se realizó análisis de frecuencias y medidas de tendencia central con los datos obtenidos inicialmente. La edad promedio de los adolescentes fue de 15 años, de los que un 15% se encontraban activos sexualmente. Los/as adolescentes tienen mejor disposición que los/as padres/madres para hablar sobre sexualidad. Sin embargo, los/as padres/madres entienden que comparten suficiente información sobre temas relacionados a la sexualidad. Los/as padres/madres y adolescentes reportaron algún grado de dificultad e incomodidad al hablar sobre métodos específicos de prevención. Los resultados destacan la necesidad de incorporar a los/as padres/madres en intervenciones con adolescentes sobre temas de salud sexual. En Puerto Rico es necesario desarrollar programas dirigidos a minimizar las conductas sexuales de alto riesgo en jóvenes. PMID:28736599

  19. Human NK cells: From surface receptors to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Pietra, Gabriella; Vacca, Paola; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Francesca; Bertaina, Alice; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in innate defenses against pathogens, primarily viruses, and are also thought to be part of the immunosurveillance against tumors. They express an array of surface receptors that mediate NK cell function. The human leukocytes antigen (HLA) class I-specific inhibitory receptors allow NK cells to detect and kill cells that have lost or under-express HLA class I antigens, a typical feature of tumor or virally infected cells. However, NK cell activation and induction of cytolytic activity and cytokine production depends on another important checkpoint, namely the expression on target cells of ligands recognized by activating NK receptors. Despite their potent cytolytic activity, NK cells frequently fail to eliminate tumors. This is due to mechanisms of tumor escape, determined by the tumor cells themselves or by tumor-associated cells (i.e. the tumor microenvironment) via the release of soluble suppressive factors or the induction of inhibitory loops involving induction of regulatory T cells, M2-polarized macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. The most important clinical application involving NK cells is the cure of high-risk leukemias in the haplo-identical hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting. NK cells originated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of HLA-haploidentical donors may express Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) that are mismatched with the HLA class I alleles of the recipient. This allows NK cells to kill leukemia blasts residual after the conditioning regimen, while sparing normal cells (that do not express ligands for activating NK receptors). More recent approaches based on the specific removal of TCR α/β(+) T cells and of CD19(+) B cells, allow the infusion, together with CD34(+) HSC, of mature KIR(+) NK cells and of TCR γ/δ(+) T cells, both characterized by a potent anti-leukemia activity. This greatly reduces the time interval necessary to obtain alloreactive, KIR(+) NK

  20. Exploring NK fitness landscapes using imitative learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanari, José F.

    2015-10-01

    The idea that a group of cooperating agents can solve problems more efficiently than when those agents work independently is hardly controversial, despite our obliviousness of the conditions that make cooperation a successful problem solving strategy. Here we investigate the performance of a group of agents in locating the global maxima of NK fitness landscapes with varying degrees of ruggedness. Cooperation is taken into account through imitative learning and the broadcasting of messages informing on the fitness of each agent. We find a trade-off between the group size and the frequency of imitation: for rugged landscapes, too much imitation or too large a group yield a performance poorer than that of independent agents. By decreasing the diversity of the group, imitative learning may lead to duplication of work and hence to a decrease of its effective size. However, when the parameters are set to optimal values the cooperative group substantially outperforms the independent agents.

  1. ACTIVATED NOTCH SUPPORTS DEVELOPMENT OF CYTOKINE PRODUCING NK CELLS WHICH ARE HYPORESPONSIVE AND FAIL TO ACQUIRE NK CELL EFFECTOR FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; McCullar, Valarie; Lenvik, Todd; Wangen, Rosanna; Peterson, Karen A.; Ankarlo, Dave EM.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Wagner, John E.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are powerful effectors of cytotoxicity against “stressed” cells. They also produce cytokines and chemokines to activate the adaptive immune response. Understanding NK cell development and maturation may have implications for cancer therapy and for immunity against infections. We hypothesized that Notch signaling, critical for hematopoesis, would be involved in NK cell development. The role of constitutively activated Notch1 (ICN) on NK cell maturation was studied using human umbilical cord blood (UCB) progenitors cultured on a murine embryonic liver stroma cell line (EL08-1D2) and human cytokines. UCB CD34+/ICN+ sorted cells resulted in a population of CD7+ early lymphoid precursors and subsequent NK lineage commitment independent of stroma or IL-15. Early expression of L-selectin on ICN+ precursors suggested their homing competence. These precursors further committed to the NK lineage, and were capable of producing cytokines and chemokines such as IL-13, GM-CSF, TNF-α, yet poorly acquired NK inhibitory receptors and cytotoxic effector function. In the presence of stroma, ICN+ precursors also gave rise to a population of early T lineage committed cells characterized by expression of cytoplasmic CD3 γ, ε, δ chains, RAG1/2 and production of IL-2, suggesting bona fide Th1 commitment. Importantly, signals from EL08-1D2 stroma were required for this development process. In conclusion, sustained Notch signaling can replace stroma in differentiation of a common CD7+ lymphoid precursor from UCB CD34+ progenitors and induce NK cell commitment. However, these NK cells are immature in their cytokine production profile, are hyporesponsive and poorly acquire NK cell receptors involved in self tolerance and effector function. PMID:19167678

  2. NK Cell Subtypes as Regulators of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    As major components of innate immunity, NK cells not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity to destroy tumors or infected cells, but also act to regulate the functions of other cells in the immune system by secreting cytokines and chemokines. Thus, NK cells provide surveillance in the early defense against viruses, intracellular bacteria, and cancer cells. However, the effecter function of NK cells must be exquisitely controlled to prevent inadvertent attack against normal “self” cells. In an organ such as the liver, where the distinction between immunotolerance and immune defense against routinely processed pathogens is critical, the plethora of NK cells has a unique role in the maintenance of homeostasis. Once self-tolerance is broken, autoimmune liver disease resulted. NK cells act as a “two-edged weapon” and even play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activities in the hepatic environment. That is, NK cells act not only to produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but also to alter the proliferation and activation of associated lymphocytes. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms at work in autoimmune liver diseases remain to be identified. In this review, we focus on recent research with NK cells and their potential role in the development of autoimmune liver disease. PMID:27462349

  3. Involvement of autophagy in NK cell development and function.

    PubMed

    López-Soto, Alejandro; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Gonzalez, Segundo

    2017-03-04

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the prototypical members of the recently identified family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Thanks to their cytotoxic and secretory functions, NK cells play a key role in the immune response to cells experiencing various forms of stress, including viral infection and malignant transformation. Autophagy is a highly conserved network of degradative pathways that participate in the maintenance of cellular and organismal homeostasis as they promote adaptation to adverse microenvironmental conditions. The relevance of autophagy in the development and functionality of cellular components of the adaptive immune system is well established. Conversely, whether autophagy also plays an important role in the biology of ILC populations such as NK cells has long remained elusive. Recent experimental evidence shows that ablating Atg5 (autophagy-related 5, an essential component of the autophagic machinery) in NK cells and other specific ILC populations results in progressive mitochondrial damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) overgeneration, and regulated cell death, hence interrupting ILC development. Moreover, disrupting the interaction of ATG7 with phosphorylated FOXO1 (forkhead box O1) in the cytosol of immature NK cells prevents autophagic responses that are essential for NK cell maturation. These findings suggest that activating autophagy may support the maturation of NK cells and other ILCs that manifest antiviral and anticancer activity.

  4. Immunoregulatory Role of NK Cells in Tissue Inflammation and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tosello-Trampont, Annie; Surette, Fionna A.; Ewald, Sarah E.; Hahn, Young S.

    2017-01-01

    NK cells represent an important first line of defense against viral infection and cancer and are also involved in tissue homeostasis. Studies of NK cell activation in the last decade have revealed that they are able to respond to the inflammatory stimuli evoked by tissue damage and contribute to both progression and resolution of diseases. Exacerbation of the inflammatory response through interactions between immune effector cells facilitates the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) into steatosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). When hepatic damage is incurred, macrophage activation is crucial for initiating cross talk with neighboring cells present in the liver, including hepatocytes and NK cells, and the importance of this interaction in shaping the immune response in liver disease is increasingly recognized. Inflicted structural damage can be in part regenerated via the process of self-limiting fibrosis, though persistent hepatic damage will lead to chronic fibrosis and loss of tissue organization and function. The cytotoxic activity of NK cells plays an important role in inducing hepatic stellate cell apoptosis and thus curtailing the progression of fibrosis. Alternatively, in some diseases, such as HCC, NK cells may become dysregulated, promoting an immunosuppressive state where tumors are able to escape immune surveillance. This review describes the current understanding of the contributions of NK cells to tissue inflammation and metabolic liver diseases and the ongoing effort to develop therapeutics that target the immunoregulatory function of NK cells. PMID:28373874

  5. HIV-1 adaptation to NK cell mediated immune pressure

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Galit; Heckerman, David; Schneidewind, Arne; Fadda, Lena; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Oniangue-Ndza, Cesar; Martin, Maureen; Li, Bin; Khakoo, Salim I.; Carrington, Mary; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells play an important role in the control of viral infections, recognizing virally infected cells through a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors1–3. Epidemiological and functional studies have recently suggested that NK cells can also contribute to the control of HIV-1 infection through recognition of virally infected cells by both activating and inhibitory Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)4–7. However, it remains unknown whether NK cells can directly mediate antiviral immune pressure in vivo in humans. Here we describe KIR-associated amino acid polymorphisms in the HIV-1 sequence of chronically infected individuals on a population level. We show that these KIR-associated HIV-1 sequence polymorphisms can enhance the binding of inhibitory KIRs to HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells, leading to reduced antiviral activity of KIR+ NK cells. These data demonstrate that KIR+ NK cells can place immunological pressure on HIV-1, and that the virus can evade such NK cell mediated immune pressure by selecting for sequence polymorphisms, as previously described for virus-specific T cells and neutralizing antibodies8. NK cells might therefore play a previously underappreciated role in contributing to viral evolution. PMID:21814282

  6. Differentiation and functional regulation of human fetal NK cells.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Martin A; Loh, Liyen; Marquardt, Nicole; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Berglin, Lena; Björkström, Niklas K; Westgren, Magnus; Nixon, Douglas F; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2013-09-01

    The human fetal immune system is naturally exposed to maternal allogeneic cells, maternal antibodies, and pathogens. As such, it is faced with a considerable challenge with respect to the balance between immune reactivity and tolerance. Here, we show that fetal natural killer (NK) cells differentiate early in utero and are highly responsive to cytokines and antibody-mediated stimulation but respond poorly to HLA class I-negative target cells. Strikingly, expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) did not educate fetal NK cells but rendered them hyporesponsive to target cells lacking HLA class I. In addition, fetal NK cells were highly susceptible to TGF-β-mediated suppression, and blocking of TGF-β signaling enhanced fetal NK cell responses to target cells. Our data demonstrate that KIR-mediated hyporesponsiveness and TGF-β-mediated suppression are major factors determining human fetal NK cell hyporesponsiveness to HLA class I-negative target cells and provide a potential mechanism for fetal-maternal tolerance in utero. Finally, our results provide a basis for understanding the role of fetal NK cells in pregnancy complications in which NK cells could be involved, for example, during in utero infections and anti-RhD-induced fetal anemia.

  7. Differentiation and functional regulation of human fetal NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Martin A.; Loh, Liyen; Marquardt, Nicole; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Berglin, Lena; Björkström, Niklas K.; Westgren, Magnus; Nixon, Douglas F.; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The human fetal immune system is naturally exposed to maternal allogeneic cells, maternal antibodies, and pathogens. As such, it is faced with a considerable challenge with respect to the balance between immune reactivity and tolerance. Here, we show that fetal natural killer (NK) cells differentiate early in utero and are highly responsive to cytokines and antibody-mediated stimulation but respond poorly to HLA class I–negative target cells. Strikingly, expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) did not educate fetal NK cells but rendered them hyporesponsive to target cells lacking HLA class I. In addition, fetal NK cells were highly susceptible to TGF-β–mediated suppression, and blocking of TGF-β signaling enhanced fetal NK cell responses to target cells. Our data demonstrate that KIR-mediated hyporesponsiveness and TGF-β–mediated suppression are major factors determining human fetal NK cell hyporesponsiveness to HLA class I–negative target cells and provide a potential mechanism for fetal-maternal tolerance in utero. Finally, our results provide a basis for understanding the role of fetal NK cells in pregnancy complications in which NK cells could be involved, for example, during in utero infections and anti-RhD–induced fetal anemia. PMID:23945237

  8. Antimicrobial activity of bovine NK-lysin-derived peptides on bovine respiratory pathogen Histophilus somni

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine NK-lysins, which are functionally and structurally similar to human granulysin and porcine NK-lysin, are predominantly found in the granules of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and NK-cells. Although antimicrobial activity of bovine NK-lysin has been assessed for several bacterial pathogens, not all t...

  9. Tim-3 Is Upregulated in NK Cells during Early Pregnancy and Inhibits NK Cytotoxicity toward Trophoblast in Galectin-9 Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jintang; Yang, Meixiang; Ban, Yanli; Gao, Wenjuan; Song, Bingfeng; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yun; Shao, Qianqian; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    NK cells accumulate at the maternal-fetal interface (MFI) and play essential roles in maintaining immune tolerance during pregnancy. The mechanisms that facilitate NK cells tolerance to fetal tissue are largely unknown. T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing protein 3 (Tim-3) is a newly defined molecule with essential immunological function in many physiological and pathological processes. Recent study showed that Tim-3 was involved in the regulation of immune tolerance at MFI. However, whether Tim-3 regulates NK cells cytotoxicity toward trophoblasts is unclear. Here, we showed Tim-3 was mainly expressed by decidual NK cells (dNK) and Tim-3 level in dNK was higher than peripheral NK cells (pNK). Tim-3(+) dNK expressed more levels of mature markers CD94 and CD69 than Tim-3- dNK cells and blocking Tim-3 significantly inhibited dNK IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion. Furthermore, we found TGF-β1 may contribute to such up-regulation of Tim-3 in NK cells. Interestingly, blocking Tim-3 enhanced NK cytotoxicity toward trophoblast cell line HTR-8 but not K562. We found HTR-8 expressed Tim-3 ligand Galectin-9, in contrast K562 did not. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of Galectin-9 expression enhanced NK cytotoxicity toward HTR-8. We further showed Tim-3/Galecin-9 inhibited NK cytotoxicity toward trophoblast partially via impairing the degranulation process. In addition, clinical data showed that abnormal Tim-3 level on pNK might be associated with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Thus, our data demonstrate Tim-3/Galectin-9 pathway maintains local tolerance by suppressing NK cytotoxicity toward trophoblasts which may represent a new immunologic tolerance mechanism at MFI.

  10. Tim-3 Is Upregulated in NK Cells during Early Pregnancy and Inhibits NK Cytotoxicity toward Trophoblast in Galectin-9 Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jintang; Yang, Meixiang; Ban, Yanli; Gao, Wenjuan; Song, Bingfeng; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yun; Shao, Qianqian; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    NK cells accumulate at the maternal-fetal interface (MFI) and play essential roles in maintaining immune tolerance during pregnancy. The mechanisms that facilitate NK cells tolerance to fetal tissue are largely unknown. T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing protein 3 (Tim-3) is a newly defined molecule with essential immunological function in many physiological and pathological processes. Recent study showed that Tim-3 was involved in the regulation of immune tolerance at MFI. However, whether Tim-3 regulates NK cells cytotoxicity toward trophoblasts is unclear. Here, we showed Tim-3 was mainly expressed by decidual NK cells (dNK) and Tim-3 level in dNK was higher than peripheral NK cells (pNK). Tim-3+ dNK expressed more levels of mature markers CD94 and CD69 than Tim-3- dNK cells and blocking Tim-3 significantly inhibited dNK IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion. Furthermore, we found TGF-β1 may contribute to such up-regulation of Tim-3 in NK cells. Interestingly, blocking Tim-3 enhanced NK cytotoxicity toward trophoblast cell line HTR-8 but not K562. We found HTR-8 expressed Tim-3 ligand Galectin-9, in contrast K562 did not. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of Galectin-9 expression enhanced NK cytotoxicity toward HTR-8. We further showed Tim-3/Galecin-9 inhibited NK cytotoxicity toward trophoblast partially via impairing the degranulation process. In addition, clinical data showed that abnormal Tim-3 level on pNK might be associated with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Thus, our data demonstrate Tim-3/Galectin-9 pathway maintains local tolerance by suppressing NK cytotoxicity toward trophoblasts which may represent a new immunologic tolerance mechanism at MFI. PMID:26789128

  11. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon S.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M.; Raulet, David H.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  12. Human NK cell development requires CD56-mediated motility and formation of the developmental synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Gunesch, Justin T.; Dixon, Amera; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    While distinct stages of natural killer (NK) cell development have been defined, the molecular interactions that shape human NK cell maturation are poorly understood. Here we define intercellular interactions between developing NK cells and stromal cells which, through contact-dependent mechanisms, promote the generation of mature, functional human NK cells from CD34+ precursors. We show that developing NK cells undergo unique, developmental stage-specific sustained and transient interactions with developmentally supportive stromal cells, and that the relative motility of NK cells increases as they move through development in vitro and ex vivo. These interactions include the formation of a synapse between developing NK cells and stromal cells, which we term the developmental synapse. Finally, we identify a role for CD56 in developmental synapse structure, NK cell motility and NK cell development. Thus, we define the developmental synapse leading to human NK cell functional maturation. PMID:27435370

  13. Human NK Cell Diversity in Viral Infection: Ramifications of Ramification

    PubMed Central

    Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Blish, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a unique lymphocyte lineage with remarkable agility in the rapid destruction of virus-infected cells. They are also the most poorly understood class of lymphocyte. A spectrum of activating and inhibitory receptors at the NK cell surface leads to an unusual and difficult-to-study mechanism of cellular recognition, as well as a very high capacity for diversity at the single-cell level. Here, we review the evidence for the role of NK cells in the earliest stage of human viral infection, and in its prevention. We argue that single-cell diversity is a logical evolutionary adaptation for their position in the immune response and contributes to their ability to kill virus-infected cells. Finally, we look to the future, where emerging single-cell technologies will enable a new generation of rigorous and clinically relevant studies on NK cells accounting for all of their unique and diverse characteristics. PMID:26973646

  14. NK-1 receptor antagonists: a new paradigm in pharmacological therapy.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Coveñas, R

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) shows a widespread distribution in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and it is known that after binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors, SP regulates many biological functions in the central nervous system such as emotional behaviour, stress, depression, anxiety, emesis, migraine, alcohol addiction and neurodegeneration. SP has been also implicated in pain, inflammation, hepatotoxicity and in virus proliferation, and it plays an important role in cancer (e.g., tumour cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and the migration of tumour cells for invasion and metastasis). By contrast, it is known that after binding to NK-1 receptors, NK-1 receptor antagonists specifically inhibit the above-mentioned biological functions mediated by SP. Thus, these antagonists exert an anxyolitic, antidepressant, antiemetic, antimigraine, antialcohol addiction or neuroprotector effect in the central nervous system, and they play a role in analgesic, antiinflammatory, hepatoprotector processes and in antivirus proliferation. Regarding cancer, NK-1 receptor antagonists exert an antitumour action (inducing tumour cell death by apoptosis), and induce antiangiogenesis and inhibit the migration of tumour cells. It is also known that NK-1 receptors have a widespread distribution and that they are overexpressed in tumour cells. Thus, NK-1 receptor antagonists are molecularly targeted agents. In general, current drugs have a single therapeutic effect, although less commonly they may exert several. However, the data reported above indicate that NK-1 receptor antagonists are promising drugs, exerting many therapeutic effects (the action of such antagonists is dose-dependent and, depending on the concentration, has more positive effects). In this review, we update the multiple therapeutic effects exerted by NK-1 receptor antagonists.

  15. [Comparison of a safety evaluation between paclitaxel injection NK and Taxol®].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Tsubota, Yu; Sueoka, Noriko; Yokoi, Takashi; Inoue, Kentaro; Ohira, Masumi; Muranaka, Tatsuya

    2013-07-01

    Paclitaxel injection NK(NK)is a generic product containing the same amount of ingredients as a Taxol®Injection. We examined the safety of NK in clinical practice compared to the original drug. Our results suggested that for the cancer patient, most safety profiles between NK and the original drug are similar. However, patients who received Taxol®Injection had significantly more grade 2 neuropathy compared to those who received NK(p<0. 01).

  16. DOCK8 Drives Src-Dependent NK Cell Effector Function.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Conor J; Vervoort, Stephin J; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Freeman, Andrew J; Michie, Jessica; Peake, Jane; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Tangye, Stuart G; Ma, Cindy S; Johnstone, Ricky W; Randall, Katrina L; Oliaro, Jane

    2017-08-09

    Mutations in the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) gene cause an autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgE syndrome, characterized by chronic immunodeficiency with persistent microbial infection and increased incidence of malignancy. These manifestations suggest a defect in cytotoxic lymphocyte function and immune surveillance. However, how DOCK8 regulates NK cell-driven immune responses remains unclear. In this article, we demonstrate that DOCK8 regulates NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine production in response to target cell engagement or receptor ligation. Genetic ablation of DOCK8 in human NK cells attenuated cytokine transcription and secretion through inhibition of Src family kinase activation, particularly Lck, downstream of target cell engagement or NKp30 ligation. PMA/Ionomycin treatment of DOCK8-deficient NK cells rescued cytokine production, indicating a defect proximal to receptor ligation. Importantly, NK cells from DOCK8-deficient patients had attenuated production of IFN-γ and TNF-α upon NKp30 stimulation. Taken together, we reveal a novel molecular mechanism by which DOCK8 regulates NK cell-driven immunity. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of NK cell differentiation and effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Cichocki, Frank; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Stephen K.; Bryceson, Yenan T.

    2013-01-01

    Upon maturation, natural killer (NK) cells acquire effector functions and regulatory receptors. New insights suggest a considerable functional heterogeneity and dynamic regulation of receptor expression in mature human NK cell subsets based on different developmental axes. Such processes include acquisition of lytic granules as well as regulation of cytokine production in response to exogenous cytokine stimulation or target cell interactions. One axis is regulated by expression of inhibitory receptors for self-MHC class I molecules, whereas other axes are less well defined but likely are driven by different activating receptor engagements or cytokines. Moreover, the recent identification of long-lived NK cell subsets in mice that are able to expand and respond rapidly following a secondary viral challenge suggest previously unappreciated plasticity in the programming of NK cell differentiation. Here, we review advances in our understanding of mature NK cell development and plasticity with regards to regulation of cellular function. Furthermore, we highlight some of the major questions that remain pertaining to the epigenetic changes that underlie the differentiation and functional specialization of NK cells and the regulation of their responses. PMID:23450696

  18. T-cell and NK-cell posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Steven H

    2007-06-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) of T-cell or natural killer (NK)-cell origin are an uncommon heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations that fulfill the criteria for one of the T- or NK-cell lymphomas/leukemias. This report summarizes 130 T/NK-cell PTLDs reported in the literature or presented at the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop on T/NK-cell malignancies. The T/NK-cell PTLDs occur at a median of 66 months following transplantation and are usually extranodal. The most common types reported are peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified, and hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma. Approximately one third are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+. The median survival is 6 months. EBV+ cases have a significantly longer survival than EBV- cases, even when indolent T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemias are included among the EBV- cases. Many T/NK-cell PTLDs have been treated with chemotherapy, often together with decreased immunosuppression, but there are infrequent patients who have done well without chemotherapy or radiation.

  19. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yaling; Fu, Binqing; Sun, Rui; Li, Wenting; Hu, Wanfu; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK) cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27), influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular)+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  20. Distinct phenotype and function of NK cells in the pancreas of nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Hanna; Elemans, Marjet; Lemos, Sara; Broberger, Christian; Holmberg, Dan; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Kärre, Klas; Höglund, Petter

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about target organ-infiltrating NK cells in type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified NK cells with a unique phenotype in the pancreas of NOD mice. Pancreatic NK cells, localized to the endocrine and exocrine parts, were present before T cells during disease development and did not require T cells for their infiltration. Furthermore, NK cells, or NK cell precursors, from the spleen could traffic to the pancreas, where they displayed the pancreatic phenotype. Pancreatic NK cells from other mouse strains shared phenotypic characteristics with pancreatic NK cells from NOD mice, but displayed less surface killer cell lectin-like receptor G1, a marker for mature NK cells that have undergone proliferation, and also did not proliferate to the same extent. A subset of NOD mouse pancreatic NK cells produced IFN-gamma spontaneously, suggesting ongoing effector responses. However, most NOD mouse pancreatic NK cells were hyporesponsive compared with spleen NK cells, as reflected by diminished cytokine secretion and a lower capacity to degranulate. Interestingly, such hyporesponsiveness was not seen in pancreatic NK cells from the nonautoimmune strain C57BL/6, suggesting that this feature is not a general property of pancreatic NK cells. Based on our data, we propose that NK cells are sentinel cells in a normal pancreas. We further speculate that during inflammation, pancreatic NK cells initially mediate proinflammatory effector functions, potentially contributing to organ-specific autoimmunity, but later become hyporesponsive because of exhaustion or regulation.

  1. Suppressive effect of a standardized mistletoe extract on the expression of activatory NK receptors and function of human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jung; Son, Young-Ok; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Soon-Won; Bae, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hyung Hoi; Lee, Eun-Yup; Chung, Byung-Seon; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kang, Chi-Dug

    2007-09-01

    Despite long-term use of mistletoe extracts for cancer treatment, their mode of action remains elusive. In this study, it was studied in vitro if mistletoe extract is able to modulate the expression of natural cytotoxic receptors (NCRs) and NKG2D receptor, which stimulate natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Unexpectedly, a mistletoe extract, ABNOBA viscum Fraxini, inhibited the expression level of NKp46 and NKG2D receptors in dose- and time-dependent manners. The levels of NKp30 and NKG2D receptors were remarkably induced and NKp44 was slightly induced after 48 h treatment with IL-2 and IL-15 in both mRNA and surface expression. The activatory NK receptors were not induced significantly after treatment with IL-12, IL-18, and IL-21 for 48 h. Induction of activatory NK receptors by IL-2 and IL-15 was suppressed almost to the untreated levels by treatment with mistletoe extract, which appeared to induce apoptosis of NK cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the treatment with IL-2 and IL-15 did not prevent the mistletoe-induced NK-cell death. Mistletoe extract inhibited significantly the cytotoxic activity of resting and IL-2- or IL-15-stimulated NK cells. These results suggest that inhibition of survival and function of NK cells by mistletoe extract may curtail in part the therapeutic effects of mistletoe.

  2. Cytomegalovirus Infection Drives Adaptive Epigenetic Diversification of NK Cells with Altered Signaling and Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Tesi, Bianca; Theorell, Jakob; Beziat, Vivien; Holmes, Tim D.; Han, Hongya; Chiang, Samuel C.C.; Foley, Bree; Mattsson, Kristin; Larsson, Stella; Schaffer, Marie; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Bryceson, Yenan T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanisms underlying human natural killer (NK) cell phenotypic and functional heterogeneity are unknown. Here, we describe the emergence of diverse subsets of human NK cells selectively lacking expression of signaling proteins after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The absence of B and myeloid cell-related signaling protein expression in these NK cell subsets correlated with promoter DNA hyperme-thylation. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were strikingly similar between HCMV-associated adaptive NK cells and cytotoxic effector T cells but differed from those of canonical NK cells. Functional interrogation demonstrated altered cytokine responsiveness in adaptive NK cells that was linked to reduced expression of the transcription factor PLZF. Furthermore, subsets of adaptive NK cells demonstrated significantly reduced functional responses to activated autologous T cells. The present results uncover a spectrum of epigenetically unique adaptive NK cell subsets that diversify in response to viral infection and have distinct functional capabilities compared to canonical NK cell subsets. PMID:25786176

  3. Murine thymic NK cells are distinct from ILC1s and have unique transcription factor requirements.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Sara; Sun, Mengxi; Bell, April; Zook, Erin C; de Pooter, Renee F; Zamai, Loris; Kee, Barbara L

    2017-03-09

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells include natural killer (NK) cells and ILC1s, which mediate the response to intracellular pathogens. Thymic NK (tNK) cells were described with hybrid features of immature NK cells and ILC1 but whether these cells are related to NK cells or ILC1 has not been fully investigated. We report that murine tNK cells expressed the NK-cell associated transcription factor EOMES and developed independent of the essential ILC1 factor TBET, confirming their placement within the NK lineage. Moreover, tNK cells resemble NK cells rather than ILC1 in their requirements for the E protein transcription factor inhibitor ID2. We provide further insight into the mechanisms governing tNK-cell development by showing that the transcription factor ETS1 prevented tNK cell acquisition of the conventional NK-cell maturation markers CD11b and KLRG1. Our data reveal few ILC1 in the thymus and clarify the identity and developmental requirements of tNK cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Natural killer (NK) cell deficit in coronary artery disease: no aberrations in phenotype but sustained reduction of NK cells is associated with low-grade inflammation.

    PubMed

    Backteman, K; Ernerudh, J; Jonasson, L

    2014-01-01

    Although reduced natural killer (NK) cell levels have been reported consistently in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), the clinical significance and persistence of this immune perturbation is not clarified. In this study we characterized the NK cell deficit further by determining (i) differentiation surface markers and cytokine profile of NK cell subsets and (ii) ability to reconstitute NK cell levels over time. Flow cytometry was used to analyse NK cell subsets and the intracellular cytokine profile in 31 patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI), 34 patients with stable angina (SA) and 37 healthy controls. In blood collected prior to coronary angiography, the proportions of NK cells were reduced significantly in non-STEMI and SA patients compared with controls, whereas NK cell subset analyses or cytokine profile measurements did not reveal any differences across groups. During a 12-month follow-up, the proportions of NK cells increased, although not in all patients. Failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with several components of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, interleukin (IL)-6 levels remained high in patients with sustained NK cell deficit, whereas a decline in IL-6 (P < 0·001) was seen in patients with a pronounced increase in NK cells. In conclusion, we found no evidence that reduction of NK cells in CAD patients was associated with aberrations in NK cell phenotype at any clinical stage of the disease. Conversely, failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with a persistent low-grade inflammation, suggesting a protective role of NK cells in CAD.

  5. T and NK cells: two sides of tumor immunoevasion.

    PubMed

    Fruci, Doriana; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Cifaldi, Loredana; Locatelli, Franco; Tremante, Elisa; Benevolo, Maria; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2013-02-04

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are known to reject several experimental murine tumors, but their antineoplastic activity in humans is not generally agreed upon, as exemplified by an interesting correspondence recently appeared in Cancer Research. In the present commentary, we join the discussion and bring to the attention of the readers of the Journal of Translational Medicine a set of recent, related reports. These studies demonstrate that effectors of the adaptive and innate immunity need to actively cooperate in order to reject tumors and, conversely, tumors protect themselves by dampening both T and NK cell responses. The recently reported ability of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) expressed by melanoma cells to down-regulate activating NK receptors is yet another piece of evidence supporting combined and highly effective T/NK cell disabling. Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, including Human Leukocyte Antigen E (HLA-E), represent another class of shared activating/inhibitory ligands. Ongoing clinical trials with small molecules interfering with IDO and PGE2 may be exploiting an immune bonus to control cancer. Conversely, failure to simultaneously engage effectors of both the innate and the adaptive immunity may contribute to explain the limited clinical efficacy of T cell-only vaccination trials. Shared (T/NK cells) natural immunosuppressants and activating/inhibitory ligands expressed by tumor cells may provide mechanistic insight into impaired gathering and function of immune effectors at the tumor site.

  6. PIBF positive uterine NK cells in the mouse decidua.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Agnes; Berta, Gergely; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2017-02-01

    Though uterine NK cells (u NK cells) contain cytotoxic granules, and selectively over- express the genes of perforin and granzymes, during normal pregnancy, they are not cytotoxic. Progesterone is indispensable for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy both in humans and in mice. Mouse uterine NK cells do not express the classical progesterone receptor, yet progesterone affects the recruitment and function of uterine NK cells, the latter partly via the Progesterone-Induced Blocking Factor (PIBF). We demonstrated PIBF positive granulated cells in the mouse decidua. The aim of this study was to characterize these cells by lectin immunohistochemistry and anti-perforin reactivity. PIBF+ granulated cells were absent from the deciduae of alymphoid mice, but appeared in the decidua of those that had been reconstituted with bone marrow from male BALB/c mice. PIBF+ granulated cells bound the DBA lectin, suggesting their NK cell nature, and also contained perforin, which co-localized with PIBF in the cytoplasmic granules. In anti-progesterone treated mice all of the PIBF+ cells were perforin positive at g. d. 12.5, in contrast to the 54% perforin positivity of PIBF+ cells in untreated mice.

  7. Functional Assessment of NK and LAK Cells Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Space flight associated stress alters some aspects of the human immune response. In this study, we determined the effects of 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle on the cytotoxic activity of NK and LAK cells. PBMCs were collected from 10-ml blood specimens from 5 astronauts 10 days before launch, immediately after landing, and again at 3 days after landing and stored at -80 C. All PBMCs were thawed simultaneously, and the cytotoxic activities of NK and LAK cells were measured by a 4 hour Cr-51 release assay. K562 cells were used to assess NK cell cytotoxicity. Following 4 days of IL-2 activation, the LAK cell cytotoxic activity was determined using K562 cells and Daudi cells as the target cells. NK cell cytotoxicity decreased at landing (p<.05) in 3/5 astronauts, and recovered to preflight levels by 3 days following landing; NK cell cytotoxicity was increased (p=0.1) in the remaining 2 astronauts at landing. In 4/5 astronauts, LAK cytotoxic activity was decreased at landing against K562 cells (p = 0.13) and Daudi cells (p = 0.08). Phenotyping of PBMC's and LAK cells showed alterations in some surface markers and adhesion molecules (CD11b, CD11c, CD11a, CD16, L-selectin, and CD3).

  8. T and NK cells: two sides of tumor immunoevasion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are known to reject several experimental murine tumors, but their antineoplastic activity in humans is not generally agreed upon, as exemplified by an interesting correspondence recently appeared in Cancer Research. In the present commentary, we join the discussion and bring to the attention of the readers of the Journal of Translational Medicine a set of recent, related reports. These studies demonstrate that effectors of the adaptive and innate immunity need to actively cooperate in order to reject tumors and, conversely, tumors protect themselves by dampening both T and NK cell responses. The recently reported ability of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) expressed by melanoma cells to down-regulate activating NK receptors is yet another piece of evidence supporting combined and highly effective T/NK cell disabling. Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, including Human Leukocyte Antigen E (HLA-E), represent another class of shared activating/inhibitory ligands. Ongoing clinical trials with small molecules interfering with IDO and PGE2 may be exploiting an immune bonus to control cancer. Conversely, failure to simultaneously engage effectors of both the innate and the adaptive immunity may contribute to explain the limited clinical efficacy of T cell-only vaccination trials. Shared (T/NK cells) natural immunosuppressants and activating/inhibitory ligands expressed by tumor cells may provide mechanistic insight into impaired gathering and function of immune effectors at the tumor site. PMID:23379575

  9. Inflammasome-Dependent Induction of Adaptive NK Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    van den Boorn, Jasper G; Jakobs, Christopher; Hagen, Christian; Renn, Marcel; Luiten, Rosalie M; Melief, Cornelis J M; Tüting, Thomas; Garbi, Natalio; Hartmann, Gunther; Hornung, Veit

    2016-06-21

    Monobenzone is a pro-hapten that is exclusively metabolized by melanocytes, thereby haptenizing melanocyte-specific antigens, which results in cytotoxic autoimmunity specifically against pigmented cells. Studying monobenzone in a setting of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), we observed that monobenzone induced a long-lasting, melanocyte-specific immune response that was dependent on NK cells, yet fully intact in the absence of T- and B cells. Consistent with the concept of "memory NK cells," monobenzone-induced NK cells resided in the liver and transfer of these cells conferred melanocyte-specific immunity to naive animals. Monobenzone-exposed skin displayed macrophage infiltration and cutaneous lymph nodes showed an inflammasome-dependent influx of macrophages with a tissue-resident phenotype, coinciding with local NK cell activation. Indeed, macrophage depletion or the absence of the NLRP3 inflammasome, the adaptor protein ASC or interleukin-18 (IL-18) abolished monobenzone CHS, thereby establishing a non-redundant role for the NLRP3 inflammasome as a critical proinflammatory checkpoint in the induction of hapten-dependent memory NK cells.

  10. Blastoid NK cell leukemia/lymphoma with cutaneous involvement.

    PubMed

    Ginarte, M; Abalde, M T; Peteiro, C; Fraga, M; Alonso, N; Toribio, J

    2000-01-01

    Malignant neoplasms from natural killer (NK) cells are characterized by their positivity for CD56 and absence of monoclonal TCR gene rearrangement. Recently, they have been classified into four main types (nasal and nasal-type NK cell lymphoma, aggressive NK cell leukemia/lymphoma, and blastoid NK cell leukemia/lymphoma), based on clinical features, racial predisposition, presence of azurophilic granules, immunophenotype and association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. A 72-year-old Caucasian man presented with a malignant neoplasm comprised of blastoid cells without azurophilic granules in the Giemsa stain, with positivity for CD2, CD4, HLA-DR, CD45 and CD56, and negativity for CD3 (surface and cytoplasmic) and CD5. In situ hybridization for EBV and PCR analysis of rearrangement of the T cell receptor gene were negative. Based on these results, a diagnosis of blastoid NK cell lymphoma was made. In this case the first clinical manifestations were the cutaneous lesions, and, although the disease was already advanced at the diagnosis, the patient responded completely to the treatment and remains asymptomatic 14 months after diagnosis. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Novel immune modulators used in hematology: impact on NK cells.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Stephanie; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    There is a wide range of important pharmaceuticals used in treatment of cancer. Besides their known effects on tumor cells, there is growing evidence for modulation of the immune system. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs(®)) play an important role in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma or myelodysplastic syndrome and have already demonstrated antitumor, anti-angiogenic, and immunostimulating effects, in particular on natural killer (NK) cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are directly targeting different kinases and are known to regulate effector NK cells and expression of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) on tumor cells. Demethylating agents, histone deacetylases, and proteasome inhibitors interfere with the epigenetic regulation and protein degradation of malignant cells. There are first hints that these drugs also sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy, radiation, and NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity by enhanced expression of TRAIL and NKG2DLs. However, these pharmaceuticals may also impair NK cell function in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In summary, this review provides an update on the effects of different novel molecules on the immune system focusing NK cells.

  12. Functional Assessment of NK and LAK Cells Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Space flight associated stress alters some aspects of the human immune response. In this study, we determined the effects of 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle on the cytotoxic activity of NK and LAK cells. PBMCs were collected from 10-ml blood specimens from 5 astronauts 10 days before launch, immediately after landing, and again at 3 days after landing and stored at -80 C. All PBMCs were thawed simultaneously, and the cytotoxic activities of NK and LAK cells were measured by a 4 hour Cr-51 release assay. K562 cells were used to assess NK cell cytotoxicity. Following 4 days of IL-2 activation, the LAK cell cytotoxic activity was determined using K562 cells and Daudi cells as the target cells. NK cell cytotoxicity decreased at landing (p<.05) in 3/5 astronauts, and recovered to preflight levels by 3 days following landing; NK cell cytotoxicity was increased (p=0.1) in the remaining 2 astronauts at landing. In 4/5 astronauts, LAK cytotoxic activity was decreased at landing against K562 cells (p = 0.13) and Daudi cells (p = 0.08). Phenotyping of PBMC's and LAK cells showed alterations in some surface markers and adhesion molecules (CD11b, CD11c, CD11a, CD16, L-selectin, and CD3).

  13. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control.

    PubMed

    Koehl, U; Kalberer, C; Spanholtz, J; Lee, D A; Miller, J S; Cooley, S; Lowdell, M; Uharek, L; Klingemann, H; Curti, A; Leung, W; Alici, E

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013-2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). Differences in donor selection, manufacturing and quality control of NK cells for cancer immunotherapies are described and basic recommendations are outlined for harmonization in future NK cell studies.

  14. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, U.; Kalberer, C.; Spanholtz, J.; Lee, D. A.; Miller, J. S.; Cooley, S.; Lowdell, M.; Uharek, L.; Klingemann, H.; Curti, A.; Leung, W.; Alici, E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013–2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). Differences in donor selection, manufacturing and quality control of NK cells for cancer immunotherapies are described and basic recommendations are outlined for harmonization in future NK cell studies. PMID:27141397

  15. Aspergillus fumigatus responds to natural killer (NK) cells with upregulation of stress related genes and inhibits the immunoregulatory function of NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Andreas; Blatzer, Michael; Posch, Wilfried; Schubert, Ralf; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Schmidt, Stanislaw; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are active against Aspergillus fumigatus, which in turn is able to impair the host defense. Unfortunately, little is known on the mutual interaction of NK cells and A. fumigatus. We coincubated human NK cells with A. fumigatus hyphae and assessed the gene expression and protein concentration of selected molecules. We found that A. fumigatus up-regulates the gene expression of pro-inflammatory molecules in NK cells, but inhibited the release of these molecules resulting in intracellular accumulation and limited extracellular availability. A. fumigatus down-regulatedmRNA levels of perforin in NK cells, but increased its intra- and extracellular protein concentration. The gene expression of stress related molecules of A. fumigatus such as heat shock protein hsp90 was up-regulated by human NK cells. Our data characterize for the first time the immunosuppressive effect of A. fumigatus on NK cells and may help to develop new therapeutic antifungal strategies. PMID:27738337

  16. Natural Killer (NK) Cell Education Differentially Influences HIV Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation and Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Nicole F; Kiani, Zahra; Tremblay-McLean, Alexandra; Kant, Sanket A; Leeks, Christopher E; Dupuy, Franck P

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy using broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) endowed with Fc-mediated effector functions has been shown to be critical for protecting or controlling viral replication in animal models. In human, the RV144 Thai trial was the first trial to demonstrate a significant protection against HIV infection following vaccination. Analysis of the correlates of immune protection in this trial identified an association between the presence of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies (Abs) to HIV envelope (Env) V1/V2 loop structures and protection from infection, provided IgA Abs with competing specificity were not present. Systems serology analyses implicated a broader range of Ab-dependent functions in protection from HIV infection, including but not limited to ADCC and Ab-dependent NK cell activation (ADNKA) for secretion of IFN-γ and CCL4 and expression of the degranulation marker CD107a. The existence of such correlations in the absence of bNAbs in the RV144 trial suggest that NK cells could be instrumental in protecting against HIV infection by limiting viral spread through Fc-mediated functions such as ADCC and the production of antiviral cytokines/chemokines. Beside the engagement of FcγRIIIa or CD16 by the Fc portion of anti-Env IgG1 and IgG3 Abs, natural killer (NK) cells are also able to directly kill infected cells and produce cytokines/chemokines in an Ab-independent manner. Responsiveness of NK cells depends on the integration of activating and inhibitory signals through NK receptors, which is determined by a process during their development known as education. NK cell education requires the engagement of inhibitory NK receptors by their human leukocyte antigen ligands to establish tolerance to self while allowing NK cells to respond to self cells altered by virus infection, transformation, stress, and to allogeneic cells. Here, we review recent findings regarding the impact of inter

  17. Disordered expression of inhibitory receptors on the NK1-type natural killer (NK) leukaemic cells from patients with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites

    PubMed Central

    Seo, N; Tokura, Y; Ishihara, S; Takeoka, Y; Tagawa, S; Takigawa, M

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the existence of a distinct type of NK cell leukaemia of the juvenile type, which presents with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) as an essential clinical manifestation and is infected with clonal Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). This disorder is thus called HMB-EBV-NK disease and has been reported in Orientals, mostly from Japan. We investigated the profile of cytokine production and the expression of both types of NK inhibitory receptors, i.e. CD94 lectin-like dimers and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, in NK leukaemic cells from three patients with HMB-EBV-NK disease. It was found that freshly isolated NK leukaemic cells expressed mRNA for interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and additionally produced IL-10 upon stimulation with IL-2, indicating that the NK cells were of NK1 type. More than 98% of NK cells from the patients bore CD94 at a higher level than did normal NK cells, whereas p70 or NKAT2, belonging to immunoglobulin-like receptor, was not expressed in those NK cells. Freshly isolated leukaemic NK cells transcribed mRNA for CD94-associated molecule NKG2C at an abnormally high level, and upon stimulation with IL-2 and/or IL-12 they expressed NKG2A as well. The disordered expression of these inhibitory receptors not only provides some insights into the pathogenesis of HMB-EBV-NK disease but also can be used as phenotypic markers for the diagnosis of this type of NK cell leukaemia. PMID:10844517

  18. Functional CD32 molecules on human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Morel, P A; Ernst, L K; Metes, D

    1999-09-01

    Human NK cells are large granular lymphocytes that kill neoplastic or virally infected targets using perforin-dependent mechanisms. CD16 or FcgammaRIII is one of the cell surface molecules that can trigger the killing machinery following binding of the Fc portion of IgG to the receptor: a mechanism known as antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We have recently shown that some individuals express an additional FcgammaR on their NK cells, CD32 or FcgammaRII. This receptor has now been characterized at the molecular, biochemical and functional level. The present review outlines our findings to date on the features of this novel receptor. These findings suggest that the presence of a functional FcgammaRII on the surface of NK cells could have important clinical consequences in both tumor immunotherapy and autoimmune disease.

  19. NK cells: walking three paths down memory lane

    PubMed Central

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hendricks, Deborah W.; Nabekura, Tsukasa; Lanier, Lewis L.

    2013-01-01

    Immunological memory has traditionally been regarded as a unique feature of the adaptive immune response, mediated in an antigen-specific manner by T and B lymphocytes. All other hematopoietic cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, are classified as innate immune cells, which have been considered short-lived but can respond rapidly against pathogens in a manner not thought to be driven by antigen. Interestingly, NK cells have recently been shown to survive long term after antigen exposure and subsequently mediate antigen-specific recall responses. In this review, we will address the similarities between, and the controversies surrounding, three major viewpoints of NK memory that have arisen from these recent studies: (i) MCMV (mouse cytomegalovirus)-induced memory; (ii) cytokine-induced memory; (iii) liver-restricted memory cells. PMID:23499559

  20. Targeting NK-cell checkpoints for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Muntasell, Aura; Ochoa, Maria C; Cordeiro, Luna; Berraondo, Pedro; López-Díaz de Cerio, Ascension; Cabo, Mariona; López-Botet, Miguel; Melero, Ignacio

    2017-02-22

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes specialized in early defense against virus-infected and transformed cells. NK-cell function is regulated by activating and inhibitory surface receptors recognizing their ligands on transformed cells. Modulation of NK numbers and/or function by a variety of agents such as cytokines and monoclonal antibodies may result in enhanced anti-tumor activity. Recombinant cytokines (i.e., IL-15 and IL-2), antibodies blocking inhibitory receptors (i.e., KIR, NKG2A and TIGIT) and agonists delivering signals via CD137, NKG2D and CD16 stand out as the most suitable opportunities. These agents can be used to potentiate NKcell- mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against antibody-coated tumor cells, offering potential for multiple combinatorial immunotherapy strategies against cancer.

  1. Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma expressing NK-cell intraepithelial lymphocyte (NK-IEL) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Naoko; Asaoka, Daisuke; Mori, Kiyoshi L; Sohda, Naomi; Miura, Ichiro; Miwa, Hiroto; Sato, Nobuhiro; Oshimi, Kazuo

    2004-07-01

    Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) is an intraepithelial T-lymphocyte (T-IEL) tumor. The tumor cells are usually CD3+, CD4-, CD8+, and contain cytotoxic granule associated proteins. We report on a CD3-negative CD56-positive enteropathy-associated lymphoma (ETL). This is the first case report of CD3-negative, CD56-positive, CD94-negative, and CD161-positive ETL. ETL cells originate from intraepithelial T-lymphocytes of the intestine. CD3-negative intraepithelial lymphocytes are known as natural killer (NK)-IELs. The phenotype of NK-IELs is also CD3-negative, CD56-positive, CD94-negative, and CD161-positive, while most normal NK cells express CD56 and CD94. CD3-negative lymphoma cells in this report also expressed CD56 and CD161, but not CD94. Because Southern blotting analysis showed a rearrangement of T-cell receptor (TCR) Cbeta in this case, the tumor is classified as an ETL. Based on the findings, NK-IELs may originate from T-cells, not NK-cells.

  2. Induced Human Decidual NK-Like Cells Improve Utero-Placental Perfusion in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pernicone, Elizabeth; Korkes, Henri A.; Burke, Suzanne D.; Rajakumar, Augustine; Thadhani, Ravi I.; Roberts, Drucilla J.; Bhasin, Manoj; Karumanchi, S. Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Decidual NK (dNK) cells, a distinct type of NK cell, are thought to regulate uterine spiral artery remodeling, a process that allows for increased blood delivery to the fetal-placental unit. Impairment of uterine spiral artery remodeling is associated with decreased placental perfusion, increased uterine artery resistance, and obstetric complications such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. Ex vivo manipulation of human peripheral blood NK (pNK) cells by a combination of hypoxia, TGFß-1 and 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine yields cells with phenotypic and in vitro functional similarities to dNK cells, called idNK cells. Here, gene expression profiling shows that CD56Bright idNK cells derived ex vivo from human pNK cells, and to a lesser extent CD56Dim idNK cells, are enriched in the gene expression signature that distinguishes dNK cells from pNK cells. When injected into immunocompromised pregnant mice with elevated uterine artery resistance, idNK cells homed to the uterus and reduced the uterine artery resistance index, suggesting improved placental perfusion. PMID:27736914

  3. Mouse host unlicensed NK cells promote donor allogeneic bone marrow engraftment.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maite; Sun, Kai; Murphy, William J

    2016-03-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells exist as subsets based on expression of inhibitory receptors that recognize major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI) molecules. NK cell subsets bearing MHCI binding receptors for self-MHCI have been termed as "licensed" and exhibit a higher ability to respond to stimuli. In the context of bone marrow transplantation (BMT), host licensed-NK (L-NK) cells have also been demonstrated to be responsible for the acute rejection of allogeneic and MHCI-deficient BM cells (BMCs) in mice after lethal irradiation. However, the role of recipient unlicensed-NK (U-NK) cells has not been well established with regard to allogeneic BMC resistance. After NK cell stimulation, the prior depletion of host L-NK cells resulted in a marked increase of donor engraftment compared with the untreated group. Surprisingly, this increased donor engraftment was reduced after total host NK cell depletion, indicating that U-NK cells can actually promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment. Furthermore, direct coculture of U-NK cells with allogeneic but not syngeneic BMCs resulted in increased colony-forming unit cell growth in vitro, which was at least partially mediated by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production. These data demonstrate that host NK cell subsets exert markedly different roles in allogeneic BMC engraftment where host L- and U-NK cells reject or promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment, respectively.

  4. Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells Have a Potential to Produce NK Cells Using IL2Rg Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Khaziri, Nahid; Mohammadi, Momeneh; Aliyari, Zeinab; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Tayefi Nasrabadi, Hamid; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although bone marrow represents the main site for NK cell development and also distinct thymic-dependentNK cell pathway was identified, the cytokines effect on the NK cell generation from cord blood is unclear. Studies were identified the role of cytokines in the regulation of bone marrow and thymic NK cells. Previous studies reported that IL15 are critical for bone marrow dependent and IL7 is important for thymic NK cells. It is remain unclear the cytokines influence on the expantion of NK cells in cord blood mononuclear cells. Methods: We evaluated cultured cord blood mononuclear cells suplememnted with combinations of cytokines using FACS in distinct time points. In this study, we presented the role of IL2, IL7 and IL15 as members of the common gamma receptor -chain (Il2rg) on the expansion NK cells from cord blood cells. Results: By investigating cord blood mononuclear cells in vitro , we demonstrated that IL2 and IL15 are important for expansion of NK cells. IL2 in comparision with IL15 has more influences in NK cell expansion. In contrast IL-7 is dispensable for NK cell generation in cord blood. Conclusion: Thus,IL-2Rg cytokines play complementary roles and are indispensable for homeostasis of NK cell development in cord blood. Probably these cytokines could help to use NK beneficials in engrafment of transplanted cells and Anti tumor activity of NK cells. PMID:27123412

  5. No monkey business: why studying NK cells in non-human primates pays off.

    PubMed

    Hong, Henoch S; Rajakumar, Premeela A; Billingsley, James M; Reeves, R Keith; Johnson, R Paul

    2013-01-01

    Human NK (hNK) cells play a key role in mediating host immune responses against various infectious diseases. For practical reasons, the majority of the data on hNK cells has been generated using peripheral blood lymphocytes. In contrast, our knowledge of NK cells in human tissues is limited, and not much is known about developmental pathways of hNK cell subpopulations in vivo. Although research in mice has elucidated a number of fundamental features of NK cell biology, mouse, and hNK cells significantly differ in their subpopulations, functions, and receptor repertoires. Thus, there is a need for a model that is more closely related to humans and yet allows experimental manipulations. Non-human primate models offer numerous opportunities for the study of NK cells, including the study of the role of NK cells after solid organ and stem cell transplantation, as well as in acute viral infection. Macaque NK cells can be depleted in vivo or adoptively transferred in an autologous system. All of these studies are either difficult or unethical to carry out in humans. Here we highlight recent advances in rhesus NK cell research and their parallels in humans. Using high-throughput transcriptional profiling, we demonstrate that the human CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cell subsets have phenotypically and functionally analogous counterparts in rhesus macaques. Thus, the use of non-human primate models offers the potential to substantially advance hNK cell research.

  6. Orbital involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphoma NK T cells.

    PubMed

    Hervás-Ontiveros, A; España-Gregori, E; Hernández-Martínez, P; Vera-Sempere, F J; Díaz-Llopis, M

    2014-11-01

    The case is presented of 37 year-old male with a history of nasal obstruction with right rhinorrhea, headache, hearing loss and right exophthalmos of 4 months progression. The MRI revealed that the ethmoidal and maxillary sinuses contained inflammatory tissue extending into the orbital region. The biopsy confirmed a non-Hodgkin lymphoma of natural killer (NK) T cells. Non-Hodgkin's T NK lymphoma is a rare tumor in the orbital area that requires an early detection and multi-disciplinary care to ensure appropriate monitoring and treatment. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. NAP-2 Secreted by Human NK Cells Can Stimulate Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Catarina R.; Caires, Hugo R.; Vasconcelos, Daniela P.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Strategies for improved homing of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to a place of injury are being sought and it has been shown that natural killer (NK) cells can stimulate MSC recruitment. Here, we studied the chemokines behind this recruitment. Assays were performed with bone marrow human MSCs and NK cells freshly isolated from healthy donor buffy coats. Supernatants from MSC-NK cell co-cultures can induce MSC recruitment but not to the same extent as when NK cells are present. Antibody arrays and ELISA assays confirmed that NK cells secrete RANTES (CCL5) and revealed that human NK cells secrete NAP-2 (CXCL7), a chemokine that can induce MSC migration. Inhibition with specific antagonists of CXCR2, a receptor that recognizes NAP-2, abolished NK cell-mediated MSC recruitment. This capacity of NK cells to produce chemokines that stimulate MSC recruitment points toward a role for this immune cell population in regulating tissue repair/regeneration. PMID:27052313

  8. NAP-2 Secreted by Human NK Cells Can Stimulate Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cell Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Catarina R; Caires, Hugo R; Vasconcelos, Daniela P; Barbosa, Mário A

    2016-04-12

    Strategies for improved homing of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to a place of injury are being sought and it has been shown that natural killer (NK) cells can stimulate MSC recruitment. Here, we studied the chemokines behind this recruitment. Assays were performed with bone marrow human MSCs and NK cells freshly isolated from healthy donor buffy coats. Supernatants from MSC-NK cell co-cultures can induce MSC recruitment but not to the same extent as when NK cells are present. Antibody arrays and ELISA assays confirmed that NK cells secrete RANTES (CCL5) and revealed that human NK cells secrete NAP-2 (CXCL7), a chemokine that can induce MSC migration. Inhibition with specific antagonists of CXCR2, a receptor that recognizes NAP-2, abolished NK cell-mediated MSC recruitment. This capacity of NK cells to produce chemokines that stimulate MSC recruitment points toward a role for this immune cell population in regulating tissue repair/regeneration.

  9. DNAM-1 expression marks an alternative program of NK cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Ludovic; Ferrari De Andrade, Lucas; Guillerey, Camille; Lee, Jason S; Liu, Jing; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Hutchinson, Dana S; Kolesnik, Tatiana B; Nicholson, Sandra E; Huntington, Nicholas D; Smyth, Mark J

    2015-04-07

    Natural killer (NK) cells comprise a heterogeneous population of cells important for pathogen defense and cancer surveillance. However, the functional significance of this diversity is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate through transcriptional profiling and functional studies that the activating receptor DNAM-1 (CD226) identifies two distinct NK cell functional subsets: DNAM-1(+) and DNAM-1(-) NK cells. DNAM-1(+) NK cells produce high levels of inflammatory cytokines, have enhanced interleukin 15 signaling, and proliferate vigorously. By contrast, DNAM-1(-) NK cells that differentiate from DNAM-1(+) NK cells have greater expression of NK-cell-receptor-related genes and are higher producers of MIP1 chemokines. Collectively, our data reveal the existence of a functional program of NK cell maturation marked by DNAM-1 expression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The antimicrobial peptide NK-2, the core region of mammalian NK-lysin, kills intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gelhaus, Christoph; Jacobs, Thomas; Andrä, Jörg; Leippe, Matthias

    2008-05-01

    In a time of dramatically increasing resistance of microbes to all kinds of antibiotics, natural antimicrobial peptides and synthetic analogs thereof have emerged as compounds with potentially significant therapeutical applications against human pathogens. Only very few of these peptide antibiotics have been tested against protozoan pathogens that are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in large parts of the world. Here, we studied the effect of NK-2, a peptide representing the cationic core region of the lymphocytic effector protein NK-lysin, on the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Whereas noninfected red blood cells were hardly affected, human erythrocytes infected with the parasite were rapidly permeabilized by NK-2 in the micromolar range. Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry and concomitant exposure of phosphatidylserine upon infection appears to be the molecular basis for the observed target preference of NK-2, as can be demonstrated by annexin V binding. The peptide also affects the viability of the intracellular parasite, as evidenced by the drop in DNA content of cultured parasites. Accumulated evidence derived from permeabilization assays using parasites and liposomes as targets and from fluorescence microscopy of infected erythrocytes treated with fluorescently labeled NK-2 indicates that the positively charged peptide electrostatically interacts with the altered and negatively charged plasma membrane of the infected host cell and traverses this membrane as well as the parasitophorous vacuole membrane to reach its final target, the intracellular parasite. The apparent affinity for foreign membranes that resulted in the death of a eukaryotic parasite residing in human host cells makes NK-2 a promising template for novel anti-infectives.

  11. Effect of Fibroblast-Like Cells of Mesenchymal Origin of Cytotoxic Activity of Lymphocytes against NK-Sensitive Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Lupatov, A Yu; Kim, Ya S; Bystrykh, O A; Vakhrushev, I V; Pavlovich, S V; Yarygin, K N; Sukhikh, G T

    2017-02-01

    We studied immunosuppressive properties of skin fibroblasts and mesenchymal stromal cells against NK cells. In vitro experiments showed that mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from human umbilical cord and human skin fibroblasts can considerably attenuate cytotoxic activity of NK cells against Jurkat cells sensitive to NK-mediated lysis. NK cells cultured in lymphocyte population exhibited higher cytotoxic activity than isolated NK cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells or fibroblasts added 1:1 to lymphocyte culture almost completely suppressed NK cell cytotoxicity. This suggests that fibroblast-like cells can suppress not only isolated NK cells, but also NK cells in natural cell microenvironment.

  12. Macrophages help NK cells to attack tumor cells by stimulatory NKG2D ligand but protect themselves from NK killing by inhibitory ligand Qa-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixia; Zhang, Cai; Zhang, Jian; Tian, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and their crosstalk with other immune cells are important for innate immunity against tumor. To explore the role of the interaction between NK cells and macrophages in the regulation of anti-tumor activities of NK cells, we here demonstrate that poly I:C-treated macrophages increased NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against target tumor cells in NKG2D-dependent manner. In addition, IL-15, IL-18, and IFN-β secreted by poly I:C-treated macrophages are also involved in NKG2D expression and NK cell activation. Interestingly, the increase in expression of NKG2D ligands on macrophages induced a highly NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells, but not against macrophages themselves. Notably, a high expression level of Qa-1, a NKG2A ligand, on macrophages may contribute to such protection of macrophages from NK cell-mediated killing. Furthermore, Qa-1 or NKG2A knockdown and Qa-1 antibody blockade caused the macrophages to be sensitive to NK cytolysis. These results suggested that macrophages may activate NK cells to attack tumor by NKG2D recognition whereas macrophages protect themselves from NK lysis via preferential expression of Qa-1.

  13. Larger Size of Donor Alloreactive NK Cell Repertoire Correlates with Better Response to NK Cell Immunotherapy in Elderly Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Curti, Antonio; Ruggeri, Loredana; Parisi, Sarah; Bontadini, Andrea; Dan, Elisa; Motta, Maria Rosa; Rizzi, Simonetta; Trabanelli, Sara; Ocadlikova, Darina; Lecciso, Mariangela; Giudice, Valeria; Fruet, Fiorenza; Urbani, Elena; Papayannidis, Cristina; Martinelli, Giovanni; Bandini, Giuseppe; Bonifazi, Francesca; Lewis, Russell E; Cavo, Michele; Velardi, Andrea; Lemoli, Roberto M

    2016-04-15

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells are crucial mediators of immune responses after haploidentical stem cell transplantation. Allogeneic NK cell infusions have been adoptively transferred with promising clinical results. We aimed at determining whether the composition of NK graft in terms of frequency of alloreactive NK cells influence the clinical response in a group of elderly AML patients undergoing NK immunotherapy. Seventeen AML patients, in first complete remission (CR; median age 64 years, range 53-73) received NK cells from haploidentical KIR-ligand-mismatched donors after fludarabine/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy, followed by IL2. To correlate donor NK cell activity with clinical response, donor NK cells were assessed before and after infusion. Toxicity was moderate, although 1 patient died due to bacterial pneumonia and was censored for clinical follow-up. With a median follow-up of 22.5 months (range, 6-68 months), 9 of 16 evaluable patients (0.56) are alive disease-free, whereas 7 of 16 (0.44) relapsed with a median time to relapse of 9 months (range, 3-51 months). All patients treated with molecular disease achieved molecular CR. A significantly higher number of donor alloreactive NK cell clones was observed in responders over nonresponders. The infusion of higher number of alloreactive NK cells was associated with prolonged disease-free survival (0.81 vs. 0.14, respectively;P= 0.03). Infusion of purified NK cells is feasible in elderly AML patients as post-CR consolidation strategy. The clinical efficacy of adoptively transferred haploidentical NK cells may be improved by infusing high numbers of alloreactive NK cells. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Human NK Cell Subsets in Pregnancy and Disease: Toward a New Biological Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Cristiani, Costanza Maria; Palella, Eleonora; Sottile, Rosa; Tallerico, Rossana; Garofalo, Cinzia; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In humans, NK cells are mainly identified by the surface expression levels of CD56 and CD16, which differentiate between five functionally different NK cell subsets. However, nowadays NK cells are considered as a more heterogeneous population formed by various subsets differing in function, surface phenotype, and anatomic localization. In human CMV- and hantaviruses-infected subjects, an increased frequency of a NKG2A−CD57+NKG2C+ NK cell subset has been observed, while the phenotype of the NK cell subpopulation associated with cancer may vary according to the specific kind of tumor and its anatomical location. The healthy human lymph nodes contain mainly the CD56bright NK cell subset while in melanoma metastatic lymph nodes the CD56dimCD57+KIR+CCR7+ NK cell subpopulation prevails. The five NK cell subpopulations are found in breast cancer patients, where they differ for expression pattern of chemokine receptors, maturation stage, functional capabilities. In pregnancy, uterine NK cells show a prevalence of the CD56brightCD16− NK cell compartment, whose activity is influenced by KIRs repertoire. This NK cell subset’s super specialization could be explained by (i) the expansion of single mature CD56dim clones, (ii) the recruitment and maturation of CD56bright NK cells through specific stimuli, and (iii) the in situ development of tumor-resident NK cells from tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells independently of the circulating NK cell compartment. This new and unexpected biological feature of the NK cell compartment could be an important source of new biomarkers to improve patients’ diagnosis. PMID:28082990

  15. NK cells in gamma-interferon-deficient mice suppress lung innate immunity against Mycoplasma spp.

    PubMed

    Woolard, Matthew D; Hudig, Dorothy; Tabor, Leslie; Ivey, James A; Simecka, Jerry W

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the 100-fold difference in mycoplasma levels in lungs of gamma interferon knockout (IFN-gamma(-/-)) mice compared to those seen with wild-type BALB/c mice at 3 days postinfection. NK cells secreted IFN-gamma; however, their cytotoxic granule extracts failed to kill mycoplasma. We found a conundrum: the clearance of organisms was as effective in NK-depleted IFN-gamma(-/-) animals as in wild-type mice (with both IFN-gamma and NK cells). NK(+) IFN-gamma(-/-) animals had high mycoplasma burdens, but, after NK-like cell depletion, mycoplasma numbers were controlled. Essentially, IFN-gamma was important in animals with NK-like cells and unimportant in animals without NK cells, suggesting that IFN-gamma counters deleterious effects of NK-like cells. Impairment of innate immunity in IFN-gamma(-/-) mice was not due to NK-like cell killing of macrophages. The increased levels of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophils in lung fluids of NK(+) IFN-gamma(-/-) mice were reduced after NK cell depletion. In summary, in the murine model that resembles chronic human disease, innate immunity to mycoplasma requires IFN-gamma when there are NK-like cells and the positive effects of IFN-gamma counteract negative effects of NK-like cells. When imbalanced, NK-like cells promote disease. Thus, it was not the lack of IFN-gamma but the presence of a previously unrecognized NK-like cell-suppressive activity that contributed to the higher mycoplasma numbers. It appears that pulmonary NK cells may contribute to the immunosuppressive environment of the lung, but when needed, these dampening effects can be counterbalanced by IFN-gamma. Furthermore, there may be instances where perturbation of this regulatory balance contributes to the susceptibility to and severity of disease.

  16. Human NK Cell Subsets in Pregnancy and Disease: Toward a New Biological Complexity.

    PubMed

    Cristiani, Costanza Maria; Palella, Eleonora; Sottile, Rosa; Tallerico, Rossana; Garofalo, Cinzia; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In humans, NK cells are mainly identified by the surface expression levels of CD56 and CD16, which differentiate between five functionally different NK cell subsets. However, nowadays NK cells are considered as a more heterogeneous population formed by various subsets differing in function, surface phenotype, and anatomic localization. In human CMV- and hantaviruses-infected subjects, an increased frequency of a NKG2A(-)CD57(+)NKG2C(+) NK cell subset has been observed, while the phenotype of the NK cell subpopulation associated with cancer may vary according to the specific kind of tumor and its anatomical location. The healthy human lymph nodes contain mainly the CD56(bright) NK cell subset while in melanoma metastatic lymph nodes the CD56(dim)CD57(+)KIR(+)CCR7(+) NK cell subpopulation prevails. The five NK cell subpopulations are found in breast cancer patients, where they differ for expression pattern of chemokine receptors, maturation stage, functional capabilities. In pregnancy, uterine NK cells show a prevalence of the CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cell compartment, whose activity is influenced by KIRs repertoire. This NK cell subset's super specialization could be explained by (i) the expansion of single mature CD56(dim) clones, (ii) the recruitment and maturation of CD56(bright) NK cells through specific stimuli, and (iii) the in situ development of tumor-resident NK cells from tissue-resident CD56(bright) NK cells independently of the circulating NK cell compartment. This new and unexpected biological feature of the NK cell compartment could be an important source of new biomarkers to improve patients' diagnosis.

  17. Continuously expanding CAR NK-92 cells display selective cytotoxicity against B-cell leukemia and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Oelsner, Sarah; Friede, Miriam E; Zhang, Congcong; Wagner, Juliane; Badura, Susanne; Bader, Peter; Ullrich, Evelyn; Ottmann, Oliver G; Klingemann, Hans; Tonn, Torsten; Wels, Winfried S

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can rapidly respond to transformed and stressed cells and represent an important effector cell type for adoptive immunotherapy. In addition to donor-derived primary NK cells, continuously expanding cytotoxic cell lines such as NK-92 are being developed for clinical applications. To enhance their therapeutic utility for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, we engineered NK-92 cells by lentiviral gene transfer to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target CD19 and contain human CD3ζ (CAR 63.z), composite CD28-CD3ζ or CD137-CD3ζ signaling domains (CARs 63.28.z and 63.137.z). Exposure of CD19-positive targets to CAR NK-92 cells resulted in formation of conjugates between NK and cancer cells, NK-cell degranulation and selective cytotoxicity toward established B-cell leukemia and lymphoma cells. Likewise, the CAR NK cells displayed targeted cell killing of primary pre-B-ALL blasts that were resistant to parental NK-92. Although all three CAR NK-92 cell variants were functionally active, NK-92/63.137.z cells were less effective than NK-92/63.z and NK-92/63.28.z in cell killing and cytokine production, pointing to differential effects of the costimulatory CD28 and CD137 domains. In a Raji B-cell lymphoma model in NOD-SCID IL2R γ(null) mice, treatment with NK-92/63.z cells, but not parental NK-92 cells, inhibited disease progression, indicating that selective cytotoxicity was retained in vivo. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to generate CAR-engineered NK-92 cells with potent and selective antitumor activity. These cells may become clinically useful as a continuously expandable off-the-shelf cell therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue resident NK cells mediate ischemic kidney injury and are not depleted by anti-Asialo GM1 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Victorino, Francisco; Sojka, Dorothy K.; Brodsky, Kelley S.; McNamee, Eoin N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Homann, Dirk; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Clambey, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    NK cells are innate lymphoid cells important for immune surveillance, identifying and responding to stress, infection, and/or transformation. While conventional NK (cNK) cells circulate systemically, many NK cells reside in tissues where they appear to be poised to locally regulate tissue function. Here we tested the contribution of tissue-resident NK (trNK) cells to tissue homeostasis by studying ischemic injury in the mouse kidney. Parabiosis experiments demonstrate that the kidney contains a significant fraction of trNK cells under homeostatic conditions. Kidney trNK cells developed independent of NFIL3 and Tbet, and expressed a distinct cell surface phenotype as compared to cNK cells. Among these, trNK cells had reduced asialo-GM1 (AsGM1) expression relative to cNK cells, a phenotype observed in trNK cells across multiple organs and mouse strains. Strikingly, anti-AsGM1 antibody treatment, commonly used as NK cell-depleting regimen, resulted in a robust and selective depletion of cNKs, leaving trNKs largely intact. Using this differential depletion, we tested the relative contribution of cNK and trNK cells in ischemic kidney injury. Whereas anti-NK1.1 antibody effectively depleted both trNK and cNK cells and protected against ischemic-reperfusion injury, anti-AsGM1 antibody preferentially depleted cNK cells and failed to protect against injury. These data demonstrate unanticipated specificity of anti-AsGM1 antibody depletion on NK cell subsets and reveal a new approach to study the contributions of cNK and trNK cells in vivo. In total, these data demonstrate that trNK cells play a key role in modulating local responses to ischemic tissue injury in the kidney and potentially other organs. PMID:26453755

  19. The characteristics of NK cells in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mouse spleens.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Cha, Hefei; Yu, Xiuxue; Xie, Hongyan; Wu, Changyou; Dong, Nuo; Huang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are classic innate immune cells that play roles in many types of infectious disease. Recently, some new characteristics of NK cells were discovered. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum for 5-6 weeks and lymphocytes were isolated from the spleen to detect some of the NK cell characteristics by multiparametric flow cytometry. The results revealed that the S. japonicum infection induced a large amount of NK cells, although the percentage of NK cells was not increased significantly. At the same time, the results showed that infected mouse splenic NK cells expressed increased levels of CD25 and CD69 and produced more IL-2, IL-4, and IL-17 and less IFN-γ after stimulation with PMA and ionomycin. This meant that NK cells played a role in S. japonicum infection. Moreover, decreased NKG2A/C/E (CD94) expression levels were detected on the surface of NK cells from infected mouse spleens, which might serve as a NK cell activation mechanism. Additionally, high levels of IL-10, but not PD-1, were expressed on the infected mouse NK cells, which implied that functional exhaustion might exist in the splenic NK cells from S. japonicum-infected mice. Collectively, our results suggest that NK cells play important roles in the course of S. japonicum infection.

  20. TLR ligands stimulation protects MSC from NK killing.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Massimo; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Nanbakhsh, Arash; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Chouaib, Salem; Azzarone, Bruno; Durrbach, Antoine; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a fundamental role in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease through their immunosuppressive abilities. Recently, Toll-like receptors (TLR) have been shown to modulate MSC functions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of several TLR ligands on the interaction between MSC and natural killer (NK) cells. Our results show that TLR-primed adult bone marrow and embryonic MSC are more resistant than unprimed MSC to IL-2-activated NK-induced killing. Such protection can be explained by the modulation of Natural Killer group 2D ligands major histocompatibility complex class I chain A and ULBP3 and DNAM-1 ligands by TLR-primed MSC. These results indicate that MSCs are able to adapt their immuno-behavior in an inflammatory context, decreasing their susceptibility to NK killing. In addition, TLR3 but not TLR4-primed MSC enhance their suppressive functions against NK cells. However, the efficiency of this response is heterogeneous, even if the phenotypes of different analyzed MSC are rather homogeneous. The consequences could be important in MSC-mediated cell therapy, since the heterogeneity of adult MSC responders may be explored in order to select the more efficient responders. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  1. Maternal obesity drives functional alterations in uterine NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdu, Sofie; Castellana, Barbara; Kim, Yoona; Chan, Kathy; DeLuca, Lauren; Beristain, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Over one-fifth of North American women of childbearing age are obese, putting these women at risk for a variety of detrimental chronic diseases. In addition, obesity increases the risk for developing major complications during pregnancy. The mechanisms by which obesity contributes to pregnancy complications and loss remain unknown. Increasing evidence indicates that obesity results in major changes to adipose tissue immune cell composition and function; whether or not obesity also affects immune function in the uterus has not been explored. Here we investigated the effect of obesity on uterine natural killer (uNK) cells, which are essential for uterine artery remodeling and placental development. Using a cohort of obese or lean women, we found that obesity led to a significant reduction in uNK cell numbers accompanied with impaired uterine artery remodeling. uNK cells isolated from obese women had altered expression of genes and pathways associated with extracellular matrix remodeling and growth factor signaling. Specifically, uNK cells were hyper-responsive to PDGF, resulting in overexpression of decorin. Functionally, decorin strongly inhibited placental development by limiting trophoblast survival. Together, these findings establish a potentially new link between obesity and poor pregnancy outcomes, and indicate that obesity-driven changes to uterine-resident immune cells critically impair placental development. PMID:27699222

  2. Biological and Pharmacological Aspects of the NK1-Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Recio, Susana; Gascón, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R) is the main receptor for the tachykinin family of peptides. Substance P (SP) is the major mammalian ligand and the one with the highest affinity. SP is associated with multiple processes: hematopoiesis, wound healing, microvasculature permeability, neurogenic inflammation, leukocyte trafficking, and cell survival. It is also considered a mitogen, and it has been associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis. Tachykinins and their receptors are widely expressed in various human systems such as the nervous, cardiovascular, genitourinary, and immune system. Particularly, NK-1R is found in the nervous system and in peripheral tissues and are involved in cellular responses such as pain transmission, endocrine and paracrine secretion, vasodilation, and modulation of cell proliferation. It also acts as a neuromodulator contributing to brain homeostasis and to sensory neuronal transmission associated with depression, stress, anxiety, and emesis. NK-1R and SP are present in brain regions involved in the vomiting reflex (the nucleus tractus solitarius and the area postrema). This anatomical localization has led to the successful clinical development of antagonists against NK-1R in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). The first of these antagonists, aprepitant (oral administration) and fosaprepitant (intravenous administration), are prescribed for high and moderate emesis. PMID:26421291

  3. Efficient Killing of Murine Pluripotent Stem Cells by Natural Killer (NK) Cells Requires Activation by Cytokines and Partly Depends on the Activating NK Receptor NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, Carina; Hübscher, Daniela; Nolte, Jessica; Monecke, Sebastian; Sasse, André; Elsner, Leslie; Paulus, Walter; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Polić, Bojan; Mansouri, Ahmed; Guan, Kaomei; Dressel, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role as cytotoxic effector cells, which scan the organism for infected or tumorigenic cells. Conflicting data have been published whether NK cells can also kill allogeneic or even autologous pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and which receptors are involved. A clarification of this question is relevant since an activity of NK cells against PSCs could reduce the risk of teratoma growth after transplantation of PSC-derived grafts. Therefore, the hypothesis has been tested that the activity of NK cells against PSCs depends on cytokine activation and specifically on the activating NK receptor NKG2D. It is shown that a subcutaneous injection of autologous iPSCs failed to activate NK cells against these iPSCs and can give rise to teratomas. In agreement with this result, several PSC lines, including two iPSC, two embryonic stem cell (ESC), and two so-called multipotent adult germline stem cell (maGSC) lines, were largely resistant against resting NK cells although differences in killing were found at low level. All PSC lines were killed by interleukin (IL)-2-activated NK cells, and maGSCs were better killed than the other PSC types. The PSCs expressed ligands of the activating NK receptor NKG2D and NKG2D-deficient NK cells from Klrk1(-)(/)(-) mice were impaired in their cytotoxic activity against PSCs. The low-cytotoxic activity of resting NK cells was almost completely dependent on NKG2D. The cytotoxic activity of IL-2-activated NKG2D-deficient NK cells against PSCs was reduced, indicating that also other activating receptors on cytokine-activated NK cells must be engaged by ligands on PSCs. Thus, NKG2D is an important activating receptor involved in killing of murine PSCs. However, NK cells need to be activated by cytokines before they efficiently target PSCs and then also other NK receptors become relevant. These features of NK cells might be relevant for transplantation of PSC-derived grafts since NK cells have the capability

  4. The NK1 receptor antagonist L822429 reduces heroin reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects.

  5. The NK1 Receptor Antagonist L822429 Reduces Heroin Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects. PMID:23303056

  6. Perturbation of NK cell peripheral homeostasis accelerates prostate carcinoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Lu, Shengjun; Wang, Xuanjun; Page, Stephanie T.; Higano, Celestia S.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Sun, Shaoli; Li, Zihai; Wu, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    The activating receptor NK cell group 2 member D (NKG2D) mediates antitumor immunity in experimental animal models. However, whether NKG2D ligands contribute to tumor suppression or progression clinically remains controversial. Here, we have described 2 novel lines of “humanized” bi-transgenic (bi-Tg) mice in which native human NKG2D ligand MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence B (MICB) or the engineered membrane-restricted MICB (MICB.A2) was expressed in the prostate of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Bi-Tg TRAMP/MICB mice exhibited a markedly increased incidence of progressed carcinomas and metastasis, whereas TRAMP/MICB.A2 mice enjoyed long-term tumor-free survival conferred by sustained NKG2D-mediated antitumor immunity. Mechanistically, we found that cancer progression in TRAMP/MICB mice was associated with loss of the peripheral NK cell pool owing to high serum levels of tumor-derived soluble MICB (sMICB). Prostate cancer patients also displayed reduction of peripheral NK cells and high sMIC levels. Our study has not only provided direct evidence in “humanized” mouse models that soluble and membrane-restricted NKG2D ligands pose opposite impacts on cancer progression, but also uncovered a mechanism of sMIC-induced impairment of NK cell antitumor immunity. Our findings suggest that the impact of soluble NKG2D ligands should be considered in NK cell–based cancer immunotherapy and that our unique mouse models should be valuable for therapy optimization. PMID:24018560

  7. NK cells activated by Interleukin-4 in cooperation with Interleukin-15 exhibit distinctive characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kiniwa, Tsuyoshi; Enomoto, Yutaka; Terazawa, Natsumi; Omi, Ai; Miyata, Naoko; Ishiwata, Kenji; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known to be activated by Th1-type cytokines, such as IL-2, -12, or -18, and they secrete a large amount of IFN-γ that accelerates Th1-type responses. However, the roles of NK cells in Th2-type responses have remained unclear. Because IL-4 acts as an initiator of Th2-type responses, we examined the characteristics of NK cells in mice overexpressing IL-4. In this study, we report that IL-4 overexpression induces distinctive characteristics of NK cells (B220high/CD11blow/IL-18Rαlow), which are different from mature conventional NK (cNK) cells (B220low/CD11bhigh/IL-18Rαhigh). IL-4 overexpression induces proliferation of tissue-resident macrophages, which contributes to NK cell proliferation via production of IL-15. These IL-4–induced NK cells (IL4-NK cells) produce higher levels of IFN-γ, IL-10, and GM-CSF, and exhibit high cytotoxicity compared with cNK cells. Furthermore, incubation of cNK cells with IL-15 and IL-4 alters their phenotype to that similar to IL4-NK cells. Finally, parasitic infection, which typically causes strong Th2-type responses, induces the development of NK cells with characteristics similar to IL4-NK cells. These IL4-NK–like cells do not develop in IL-4Rα KO mice by parasitic infection. Collectively, these results suggest a novel role of IL-4 in immune responses through the induction of the unique NK cells. PMID:27551096

  8. Listeria monocytogenes infection differentially affects expression of ligands for NK cells and NK cell responses, depending on the cell type infected.

    PubMed

    Shegarfi, Hamid; Rolstad, Bent; Kane, Kevin P; Nestvold, Janne

    2016-04-22

    The pivotal role of NK cells in viral infection is extensively studied, whereas the role of NK cells in bacterial infection has been poorly investigated. Here, we have examined how Listeria monocytogenes (LM) affects expression of ligands for NK cell receptors and subsequent NK cell responses, depending on the type of cell infected. LM infected rat cell lines derived from different tissues were coincubated with splenic NK cells, and NK cell proliferation and IFN-γ production were measured. In addition, expression of ligands for the NK cell receptors Ly49 and NK cell receptor protein 1 (NKR-P1), MHC class I and C-type lectin-related molecules, respectively, was assessed. Infected pleural R2 cells, but not epithelium-derived colon carcinoma cell line CC531 cells, induced proliferation of NK cells. Reporter cells expressing the inhibitory NKR-P1G receptor or the activating NKR-P1F receptor were less stimulated under incubation with infected CC531 cells versus uninfected CC531 controls, suggesting that the ligand(s) in question were down-regulated by infection. Conversely, LM infection of R2 cells did not affect reporter cell stimulation compared with uninfected R2 controls. We characterized a rat monocyte cell line, termed RmW cells. In contrast to LM infected R2 cells that up-regulate MHC class I molecules, RmW cells displayed unchanged MHC class I expression following infection. In line with MHC class I expression, more NK cells produced a higher amount of IFN-γ against infected R2 cells compared with RmW cells. Together, L. monocytogenes infection may variously regulate cellular ligands for NK cells, depending on the cell type infected, affecting the outcome of NK cell responses.

  9. Absence of circulating natural killer (NK) cells in a child with erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis lacking NK cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, H.; Komiyama, A.; Aoyama, K.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1988-06-01

    A 5-year-old girl who was diagnosed as having erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis died at age 9 years. Peripheral lymphocytes from the patient persistently lacked natural killer (NK) cell activity during the 4-year observation period: the percent lysis values as measured by a 4-hr /sup 51/Cr release assay at a 40:1 effector:target ratio were below 1.0% against K562 and Molt-4 cells as compared with the normal lymphocyte value (mean +/- SD) of 46.2% +/- 5.8% and 43.9% +/- 6.7%, respectively. The patient's lymphocytes never developed NK cell activity by their incubation with target cells for longer time periods or by their stimulation with interferon-alpha, interleukin-2, or polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid. Single cell-in-agarose assay showed the absence of target-binding cells (TBCs): TBC numbers were below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 8.1% +/- 1.3% (mean +/- SD). Flow cytometry showed a marked decrease in Leu-7+ cells (1.7%) and the absence of Leu-11+ cells (0.4%) in the peripheral blood. These results first demonstrate a case of erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in which there is the lack of NK cell activity due to the absence of circulating NK cells.

  10. The unconventional expression of IL-15 and its role in NK cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Nicholas D

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the founding members of the innate lymphoid cell family and contribute to the rapid production of inflammatory mediators upon pathogen detection. The evolution of receptors for self major histocompatibility complex-I and stress-induced ligands also bestows upon NK cells an important effector role in the clearance of virus-infected and transformed cells. NK cells are dependent on the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin (IL)-15 for their development, differentiation and optimal function. Here I review the regulation of IL-15 in vivo, its role in driving NK cell differentiation and discuss the function of NK cell diversification with regard to innate immunity.

  11. Purification of human NK cell developmental intermediates from lymph nodes and tonsils.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Accumulating data indicate that human natural killer (NK) cells undergo terminal maturation in secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) including lymph nodes (LNs) and tonsils. In addition, recent studies have revealed that maturing NK cells progress through at least five functionally discrete stages of development within SLTs. These discoveries provide unique possibilities for researchers to investigate the natural processes governing human NK cell development, as they exist in vivo, through analysis of NK cell maturational intermediates found in situ. Herein we describe a detailed, yet simple, four-step protocol for the viable enrichment and purification of human NK cell developmental intermediates from LNs and tonsils.

  12. Plasmid Vector-Linked Maturation of Natural Killer (NK) Cells Is Coupled to Antigen-Dependent NK Cell Activation during DNA-Based Immunization in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ren; Mancini-Bourgine, Maryline; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Bayard, Florence; Deng, Qiang; Michel, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid DNA vaccines serve in a wide array of applications ranging from prophylactic vaccines to potential therapeutic tools against infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms underlying the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and their potential role in adaptive immunity during DNA-based immunization against hepatitis B virus surface antigen in mice. We observed that the mature Mac-1+ CD27− NK cell subset increased in the liver of mice early after DNA injection, whereas the number of the less mature Mac-1+ CD27+ NK cells in the liver and spleen was significantly reduced. This effect was attributed to bacterial sequences present in the plasmid backbone rather than to the encoded antigen and was not observed in immunized MyD88-deficient mice. The activation of NK cells by plasmid-DNA injection was associated with an increase in their effector functions that depended on the expressed antigen. Maturation of NK cells was abrogated in the absence of T cells, suggesting that cross talk exists between NK cells and antigen-specific T cells. Taken together, our data unravel the mechanics of plasmid vector-induced maturation of NK cells and plasmid-encoded antigen-dependent activation of NK cells required for a crucial role of NK cells in DNA vaccine-induced immunogenicity. PMID:21775455

  13. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein is required for NK cell cytotoxicity and colocalizes with actin to NK cell-activating immunologic synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orange, Jordan S.; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen; Sasahara, Yoji; Koopman, Louise; Byrne, Michael; Bonilla, Francisco A.; Rosen, Fred S.; Geha, Raif S.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2002-08-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by a mutation in WAS protein (WASp) that results in defective actin polymerization. Although the function of many hematopoietic cells requires WASp, the specific expression and function of this molecule in natural killer (NK) cells is unknown. Here, we report that WAS patients have increased percentages of peripheral blood NK cells and that fresh enriched NK cells from two patients with a WASp mutation have defective cytolytic function. In normal NK cells, WASp was expressed and localized to the activating immunologic synapse (IS) with filamentous actin (F-actin). Perforin also localized to the NK cell-activating IS but at a lesser frequency than F-actin and WASp. The accumulation of F-actin and WASp at the activating IS was decreased significantly in NK cells that had been treated with the inhibitor of actin polymerization, cytochalasin D. NK cells from WAS patients lacked expression of WASp and accumulated F-actin at the activating IS infrequently. Thus, WASp has an important function in NK cells. In patients with WASp mutations, the resulting NK cell defects are likely to contribute to their disease.

  14. Reversal of tumor acidosis by systemic buffering reactivates NK cells to express IFN-γ and induces NK cell-dependent lymphoma control without other immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Pötzl, Johann; Roser, David; Bankel, Lorenz; Hömberg, Nadine; Geishauser, Albert; Brenner, Christoph D; Weigand, Michael; Röcken, Martin; Mocikat, Ralph

    2017-05-01

    Like other immune cells, natural killer (NK) cells show impaired effector functions in the microenvironment of tumors, but little is known on the underlying mechanisms. Since lactate acidosis, a hallmark of malignant tissue, was shown to contribute to suppression of effective antitumor immune responses, we investigated the impact of tissue pH and lactate concentration on NK-cell functions in an aggressive model of endogenously arising B-cell lymphoma. The progressive loss of IFN-γ production by NK cells observed during development of this disease could be ascribed to decreased pH values and lactate accumulation in the microenvironment of growing tumors. Interestingly, IFN-γ expression by lymphoma-derived NK cells could be restored by transfer of these cells into a normal micromilieu. Likewise, systemic alkalization by oral delivery of bicarbonate to lymphoma-developing mice was capable of enhancing IFN-γ expression in NK cells and increasing the NK-cell numbers in the lymphoid organs where tumors were growing. By contrast, NK-cell cytotoxicity was dampened in vivo by tumor-dependent mechanisms that seemed to be different from lactate acidosis and could not be restored in a normal milieu. Most importantly, alkalization and the concomitant IFN-γ upregulation in NK cells were sufficient to significantly delay tumor growth without any other immunotherapy. This effect was strictly dependent on NK cells.

  15. HIV-1-Specific T Cell-Dependent Natural Killer (NK) Cell Activation: Major Contribution by NK Cells to Interferon-γ Production in Response to HIV-1 Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christopher P.; Long, Brian R.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Natural killer (NK) cells can directly recognize virus-infected cells. Here, we demonstrate that NK cells also produce interferon (IFN)-γ in an HIV-1-specific, T cell-dependent manner. After stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-1-infected individuals with HIV-1-derived peptides, up to half of the IFN-γ-producing PBMCs are NK cells. These results indicate that T cell-dependent NK cell IFN-γ production can be important for immune control of HIV-1, and have implications for the interpretation of data from vaccine trials using ELISPOT and ELISA. PMID:19500013

  16. NK cell killing of AML and ALL blasts by Killer-Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) negative NK cells after NKG2A and LIR-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Godal, Robert; Bachanova, Veronika; Gleason, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Yun, Gong H.; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R.; McGlave, Philip B.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Although NK cell alloreactivity has been dominated by studies of KIR, we hypothesized that NKG2A and LIR-1, present on 53±13% and 36±18% of normal NK cells, plays a role in NK cell killing of primary leukemia targets. KIR− cells, which comprise nearly half of the circulating NK cell population, exhibited tolerance to primary leukemia targets, suggesting signaling through other inhibitory receptors. Both AML and ALL targets could be rendered susceptible to lysis by fresh resting KIR− NK cells when inhibitory receptor-MHC class I interactions were blocked by pan-HLA antibodies demonstrating that these cells were functionally competent. Blockade of a single inhibitory receptor resulted in slight increases in killing, while combined LIR-1 and NKG2A blockade consistently resulted in increased NK cell cytotoxicity. Dual blockade of NKG2A and LIR-1 led to significant killing of targets by resting KIR− NK cells showing that this population is not hyporesponsive. Together these results suggest that alloreactivity of a significant fraction of KIR− NK cells is determined by NKG2A and LIR-1. Thus strategies to interrupt NKG2A and LIR-1 in combination with anti-KIR blockade hold promise for exploiting NK cell therapy in acute leukemia. PMID:20139023

  17. Selection and expansion of natural killer cells for NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Petra S A; Suck, Garnet; Nowakowska, Paulina; Ullrich, Evelyn; Seifried, Erhard; Bader, Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been used in several clinical trials as adaptive immunotherapy. The low numbers of these cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have resulted in various approaches to preferentially expand primary NK cells from PBMC. While some clinical trials have used the addition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) to co-stimulate the expansion of purified NK cells from allogeneic donors, recent studies have shown promising results in achieving in vitro expansion of NK cells to large numbers for adoptive immunotherapy. NK cell expansion requires multiple cell signals for survival, proliferation and activation. Thus, expansion strategies have been focused either to substitute these factors using autologous feeder cells or to use genetically modified allogeneic feeder cells. Recent developments in the clinical use of genetically modified NK cell lines with chimeric antigen receptors, the development of expansion protocols for the clinical use of NK cell from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are challenging improvements for NK cell-based immunotherapy. Transfer of several of these protocols to clinical-grade production of NK cells necessitates adaptation of good manufacturing practice conditions, and the development of freezing conditions to establish NK cell stocks will require some effort and, however, should enhance the therapeutic options of NK cells in clinical medicine.

  18. Upregulation of thioredoxin-1 in activated human NK cells confers increased tolerance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Kousaku; Kua, Ley-Fang; Shimasaki, Noriko; Shiraishi, Kensuke; Nakajima, Shotaro; Siang, Lim Kee; Shabbir, Asim; So, Jimmy; Yong, Wei-Peng; Kono, Koji

    2017-02-21

    Adoptive transfer of immune cells, such as T lymphocytes and NK cells, has potential to control cancer growth. However, this can be counteracted by immune escape mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment, including those mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we determined the levels of anti-oxidant molecules in NK cells and their capacity to overcome ROS-induced immune suppression. We investigated the effect of H2O2 on resting NK cells, IL-2-activated NK cells and NK cells expanded by coculture with the K562 leukemia cell line genetically modified to express membrane-bound IL-15 and 4-1BB ligand (K562-mb15-41BBL). Expression of anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic genes was evaluated by expression array, and protein levels of anti-oxidant molecules by Western blot. Activated NK cells, IL-2-activated NK cells and NK cells expanded by K562-mb15-41BBL were significantly more resistant to H2O2-induced cell death than resting NK. Thioredoxin-1 (TXN1) and peroxiredoxin-1 (PRDX1) were also up-regulated in activated NK cells. Moreover, H2O2-induced cell death after IL-2 activation was significantly induced in the presence of an anti-TXN1-neutralising antibody. Collectively, these data document that activated NK cells can resist to H2O2-induced cell death by up-regulation of TXN1.

  19. Licensed and Unlicensed NK Cells: Differential Roles in Cancer and Viral Control.

    PubMed

    Tu, Megan M; Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known for their well characterized ability to control viral infections and eliminate tumor cells. Through their repertoire of activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cells are able to survey different potential target cells for various surface markers, such as MHC-I - which signals to the NK cell that the target is healthy - as well as stress ligands or viral proteins, which alert the NK cell to the aberrant state of the target and initiate a response. According to the "licensing" hypothesis, interactions between self-specific MHC-I receptors - Ly49 in mice and KIR in humans - and self-MHC-I molecules during NK cell development is crucial for NK cell functionality. However, there also exists a large proportion of NK cells in mice and humans, which lack self-specific MHC-I receptors and are consequentially "unlicensed." While the licensed NK cell subset plays a major role in the control of MHC-I-deficient tumors, this review will go on to highlight the important role of the unlicensed NK cell subset in the control of MHC-I-expressing tumors, as well as in viral control. Unlike the licensed NK cells, unlicensed NK cells seem to benefit from the lack of self-specific inhibitory receptors, which could otherwise be exploited by some aberrant cells for immunoevasion by upregulating the expression of ligands or mimic ligands for these receptors.

  20. Biallelic mutations in IRF8 impair human NK cell maturation and function

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Gunesch, Justin T.; Chinn, Ivan K.; Angelo, Laura S.; Maisuria, Sheetal; Keller, Michael D.; Togi, Sumihito; Watkin, Levi B.; LaRosa, David F.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep; Smith, Jansen B.; Hernández-Sanabria, Mayra; Le, Duy T.; Hogg, Graham D.; Cao, Tram N.; Freud, Aharon G.; Szymanski, Eva P.; Collin, Matthew; Cant, Andrew J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Holland, Steven M.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Ozato, Keiko; Paust, Silke; Doody, Gina M.; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cell deficiencies are rare yet result in severe and often fatal disease, particularly as a result of viral susceptibility. NK cells develop from hematopoietic stem cells, and few monogenic errors that specifically interrupt NK cell development have been reported. Here we have described biallelic mutations in IRF8, which encodes an interferon regulatory factor, as a cause of familial NK cell deficiency that results in fatal and severe viral disease. Compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in IRF8 in 3 unrelated families resulted in a paucity of mature CD56dim NK cells and an increase in the frequency of the immature CD56bright NK cells, and this impairment in terminal maturation was also observed in Irf8–/–, but not Irf8+/–, mice. We then determined that impaired maturation was NK cell intrinsic, and gene expression analysis of human NK cell developmental subsets showed that multiple genes were dysregulated by IRF8 mutation. The phenotype was accompanied by deficient NK cell function and was stable over time. Together, these data indicate that human NK cells require IRF8 for development and functional maturation and that dysregulation of this function results in severe human disease, thereby emphasizing a critical role for NK cells in human antiviral defense. PMID:27893462

  1. NK cell trafficking in health and autoimmunity:a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an important subpopulation of lymphocytes that are distributed throughout the body. The development of NK cells primarily occurs in the bone marrow during adult life, involving several putative intermediate stages that finally result in functional maturation. At steady state, NK cell egress from the bone marrow to various peripheral areas is controlled by a network of adhesion molecules, including integrins, selectins, and chemokine receptors and their corresponding ligands. NK cells at different developmental stages express distinct repertoire of adhesion molecules and can therefore be recruited to different sites of the body, including lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues, and NK cells undergo further differentiation driven by local microenvironmental signals, resulting in unique tissue-specific NK cells. Through their abilities of cytotoxicity and cytokine production, NK cells not only play key roles in the innate immune system, but also participate in shaping adaptive immune responses. On the basis of their heterogeneity in phenotype, function, and tissue distribution, NK cells can be further subdivided into distinct subsets. Under pathological conditions, such as in autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases, as local microenvironment changes, NK cell subsets would redistribute between tissues and organs and rapidly accumulate at the local pathological sites to exert their effector functions. Here, we describe the development and tissue distribution of NK cell subsets in mice and humans. We focus on the trafficking of NK cell subsets within the bone marrow and emigration into periphery at steady state, and molecular mechanisms involved in their trafficking in autoimmune diseases.

  2. The Correlation between NK Cell and Liver Function in Patients with Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiao-Hui; Min, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to detect the expression of natural killer (NK) cell receptor natural killer group 2D (NKG2D) in the peripheral blood of patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and to discuss the correlation between NK cell cytotoxicity and liver function. Methods The number of NK cells and the expression of NK cell receptor NKG2D in peripheral blood were determined by flow cytometry in patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatitis B cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis B, and healthy controls. Results When compared with patients in the healthy and the chronic hepatitis B groups, the primary hepatocellular carcinoma group showed significant decreases in all parameters, including the cytotoxicity of NK cells on K562 cells, expression rate of NKG2D in NK cells, number of NKG2D+ NK cells, expression level of NKG2D, and number of NK cells (p<0.05). The activity of NK cells showed a positive correlation, whereas the Child-Pugh scores in the primary hepatocellular carcinoma and the hepatitis B cirrhosis groups showed a negative correlation with all parameters detected above. Conclusions The decrease of NK cell activity in patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma is closely related to their lower expression of NKG2D. Liver function affects the expression of NKG2D and the activity of NK cells. PMID:24827627

  3. Recruitment and Activation of Natural Killer (Nk) Cells in Vivo Determined by the Target Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Rickard; Franksson, Lars; Une, Clas; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Öhlén, Claes; Örn, Anders; Kärre, Klas

    2000-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can spontaneously lyse certain virally infected and transformed cells. However, early in immune responses NK cells are further activated and recruited to tissue sites where they perform effector functions. This process is dependent on cytokines, but it is unclear if it is regulated by NK cell recognition of susceptible target cells. We show here that infiltration of activated NK cells into the peritoneal cavity in response to tumor cells is controlled by the tumor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I phenotype. Tumor cells lacking appropriate MHC class I expression induced NK cell infiltration, cytotoxic activation, and induction of transcription of interferon γ in NK cells. The induction of these responses was inhibited by restoration of tumor cell MHC class I expression. The NK cells responding to MHC class I–deficient tumor cells were ∼10 times as active as endogenous NK cells on a per cell basis. Although these effector cells showed a typical NK specificity in that they preferentially killed MHC class I–deficient cells, this specificity was even more distinct during induction of the intraperitoneal response. Observations are discussed in relation to a possible adaptive component of the NK response, i.e., recruitment/activation in response to challenges that only NK cells are able to neutralize. PMID:10620611

  4. Biallelic mutations in IRF8 impair human NK cell maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Mace, Emily M; Bigley, Venetia; Gunesch, Justin T; Chinn, Ivan K; Angelo, Laura S; Care, Matthew A; Maisuria, Sheetal; Keller, Michael D; Togi, Sumihito; Watkin, Levi B; LaRosa, David F; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep; Smith, Jansen B; Hernández-Sanabria, Mayra; Le, Duy T; Hogg, Graham D; Cao, Tram N; Freud, Aharon G; Szymanski, Eva P; Savic, Sinisa; Collin, Matthew; Cant, Andrew J; Gibbs, Richard A; Holland, Steven M; Caligiuri, Michael A; Ozato, Keiko; Paust, Silke; Doody, Gina M; Lupski, James R; Orange, Jordan S

    2017-01-03

    Human NK cell deficiencies are rare yet result in severe and often fatal disease, particularly as a result of viral susceptibility. NK cells develop from hematopoietic stem cells, and few monogenic errors that specifically interrupt NK cell development have been reported. Here we have described biallelic mutations in IRF8, which encodes an interferon regulatory factor, as a cause of familial NK cell deficiency that results in fatal and severe viral disease. Compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in IRF8 in 3 unrelated families resulted in a paucity of mature CD56dim NK cells and an increase in the frequency of the immature CD56bright NK cells, and this impairment in terminal maturation was also observed in Irf8-/-, but not Irf8+/-, mice. We then determined that impaired maturation was NK cell intrinsic, and gene expression analysis of human NK cell developmental subsets showed that multiple genes were dysregulated by IRF8 mutation. The phenotype was accompanied by deficient NK cell function and was stable over time. Together, these data indicate that human NK cells require IRF8 for development and functional maturation and that dysregulation of this function results in severe human disease, thereby emphasizing a critical role for NK cells in human antiviral defense.

  5. Immunological and Translational Aspects of NK Cell-Based Antitumor Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Maxim; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role in the first line of defense against cancer. NK cells that are deficient in CD3 and a clonal T cell receptor (TCR) can be subdivided into two major subtypes, CD56dimCD16+ cytotoxic and CD56brightCD16− immunoregulatory NK cells. Cytotoxic NK cells not only directly kill tumor cells without previous stimulation by cytotoxic effector molecules, such as perforin and granzymes or via death receptor interactions, but also act as regulatory cells for the immune system by secreting cytokines and chemokines. The aim of this review is to highlight therapeutic strategies utilizing autologous and allogenic NK cells, combinations of NK cells with monoclonal antibodies to induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, or immune checkpoint inhibitors. Additionally, we discuss the use of chimeric antigen receptor-engineered NK cells in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27891129

  6. Natural Killers Are Made Not Born: How to Exploit NK Cells in Lung Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, progress has been made in the characterization of natural killer (NK) cells in lung malignancies, and we have now gained a better understanding of the frequency, localization, phenotype, and functional status of NK cells infiltrating these tumors. NK cell subset recruited in lung cancer is mainly capable of producing relevant cytokines rather than exerting direct cancer cell killing. Thus, the relevance of NK cells in tumor microenvironment might also go beyond the killing of tumor cells, being NK cells endowed with regulatory functions toward an ample array of immune effectors. Nevertheless, boosting their cytotoxic functions and redirecting the migration of cytotoxic NK cell subset to the tumor site might open new therapeutic avenues for lung cancer. Also, we believe that a deeper investigation into the impact of both conventional (e.g., chemotherapy) or new therapies (e.g., anti-immune checkpoints mAbs) on NK cell homeostasis in lung cancer patients is now required. PMID:28348567

  7. Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Line; Idorn, Manja; Olofsson, Gitte H; Lauenborg, Britt; Nookaew, Intawat; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Becker, Jürgen C; Pedersen, Katrine S; Dethlefsen, Christine; Nielsen, Jens; Gehl, Julie; Pedersen, Bente K; Thor Straten, Per; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-03-08

    Regular exercise reduces the risk of cancer and disease recurrence. Yet the mechanisms behind this protection remain to be elucidated. In this study, tumor-bearing mice randomized to voluntary wheel running showed over 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across five different tumor models. Microarray analysis revealed training-induced upregulation of pathways associated with immune function. NK cell infiltration was significantly increased in tumors from running mice, whereas depletion of NK cells enhanced tumor growth and blunted the beneficial effects of exercise. Mechanistic analyses showed that NK cells were mobilized by epinephrine, and blockade of β-adrenergic signaling blunted training-dependent tumor inhibition. Moreover, epinephrine induced a selective mobilization of IL-6-sensitive NK cells, and IL-6-blocking antibodies blunted training-induced tumor suppression, intratumoral NK cell infiltration, and NK cell activation. Together, these results link exercise, epinephrine, and IL-6 to NK cell mobilization and redistribution, and ultimately to control of tumor growth.

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Enhances NK Cell Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tschan-Plessl, Astrid; Stern, Martin; Schmied, Laurent; Retière, Christelle; Hirsch, Hans H.; Garzoni, Christian; van Delden, Christian; Boggian, Katia; Mueller, Nicolas J.; Berger, Christoph; Villard, Jean; Manuel, Oriol; Meylan, Pascal; Terszowski, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Background Occurring frequently after solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication remains a relevant cause of mortality and morbidity in affected patients. Despite these adverse effects, an increased alloreactivity of natural killer (NK) cells after CMV infection has been assumed, but the underlying physiopathological mechanisms have remained elusive. Methods We used serial analyses of NK cells before and after CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients as an in vivo model for CMV primary infection to explore the imprint of CMV infection using every patient as their own control: We analyzed NK cell phenotype and function in 47 CMV seronegative recipients of CMV seropositive kidney grafts, who developed CMV primary infection posttransplant. Seronegative recipients of seronegative kidney grafts served as controls. Results We observed a significant increase of NKG2C expressing NK cells after CMV infection (mean increase, 17.5%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 10.2-24.9, P < 0.001), whereas cluster of differentiation (CD)57 expressing cells decreased (mean decrease, 14.1%; 95% CI, 8.0-20.2; P < 0.001). Analysis of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) expression showed an increase of cells expressing KIR2DL1 as their only inhibitory KIR in patients carrying the cognate ligand HLA-C2 (mean increase, 10.0%; 95% CI, 1.7-18.3; P = 0.018). In C2-negative individuals, KIR2DL1 expression decreased (mean decrease, 3.9%; 95% CI, 1.6-6.2; P = 0.001). As for activating KIR, there was no conclusive change pattern. Most importantly, we observed a significantly higher NK cell degranulation and IFNγ production in response to different target cells (target K562, CD107a: mean increase, 9.9%; 95% CI, 4.8-15.0; P < 0.001; IFNγ: mean increase, 6.6%; 95% CI, 1.6-11.1; P < 0.001; target MRC-5, CD107a: mean increase, 6.9%; 95% CI, 0.7-13.1; P = 0.03; IFNγ: mean increase, 4.8%; 95% CI, 1.7-7.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions We report

  9. Ex Vivo Expanded Adaptive NK Cells Effectively Kill Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lisa L; Béziat, Vivien; Oei, Vincent Y S; Pfefferle, Aline; Schaffer, Marie; Lehmann, Sören; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Söderhäll, Stefan; Heyman, Mats; Grandér, Dan; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2017-08-01

    Manipulation of human natural killer (NK) cell repertoires promises more effective strategies for NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy. A subset of highly differentiated NK cells, termed adaptive NK cells, expands naturally in vivo in response to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, carries unique repertoires of inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), and displays strong cytotoxicity against tumor cells. Here, we established a robust and scalable protocol for ex vivo generation and expansion of adaptive NK cells for cell therapy against pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Culture of polyclonal NK cells together with feeder cells expressing HLA-E, the ligand for the activating NKG2C receptor, led to selective expansion of adaptive NK cells with enhanced alloreactivity against HLA-mismatched targets. The ex vivo expanded adaptive NK cells gradually obtained a more differentiated phenotype and were specific and highly efficient killers of allogeneic pediatric T- and precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) blasts, previously shown to be refractory to killing by autologous NK cells and the NK-cell line NK92 currently in clinical testing. Selective expansion of NK cells that express one single inhibitory KIR for self-HLA class I would allow exploitation of the full potential of NK-cell alloreactivity in cancer immunotherapy. In summary, our data suggest that adaptive NK cells may hold utility for therapy of refractory ALL, either as a bridge to transplant or for patients that lack stem cell donors. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(8); 654-65. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Cloning of a C-terminally truncated NK-1 receptor from guinea-pig nervous system.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sarah J; Morris, Judy L; Gibbins, Ian L

    2003-03-17

    In order to examine the possibility that some actions of substance P may be mediated by a variant of the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor, we isolated and sequenced the cDNA encoding a truncated NK-1 receptor from guinea-pig celiac ganglion and brain mRNA by two-step RT-PCR based on the 3'RACE method. The truncated NK-1 receptor sequence corresponded to a splice variant missing the final exon 5, and encoded a 311-amino acid protein that was truncated just after transmembrane domain 7, in an identical position to a truncated variant of the human NK-1 receptor. Thus, the truncated NK-1 receptor lacked the intracellular C-terminus sequence required for the phosphorylation and internalisation of the full-length NK-1 receptor. Using a sensitive one-step semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay, we detected mRNA for both the full length and truncated NK-1 receptors throughout the brain, spinal cord, sensory and autonomic ganglia, and viscera. Truncated NK-1 receptor mRNA was present in lower quantities than mRNA for the full-length NK-1R in all tissues. Highest levels of mRNA for the truncated NK-1 receptor were detected in coeliac ganglion, spinal cord, basal ganglia and hypothalamus. An antiserum to the N-terminus of the NK-1 receptor labelled dendrites of coeliac ganglion neurons that were not labelled with antisera to the C-terminus of the full length NK-1 receptor. These results show that a C-terminally truncated variant of the NK-1 receptor is likely to be widespread in central and peripheral nervous tissue. We predict that this receptor will mediate actions of substance P on neurons where immunohistochemical evidence for a full-length NK-1 receptor is lacking.

  11. CD52-Negative NK Cells Are Abundant in the Liver and Less Susceptible to Alemtuzumab Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Ryuichi; Ohira, Masahiro; Matsuura, Toshiharu; Muraoka, Izumi; Tryphonopoulos, Panagiotis; Fan, Ji; Tekin, Akin; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Levi, David; Ruiz, Phillip; Ricordi, Camillo; Vianna, Rodrigo; Ohdan, Hideki; Waldmann, Herman; Tzakis, Andreas G; Nishida, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    T-cell depleting strategies have become an integral part of immunosuppressive regimens in organ transplantation. Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52, a cell-surface antigen on several immune cells. It has been suggested that lymphocyte depletion increases the risk of serious infections. However, this has not been observed with short-term alemtuzumab treatment in an organ transplant setting. For induction therapy using alemtuzumab following liver transplantation, we found that T- and B-cell numbers declined rapidly after alemtuzumab therapy; however, the natural killer (NK) cell number was sustained. NK cells are important effectors of innate immunity. Since the effects of alemtuzumab on NK cell functions, especially those of liver NK cells, are unknown, this study aimed to investigate this in detail. To assess the effect of alemtuzumab on NK cells, samples were obtained from 7 organ donors and examined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide. Phenotypical and functional differences within subsets of NK cells with different levels of CD52 expression were determined by flow cytometry and in vitro cytotoxicity assays. CD52 expression on NK cells was lower than that on other lymphocyte subsets. The liver contained a large number of CD52- NK cells compared with the peripheral blood. In vitro treatment of liver-derived NK cells with alemtuzumab did not result in cell death. In contrast, co-incubation with alemtuzumab induced cell death in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and non-NK cells in the liver. Furthermore, CD52- liver NK cells were more cytotoxic and produced more IFN-γ than CD52+ NK cells after cytokine activation. The liver contains a large number of CD52- NK cells. These cells are refractory to alemtuzumab and have robust activity. These findings indicate that CD52- NK cells persist and could protect against infection after alemtuzumab-based lymphocyte depletion.

  12. Low baseline levels of NK cells may predict a positive response to ipilimumab in melanoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Julia K; Angelova, Daniela; Heppt, Markus V; Ruzicka, Thomas; Berking, Carola

    2016-11-28

    The introduction of immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) has been a breakthrough in the therapy of metastatic melanoma. The influence of ICB on T-cell populations has been studied extensively, but little is known about the effect on NK cells. In this study, we analysed the relative and absolute amounts of NK cells and of the subpopulations of CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cells among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 32 patients with metastatic melanoma before and under treatment with ipilimumab or pembrolizumab by flow cytometry. In 15 (47%) patients, an abnormal low amount of NK cells was found at baseline. Analysis of the subpopulations showed also low or normal baseline levels for CD56(dim) NK cells, whereas the baseline levels of CD56(bright) NK cells were either normal or abnormally high. The relative and absolute amounts of NK cells and of CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cell subpopulations in patients with a normal baseline did not change under treatment. However, patients with a low baseline of NK cells and CD56(dim) NK cells showed a significant increase in these immune cell subsets, but the amounts remained to be lower than the normal baseline. The amount of CD56(bright) NK cells was unaffected by treatment. The baseline levels of NK cells were correlated with the number of metastatic organs. Their proportion increased, whereas the expression of NKG2D decreased significantly when more than one organ was affected by metastases. Low baseline levels of NK cells and CD56(dim) NK cells as well as normal baseline levels of CD56(bright) NK cells correlated significantly with a positive response to ipilimumab but not to pembrolizumab. Survival curves of patients with low amounts of CD56(dim) NK cells treated with ipilimumab showed a trend to longer survival. Normal baseline levels of CD56(bright) NK cells were significantly correlated with longer survival as compared to patients with high baseline levels. In conclusion, analysis of the amounts of total

  13. An NK cell line (haNK) expressing high levels of granzyme and engineered to express the high affinity CD16 allele.

    PubMed

    Jochems, Caroline; Hodge, James W; Fantini, Massimo; Fujii, Rika; Morillon, Y Maurice; Greiner, John W; Padget, Michelle R; Tritsch, Sarah R; Tsang, Kwong Yok; Campbell, Kerry S; Klingemann, Hans; Boissel, Laurent; Rabizadeh, Shahrooz; Soon-Shiong, Patrick; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2016-12-27

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known to play a role in mediating innate immunity, in enhancing adaptive immune responses, and have been implicated in mediating anti-tumor responses via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by reactivity of CD16 with the Fc region of human IgG1 antibodies. The NK-92 cell line, derived from a lymphoma patient, has previously been well characterized and adoptive transfer of irradiated NK-92 cells has demonstrated safety and shown preliminary evidence of clinical benefit in cancer patients. The NK-92 cell line, devoid of CD16, has now been engineered to express the high affinity (ha) CD16 V158 FcγRIIIa receptor, as well as engineered to express IL-2; IL-2 has been shown to replenish the granular stock of NK cells, leading to enhanced perforin- and granzyme-mediated lysis of tumor cells. The studies reported here show high levels of granzyme in haNK cells, and demonstrate the effects of irradiation of haNK cells on multiple phenotypic markers, viability, IL-2 production, and lysis of a spectrum of human tumor cells. Studies also compare endogenous irradiated haNK lysis of tumor cells with that of irradiated haNK-mediated ADCC using cetuximab, trastuzumab and pertuzumab monoclonal antibodies. These studies thus provide the rationale for the potential use of irradiated haNK cells in adoptive transfer studies for a range of human tumor types. Moreover, since only approximately 10% of humans are homozygous for the high affinity V CD16 allele, these studies also provide the rationale for the use of irradiated haNK cells in combination with IgG1 anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies.

  14. An NK cell line (haNK) expressing high levels of granzyme and engineered to express the high affinity CD16 allele

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Caroline; Hodge, James W.; Fantini, Massimo; Fujii, Rika; Maurice, Y. Morillon; Greiner, John W.; Padget, Michelle R.; Tritsch, Sarah R.; Tsang, Kwong Yok; Campbell, Kerry S.; Klingemann, Hans; Boissel, Laurent; Rabizadeh, Shahrooz; Soon-Shiong, Patrick; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known to play a role in mediating innate immunity, in enhancing adaptive immune responses, and have been implicated in mediating anti-tumor responses via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by reactivity of CD16 with the Fc region of human IgG1 antibodies. The NK-92 cell line, derived from a lymphoma patient, has previously been well characterized and adoptive transfer of irradiated NK-92 cells has demonstrated safety and shown preliminary evidence of clinical benefit in cancer patients. The NK-92 cell line, devoid of CD16, has now been engineered to express the high affinity (ha) CD16 V158 FcγRIIIa receptor, as well as engineered to express IL-2; IL-2 has been shown to replenish the granular stock of NK cells, leading to enhanced perforin- and granzyme-mediated lysis of tumor cells. The studies reported here show high levels of granzyme in haNK cells, and demonstrate the effects of irradiation of haNK cells on multiple phenotypic markers, viability, IL-2 production, and lysis of a spectrum of human tumor cells. Studies also compare endogenous irradiated haNK lysis of tumor cells with that of irradiated haNK-mediated ADCC using cetuximab, trastuzumab and pertuzumab monoclonal antibodies. These studies thus provide the rationale for the potential use of irradiated haNK cells in adoptive transfer studies for a range of human tumor types. Moreover, since only approximately 10% of humans are homozygous for the high affinity V CD16 allele, these studies also provide the rationale for the use of irradiated haNK cells in combination with IgG1 anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies. PMID:27861156

  15. Comparative behavioural profile of centrally administered tachykinin NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptor agonists in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Piot, O; Betschart, J; Grall, I; Ravard, S; Garret, C; Blanchard, J C

    1995-11-01

    1. The NK1 tachykinin receptor agonists, septide, [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP and [Pro9]SP produced locomotor hyperactivity (10-20 min) when injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) in the guinea-pig. The most potent in eliciting this hyperactivity was septide (from 0.63 to 5 micrograms), compared to [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP, which was active at 2.5 and 5 micrograms and [Pro9]SP which induced a non-significant increase even at 10 micrograms. 2. Wet-dog shakes were elicited by septide, [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP and [Pro9]SP injected by the i.c.v. route in the guinea-pig. [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP, active from 0.16 to 2.5 micrograms was more potent than septide (active at 1.25 micrograms) and [Pro9]SP (active at 0.63 micrograms) in eliciting such behaviour. To a lesser extent, grooming was also observed after injection of these agonists. 3. The NK2 tachykinin receptor agonist, [Lys5,MeLeu9,Nle10]NKA(4-10), up to the dose of 10 micrograms i.c.v. had no effect in the guinea-pig. It neither modified locomotor activity nor induced a characteristic behavioural response. At higher doses (20 micrograms), some toxic effects were noted. 4. The NK3 tachykinin receptor agonist, senktide, contrasts with the NK1 receptor agonists in that it elicited only wet-dog shakes, at doses ranging from 0.32 to 1.25 micrograms. It neither modified locomotor activity (1 microgram) nor induced grooming (up to 5 micrograms) in the guinea-pig. 5. To our knowledge, these results are the first demonstration that the guinea-pig could be useful to differentiate tachykinin agonists on the basis of their behavioural profile, distinct from those obtained in mice and rats.

  16. Comparative behavioural profile of centrally administered tachykinin NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptor agonists in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Piot, O.; Betschart, J.; Grall, I.; Ravard, S.; Garret, C.; Blanchard, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    1. The NK1 tachykinin receptor agonists, septide, [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP and [Pro9]SP produced locomotor hyperactivity (10-20 min) when injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) in the guinea-pig. The most potent in eliciting this hyperactivity was septide (from 0.63 to 5 micrograms), compared to [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP, which was active at 2.5 and 5 micrograms and [Pro9]SP which induced a non-significant increase even at 10 micrograms. 2. Wet-dog shakes were elicited by septide, [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP and [Pro9]SP injected by the i.c.v. route in the guinea-pig. [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP, active from 0.16 to 2.5 micrograms was more potent than septide (active at 1.25 micrograms) and [Pro9]SP (active at 0.63 micrograms) in eliciting such behaviour. To a lesser extent, grooming was also observed after injection of these agonists. 3. The NK2 tachykinin receptor agonist, [Lys5,MeLeu9,Nle10]NKA(4-10), up to the dose of 10 micrograms i.c.v. had no effect in the guinea-pig. It neither modified locomotor activity nor induced a characteristic behavioural response. At higher doses (20 micrograms), some toxic effects were noted. 4. The NK3 tachykinin receptor agonist, senktide, contrasts with the NK1 receptor agonists in that it elicited only wet-dog shakes, at doses ranging from 0.32 to 1.25 micrograms. It neither modified locomotor activity (1 microgram) nor induced grooming (up to 5 micrograms) in the guinea-pig. 5. To our knowledge, these results are the first demonstration that the guinea-pig could be useful to differentiate tachykinin agonists on the basis of their behavioural profile, distinct from those obtained in mice and rats. PMID:8581290

  17. Beyond NK Cells: The Expanding Universe of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cella, Marina; Miller, Hannah; Song, Christina

    2014-01-01

    For a long time, natural killer (NK) cells were thought to be the only innate immune lymphoid population capable of responding to invading pathogens under the influence of changing environmental cues. In the last few years, an increasing amount of evidence has shown that a number of different innate lymphoid cell (ILC) populations found at mucosal sites rapidly respond to locally produced cytokines in order to establish or maintain homeostasis. These ILC populations closely mirror the phenotype of adaptive T helper subsets in their repertoire of secreted soluble factors. Early in the immune response, ILCs are responsible for setting the stage to mount an adaptive T cell response that is appropriate for the incoming insult. Here, we review the diversity of ILC subsets and discuss similarities and differences between ILCs and NK cells in function and key transcriptional factors required for their development. PMID:24982658

  18. Beyond NK cells: the expanding universe of innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Cella, Marina; Miller, Hannah; Song, Christina

    2014-01-01

    For a long time, natural killer (NK) cells were thought to be the only innate immune lymphoid population capable of responding to invading pathogens under the influence of changing environmental cues. In the last few years, an increasing amount of evidence has shown that a number of different innate lymphoid cell (ILC) populations found at mucosal sites rapidly respond to locally produced cytokines in order to establish or maintain homeostasis. These ILC populations closely mirror the phenotype of adaptive T helper subsets in their repertoire of secreted soluble factors. Early in the immune response, ILCs are responsible for setting the stage to mount an adaptive T cell response that is appropriate for the incoming insult. Here, we review the diversity of ILC subsets and discuss similarities and differences between ILCs and NK cells in function and key transcriptional factors required for their development.

  19. Prenatal exposure to cypermethrin modulates rat NK cell cytotoxic functions.

    PubMed

    Santoni, G; Cantalamessa, F; Mazzucca, L; Romagnoli, S; Piccoli, M

    1997-07-11

    The synthetic pyrethroid insecticide, cypermethrin, was given during gestation to pregnant rats by gavage in corn oil. Peripheral blood and spleen cytotoxic activity of dams and their offspring were then evaluated at different times (30, 60, 90, 120 days) after birth. Pups showed a significant increase in peripheral blood natural killer (NK) and antibody-dependent (ADCC) cytotoxic activity paralleled with a similar increase in the percentage of NK-RP1+ cells and decreased activity in the spleen. Pregnant cypermethrin-exposed dams showed no changes in peripheral blood or spleen cytotoxic function during the postnatal period. Overall, these results suggest that immunomodulation of cytotoxic activity observed in the offspring is likely attributable to a specific effect of cypermethrin administered during the prenatal period.

  20. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  1. NK Cell-based Immunotherapies in Pediatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Kimberly A.; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; DeSantes, Kenneth B.; Capitini, Christian M.; Otto, Mario; Sondel, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen several anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies transition from “promising preclinical models” to treatments with proven clinical activity or benefit. In 2013, the journal Science selected the field of Cancer Immunotherapy as the overall number-1 breakthrough for the year in all of scientific research. In the setting of cancer immunotherapy for adult malignancies, many of these immunotherapy strategies have relied on the cancer patient’s endogenous anti-tumor T cell response. While much promising research in pediatric oncology is similarly focused on T cell reactivity, several pediatric malignancies themselves, or the chemo-radiotherapy used to achieve initial responses, can be associated with profound immune suppression, particularly of the T cell system. A separate component of the immune system, also able to mediate anti-tumor effects and less suppressed by conventional cancer treatment, is the NK cell system. In recent years, several distinct immunotherapeutic approaches that rely on the activity of NK cells have moved from preclinical development into clinical testing, and some have shown clear antitumor benefit. This review provides an overview of NK cell-based immunotherapy efforts that are directed towards childhood malignancies, with an emphasis on protocols that are already in clinical testing. PMID:25590232

  2. Enhancement of anti-leukemia activity of NK cells in vitro and in vivo by inhibition of leukemia cell-induced NK cell damage.

    PubMed

    Arriga, Roberto; Caratelli, Sara; Coppola, Andrea; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Venditti, Adriano; Amadori, Sergio; Lanzilli, Giulia; Lauro, Davide; Palomba, Patrizia; Sconocchia, Tommaso; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Capuani, Barbara; Ferrone, Soldano; Sconocchia, Giuseppe

    2016-01-12

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells induce, in vitro, NK cell abnormalities (NKCAs) including apoptosis and activating receptor down-regulation. The potential negative impact of AML cells on the therapeutic efficacy of NK cell-based strategies prompted us to analyze the mechanisms underlying NKCAs and to develop approaches to protect NK cells from NKCAs. NKCA induction by the AML leukemia cells target a subpopulation of peripheral blood NK cells and is interleukin-2 independent but is abrogated by a long-term culture of NK (LTNK) cells at 37°C. LTNK cells displayed a significantly enhanced ability to damage AML cells in vitro and inhibited the subcutaneous growth of ML-2 cells grafted into CB17 SCID mice. Actinomycin D restored the susceptibility of LTNK cells to NKCAs while TAPI-0, a functional analog of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 3, inhibits ML-2 cell-induced NKCAs suggesting that the generation of NK cell resistance to NKCAs involves RNA transcription and metalloproteinase (MPP) inactivation. This conclusion is supported by the reduced susceptibility to AML cell-induced NKCAs of LTNK cells in which TIMP3 gene and protein are over-expressed. This information may contribute to the rational design of targeted strategies to enhance the efficacy of NK cell-based-immunotherapy of AML with haploidentical NK cells.

  3. Proapoptotic Bim regulates antigen-specific NK cell contraction and the generation of the memory NK cell pool after cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Bezman, Natalie A.; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is critical for the elimination of activated lymphocytes after viral infection. Proapoptotic factor Bim (Bcl2l11) controls T lymphocyte contraction and the formation of memory T cells after infection. Natural killer (NK) cells also undergo antigen-driven expansion to become long-lived memory cells after mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection; therefore, we examined the role of Bim in regulating the MCMV-driven memory NK cell pool. Despite responding similarly early after infection, Bcl2l11−/− Ly49H+ NK cells show impaired contraction and significantly outnumber wild-type (WT) cells after the expansion phase. The inability to reduce the effector pool leads to a larger Bcl2l11−/− NK memory subset, which displays a less mature phenotype (CD11blo, CD27+) and lower levels of NK cell memory-associated markers KLRG1 and Ly6C. Bcl2l11−/− memory NK cells demonstrate a reduced response to m157-mediated stimulation and do not protect as effectively as WT memory NK cells in an MCMV challenge model. Thus, Bim-mediated apoptosis drives selective contraction of effector NK cells to generate a pool of mature, MCMV-specific memory cells. PMID:24958849

  4. Proapoptotic Bim regulates antigen-specific NK cell contraction and the generation of the memory NK cell pool after cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Bezman, Natalie A; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2014-06-30

    Apoptosis is critical for the elimination of activated lymphocytes after viral infection. Proapoptotic factor Bim (Bcl2l11) controls T lymphocyte contraction and the formation of memory T cells after infection. Natural killer (NK) cells also undergo antigen-driven expansion to become long-lived memory cells after mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection; therefore, we examined the role of Bim in regulating the MCMV-driven memory NK cell pool. Despite responding similarly early after infection, Bcl2l11(-/-) Ly49H(+) NK cells show impaired contraction and significantly outnumber wild-type (WT) cells after the expansion phase. The inability to reduce the effector pool leads to a larger Bcl2l11(-/-) NK memory subset, which displays a less mature phenotype (CD11b(lo), CD27(+)) and lower levels of NK cell memory-associated markers KLRG1 and Ly6C. Bcl2l11(-/-) memory NK cells demonstrate a reduced response to m157-mediated stimulation and do not protect as effectively as WT memory NK cells in an MCMV challenge model. Thus, Bim-mediated apoptosis drives selective contraction of effector NK cells to generate a pool of mature, MCMV-specific memory cells. © 2014 Min-Oo et al.

  5. Enhancement of anti-leukemia activity of NK cells in vitro and in vivo by inhibition of leukemia cell-induced NK cell damage

    PubMed Central

    Arriga, Roberto; Caratelli, Sara; Coppola, Andrea; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Venditti, Adriano; Amadori, Sergio; Lanzilli, Giulia; Lauro, Davide; Palomba, Patrizia; Sconocchia, Tommaso; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Capuani, Barbara; Ferrone, Soldano; Sconocchia, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells induce, in vitro, NK cell abnormalities (NKCAs) including apoptosis and activating receptor down-regulation. The potential negative impact of AML cells on the therapeutic efficacy of NK cell-based strategies prompted us to analyze the mechanisms underlying NKCAs and to develop approaches to protect NK cells from NKCAs. NKCA induction by the AML leukemia cells target a subpopulation of peripheral blood NK cells and is interleukin-2 independent but is abrogated by a long-term culture of NK (LTNK) cells at 37°C. LTNK cells displayed a significantly enhanced ability to damage AML cells in vitro and inhibited the subcutaneous growth of ML-2 cells grafted into CB17 SCID mice. Actinomycin D restored the susceptibility of LTNK cells to NKCAs while TAPI-0, a functional analog of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 3, inhibits ML-2 cell-induced NKCAs suggesting that the generation of NK cell resistance to NKCAs involves RNA transcription and metalloproteinase (MPP) inactivation. This conclusion is supported by the reduced susceptibility to AML cell-induced NKCAs of LTNK cells in which TIMP3 gene and protein are over-expressed. This information may contribute to the rational design of targeted strategies to enhance the efficacy of NK cell-based-immunotherapy of AML with haploidentical NK cells. PMID:26655503

  6. Local Microenvironment Controls the Compartmentalization of NK Cell Responses during Systemic Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rasid, Orhan; Ciulean, Ioana Sonya; Fitting, Catherine; Doyen, Noelle; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-15

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a whole-body reaction to a triggering insult that often results in life-threatening illness. Contributing to the development of this inflammatory cascade are numerous cellular partners, among which NK cells were shown to play a key role. Accumulating evidence points to organ-specific properties of systemic inflammation and NK cells. However, little is known about compartment-specific activation of NK cells during systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the relative contribution of NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues. In this study, we undertook a sequential characterization of NK responses in the spleen, lungs, bone marrow, peritoneum, and blood using a mouse model of endotoxemia. We report that, despite similar systemic dynamics of NK cell responses, expression of activation markers (CD69 and CD25) and effector molecules (IFN-γ, granzyme B, and IL-10) display organ-specific thresholds of maximum activation. Using adoptive transfers of spleen and lung NK cells, we found that these cells have the capacity to quickly adapt to a new environment and adjust their response levels to that of resident NK cells. This functional adaptation occurs without significant alterations in phenotype and independently of subpopulation-specific trafficking. Thus, using a dynamic in vivo-transfer system, to our knowledge our study is the first to report the compartmentalization of NK cells responses during systemic inflammation and to show that NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues are involved in this process, in a sequential manner.

  7. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated "Missing-Self" Recognition.

    PubMed

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells' ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated "missing-self" reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors.

  8. Respiratory Influenza Virus Infection Induces Memory-like Liver NK Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yanshi; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-02-01

    Although NK cells are classified as innate immune cells, recent studies have demonstrated the transformation of NK cells into long-lived memory cells that contribute to secondary immune responses in certain mouse models. However, whether NK cells mount an Ag-specific memory response to acute influenza virus infection has not yet been examined. Here, we show that, consistent with previous studies, lung NK cells play an important role in controlling viral proliferation after primary influenza virus infection. However, although lung NK cells display a memory phenotype at the late stage of infection, these cells do not protect mice against secondary influenza virus infection. Interestingly, liver NK cells from influenza virus-infected mice possess a memory phenotype and protect mice against secondary influenza virus infection. Memory-like liver NK cells display a CD49a(+)DX5(-) phenotype, and the adoptive transfer of purified liver CD49a(+)DX5(-) NK cells into naive mice followed by viral infection results in protective immunity and decreased viral titer. Moreover, we demonstrate that primary inactivated influenza virus induces memory NK cells residing in the liver of Rag1(-/-) mice. Collectively, these data suggest that liver CD49a(+)DX5(-) NK cells remember encountered Ag from influenza virus after primary infection and are more protective upon subsequent infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. TIGIT expression levels on human NK cells correlate with functional heterogeneity among healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hou, Hongyan; Wu, Shiji; Tang, Qing; Liu, Weiyong; Huang, Min; Yin, Botao; Huang, Jing; Mao, Lie; Lu, Yanfang; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-10-01

    Human NK cells display extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity among healthy individuals, but the mechanism responsible for this variation is still largely unknown. Here, we show that a novel immune receptor, T-cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), is expressed preferentially on human NK cells but shows wide variation in its expression levels among healthy individuals. We found that the TIGIT expression level is related to the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of NK cells, and that NK cells from healthy individuals can be divided into three categories according to TIGIT expression. NK cells with low levels of TIGIT expression show higher cytokine secretion capability, degranulation activity, and cytotoxic potential than NK cells with high levels of TIGIT expression. Blockade of the TIGIT pathway significantly increased NK-cell function, particularly in NK cells with high levels of TIGIT expression. We further observed that the TIGIT expression level was inversely correlated with the IFN-γ secretion capability of NK cells in patients with cancers and autoimmune diseases. Importantly, we propose a novel mechanism that links TIGIT expression with NK-cell functional heterogeneity, and this mechanism might partially explain why individuals have different susceptibilities to infection, autoimmune disease, and cancer.

  10. Effect of radiotherapy on the natural killer (NK)-cell activity of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnes, K.; Florence, J.; Penny, R.

    1987-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of radiotherapy on peripheral blood natural killer (NK)-cell number and activity in 15 patients with cancer, prior to the commencement and at the completion of radiotherapy. The following observations were made. Prior to radiotherapy NK activity could not be correlated with the stage of malignancy. In all patients with advanced disease and with subnormal baseline NK activity, the outcome of radiotherapy was unfavorable. Following radiotherapy to sites including the mediastinum, patients had decreased NK activity compared with those receiving treatment to other sites. This decrease was not related to the dose of radiotherapy or stage of malignancy. The tumor response was favorable in most patients whose NK activity decreased as a result of radiotherapy. The decrease in NK activity may be associated with a decrease in the percentage of NK (N901) cells in the peripheral blood. The reduction in NK activity in those patients receiving mediastinal irradiation may be due to the large volume of blood which transits the field, so that the NK cells, or their more radiosensitive precursors, may be damaged and/or differentiation inhibited. Thus, these new observations show that radiotherapy does indeed affect the NK activity in cancer patients predominantly when the irradiation site includes the mediastinum.

  11. NK Cell Maturation and Cytotoxicity Are Controlled by the Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease SPPL3.

    PubMed

    Hamblet, Corinne E; Makowski, Stefanie L; Tritapoe, Julia M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2016-03-15

    NK cell maturation is critical for normal effector function and the innate immune response to tumors and pathogens. However, the molecular pathways that control NK cell maturation remain largely undefined. In this article, we investigate the role of SPPL3, an intramembrane aspartyl protease, in murine NK cell biology. We find that deletion of SPPL3 in the hematopoietic system reduces numbers of peripheral NK cells, clearance of MHC class I-deficient tumors in vivo, and cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. This phenotype is concomitant with reduced numbers of CD27(+)CD11b(+) and CD27(-)CD11b(+) NK cells, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 in efficient NK cell maturation. NK cell-specific deletion of SPPL3 results in the same deficiencies, revealing a cell-autonomous role for SPPL3 in these processes. CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing in murine zygotes was used to generate knockin mice with a catalytically compromised SPPL3 D271A allele. Mice engineered to express only SPPL3 D271A in NK cells phenocopy mice deleted for SPPL3, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 protease activity in NK cell biology. Our results identify SPPL3 as a cell-autonomous molecular determinant of NK cell maturation and expand the role of intramembrane aspartyl proteases in innate immunity. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. NK Cell Maturation and Cytotoxicity are Controlled by the Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease SPPL31

    PubMed Central

    Hamblet, Corinne E.; Makowski, Stefanie L.; Tritapoe, Julia M.; Pomerantz, Joel L.

    2016-01-01

    NK cell maturation is critical for normal effector function and the innate immune response to tumors and pathogens. However, the molecular pathways that control NK cell maturation remain largely undefined. Here, we investigate the role of SPPL3, an intramembrane aspartyl protease, in murine NK cell biology. We find that deletion of SPPL3 in the hematopoietic system reduces numbers of peripheral NK cells, clearance of MHC Class I-deficient tumors in vivo, and cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. This phenotype is concomitant with reduced numbers of CD27+CD11b+ and CD27−CD11b+ NK cells, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 in efficient NK cell maturation. NK cell-specific deletion of SPPL3 results in the same deficiencies, revealing a cell-autonomous role for SPPL3 in these processes. CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing in murine zygotes was used to generate knock-in mice with a catalytically compromised SPPL3 D271A allele. Mice engineered to express only SPPL3 D271A in NK cells phenocopy mice deleted for SPPL3, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 protease activity in NK cell biology. Our results identify SPPL3 as a cell-autonomous molecular determinant of NK cell maturation and expand the role of intramembrane aspartyl proteases in innate immunity. PMID:26851218

  13. Impact of HCMV Infection on NK Cell Development and Function after HSCT

    PubMed Central

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Falco, Michela; Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cell function is regulated by an array of inhibitory and activating surface receptors that during NK cell differentiation, at variance with T and B cells, do not require genetic rearrangement. Importantly, NK cells are the first lymphocyte population recovering after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Thus, their role in early immunity after HSCT is considered crucial, as they can importantly contribute to protect the host from tumor recurrence and viral infections before T-cell immunity is fully recovered. In order to acquire effector functions and regulatory receptors, NK cell precursors undergo a maturation process that can be analyzed during immune reconstitution after HSCT. In this context, the occurrence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection/reactivation was shown to accelerate NK cell maturation by promoting the differentiation of high frequencies of NK cells characterized by a KIR+NKG2A− and NKG2C+ mature phenotype. Thus, it appears that the development of NK cells and the distribution of NK cell receptors can be deeply influenced by HCMV infection. Moreover, in HCMV-infected subjects the emergence of so called “memory-like” or “long-lived” NK cells has been documented. These cells could play an important role in protecting from infections and maybe from relapse in patients transplanted for leukemia. All the aspects regarding the influence of HCMV infection on NK cell development will be discussed. PMID:24379818

  14. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated “Missing-Self” Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells’ ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated “missing-self” reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors. PMID:27054584

  15. Prenatal allospecific NK cell tolerance hinges on instructive allorecognition through the activating receptor during development

    PubMed Central

    Alhajjat, Amir M.; Strong, Beverly S.; Lee, Amanda E.; Turner, Lucas E.; Wadhwani, Ram K.; Ortaldo, John R.; Heusel, Jonathan W.; Shaaban, Aimen F.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how the prenatal interaction between NK cells and alloantigens shapes the developing NK cell repertoire towards tolerance or immunity. Specifically, the effect on NK cell education arising from developmental co-recognition of alloantigens by activating and inhibitory receptors with shared specificity is uncharacterized. Using a murine prenatal transplantation model, we examined the manner in which this seemingly conflicting input affects NK cell licensing and repertoire formation in mixed hematopoietic chimeras. We found that prenatal NK cell tolerance arose from the elimination of phenotypically “hostile” NK cells that express an allospecific activating receptor without co-expressing any allospecific inhibitory receptors. Importantly, the checkpoint for the system appeared to occur centrally within the bone marrow during the final stage of NK cell maturation and hinged on the instructive recognition of allogeneic ligand by the activating receptor rather than through the inhibitory receptor as classically proposed. Residual non-deleted hostile NK cells expressing only the activating receptor exhibited an immature, anergic phenotype but retained the capacity to upregulate inhibitory receptor expression in peripheral sites. However, the potential for this adaptive change to occur was lost in developmentally mature chimeras. Collectively, these findings illuminate the intrinsic process in which developmental allorecognition through the activating receptor regulates the emergence of durable NK cell tolerance and establishes a new paradigm to fundamentally guide future investigations of prenatal NK cell allospecific education. PMID:26136432

  16. NK Cells and Their Ability to Modulate T Cells during Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Kevin D.; Waggoner, Stephen N.; Whitmire, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in protection against virus infections, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to thwart NK cell activity. NK cells respond to inflammatory signals at an early stage of virus infection, resulting in proliferation, cytokine production, and cytolytic activity that can reduce virus loads. Moreover, the rapid kinetics of the NK cell response enables NK cells to influence other populations of innate immune cells, affect the inflammatory milieu, and guide adaptive immune responses to infection. Early NK cell interactions with other leukocytes can have long-lasting effects on the number and quality of memory T cells, as well as impact the exhaustion of T cells during chronic infections. The ability of NK cells to modulate T cell responses can be mediated through direct T-NK interactions, cytokine production, or indirectly through dendritic cells and other cell types. Herein, we summarize our current understanding of how NK cells interact with T cells, dendritic cells, B cells, and other cell types involved in adaptive immune responses to virus infection. We outline several mechanisms by which NK cells enhance or suppress adaptive immune response and long-lived immunological memory. PMID:25404045

  17. Transcription factor KLF2 regulates homeostatic NK cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Rabacal, Whitney; Pabbisetty, Sudheer K; Hoek, Kristen L; Cendron, Delphine; Guo, Yin; Maseda, Damian; Sebzda, Eric

    2016-05-10

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that recognize and lyse virally infected or transformed cells. This latter property is being pursued in clinics to treat leukemia with the hope that further breakthroughs in NK cell biology can extend treatments to other cancers. At issue is the ability to expand transferred NK cells and prolong their functionality within the context of a tumor. In terms of NK cell expansion and survival, we now report that Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) is a key transcription factor that underpins both of these events. Excision of Klf2 using gene-targeted mouse models promotes spontaneous proliferation of immature NK cells in peripheral tissues, a phenotype that is replicated under ex vivo conditions. Moreover, KLF2 imprints a homeostatic migration pattern on mature NK cells that allows these cells to access IL-15-rich microenvironments. KLF2 accomplishes this feat within the mature NK cell lineage via regulation of a subset of homing receptors that respond to homeostatic ligands while leaving constitutively expressed receptors that recognize inflammatory cytokines unperturbed. Under steady-state conditions, KLF2-deficient NK cells alter their expression of homeostatic homing receptors and subsequently undergo apoptosis due to IL-15 starvation. This novel mechanism has implications regarding NK cell contraction following the termination of immune responses including the possibility that retention of an IL-15 transpresenting support system is key to extending NK cell activity in a tumor environment.

  18. NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy: from basic biology to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Yin, Jie; Li, Ting; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Leavenworth, JianMei; Wang, Xi

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, which recognize and kill target cells independent of antigen specificity and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matching, play pivotal roles in immune defence against tumors. However, tumor cells often acquire the ability to escape NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Thus, understanding mechanisms underlying regulation of NK cell phenotype and function within the tumor environment is instrumental for designing new approaches to improve the current cell-based immunotherapy. In this review, we elaborate the main biological features and molecular mechanisms of NK cells that pertain to regulation of NK cell-mediated anti-tumor activity. We further overview current clinical approaches regarding NK cell-based cancer therapy, including cytokine infusion, adoptive transfer of autologous or allogeneic NK cells, applications of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing NK cells and adoptive transfer of memory-like NK cells. With these promising clinical outcomes and fuller understanding the basic questions raised in this review, we foresee that NK cell-based approaches may hold great potential for future cancer immunotherapy.

  19. NK Cell Subgroups, Phenotype, and Functions After Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Benedikt; Tognarelli, Sara; Poller, Kerstin; Bader, Peter; Mackensen, Andreas; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy with consecutive autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT) is a well-established treatment option for patients suffering from malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma. Natural killer (NK) cells are an important part of the immune surveillance, and their cell number after autoSCT is predictive for progression-free and overall survival. To improve knowledge about the role of NK cells after autoSCT, we investigated different NK cell subgroups, their phenotype, and their functions in patients treated with autoSCT. Directly after leukocyte regeneration (>1000 leukocytes/μl) following autoSCT, CD56(++) NK cells were the major NK cell subset. Surprisingly, these cells showed unusually high surface expression levels of CD57 and killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) compared to expression levels before or at later time points after autoSCT. Moreover, these NK cells strongly upregulated KIR2DL2/3/S2 and KIR3DL1, whereas KIR2DL1/S1 remained constant, indicating that this cell population arose from more immature NK cells instead of from activated mature ones. Remarkably, NK cells were already able to degranulate and produce IFN-γ and MIP-1β upon tumor interaction early after leukocyte regeneration. In conclusion, we describe an unusual upregulation of CD57 and KIRs on CD56(++) NK cells shortly after autoSCT. Importantly, these NK cells were functionally competent upon tumor interaction at this early time point.

  20. Polyclonal Expansion of NKG2C+ NK Cells in TAP-Deficient Patients

    PubMed Central

    Béziat, Vivien; Sleiman, Marwan; Goodridge, Jodie P.; Kaarbø, Mari; Liu, Lisa L.; Rollag, Halvor; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Zimmer, Jacques; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive natural killer (NK) cell responses to human cytomegalovirus infection are characterized by the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Here, we set out to study the HLA class I dependency of such NKG2C+ NK cell expansions. We demonstrate the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells in patients with transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) deficiency, who express less than 10% of normal HLA class I levels. In contrast to normal individuals, expanded NKG2C+ NK cell populations in TAP-deficient patients display a polyclonal KIR profile and remain hyporesponsive to HLA class I-negative target cells. Nonetheless, agonistic stimulation of NKG2C on NK cells from TAP-deficient patients yielded significant responses in terms of degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, while interactions with self-HLA class I molecules likely shape the KIR repertoire of expanding NKG2C+ NK cells during adaptive NK cell responses in normal individuals, they are not a prerequisite for NKG2C+ NK cell expansions to occur. The emergence of NKG2C-responsive adaptive NK cells in TAP-deficient patients may contribute to antiviral immunity and potentially explain these patients’ low incidence of severe viral infections. PMID:26500647

  1. NK cells and T cells cooperate during the clinical course of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Eppenberger, Serenella; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul; Caratelli, Sara; Ferrelli, Francesca; Coppola, Andrea; Arriga, Roberto; Lauro, Davide; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Terracciano, Luigi; Ferrone, Soldano

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that natural killer (NK) cells are typically defective in infiltrating solid tumors, with the exception of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Interestingly, however, infrequently infiltrating NK cells do not appear to have a direct effect on tumor progression. Here, prompted by the recent evidence that NK cell and T cell crosstalk may trigger, or enhance, tumor antigen-specific immune responses, we have tested the clinical significance of this reciprocal signaling. To this end, a tissue microarray constructed with 1410 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patient specimens was stained with NK and T cell antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies, utilizing the immunoperoxidase staining technique. Cut-off scores for positive (>4 NK cells) and negative (≤4 NK cells) NK cell CRC patient samples were determined using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Using this approach, NK cells were detected in 423 (30%) of the 1410 CRC specimens evaluated. The number of NK cells was >4 in only 132 (9%) of CRC samples. Correlation of the immunohistochemical staining results together with analysis of the clinical course of the disease revealed that the infiltration of colorectal tumors with both NK cells and CD8+ T cells is associated with prolonged patient survival. In contrast, infiltration of tumors with NK cells in combination with CD3+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes had no detectable effect on the clinical course of the disease. These results suggest that NK cell and CD8+ T cell crosstalk in the tumor microenvironment may benefit patient outcome and further, that the enumeration of infiltrating NK and CD8+ T cells in CRC tumors may provide useful prognostic information. PMID:25610741

  2. Genetic deletion of Cxcl14 in mice alters uterine NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qichen; Chen, Hua; Deng, Zhili; Yue, Jingwen; Chen, Qi; Cao, Yujing; Ning, Lina; Lei, Xiaohua; Duan, Enkui

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •We first examined the expression of Cxcl14 in MLAp and DB of uterus. •We found the uNK cells in MLAp and decidua express Cxcl14. •In Cxcl14{sup −/−} placenta, we found significantly decreased uNK cells. •We first performed microarray to compare the gene expression in MLAp and DB. -- Abstract: The uterine natural killer cells (uNK cells) are the major immune cells in pregnant uterus and the number of uNK cells is dramatically increased during placentation and embryo development. The uNK cells are necessary for the immune tolerance, cytokine secretion and angiogenesis of placenta. Former studies indicated that the population expansion of uNK cells was accomplished through recruitment of NK cell precursors from the spleen and bone marrow, but not proliferation of NK cells. However, the necessary molecules within this process were little understood. Here in our study, we found the co-localized expression of Cxcl14 protein with uNK cells in E13.5 pregnant uterus. Moreover, we used Cxcl14 knockout mice to examine uNK cells in mesometrial lymphoid aggregate of pregnancy (MLAp) and decidua basalis (DB) of E13.5 pregnant uterus and found significantly decreased uNK cells in Cxcl14{sup −/−} pregnant uteri compared with Cxcl14{sup +/−} pregnant uteri. To further explorer the molecular change in MLAp and DB after Cxcl14 knockout, we isolated the MLAp and DB from Cxcl14{sup +/+} and Cxcl14{sup −/−} pregnant uteri and performed microarray analysis. We found many genes were up and down regulated after Cxcl14 knockout. In conclusion, our results suggested the important function of Cxcl14 in uNK cells and the proper level of Cxcl14 protein were required to recruit NK cells to pregnant uterus.

  3. Novel Strategy to Expand Super-Charged NK Cells with Significant Potential to Lyse and Differentiate Cancer Stem Cells: Differences in NK Expansion and Function between Healthy and Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kawaljit; Cook, Jessica; Park, So-Hyun; Topchyan, Paytsar; Kozlowska, Anna; Ohanian, Nick; Fang, Changge; Nishimura, Ichiro; Jewett, Anahid

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known to target cancer stem cells and undifferentiated tumors. In this paper, we provide a novel strategy for expanding large numbers of super-charged NK cells with significant potential to lyse and differentiate cancer stem cells and demonstrate the differences in the dynamics of NK cell expansion between healthy donors and cancer patients. Decline in cytotoxicity and lower interferon (IFN)-γ secretion by osteoclast (OC)-expanded NK cells from cancer patients correlates with faster expansion of residual contaminating T cells within purified NK cells, whereas healthy donors’ OCs continue expanding super-charged NK cells while limiting T cell expansion for up to 60 days. Similar to patient NK cells, NK cells from tumor-bearing BLT-humanized mice promote faster expansion of residual T cells resulting in decreased numbers and function of NK cells, whereas NK cells from mice with no tumor continue expanding NK cells and retain their cytotoxicity. In addition, dendritic cells (DCs) in contrast to OCs are found to promote faster expansion of residual T cells within purified NK cells resulting in the decline in NK cell numbers from healthy individuals. Addition of anti-CD3 mAb inhibits T cell proliferation while enhancing NK cell expansion; however, expanding NK cells have lower cytotoxicity but higher secretion of IFN-γ. Expansion and functional activation of super-charged NK cells by OCs is dependent on interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-15. Thus, in this report, we not only provide a novel strategy to expand super-charged NK cells, but also demonstrate that rapid and sustained expansion of residual T cells within the purified NK cells during expansion with DCs or OCs could be a potential mechanism by which the numbers and function of NK cells decline in cancer patients and in BLT-humanized mice. PMID:28424683

  4. Novel Strategy to Expand Super-Charged NK Cells with Significant Potential to Lyse and Differentiate Cancer Stem Cells: Differences in NK Expansion and Function between Healthy and Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kawaljit; Cook, Jessica; Park, So-Hyun; Topchyan, Paytsar; Kozlowska, Anna; Ohanian, Nick; Fang, Changge; Nishimura, Ichiro; Jewett, Anahid

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known to target cancer stem cells and undifferentiated tumors. In this paper, we provide a novel strategy for expanding large numbers of super-charged NK cells with significant potential to lyse and differentiate cancer stem cells and demonstrate the differences in the dynamics of NK cell expansion between healthy donors and cancer patients. Decline in cytotoxicity and lower interferon (IFN)-γ secretion by osteoclast (OC)-expanded NK cells from cancer patients correlates with faster expansion of residual contaminating T cells within purified NK cells, whereas healthy donors' OCs continue expanding super-charged NK cells while limiting T cell expansion for up to 60 days. Similar to patient NK cells, NK cells from tumor-bearing BLT-humanized mice promote faster expansion of residual T cells resulting in decreased numbers and function of NK cells, whereas NK cells from mice with no tumor continue expanding NK cells and retain their cytotoxicity. In addition, dendritic cells (DCs) in contrast to OCs are found to promote faster expansion of residual T cells within purified NK cells resulting in the decline in NK cell numbers from healthy individuals. Addition of anti-CD3 mAb inhibits T cell proliferation while enhancing NK cell expansion; however, expanding NK cells have lower cytotoxicity but higher secretion of IFN-γ. Expansion and functional activation of super-charged NK cells by OCs is dependent on interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-15. Thus, in this report, we not only provide a novel strategy to expand super-charged NK cells, but also demonstrate that rapid and sustained expansion of residual T cells within the purified NK cells during expansion with DCs or OCs could be a potential mechanism by which the numbers and function of NK cells decline in cancer patients and in BLT-humanized mice.

  5. Increased Tim-3 expression in peripheral NK cells predicts a poorer prognosis and Tim-3 blockade improves NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Huang, Yanyan; Tan, Linlin; Yu, Wei; Chen, Dongdong; Lu, ChangChang; He, Jianying; Wu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yongkui

    2015-12-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been shown to play an important role in mediating NK-cell function in human diseases. However, the relationship between Tim-3 expression in natural killer (NK) cells and human lung adenocarcinoma remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expression of Tim-3 in NK cells and explored the effect of Tim-3 blockade on NK cell-mediated activity in human lung adenocarcinoma. Upregulated expression of Tim-3 on CD3-CD56+ cells (P<0.05) and CD3-CD56(dim) cells (P<0.05) of patients with lung adenocarcinoma was detected by flow cytometry. Moreover, Tim-3 expression in CD3-CD56+ NK cells was higher in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Tim-3 expression in CD56(dim) NK-cell subset was higher in patients with tumor size ≥3cm (P<0.05), or LNM (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Further analysis showed that higher expressions of Tim-3 on both CD3-CD56+ NK cells and CD56(dim) NK-cell subset were independently correlated with shorter overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma (log-rank test, P=0.0418, 0.0406, respectively). Importantly, blockade of Tim-3 signaling with anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in the increased cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production of peripheral NK cells from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Our data indicate that Tim-3 expression in NK cells can function as a prognostic biomarker in human lung adenocarcinoma and support that Tim-3 could be a new target for an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  6. Broadly impaired NK cell function in non-obese diabetic mice is partially restored by NK cell activation in vivo and by IL-12/IL-18 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Sofia E; Hall, Håkan; Björklund, Jens; Höglund, Petter

    2004-01-01

    NK cells represent a link between innate and adaptive immunity, and may play a role in regulating autoimmune disorders. We have characterized the NK cell population in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. The percentage and absolute numbers of NK cells were similar in NOD and control MHC-matched B6.g7 mice. However, the capacity of NOD NK cells to mediate natural cytotoxicity as well as FcR- and Ly49D-mediated killing was compromised in vitro, suggesting a defect affecting multiple activation pathways. The defect was neither linked to the NK gene complex nor to the MHC, as determined by comparison with mice congenic for these regions. Introducing the beta(2)-microglobulin mutation on the NOD background further impaired NK cell function, showing that the compromised cytotoxic capacity in these two strains arises from two independent mechanisms. In vivo rejection responses against tumor cells and against MHC class I-deficient spleen cells were decreased in naive NOD recipients, but restored in mice pre-activated with tilorone, a potent activator of NK cells. In addition, killing of some tumor targets was restored in vitro after activation of NK cells with IL-12 plus IL-18 or with IFN-alpha/beta, but not with IL-2. Interestingly, natural killing of RMA-S targets by NOD NK cells could not be restored in vitro, indicating that restoration of killing capacity was only partial. Our data suggest a severe, but partially restorable, killing defect in NOD NK cells, affecting activation through several pathways.

  7. A role for Tac2, NkB and Nk3 receptor in normal and dysregulated fear memory consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Andero, Raül; Dias, Brian G.; Ressler, Kerry J

    2014-01-01

    Summary The centromedial amygdala (CeM), a subdivision of the central amygdala (CeA), is believed to be the main output station of the amygdala for fear expression. We provide evidence that the Tac2 gene, expressed by neurons specifically within the CeM, is required for modulating fear memories. Tac2 is colocalized with GAD65 and CaMKIIα but not with PKCd and Enk neurons in the CeM. Moreover, the Tac2 product, NkB, and its specific receptor, Nk3R, are also involved in the consolidation of fear memories. Increased Tac2 expression, through a stress-induced PTSD-like model, or following lentiviral CeA overexpression, are sufficient to enhance fear consolidation. This effect is blocked by the Nk3R antagonist, osanetant. Concordantly, silencing of Tac2-expressing neurons in CeA with DREADDs impairs fear consolidation. Together these studies provide a new understanding of the role of the Tac2 gene and CeM in fear processing and may provide novel approaches to intervention for fear-related disorders. PMID:24976214

  8. A role for Tac2, NkB, and Nk3 receptor in normal and dysregulated fear memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Andero, Raül; Dias, Brian G; Ressler, Kerry J

    2014-07-16

    The centromedial amygdala (CeM), a subdivision of the central amygdala (CeA), is believed to be the main output station of the amygdala for fear expression. We provide evidence that the Tac2 gene, expressed by neurons specifically within the CeM, is required for modulating fear memories. Tac2 is colocalized with GAD65 and CaMKIIα but not with PKCd and Enk neurons in the CeM. Moreover, the Tac2 product, NkB, and its specific receptor, Nk3R, are also involved in the consolidation of fear memories. Increased Tac2 expression, through a stress-induced PTSD-like model, or following lentiviral CeA overexpression, are sufficient to enhance fear consolidation. This effect is blocked by the Nk3R antagonist osanetant. Concordantly, silencing of Tac2-expressing neurons in CeA with DREADDs impairs fear consolidation. Together, these studies further our understanding of the role of the Tac2 gene and CeM in fear processing and may provide approaches to intervention for fear-related disorders.

  9. Activation of Natural Killer (NK) T Cells during Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection Enhances the Antiviral Response Mediated by NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dommelen, Serani L. H.; Tabarias, Hyacinth A.; Smyth, Mark J.; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A.

    2003-01-01

    NK1.1+ T (NKT) cells are efficient regulators of early host responses which have been shown to play a role in tumor surveillance. The relevance of NKT cells in immune surveillance of viral infections, however, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the functional relevance of NKT cells in controlling herpesvirus infections by using challenge with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) as the study model. This model has proven to be one of the best systems for evaluating the role of NK cells during virus infection. Using gene-targeted mice and α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) as an exogenous stimulator of NKT cells, we have analyzed the role of these cells in the immune surveillance of MCMV infection. Our studies in NKT-cell-deficient, T-cell receptor Jα281 gene-targeted mice have established that classical NKT cells do not play a critical role in the early clearance of MCMV infection. Importantly, however, activation of NKT cells by α-GalCer resulted in reduced viral replication in visceral organs. Depletion studies, coupled with analysis of gene-targeted mice lacking perforin and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), have revealed that the antiviral effects of α-GalCer involve NK cells and have clearly demonstrated that the antiviral activity of α-GalCer, unlike the antitumor one, is critically dependent on both perforin and IFN-γ. PMID:12525622

  10. Controlling NK Cell Responses: Integration of Signals for Activation and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Long, Eric O.; Kim, Hun Sik; Liu, Dongfang; Peterson, Mary E.; Rajagopalan, Sumati

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how signals are integrated to control NK cell responsiveness in the absence of antigen-specific receptors has been a challenge, but recent work has revealed some underlying principles that govern NK cell responses. NK cells use an array of innate receptors to sense their environment and respond to alterations caused by infections, cellular stress and transformation. No single activation receptor dominates; instead, synergistic signals from combinations of receptors are integrated to activate natural cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Inhibitory receptors for MHC class I have a critical role in controlling NK cell responses and paradoxically, in maintaining NK cells in a state of responsiveness to subsequent activation events, a process referred to as licensing. MHC-I specific inhibitory receptors both block activation signals and trigger signals to phosphorylate and inactivate the small adaptor Crk. These different facets of inhibitory signaling are incorporated into a revocable license model for the reversible tuning of NK cell responsiveness. PMID:23516982

  11. Amphotericin B, an Anti-Fungal Medication, Directly Increases the Cytotoxicity of NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Ji-Wan; Park, Hye-Ran; Kim, Inki; Kim, Hun Sik

    2017-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) present one example of immunomodulatory agents that improve cancer immunotherapy. Based on the cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells against cancer cells, a high throughput screening method for the identification of novel immunomodulatory molecules with the potential to stimulate NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells was designed and tested using an approved drug library. Among the primary hit compounds, the anti-fungal drug amphotericin B (AMP-B) increased the cytotoxicity of NK cell line and human primary NK cells in a direct manner. The increase in NK cell activity was related to increased formation of NK-target cell conjugates and the subsequent granule polarization toward target cells. The results of the present study indicate that AMP-B could serve a dual function as an anti-fungal and immunomodulatory drug. PMID:28608807

  12. Hidden talents of natural killers: NK cells in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Megan A; Colonna, Marco; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2009-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune lymphocytes capable of killing target cells and producing immunoregulatory cytokines. Herein, we discuss recent studies that indicate that NK cells span the conventional boundaries between innate and adaptive immunity. For example, it was recently discovered that NK cells have the capacity for memory-like responses, a property that was previously thought to be limited to adaptive immunity. NK cells have also been identified in multiple tissues, and a subset of cells that specialize in the production of the T(H)17 cytokine IL-22, NK-22s, was recently described in mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue. Finally, we review work that shows that NK cells develop at sites that were traditionally thought to be occupied only by adaptive immune cells, including the thymus and lymph nodes.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Activation Phenotype, Proliferation, and IFN-γ Production by Spleen NK1.1+ and NK1.1− T Cells During Plasmodium chabaudi AS Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Freitas do Rosário, Ana Paula; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Castillo-Méndez, Sheyla Inés; Zago, Cláudia Augusta; Rodriguez-Málaga, Sérgio Marcelo; Álvarez Mosig, José Maria; D'Império Lima, Maria Regina

    2010-01-01

    The NK1.1 molecule participates in NK, NKT, and T-cell activation, contributing to IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity. To characterize the early immune response to Plasmodium chabaudi AS, spleen NK1.1+ and NK1.1− T cells were compared in acutely infected C57BL/6 mice. The first parasitemia peak in C57BL/6 mice correlated with increase in CD4+NK1.1+TCR-αβ+, CD8+NK1.1+TCR-αβ+, and CD4+NK1.1−TCR-αβ+ cell numbers per spleen, where a higher increment was observed for NK1.1+ T cells compared to NK1.1− T cells. According to the ability to recognize the CD1d-α-GalCer tetramer, CD4+NK1.1+ cells in 7-day infected mice were not predominantly invariant NKT cells. At that time, nearly all NK1.1+ T cells and around 30% of NK1.1− T cells showed an experienced/activated (CD44HICD69HICD122HI) cell phenotype, with high expression of Fas and PD-L1 correlating with their low proliferative capacity. Moreover, whereas IFN-γ production by CD4+NK1.1+ cells peaked at day 4 p.i., the IFN-γ response of CD4+NK1.1− cells continued to increase at day 5 of infection. We also observed, at day 7 p.i., 2-fold higher percentages of perforin+ cells in CD8+NK1.1+ cells compared to CD8+NK1.1− cells. These results indicate that spleen NK1.1+ and NK1.1− T cells respond to acute P. chabaudi malaria with different kinetics in terms of activation, proliferation, and IFN-γ production. PMID:20187775

  14. 19F-MRI for monitoring human NK cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Ludwig, Kai D.; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Kutz, Matthew P.; Bednarz, Bryan P.; Fain, Sean B.; Capitini, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The availability of clinical-grade cytokines and artificial antigen-presenting cells has accelerated interest in using natural killer (NK) cells as adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) for cancer. One of the technological shortcomings of translating therapies from animal models to clinical application is the inability to effectively and non-invasively track these cells after infusion in patients. We have optimized the nonradioactive isotope fluorine-19 (19F) as a means to label and track NK cells in preclinical models using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human NK cells were expanded with interleukin (IL)-2 and labeled in vitro with increasing concentrations of 19F. Doses as low as 2 mg/mL 19F were detected by MRI. NK cell viability was only decreased at 8 mg/mL 19F. No effects on NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells were observed with 2, 4 or 8 mg/mL 19F. Higher doses of 19F, 4 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL, led to an improved 19F signal by MRI with 3 × 1011 19F atoms per NK cell. The 4 mg/mL 19F labeling had no effect on NK cell function via secretion of granzyme B or interferon gamma (IFNγ), compared to NK cells exposed to vehicle alone. 19F-labeled NK cells were detectable immediately by MRI after intratumoral injection in NSG mice and up to day 8. When 19F-labeled NK cells were injected subcutaneously, we observed a loss of signal through time at the site of injection suggesting NK cell migration to distant organs. The 19F perfluorocarbon is a safe and effective reagent for monitoring the persistence and trafficking of NK cell infusions in vivo, and may have potential for developing novel imaging techniques to monitor ACT for cancer. PMID:27467963

  15. PD-1 mediates functional exhaustion of activated NK cells in patients with Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Beldi-Ferchiou, Asma; Lambert, Marion; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Vély, Frédéric; Vivier, Eric; Olive, Daniel; Dupuy, Stéphanie; Levasseur, Frank; Zucman, David; Lebbé, Céleste; Sène, Damien; Hivroz, Claire; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-11-08

    Programmed Death-1 (PD-1), an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated lymphocytes, is involved in regulating T- and B-cell responses. PD-1 and its ligands are exploited by a variety of cancers to facilitate tumor escape through PD-1-mediated functional exhaustion of effector T cells. Here, we report that PD-1 is upregulated on Natural Killer (NK) cells from patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS). PD-1 was expressed in a sub-population of activated, mature CD56dimCD16pos NK cells with otherwise normal expression of NK surface receptors. PD-1pos NK cells from KS patients were hyporesponsive ex vivo following direct triggering of NKp30, NKp46 or CD16 activating receptors, or short stimulation with NK cell targets. PD-1pos NK cells failed to degranulate and release IFNγ, but exogenous IL-2 or IL-15 restored this defect. That PD-1 contributed to NK cell functional impairment and was not simply a marker of dysfunctional NK cells was confirmed in PD-1-transduced NKL cells. In vitro, PD-1 was induced at the surface of healthy control NK cells upon prolonged contact with cells expressing activating ligands, i.e. a condition mimicking persistent stimulation by tumor cells. Thus, PD-1 appears to plays a critical role in mediating NK cell exhaustion. The existence of this negative checkpoint fine-tuning NK activation highlights the possibility that manipulation of the PD-1 pathway may be a strategy for circumventing tumor escape not only from the T cell-, but also the NK-cell mediated immune surveillance.

  16. Experimental study on rat NK cell activity improvement by laser acupoint irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongxiao; Chen, Xiufeng; Ruan, Buqing; Yang, Feng

    1998-08-01

    To study the improvement of the natural killer (NK) cell activity by semiconductor laser acupoint irradiation, rats were used in this experiment and were injected immunosuppressant in their abdomen. The immunoassay was made after the surface irradiation and inner irradiation at Baihui point by semiconductor laser. The NK cell activity is an important index of immunologic function. The results showed that the NK cell activity after laser acupoint irradiation was enhanced. This enhancement is relatively important in the clinical therapy of tumor.

  17. Analysis of NK Cell Function and Receptor Expression During HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Infection.

    PubMed

    Bozzano, Federica; Marras, Francesco; De Maria, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Cytofluorimetric analysis is a typical method in immunology to evaluate phenotype and function of Natural Killer (NK) cells derived from HTLV-1/2 infected patients and healthy donors. Here, we described protocols to NK cells phenotypical and cytotoxicity assay, performed by flow cytometry on fresh and immune-magnetically or flow cytometry sorted NK cells. A new developed protocol able to evaluate IFNγ production has been included.

  18. Characterization of tachykinin NK2 receptor in the anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pisera, Daniel; Candolfi, Marianela; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Seilicovich, Adriana

    2003-09-26

    Tachykinins are a family of bioactive peptides that interact with three subtypes of receptors: NK1, NK2 and NK3. Substance P has greater affinity for NK1, and neurokinin A (NKA) for NK2 receptor subtype. Although only NK1 receptor has been characterized in the anterior pituitary gland, some evidence suggests the existence of NK2 receptors in this gland. Therefore, we investigated the presence of NK2 receptors in the anterior pituitary gland of male rats by radioligand binding studies using labeled SR48968, a non peptidic specific antagonist. [3H]SR48968 specific binding to cultured anterior pituitary cells was time-dependent and saturable, but with a lower affinity than previously reported values for cells expressing NK2 receptors. Unlabeled NKA inhibited only partially [(3)H]SR48968 specific binding to whole anterior pituitary cells. Since SR48968 is a non polar molecule, we performed experiments to discriminate surface from intracellular binding sites. SR48968 exhibited both surface and intracellular specific binding. Analysis of the surface-bound ligand indicated that [3H]SR48968 binds to one class of receptor with high affinity. Neurokinin A completely displaced [3H]SR48968 surface specific binding fitting to a two-site/two-state model with high and low affinity. Additionally, immunocytochemical studies showed that the NK2 receptor is expressed at least in a subset of lactotropes. These results demonstrate the presence of NK2 receptors in the anterior pituitary gland and suggest that NKA actions in this gland are mediated, at least in part, by the NK2 receptor subtype.

  19. Lenalidomide augments actin remodeling and lowers NK-cell activation thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Lagrue, Kathryn; Carisey, Alex; Morgan, David J.; Chopra, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    As multiple myeloma (MM) progresses, natural killer (NK)-cell responses decline against malignant plasma cells. The immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide is widely used for treatment of MM but its influence on NK-cell biology is unclear. Here, we report that lenalidomide lowers the threshold for NK-cell activation, causing a 66% decrease in the 50% effective concentration (EC50) for activation through CD16, and a 38% decrease in EC50 for NK group 2 member D (NKG2D)–mediated activation, allowing NK cells to respond to lower doses of ligand. In addition, lenalidomide augments NK-cell responses, causing a twofold increase in the proportion of primary NK cells producing interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and a 20-fold increase in the amount of IFN-γ produced per cell. Importantly, lenalidomide did not trigger IFN-γ production in unstimulated NK cells. Thus, lenalidomide enhances the NK-cell arm of the immune response, without activating NK cells inappropriately. Of particular clinical importance, lenalidomide also allowed NK cells to be activated by lower doses of rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) widely used to treat B-cell malignancies. This supports combined use of lenalidomide and rituximab in a clinical setting. Finally, superresolution microscopy revealed that lenalidomide increased the periodicity of cortical actin at immune synapses, resulting in an increase in the area of the actin mesh predicted to be penetrable to vesicles containing IFN-γ. NK cells from MM patients also responded to lenalidomide in this way. This indicates that nanometer-scale rearrangements in cortical actin, a recently discovered step in immune synapse assembly, are a potential new target for therapeutic compounds. PMID:26002964

  20. Lenalidomide augments actin remodeling and lowers NK-cell activation thresholds.

    PubMed

    Lagrue, Kathryn; Carisey, Alex; Morgan, David J; Chopra, Rajesh; Davis, Daniel M

    2015-07-02

    As multiple myeloma (MM) progresses, natural killer (NK)-cell responses decline against malignant plasma cells. The immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide is widely used for treatment of MM but its influence on NK-cell biology is unclear. Here, we report that lenalidomide lowers the threshold for NK-cell activation, causing a 66% decrease in the 50% effective concentration (EC50) for activation through CD16, and a 38% decrease in EC50 for NK group 2 member D (NKG2D)-mediated activation, allowing NK cells to respond to lower doses of ligand. In addition, lenalidomide augments NK-cell responses, causing a twofold increase in the proportion of primary NK cells producing interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and a 20-fold increase in the amount of IFN-γ produced per cell. Importantly, lenalidomide did not trigger IFN-γ production in unstimulated NK cells. Thus, lenalidomide enhances the NK-cell arm of the immune response, without activating NK cells inappropriately. Of particular clinical importance, lenalidomide also allowed NK cells to be activated by lower doses of rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) widely used to treat B-cell malignancies. This supports combined use of lenalidomide and rituximab in a clinical setting. Finally, superresolution microscopy revealed that lenalidomide increased the periodicity of cortical actin at immune synapses, resulting in an increase in the area of the actin mesh predicted to be penetrable to vesicles containing IFN-γ. NK cells from MM patients also responded to lenalidomide in this way. This indicates that nanometer-scale rearrangements in cortical actin, a recently discovered step in immune synapse assembly, are a potential new target for therapeutic compounds.

  1. PD-1 mediates functional exhaustion of activated NK cells in patients with Kaposi sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Beldi-Ferchiou, Asma; Lambert, Marion; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Vély, Frédéric; Vivier, Eric; Olive, Daniel; Dupuy, Stéphanie; Levasseur, Frank; Zucman, David; Lebbé, Céleste; Sène, Damien; Hivroz, Claire; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Programmed Death-1 (PD-1), an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated lymphocytes, is involved in regulating T- and B-cell responses. PD-1 and its ligands are exploited by a variety of cancers to facilitate tumor escape through PD-1-mediated functional exhaustion of effector T cells. Here, we report that PD-1 is upregulated on Natural Killer (NK) cells from patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS). PD-1 was expressed in a sub-population of activated, mature CD56dimCD16pos NK cells with otherwise normal expression of NK surface receptors. PD-1pos NK cells from KS patients were hyporesponsive ex vivo following direct triggering of NKp30, NKp46 or CD16 activating receptors, or short stimulation with NK cell targets. PD-1pos NK cells failed to degranulate and release IFNγ, but exogenous IL-2 or IL-15 restored this defect. That PD-1 contributed to NK cell functional impairment and was not simply a marker of dysfunctional NK cells was confirmed in PD-1-transduced NKL cells. In vitro, PD-1 was induced at the surface of healthy control NK cells upon prolonged contact with cells expressing activating ligands, i.e. a condition mimicking persistent stimulation by tumor cells. Thus, PD-1 appears to plays a critical role in mediating NK cell exhaustion. The existence of this negative checkpoint fine-tuning NK activation highlights the possibility that manipulation of the PD-1 pathway may be a strategy for circumventing tumor escape not only from the T cell-, but also the NK-cell mediated immune surveillance. PMID:27662664

  2. Cytomegalovirus infection drives adaptive epigenetic diversification of NK cells with altered signaling and effector function.

    PubMed

    Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Tesi, Bianca; Theorell, Jakob; Beziat, Vivien; Holmes, Tim D; Han, Hongya; Chiang, Samuel C C; Foley, Bree; Mattsson, Kristin; Larsson, Stella; Schaffer, Marie; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Miller, Jeffrey S; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2015-03-17

    The mechanisms underlying human natural killer (NK) cell phenotypic and functional heterogeneity are unknown. Here, we describe the emergence of diverse subsets of human NK cells selectively lacking expression of signaling proteins after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The absence of B and myeloid cell-related signaling protein expression in these NK cell subsets correlated with promoter DNA hypermethylation. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were strikingly similar between HCMV-associated adaptive NK cells and cytotoxic effector T cells but differed from those of canonical NK cells. Functional interrogation demonstrated altered cytokine responsiveness in adaptive NK cells that was linked to reduced expression of the transcription factor PLZF. Furthermore, subsets of adaptive NK cells demonstrated significantly reduced functional responses to activated autologous T cells. The present results uncover a spectrum of epigenetically unique adaptive NK cell subsets that diversify in response to viral infection and have distinct functional capabilities compared to canonical NK cell subsets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic. PMID:26113846

  4. An overview of the potential strategies for NK cell-based immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Chandrima; Cunningham, Lea C

    2016-12-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have relatively low survival rates compared to patients with other pediatric cancers. Relapse is frequent with conventional treatment and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Natural killer (NK) cells offer an alternative approach to chemotherapy that combats relapse by substantially eradicating AML blasts. New methods for enhancing NK cell activation and expression of the activating ligand on target malignant cells will increase the likelihood of success with this approach. We review these latest discoveries in NK cell-based therapy for AML and delineate recent advances in sensitizing AML cells to NK cell-mediated immunosurveillance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV.

  6. Genetic engineering of human NK cells to express CXCR2 improves migration to renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Veronika; Ligtenberg, Maarten; Zendehdel, Rosa; Seitz, Christina; Duivenvoorden, Annet; Wennerberg, Erik; Colón, Eugenia; Scherman-Plogell, Ann-Helén; Lundqvist, Andreas

    2017-09-19

    Adoptive natural killer (NK) cell transfer is being increasingly used as cancer treatment. However, clinical responses have so far been limited to patients with hematological malignancies. A potential limiting factor in patients with solid tumors is defective homing of the infused NK cells to the tumor site. Chemokines regulate the migration of leukocytes expressing corresponding chemokine receptors. Various solid tumors, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC), readily secrete ligands for the chemokine receptor CXCR2. We hypothesize that infusion of NK cells expressing high levels of the CXCR2 chemokine receptor will result in increased influx of the transferred NK cells into tumors, and improved clinical outcome in patients with cancer. Blood and tumor biopsies from 14 primary RCC patients were assessed by flow cytometry and chemokine analysis. Primary NK cells were transduced with human CXCR2 using a retroviral system. CXCR2 receptor functionality was determined by Calcium flux and NK cell migration was evaluated in transwell assays. We detected higher concentrations of CXCR2 ligands in tumors compared with plasma of RCC patients. In addition, CXCL5 levels correlated with the intratumoral infiltration of CXCR2-positive NK cells. However, tumor-infiltrating NK cells from RCC patients expressed lower CXCR2 compared with peripheral blood NK cells. Moreover, healthy donor NK cells rapidly lost their CXCR2 expression upon in vitro culture and expansion. Genetic modification of human primary NK cells to re-express CXCR2 improved their ability to specifically migrate along a chemokine gradient of recombinant CXCR2 ligands or RCC tumor supernatants compared with controls. The enhanced trafficking resulted in increased killing of target cells. In addition, while their functionality remained unchanged compared with control NK cells, CXCR2-transduced NK cells obtained increased adhesion properties and formed more conjugates with target cells. To increase the success of NK

  7. Transcription Factor Foxo1 Is a Negative Regulator of NK Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Youcai; Kerdiles, Yann; Chu, Jianhong; Yuan, Shunzong; Wang, Youwei; Chen, Xilin; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Hughes, Tiffany; Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Zou, Xianghong; Liu, Chang-Gong; Freud, Aharon G.; Li, Xiaohui; Caligiuri, Michael A; Vivier, Eric; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about the role of negative regulators in controlling natural killer (NK) cell development and effector functions. Foxo1 is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. Using a mouse model of conditional deletion in NK cells, we found that Foxo1 negatively controlled NK cell differentiation and function. Immature NK cells expressed abundant Foxo1 and little Tbx21 relative to mature NK cells, but these two transcription factors reversed their expression as NK cells proceeded through development. Foxo1 promoted NK cell homing to lymph nodes through upregulating CD62L expression, and impaired late-stage maturation and effector functions by repressing Tbx21 expression. Loss of Foxo1 rescued the defect in late-stage NK cell maturation in heterozygous Tbx21+/− mice. Collectively, our data reveal a regulatory pathway by which the negative regulator Foxo1 and the positive regulator Tbx21 play opposing roles in controlling NK cell development and effector functions. PMID:25769609

  8. Novel APC-like properties of human NK cells directly regulate T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Jacob; Gonen-Gross, Tsufit; Fitchett, Jonathan; Rowe, Tony; Daniels, Mark; Arnon, Tal I.; Gazit, Roi; Joseph, Aviva; Schjetne, Karoline W.; Steinle, Alexander; Porgador, Angel; Mevorach, Dror; Goldman-Wohl, Debra; Yagel, Simcha; LaBarre, Michael J.; Buckner, Jane H.; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2004-01-01

    Initiation of the adaptive immune response is dependent on the priming of naive T cells by APCs. Proteomic analysis of unactivated and activated human NK cell membrane–enriched fractions demonstrated that activated NK cells can efficiently stimulate T cells, since they upregulate MHC class II molecules and multiple ligands for TCR costimulatory molecules. Furthermore, by manipulating antigen administration, we show that NK cells possess multiple independent unique pathways for antigen uptake. These results highlight NK cell–mediated cytotoxicity and specific ligand recognition by cell surface–activating receptors on NK cells as unique mechanisms for antigen capturing and presentation. In addition, we analyzed the T cell–activating potential of human NK cells derived from different clinical conditions, such as inflamed tonsils and noninfected and CMV-infected uterine decidual samples, and from transporter-associated processing antigen 2–deficient patients. This in vivo analysis revealed that proinflammatory, but not immune-suppressive, microenvironmental requirements can selectively dictate upregulation of T cell–activating molecules on NK cells. Taken together, these observations offer new and unexpected insights into the direct interactions between NK and T cells and suggest novel APC-like activating functions for human NK cells. PMID:15578093

  9. NK Cells: Key to Success of DC-Based Cancer Vaccines?

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Evelien L.J.M.; Berneman, Zwi N.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.I.

    2012-01-01

    The cytotoxic and regulatory antitumor functions of natural killer (NK) cells have become attractive targets for immunotherapy. Manipulation of specific NK cell functions and their reciprocal interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) might hold therapeutic promise. In this review, we focus on the engagement of NK cells in DC-based cancer vaccination strategies, providing a comprehensive overview of current in vivo experimental and clinical DC vaccination studies encompassing the monitoring of NK cells. From these studies, it is clear that NK cells play a key regulatory role in the generation of DC-induced antitumor immunity, favoring the concept that targeting both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms may synergistically promote clinical outcome. However, to date, DC vaccination trials are only infrequently accompanied by NK cell monitoring. Here, we discuss different strategies to improve DC vaccine preparations via exploitation of NK cells and provide a summary of relevant NK cell parameters for immune monitoring. We underscore that the design of DC-based cancer vaccines should include the evaluation of their NK cell stimulating potency both in the preclinical phase and in clinical trials. PMID:22907975

  10. Tim-3 pathway affects NK cell impairment in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hou, Hongyan; Wu, Shiji; Tang, Qing; Huang, Min; Yin, Botao; Huang, Jing; Liu, Weiyong; Mao, Lie; Lu, Yanfang; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-12-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) patients show impaired NK cell function, and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we confirmed the decrease in activation, cytokine secretion, and degranulation potential of NK cells in active TB patients. We further investigated whether coinhibitory receptor Tim-3 was involved with impairment of NK cells. Our results revealed that the expression of Tim-3 on NK cells was increased in active TB patients. Tim-3 expression was inversely correlated with IL-12-stimualted IFN-γ production. Moreover, blocking the Tim-3 pathway restored IFN-γ secretion and degranulation of NK cells. Blocking this pathway also increased NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 target cells, and improved the ability of NK cells to control Mtb growth in monocyte-derived macrophages. The Tim-3 expression on NK cells was also observed to be significantly decreased in TB patients post-treatment. In this study, we have identified that Tim-3 is involved with NK cell impairment in TB patients.

  11. Evaluation of Functional NK Cell Responses in Vaccinated and SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Ying, Olivia; Demberg, Thorsten; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are crucial components of the innate immune system due to their capacity to exert rapid cytotoxic and immunomodulatory function in the absence of prior sensitization. NK cells can become activated by exposure to target cells and/or by cytokines produced by antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined the effects of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine regimen and subsequent SIV infection on the cytotoxic and immunomodulatory functions of circulatory NK cells. While vaccination did not significantly impact the capacity of NK cells to kill MHC-devoid 721.221 target cells, SIV-infection led to a significant decrease in target cell killing. NK cells from uninfected macaques were responsive to a low dose (5 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation, leading to significant increases in their cytotoxic potential, however, NK cells from SIV-infected macaques required a higher dose (50 ng/ml) of IL-15 pre-activation in order to significantly increase their cytotoxic potential. By contrast, no differences were observed in the capacity of NK cells from vaccinated and SIV-infected macaques to respond to IL-12 and IL-18. Similarly, NK cells both before and after infection exhibited equivalent responses to Fc-mediated activation. Collectively, our results show that early SIV-infection impairs the natural cytotoxic capacity of circulatory NK cells without affecting Fc-mediated or cytokine-producing function.

  12. Microchip Screening Platform for Single Cell Assessment of NK Cell Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Guldevall, Karolin; Brandt, Ludwig; Forslund, Elin; Olofsson, Karl; Frisk, Thomas W; Olofsson, Per E; Gustafsson, Karin; Manneberg, Otto; Vanherberghen, Bruno; Brismar, Hjalmar; Kärre, Klas; Uhlin, Michael; Önfelt, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a screening platform for assessment of the cytotoxic potential of individual natural killer (NK) cells within larger populations. Human primary NK cells were distributed across a silicon-glass microchip containing 32,400 individual microwells loaded with target cells. Through fluorescence screening and automated image analysis, the numbers of NK and live or dead target cells in each well could be assessed at different time points after initial mixing. Cytotoxicity was also studied by time-lapse live-cell imaging in microwells quantifying the killing potential of individual NK cells. Although most resting NK cells (≈75%) were non-cytotoxic against the leukemia cell line K562, some NK cells were able to kill several (≥3) target cells within the 12-h long experiment. In addition, the screening approach was adapted to increase the chance to find and evaluate serial killing NK cells. Even if the cytotoxic potential varied between donors, it was evident that a small fraction of highly cytotoxic NK cells were responsible for a substantial portion of the killing. We demonstrate multiple assays where our platform can be used to enumerate and characterize cytotoxic cells, such as NK or T cells. This approach could find use in clinical applications, e.g., in the selection of donors for stem cell transplantation or generation of highly specific and cytotoxic cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

  13. Tracking in vivo dynamics of NK cells transferred in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Killig, Monica; Friedrichs, Birte; Meisig, Johannes; Gentilini, Chiara; Blüthgen, Nils; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Labopin, Myriam; Basara, Nadezda; Pfrepper, Christian; Niederwieser, Dietger W; Uharek, Lutz; Romagnani, Chiara

    2014-09-01

    Haploidentical stem cell transplantation (haploSCT) offers an alternative treatment option for advanced leukemia patients lacking a HLA-compatible donor. Transfer of NK cells represents a promising therapeutic option in combination with SCT, as NK cells can promote graft versus leukemia with low risk of GVH disease. In this study, we show results from a phase I/II trial in which 24 acute myeloid leukemia patients underwent haploSCT in combination with early transfer of unmodified NK cells and observed a promising 2-year overall survival rate of 37%. By performing immunomonitoring and subsequent principal component analysis, we tracked donor NK-cell dynamics in the patients and distinguished between NK cells reconstituting from CD34(+) precursors, giving rise over time to a continuum of multiple differentiation stages, and adoptively transferred NK cells. Transferred NK cells displayed a mature phenotype and proliferated in vivo during the early days after haploSCT even in the absence of exogenous IL-2 administration. Moreover, we identified the NK-cell phenotype associated with in vivo expansion. Thus, our study indicates a promising path for adoptive transfer of unmodified NK cells in the treatment of high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.

  14. Cutting edge: identification and characterization of human intrahepatic CD49a+ NK cells.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Nicole; Béziat, Vivien; Nyström, Sanna; Hengst, Julia; Ivarsson, Martin A; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Johansson, Helene; Mjösberg, Jenny; Westgren, Magnus; Lankisch, Tim O; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Ellis, Ewa C; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Björkström, Niklas K

    2015-03-15

    Although NK cells are considered innate, recent studies in mice revealed the existence of a unique lineage of hepatic CD49a(+)DX5(-) NK cells with adaptive-like features. Development of this NK cell lineage is, in contrast to conventional NK cells, dependent on T-bet but not Eomes. In this study, we describe the identification of a T-bet(+)Eomes(-)CD49a(+) NK cell subset readily detectable in the human liver, but not in afferent or efferent hepatic venous or peripheral blood. Human intrahepatic CD49a(+) NK cells express killer cell Ig-like receptor and NKG2C, indicative of having undergone clonal-like expansion, are CD56(bright), and express low levels of CD16, CD57, and perforin. After stimulation, CD49a(+) NK cells express high levels of inflammatory cytokines but degranulate poorly. CD49a(+) NK cells retain their phenotype after expansion in long-term in vitro cultures. These results demonstrate the presence of a likely human counterpart of mouse intrahepatic NK cells with adaptive-like features. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Peripheral NK cell phenotypes: multiple changing of faces of an adapting, developing cell.

    PubMed

    Perussia, Bice; Chen, Yingying; Loza, Matthew J

    2005-02-01

    We have defined the existence of developmental relationships among human peripheral NK cells with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics. These findings closely parallel the changes that occur in vivo during NK cell development, and in vitro in experimental culture systems supporting NK cell generation from hematopoietic progenitors. These new insights provide a simplified framework to understand NK cell immunobiology and the cellular bases for their roles in innate immunity, initiation and maintenance of immune responses via regulation of adaptive and accessory cell functions, and immune pathologies.

  16. Flow Cytometry-based Assay for the Monitoring of NK Cell Functions.

    PubMed

    Tognarelli, Sara; Jacobs, Benedikt; Staiger, Nina; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2016-10-30

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important part of the human tumor immune surveillance system. NK cells are able to distinguish between healthy and virus-infected or malignantly transformed cells due to a set of germline encoded inhibitory and activating receptors. Upon virus or tumor cell recognition a variety of different NK cell functions are initiated including cytotoxicity against the target cell as well as cytokine and chemokine production leading to the activation of other immune cells. It has been demonstrated that accurate NK cell functions are crucial for the treatment outcome of different virus infections and malignant diseases. Here a simple and reliable method is described to analyze different NK cell functions using a flow cytometry-based assay. NK cell functions can be evaluated not only for the whole NK cell population, but also for different NK cell subsets. This technique enables scientists to easily study NK cell functions in healthy donors or patients in order to reveal their impact on different malignancies and to further discover new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Protocol for the clonal analysis of NK cell effector functions by multi-parameter flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schönberg, Kathrin; Hejazi, Maryam; Uhrberg, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells provide a first line of defense against viral infections and prepare the ground for subsequent action of virus-specific T cells in a concerted way. Human NK cells use a sophisticated system of inhibitory and stimulatory receptors of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family, which are expressed in a clonally distributed manner. Several studies suggest that KIR play a critical role in NK cell-mediated protection against HCV and HIV infection. As each NK cell expresses an individual set of KIR receptors that enables them to sense differences in HLA class I expression, classical measurement of NK cell function by analysis of target cell killing does not enable one to define and isolate the clinically relevant NK cell effector subsets. Here, we have developed a flow cytometry-based protocol to measure cytolytic activity together with KIR expression at a clonal level. Combined analysis of KIR expression in conjunction with cell surface mobilization of CD107 enables precise enumeration of cytolytic NK cells with defined specificity for HLA class I. Moreover, via inclusion of intracellular perforin or alternatively granzyme B, NK cells with deficient loading of cytotoxic granula can be identified. The present protocol enables identification and isolation of cytotoxic NK cells on a clonal level and enables reliable measurement in healthy as well as in pathological settings such as virus infection and hematological disease.

  18. Microchip Screening Platform for Single Cell Assessment of NK Cell Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guldevall, Karolin; Brandt, Ludwig; Forslund, Elin; Olofsson, Karl; Frisk, Thomas W.; Olofsson, Per E.; Gustafsson, Karin; Manneberg, Otto; Vanherberghen, Bruno; Brismar, Hjalmar; Kärre, Klas; Uhlin, Michael; Önfelt, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a screening platform for assessment of the cytotoxic potential of individual natural killer (NK) cells within larger populations. Human primary NK cells were distributed across a silicon–glass microchip containing 32,400 individual microwells loaded with target cells. Through fluorescence screening and automated image analysis, the numbers of NK and live or dead target cells in each well could be assessed at different time points after initial mixing. Cytotoxicity was also studied by time-lapse live-cell imaging in microwells quantifying the killing potential of individual NK cells. Although most resting NK cells (≈75%) were non-cytotoxic against the leukemia cell line K562, some NK cells were able to kill several (≥3) target cells within the 12-h long experiment. In addition, the screening approach was adapted to increase the chance to find and evaluate serial killing NK cells. Even if the cytotoxic potential varied between donors, it was evident that a small fraction of highly cytotoxic NK cells were responsible for a substantial portion of the killing. We demonstrate multiple assays where our platform can be used to enumerate and characterize cytotoxic cells, such as NK or T cells. This approach could find use in clinical applications, e.g., in the selection of donors for stem cell transplantation or generation of highly specific and cytotoxic cells for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27092139

  19. Repression of GSK3 restores NK cell cytotoxicity in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Ramakrishnan, Parameswaran; Moreton, Stephen A; Xia, Zhiqiang; Hou, Yongchun; Lee, Dean A; Gupta, Kalpana; deLima, Marcos; Beck, Rose C; Wald, David N

    2016-04-04

    Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients (AML-NK) show a dramatic impairment in cytotoxic activity. The exact reasons for this dysfunction are not fully understood. Here we show that the glycogen synthase kinase beta (GSK3β) expression is elevated in AML-NK cells. Interestingly, GSK3 overexpression in normal NK cells impairs their ability to kill AML cells, while genetic or pharmacological GSK3 inactivation enhances their cytotoxic activity. Mechanistic studies reveal that the increased cytotoxic activity correlates with an increase in AML-NK cell conjugates. GSK3 inhibition promotes the conjugate formation by upregulating LFA expression on NK cells and by inducing ICAM-1 expression on AML cells. The latter is mediated by increased NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α production by NK cells. Finally, GSK3-inhibited NK cells show significant efficacy in human AML mouse models. Overall, our work provides mechanistic insights into the AML-NK dysfunction and a potential NK cell therapy strategy.

  20. Combination Immune Therapies to Enhance Anti-Tumor Responses by NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mentlik James, Ashley; Cohen, Adam D.; Campbell, Kerry S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are critical innate immune lymphocytes capable of destroying virally infected or cancerous cells through targeted cytotoxicity and further assisting in the immune response by releasing inflammatory cytokines. NK cells are thought to contribute to the process of tumor killing by certain therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by directing antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) through FcγRIIIA (CD16). Numerous therapeutic mAb have been developed that target distinct cancer-specific cell markers and may direct NK cell-mediated ADCC. Recent therapeutic approaches have combined some of these cancer-specific mAb with additional strategies to optimize NK cell cytotoxicity. These include agonistic mAb targeting NK cell activating receptors and mAbs blocking NK cell inhibitory receptors to enhance NK cell functions. Furthermore, several drugs that can potentiate NK cell cytotoxicity through other mechanisms are being used in combination with therapeutic mAb. In this review, we examine the mechanisms employed by several promising agents used in combination therapies that enhance natural or Ab-dependent cytotoxicity of cancer cells by NK cells, with a focus on treatments for leukemia and multiple myeloma. PMID:24391651

  1. NK cell activity in tuberculosis is associated with impaired CD11a and ICAM-1 expression: a regulatory role of monocytes in NK activation

    PubMed Central

    Schierloh, Pablo; Alemán, Mercedes; Yokobori, Noemí; Alves, Leandro; Roldán, Nicolás; Abbate, Eduardo; del C Sasiain, María; de la Barrera, Silvia

    2005-01-01

    Although the role of natural killer (NK) cells in mycobacterial infections is unclear, it has been postulated that they contribute to protective immunity through the production of interferon (IFN)-γ. In this study, we evaluate the effect of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-15 and IL-18 on NK lytic activity through the expression of CD16, CD11a and CD69 molecules and the induction of IFN-γ production in patients with tuberculosis (TB) and healthy individuals (N). Our results showed an impairment of NK lytic activity and a gradual down-regulation of costimulatory and adhesion molecules on NK cells which were dependent on the severity of the disease. NK lytic activity was increased by exogenous IL-15 and IL-18 in both TB and N, and by neutralization of endogenous IL-10 only in TB; IL-15 and IL-18 increased CD69 receptor expression, while anti-IL-10 up-regulated CD16 and CD11a expression in TB. Mycobacterium tuberculosis reduced the number of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1+ CD14+ cells, but in the presence of IL-15, IL-18 and anti-IL-10 its expression was up-regulated. In cells from TB patients, the observed effects of IL-15 and IL-18 on NK function were not dependent on IL-10 modulation of the surface expression of activator/adhesion molecules. In the absence of monocytes, IL-10 activated NK cells, suggesting an indirect effect on their function. Furthermore, in TB patients the depletion of monocytes increased the production of IFN-γ by NK cells. Therefore, monocytes from TB patients regulated the NK function involving IL-10 which, through an indirect mechanism, led to the down-regulation of costimulatory/adhesion molecules and/or IFN-γ production. PMID:16313368

  2. Defects in DNA replication hit NK cells and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ley, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    Patients who present with unique immunological phenotypes provide an opportunity to better understand defect-driving mutations. In this issue of the JCI, Cottineau and colleagues characterize 5 individuals who exhibited growth restriction, facial deformities, and a history of bacterial and viral infection. Further characterization revealed that these patients were neutropenic and NK cell deficient. These phenotypes were unexpectedly linked to mutations in the gene encoding a subunit of the Go-Ichi-Ni-San (GINS) complex, which is essential for DNA replication prior to cell division. Together, the results of this study lay the groundwork for future studies to explore the role of DNA replication in immune cell generation and function.

  3. Zika virus escapes NK cell detection by upregulating MHC class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Glasner, Ariella; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Weisblum, Yiska; Diab, Mohammad; Panet, Amos; Wolf, Dana G; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2017-09-06

    NK cells are innate lymphocytes that participate in many immune processes encompassing cancer, bacterial and fungal infection, autoimmunity and even pregnancy and are specialize in anti-viral defense. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors and kill their targets when activating signals overpower the inhibitory ones. The NK cell inhibitory receptors compose of a uniquely diverse array of proteins named Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) the CD94 family and the leukocyte immunoglobulin like receptor family (LIR). The NK inhibitory receptors recognize mostly MHC class I proteins. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat due to its association with birth defects and its pandemic potential. How Zika virus interacts with the immune system, especially with NK cells is unclear. Here we show that Zika virus infection is barely sensed by NK cells, as little or no increase in the expression of activating NK cell ligands was observed. In contrast, we demonstrate that Zika virus infection leads to the upregulation of MHC class I proteins and consequently to inhibition of NK cell killing. Mechanistically, we show that the upregulation of MHC class I occurs via the RIGI-IRF3 pathway, and is mediated via IFNβ. Potentially, countering MHC class I upregulation during Zika virus infection could be used as a prophylactic treatment against Zika virus.IMPORTANCE NK cells are innate lymphocytes, which recognize and eliminate various pathogens, and are mostly known for their role in controlling viral infections. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors and kill or spare their targets based on integration of inhibitory and activating signals. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat to humans due to its pandemic potential and association with birth defects. The role of NK cells in Zika virus infection is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Zika virus infection is almost undetected by NK cells, as expression of activating

  4. Multiple effects of IL-21 on human NK cells in ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Ye, Lin-Jie; Ren, Hai-Long; Huyan, Ting; Li, Jing; Shi, Jun-Ling; Huang, Qing-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells (CD56(+)CD3(-)) are large, granular immunocytes that play a very pivotal role in the anti-inflammatory response and tumor surveillance. As an ideal cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL), NK cells have attracted much attention in clinical trials. However, an insufficient number and their limited life span are bottlenecks that limit the application of NK cells in adoptive immunotherapy. Interleukins such as IL-2, IL-15 and IL-18 are recognized as factors that stimulate NK cells and have been used in NK cells ex vivo expansion. Similar to IL-2 and IL-15, IL-21 is a common γ-chain cytokine that is important in NK cell activation, maturation and proliferation. The present study aims to assess the effects of membrane-bound and soluble IL-21 on primary human NK cells during ex vivo expansion. IL-21 was found to have multiple effects on NK cells, increasing their cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner by up-regulating IFN-γ and Granzyme-B expression. Nevertheless, at a high concentration (50 ng/mL), IL-21 curtailed the life span of NK cells by significantly inducing apoptosis. Moreover, when treated with IL-21, the number of NKT (CD56(+)CD3(+)) cells increased among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during ex vivo expansion in a concentration-dependent manner. IL-21 also promoted expanded cells to enter into S phase of the cell cycle during the first to second weeks of culture. All these results suggest that IL-21 has multiple effects on NK cell development and functions. More attention should be given to the dosage and multiple effects of IL-21 when it was applied to NK cells in ex vivo expansion.

  5. Significantly enhanced lung metastasis and reduced organ NK cell functions in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, J; Hanke, J; Knauf, D; Ben-Eliyahu, S; Jacobs, R; Stangl, G I; Bähr, I; Kielstein, H

    2017-01-01

    Obesity was identified as a major risk factor for malignant diseases, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Natural killer (NK) cells, a pivotal aspect of innate immunity, are capable of identifying and killing virally infected and tumor cells. Previous studies have shown altered NK cell functions in obesity, and the current study aimed to investigate the relationship between altered NK cell functions and increased cancer risk in obesity. To induce obesity male F344-rats received a high-fat diet (34% fat) or a control diet (4% fat). Thereafter, syngeneic mammary adenocarcinoma cells (MADB106) or a vehicle were intravenously (i.v.) injected. 15 min after injection, half of each group of rats were killed, lungs removed and immunohistochemically stained. Numbers of NK cells, MADB106 cells and NK cell-tumor cell interactions were quantified. Twenty-one days after tumor-cell injection the other half group of rats was killed and lung metastases were counted and relative mRNA concentrations of different NK cell receptors were determined. After short-term MADB106-challenge, DIO fed animals showed significantly decreased NK cell numbers in the blood and NK cell-tumor cell interactions in the lung as compared to their control littermates. Twenty-one days after MADB106 injection, the lungs of the DIO fed rats showed significantly more lung metastases compared to control animals, accompanied by reduced relative mRNA concentrations of the activating NK cell receptor NKG2D. We conclude that induction of obesity in F344-rats leads to reduced lung NK cell function against tumor cells and results in significantly enhanced lung metastasis as compared to lean animals. It can be hypothesized that obesity-induced altered NK cell functions play an important role in cancer growth and metastasis.

  6. CALGB 150905 (Alliance): Rituximab broadens the anti-lymphoma response by activating unlicensed NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Lopez-Verges, Sandra; Pitcher, Brandelyn N.; Johnson, Jeffrey; Jung, Sin-Ho; Zhou, Lili; Hsu, Katharine; Czuczman, Myron S.; Cheson, Bruce; Kaplan, Lawrence; Lanier, Lewis L.; Venstrom, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to clinical responses in patients treated with rituximab, but the rules determining NK cell responsiveness to mAb therapies are poorly defined. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms responsible for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) could yield useful biomarkers for predicting clinical responses in patients. Unlicensed NK cells, defined as NK cells lacking expression of an inhibitory KIR for self-HLA class I ligands, are hypo-responsive in steady-state, but are potent effectors in inflammatory conditions. We hypothesized that antitumor antibodies such as rituximab can overcome NK cell dependence on licensing, making unlicensed NK cells important for clinical responses. Here we examined the influences of variations in KIR and HLA class I alleles on in vitro responses to rituximab. We tested the clinical significance in a cohort of follicular lymphoma patients treated with rituximab-containing mAb combinations and show that rituximab triggers responses from all NK cell populations regardless of licensing. Neither IL-2 nor accessory cells are required for activating unlicensed NK cells, but both can augment rituximab-mediated ADCC. Moreover, in 101 follicular lymphoma patients treated with rituximab-containing mAb combinations, a “missing ligand” genotype (predictive of unlicensed NK cells) is associated with higher progression-free survival. Our data suggest that the clinical efficacy of rituximab may be driven, in part, by its ability to broaden the NK cell repertoire to include previously hypo-responsive, unlicensed NK cells. A “missing ligand” KIR and HLA class I genotype may be predictive of this benefit, and useful for personalizing treatment decisions in lymphomas and other tumors. PMID:24958280

  7. NK Cells Help Induce Anti-Hepatitis B Virus CD8+ T Cell Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meijuan; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-15

    Although recent clinical studies demonstrate that NK cell function is impaired in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-persistent patients, whether or how NK cells play a role in anti-HBV adaptive immunity remains to be explored. Using a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection by hydrodynamic injection of an HBV plasmid, we observed that although serum hepatitis B surface Ag and hepatitis B envelope Ag were eliminated within 3 to 4 wk, HBV might persist for >8 wk in CD8(-/-) mice and that adoptive transfer of anti-HBV CD8(+) T cells restored the ability to clear HBV in HBV-carrier Rag1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that CD8(+) T cells are critical in HBV elimination. Furthermore, NK cells increased IFN-γ production after HBV plasmid injection, and NK cell depletion led to significantly increased HBV persistence along with reduced frequency of hepatitis B core Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer of IFN-γ-sufficient NK cells restored donor CD8(+) T cell function, indicating that NK cells positively regulated CD8(+) T cells via secreting IFN-γ. We also observed that NK cell depletion correlated with decreased effector memory CD8(+) T cell frequencies. Importantly, adoptive transfer experiments showed that NK cells were involved in anti-HBV CD8(+) T cell recall responses. Moreover, DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional, but not DX5(-)CD49a(+) liver-resident, NK cells were involved in improving CD8(+) T cell responses against HBV. Overall, the current study reveals that NK cells, especially DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional NK cells, promote the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cell responses via secreting IFN-γ in a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection.

  8. Strategies to rescue mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) from NK cell mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Anahid; Arasteh, Aida; Tseng, Han-Ching; Behel, Armin; Arasteh, Hobie; Yang, Wendy; Cacalano, Nicholas A; Paranjpe, Avina

    2010-03-31

    The aim of this paper is to study the function of allogeneic and autologous NK cells against Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) and Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) and to determine the function of NK cells in a three way interaction with monocytes and stem cells. We demonstrate here that freshly isolated untreated or IL-2 treated NK cells are potent inducers of cell death in DPSCs and MSCs, and that anti-CD16 antibody which induces functional split anergy and apoptosis in NK cells inhibits NK cell mediated lysis of DPSCs and MSCs. Monocytes co-cultured with either DPSCs or MSCs decrease lysis of stem cells by untreated or IL-2 treated NK cells. Monocytes also prevent NK cell apoptosis thereby raising the overall survival and function of NK cells, DPSCs or MSCs. Both total population of monocytes and those depleted of CD16(+) subsets were able to prevent NK cell mediated lysis of MSCs and DPSCs, and to trigger an increased secretion of IFN-gamma by IL-2 treated NK cells. Protection of stem cells from NK cell mediated lysis was also seen when monocytes were sorted out from stem cells before they were added to NK cells. However, this effect was not specific to monocytes since the addition of T and B cells to stem cells also protected stem cells from NK cell mediated lysis. NK cells were found to lyse monocytes, as well as T and B cells. By increasing the release of IFN-gamma and decreasing the cytotoxic function of NK cells monocytes are able to shield stem cells from killing by the NK cells, resulting in an increased protection and differentiation of stem cells. More importantly studies reported in this paper indicate that anti-CD16 antibody can be used to prevent NK cell induced rejection of stem cells.

  9. Adaptive NK cells can persist in patients with GATA2 mutation depleted of stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Schlums, Heinrich; Jung, Moonjung; Han, Hongya; Theorell, Jakob; Bigley, Venetia; Chiang, Samuel C C; Allan, David S J; Davidson-Moncada, Jan K; Dickinson, Rachel E; Holmes, Tim D; Hsu, Amy P; Townsley, Danielle; Winkler, Thomas; Wang, Weixin; Aukrust, Pål; Nordøy, Ingvild; Calvo, Katherine R; Holland, Steve M; Collin, Matthew; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2017-04-06

    Heterozygous GATA2 mutation is associated with immunodeficiency, lymphedema, and myelodysplastic syndrome. Disease presentation is variable, often coinciding with loss of circulating dendritic cells, monocytes, B cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Nonetheless, in a proportion of patients carrying GATA2 mutation, NK cells persist. We found that peripheral blood NK cells in symptomatic patients uniformly lacked expression of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF), as well as expression of intracellular signaling proteins FcεRγ, spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK), and EWS/FLI1-Activated Transcript 2 (EAT-2) in a variegated manner. Moreover, consistent with an adaptive identity, NK cells from patients with GATA2 mutation displayed altered expression of cytotoxic granule constituents and produced interferon-γ upon Fc-receptor engagement but not following combined interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-18 stimulation. Canonical, PLZF-expressing NK cells were retained in asymptomatic carriers of GATA2 mutation. Developmentally, GATA-binding protein-2 (GATA-2) was expressed in hematopoietic stem cells, but not in NK-cell progenitors, CD3(-)CD56(bright), canonical, or adaptive CD3(-)CD56(dim) NK cells. Peripheral blood NK cells from individuals with GATA2 mutation proliferated normally in vitro, whereas lineage-negative progenitors displayed impaired NK-cell differentiation. In summary, adaptive NK cells can persist in patients with GATA2 mutation, even after NK-cell progenitors expire. Moreover, our data suggest that adaptive NK cells are more long-lived than canonical, immunoregulatory NK cells.

  10. NK cells lacking FcεRIγ are associated with reduced liver damage in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jun S; Ali, Alaa K; Kim, Sungjin; Corsi, Daniel J; Cooper, Curtis L; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-04-01

    A novel subset of human natural killer (NK) cells, which displays potent and broad antiviral responsiveness in concert with virus-specific antibodies, was recently uncovered in cytomegalovirus (CMV)+ individuals. This NK-cell subset (g-NK) was characterized by a deficiency in the expression of FcεRIγ adaptor protein and the long-lasting memory-like NK-cell phenotype, suggesting a role in chronic infections. This study investigates whether the g-NK-cell subset is associated with the magnitude of liver disease during chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Analysis of g-NK-cell proportions and function in the PBMCs of healthy controls and chronic HCV subjects showed that chronic HCV subjects had slightly lower proportions of the g-NK-cell subset having similarly enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses compared to conventional NK cells. Notably, among CMV+ chronic HCV patients, lower levels of liver enzymes and fibrosis were found in those possessing g-NK cells. g-NK cells were predominant among the CD56(neg) NK cell population often found in chronic HCV patients, suggesting their involvement in immune response during HCV infection. For the first time, our findings indicate that the presence of the g-NK cells in CMV+ individuals is associated with amelioration of liver disease in chronic HCV infection, suggesting the beneficial roles of g-NK cells during a chronic infection.

  11. Uptake of poly-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes and decline of functions in mouse NK cells undergoing activation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Anwar; Puri, Niti; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of poly-dispersed acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNT) with NK cells undergoing activation was examined. Exposure to AF-SWCNT during NK activation in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2, and in vivo by Poly(I:C) significantly lowered cytotoxic activity generated against YAC-1 tumor cells. Recoveries of spleen NK1.1(+) cells as well as the activated subset of NK cells (NK1.1(+)CD69(+) cells) were significantly reduced by the AF-SWCNT exposure. The proportion of apoptotic NK cells (NK1.1(+) phosphatidylserine(+)) in the spleen cell preparations activated in vitro was also significantly elevated. Expression levels of CD107a [for assessing NK cell degranulation] as well as of FasL marker [mediating non-secretory pathway of NK cell killing] were significantly lower in cells exposed to AF-SWCNT during the activation phase. Intracellular levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the cells were also significantly reduced. Fluorescent AF-SWCNT (FAF-SWCNT) were internalized by the NK cells and uptake was significantly greater in activated cells. Confocal microscopy indicated the internalized FAF-SWCNT were localized to the cytoplasm of the NK cells. These results indicated that AF-SWCNT were internalized by NK cells and caused a general down-regulation of a variety of parameters associated with NK cell cytotoxicity and other cellular functions.

  12. Upregulation of tachykinin NK-1 and NK-3 receptor binding sites in the spinal cord of spontaneously hypertensive rat: impact on the autonomic control of blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Frank; Ongali, Brice; Deschamps, Kathleen; Brouillette, Jonathan; Neugebauer, Witold; Couture, Réjean

    2006-01-01

    Effects of intrathecally (i.t.) injected tachykinin NK-1 and -3 receptor agonists and antagonists were measured on mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in awake unrestrained spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR,15-week-old) and age-matched Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). Quantitative in vitro autoradiography was also performed on the lower thoracic spinal cord of both strains and Wistar rats using specific radioligands for NK-1 receptor ([125I]HPP[Arg3,Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP (3–11)) and NK-3 receptor ([125I]HPP-Asp-Asp-Phe-N-MePhe-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2). The NK-1 agonist [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP (650 and 6500 pmol) decreased MAP and increased HR in WKY. The fall in MAP was blunted in SHR and substituted by increases in MAP (65–6500 pmol) and more sustained tachycardia. The NK-3 agonist senktide (6.5–65 pmol) evoked marked increases in MAP and HR (SHR>>>WKY), yet this response was rapidly desensitized. Cardiovascular effects of [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP (650 pmol) and senktide (6.5 pmol) were selectively blocked by the prior i.t. injection of LY303870 (NK-1 antagonist, 65 nmol) and SB235375 (NK-3 antagonist, 6.5 nmol), respectively. Antagonists had no direct effect on MAP and HR in both strains. Densities of NK-1 and -3 receptor binding sites were significantly increased in all laminae of the spinal cord in SHR when compared to control WKY and Wistar rats. The dissociation constant was however not affected in SHR for both NK-1 (Kd=2.5 nM) and NK-3 (Kd=5 nM) receptors. Data highlight an upregulation of NK-1 and -3 receptor binding sites in the thoracic spinal cord of SHR that may contribute to the hypersensitivity of the pressor response to agonists and to the greater sympathetic activity seen in this model of arterial hypertension. PMID:16491095

  13. NK Cells Alleviate Lung Inflammation by Negatively Regulating Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jiacheng; Cui, Lulu; Yu, Guang; Yang, Xiaolu; Chen, Youhai; Wan, Xiaochun

    2017-04-15

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) play an important role in orchestrating type II immune responses. However, the cellular mechanisms of group 2 innate lymphoid cell regulation remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that activated NK cells inhibited the proliferation of, as well as IL-5 and IL-13 production by, ILC2s in vitro via IFN-γ. In addition, in a murine model of ILC2 expansion in the liver, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, an NK cell-activating agent, inhibited ILC2 proliferation, IL-5 and IL-13 production, and eosinophil recruitment. Such effects of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid were abrogated in NK cell-depleted mice and in IFN-γ-deficient mice. Adoptively transferring wild-type NK cells into NK cell-depleted mice resulted in fewer ILC2s induced by IL-33 compared with the transfer of IFN-γ-deficient NK cells. Importantly, during the early stage of papain- or bleomycin-induced lung inflammation, depletion of NK cells resulted in increased ILC2 numbers and enhanced cytokine production by ILC2s, as well as aggravated eosinophilia and goblet cell hyperplasia. Collectively, these data show that NK cells negatively regulate ILC2s during the early stage of lung inflammation, which represents the novel cellular interaction between two family members of ILCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. The Memories of NK Cells: Innate-Adaptive Immune Intrinsic Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Ortolani, Claudio; del Zotto, Genny; Luchetti, Francesca; Canonico, Barbara; Artico, Marco; Papa, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Although NK cells are considered part of the innate immune system, a series of evidences has demonstrated that they possess characteristics typical of the adaptive immune system. These NK adaptive features, in particular their memory-like functions, are discussed from an ontogenetic and evolutionary point of view. PMID:28078307

  15. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  16. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and cladribine synergistically induce apoptosis in NK-LGL leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoshen; Hasanali, Zainul S; Chen, Allshine; Zhang, Dianzheng; Liu, Xin; Wang, Hong-Gang; Feith, David J; Loughran, Thomas P; Xu, Kailin

    2015-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukaemia features a clonal proliferation of CD3(-) NK cells that can be classified into either aggressive or chronic categories. The NKL cell line, derived from an aggressive Asian NK cell leukaemia, and patient samples from chronic NK-LGL leukaemia were used in our study to probe for synergistic efficacy of the epigenetic drugs vorinostat (SAHA) and cladribine in this disease. We demonstrate that histone deacetylases (HDACs) are over-expressed in both aggressive and chronic NK leukaemia. Administration of the HDAC inhibitor SAHA reduces class I and II HDAC expression and enhances histone acetylation in leukaemic NK cells. In vitro combination treatment with SAHA and cladribine dose-dependently exerts synergistic cytotoxic and apoptotic effects on leukaemic NK cells. Expression profiling of apoptotic regulatory genes suggests that both compounds led to caspase-dependent apoptosis through activation of intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathways. Collectively, these data show that combined epigenetic therapy, using HDAC and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, may be a promising therapeutic approach for NK-LGL leukaemia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. GVHD prevents NK-cell-dependent leukemia and virus-specific innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Mark D; Varelias, Antiopi; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Schuster, Iona S; Lineburg, Katie E; Kuns, Rachel D; Fleming, Peter; Locke, Kelly R; Huntington, Nicholas D; Blazar, Bruce R; Lane, Steven W; Tey, Siok-Keen; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Smyth, Mark J; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2017-02-02

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) is a curative therapy for hematological malignancies, but is associated with significant complications, principally graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and opportunistic infections. Natural killer (NK) cells mediate important innate immunity that provides a temporal bridge until the reconstruction of adaptive immunity. Here, we show that the development of GVHD after allo-BMT prevented NK-cell reconstitution, particularly within the maturing M1 and M2 NK-cell subsets in association with exaggerated activation, apoptosis, and autophagy. Donor T cells were critical in this process by limiting the availability of interleukin 15 (IL-15), and administration of IL-15/IL-15Rα or immune suppression with rapamycin could restore NK-cell reconstitution. Importantly, the NK-cell defect induced by GVHD resulted in the failure of NK-cell-dependent in vivo cytotoxicity and graft-versus-leukemia effects. Control of cytomegalovirus infection after allo-BMT was also impaired during GVHD. Thus, during GVHD, donor T cells compete with NK cells for IL-15 thereby inducing profound defects in NK-cell reconstitution that compromise both leukemia and pathogen-specific immunity. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-02-26

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag(-/-) γc(-/-) mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions.

  19. Two photon microscopy intravital study of DC-mediated anti-tumor response of NK cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccia, Michele; Gorletta, Tatiana; Sironi, Laura; Zanoni, Ivan; Salvetti, Cristina; Collini, Maddalena; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the activation of Natural Killer cells (NKs) that are responsible for anti-tumor innate immune responses. The focus of this report is on the role of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) activated-DCs in inducing NK cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. Mice transplanted sub-cute (s.c.) with AK7 cells, a mesothelioma cell line sensitive to NK cell responses, are injected with fluorescent NK cells and DC activation is then induced by s.c. injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using 4 dimensional tracking we follow the kinetic behavior of NK cells at the Draining Lymph-Node (DLN). As control, noninflammatory conditions are also evaluated. Our data suggest that NK cells are recruited to the DLN where they can interact with activated-DCs with a peculiar kinetic behavior: short lived interactions interleaved by rarer longer ones. We also found that the changes in the NK dynamic behavior in inflammatory conditions clearly affect relevant motility parameters such as the instantaneous and average velocity and the effective diffusion coefficient. This observation suggests that NK cells and activated-DCs might efficiently interact in the DLN, where cells could be activated. Therefore the interaction between activated-DCs and NK cells in DLN is not only a reality but it may be also crucial for the start of the immune response of the NKs.

  20. Differential phenotypic and functional properties of liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ling; Peng, Hui; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) consist of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells, tissue-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s. Recently identified liver-resident NK cells, which can mount contact hypersensitivity responses, and mucosal ILC1s that are involved in pathogenesis of colitis are distinct from cNK cells in several aspects, but the issue of how they are related to each other has not been clearly clarified. Here, we show that liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s have different phenotypes, as evidenced by distinct expression patterns of homing-associated molecules. Moreover, mucosal ILC1s exhibit tissue residency akin to liver-resident NK cells. Importantly, liver-resident NK cells express relative high levels of cytotoxic effector molecules, which are poorly expressed by mucosal ILC1s, and exhibit stronger cytotoxic activity compared with mucosal ILC1s. These results demonstrate differential phenotypic and functional characteristics of liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s, shedding new light on the diversity of ILC family.

  1. Mapping and genotypic analysis of NK-lysin gene in chicken

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are important elements of the first line of defence against pathogens in animals. NK-lysin is a cationic AMP that plays a critical role in innate immunity. The chicken NK-lysin gene has been cloned and its antimicrobial and anticancer activity has been descri...

  2. Mapping and genotypic analysis of NK-lysin gene in chicken

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NK-lysin is a cationic anti-microbial peptide that plays a critical role in innate immunity against infectious pathogens. Chicken NK-lysin has been cloned and its antimicrobial and anticancer activity has been described but its location in the chicken genome prior this study was unknown. A 6000 rad ...

  3. Human immunodeficiency-causing mutation defines CD16 in spontaneous NK cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Grier, Jennifer T; Forbes, Lisa R; Monaco-Shawver, Linda; Oshinsky, Jennifer; Atkinson, T Prescott; Moody, Curtis; Pandey, Rahul; Campbell, Kerry S; Orange, Jordan S

    2012-10-01

    The Fc receptor on NK cells, FcγRIIIA (CD16), has been extensively studied for its role in mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). A homozygous missense mutation in CD16 (encoding a L66H substitution) is associated with severe herpesvirus infections in rare patients. Here, we identified a new patient with this CD16 mutation and compared the patient's NK cells to those of the originally reported patient. Patients with the L66H mutation had intact ADCC, but deficient spontaneous NK cell cytotoxicity and decreased surface expression of CD2, a coactivation receptor. Mechanistic studies in a human NK cell line, NK-92, demonstrated that CD16 expression correlated with CD2 surface levels and enabled killing of a melanoma cell line typically resistant to CD16-deficient NK-92 cells. An association between CD16 and CD2 was identified biochemically and at the immunological synapse, which elicited CD16 signaling after CD2 engagement. Stable expression of CD16 L66H in NK-92 cells recapitulated the patient phenotype, abrogating association of CD16 with CD2 as well as CD16 signaling after CD2 ligation. Thus, CD16 serves a role in NK cell-mediated spontaneous cytotoxicity through a specific association with CD2 and represents a potential mechanism underlying a human congenital immunodeficiency.

  4. Intrinsic Contribution of Perforin to NK-Cell Homeostasis during Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Arapović, Maja; Brizić, Ilija; Popović, Branka; Jurković, Slaven; Jordan, Stefan; Krmpotić, Astrid; Arapović, Jurica; Jonjić, Stipan

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their role as effector cells in virus control, natural killer (NK) cells have an immunoregulatory function in shaping the antiviral T-cell response. This function is further pronounced in perforin-deficient mice that show the enhanced NK-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion upon mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Here, we confirmed that stronger activation and maturation of NK cells in perforin-deficient mice correlates with higher MCMV load. To further characterize the immunoregulatory potential of perforin, we compared the response of NK cells that express or do not express perforin using bone-marrow chimeras. Our results demonstrated that the enhanced proliferation and maturation of NK cells in MCMV-infected bone-marrow chimeras is an intrinsic property of perforin-deficient NK cells. Thus, in addition to confirming that NK-cell proliferation is virus load dependent, our data extend this notion demonstrating that perforin plays an intrinsic role as a feedback mechanism in the regulation of NK-cell proliferation during viral infections.

  5. Epirubicin pretreatment enhances NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui; Dong, Ying; Wu, Jing; Qiao, Yuan; Zhu, Ge; Jin, Haofan; Cui, Jiuwei; Li, Wei; Liu, Yong-Jun; Chen, Jingtao; Song, Yanqiu

    2016-01-01

    Anthracycline-based chemotherapy is a conventional treatment for breast cancer. However, it can negatively affect host immune function and thereby impair patients' quality of life. Boosting the host immune system and reducing the adverse effect of chemotherapy are important for effective cancer treatment. Natural killer (NK) cells stimulate immune responses against cancer; autologous immune enhancement therapy with NK cells prolongs patient survival without significant adverse effects. This study investigated the effects of combined treatment with the anthracycline agent epirubicin (EPI) and NK cells on human breast cancer cells. NK cells were obtained by autologous adoptive cell transfer from breast cancer patients and amplified for 14 days in vitro. The cytotoxicity of NK cells against breast cancer cells was higher following EPI (5.0 μg/ml) pretreatment than without EPI pretreatment or application of EPI alone. The expression of NKG2D ligands [unique long 16-binding protein (ULBP) 1, ULBP2, and major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A] in breast cancer cells was upregulated by pretreatment with EPI, which also increased the secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and expression of perforin and granzyme B in NK cells. These results indicate that EPI-NK cell treatment has synergistic cytotoxic effects against breast cancer cells, and suggest that anthracycline-based chemotherapy and NK cell-based immunotherapy can be combined for more effective breast cancer treatment.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of bovine NK-lysin-derived peptides on Mycoplasma bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a diverse group of molecules which play an important role in the innate immune response in various organisms, including cattle. Bovine NK-lysins, a type of AMP, have been predominantly found in the granules of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and NK-cells. Collective results...

  7. Impaired NK cell antiviral cytokine response against influenza virus in small-for-gestational-age neonates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinrong; Li, Hong; Mao, Huawei; Yu, Meixing; Yang, Fan; Feng, Ting; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Shen, Chongyang; Yin, Zhongwei; Mao, Meng; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    The neonates, particularly small-for-gestational-age (SGA) ones, are susceptible to various microbial infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of host innate immunity system and the main source of the inflammatory cytokines, which provide critical protection during the early phase of viral infections before the development of an appropriate adaptive immune response. However, little is known about the antiviral effects of NK cells in neonates especially the SGA population. Herein, a prospective descriptive study was performed to determine the differences of NK cell immunity among adults, appropriate-for gestational-age (AGA) and SGA neonates. Adults have much higher NK cell number in peripheral blood than that in cord blood from neonates. In response to influenza virus stimulation, neonatal NK cells, especially SGA baby cells, expressed significantly lower antiviral cytokines including perforin, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-α responses than adult NK cells. In addition, the antiviral cytokine responses of NK cells were positively correlated with neonatal birth weight. Our data suggested that the depressed antiviral activity and less frequency of NK cells are likely to be responsible for the high susceptibility to microbial infection in neonates, at least in part. Improving the function of innate immunity may provide a new way to defend virus infection. PMID:23872919

  8. NK Cell Proportion and Number Are Influenced by Genetic Loci on Chromosomes 8, 9, and 17.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Adam-Nicolas; Guilbault, Lorie; Guimont-Desrochers, Fanny; Hillhouse, Erin E; Lesage, Sylvie

    2016-03-15

    NK cells play a crucial role in innate immunity due to their direct cytotoxicity toward tumors, virally infected cells, and stressed cells, and they also contribute to the orchestration of the adaptive response by their ability to produce immunoregulatory cytokines. In secondary lymphoid organs, NK cells compose the third most abundant lymphocyte subset after T cells and B cells. In this study, we perform an unbiased linkage analysis to determine the genetic loci that may limit the size of the NK cell compartment. Specifically, we exploit differences in NK cell proportion and absolute number between the C57BL/6 and the NOD mice. In addition to the previously identified linkage to chromosome 8, we find that a locus on chromosome 17, which encompasses the MHC locus, impacts NK cell number. Moreover, we identify a locus on mouse chromosome 9 that is strongly linked to the proportion and absolute number of NK cells. Using NOD congenic mice, we validate that both the MHC and the chromosome 9 loci influence the proportion and absolute number of NK cells. We have thus identified additional loci specifically linked to the proportion of NK cells and present some of the potential candidate genes comprised within these loci.

  9. Know Thyself: NK-Cell Inhibitory Receptors Prompt Self-Tolerance, Education, and Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Nash, William T.; Teoh, Jeffrey; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Brown, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells provide essential protection against viral infections. One of the defining features of this lymphocyte population is the expression of a wide array of variable cell surface stimulatory and inhibitory NK receptors (sNKR and iNKR, respectively). The iNKR are particularly important in terms of NK-cell education. As receptors specific for MHC class I (MHC I) molecules, they are responsible for self-tolerance and adjusting NK-cell reactivity based on the expression level of self-MHC I. The end result of this education is twofold: (1) inhibitory signaling tunes the functional capacity of the NK cell, endowing greater potency with greater education, and (2) education on self allows the NK cell to detect aberrations in MHC I expression, a common occurrence during many viral infections. Many studies have indicated an important role for iNKR and MHC I in disease, making these receptors attractive targets for manipulating NK-cell reactivity in the clinic. A greater understanding of iNKR and their ability to regulate NK cells will provide a basis for future attempts at translating their potential utility into benefits for human health. PMID:24795719

  10. The biology of NK cells and their receptors affects clinical outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT).

    PubMed

    Foley, Bree; Felices, Martin; Cichocki, Frank; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were first identified for their capacity to reject bone marrow allografts in lethally irradiated mice without prior sensitization. Subsequently, human NK cells were detected and defined by their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity toward transformed or virally infected target cells. Karre et al. later proposed 'the missing self hypothesis' to explain the mechanism by which self-tolerant cells could kill targets that had lost self MHC class I. Subsequently, the receptors that recognize MHC class I to mediate tolerance in the host were identified on NK cells. These class I-recognizing receptors contribute to the acquisition of function by a dynamic process known as NK cell education or licensing. In the past, NK cells were assumed to be short lived, but more recently NK cells have been shown to mediate immunologic memory to secondary exposures to cytomegalovirus infection. Because of their ability to lyse tumors with aberrant MHC class I expression and to produce cytokines and chemokines upon activation, NK cells may be primed by many stimuli, including viruses and inflammation, to contribute to a graft-versus-tumor effect. In addition, interactions with other immune cells support the therapeutic potential of NK cells to eradicate tumor and to enhance outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

  11. Pharmacological properties of NK433, a new centrally acting muscle relaxant.

    PubMed

    Sakitama, K; Ozawa, Y; Aoto, N; Nakamura, K; Ishikawa, M

    1995-01-24

    The pharmacological properties of NK433 ((-)-(R)-2-methyl-3-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-4'-trifluoromethylpropiophenone+ ++ monohydrochloride), a novel muscle relaxant, were investigated. NK433 inhibited intercollicular decerebrate rigidity (gamma-rigidity) and anemic decerebrate rigidity (alpha-rigidity) dose dependently. NK433 was stronger in inhibiting gamma-rigidity than alpha-rigidity. NK433 inhibited the increase in muscle spindle discharges induced by pinna pinching (gamma-activity) without affecting muscle spindle discharges or neuromuscular transmission. At muscle relaxant doses in decerebrate rigidities, NK433 did not affect the muscle tone induced by morphine-HCl nor that of normal animals. These results suggest that NK433 selectively depresses the excessive muscle tone of decerebrate rigidities through its effects on the central nervous system, and inhibition of gamma-activity causes a preferential depression of gamma-rigidity in comparison to alpha-rigidity. In i.v. experiments, the effects of NK433 on decerebrate rigidities were similar to those of eperisone-HCl and tolperisone-HCl, but in p.o. experiments, NK433 was at least 3 times as potent as eperisone-HCl and tolperisone-HCl.

  12. An autosomal dominant locus, Nka, mapping to the Ly-49 region of a rat natural killer (NK) gene complex, controls NK cell lysis of allogeneic lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells can recognize and kill MHC-incompatible normal bone marrow-derived cells. Presently characterized MHC-binding receptors on NK cells, including the Ly-49 family in the mouse, transmit inhibitory signals upon binding to cognate class I MHC ligands. Here we study in vivo NK-mediated lysis of normal allogeneic lymphocytes in crosses between alloreactivity-competent PVG rats and alloreactivity-deficient DA rats. NK cells from both strains are able to lyse standard tumor targets. We identify an autosomal dominant locus, Nka, that controls NK-mediated alloreactivity. Individuals carrying the dominant PVG allele in single dose were fully competent in eliminating allogeneic target cells, suggesting that Nka encodes or regulates a gene product inducing or activating alloreactivity. By linkage analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis, a natural killer gene complex (NKC) on rat chromosome 4 is described that contains the rat NKR-P1 and Ly-49 multigene families plus a rat NKG2D homologue. Nka maps within the NKC, together with the most telomeric Ly-49 family members, but separate from NKG2D and the NKR-P1 family. The Nka-encoded response, moreover, correlates with the expression of transcripts for Ly-49 receptors in NK cell populations, as Northern blot analysis demonstrated low expression of Ly-49 genes in DA NK cells, in contrast to high expression in alloreactivity-competent PVG, (DA X PVG)F1, and PVG.1AVI NK cells. The low Ly-49 expression in DA is not induced by MHC haplotype, as demonstrated by high expression of Ly-49 in the DA MHC- congenic PVG.1AVI strain. Finally, we have cloned and characterized the first four members of the rat Ly-49 gene family. Their cytoplasmic domains demonstrate substantial heterogeneity, consistent with the hypothesis that different Ly-49 family members may subserve different signaling functions. PMID:8642329

  13. CD4+ T-cell help enhances NK cell function following therapeutic HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jost, Stephanie; Tomezsko, Phillip John; Rands, Keith; Toth, Ildiko; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Gandhi, Rajesh Tim; Altfeld, Marcus

    2014-08-01

    Increasing data suggest that NK cells can mediate antiviral activity in HIV-1-infected humans, and as such, novel approaches harnessing the anti-HIV-1 function of both T cells and NK cells represent attractive options to improve future HIV-1 immunotherapies. Chronic progressive HIV-1 infection has been associated with a loss of CD4(+) T helper cell function and with the accumulation of anergic NK cells. As several studies have suggested that cytokines produced by CD4(+) T cells are required to enhance NK cell function in various infection models, we hypothesized that reconstitution of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses by therapeutic immunization would restore NK cell activity in infected individuals. Using flow cytometry, we examined the function of CD4(+) T cells and NK cells in response to HIV-1 in subjects with treated chronic HIV-1 infection before and after immunization with an adjuvanted HIV-1 Gp120/NefTat subunit protein vaccine candidate provided by GlaxoSmithKline. Vaccination induced an increased expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) by Gp120-specific CD4(+) T cells in response to HIV-1 peptides ex vivo, which was associated with enhanced production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) by NK cells. Our data show that reconstitution of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell function by therapeutic immunization can enhance NK cell activity in HIV-1-infected individuals. NK cells are effector cells of the innate immune system and are important in the control of viral infection. Recent studies have demonstrated the crucial role played by NK cells in controlling and/or limiting acquisition of HIV-1 infection. However, NK cell function is impaired during progressive HIV-1 infection. We recently showed that therapeutic immunization of treated HIV-1-infected individuals reconstituted strong T-cell responses, measured notably by their production of IL-2, a cytokine that can activate NK cells. The current study suggests that reconstitution of T-cell function by therapeutic

  14. Characterization and developmental expression of AmphiNk2-2, an NK2 class homeobox gene from Amphioxus. (Phylum Chordata; Subphylum Cephalochordata).

    PubMed

    Holland, L Z; Venkatesh, T V; Gorlin, A; Bodmer, R; Holland, N D

    1998-04-01

    The genome of amphioxus includes AmphiNk2-2, the first gene of the NK2 homeobox class to be demonstrated in any invertebrate deuterostome. AmphiNk2-2 encodes a protein with a TN domain, homeodomain, and NK2-specific domain; on the basis of amino acid identities in these conserved regions, AmphiNk2-2 is a homolog of Drosophila vnd and vertebrate Nkx2-2. During amphioxus development, expression of Amph- iNk2-2 is first detected ventrally in the endoderm of late gastrulae. In neurulae, endodermal expression divides into three domains (the pharynx, midgut, and hindgut), and neural expression commences in two longitudinal bands of cells in the anterior neural tube. These neural tube cells occupy a ventrolateral position on either side of the cerebral vesicle (the probable homolog of the vertebrate diencephalic forebrain). The dynamic expression patterns of AmphiNkx2-2 suggest successive roles, first in regionalizing the endoderm and nervous system and later during differentiation of specific cell types in the gut (possibly peptide endocrine cells) and brain (possibly including axon outgrowth and guidance).

  15. Neutralization of (NK-cell-derived) B-cell activating factor by Belimumab restores sensitivity of chronic lymphoid leukemia cells to direct and Rituximab-induced NK lysis.

    PubMed

    Wild, J; Schmiedel, B J; Maurer, A; Raab, S; Prokop, L; Stevanović, S; Dörfel, D; Schneider, P; Salih, H R

    2015-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that substantially contribute to the therapeutic benefit of antitumor antibodies like Rituximab, a crucial component in the treatment of B-cell malignancies. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the ability of NK cells to lyse the malignant cells and to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity upon Fc receptor stimulation is compromised, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unclear. We report here that NK-cells activation-dependently produce the tumor necrosis factor family member 'B-cell activating factor' (BAFF) in soluble form with no detectable surface expression, also in response to Fc receptor triggering by therapeutic CD20-antibodies. BAFF in turn enhanced the metabolic activity of primary CLL cells and impaired direct and Rituximab-induced lysis of CLL cells without affecting NK reactivity per se. The neutralizing BAFF antibody Belimumab, which is approved for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, prevented the effects of BAFF on the metabolism of CLL cells and restored their susceptibility to direct and Rituximab-induced NK-cell killing in allogeneic and autologous experimental systems. Our findings unravel the involvement of BAFF in the resistance of CLL cells to NK-cell antitumor immunity and Rituximab treatment and point to a benefit of combinatory approaches employing BAFF-neutralizing drugs in B-cell malignancies.

  16. NK cells link obesity-induced adipose stress to inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wensveen, Felix M; Jelenčić, Vedrana; Valentić, Sonja; Šestan, Marko; Wensveen, Tamara Turk; Theurich, Sebastian; Glasner, Ariella; Mendrila, Davor; Štimac, Davor; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Brüning, Jens C; Mandelboim, Ofer; Polić, Bojan

    2015-04-01

    An important cause of obesity-induced insulin resistance is chronic systemic inflammation originating in visceral adipose tissue (VAT). VAT inflammation is associated with the accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages in adipose tissue, but the immunological signals that trigger their accumulation remain unknown. We found that a phenotypically distinct population of tissue-resident natural killer (NK) cells represented a crucial link between obesity-induced adipose stress and VAT inflammation. Obesity drove the upregulation of ligands of the NK cell-activating receptor NCR1 on adipocytes; this stimulated NK cell proliferation and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production, which in turn triggered the differentiation of proinflammatory macrophages and promoted insulin resistance. Deficiency of NK cells, NCR1 or IFN-γ prevented the accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages in VAT and greatly ameliorated insulin sensitivity. Thus NK cells are key regulators of macrophage polarization and insulin resistance in response to obesity-induced adipocyte stress.

  17. Cutting Edge: Murine NK Cells Degranulate and Retain Cytotoxic Function without Store-Operated Calcium Entry.

    PubMed

    Freund-Brown, Jacquelyn; Choa, Ruth; Singh, Brenal K; Robertson, Tanner Ford; Ferry, Gabrielle M; Viver, Eric; Bassiri, Hamid; Burkhardt, Janis K; Kambayashi, Taku

    2017-08-09

    Sustained Ca(2+) signaling, known as store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), occurs downstream of immunoreceptor engagement and is critical for cytotoxic lymphocyte signaling and effector function. CD8(+) T cells require sustained Ca(2+) signaling for inflammatory cytokine production and the killing of target cells; however, much less is known about its role in NK cells. In this study, we use mice deficient in stromal interacting molecules 1 and 2, which are required for SOCE, to examine the contribution of sustained Ca(2+) signaling to murine NK cell function. Surprisingly, we found that, although SOCE is required for NK cell IFN-γ production in an NFAT-dependent manner, NK cell degranulation/cytotoxicity and tumor rejection in vivo remained intact in the absence of sustained Ca(2+) signaling. Our data suggest that mouse NK cells use different signaling mechanisms for cytotoxicity compared with other cytotoxic lymphocytes. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. T-bet and Eomesodermin in NK Cell Development, Maturation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Simonetta, Federico; Pradier, Amandine; Roosnek, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports give insights into the role of the T-box transcription factors, T-bet and Eomesodermin (Eomes), in NK cell biology. In this mini-review, we recapitulate the initial reports that delineate T-bet and Eomes as master regulators of NK cell development, maturation, and function. We discuss how T-bet and Eomes expression is regulated during NK cell development and peripheral maturation. Furthermore, we summarize the current literature on the role of T-bet and Eomes in the transcriptional regulation of NK cell function and review possible effects of T-box transcription factor anomalies during aging, infection, cancer, and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We discuss how the current data argue in favor of a model of T-bet and Eomes synergy in transcriptional regulation of NK cell function and identify T-box transcription factors as potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27379101

  19. NK cell maturation to CD56(dim) subset associated with high levels of NCRs overrides the inhibitory effect of NKG2A and recovers impaired NK cell cytolytic potential after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh, Mehran; Hosseini, Ehteramolsadat; Schwarer, Anthony P; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar

    2016-04-01

    NK cell cytotoxicity against residual leukemic cells is crucial for immune system reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Since immune recovery after transplant still remains a major concern, we studied the counterbalance of NK cell receptors after HSCT and its importance in NK cell functional recovery. We investigated NK cell reconstitution in 27 acute leukemia patients at different time points following HLA-matched allogeneic HSCT compared to those of donors. NK cells were evaluated for their cytotoxicity in a standard (51)Cr-release assay against target cells and also analyzed for their receptors expression using flow cytometry. Early after transplant, we found higher percentage of CD56(bright) NK cells, increased levels of NKG2A and NCRs as well as decreased levels of KIRs expression on NK cells associated with an impaired cytotoxicity of these cells. All the abnormalities were normalized by one year after HSCT when CD56(bright) NK cells gradually differentiated into CD56(dim) subset. Collectively, we confirmed a gradual increase of CD56(dim) NK cells expressing NCRs with the significant decrease in NKG2A expression on NK cells. This finding was also associated with the recovery of NK cell cytotoxicity that suggests an important role for the kinetics of NK cell receptors during cell maturation in HSCT outcome.

  20. [Comparison of the pharmacokinetics and safety of a paclitaxel injection NK and Taxol injection in breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Sagara, Yoshiaki; Rai, Yoshiaki; Sagara, Yoshiatsu; Matsuyama, Yoshito; Baba, Shinichi; Tamada, Shugo; Sagara, Yasuaki; Ando, Mitsutake

    2009-02-01

    A paclitaxel injection NK (NK) is a generic product containing the same amount of ingredient as a Taxol Injection. We examined the pharmacokinetics and safety of NK compared to the original product in breast cancer patients. As a result, the transition of plasma paclitaxel concentration and pharmacokinetic parameter in NK and the original drug were almost equal, which suggested that these products were bioequivalent. In adjuvant therapy, there was no significant difference in adverse events reported, and these products were approximately equally safe.

  1. Mechanisms by Which Interleukin-12 Corrects Defective NK Cell Anticryptococcal Activity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Stephen K.; Ogbomo, Henry; Li, ShuShun; Timm-McCann, Martina; Xiang, Richard F.; Huston, Shaunna M.; Ganguly, Anutosh; Colarusso, Pina; Gill, M. John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast and a leading cause of life-threatening meningitis in AIDS patients. Natural killer (NK) cells are important immune effector cells that directly recognize and kill C. neoformans via a perforin-dependent cytotoxic mechanism. We previously showed that NK cells from HIV-infected patients have aberrant anticryptococcal killing and that interleukin-12 (IL-12) restores the activity at least partially through restoration of NKp30. However, the mechanisms causing this defect or how IL-12 restores the function was unknown. By examining the sequential steps in NK cell killing of Cryptococcus, we found that NK cells from HIV-infected patients had defective binding of NK cells to C. neoformans. Moreover, those NK cells that bound to C. neoformans failed to polarize perforin-containing granules to the microbial synapse compared to healthy controls, suggesting that binding was insufficient to restore a defect in perforin polarization. We also identified lower expression of intracellular perforin and defective perforin release from NK cells of HIV-infected patients in response to C. neoformans. Importantly, treatment of NK cells from HIV-infected patients with IL-12 reversed the multiple defects in binding, granule polarization, perforin content, and perforin release and restored anticryptococcal activity. Thus, there are multiple defects in the cytolytic machinery of NK cells from HIV-infected patients, which cumulatively result in defective NK cell anticryptococcal activity, and each of these defects can be reversed with IL-12. PMID:27555306

  2. Activated Allogeneic NK Cells Preferentially Kill Poor Prognosis B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Lanuza, Pilar M; Gómez, Natalia; Muntasell, Aura; Cisneros, Elisa; Moraru, Manuela; Azaceta, Gemma; Anel, Alberto; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Villalba, Martin; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; García Marco, José A; Pardo, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild-type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA-mismatched Natural killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here, we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell-activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs) and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV) are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells, and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.

  3. Influenza Virus Targets Class I MHC-Educated NK Cells for Immunoevasion.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Tu, Megan M; Wight, Andrew; Zein, Haggag S; Rahim, Mir Munir A; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Sekhon, Harman S; Brown, Earl G; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    The immune response to influenza virus infection comprises both innate and adaptive defenses. NK cells play an early role in the destruction of tumors and virally-infected cells. NK cells express a variety of inhibitory receptors, including those of the Ly49 family, which are functional homologs of human killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Like human KIR, Ly49 receptors inhibit NK cell-mediated lysis by binding to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules that are expressed on normal cells. During NK cell maturation, the interaction of NK cell inhibitory Ly49 receptors with their MHC-I ligands results in two types of NK cells: licensed ("functional"), or unlicensed ("hypofunctional"). Despite being completely dysfunctional with regard to rejecting MHC-I-deficient cells, unlicensed NK cells represent up to half of the mature NK cell pool in rodents and humans, suggesting an alternative role for these cells in host defense. Here, we demonstrate that after influenza infection, MHC-I expression on lung epithelial cells is upregulated, and mice bearing unlicensed NK cells (Ly49-deficient NKCKD and MHC-I-deficient B2m-/- mice) survive the infection better than WT mice. Importantly, transgenic expression of an inhibitory self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 receptor in NKCKD mice restores WT influenza susceptibility, confirming a direct role for Ly49. Conversely, F(ab')2-mediated blockade of self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 inhibitory receptors protects WT mice from influenza virus infection. Mechanistically, perforin-deficient NKCKD mice succumb to influenza infection rapidly, indicating that direct cytotoxicity is necessary for unlicensed NK cell-mediated protection. Our findings demonstrate that Ly49:MHC-I interactions play a critical role in influenza virus pathogenesis. We suggest a similar role may be conserved in human KIR, and their blockade may be protective in humans.

  4. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  5. NK cell responses to simian immunodeficiency virus vaginal exposure in naive and vaccinated rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Shang, Liang; Smith, Anthony J; Duan, Lijie; Perkey, Katherine E; Qu, Lucy; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Zupancic, Mary; Southern, Peter J; Masek-Hammerman, Katherine; Reeves, R Keith; Johnson, R Paul; Haase, Ashley T

    2014-07-01

    NK cell responses to HIV/SIV infection have been well studied in acute and chronic infected patients/monkeys, but little is known about NK cells during viral transmission, particularly in mucosal tissues. In this article, we report a systematic study of NK cell responses to high-dose vaginal exposure to SIVmac251 in the rhesus macaque female reproductive tract (FRT). Small numbers of NK cells were recruited into the FRT mucosa following vaginal inoculation. The influx of mucosal NK cells preceded local virus replication and peaked at 1 wk and, thus, was in an appropriate time frame to control an expanding population of infected cells at the portal of entry. However, NK cells were greatly outnumbered by recruited target cells that fuel local virus expansion and were spatially dissociated from SIV RNA+ cells at the major site of expansion of infected founder populations in the transition zone and adjoining endocervix. The number of NK cells in the FRT mucosa decreased rapidly in the second week, while the number of SIV RNA+ cells in the FRT reached its peak. Mucosal NK cells produced IFN-γ and MIP-1α/CCL3 but lacked several markers of activation and cytotoxicity, and this was correlated with inoculum-induced upregulation of the inhibitory ligand HLA-E and downregulation of the activating receptor CD122/IL-2Rβ. Examination of SIVΔnef-vaccinated monkeys suggested that recruitment of NK cells to the genital mucosa was not involved in vaccine-induced protection from vaginal challenge. In summary, our results suggest that NK cells play, at most, a limited role in defenses in the FRT against vaginal challenge.

  6. Activating KIR2DS4 Is Expressed by Uterine NK Cells and Contributes to Successful Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chazara, Olympe; Gardner, Lucy; Ivarsson, Martin A.; Farrell, Lydia E.; Xiong, Shiqiu; Hiby, Susan E.; Colucci, Francesco; Sharkey, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific NK cells are abundant in the pregnant uterus and interact with invading placental trophoblast cells that transform the maternal arteries to increase the fetoplacental blood supply. Genetic case-control studies have implicated killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) genes and their HLA ligands in pregnancy disorders characterized by failure of trophoblast arterial transformation. Activating KIR2DS1 or KIR2DS5 (when located in the centromeric region as in Africans) lower the risk of disorders when there is a fetal HLA-C allele carrying a C2 epitope. In this study, we investigated another activating KIR, KIR2DS4, and provide genetic evidence for a similar effect when carried with KIR2DS1. KIR2DS4 is expressed by ∼45% of uterine NK (uNK) cells. Similarly to KIR2DS1, triggering of KIR2DS4 on uNK cells led to secretion of GM-CSF and other chemokines, known to promote placental trophoblast invasion. Additionally, XCL1 and CCL1, identified in a screen of 120 different cytokines, were consistently secreted upon activation of KIR2DS4 on uNK cells. Inhibitory KIR2DL5A, carried in linkage disequilibrium with KIR2DS1, is expressed by peripheral blood NK cells but not by uNK cells, highlighting the unique phenotype of uNK cells compared with peripheral blood NK cells. That KIR2DS4, KIR2DS1, and some alleles of KIR2DS5 contribute to successful pregnancy suggests that activation of uNK cells by KIR binding to HLA-C is a generic mechanism promoting trophoblast invasion into the decidua. PMID:27815424

  7. Conventional NK cells can produce IL-22 and promote host defense in Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Weiss, Ido D; Zhang, Hongwei H; Singh, Satya P; Wynn, Thomas A; Wilson, Mark S; Farber, Joshua M

    2014-02-15

    It was reported that host defense against pulmonary Klebsiella pneumoniae infection requires IL-22, which was proposed to be of T cell origin. Supporting a role for IL-22, we found that Il22(-/-) mice had decreased survival compared with wild-type mice after intratracheal infection with K. pneumoniae. Surprisingly, however, Rag2(-/-) mice did not differ from wild-type mice in survival or levels of IL-22 in the lungs postinfection with K. pneumoniae. In contrast, K. pneumoniae-infected Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice failed to produce IL-22. These data suggested a possible role for NK cells or other innate lymphoid cells in host defense and production of IL-22. Unlike NK cell-like innate lymphoid cells that produce IL-22 and display a surface phenotype of NK1.1(-)NKp46(+)CCR6(+), lung NK cells showed the conventional phenotype, NK1.1(+)NKp46(+)CCR6(-). Mice depleted of NK cells using anti-asialo GM1 showed decreased survival and higher lung bacterial counts, as well as increased dissemination of K. pneumoniae to blood and liver, compared with control-treated mice. NK cell depletion also led to decreased production of IL-22 in the lung. Within 1 d postinfection, although there was no increase in the number of lung NK cells, a subset of lung NK cells became competent to produce IL-22, and such cells were found in both wild-type and Rag2(-/-) mice. Our data suggest that, during pulmonary infection of mice with K. pneumoniae, conventional NK cells are required for optimal host defense, which includes the production of IL-22.

  8. NK Cells Preferentially Target Tumor Cells with a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ames, Erik; Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Mac, Stephanie; Chen, Mingyi; Smith, Rachel C; Hagino, Takeshi; Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Sckisel, Gail D; Urayama, Shiro; Monjazeb, Arta M; Fragoso, Ruben C; Sayers, Thomas J; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-15

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are resistant to antiproliferative therapies, able to repopulate tumor bulk, and seed metastasis. NK cells are able to target stem cells as shown by their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells but not solid tissue grafts. Using multiple preclinical models, including NK coculture (autologous and allogeneic) with multiple human cancer cell lines and dissociated primary cancer specimens and NK transfer in NSG mice harboring orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts, we assessed CSC viability, CSC frequency, expression of death receptor ligands, and tumor burden. We demonstrate that activated NK cells are capable of preferentially killing CSCs identified by multiple CSC markers (CD24(+)/CD44(+), CD133(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase(bright)) from a wide variety of human cancer cell lines in vitro and dissociated primary cancer specimens ex vivo. We observed comparable effector function of allogeneic and autologous NK cells. We also observed preferential upregulation of NK activation ligands MICA/B, Fas, and DR5 on CSCs. Blocking studies further implicated an NKG2D-dependent mechanism for NK killing of CSCs. Treatment of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer tumor-bearing NSG mice with activated NK cells led to significant reductions in both intratumoral CSCs and tumor burden. Taken together, these data from multiple preclinical models, including a strong reliance on primary human cancer specimens, provide compelling preclinical evidence that activated NK cells preferentially target cancer cells with a CSC phenotype, highlighting the translational potential of NK immunotherapy as part of a combined modality approach for refractory solid malignancies.

  9. Murine viral hepatitis involves NK cell depletion associated with virus-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    LEHOUX, M; JACQUES, A; LUSIGNAN, S; LAMONTAGNE, L

    2004-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3), a coronavirus, is an excellent animal model for the study of immunological disorders related to acute and chronic hepatitis. In this study, we have verified if the fulminant hepatitis induced by MHV3 could be related to an impairment of innate immunity. Groups of three C57BL/6 mice were infected with the pathogenic L2-MHV3 or attenuated YAC-MHV3 viruses, and the natural killer (NK) cell populations from liver, spleen and bone marrow were analysed. The percentage of intrahepatic NK1·1+T cell receptor (TCR)− cells did not increase while NK1·1+TCRinter cells decreased in both L2-MHV3- and YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Concurrently, splenic and myeloid NK1·1+ cells decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice. However, the cytotoxic activity of NK cells increased in liver and decreased in bone marrow from pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice while no modification was detected in YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that both normal and larger splenic or myeloid NK cells decreased more in pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice than in attenuated YAC-MHV3-infected mice. In vitro viral infections of interleukin (IL)-15-stimulated lymphoid cells from liver and bone marrow revealed that L2-MHV3 induced higher decreases in cell viability of NK1·1+ cells than the YAC-MHV3 variant. The NK cell decreases were due to the viral permissivity leading to cytopathic effects characterized by cell rounding, syncytia formation and apoptosis. Larger NK+ syncytia were observed in L2-MHV3-infected cells than in YAC-MHV3-infected cells. These results suggest that NK cell production is impaired by viral infection favouring fulminant hepatitis. PMID:15196242

  10. Activated Allogeneic NK Cells Preferentially Kill Poor Prognosis B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Lanuza, Pilar M.; Gómez, Natalia; Muntasell, Aura; Cisneros, Elisa; Moraru, Manuela; Azaceta, Gemma; Anel, Alberto; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Villalba, Martin; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; García Marco, José A.; Pardo, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild-type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA-mismatched Natural killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here, we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell-activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs) and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV) are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells, and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments. PMID:27833611

  11. Helper role of NK cells during the induction of anticancer responses by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kalinski, Pawel; Giermasz, Adam; Nakamura, Yutaro; Basse, Per; Storkus, Walter J; Kirkwood, John M; Mailliard, Robbie B

    2005-02-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DC) support each other's activity in a positive feedback. We observed that activated NK cells induce the maturation of DCs into stable type-1 polarized DCs (DC1), characterized by up to 100-fold enhanced ability to produce IL-12p70 in response to subsequent interaction with Th cells. DC1 induction depends on NK cell-produced IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, with a possible involvement of additional factors. DC1, induced by NK cells or by NK cell-related soluble factors, are stable, resistant to tumor-related suppressive factors, and show strongly enhanced ability to induce Th1 and CTL responses. In analogy to resting T cells, the induction of "helper" function of NK cells relies on a two-signal activation paradigm. While NKG2D-dependent tumor cell recognition is sufficient to induce the cytotoxic "effector" function of NK cells, the induction of "NK cell help" requires additional signals from type-1 IFNs, products of virally-infected cells, or from IL-2. Compared to non-polarized DCs currently-used in clinical trials, DC1s act as superior inducers of anti-cancer CTL responses during in vitro sensitization. The current data provides rationale for the clinical use of DC1s in cancer and chronic infections (such as HIV), as a new generation DC-based vaccines, uniquely combining fully mature DC status with an elevated, rather than "exhausted" ability to produce bioactive IL-12p70. We are currently implementing stage I/II clinical trials, testing the effectiveness of DC1s induced by NK cells or by NK cell-related factors, as therapeutic vaccines against melanoma.

  12. Involvement of substance P and the NK-1 receptor in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Miguel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related-death for both men and women and the 1- and 5-year relative survival rates are 25% and 6%, respectively. Thus, it is urgent to investigate new antitumor drugs to improve the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. The peptide substance P (SP) has a widespread distribution throughout the body. After binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor, SP regulates biological functions related to cancer, such as tumor cell proliferation, neoangiogenesis, the migration of tumor cells for invasion, infiltration and metastasis, and it exerts an antiapoptotic effects on tumor cells. It is known that the SP/NK-1 receptor system is involved in pancreatic cancer progression: (1) pancreatic cancer cells and samples express NK-1 receptors; (2) the NK-1 receptor is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells in comparison with non-tumor cells; (3) nanomolar concentrations of SP induce pancreatic cancer cell proliferation; (4) NK-1 receptor antagonists inhibit pancreatic cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, at a certain concentration, these antagonists inhibit 100% of tumor cells; (5) this antitumor action is mediated through the NK-1 receptor, and tumor cells die by apoptosis; and (6) NK-1 receptor antagonists inhibit angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer xenografts. All these data suggest that the SP/NK-1 receptor system could play an important role in the development of pancreatic cancer; that the NK-1 receptor could be a new promising therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer, and that NK-1 receptor antagonists could improve the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24605029

  13. Impaired NK cell functionality and increased TNF-α production as biomarkers of chronic chikungunya arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thanapati, Subrat; Ganu, Mohini; Giri, Prashant; Kulkarni, Shruti; Sharma, Meenal; Babar, Prasad; Ganu, Ashok; Tripathy, Anuradha S

    2017-04-01

    The chronic chikungunya arthritis symptoms closely mimic the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) symptoms, thus making it difficult to distinguish between these two clinical entities. The current comparative study characterizes NK (CD3(-)CD56(+)) and NK-like T (CD3(+)CD56(+)) cell responses in patients with chronic chikungunya arthritis and RA. Phenotype and functions of NK and NK-like T cells repertoire were assessed in 56 chronic chikungunya arthritis, 26 RA patients and 82 controls using flow cytometry. TNF-α and IFN-γ-secreting NK-like T cells were high in both chronic arthritis patients than in controls. Percentage of TNF-α(+) NK cells was higher in RA patients than in controls. Percentage of perforin(+) NK cells was low in both chronic arthritis patient groups. Among the patient groups, expressions of perforin(+) and IFN-γ(+) NK-like T cells were higher in RA. Overall, our data show reduced frequency of NK-like T cells, lower expression of perforin(+) NK, higher expression of TNF-α(+) NK-like T and IFN-γ(+) NK-like T cells as the markers of chronic arthritic diseases. In the absence of any specific treatment for chronic chikungunya induced arthritis and promising results of anti-TNF-α therapy against RA, current data may form the basis for future in vivo studies and has scope as possible therapeutics against chikungunya.

  14. NOVEL ANTI-MICROBIAL PEPTIDE, NK-LYSIN, IS PRODUCED LOCALLY IN THE GUT OF EIMERIA-INFECTED HOST

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NK-lysin is an anti-microbial and anti-tumor protein produced by NK cells and T lymphocytes in mammals and is considered to be an important component of the local innate immune response to pathogens. Chicken NK-lysin consists of an 868 bp DNA sequence with an ORF of 140 amino acids with a predicted ...

  15. Effects of a cloned cell line with NK activity on bone marrow transplants, tumour development and metastasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John F.; Dennert, Gunther

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells cloned in vitro have been transferred into NK-deficient hosts. These cells have been shown to have a role in the rejection of allogeneic bone marrow grafts, resistance to both radiation-induced thymic leukaemia and challenge with melanoma tumour cells. It appears that NK cells have an important role in immune surveillance.

  16. Tumor-Associated Monocytes/Macrophages Impair NK-Cell Function via TGFβ1 in Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liu-Sheng; Zhang, Jin-Yu; Teng, Yong-Sheng; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Wang, Ting-Ting; Mao, Fang-Yuan; Lv, Yi-Pin; Cheng, Ping; Li, Wen-Hua; Chen, Na; Duan, Mubing; Chen, Weisan; Guo, Gang; Zou, Quan-Ming; Zhuang, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a major component of the host antitumor immune response in human cancer. However, the nature, functional regulation, and clinical relevance of NK cells in gastric cancer remain largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the percentages of NK cells in tumors were significantly decreased, and low percentages of tumor-infiltrating NK cells were positively correlated with poor survival and disease progression. Although the expression of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells was shown to be not different between tumor and nontumor tissues, NK cells in tumors had impaired effector functions, characterized by decreased IFNγ, TNFα, and Ki-67 expression. We found that tumor-infiltrating monocytes/macrophages were physically close to NK cells, and their percentages negatively correlated with IFNγ(+) and TNFα(+) NK-cell percentages. Ex vivo study showed that isolated tumor-associated monocytes/macrophages could impair NK-cell expression of IFNγ, TNFα, and Ki-67. Blockade of TGFβ1 attenuated such monocytes/macrophages-mediated impairment of NK-cell function. Our data suggest that human NK-cell function was impaired by tumor-associated monocytes/macrophages, and that restoring NK-cell function may be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent tumor immune escape in gastric cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(3); 248-56. ©2017 AACR.

  17. CD56(bright) NK IL-7Rα expression negatively associates with HCV level, and IL-7-induced NK function is impaired during HCV and HIV infections.

    PubMed

    Judge, Chelsey J; Kostadinova, Lenche; Sherman, Kenneth E; Butt, Adeel A; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Funderburg, Nicholas T; Landay, Alan L; Lederman, Michael M; Sieg, Scott F; Sandberg, Johan K; Anthony, Donald D

    2017-07-01

    Several lines of evidence support the concept that NK cells play an important role in control of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection via cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity. IL-7 is a homeostatic cytokine with a role in T cell development, activation, proliferation, and cytokine secretion. The IL-7Rα chain [cluster of differentiation (CD)127] is expressed on NK cells, with greatest abundance on the CD56(bright)CD16(dim/-) (CD56(bright)) subset. Here, we measured CD127 expression on CD56(bright), CD56(dim)CD16(+) (CD56(dim)), or CD56(neg)CD16(+) (CD56(neg)) NK cell subsets of 25 uninfected donors (UD); 34 chronic HCV-infected, treatment-naïve; 25 HIV-infected, virally suppressed on antiretroviral therapy (ART); and 42 HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects on ART. Interestingly, CD127 expression on CD56(bright) NK cells negatively correlated with HCV plasma levels in HCV monoinfection and HCV-HIV coinfection. IL-7 induced CD69 expression, as well as IFN-γ production, in CD56(bright) NK cells and also enhanced the IFN-α-induced CD69 expression on these cells. The latter was impaired in HIV infection. Furthermore, IL-7 induced B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) expression and cell cycling of CD56(bright) NK cells, and this effect was impaired in HCV- and HIV-infected subjects. Whereas IL-7-stimulated CD56(bright) NK cell degranulation appeared intact in all cohorts, we observed impaired IL-7-activated NK cell cytolytic function in HCV- and HIV-infected subjects. Finally, IL-7-induced phosphorylation of STAT-5 (pSTAT-5) signaling was impaired in NK cells of subjects with chronic viral infection, and this was reversible upon 6 mo of viral suppression with IFN-free HCV therapy. These results implicate that IL-7-dependent NK cell activation and effector function may be other host immune surveillance mechanisms that are impaired in viral infections. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell-based NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yin; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Zhen; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Luo, Shi-Wen; Zhang, Kun-He; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as promising delivery vehicles for gene therapy of tumors. Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, and novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. NK4 is an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor receptors (Met) which are often aberrantly activated in gastric cancer and thus represent a useful candidate for targeted therapies. This study investigated MSC-delivered NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying NK4 complementary DNA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Such transduction did not change the phenotype of MSCs. Gastric cancer xenografts were established in BALB/C nude mice, and the mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4. The tropism of MSCs toward gastric cancer cells was determined by an in vitro migration assay using MKN45 cells, GES-1 cells and human fibroblasts and their presence in tumor xenografts. Tumor growth, tumor cell apoptosis and intratumoral microvessel density of tumor tissue were measured in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts treated with PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4 via tail vein injection. The results showed that MSCs migrated preferably to gastric cancer cells in vitro. Systemic MSCs-NK4 injection significantly suppressed the growth of gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs-NK4 migrated and accumulated in tumor tissues after systemic injection. The microvessel density of tumor xenografts was decreased, and tumor cellular apoptosis was significantly induced in the mice treated with MSCs-NK4 compared to control mice. These findings demonstrate that MSC-based NK4 gene therapy can obviously inhibit the growth of gastric cancer xenografts, and MSCs are a better vehicle for NK4 gene therapy than lentiviral vectors. Further studies are warranted to explore the efficacy and safety of the MSC-based NK4 gene therapy in

  19. Nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Takakuwa, Tetsuya; Hongyo, Tadashi; Yang, Woo-Ick

    2008-01-01

    Nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) is an uncommon disease, but usually shows a highly aggressive clinical course. The disease is much more frequent in Asian and Latin American countries than in Western countries, and is universally associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. Analyses of gene mutations, especially p53 and c-KIT, revealed the different frequencies by district. Epidemiological studies revealed the changes of the disease frequency in Korea during the period from 1977–1989 to 1990–1996. Case-control study showed that the exposure to pesticides and chemical solvents could be causative of NKTCL. Further studies including HLA antigen typing of patients is necessary to further clarify the disease mechanism. PMID:18256789

  20. Canalization and the stability of NK-Kauffman networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zertuche, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Boolean variables are such that they take values on Z2 ≅ { 0 , 1 } . NK-Kauffman networks are dynamical deterministic systems of N Boolean functions that depend only on K ≤ N Boolean variables. They were proposed by Kauffman as a first step to understand cellular behavior (Kauffman, 1969) with great success. Among the problems that still have not been well understood in Kauffman networks, is the mechanism that regulates the phase transition of the system from an ordered phase where small changes of the initial state decay, to a chaotic one, where they grow exponentially. I show, that this mechanism is regulated through the irreducible decomposition of Boolean functions proposed in Zertuche (2009). This is in contrast to previous knowledge that attributed it to canalization. I also review other statistical properties of Kauffman networks that Boolean irreducibility explains.

  1. The development of NK cell activity in thymectomized bone marrow chimaeras.

    PubMed Central

    Sihvola, M; Hurme, M

    1984-01-01

    Most of the natural killer (NK) cells, recently derived from the bone marrow (14 days after injection of bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated mice), express the Thy-1 antigen; after some period of time (by day 28) a normal proportion (50%) of Thy-1+ NK cells is found. This study demonstrates that the shift of these Thy-1+ NK cells to Thy-1- NK cells is influenced by the thymus: NK cells developing in the total absence of the thymus--bone marrow (bm) cells from adult thymectomized (Tx) or nude (nu) mice injected into thymectomized recipients, (Tx) bm----(Tx) or nu bm----(Tx)--remain Thy-1+, while the presence of the thymus at some stage of the NK cell maturation--bone marrow cells injected into thymectomized recipients, bm----(Tx), or normal recipients reconstituted with bone marrow cells from thymectomized or nude mice, (Tx) bm----or nu bm----normal recipients--is sufficient for the development of normal ratio of Thy-1+ and Thy-1- NK cells. PMID:6147307

  2. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection. PMID:27621819

  3. STATs in NK-Cells: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    PubMed Central

    Gotthardt, Dagmar; Sexl, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK)-cells are major players in the fight against viral infections and transformed cells, but there is increasing evidence attributing a disease-promoting role to NK-cells. Cytokines present in the tumor microenvironment shape NK-cell maturation, function, and effector responses. Many cytokines signal via the Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway that is also frequently altered and constitutively active in a broad range of tumor cells. As a consequence, there are currently major efforts to develop therapeutic strategies to target this pathway. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to understand the role and contributions of JAK–STAT molecules in NK-cell biology—only this knowledge will allow us to predict effects of JAK–STAT inhibition for NK-cell functions and to successfully apply precision medicine. We will review the current knowledge on the role of JAK–STAT signaling for NK-cell functions and discuss conditions involved in the switch from NK-cell tumor surveillance to disease promotion. PMID:28149296

  4. Natural Killer (NK) Cells in Antibacterial Innate Immunity: Angels or Devils?

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Adib-Conquy, Minou; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were first described as immune leukocytes that could kill tumor cells and soon after were reported to kill virus-infected cells. In the mid-1980s, 10 years after their discovery, NK cells were also demonstrated to contribute to the fight against bacterial infection, particularly because of crosstalk with other leukocytes. A wide variety of immune cells are now recognized to interact with NK cells through the production of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18, which boost NK cell activities. The recent demonstration that NK cells express pattern recognition receptors, namely Toll-like and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors, led to the understanding that these cells are not only under the control of accessory cells, but can be directly involved in the antibacterial response thanks to their capacity to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Interferon (IFN)-γ is the predominant cytokine produced by activated NK cells. IFN-γ is a key contributor to antibacterial immune defense. However, in synergy with other inflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ can also lead to deleterious effects similar to those observed during sepsis. Accordingly, as the main source of IFN-γ in the early phase of infection, NK cells display both beneficial and deleterious effects, depending on the circumstances. PMID:22105606

  5. Dysregulation of Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Axes and NK Cell Tissue Localization during Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Bonanni, Valentina; Santoni, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic molecules that play key roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Upon signaling via their specific receptors, chemokines regulate tissue mobilization and trafficking of a wide array of immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Current research is focused on analyzing changes in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression during various diseases to interfere with pathological trafficking of cells or to recruit selected cell types to specific tissues. NK cells are a heterogeneous lymphocyte population comprising several subsets endowed with distinct functional properties and mainly representing distinct stages of a linear development process. Because of their different functional potential, the type of subset that accumulates in a tissue drives the final outcome of NK cell-regulated immune response, leading to either protection or pathology. Correspondingly, chemokine receptors, including CXCR4, CXCR3, and CX3CR1, are differentially expressed by NK cell subsets, and their expression levels can be modulated during NK cell activation. At first, this review will summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of chemokines to the localization and generation of NK cell subsets in homeostasis. How an inappropriate chemotactic response can lead to pathology and how chemokine targeting can therapeutically affect tissue recruitment/localization of distinct NK cell subsets will also be discussed. PMID:27766097

  6. Expansion of CD16 positive and negative human NK cells in response to tumor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tsukerman, Pinchas; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Yamin, Rachel; Ophir, Yael; Stanietsky, Anna Miller Noa; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2014-05-01

    NK cells are innate immune lymphocytes that express a vast repertoire of germ-line encoded receptors for target recognition. These receptors include inhibitory and activating proteins, among the latter of which is CD16, a low affinity binding Fc receptor. Here, we show that human NK cells expand in response to stimulation with various tumor cell lines. We further demonstrate that the tumor-derived expansion of NK cells is accompanied by rapid, cell-dependent, changes in CD16 expression levels. We show that in NK cells expanded in response to the EBV-transformed cell line 721.221, CD16 is shed and therefore approximately half of the expanded 721.221-derived NK-cell population does not express CD16. We also show, in contrast, that in response to 1106mel cells, CD16 expression is maintained on the cell surface of the expanded NK cells due to an antibody-dependent mechanism. Our results may provide a basis for the selective expansion of NK cells that may be used for tumor immunotherapy.

  7. Exosomes mediate hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission and NK-cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yinli; Han, Qiuju; Hou, Zhaohua; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that exosomes can transfer genetic material between cells. However, their roles in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remain unclear. Here, we report that exosomes present in the sera of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients contained both HBV nucleic acids and HBV proteins, and transferred HBV to hepatocytes in an active manner. Notably, HBV nucleic acids were detected in natural killer (NK) cells from both CHB patients and healthy donors after exposure to HBV-positive exosomes. Through real-time fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3',-tetramethylindodicarbocyanine, 4-chlorobenzenesulfnate salt (DiD)-labeled exosomes were observed to interact with NK cells and to be taken up by NK cells, which was enhanced by transforming growth factor-β treatment. Furthermore, HBV-positive exosomes impaired NK-cell functions, including interferon (IFN)-γ production, cytolytic activity, NK-cell proliferation and survival, as well as the responsiveness of the cells to poly (I:C) stimulation. HBV infection suppressed the expression of pattern-recognition receptors, especially retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I), on NK cells, resulting in the dampening of the nuclear factor κB(NF-κB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Our results highlight a previously unappreciated role of exosomes in HBV transmission and NK-cell dysfunction during CHB infection. PMID:27238466

  8. Redirecting NK cells mediated tumor cell lysis by a new recombinant bifunctional protein

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Claire; Campigna, Emmanuelle; Salhi, Imed; Morisseau, Sébastien; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Pèlegrin, André; Robert, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are at the crossroad between innate and adaptive immunity and play a major role in cancer immunosurveillance. NK cell stimulation depends on a balance between inhibitory and activating receptors, such as the stimulatory lectinlike receptor NKG2D. To redirect NK cells against tumor cells we designed bifunctional proteins able to specifically bind tumor cells and to induce their lysis by NK cells, after NKG2D engagement. To this aim, we used the “knob into hole” heterodimerization strategy, in which “knob” and “hole” variants were generated by directed mutagenesis within the CH3 domain of human IgG1 Fc fragments fused to an anti-CEA or anti-HER2 scFv or to the H60 murine ligand of NKG2D, respectively. We demonstrated the capacity of the bifunctional proteins produced to specifically coat tumor cells surface with H60 ligand. Most importantly, we demonstrated that these bifunctional proteins were able to induce an NKG2D-dependent and antibody-specific tumor cell lysis by murine NK cells. Overall, the results show the possibility to redirect NK cytotoxicity to tumor cells by a new format of recombinant bispecific antibody, opening the way of potential NK cell-based cancer immunotherapies by specific activation of the NKG2D receptor at the tumor site. PMID:18790793

  9. Do NK-cell receptors and alloreactivity affect solid organ transplantation?

    PubMed

    Vilches, Carlos; Parham, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Although natural killer cells lyse targets without pre-sensitization, and in an MHC-unrestricted manner, they can also respond to healthy allogeneic cells of different MHC type. Such alloreactivity is a consequence of NK cells using clonally distributed, inhibitory MHC class I receptors to achieve tolerance to healthy autologous cells. Absence of an appropriate MHC class I ligand on an allogeneic cell erroneously informs the NK cell that the allogeneic cell has lost MHC class I expression and should be killed. Potential NK-cell allo-reactivities are common in non-HLA-identical hematopoietic cell transplants and can have both beneficial and detrimental effects. Less is known of NK-cell allo-reactivities in solid organ transplantation. In animal models NK cells are neither necessary nor sufficient for acute transplant rejection, but they can make a contribution by helping activate T cells. Genes encoding NK-cell receptors for polymorphic MHC class I molecules are also highly polymorphic, contributing to variability of the NK-cell repertoire and response in the human population. These receptors could represent intrinsic patient factors that influence the success of their transplanted solid organs.

  10. Highly effective NK cells are associated with good prognosis in patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pasero, Christine; Gravis, Gwenaëlle; Granjeaud, Samuel; Guerin, Mathilde; Thomassin-Piana, Jeanne; Rocchi, Palma; Salem, Naji; Walz, Jochen; Moretta, Alessandro; Olive, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcome of patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPC) at diagnosis is heterogeneous and unpredictable; thus alternative treatments such as immunotherapy are investigated. We retrospectively analyzed natural killer (NK) cells by flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 39 mPC patients, with 5 year-follow-up, and their correlation with time to castration resistance (TCR) and overall survival (OS). In parallel, NK functionality was carried out against prostate tumor cell lines, analyzed for the expression of NK cell ligands, to identify the receptors involved in PC recognition. NK cells from patients with longer TCR and OS displayed high expression of activating receptors and high cytotoxicity. The activating receptors NKp30 and NKp46 were the most obvious predictive markers of OS and TCR in a larger cohort of mPC patients (OS: p= 0.0018 and 0.0009; TCR: p= 0.007 and < 0.0001 respectively, log-rank test). Importantly, blocking experiments revealed that NKp46, along with NKG2D and DNAM-1 and, to a lesser extent NKp30, were involved in prostate tumor recognition by NK cells. These results identify NK cells as potential predictive biomarkers to stratify patients who are likely to have longer castration response, and pave the way to explore therapies aimed at enhancing NK cells in mPC patients. PMID:25961317

  11. Sleep-deprivation reduces NK cell number and function mediated by β-adrenergic signalling.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Beatriz H P; de Oliveira Marchioro, Laís; Greco, Carollina Ribeiro; Suchecki, Deborah

    2015-07-01

    Reduction of sleep time triggers a stress response, leading to augmented levels of glucocorticoids and adrenaline. These hormones regulate components of the innate immune system such as natural killer (NK) and NKT cells. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether and how stress hormones could alter the population and function of NK and NKT cells of mice submitted to different lengths of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD, from 24 to 72 h). Results showed that 72h of PSD decreased not only NK and NKT cell counts, but also their cytotoxic activity against B16F10 melanoma cells in vitro. Propranolol treatment during PSD reversed these effects, indicating a major inhibitory role of beta-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) on NK cells function. Moreover, both corticosterone plasma levels and expression of beta 2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR) in NK cells increased by 48 h of PSD. In vitro incubation of NK cells with dexamethasone augmented the level of β2-AR in the cell surface, suggesting that glucocorticoids could induce β2-AR expression. In summary, we propose that reduction of NK and NKT cell number and cytotoxic activity appears to be mediated by glucocorticoids-induced increased expression of β2-AR in these cells.

  12. Stage-specific requirement of IL-18 for antiviral NK cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Although natural killer (NK) cells are considered part of the innate immune system, recent studies have demonstrated the ability of antigen-experienced NK cells to become long-lived and contribute to potent recall responses similar to T and B cells. The precise signals that promote the generation of a long-lived NK cell response are largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that NK cells require interleukin (IL)-18 signaling to generate a robust primary response during mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, but do not require this signal for memory cell maintenance or recall responses. IL-12 signaling and STAT4 in activated NK cells increased the expression of the adaptor protein MyD88, which mediates signaling downstream of the IL-18 and IL-1 receptors. During MCMV infection, NK cells required MyD88 but not IL-1 receptor for optimal expansion. Thus, an IL-18-MyD88 signaling axis facilitates the prolific expansion of NK cells in response to primary viral infection, but not recall responses. PMID:25589075

  13. Cutting edge: stage-specific requirement of IL-18 for antiviral NK cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-02-15

    Although NK cells are considered part of the innate immune system, recent studies have demonstrated the ability of Ag-experienced NK cells to become long-lived and contribute to potent recall responses similar to T and B cells. The precise signals that promote the generation of a long-lived NK cell response are largely undefined. In this article, we demonstrate that NK cells require IL-18 signaling to generate a robust primary response during mouse CMV (MCMV) infection but do not require this signal for memory cell maintenance or recall responses. IL-12 signaling and STAT4 in activated NK cells increased the expression of the adaptor protein MyD88, which mediates signaling downstream of the IL-18 and IL-1 receptors. During MCMV infection, NK cells required MyD88, but not IL-1R, for optimal expansion. Thus, an IL-18-MyD88 signaling axis facilitates the prolific expansion of NK cells in response to primary viral infection, but not recall responses. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Decreased NK cell functions in obesity can be reactivated by fat mass reduction.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Janine; Spielau, Marco; Brandsch, Corinna; Stangl, Gabriele I; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Bähr, Ina; Berreis, Tobias; Wrann, Christiane D; Kielstein, Heike

    2015-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the first defense against malignant cells, and their functions are severely impaired in individuals with obesity. However, it is not known whether functions can be re-activated after weight loss. The alterations of NK cell functions after fat mass reduction were investigated. Thirty-two healthy adults with obesity were divided into control and experimental groups. Participants of the experimental group performed a 3-month program of exercise training and nutrition. Anthropometric, physiological, and metabolic parameters and plasma adipocytokines were determined. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analyzed by means of flow cytometry and Western blot assay for various NK cell-specific functional parameters and leptin signaling components. NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay with leptin stimulation was performed. Male participants significantly decreased their body fat mass (P < 0.05) and increased physical fitness (P < 0.05). Plasma leptin levels were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) and intracellular interferon gamma (IFN-γ) expression in CD56(dim) NK cells was significantly increased (P < 0.001) 3 months after study end. Stimulation of NK-92 cells with different leptin dosages revealed a significant dose-dependent decrease of specific tumor cell lysis. The present study demonstrates a reactivation of NK cell functionality after body fat mass reduction in persons with obesity. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  15. Monocyte/Macrophage: NK Cell Cooperation-Old Tools for New Functions.

    PubMed

    Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Dzik, Jolanta M

    Monocyte/macrophage and natural killer (NK) cells are partners from a phylogenetic standpoint of innate immune system development and its evolutionary progressive interaction with adaptive immunity. The equally conservative ways of development and differentiation of both invertebrate hemocytes and vertebrate macrophages are reviewed. Evolutionary conserved molecules occurring in macrophage receptors and effectors have been inherited by vertebrates after their common ancestor with invertebrates. Cytolytic functions of mammalian NK cells, which are rooted in immune cells of invertebrates, although certain NK cell receptors (NKRs) are mammalian new events, are characterized. Broad heterogeneity of macrophage and NK cell phenotypes that depends on surrounding microenvironment conditions and expression profiles of specific receptors and activation mechanisms of both cell types are discussed. The particular tissue specificity of macrophages and NK cells, as well as their plasticity and mechanisms of their polarization to different functional subtypes have been underlined. The chapter summarized studies revealing the specific molecular mechanisms and regulation of NK cells and macrophages that enable their highly specific cross-cooperation. Attention is given to the evolving role of human monocyte/macrophage and NK cell interaction in pathogenesis of hypersensitivity reaction-based disorders, including autoimmunity, as well as in cancer surveillance and progression.

  16. Cytokines can counteract the inhibitory effect of MEK-i on NK-cell function.

    PubMed

    Manzini, Claudia; Venè, Roberta; Cossu, Irene; Gualco, Marina; Zupo, Simonetta; Dono, Mariella; Spagnolo, Francesco; Queirolo, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Pietra, Gabriella

    2016-09-20

    Oncogene-targeted therapies based on mutated BRAF- and/or MEK-specific inhibitors have been developed for melanoma treatment. Although these drugs induce tumor regression in a high percentage of patients, clinical responses are frequently limited in time and tumors often recur. Recent studies suggested that the combination of BRAF/MEK inhibition with immunotherapy could represent a promising strategy for the cure of melanoma. NK cells are suitable effectors for tumor immunotherapy. Here we show that PLX4032 (a mutant BRAFV600 inhibitor) had no effect on the functional properties of NK cells cultured in the presence of IL-2 or IL-15. In contrast, PD0325901 (a MEK inhibitor) induced the down-regulation of the main activating NK receptors and inhibited NK cell function. Importantly, PD0325901 did not affect the anti-tumor activity of NK cells that had been exposed to a combination of IL-15 and IL-18. In addition, both PLX4032 and PD0325901 did not exert any inhibitory effect on in vitro IL-2 or IL-15 pre-activated NK cells.Our data may provide a rationale for future clinical protocols that combine IL-15/IL-18 cytokine administration with MEK inhibitors. In addition, they suggest that oncogene-targeting drugs are compatible with NK-based adoptive therapy.

  17. About Training and Memory: NK-Cell Adaptation to Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Q; Romagnani, C

    2017-01-01

    Viral infections continuously challenge and shape our immune system. Due to their fine antigen recognition ability, adaptive lymphocytes protect against pathogen reencounter by generating specific immunological memory. Innate cells such as macrophages also adapt to pathogen challenge and mount resistance to reinfection, a phenomenon termed trained immunity. As part of the innate immunity, natural killer (NK) cells can display rapid effector functions and play a crucial role in the control of viral infections, especially by the β-herpesvirus cytomegalovirus (CMV). CMV activates the NK-cell pool by inducing proinflammatory signals, which prime NK cells, paralleling macrophage training. In addition, CMV dramatically shapes the NK-cell repertoire due to its ability to trigger specific NK cell-activating receptors, and enables the expansion and persistence of a specific NK-cell subset displaying adaptive and memory features. In this chapter, we will discuss how different signals during CMV infection contribute to NK-cell training and acquisition of classical memory properties and how these events can impact on reinfection and cross-resistance.

  18. Exercise induced alterations in NK-cell cytotoxicity - methodological issues and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Philipp; Schenk, Alexander; Kieven, Markus; Holthaus, Michelle; Lehmann, Jonas; Lövenich, Lukas; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    With their ability to recognize and eliminate virus-infected and neoplastic cells, natural killer cells (NK-cells) represent an important part of the innate immune system. NK-cells have attracted the attention of exercise scientists for more than thirty years ago. To date, it is widely accepted that NK-cell counts in the peripheral blood are strongly influenced by acute exercise. Additionally, many studies reported effects of both, acute and chronic exercise on NK-cell cytotoxicity. However, these findings are contradictory. The inconsistence in findings may be argued with different exercise paradigms (type, duration, intensity). Moreover, strongly varying methods were used to detect NK-cell cytotoxicity. This review gives an overview of studies, investigating the impact of acute and chronic exercise on NK-cell cytotoxicity in young and old healthy adults, as well as on specific populations, such as cancer patients. Furthermore, different methodological approaches to assess NK-cell cytotoxicity are critically discussed to state on inconsistent study results and to give perspectives for further research in this field.

  19. NK-cell receptors NKp46 and NCR1 control human metapneumovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Diab, Mohammad; Glasner, Ariella; Isaacson, Batya; Bar-On, Yotam; Drori, Yaron; Yamin, Rachel; Duev-Cohen, Alexandra; Danziger, Oded; Zamostiano, Rachel; Mandelboim, Michal; Jonjic, Stipan; Bacharach, Eran; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2017-02-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells are capable of killing various pathogens upon stimulation of activating receptors. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a respiratory virus, which was discovered in 2001 and is responsible for acute respiratory tract infection in infants and children worldwide. HMPV infection is very common, infecting around 70% of all children under the age of five. Under immune suppressive conditions, HMPV infection can be fatal. Not much is known on how NK cells respond to HMPV. In this study, using reporter assays and NK-cell cytotoxicity assays performed with human and mouse NK cells, we demonstrated that the NKp46-activating receptor and its mouse orthologue Ncr1, both members of the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) family, recognized an unknown ligand expressed by HMPV-infected human cells. We demonstrated that MHC class I is upregulated and MICA is downregulated upon HMPV infection. We also characterized mouse NK-cell phenotype in the blood and the lungs of HMPV-infected mice and found that lung NK cells are more activated and expressing NKG2D, CD43, CD27, KLRG1, and CD69 compared to blood NK cells regardless of HMPV infection. Finally, we demonstrated, using Ncr1-deficient mice, that NCR1 plays a critical role in controlling HMPV infection.

  20. Dysregulation of Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Axes and NK Cell Tissue Localization during Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Bonanni, Valentina; Santoni, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic molecules that play key roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Upon signaling via their specific receptors, chemokines regulate tissue mobilization and trafficking of a wide array of immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Current research is focused on analyzing changes in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression during various diseases to interfere with pathological trafficking of cells or to recruit selected cell types to specific tissues. NK cells are a heterogeneous lymphocyte population comprising several subsets endowed with distinct functional properties and mainly representing distinct stages of a linear development process. Because of their different functional potential, the type of subset that accumulates in a tissue drives the final outcome of NK cell-regulated immune response, leading to either protection or pathology. Correspondingly, chemokine receptors, including CXCR4, CXCR3, and CX3CR1, are differentially expressed by NK cell subsets, and their expression levels can be modulated during NK cell activation. At first, this review will summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of chemokines to the localization and generation of NK cell subsets in homeostasis. How an inappropriate chemotactic response can lead to pathology and how chemokine targeting can therapeutically affect tissue recruitment/localization of distinct NK cell subsets will also be discussed.

  1. STATs in NK-Cells: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, Dagmar; Sexl, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK)-cells are major players in the fight against viral infections and transformed cells, but there is increasing evidence attributing a disease-promoting role to NK-cells. Cytokines present in the tumor microenvironment shape NK-cell maturation, function, and effector responses. Many cytokines signal via the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway that is also frequently altered and constitutively active in a broad range of tumor cells. As a consequence, there are currently major efforts to develop therapeutic strategies to target this pathway. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to understand the role and contributions of JAK-STAT molecules in NK-cell biology-only this knowledge will allow us to predict effects of JAK-STAT inhibition for NK-cell functions and to successfully apply precision medicine. We will review the current knowledge on the role of JAK-STAT signaling for NK-cell functions and discuss conditions involved in the switch from NK-cell tumor surveillance to disease promotion.

  2. Successful adoptive transfer and in vivo expansion of human haploidentical NK cells in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeffrey S; Soignier, Yvette; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; McNearney, Sarah A; Yun, Gong H; Fautsch, Susan K; McKenna, David; Le, Chap; Defor, Todd E; Burns, Linda J; Orchard, Paul J; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E; Slungaard, Arne; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Okazaki, Ian J; McGlave, Philip B

    2005-04-15

    We previously demonstrated that autologous natural killer (NK)-cell therapy after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is safe but does not provide an antitumor effect. We hypothesize that this is due to a lack of NK-cell inhibitory receptor mismatching with autologous tumor cells, which may be overcome by allogeneic NK-cell infusions. Here, we test haploidentical, related-donor NK-cell infusions in a nontransplantation setting to determine safety and in vivo NK-cell expansion. Two lower intensity outpatient immune suppressive regimens were tested: (1) low-dose cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone and (2) fludarabine. A higher intensity inpatient regimen of high-dose cyclophosphamide and fludarabine (Hi-Cy/Flu) was tested in patients with poor-prognosis acute myeloid leukemia (AML). All patients received subcutaneous interleukin 2 (IL-2) after infusions. Patients who received lower intensity regimens showed transient persistence but no in vivo expansion of donor cells. In contrast, infusions after the more intense Hi-Cy/Flu resulted in a marked rise in endogenous IL-15, expansion of donor NK cells, and induction of complete hematologic remission in 5 of 19 poor-prognosis patients with AML. These findings suggest that haploidentical NK cells can persist and expand in vivo and may have a role in the treatment of selected malignancies used alone or as an adjunct to HCT.

  3. Interaction of NK Lysin, a Peptide Produced by Cytolytic Lymphocytes, with Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, M.; Girard, R.; Cazenave, P.-A.

    1999-01-01

    NK lysin is a 9-kDa polypeptide that was originally isolated from porcine intestinal tissue based on its antibacterial activity. It is produced by cytolytic lymphocytes and is cytolytic against a number of different types of tumor cells. Here we report the binding of NK lysin to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its anti-LPS activity. NK lysin binds to matrix-coated LPS from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and different strains of Salmonella enterica. Lipid A and polymyxin B inhibited the binding, demonstrating a preferential interaction of NK lysin with the lipid part of LPS. Chromium-labeled lymphoma cells were lysed by NK lysin, and LPS dose-dependently inhibited the cytolysis at equimolar amounts. In the same manner, NK lysin inhibited certain LPS-stimulated effects on mouse bone marrow cells as well as LPS binding to mouse granulocytes. These results suggest that NK lysin may be a another natural LPS-binding protein from lymphocytes that may participate in the endogenous defense response associated with elevated concentrations of LPS. PMID:9864216

  4. Cytokines can counteract the inhibitory effect of MEK-i on NK-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, Claudia; Venè, Roberta; Cossu, Irene; Gualco, Marina; Zupo, Simonetta; Dono, Mariella; Spagnolo, Francesco; Queirolo, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Pietra, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-targeted therapies based on mutated BRAF- and/or MEK-specific inhibitors have been developed for melanoma treatment. Although these drugs induce tumor regression in a high percentage of patients, clinical responses are frequently limited in time and tumors often recur. Recent studies suggested that the combination of BRAF/MEK inhibition with immunotherapy could represent a promising strategy for the cure of melanoma. NK cells are suitable effectors for tumor immunotherapy. Here we show that PLX4032 (a mutant BRAFV600 inhibitor) had no effect on the functional properties of NK cells cultured in the presence of IL-2 or IL-15. In contrast, PD0325901 (a MEK inhibitor) induced the down-regulation of the main activating NK receptors and inhibited NK cell function. Importantly, PD0325901 did not affect the anti-tumor activity of NK cells that had been exposed to a combination of IL-15 and IL-18. In addition, both PLX4032 and PD0325901 did not exert any inhibitory effect on in vitro IL-2 or IL-15 pre-activated NK cells. Our data may provide a rationale for future clinical protocols that combine IL-15/IL-18 cytokine administration with MEK inhibitors. In addition, they suggest that oncogene-targeting drugs are compatible with NK-based adoptive therapy. PMID:27563819

  5. NK Cells Respond to Haptens by the Activation of Calcium Permeable Plasma Membrane Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grandclément, Camille; Pick, Horst; Vogel, Horst; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells mediate innate immunity to infected and transformed cells. Yet, NK cells can also mount hapten-specific recall responses thereby contributing to contact hypersensitivity (CHS). However, since NK cells lack antigen receptors that are used by the adaptive immune system to recognize haptens, it is not clear if NK cells respond directly to haptens and, if so, what mediates these responses. Here we show that among four haptens the two that are known to induce NK cell-dependent CHS trigger the rapid influx of extracellular Ca2+ into NK cells and lymphocyte cell lines. Thus lymphocytes can respond to haptens independent of antigen presentation and antigen receptors. We identify the Ca2+-permeable cation channel TRPC3 as a component of the lymphocyte response to one of these haptens. These data suggest that the response to the second hapten is based on a distinct mechanism, consistent with the capacity of NK cells to discriminate haptens. These findings raise the possibility that antigen-receptor independent activation of immune cells contributes to CHS. PMID:26963818

  6. NK cells, displaying early activation, cytotoxicity and adhesion molecules, are associated with mild dengue disease.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, E L; De Oliveira-Pinto, L M; Zagne, S M; Cerqueira, D I S; Nogueira, R M R; Kubelka, C F

    2006-02-01

    During the innate immune response against infections, Natural Killer (NK) cells are as important effector cells as are Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated after antigenic stimulation in the adaptative response. NK cells increase in numbers, after viral infection or vaccination. We investigated the NK cell and CD8 T lymphocyte status in 55 dengue infected patients. The NK (CD56+CD3-) and CD56+ T cell (CD56+CD3+) rates rise during the acute phase of disease. The majority of NK cells from dengue patients display early markers for activation (CD69, HLA-DR, and CD38) and cell adhesion molecules (CD44, CD11a) during the acute phase of disease. The intracellular cytotoxic granule, TIA-1, is also up-regulated early in NK cells. Most of these markers appear also on CD8+ T lymphocytes but during the late acute phase. Circulating IL-15 is elevated in a significant number of patients during early acute infection and its values were statistically correlated with NK frequencies and cytotoxic markers on NKs. We have therefore shown that dengue virus infection is very likely stimulating a cytotoxic response that may be efficient in controlling the virus in synergism with CD8+ T lymphocytes. Interestingly, the heightened CD56+CD3-, CD56+CD3+, CD56+TIA-1+ and CD56+CD11a+ cell rates are associated with mild dengue clinical manifestations and might indicate a good prognosis of the disease.

  7. Fused tricyclic pyrrolizinones that exhibit pseudo-irreversible blockade of the NK1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Morriello, Gregori J; Chicchi, Gary; Johnson, Tricia; Mills, Sander G; Demartino, Julie; Kurtz, Marc; Tsao, K L C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Carlson, Emma; Townson, Karen; Wheeldon, Alan; Boyce, Susan; Collinson, Neil; Rupniak, Nadia; Devita, Robert J

    2010-10-01

    Previously, we had disclosed a novel class of hNK(1) antagonists based on the 5,5-fused pyrrolidine core. These compounds displayed subnanomolar hNK(1) affinity along with good efficacy in a gerbil foot-tapping (GFT) model, but unfortunately they had low to moderate functional antagonist (IP-1) activity. To elaborate on the SAR of this class of hNK(1) compounds and to improve functional activity, we have designed and synthesized a new class of hNK(1) antagonist with a third fused ring. Compared to the 5,5-fused pyrrolidine class, these 5,5,5-fused tricyclic hNK(1) antagonists maintain subnanomolar hNK(1) binding affinity with highly improved functional IP-1 activity (<10% SP remaining). A fused tricyclic methyl, hydroxyl geminally substituted pyrrolizinone (compound 20) had excellent functional IP (<2% SP remaining), hNK(1) binding affinity, off-target selectivity, pharmacokinetic profile and in vivo activity. Complete inhibition of agonist activity was observed at both 0 and 24h in the gerbil foot-tapping model with an ID(50) of 0.02 mpk at both 0 and 24h, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of a new centrally acting muscle relaxant, NK433 (lanperisone hydrochloride) on spinal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Sakitama, K; Ozawa, Y; Aoto, N; Tomita, H; Ishikawa, M

    1997-10-22

    (-)-(R)-2-methyl-3-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-4'-trifluoromethylpropiophenone++ + monohydrochloride, lanperisone hydrochloride (NK433) administered intravenously or orally depressed the mono- and polysynaptic reflex potential, dorsal root reflex potential, flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers, patellar and flexor reflexes. These effects were reduced by spinal transection. NK433 inhibited the facilitation of the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers that was induced by intrathecal administration of noradrenaline-HCl. (+)-(1R,2R)-2-methyl-3-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)-1-pr opanol (LPS-9)-HCl, a metabolite of NK433, also inhibited the spinal reflexes. Given orally, NK433 had effects more than three times stronger and tending to be longer-lasting than those of eperisone-HCl. These results suggest that NK433 exerts a non-selective inhibition on spinal reflexes and that inhibition of the descending noradrenergic tonic facilitation within the spinal cord is involved in the mechanism of spinal reflex depression by NK433. LPS-9 could contribute to the potent activity of NK433 after oral administration.

  9. Using NK Cell Lipid Raft Fractionation to Understand the Role of Lipid Rafts in NK Cell Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts were first defined as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) due to their relative insolubility in non-ionic detergents. Although they should not be confused with lipid rafts, DRMs are a valuable starting point for the study of these membrane domains and the interactions of proteins with rafts.Here we describe the isolation of DRMs by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose gradient, a method we have used to study the role of lipid rafts in NKG2D-mediated signaling. We also describe raft fractionation of NK cells involving the selective solubility of β-octylglucoside (β-OG). OG is a non-ionic detergent that efficiently dissolves DRMs but does not disrupt protein associations with the cytoskeleton. Using these two techniques may yield useful information about the proteins involved in receptor recruitment into lipid rafts and the interactions of the actin cytoskeleton with lipid rafts.

  10. Adaptive NK Cells with Low TIGIT Expression Are Inherently Resistant to Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Dhifaf; Cichocki, Frank; Zhang, Bin; Yingst, Ashley; Spellman, Stephen R; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; Blazar, Bruce R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2016-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-induced adaptive natural killer (NK) cells display distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics, including properties of immune memory. We hypothesized that these cells may be more resistant to suppression mediated by immunoregulatory cell subsets, making them attractive for use in cancer therapy. Here we report that relative to conventional NK cells, adaptive NK cells express lower levels of the inhibitory receptor T-cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT), which results in resistance to immune suppression mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), as derived from cytokine induction in normal blood or patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. In contrast, conventional NK cells were potently suppressed by MDSCs, an effect abrogated completely by TIGIT blockade. Mechanistically, TIGIT signaling in NK cells after MDSC coculture led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of ZAP70/Syk and ERK1/2. These effects were reversed by blocking TIGIT on NK cells or by inhibiting production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by MDSCs, the latter of which upregulated the TIGIT ligand CD155 on MDSCs. Accordingly, the blunted cytotoxicity of NK cells cocultured with MDSCs against tumor cells could be reversed by blocking TIGIT or ROS production. Overall, our results show how adaptive NK cells arising in response to CMV infection can escape MDSC-mediated suppression, and defined TIGIT antagonists as a novel type of checkpoint inhibitor to enhance NK-cell-mediated responses against cancer and infection. Cancer Res; 76(19); 5696-706. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Report – Inception Through May 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Don Karner; James Francfort; Randall Solomon

    2004-11-01

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric vehicles for transportation in urban applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations, where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK city vehicles is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Ford leased 97 TH!NK city electric vehicles to commuters from Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk counties for $199 per month per vehicle. The first Clean Commute Program vehicle deliveries occurred late in 2001, with data collection commencing in February 2002. Through May 2004, 24 of the lessees have returned their vehicles to Ford and no longer participate in the Clean Commute Program. Reasons given for returning the vehicles include relocation out of the Program area, change in employment status, change in commuting status, and, in a few cases, dissatisfaction with the vehicle. Additionally, 13 vehicles have been returned to Ford as their leases have completed. In August 2002, Ford announced that it was ceasing production of the TH!NK city and would not extend any TH!NK city leases. Through May 2004, participants in the Clean Commute Program have driven their vehicles over 370,000 miles, avoiding the use of over 17,000 gallons of gasoline. The TH!NK city vehicles are driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month, and over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replace trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through May 2004.

  12. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Final Report - Inception through December 2004

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort; Don Karner

    2005-11-01

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric transportation in urban applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations, where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK city vehicles is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Ford leased at total of 97 TH!NK city electric vehicles to commuters from Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk counties for $199 per month. First Clean Commute Program vehicle deliveries occurred late in 2001, with data collection commencing in February 2002. Through May, 2004, 24 of the lessees have returned their vehicles to Ford and no longer participate in the Clean Commute Program. Reasons given for leaving the Program include relocation out of the Program area, change in employment status, change in commuting status, and, in a few cases, dissatisfaction with the vehicle. Additionally, 13 vehicles were returned to Ford when the lease was completed. In August 2002, Ford announced that it was ceasing production of the TH!NK city and would not extend any TH!NK city leases. Mileage accumulation dropped in the last quarter of the program as vehicle leases were returned to Ford. The impact of the program overall was significant as participants in the Clean Commute Program drove their vehicles over 406,074 miles, avoiding the use of over 18,887 gallons of gasoline. During the active portion of the program, the TH!NK city vehicles were driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month. Over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replaced trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through December 2004.

  13. Dysregulation of regulatory CD56(bright) NK cells/T cells interactions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Laroni, Alice; Armentani, Eric; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Ivaldi, Federico; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Sivori, Simona; Gandhi, Roopali; Weiner, Howard L; Moretta, Alessandro; Mancardi, Giovanni L; Uccelli, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence has shown that CD56(bright) NK cells, a subset of NK cells abundant in lymph nodes, may have an immunoregulatory function. In multiple sclerosis (MS), expansion of CD56(bright) NK cells has been associated to successful response to different treatments and to remission of disease during pregnancy; how whether they exert immunoregulation in physiologic conditions and whether this is impaired in MS is not known. We dissected the immunoregulatory role of CD56(bright) NK cells function in healthy subjects (HS) and compared it with that of untreated MS subjects or patients with clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of MS (CIS). We found that CD56(bright) NK cells from HS acquire, upon inflammatory cues, the capability of suppressing autologous CD4+T cell proliferation through direct cytotoxicity requiring engagement of natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) and secretion of granzyme B. CD56(bright) NK cells from patients with MS/CIS did not differ in frequency and share a similar phenotype but displayed a significantly lower ability to inhibit autologous T cell proliferation. This impairment was not related to deficient expression of NCRs or granzyme B by CD56(bright) NK cells, but to increased HLA-E expression on T cells from MS/CIS subjects, which could enhance the inhibitory effect mediated by NKG2A that is homogeneously expressed on CD56(bright) NK cells. The defect in controlling autologous T cells by CD56(bright) NK cells in MS/CIS might contribute to the excess of autoimmune response that is associated to disease development. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. IL-21 augments NK effector functions in chronically HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Strbo, Natasa; de Armas, Lesley; Liu, Huanliang; Kolber, Michael A.; Lichtenheld, Mathias; Pahwa, Savita

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study addresses the interleukin (IL)-21 effects on resting peripheral blood NK cells in chronically HIV-infected individuals. Design The effects of IL-21 on perforin expression, proliferation, degranulation, IFN-γ production, cytotoxicity and induction of STAT phosphorylation in NK cells were determined in vitro. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected and healthy individuals were incubated in vitro for 6h, 24h or 5 days with IL-21 or IL-15. Percentages of perforin, IFN-γ, CD107a, NKG2D and STAT3-5 positive cells were determined within NK cell populations. K562 cells were used as target cells in NK cytotoxicity assay. Results Frequency of CD56dim cells in chronically HIV-infected individuals was diminished. Perforin expression in CD56dim and CD56bright was comparable in healthy and HIV-infected individuals. IL-15 up-regulated perforin expression primarily in CD56bright NK cells while IL-21 up-regulated perforin in both NK subsets. IL-21 and IL- 15 up-regulated CD107a and IFN-γ as well as NK cytotoxicity. IL-15 predominantly activated STAT5, while IL-21 activated STAT5 and STAT3. IL-15, but not IL-21 increased NK cell proliferation in uninfected and HIV-infected individuals. Conclusion IL-21 augments NK effector functions in chronically HIV-infected individuals and due to its perforin enhancing properties it has potential for immunotherapy or as a vaccine adjuvant. PMID:18670213

  15. Structure and functions of gamma-dodecalactone isolated from Antrodia camphorata for NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Jung; Vijaya Krishna, R; Tsai, Chia-Che; Wu, Wan-Hsun; Chao, Louis Kuoping; Hwang, Kent-Hao; Chien, Chichen Michael; Chang, Hwan-You; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2010-09-15

    The preserved fungal species Antrodia camphorata has diverse health-promoting effects and has been popularly used in East Asia as a traditional herb. We isolated a volatile compound from the culture medium of A. camphorata and identified it as gamma-dodecalactone (gamma-DDL). Cytomic screening for immune-modulating activity revealed that gamma-DDL can activate human NK cells to express the early activation marker CD69. Further experiments showed that gamma-DDL not only can induce NK cells to express CD69 but also stimulate NK cells to secrete cytotoxic molecules (FasL and granzyme B) and Th1 cytokines (TNF-alpha and INF-gamma). Measuring the distribution of gamma-DDL in the subcellular compartments of NK cells revealed that gamma-DDL has been converted to 4-hydroxydodecanoic acid (an acyclic isomer of gamma-DDL) in a time-dependent manner in the cytoplasm. Synthetic (R,S)-4-hydroxydodecanoic acid activated NK cells to express CD69 mRNA within 10min, in contrast to gamma-DDL, which activated NK cells to express CD69 within 50min. This faster activation suggests that gamma-DDL has converted to 4-hydroxydodecanoic acid and to stimulate the NK cells to express CD69. Optically pure (R)-(+)-4-hydroxydodecanoic acid and (S)-(-)-4-hydroxydodecanoic acid were obtained via: (1) synthesis of its diastereomeric esters of (R,S)-4-hydroxydodecanoic (R)-(-)-2-phenylpropionate; (2) separation of diastereomers via preparative HPLC, and (3) subsequent hydrolysis of the obtained optical pure ester of (R)-(+)-4-hydroxydodecanoic acid (R)-(-)-2-phenylpropionate and (R)-(-)-4-hydroxydodecanoic acid (R)-(-)-2-phenylpropionate, respectively. Further assays of NK cells activation using each enantiomer showed that only the (R)-(+)-4-hydroxydodecanoic acid can activate NK cells.

  16. [Effects of simulated weightlessness on biological activity of human NK cells induced by IL-2].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenli; Zhu, Xia; Zhao, Li; Yang, Xiling; Cao, Fei; Huang, Yong; Mu, Peihong

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effects of simulated weightlessness on the activity of human natural killer (NK) cells induced by interleukin 2 (IL-2). Primary human NK cells were cultured under simulated weightlessness condition. The viability of NK cells was determined by CCK-8 assay; cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry combined with annexin V-FITC/PI staining; the level of interferon γ (IFN-γ) was examined by ELISA; the mRNA levels of IL-12 receptor genes were detected by reverse transcription PCR. Compared with control cells cultured in normal gravity, IL-2-induced cell proliferation rate of NK cells cultured in simulated weightlessness decreased by 13.6% and 31% at 24 and 48 hours, respectively; the cell apoptotic rate increased by 8% and 19%; IL-2-induced IFN-γ production was inhibited by 25.2% and 47.8%; the cytotoxicity of NK cells induced by IL-2 was reduced by 7% and 18%; IL-12-induced IFN-γ production was suppressed by 21.8% and 58.8% in IL-2 pretreated cells at 24 and 48 hours, respectively. In addition, the mRNA levels of IL-12 β1 and β2 receptor genes were significantly down-regulated in the cells cultured in simulated weightlessness. Simulated weightlessness can inhibit the proliferation of NK cells induced by IL-2, promote NK cell apoptosis, impair IL-2-induced IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity in NK cells, and inhibit IL-12-induced IFN-γ production through down-regulating IL-12 receptor gene expression in NK cells.

  17. Identification of genuine primary pulmonary NK cell lymphoma via clinicopathologic observation and clonality assay.

    PubMed

    Gong, Li; Wei, Long-Xiao; Huang, Gao-Sheng; Zhang, Wen-Dong; Wang, Lu; Zhu, Shao-Jun; Han, Xiu-Juan; Yao, Li; Lan, Miao; Li, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-19

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, is an uncommon lymphoma associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). It most commonly involves the nasal cavity and upper respiratory tract. Primary pulmonary NK/T cell lymphoma is extremely rare. If a patient with a NK or T-cell tumor has an unusual reaction to treatment or an unusual prognosis, it is wise to differentiate NK from T-cell tumors. The clinicopathologic characteristics, immunophenotype, EBV in situ hybridization, and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement of primary pulmonary NK cell lymphoma from a 73-year-old Chinese woman were investigated and the clonal status was determined using female X-chromosomal inactivation mosaicism and polymorphisms at the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) gene. The lesion showed the typical histopathologic characteristics and immunohistochemical features of NK/T cell lymphoma. However, the sample was negative for TCR gene rearrangement. A clonality assay demonstrated that the lesion was monoclonal. It is concluded that this is the first recorded case of genuine primary pulmonary NK cell lymphoma. The purpose of the present work is to recommend that pathologists carefully investigate the whole lesion to reduce the likelihood that primary pulmonary NK cell lymphoma will be misdiagnosed as an infectious lesion. In addition, TCR gene rearrangement and clonal analysis, which is based on female X-chromosomal inactivation mosaicism and polymorphisms at PGK and androgen receptor (AR) loci, were found to play important roles in differentiating NK cell lymphoma from T cell lymphoma. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/5205300349457729.

  18. Myeloma cells resistance to NK cell lysis mainly involves an HLA class I-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minjie; Gao, Lu; Yang, Guang; Tao, Yi; Hou, Jun; Xu, Hongwei; Hu, Xiaojing; Han, Ying; Zhang, Qianqiao; Zhan, Fenghuang; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2014-07-01

    The anti-multiple myeloma (MM) potential of natural killer (NK) cells has been of rising interest in recent years. However, the molecular mechanism of NK cell cytotoxicity to myeloma cells remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expressions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and HLA-G in patient myeloma cells, and determined their relevance in patient tumor-cell susceptibility to NK cell cytotoxicity. Our results showed that patient myeloma cells (n = 12) were relatively resistant to NK-92 cell lysis, compared with myeloma cell lines (n = 7, P < 0.01). Gene expression profiling and flow cytometry analysis showed that both mRNA and protein of HLA class I were highly expressed in 12 patient myeloma cells. Interestingly, no or low HLA-G surface expression was detected, although multiple HLA-G transcripts were detected in these myeloma cells. NK cell function assay showed that down-regulating HLA class I expression on patient cells by acid treatment significantly increased the susceptibility of MM cells to NK-mediated lysis. Furthermore, we found that the blocking of membrane-bound HLA class I rather than HLA-G using antibodies on myeloma samples markedly increased their susceptibility to NK-mediated killing. These results demonstrated that the resistance of patient MM cells to NK lysis mainly involves an HLA class I-dependent mechanism, suggesting that HLA class I may be involved in protecting MM cells from NK-mediated attack and contribute to their immune escape in vivo.

  19. NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K.; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; Morris, Zachary S.; Sondel, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in cancer immunotherapies that involve tumor-antigen targeting by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). NK cells express a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors that serve to regulate the function and activity of the cells. In the context of targeting cells, NK cells can be “specifically activated” through certain Fc receptors that are expressed on their cell surface. NK cells can express FcγRIIIA and/or FcγRIIC, which can bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, transmitting activating signals within NK cells. Once activated through Fc receptors by antibodies bound to target cells, NK cells are able to lyse target cells without priming, and secrete cytokines like interferon gamma to recruit adaptive immune cells. This antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of tumor cells is utilized in the treatment of various cancers overexpressing unique antigens, such as neuroblastoma, breast cancer, B cell lymphoma, and others. NK cells also express a family of receptors called killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which regulate the function and response of NK cells toward target cells through their interaction with their cognate ligands that are expressed on tumor cells. Genetic polymorphisms in KIR and KIR-ligands, as well as FcγRs may influence NK cell responsiveness in conjunction with mAb immunotherapies. This review focuses on current therapeutic mAbs, different strategies to augment the anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and genotypic factors that may influence patient responses to antibody-dependent immunotherapies. PMID:26284063

  20. Cryptococcus neoformans Directly Stimulates Perforin Production and Rearms NK Cells for Enhanced Anticryptococcal Microbicidal Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Kaleb J.; Jones, Gareth J.; Zheng, Chunfu; Huston, Shaunna M.; Timm-McCann, Martina; Islam, Anowara; Berenger, Byron M.; Ma, Ling Ling; Wiseman, Jeremy C. D.; Mody, Christopher H.

    2009-01-01

    NK cells, in addition to possessing antitumor and antiviral activity, exhibit perforin-dependent microbicidal activity against the opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the factors controlling this response, particularly whether the pathogen itself provides an activation or rearming signal, are largely unknown. The current studies were performed to determine whether exposure to this fungus alters subsequent NK cell anticryptococcal activity. NK cells lost perforin and mobilized lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 to the cell surface following incubation with the fungus, indicating that degranulation had occurred. Despite a reduced perforin content during killing, NK cells acquired an enhanced ability to kill C. neoformans, as demonstrated using auxotrophs that allowed independent assessment of the killing of two strains. De novo protein synthesis was required for optimal killing; however, there was no evidence that a soluble factor contributed to the enhanced anticryptococcal activity. Exposure of NK cells to C. neoformans caused the cells to rearm, as demonstrated by increased perforin mRNA levels and enhanced loss of perforin when transcription was blocked. Degranulation alone was insufficient to provide the activation signal as NK cells lost anticryptococcal activity following treatment with strontium chloride. However, NK cells regained the activity upon prolonged exposure to C. neoformans, which is consistent with activation by the microbe. The enhanced cytotoxicity did not extend to tumor killing since NK cells exposed to C. neoformans failed to kill NK-sensitive tumor targets (K562 cells). These studies demonstrate that there is contact-mediated microbe-specific rearming and activation of microbicidal activity that are necessary for optimal killing of C. neoformans. PMID:19307209

  1. Inhibitory 2B4 contributes to NK cell education and immunological derangements in XLP1 patients.

    PubMed

    Meazza, Raffaella; Falco, Michela; Marcenaro, Stefania; Loiacono, Fabrizio; Canevali, Paolo; Bellora, Francesca; Tuberosa, Claudia; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Moretta, Alessandro; Mingari, Maria C; Moretta, Lorenzo; Aricò, Maurizio; Bottino, Cristina; Pende, Daniela

    2017-06-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease 1 (XLP1) is an inherited immunodeficiency, caused by mutations in SH2D1A encoding Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP). In XLP1, 2B4, upon engagement with CD48, has inhibitory instead of activating function. This causes a selective inability of cytotoxic effectors to kill EBV-infected cells, with dramatic clinical sequelae. Here, we investigated the NK cell education in XLP1, upon characterization of killer Ig-like receptor (KIR)/KIR-L genotype and phenotypic repertoire of self-HLA class I specific inhibitory NK receptors (self-iNKRs). We also analyzed NK-cell cytotoxicity against CD48(+) or CD48(-) KIR-ligand matched or autologous hematopoietic cells in XLP1 patients and healthy controls. XLP1 NK cells may show a defective phenotypic repertoire with substantial proportion of cells lacking self-iNKR. These NK cells are cytotoxic and the inhibitory 2B4/CD48 pathway plays a major role to prevent killing of CD48(+) EBV-transformed B cells and M1 macrophages. Importantly, self-iNKR defective NK cells kill CD48(-) targets, such as mature DCs. Self-iNKR(-) NK cells in XLP1 patients are functional even in resting conditions, suggesting a role of the inhibitory 2B4/CD48 pathway in the education process during NK-cell maturation. Killing of autologous mature DC by self-iNKR defective XLP1 NK cells may impair adaptive responses, further exacerbating the patients' immune defect. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Effect of tributyltin (TBT) on ATP levels in human natural killer (NK) cells: relationship to TBT-induced decreases in NK function.

    PubMed

    Dudimah, Fred D; Odman-Ghazi, Sabah O; Hatcher, Frank; Whalen, Margaret M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role that tributyltin (TBT)-induced decreases in ATP levels may play in TBT-induced decreases in the tumor lysing (lytic) function of natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are a subset of lymphocytes that act as an initial immune defense against tumor cells and virally infected cells. TBT is an environmental contaminant that has been detected in human blood, which has been shown to interfere with ATP synthesis. Previous studies have shown that TBT is able to decrease very significantly the lytic function of NK cells. In this study NK cells were exposed to various concentrations of TBT and to two other compounds that interfere with ATP synthesis (rotenone a complex I inhibitor and oligomycin an ATP synthase inhibitor) for various lengths of time before determining the levels of ATP and lytic function. Exposures of NK cells to 10, 25, 50 and 100 nm TBT did not significantly reduce ATP levels after 24 h. However, these same exposures caused significant decreases in cytotoxic function. Studies of brief 1 h exposures to a range of TBT, rotenone and oligomycin concentrations followed by 24 h, 48 h and 6 day periods in compound-free media prior to assaying for ATP levels or cytotoxic function showed that each of the compounds caused persistent decreases in ATP levels and lytic function of NK cells. Exposures to 0.05-5 microm rotenone or oligomycin for 1 h reduced ATP levels by 20-25% but did not have any measurable effect on the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells. ATP levels were also decreased by about 20-25% after 24 h or 48 h exposures to rotenone or oligomycin (0.5 microm ), and the lytic function was decreased by about 50%. The results suggest that TBT-induced decreases in ATP levels were not responsible for the loss of cytotoxic function seen at 1 h and 24 h. However, TBT-induced decreases of NK-ATP levels may be at least in part responsible for losses of NK-cytotoxic function seen after 48 h and 6 day exposures.

  3. Oligosaccharide ligands for NKR-P1 protein activate NK cells and cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezouška, Karel; Yuen, Chun-Ting; O'Brien, Jacqui; Childs, Robert A.; Chai, Wengang; Lawson, Alexander M.; Drbal, Karel; Fišerová, Anna; Posíšil, Miloslav; Feizi, Ten

    1994-11-01

    A diversity of high-affinity Oligosaccharide ligands are identified for NKR-P1, a membrane protein on natural killer (NK) cells which contains an extracellular Ca2+-dependent lectin domain. Interactions of such oligosaccharides on the target cell surface with NKR-P1 on the killer cell surface are crucial both for target cell recognition and for delivery of stimulatory or inhibitory signals linked to the NK cytolytic machinery. NK-resistant tumour cells are rendered susceptible by preincubation with liposomes expressing NKR-P1 ligands, suggesting that purging of tumour or virally infected cells in vivo may be a therapeutic possibility.

  4. Augmenting Trastuzumab Therapy against Breast Cancer through Selective Activation of NK Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    via their Fc receptor (FcγRIII, CD16 ) to the IgG1 Fc, heavy-chain, portion of trastuzumab(3). This leads to the activation of the NK cells, release...was associated with a concurrent decrease in the expression of the FcγRIII ( CD16 )(Figure 1C). Despite a similar decrease in NK cell expression of... CD16 following culture with trastuzumab- bound HER2-expressing tumor cells (Supplementary Figure 2A), NK cells from healthy donors with high affinity

  5. ErbB2/HER2-Specific NK Cells for Targeted Therapy of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Congcong; Burger, Michael C; Jennewein, Lukas; Genßler, Sabrina; Schönfeld, Kurt; Zeiner, Pia; Hattingen, Elke; Harter, Patrick N; Mittelbronn, Michel; Tonn, Torsten; Steinbach, Joachim P; Wels, Winfried S

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and malignant intracranial tumor in adults and currently incurable. To specifically target natural killer (NK) cell activity to GBM, we employed NK-92/5.28.z cells that are continuously expanding human NK cells expressing an ErbB2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). ErbB2 expression in 56 primary tumors, four primary cell cultures, and seven established cell lines was assessed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Cell killing activity of NK-92/5.28.z cells was analyzed in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. In vivo antitumor activity was evaluated in NOD-SCID IL2Rγ(null) (NSG) mice carrying orthotopic human GBM xenografts (6 to 11 mice per group) and C57BL/6 mice carrying subcutaneous and orthotopic ErbB2-expressing murine GBM tumors (5 to 8 mice per group). Statistical tests were two-sided. We found elevated ErbB2 protein expression in 41% of primary GBM samples and in the majority of GBM cell lines investigated. In in vitro assays, NK-92/5.28.z in contrast to untargeted NK-92 cells lysed all ErbB2-positive established and primary GBM cells analyzed. Potent in vivo antitumor activity of NK-92/5.28.z was observed in orthotopic GBM xenograft models in NSG mice, leading to a marked extension of symptom-free survival upon repeated stereotactic injection of CAR NK cells into the tumor area (median survival of 200.5 days upon treatment with NK-92/5.28.z vs 73 days upon treatment with parental NK-92 cells, P < .001). In immunocompetent mice, local therapy with NK-92/5.28.z cells resulted in cures of transplanted syngeneic GBM in four of five mice carrying subcutaneous tumors and five of eight mice carrying intracranial tumors, induction of endogenous antitumor immunity, and long-term protection against tumor rechallenge at distant sites. Our data demonstrate the potential of ErbB2-specific NK-92/5.28.z cells for adoptive immunotherapy of glioblastoma, justifying evaluation of this approach for the treatment of ErbB2-positive

  6. Effect of ginseng polysaccharides on NK cell cytotoxicity in immunosuppressed mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaoyao; Guo, Mofei; Feng, Yuanjie; Zheng, Huifang; Lei, Ping; Ma, Xiande; Han, Xiaowei; Guan, Hongquan; Hou, Diandong

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Ginseng polysaccharides (GPS) on natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity in immunosuppressed mice. Cyclophosphamide (Cy) was used to construct an immunosuppressed mouse model. The mice in each group were submitted to gavages with 200 or 400 mg/kg GPS every day for 10 days. Magnetic-activated cell sorting was used to isolate spleen NK cells, and the NK cell cytotoxicity, blood distribution, expression levels of perforin and granzyme, and the mRNA expression levels of interferon (IFN)-γ were detected. Compared with the normal control group, the cytotoxicity and proportion of NK cells in the blood, and the expression levels of perforin, granzyme and IFN-γ mRNA in the Cy model group were significantly reduced (P<0.05). In addition, compared with the Cy model group, the cytotoxicity and proportion of NK cells in the whole blood, and the expression levels of perforin and granzyme in the NK cells in the Cy + low-dose GPS and Cy + high-dose GPS groups were significantly increased (P<0.05). However, the mRNA expression levels of IFN-γ in the NK cells did not significantly change (P>0.05). Compared with the normal control group, the cytotoxicity and proportion of NK cells in the whole blood, and the expression levels of perforin in the Cy + low-dose GPS and the Cy + high-dose GPS groups were significantly lower (P<0.05). However, the expression levels of granzyme in the NK cells was not significantly different, as compared with the normal control group (P>0.05). These results suggested that GPS promotes NK cell cytotoxicity in immunosuppressed mice by increasing the number of NK cells in the whole blood and upregulating the expression of perforin and granzyme. Thus, the present study investigated the molecular mechanism underlying NK cell activation by GPS, the research showed that GPS have a wide application prospects in the treatment of cancer and immunodeficiency diseases.

  7. The Past, Present, and Future of NK Cells in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation and Adoptive Transfer.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Frank; Verneris, Michael R; Cooley, Sarah; Bachanova, Veronika; Brunstein, Claudio G; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John; Schlums, Heinrich; Bryceson, Yenan T; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used as a part of cancer therapy for over half a decade. Beyond the necessity for donor-derived cells to reconstitute hematopoiesis after radiation and chemotherapy, immunologic reconstitution from allogeneic cells is important for the elimination of residual tumor cells. Natural killer (NK) cells are first among lymphocytes to reconstitute post-transplant and protect against cancer relapse. In this review, we provide a historical perspective on the role of NK cells in cancer control in the transplant setting and focus on current research aimed at improving NK cell responses for therapeutic benefit.

  8. HIF-2α/ITPR1 axis: A new saboteur of NK-mediated lysis

    PubMed Central

    Messai, Yosra; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Hasmim, Meriem; Escudier, Bernard; Chouaib, Salem

    2015-01-01

    We recently investigated the role of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) mutation and the subsequent induction of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) in the regulation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) susceptibility to natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing. We demonstrated that the resistance of VHL-mutated RCC cell line 786-0 to NK-mediated lysis requires HIF-2α and ITPR1, a direct novel target of HIF-2α, through the activation of autophagy in target cells by NK-derived signals. PMID:25949883

  9. Murine NK cell intrinsic cytokine-induced memory-like responses are maintained following homeostatic proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    Keppel, Molly P.; Yang, Liping; Cooper, Megan A.

    2013-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that innate immune NK cells exhibit memory-like properties with enhanced non-specific and specific recall responses. Cytokine activation alone of murine NK cells induces the differentiation of memory-like cells that are more likely to produce IFN-γ, a key NK cell cytokine important for activation of the immune response. Using an adoptive co-transfer system, we first show that cytokine-induced memory-like responses are NK intrinsic. However, engraftment of donor NK cells in NK-competent hosts is poor due to homeostatic control mechanisms. Therefore, we utilized alymphoid Rag- and common gamma chain (γc)-deficient mice as recipients and observed homeostatic expansion of co-transferred cytokine-activated and control donor NK cells. Despite proliferation of all cells, NK cells derived from those cells originally activated by cytokines retained an intrinsic enhanced capacity to produce IFN-γ when re-stimulated in vitro with cytokines or target cells. These NK cell memory-like responses persisted for at least 4 weeks in alymphoid hosts and 12 weeks in NK-competent hosts. These findings indicate that memory-like NK cells can readily self-renew and maintain enhanced function in a lymphopenic host for at least a month. PMID:23530145

  10. CX3CR1-dependent recruitment of mature NK cells into the central nervous system contributes to control autoimmune neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Laura; Hamann, Isabell; Romero-Suarez, Silvina; Millward, Jason M; Pietrek, Rebekka; Chanvillard, Coralie; Stuis, Hanna; Pollok, Karolin; Ransohoff, Richard M; Cardona, Astrid E; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1)-deficient mice develop very severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), associated with impaired NK cell recruitment into the CNS. Yet, the precise implications of NK cells in autoimmune neuroinflammation remain elusive. Here, we investigated the pattern of NK cell mobilization and the contribution of CX3CR1 to NK cell dynamics in the EAE. We show that in both wild-type and CX3CR1-deficient EAE mice, NK cells are mobilized from the periphery and accumulate in the inflamed CNS. However, in CX3CR1-deficient mice, the infiltrated NK cells displayed an immature phenotype contrasting with the mature infiltrates in WT mice. This shift in the immature/mature CNS ratio contributes to EAE exacerbation in CX3CR1-deficient mice, since transfer of mature WT NK cells prior to immunization exerted a protective effect and normalized the CNS NK cell ratio. Moreover, mature CD11b(+) NK cells show higher degranulation in the presence of autoreactive 2D2 transgenic CD4(+) T cells and kill these autoreactive cells more efficiently than the immature CD11b(-) fraction. Together, these data suggest a protective role of mature NK cells in EAE, possibly through direct modulation of T cells inside the CNS, and demonstrate that mature and immature NK cells are recruited into the CNS by distinct chemotactic signals.

  11. Prolonged contact with dendritic cells turns lymph node-resident NK cells into anti-tumor effectors.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Francesca; Spreafico, Roberto; Gorletta, Tatiana; Cigni, Clara; Di Gioia, Marco; Caccia, Michele; Sironi, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; Soncini, Matias; Rusconi, Michela; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Chirico, Giuseppe; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are critical players against tumors. The outcome of anti-tumor vaccination protocols depends on the efficiency of NK-cell activation, and efforts are constantly made to manipulate them for immunotherapeutic approaches. Thus, a better understanding of NK-cell activation dynamics is needed. NK-cell interactions with accessory cells and trafficking between secondary lymphoid organs and tumoral tissues remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that upon triggering innate immunity with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), NK cells are transiently activated, leave the lymph node, and infiltrate the tumor, delaying its growth. Interestingly, NK cells are not actively recruited at the draining lymph node early after LPS administration, but continue their regular homeostatic turnover. Therefore, NK cells resident in the lymph node at the time of LPS administration become activated and exert anti-tumor functions. NK-cell activation correlates with the establishment of prolonged interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes, as observed by two-photon microscopy. Close DC and NK-cell contacts are essential for the localized delivery of DC-derived IL-18 to NK cells, a strict requirement in NK-cell activation.

  12. Functional analysis of NK cell subsets activated by 721.221 and K562 HLA-null cells.

    PubMed

    Lisovsky, Irene; Isitman, Gamze; Bruneau, Julie; Bernard, Nicole F

    2015-04-01

    HLA-null cell lines [721.221 (henceforth, 721) and K562] are often used to study NK cell activation. NK cells are innate immune lymphocytes that express a variety of stochastically expressed inhibitory and activating receptors. Although it is known that 721 and K562 have divergent origins, they have been used interchangeably to stimulate NK cells in many studies. We hypothesized that the differences between 721 and K562 cells may result in differential NK cell-activation patterns. In this report, we assessed all possible combinations of CD107a expression and IFN-γ and CCL4 secretion in total NK and 3DL1(+/-) NK cell populations induced by these 2 cell lines. 721 activates a significantly higher frequency of NK cells and 3DL1(+) NK cells than K562. The NK cell functional subsets that are stimulated to a higher degree by 721 than K562 include those secreting IFN-γ and/or CCL4. On the other hand, the functional subsets that include CD107 expression contribute to a higher proportion of the total NK cell response following stimulation with K562 than 721. These results have implications for the selection of HLA-null cell lines to use as NK cell stimuli in investigations of their role in infectious diseases, cancer, and transplantation.

  13. Natural Killer (NK) Cell–mediated Cytotoxicity: Differential Use of  TRAIL and Fas Ligand by Immature and Mature Primary Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zamai, Loris; Ahmad, Manzoor; Bennett, Ian M.; Azzoni, Livio; Alnemri, Emad S.; Perussia, Bice

    1998-01-01

    Mature natural killer (NK) cells use Ca2+-dependent granule exocytosis and release of cytotoxic proteins, Fas ligand (FasL), and membrane-bound or secreted cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) to induce target cell death. Fas belongs to the TNF receptor family of molecules, containing a conserved intracytoplasmic “death domain” that indirectly activates the caspase enzymatic cascade and ultimately apoptotic mechanisms in numerous cell types. Two additional members of this family, DR4 and DR5, transduce apoptotic signals upon binding soluble TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) that, like FasL, belongs to the growing TNF family of molecules. Here, we report that TRAIL produced or expressed by different populations of primary human NK cells is functional, and represents a marker of differentiation or activation of these, and possibly other, cytotoxic leukocytes. During differentiation NK cells, sequentially and differentially, use distinct members of the TNF family or granule exocytosis to mediate target cell death. Phenotypically immature CD161+/CD56− NK cells mediate TRAIL-dependent but not FasL- or granule release–dependent cytotoxicity, whereas mature CD56+ NK cells mediate the latter two. PMID:9858524

  14. Nitric oxide is a mediator of tachykinin NK3 receptor-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, A.; Takano, Y.; Honda, K.; Saito, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Kamiya, H.

    1995-01-01

    1. The mechanism of vasodilatation induced by tachykinin peptides was studied in isolated mesenteric arteries of rats. 2. Senktide, a selective NK3 agonist, elicited potent endothelium-dependent relaxation of arteries precontracted with phenylephrine (10(-5) M), but an NK1 agonist did not. 3. A non-peptide NK3 antagonist, SR 142801, inhibited senktide-induced relaxation. However, a non-peptide NK1 antagonist, CP-96,345, and a peptide-based NK2 antagonist, L-659,877, had no effect on senktide-induced relaxation. 4. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), a nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor, markedly attenuated the relaxant response to senktide. 5. These results suggest that the endothelium of rat mesenteric arteries possesses tachykinin NK3 receptors, and that NK3 agonist-induced vasodilatation is mediated by release of nitric oxide (NO) from the endothelium. PMID:8680725

  15. Insufficient natural killer cell responses against retroviruses: how to improve NK cell killing of retrovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Littwitz-Salomon, Elisabeth; Dittmer, Ulf; Sutter, Kathrin

    2016-11-08

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and protect against cancers and a variety of viruses including retroviruses by killing transformed or infected cells. They express activating and inhibitory receptors on their cell surface and often become activated after recognizing virus-infected cells. They have diverse antiviral effector functions like the release of cytotoxic granules, cytokine production and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The importance of NK cell activity in retroviral infections became evident due to the discovery of several viral strategies to escape recognition and elimination by NK cells. Mutational sequence polymorphisms as well as modulation of surface receptors and their ligands are mechanisms of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 to evade NK cell-mediated immune pressure. In Friend retrovirus infected mice the virus can manipulate molecular or cellular immune factors that in turn suppress the NK cell response. In this model NK cells lack cytokines for optimal activation and can be functionally suppressed by regulatory T cells. However, these inhibitory pathways can be overcome therapeutically to achieve full activation of NK cell responses and ultimately control dissemination of retroviral infection. One effective approach is to modulate the crosstalk between NK cells and dendritic cells, which produce NK cell-stimulating cytokines like type I interferons (IFN), IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 upon retrovirus sensing or infection. Therapeutic administration of IFNα directly increases NK cell killing of retrovirus-infected cells. In addition, IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes that direct IL-2 to NK cells have been shown to significantly improve control of retroviral infection by NK cells in vivo. In this review, we describe novel approaches to improve NK cell effector functions in retroviral infections. Immunotherapies that target NK cells of patients suffering from viral infections might be a promising treatment option for the

  16. HIV's evasion of host's NK cell response and novel ways of its countering and boosting anti-HIV immunity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ali; Ahmad, Rasheed

    2003-07-01

    NK cells were characterized by their ability to spontaneously kill certain tumor and virus-infected cells. They constitute first line of defense against invading pathogens and usually become activated in viral infections particularly in early phases. Activated NK cells play a crucial role in the induction and amplification of virus-specific immunity by providing IFN-gamma and "danger signal". The functional activities of NK cells are regulated by a balance between the engagement of their inhibitory and activating receptors. In recent years, the discovery of several MHC and non-MHC binding NK receptors has provided important insights regarding NK cell biology and its role in viral infections. These receptors are increasingly being viewed as important regulators of immune response. Like many other viruses, HIV also seems to activate NK cells. However, several studies have reported compromised NK cell functions in HIV-infected individuals. The virus employs several strategies to counter the host's NK cell response, e.g., a differential downregulation of MHC class I molecules on the surface of infected cells, a dysregulated production of NK cell function-enhancing cytokines, direct inhibitory effects of certain viral proteins on NK cell functions, and changes in the expression of NK cell receptors, etc. The individuals expressing activating NK cell receptors and their cognate MHC ligands have activated NK cells. The development of AIDS is significantly delayed in these individuals after HIV infection. The discovery of NK receptors and their ligands has opened new avenues of developing AIDS vaccine and boosting innate and adaptive antiviral immunity in HIV-infected individuals.

  17. Loss of DNAM-1 ligand expression by acute myeloid leukemia cells renders them resistant to NK cell killing.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Conor J; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Darcy, Phillip K; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with poor natural killer (NK) cell function through aberrant expression of NK-cell-activating receptors and their ligands on tumor cells. These alterations are thought to promote formation of inhibitory NK-target cell synapses, in which killer cell degranulation is attenuated. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be effective in treating AML, through restoration of NK cell lytic activity. Similarly, agents that augment NK-cell-activating signals within the immunological synapse may provide some therapeutic benefit. However, the receptor-ligand interactions that critically dictate NK cell function in AML remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that CD112/CD155 expression is required for DNAM-1-dependent killing of AML cells. Indeed, the low, or absent, expression of CD112/CD155 on multiple AML cell lines resulted in failure to stimulate optimal NK cell function. Importantly, isolated clones with low CD112/155 expression were resistant to NK cell killing while those expressing abundant levels of CD112/155 were highly susceptible. Attenuated NK cell killing in the absence of CD112/CD155 originated from decreased NK-target cell conjugation. Furthermore, we reveal by time-lapse microscopy, a significant increase in NK cell 'failed killing' in the absence of DNAM-1 ligands. Consequently, NK cells preferentially lysed ligand-expressing cells within heterogeneous populations, driving clonal selection of CD112/CD155-negative blasts upon NK cell attack. Taken together, we identify reduced CD155 expression as a major NK cell escape mechanism in AML and an opportunity for targeted immunotherapy.

  18. Termination of the Activating NK Cell Immunological Synapse Is an Active and Regulated Process.

    PubMed

    Netter, Petra; Anft, Moritz; Watzl, Carsten

    2017-08-23

    Cellular cytotoxicity is essential for the elimination of virus-infected and cancerous cells by NK cells. It requires a direct cellular contact through the establishment of an immunological synapse (IS) between the NK cell and the target cell. In this article, we show that not only the establishment of the IS, but also its maintenance is a highly regulated process. Ongoing receptor-proximal signaling events from activating NK cell receptors and actin dynamics were necessary to maintain a stable contact in an energy-dependent fashion, even after the IS was formed successfully. More importantly, the initiation of a contact to a new susceptible target cell resulted in accelerated detachment from an old target cell. We propose that the maintenance of an existing IS is a dynamic and regulated process to allow for effective serial killing of NK cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  20. Primary NK/T cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon.

    PubMed

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Bilbao, Erica Rojas; Garate, Gonzalo Martín; de Los Ángeles Vicente Repáraz, María; Del Olmo, Mercedes; Casali, Claudia Érica; Zerga, Marta Elisa; Chirife, Ana María; Cicco, Juan Alberto

    2013-02-11

    Since nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type are rare diseases, colonic involvement has seldom been seen. We report a case of a patient with a primary NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon. The patient had no history of malignant diseases and was diagnosed after exhaustive study in the context of fever of unknown origin. The first therapeutic approach followed the DA-EPOCH-protocol: etoposide, prednisone, doxor-rubicin, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The persistence of constitutional symptoms after the first treatment course motivated the switch to a second line following the SMILE-protocol: dexamethasone, metotrexate, ifosfamide, E.coli L-asparaginase, and etoposide. Despite intensive chemotherapy, the patient died 2 months after the diagnose of an extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma of the colon and 4 months after the first symptomatic appearance of disease.

  1. Primary NK/T cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Bilbao, Érica Rojas; Garate, Gonzalo Martín; de los Ángeles Vicente Repáraz, María; del Olmo, Mercedes; Casali, Claudia Érica; Zerga, Marta Elisa; Chirife, Ana María; Cicco, Juan Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Since nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type are rare diseases, colonic involvement has seldom been seen. We report a case of a patient with a primary NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon. The patient had no history of malignant diseases and was diagnosed after exhaustive study in the context of fever of unknown origin. The first therapeutic approach followed the DA-EPOCH-protocol: etoposide, prednisone, doxor-rubicin, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The persistence of constitutional symptoms after the first treatment course motivated the switch to a second line following the SMILE-protocol: dexamethasone, metotrexate, ifosfamide, E.coli L-asparaginase, and etoposide. Despite intensive chemotherapy, the patient died 2 months after the diagnose of an extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma of the colon and 4 months after the first symptomatic appearance of disease. PMID:23772308

  2. Prospective study of percutaneous cryoablation combined with allogenic NK cell immunotherapy for advanced renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao; Xu, Kecheng; Liang, Shuzhen; Wang, Xiaohua; Liang, Yinqing; Zhang, Mingjie; Chen, Jibing; Niu, LiZhi

    2017-03-05

    In this study, the clinical efficacy of cryosurgery combined with allogenic NK cell immunotherapy for advanced renal cell cancer was evaluated. From July to December 2016, we enrolled 60 patients who met the enrollment criteria and divided them into two groups: (1) the simple cryoablation group (n=30); and (2) the cryoablation combined with allogenic NK cells group (n=30). The clinical efficacy, quality of life, immune function, and other related indicators were evaluated. Combining allogeneic NK cells with cryoablation had a synergistic effect, not only enhancing the immune function and improving the quality of life of the patients, but also significantly exhibiting good clinical efficacy of the patients. This study is the first clinical trial that has evaluated the safety and efficacy of allogenic NK cells combined with cryosurgery for the treatment of renal cell cancer.

  3. Gliadin regulates the NK-dendritic cell cross-talk by HLA-E surface stabilization.

    PubMed

    Terrazzano, Giuseppe; Sica, Michela; Gianfrani, Carmen; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Maurano, Francesco; De Giulio, Beatrice; de Saint-Mezard, Sophie; Zanzi, Delia; Maiuri, Luigi; Londei, Marco; Jabri, Bana; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore; Zappacosta, Serafino; Carbone, Ennio

    2007-07-01

    We analyzed the autologous NK cell interaction with gliadin-presenting dendritic cells. Gliadin is the known Ag priming the celiac disease (CD) pathogenesis. We demonstrate that gliadin prevents immature dendritic cells (iDCs) elimination by NK cells. Furthermore, cooperation between human NK cells-iDCs and T cells increases IFN-gamma production of anti-gliadin immune response. Gliadin fractions were analyzed for their capability to stabilize HLA-E molecules. The alpha and omega fractions conferred the protection from NK cell lysis to iDCs and increased their HLA-E expression. Gliadin pancreatic enzyme digest and a peptide derived from gliadin alpha increased HLA-E levels on murine RMA-S/HLA-E-transfected cells. Analysis of HLA-E expression in the small intestinal mucosa of gluten-containing diet celiac patients and organ culture experiments confirmed the in vitro data.

  4. The role of NK cells in HIV-1 protection: autologous, allogeneic or both?

    PubMed

    Hens, Jef; Jennes, Wim; Kestens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells specialize in killing virally infected- or tumor cells and are part of the innate immune system. The activational state of NK cells is determined by the balance of incoming activating and inhibitory signals mediated by receptor-ligand binding with the target cell. These receptor-ligand bonds mainly consist of the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), which are expressed at the cell surface of NK cells, and their ligands: the highly variable human leukocyte antigen -class I molecules (HLA). Absence of an inhibitory receptor-ligand bond lowers the NK cell activation threshold, whereas an activating receptor-ligand bond stimulates the cell, potentially overcoming this threshold and triggering NK cell activation. NK cells influence the course of infection as well as the acquisition of HIV-1. Several lines of evidence relate the activating NK cell receptor KIR3DS1, in the presence or absence of its putative ligand HLA-Bw4, with slower disease progression as well as resistance to HIV-1 infection. Overall, resistance to HIV-1 infection predominantly correlates with activating KIR/HLA profiles, consisting of e.g. activating KIRs, group B haplotypes, or inhibitory KIRs in absence of their ligands. Such a conclusion is less evident for studies of HIV-1 disease progression, with studies reporting beneficial as well as detrimental effects of activating KIR/HLA genotypes. It is likely that KIR/HLA association studies are complicated by the complexity of the KIR and HLA loci and their mutual interactions, as well as by additional factors like route of HIV exposure, immune activation, presence of co-infections, and the effect of anti-HIV-1 antibodies. One newly discovered NK cell activation pathway associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection involves the presence of an iKIR/HLA mismatch between partners. The absence of such an iKIR/HLA bond renders donor-derived allogeneic HIV-1 infected cells vulnerable to NK cell responses during HIV-1

  5. Chemokine Receptor Expression on Normal Blood CD56(+) NK-Cells Elucidates Cell Partners That Comigrate during the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses and Identifies a Transitional NK-Cell Population.

    PubMed

    Lima, Margarida; Leander, Magdalena; Santos, Marlene; Santos, Ana Helena; Lau, Catarina; Queirós, Maria Luís; Gonçalves, Marta; Fonseca, Sónia; Moura, João; Teixeira, Maria Dos Anjos; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Studies of chemokine receptors (CKR) in natural killer- (NK-) cells have already been published, but only a few gave detailed information on its differential expression on blood NK-cell subsets. We report on the expression of the inflammatory and homeostatic CKR on normal blood CD56(+low) CD16(+) and CD56(+high)  CD16(-/+low) NK-cells. Conventional CD56(+low) and CD56(+high) NK-cells present in the normal PB do express CKR for inflammatory cytokines, although with different patterns CD56(+low) NK-cells are mainly CXCR1/CXCR2(+) and CXCR3/CCR5(-/+), whereas mostly CD56(+high) NK-cells are CXCR1/CXCR2(-) and CXCR3/CCR5(+). Both NK-cell subsets have variable CXCR4 expression and are CCR4(-) and CCR6(-). The CKR repertoire of the CD56(+low) NK-cells approaches to that of neutrophils, whereas the CKR repertoire of the CD56(+high) NK-cells mimics that of Th1(+) T cells, suggesting that these cells are prepared to migrate into inflamed tissues at different phases of the immune response. In addition, we describe a subpopulation of NK-cells with intermediate levels of CD56 expression, which we named CD56(+int) NK-cells. These NK-cells are CXCR3/CCR5(+), they have intermediate levels of expression of CD16, CD62L, CD94, and CD122, and they are CD57(-) and CD158a(-). In view of their phenotypic features, we hypothesize that they correspond to a transitional stage, between the well-known CD56(+high) and CD56(+low) NK-cells populations.

  6. Chemokine Receptor Expression on Normal Blood CD56+ NK-Cells Elucidates Cell Partners That Comigrate during the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses and Identifies a Transitional NK-Cell Population

    PubMed Central

    Queirós, Maria Luís; Gonçalves, Marta; Fonseca, Sónia; Moura, João

    2015-01-01

    Studies of chemokine receptors (CKR) in natural killer- (NK-) cells have already been published, but only a few gave detailed information on its differential expression on blood NK-cell subsets. We report on the expression of the inflammatory and homeostatic CKR on normal blood CD56+low CD16+ and CD56+high  CD16−/+low NK-cells. Conventional CD56+low and CD56+high NK-cells present in the normal PB do express CKR for inflammatory cytokines, although with different patterns CD56+low NK-cells are mainly CXCR1/CXCR2+ and CXCR3/CCR5−/+, whereas mostly CD56+high NK-cells are CXCR1/CXCR2− and CXCR3/CCR5+. Both NK-cell subsets have variable CXCR4 expression and are CCR4− and CCR6−. The CKR repertoire of the CD56+low NK-cells approaches to that of neutrophils, whereas the CKR repertoire of the CD56+high NK-cells mimics that of Th1+ T cells, suggesting that these cells are prepared to migrate into inflamed tissues at different phases of the immune response. In addition, we describe a subpopulation of NK-cells with intermediate levels of CD56 expression, which we named CD56+int NK-cells. These NK-cells are CXCR3/CCR5+, they have intermediate levels of expression of CD16, CD62L, CD94, and CD122, and they are CD57− and CD158a−. In view of their phenotypic features, we hypothesize that they correspond to a transitional stage, between the well-known CD56+high and CD56+low NK-cells populations. PMID:26543875

  7. The neurokinin-3 (NK3) and the neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors are differentially targeted to mesocortical and mesololimbic projection neurons, and to neuronal nuclei in the rat ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Andrée; Savard, Martin; Gobeil, Fernand; Pierce, Joseph P.; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2009-01-01

    Tonic activation of neurokinin-3 (NK3) receptors in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This psychiatric disorder is associated with a dysfunctional activity in VTA projection neurons that can affect cognitive function at the level of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) as well as motor and motivational states controlled in part by mesolimbic output to the nucleus accumbens (Acb). To determine the relevant sites for NK3 receptor activation within this neuronal network, we used confocal and electron microscopy to examine NK3 receptors (Cy5; immunogold) and retrograde labeling of fluorogold (FG, FITC; immunoperoxidase) in the VTA of rats receiving either Acb or mPFC injections of FG. Comparison was made with neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors, which are also present, but less abundant then NK3 receptors, in dopaminergic and GABAergic VTA neurons. There were no observable differences between NK3 and NK1 receptors in their primary locations in the cytoplasm and on the plasma membrane of VTA somata and dendrites with or without FG. Dendrites labeled with FG retrogradely transported from mPFC, however, contained more NK3 or less NK1 immunogold particles (plasmalemmal + cytoplasmic) then those retrogradely labeled following FG injection in the Acb. Moreover, only the NK3 receptors were detected in neuronal nuclei in the VTA and in the nuclei of human HEK-293T NK3-transfected cells. The enrichment of NK3 receptors in mesocortical projection neurons and nuclear distribution of these receptors may provide insight for understanding the selective antipsychotic effectiveness of NK3 antagonists. PMID:19224600

  8. Features of Memory-Like and PD-1(+) Human NK Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Pesce, Silvia; Muccio, Letizia; Carlomagno, Simona; Sivori, Simona; Moretta, Alessandro; Marcenaro, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells are distinguished into CD56(bright)CD16(-) cells and CD56(dim)CD16(+) cells. These two subsets are conventionally associated with differential functional outcomes and are heterogeneous with respect to the expression of KIR and CD94/NKG2 heterodimers that represent the two major types of HLA-class I-specific receptors. Recent studies indicated that immature CD56(bright) NK cells, homogeneously expressing the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor, are precursors of CD56(dim) NK cells that, in turn, during their process of differentiation, lose expression of CD94/NKG2A and subsequentially acquire inhibitory KIRs and LIR-1. The terminally differentiated phenotype of CD56(dim) cells is marked by the expression of the CD57 molecule that is associated with poor responsiveness to cytokine stimulation, but retained cytolytic capacity. Remarkably, this NKG2A(-)KIR(+)LIR-1(+)CD57(+)CD56(dim) NK cell subset when derived from individuals previously exposed to pathogens, such as human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), may contain "memory-like" NK cells. These cells are generally characterized by an upregulation of the activating receptor CD94/NKG2C and a downregulation of the inhibitory receptor Siglec-7. The "memory-like" NK cells are persistent over time and display some hallmarks of adaptive immunity, i.e., clonal expansion, more effective antitumor and antiviral immune responses, longevity, as well as given epigenetic modifications. Interestingly, unknown cofactors associated with HCMV infection may induce the onset of a recently identified fully mature NK cell subset, characterized by marked downregulation of the activating receptors NKp30 and NKp46 and by the unexpected expression of the inhibitory PD-1 receptor. This phenotype correlates with an impaired antitumor NK cell activity that can be partially restored by antibody-mediated disruption of PD-1/PD-L interaction.

  9. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samar; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Hisham, Ahmed; Ismail, Nahed

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE), which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8–10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia. PMID:27092553

  10. Protective role of NK1.1+ cells in experimental Staphylococcus aureus arthritis

    PubMed Central

    NILSSON, N; BREMELL, T; TARKOWSKI, A; CARLSTEN, H

    1999-01-01

    In a model of Staphylococcus aureus-induced septic arthritis in C57Bl/6 mice we investigated the role of natural killer (NK) cells in the development of disease. Depletion of NK1.1+ cells was achieved by repeated injections of the PK136 antibody, whereas control mice received an irrelevant monoclonal antibody, O1C5.B2. Both groups of mice then received injections intravenously with 2 × 107 live S. aureus LS-1 secreting toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). The mice were evaluated for 16 days with regard to weight, mortality and arthritis. Nine days after bacterial injection, 9/19 mice depleted of NK cells had developed arthritis compared with 1/17 in the control group (P = 0.01). The experiment was repeated twice with the same outcome. NK cell-depleted and control mice displayed the same degree of histopathological signs of arthritis at day 16. Depletion of NK cells did not affect uptake of bacteria by phagocytic cells in vitro, or bacterial clearance in vivo. In NK cell-depleted mice there was a tendency to increased levels of antibodies to TSST-1, whereas total immunoglobulin levels were similar to those in controls. NK cell depletion of non-infected mice did not affect the magnitude of inflammatory response during the T cell-dependent cutaneous DTH reaction to oxazolone, or during granulocyte-mediated inflammation. However, specific antibody responses to oxazolone were greatly increased in depleted animals. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that NK cells protect against arthritis during S. aureus infection. This outcome does not seem to be due to an influence on bacterial clearance, but could be due to an interaction with the host anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:10403917

  11. Sustained Immune Complex-Mediated Reduction in CD16 Expression after Vaccination Regulates NK Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Goodier, Martin R; Lusa, Chiara; Sherratt, Sam; Rodriguez-Galan, Ana; Behrens, Ron; Riley, Eleanor M

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking of FcγRIII (CD16) by immune complexes induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) by natural killer (NK) cells, contributing to control of intracellular pathogens; this pathway can also be targeted for immunotherapy of cancerous or otherwise diseased cells. However, downregulation of CD16 expression on activated NK cells may limit or regulate this response. Here, we report sustained downregulation of CD16 expression on NK cells in vivo after intramuscular (but not intranasal) influenza vaccination. CD16 downregulation persisted for at least 12 weeks after vaccination and was associated with robust enhancement of influenza-specific plasma antibodies after intramuscular (but not intranasal) vaccination. This effect could be emulated in vitro by co-culture of NK cells with influenza antigen and immune serum and, consistent with the sustained effects after vaccination, only very limited recovery of CD16 expression was observed during long-term in vitro culture of immune complex-treated cells. CD16 downregulation was most marked among normally CD16(high) CD57(+) NK cells, irrespective of NKG2C expression, and was strongly positively associated with degranulation (surface CD107a expression). CD16 downregulation was partially reversed by inhibition of ADAM17 matrix metalloprotease, leading to a sustained increase in both CD107a and CD25 (IL-2Rα) expression. Both the degranulation and CD25 responses of CD57+ NK cells were uniquely dependent on trivalent influenza vaccine-specific IgG. These data support a role for CD16 in early activation of NK cells after vaccination and for CD16 downregulation as a means to modulate NK cell responses and maintain immune homeostasis of both antibody and T cell-dependent pathways.

  12. Histaminergic regulation of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by human natural killer (NK) cells

    PubMed Central

    ASEA, A; HANSSON, M; CZERKINSKY, C; HOUZE, T; HERMODSSON, S; STRANNEGÅRD, Ö; HELLSTRAND, K

    1996-01-01

    Monocytes, recovered from human peripheral blood by counter-current centrifugal elutriation, effectively inhibit the production of IFN-γ by CD3−/56+ NK cells in response to IL-2. This study aimed at defining the nature of the inhibitory signal, particularly the importance of monocyte-derived reactive metabolites of oxygen. It was found that monocytes recovered from patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a condition characterized by deficient NADPH-oxidase activity of phagocytes, did not inhibit IFN-γ production by NK cells. Further, catalase, a scavenger of hydrogen peroxide, completely reversed the inhibitory signal, whereas scavengers of the superoxide anion, hypohalous acids, the hydroxyl radical, or nitric oxide synthesis inhibitors such as L-NMMA were ineffective. Inhibition of IFN-γ production was operating on a pre-translational level, as indicated by the inability of enriched NK cells to accumulate IFN-γ mRNA in the presence of elutriated monocytes. Hydrogen peroxide, at micromolar concentrations, reconstituted the inhibition of IFN-γ production when added to enriched NK cells. Histamine, a biogenic amine which inhibits the generation of reactive oxygen metabolites in monocytes, abrogated the inhibition of IFN-γ production in NK cells; by this mechanism, histamine strongly synergized with IL-2 to induce IFN-γ in mixtures of NK cells and monocytes. The synergizing effect of histamine was specifically mediated by H2-type histamine receptors. We conclude that: (i) the induction of IFN-γ mRNA in NK cells is effectively down-regulated by products of the oxidative metabolism of monocytes; and (ii) histamine effectively enhances IFN-γ production by preventing monocyte-induced oxidative damage to NK cells. PMID:8706348

  13. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. - Highlights: • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NK cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NKG2D expression on NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity. • The distinguished cytokine expression of TLR4+ MSC may contribute to the inhibition on NK cell function.

  14. NK Cell–Mediated Antitumor Effects of a Folate-Conjugated Immunoglobulin are Enhanced by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Kondadasula, SriVidya; Skinner, Cassandra C.; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L.; Luedke, Eric; Jones, Natalie B.; Mani, Aruna; Roda, Julie; Karpa, Volodymyr; Li, Hong; Li, Jilong; Elavazhagan, Saranya; La Perle, Krista M.; Schmitt, Alessandra C.; Lu, Yanhui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Pan, Xueliang; Mao, Hsaioyin; Davis, Melanie; Jarjoura, David; Butchar, Jonathan P.; Poi, Ming; Phelps, Mitch; Tridandapani, Susheela; Byrd, John C.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Lee, Robert J.; Carson, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Optimally effective antitumor therapies would not only activate immune effector cells, but engage them at the tumor. Folate-conjugated to immunoglobulin (F-IgG) could direct innate immune cells with Fc receptors to folate receptor–expressing cancer cells. F-IgG bound to human KB and HeLa cells, as well as murine L1210JF, a folate receptor (FR) overexpressing cancer cell line, as determined by flow cytometry. Recognition of F-IgG by NK cell Fc receptors led to phosphorylation of the ERK transcription factor and increased NK cell expression of CD69. Lysis of KB tumor cells by NK cells increased about 5-fold after treatment with F-IgG, an effect synergistically enhanced by treatment with IL2, IL12, IL15, or IL21 (P < 0.001). F-IgG also enhanced the lysis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by autologous NK cells. NK cells significantly increased production of IFNγ, MIP-1α, and RANTES in response to F-IgG–coated KB target cells in the presence of the NK cell–activating cytokine IL12, and these coculture supernatants induced significant T cell chemotaxis P < 0.001). F-IgG–coated targets also stimulated FcR-mediated monocyte effector functions. Studies in a murine leukemia model confirmed the intratumoral localization and antitumor activity of F-IgG, as well as enhancement of its effects by IL12 (P = 0.05). The antitumor effect of this combination was dependent on NK cells and led to decreased tumor cell proliferation in vivo. Thus, F-IgG can induce an immune response against FR-positive tumor cells that is mediated by NK cells and can be augmented by cytokine therapy. PMID:26865456

  15. Effect of boar seminal plasma immunosuppressive factor on NK cell activity and skin graft survival.

    PubMed

    Veselsky, L; Holan, V; Soucek, J; Stanek, R; Hoskova, M

    1992-01-01

    The B 10 strain of mice was used to test the effect of the boar seminal vesicle immunosuppressive factor on the female mouse response to the male-specific transplantation antigen. Influence of this factor on human natural killer (NK) cell activity was also studied. No inhibitory effect of the immunosuppressive factor on graft survival was apparent during a time of more than 200 days, nor did the factor suppress NK cell activity.

  16. Characterization of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset regulated by NK cells in malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Satoru; Asakura, Miki; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population with the ability to suppress immune responses and are currently classified into three distinct MDSC subsets: monocytic, granulocytic and non-monocytic, and non-granulocytic MDSCs. Although NK cells provide an important first-line defense against newly transformed cancer cells, it is unknown whether NK cells can regulate MDSC populations in the context of cancer. In this study, we initially found that the frequency of MDSCs in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients was increased and inversely correlated with that of NK cells, but not that of T cells. To investigate the regulation of MDSC subsets by NK cells, we used an EL4 murine lymphoma model and found the non-monocytic and non-granulocytic MDSC subset, i.e., Gr1(+)CD11b(+)Ly6G(med)Ly6C(med) MDSC, is increased after NK cell depletion. The MDSC population that expresses MHC class II, CD80, CD124, and CCR2 is regulated mainly by CD27(+)CD11b(+)NK cells. In addition, this MDSC subset produces some immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 but not nitric oxide (NO) or arginase. We also examined two subsets of MDSCs (CD14(+)HLA-DR(-) and CD14(-) HLA-DR(-) MDSC) in NHL patients and found that higher IL-10-producing CD14(+)HLA-DR(-)MDSC subset can be seen in lymphoma patients with reduced NK cell frequency in peripheral blood. Our analyses of MDSCs in this study may enable a better understanding of how MDSCs manipulate the tumor microenvironment and are regulated by NK cells in patients with lymphoma.

  17. Human Dendritic Cells Mitigate NK-Cell Dysfunction Mediated by Nonselective JAK1/2 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Curran, Shane A; Shyer, Justin A; St Angelo, Erin T; Talbot, Lillian R; Sharma, Sneh; Chung, David J; Heller, Glenn; Hsu, Katharine C; Betts, Brian C; Young, James W

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have achieved positive responses in myeloproliferative neoplasms, but at the expense of decreased natural killer (NK) cell numbers and compromised function. Selective JAK2 inhibition may also have a role in preventing and treating graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although JAK inhibitors can impair monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDC) activation and function and suppress effector T-cell responses, the effects on NK cells and the relevant mechanisms remain undefined. Using common γc cytokines and distinct human dendritic cell (DC) subtypes, we compared the effects of a JAK2-specific (TG101348) with a less selective JAK1/2 (ruxolitinib) inhibitor on NK-cell activation and function. Ruxolitinib treatment completely blocked IL2, IL15, and DC-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, along with the capacity of NK cells to secrete IFNγ or lyse NK cell-sensitive targets. Only NK-cell proliferation stimulated by moDCs resisted ruxolitinib treatment. In contrast, TG101348 treatment of stimulated NK cells resulted in far less functional compromise. TG101348 completely inhibited only soluble IL15-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, which Langerhans-type DCs (LCs), presenting membrane-bound IL15 in trans, could salvage. These results demonstrate that ruxolitinib's nonselective inhibition of JAK1/2 results in profound NK-cell dysfunction by blocking downstream pSTAT5, hence providing a persuasive rationale for the development of selective JAK2 inhibitors for immunotherapeutic applications. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(1); 52-60. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Myxoma Virus Infection Promotes NK Lysis of Malignant Gliomas In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J.; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mcfadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas. PMID:23762498

  19. Myxoma virus infection promotes NK lysis of malignant gliomas in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas.

  20. Characterization of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset regulated by NK cells in malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Satoru; Asakura, Miki; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population with the ability to suppress immune responses and are currently classified into three distinct MDSC subsets: monocytic, granulocytic and non-monocytic, and non-granulocytic MDSCs. Although NK cells provide an important first-line defense against newly transformed cancer cells, it is unknown whether NK cells can regulate MDSC populations in the context of cancer. In this study, we initially found that the frequency of MDSCs in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients was increased and inversely correlated with that of NK cells, but not that of T cells. To investigate the regulation of MDSC subsets by NK cells, we used an EL4 murine lymphoma model and found the non-monocytic and non-granulocytic MDSC subset, i.e., Gr1+CD11b+Ly6GmedLy6Cmed MDSC, is increased after NK cell depletion. The MDSC population that expresses MHC class II, CD80, CD124, and CCR2 is regulated mainly by CD27+CD11b+NK cells. In addition, this MDSC subset produces some immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 but not nitric oxide (NO) or arginase. We also examined two subsets of MDSCs (CD14+HLA-DR− and CD14− HLA-DR− MDSC) in NHL patients and found that higher IL-10-producing CD14+HLA-DR−MDSC subset can be seen in lymphoma patients with reduced NK cell frequency in peripheral blood. Our analyses of MDSCs in this study may enable a better understanding of how MDSCs manipulate the tumor microenvironment and are regulated by NK cells in patients with lymphoma. PMID:25949922

  1. Sustained Immune Complex-Mediated Reduction in CD16 Expression after Vaccination Regulates NK Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Goodier, Martin R.; Lusa, Chiara; Sherratt, Sam; Rodriguez-Galan, Ana; Behrens, Ron; Riley, Eleanor M.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking of FcγRIII (CD16) by immune complexes induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) by natural killer (NK) cells, contributing to control of intracellular pathogens; this pathway can also be targeted for immunotherapy of cancerous or otherwise diseased cells. However, downregulation of CD16 expression on activated NK cells may limit or regulate this response. Here, we report sustained downregulation of CD16 expression on NK cells in vivo after intramuscular (but not intranasal) influenza vaccination. CD16 downregulation persisted for at least 12 weeks after vaccination and was associated with robust enhancement of influenza-specific plasma antibodies after intramuscular (but not intranasal) vaccination. This effect could be emulated in vitro by co-culture of NK cells with influenza antigen and immune serum and, consistent with the sustained effects after vaccination, only very limited recovery of CD16 expression was observed during long-term in vitro culture of immune complex-treated cells. CD16 downregulation was most marked among normally CD16high CD57+ NK cells, irrespective of NKG2C expression, and was strongly positively associated with degranulation (surface CD107a expression). CD16 downregulation was partially reversed by inhibition of ADAM17 matrix metalloprotease, leading to a sustained increase in both CD107a and CD25 (IL-2Rα) expression. Both the degranulation and CD25 responses of CD57+ NK cells were uniquely dependent on trivalent influenza vaccine-specific IgG. These data support a role for CD16 in early activation of NK cells after vaccination and for CD16 downregulation as a means to modulate NK cell responses and maintain immune homeostasis of both antibody and T cell-dependent pathways. PMID:27725819

  2. Bcl10 plays a divergent role in NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine generation.

    PubMed

    Malarkannan, Subramaniam; Regunathan, Jeyarani; Chu, Haiyan; Kutlesa, Snjezana; Chen, Yuhong; Zeng, Hu; Wen, Renren; Wang, Demin

    2007-09-15

    Activating receptors such as NKG2D and Ly49D mediate a multitude of effector functions including cytotoxicity and cytokine generation in NK cells. However, specific signaling events that are responsible for the divergence of distinct effector functions have yet to be determined. In this study, we show that lack of caspase recruitment domain-containing protein Bcl10 significantly affected receptor-mediated cytokine and chemokine generation, but not cytotoxicity against tumor cells representing "missing-self" or "induced-self." Lack of Bcl10 completely abrogated the generation of GM-CSF and chemokines and it significantly reduced the generation of IFN-gamma (>75%) in NK cells. Commitment, development, and terminal maturation of NK cells were largely unaffected in the absence of Bcl10. Although IL-2-activated NK cells could mediate cytotoxicity to the full extent, the ability of the freshly isolated NK cells to mediate cytotoxicity was somewhat reduced. Therefore, we conclude that the Carma1-Bcl10-Malt1 signaling axis is critical for cytokine and chemokine generation, although it is dispensable for cytotoxic granule release depending on the activation state of NK cells. These results indicate that Bcl10 represents an exclusive "molecular switch" that links the upstream receptor-mediated signaling to cytokine and chemokine generations.

  3. NK cells promote neutrophil recruitment in the brain during sepsis-induced neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    He, Hao; Geng, Tingting; Chen, Piyun; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; Kang, Li; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis could affect the central nervous system and thus induces neuroinflammation, which subsequently leads to brain damage or dysfunction. However, the mechanisms of generation of neuroinflammation during sepsis remain poorly understood. By administration of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in mice to mimic sepsis, we found that shortly after opening the blood–brain barrier, conventional CD11b+CD27+ NK subset migrated into the brain followed by subsequent neutrophil infiltration. Interestingly, depletion of NK cells prior to LPS treatment severely impaired neutrophil recruitment in the inflamed brain. By in vivo recruitment assay, we found that brain-infiltrated NK cells displayed chemotactic activity to neutrophils, which depended on the higher expression of chemokines such as CXCL2. Moreover, microglia were also responsible for neutrophil recruitment, and their chemotactic activity was significantly impaired by ablation of NK cells. Furthermore, depletion of NK cells could significantly ameliorate depression-like behavior in LPS-treated mice. These data indicated a NK cell-regulated neutrophil recruitment in the blamed brain, which also could be seen on another sepsis model, cecal ligation and puncture. So, our findings revealed an important scenario in the generation of sepsis-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:27270556

  4. Effect of tumor cells and tumor microenvironment on NK-cell function.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Massimo; Cantoni, Claudia; Pietra, Gabriella; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    The ability of tumors to manage an immune-mediated attack has been recently included in the "next generation" of cancer hallmarks. In solid tumors, the microenvironment that is generated during the first steps of tumor development has a pivotal role in immune regulation. An intricate net of cross-interactions occurring between tumor components, stromal cells, and resident or recruited immune cells skews the possible acute inflammatory response toward an aberrant ineffective chronic inflammatory status that favors the evasion from the host's defenses. Natural killer (NK) cells have powerful cytotoxic activity, but their activity may be eluded by the tumor microenvironment. Immunosubversion, immunoediting or immunoselection of poorly immunogenic tumor cells and interference with tumor infiltration play a major role in evading NK-cell responses to tumors. Tumor cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts and tumor-induced aberrant immune cells (i.e. tolerogenic or suppressive macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells) can interfere with NK-cell activation pathways or the complex receptor array that regulate NK-cell activation and antitumor activity. Thus, the definition of tumor microenvironment-related immunosuppressive factors, along with the identification of new classes of tissue-residing NK-like innate lymphoid cells, represent key issues to design effective NK-cell-based therapies of solid tumors.

  5. Delivery of methoxymorpholinyl doxorubicin by interleukin 2-activated NK cells: effect in mice bearing hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Quintieri, L; Rosato, A; Amboldi, N; Vizler, C; Ballinari, D; Zanovello, P; Collavo, D

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of using interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated natural killer cells (A-NK) to carry methoxymorpholinyl doxorubicin (MMDX; PNU 152243) to liver-infiltrating tumours was explored in mice bearing 2-day established M5076 reticulum cell sarcoma hepatic metastases. In vitro, MMDX was 5.5-fold more potent than doxorubicin against M5076 tumour cells. MMDX uptake by A-NK cells correlated linearly with drug concentration in the incubation medium [correlation coefficient (r) = 0.999]; furthermore, as MMDX incorporation was readily reproducible in different experiments, the amount of drug delivered by A-NK cells could be modulated. In vivo experiments showed that intravenous (i.v.) injection of MMDX-loaded A-NK cells exerted a greater therapeutic effect than equivalent or even higher doses of free drug. The increase in lifespan (ILS) following A-NK cell delivery of 53 μg kg−1 MMDX, a dosage that is ineffective when administered in free form, was similar to that observed in response to 92 μg kg−1 free drug, a dosage close to the 10% lethal dose (ILS 42% vs. 38% respectively). These results correlated with pharmacokinetic studies showing that MMDX encapsulation in A-NK cells strongly modifies its organ distribution and targets it to tissues in which IL-2 activated lymphocytes are preferentially entrapped after i.v. injection. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098738

  6. Phenotypically distinct helper NK cells are required for gp96-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sedlacek, Abigail L.; Kinner-Bibeau, Lauren B.; Binder, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    A number of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs), in the extracellular environment, are immunogenic. Following cross-presentation of HSP-chaperoned peptides by CD91+ antigen presenting cells (APCs), T cells are primed with specificity for the derivative antigen-bearing cell. Accordingly, tumor-derived HSPs are in clinical trials for cancer immunotherapy. We investigate the role of NK cells in gp96-mediated anti-tumor immune responses given their propensity to lyse tumor cells. We show that gp96-mediated rejection of tumors requires a unique and necessary helper role in NK cells. This helper role occurs during the effector phase of the anti-tumor immune response and is required for T cell and APC function. Gp96 activates NK cells indirectly via APCs to a phenotype distinct from NK cells activated by other mechanisms such as IL-2. While NK cells have both lytic and cytokine producing properties, we show that gp96 selectively activates cytokine production in NK cells, which is important in the HSP anti-tumor immune response, and leaves their cytotoxic capacity unchanged. PMID:27431727

  7. WASH has a critical role in NK cell cytotoxicity through Lck-mediated phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Zhu, P; Xia, P; Fan, Z

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effector cells of the innate immune system to kill certain virus-infected and transformed cells. Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) and SCAR homolog (WASH) has been identified as a member of WASP family proteins implicated in regulating the cytoskeletal reorganization, yet little is known about its function in lymphocytes. Here we demonstrate that WASH is crucial for NK cell cytotoxicity. WASH was found to colocalize with lytic granules upon NK cell activation. Knockdown of WASH expression substantially inhibited polarization and release of lytic granules to the immune synapse, resulting in the impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity. More importantly, our data also define a previously unappreciated mechanism for WASH function, in which Src family kinase Lck can interact with WASH and induce WASH phosphorylation. Mutation of tyrosine residue Y141, identified here as the major site of WASH phosphorylation, partially blocked WASH tyrosine phosphorylation and NK cell cytotoxicity. Taken together, these observations suggest that WASH has a pivotal role for regulation of NK cell cytotoxicity through Lck-mediated Y141 tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:27441653

  8. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C.; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O. K.; Payne, Harold R.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Womack, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  9. rhG-CSF does not affect the phenotype of adult donor peripheral blood NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lassailly, F; Sielleur, I; Blaise, D; Chabannon, C

    2005-01-01

    Considerable evidence in preclinical models as well as in human transplantation now suggests that donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells can contribute to alloimmune recognition of recipient residual tumour cells. This makes the NK cell population an attractive target for in vitro or in vivo manipulations, in order to improve the antitumour effect of allogeneic transplantation. However, conditions in which allogeneic donor cells are collected vary; several reports have emphasised the different phenotypic and functional properties of T cells derived from marrow, cord blood or mobilised peripheral blood grafts; others have demonstrated different clinical outcomes following blood or marrow transplantation after myeloablative conditioning regimens. NK cells have been examined in this setting; the availability of new tools to study the expression of a variety of surface antigens that are involved in the control of NK cell activity offered us an opportunity to extensively characterise the phenotypic properties of NK cells from donors, before and after administration of pharmacological doses of rhG-CSF used for haematopoietic progenitor mobilisation. Our study suggests that rhG-CSF does not reproducibly alter blood NK cell phenotype in normal individuals, and thus that donor-derived cells are fully equipped to exert their potential antitumour effect.

  10. Are T-LGL Leukemia and NK-Chronic Lymphoproliferative Disorder Really Two Distinct Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Zambello, Renato; Teramo, Antonella; Gattazzo, Cristina; Semenzato, Gianpietro

    2014-01-01

    Mature Large Granular lymphocytes (LGL) disorders include a spectrum of conditions, ranging from polyclonal to clonal indolent and/or overt leukemic LGL proliferations. Most cases are represented by clonal expansions of TCRα/β+ LGL displaying a CD8+ phenotype with expression of cytotoxic T-cell antigens (CD57, CD16, TIA-1, perforin and granzyme B). Proliferations of CD3-CD16+ NK cells with a restricted patter of NK receptors are less common, usually comprising 15% of the cases. Main features are cytopenias, splenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Morphology, immunophenotyping and molecular analyses are crucial to establish a correct diagnosis of disease. According to the 2008 WHO classification, two separate entities account for the majority of cases, T-LGL leukemia and Chronic Lymphoproliferative Disease of NK cell (this latter still provisional). Although these disorders are characterized by the expansion of different cells types i.e. T and NK cells, with specific genetic features and abnormalities, compelling evidence supports the hypothesis that a common pathogenic mechanism would be involved in both disorders. As a matter of fact, a foreign antigen driven clonal selection is considered the initial step in the mechanism ultimately leading to generation of both conditions. In this chapter we will discuss recent advances on the pathogenesis of chronic T and NK disorders of granular lymphocytes, challenging the current WHO classification on the opportunity to separate T and NK disorders, which are likely to represent two sides of the same coin. PMID:24778993

  11. Natural killer (NK) activity of pit cells perfused from livers of rats treated with ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Albornoz, L.; Jones, J.M.; Crutchfield, C.; Veech, R.L. Univ. of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock )

    1991-03-11

    The liver is the major site of ethanol (ETOH) metabolism. Liver sinusoids contain lymphocytes with NK activity. The authors treated LEW rats for 2 weeks with i.p. injection of 1.25 ml 25% ETOH/kg 3 times/week and 5% ETOH in drinking water. Livers were perfused at 5-fold physiological pressure and cells obtained were banded on 1.077 density Ficoll. Their cytotoxicity was tested against {sup 51}Cr-labeled YAC-1 or U937 and compared to spleen and blood lymphocytes. In untreated rats, pit cell NK activity was 2-fold that of splenic lymphocytes and 4-fold that of blood lymphocytes. Compared to controls, ETOH-treated rats exhibited a 30 to 90% rise in pit cell NK activity detected with YAC-1 or U937 targets. The pit cell enhanced NK activity in ETOH-treated rats was further increased if polyinosinicpolycytidilic acid was injection i.p. 18 hours before the assay. Blood and spleen lymphocyte NK activity of ETOH-treated rats was also greater than in controls. There was no evidence that ETOH merely redistributed lymphocytes among the tissues. Although ETOH acutely inhibits NK activity in vitro, chronic ETOH increases in vivo.

  12. NK Cells Promote Th-17 Mediated Corneal Barrier Disruption in Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Volpe, Eugene A.; Gandhi, Niral B.; Schaumburg, Chris S.; Siemasko, Karyn F.; Pangelinan, Solherny B.; Kelly, Scott D.; Hayday, Adrian C.; Li, De-Quan; Stern, Michael E.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; De Paiva, Cintia S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The conjunctiva contains a specialized population of lymphocytes that reside in the epithelium, named intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). Methodology/Principal Findings Here we characterized the IEL population prior to and after experimental desiccating stress (DS) for 5 or 10 days (DS5, DS10) and evaluated the effect of NK depletion on DS. The frequency of IELs in normal murine conjunctiva was CD3+CD103+ (∼22%), CD3+γδ+ (∼9.6%), CD3+NK+ (2%), CD3−NK+ (∼4.4%), CD3+CD8α (∼0.9%), and CD4 (∼0.6%). Systemic depletion of NK cells prior and during DS led to a decrease in the frequency of total and activated DCs, a decrease in T helper-17+ cells in the cervical lymph nodes and generation of less pathogenic CD4+T cells. B6.nude recipient mice of adoptively transferred CD4+T cells isolated from NK-depleted DS5 donor mice showed significantly less corneal barrier disruption, lower levels of IL-17A, CCL20 and MMP-3 in the cornea epithelia compared to recipients of control CD4+T cells. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results show that the NK IELs are involved in the acute immune response to desiccation-induced dry eye by activating DC, which in turn coordinate generation of the pathogenic Th-17 response. PMID:22590618

  13. Genotype, phenotype, and outcomes of nine patients with T-B+NK+ SCID.

    PubMed

    Yu, Grace P; Nadeau, Kari C; Berk, David R; de Saint Basile, Geneviève; Lambert, Nathalie; Knapnougel, Perrine; Roberts, Joseph; Kavanau, Kristina; Dunn, Elizabeth; Stiehm, E Richard; Lewis, David B; Umetsu, Dale T; Puck, Jennifer M; Cowan, Morton J

    2011-11-01

    There are few reports of clinical presentation, genotype, and HCT outcomes for patients with T-B+NK+ SCID. Between 1981 and 2007, eight of 84 patients with SCID who received and/or were followed after HCT at UCSF had the T-B+NK+ phenotype. One additional patient with T-B+NK+ SCID was identified as the sibling of a patient treated at UCSF. Chart reviews were performed. Molecular analyses of IL7R, IL2RG, JAK3, and the genes encoding the CD3 T-cell receptor components δ (CD3D), ε (CD3E), and ζ (CD3Z) were carried out. IL7R mutations were documented in four patients and CD3D mutations in two others. Three patients had no defects found. Only two of nine patients had an HLA-matched related HCT donor. Both survived, and neither developed GVHD. Five of seven recipients of haploidentical grafts survived. Although the majority of reported cases of T-B+NK+ SCID are caused by defects in IL7R, CD3 complex defects were also found in this series and should be considered when evaluating patients with T-B+NK+ SCID. Additional genes, mutations in which account for T-B+NK+ SCID, remain to be found. Better approaches to early diagnosis and HCT treatment are needed for patients lacking an HLA-matched related donor. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. NK cell-mediated immunopathology during an acute viral infection of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Alsharifi, Mohammed; Lobigs, Mario; Simon, Markus M; Kersten, Astrid; Müller, Klaus; Koskinen, Aulikki; Lee, Eva; Müllbacher, Arno

    2006-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T (Tc) cells are prime effector populations in the antiviral response of the host. Tc cells are essential for recovery from many viral diseases but may also be responsible for immunopathology. The role of NK cells in recovery from viral infections is less well established. We have studied acute virulent Semliki Forest virus (vSFV) infection of the central nervous system in C57BL/6J mice, which was mainly controlled by NK cells without marked Tc cell involvement. We show that mice with defects in the Fas and/or granule exocytosis pathways of cytotoxicity are more resistant to lethal vSFV infection than wild-type mice. On the other hand, mice defective in the IFN-gamma response are more sensitive than wild-type mice, whereas mice lacking the Tc cell compartment (beta-2 microglobulin-deficient mice) exhibit susceptibility similar to wild-type mice. The additional finding that depletion of NK cells significantly delayed the mean time to death but did not prevent mortality in SFV-infected B6 mice suggests that cytolytic activity of NK cells is detrimental, while IFN-gamma production is beneficial for recovery from SFV infection. This is the first study illustrating an NK cell-mediated immunopathological outcome to an acute viral infection.

  15. Proteomic analysis of NK92-MI cells activated by neuropeptide substance P.

    PubMed

    Diandong, Hou; Kefeng, Sun; Weixin, Fu; Zaifu, Liang

    2013-06-01

    Substance P (SP) has been well known by its immunoregulatory properties on the functions of NK cells. However, the changes of molecules involved in the signaling pathways and effects of these molecules of NK92-MI cells activated by SP remain unclear. In this study, we explored the global changes in cellular protein expression of NK92-MI cells activated by SP by 2D-PAGE analysis. Subsequently, we demonstrated that 40 protein spots showed more than 2-fold changes, which displayed marked alterations with statistic significance (p<0.05) between the testing group and control group. Compared with the control we also found that 16 proteins were up-regulated and 24 proteins were down-regulated among the 40 differentially expressed protein spots in the NK92-MI cells activated by SP. In addition 21 differentially expressed proteins were identified by MS/MS, suggesting that those proteins may play important roles in the process of activation of NK92-MI cells by SP. Moreover, the protein Rho GDI-2, Protein DJ-1 and alpha-enolase were reconfirmed by western blotting. Taken together, these findings may provide a new insight into better understanding at the molecular mechanisms of activation of NK92-MI cells by SP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EBV-associated, extranodal NK-cell lymphoma, nasal type of the breast, after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Lawrence; Draoua, Hediya Y; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Bhagat, Govind; Alobeid, Bachir

    2004-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are predominantly Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferations. PTLDs of T-cell lineage are rare, mostly reported after renal transplantation and show less frequent association with EBV. NK-cell lymphomas after transplantation (NK-cell PTLDs) are very rare; only five cases are reported so far in the English literature, all developed after renal transplantation. We describe a case of EBV-associated, extranodal NK-cell lymphoma of nasal type, involving the breast in a cardiac allograft recipient 5 years after transplantation. The neoplastic cells are positive for CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, CD7, CD43, CD56, TIA-1 and p53; and negative for surface CD3 and CD57. Analysis of T-cell receptor beta and gamma genes fails to show clonal rearrangement. EBV studies show clonal episomal integration of EBV and latency II pattern (EBER-1+, LMP-1+, EBNA-1+, EBNA-2-). In conclusion, NK-cell PTLDs are rare complications that arise relatively late after solid organ transplantation, show strong association with EBV, and can follow an aggressive clinical course. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first reported case of NK-cell PTLD after cardiac transplantation and the unifying clinical and diagnostic features of NK-cell PTLDs occurring after solid organ transplantation.

  17. In vivo eradication of MLL/ENL leukemia cells by NK cells in the absence of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Nakata, J; Nakano, K; Okumura, A; Mizutani, Y; Kinoshita, H; Iwai, M; Hasegawa, K; Morimoto, S; Fujiki, F; Tatsumi, N; Nakajima, H; Nakae, Y; Nishida, S; Tsuboi, A; Oji, Y; Oka, Y; Sugiyama, H; Kumanogoh, A; Hosen, N

    2014-06-01

    It remains unclear how the immune system affects leukemia development. To clarify the significance of the presence of immune systems in leukemia development, we transferred MLL/ENL leukemia cells into immune-competent or immune-deficient mice without any preconditioning including irradiation. The wild-type mice did not develop leukemia, whereas all the Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice lacking both adaptive immune cells and natural killer (NK) cells developed leukemia, indicating that leukemia cells were immunologically rejected. Interestingly, leukemia cells were also rejected in 60% of the Rag2(-/-) mice that lacked adaptive immune cells but possessed NK cells, suggesting that NK cells play a substantial role in the rejection of leukemia. Moreover, engraftment of leukemia cells was enhanced by NK cell depletion in Rag2(-/-) recipients and inhibited by transfer of NK cells into Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) recipients. Upregulation of NKG2D (NK group 2, member D) ligands in MLL/ENL leukemia cells caused elimination of leukemia cells by NK cells. Finally, we found that leukemia cells resistant to elimination by NK cells had been selected during leukemia development in Rag2(-/-) recipients. These results demonstrate that NK cells can eradicate MLL/ENL leukemia cells in vivo in the absence of adaptive immunity, thus suggesting that NK cells can play a potent role in immunosurveillance against leukemia.

  18. Shared alterations in NK cell frequency, phenotype, and function in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infections.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ute-Christiane; Owen, Rachel E; Taylor, Elizabeth; Worth, Andrew; Naoumov, Nikolai; Willberg, Christian; Tang, Kwok; Newton, Phillipa; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Klenerman, Paul; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause clinically important persistent infections. The effects of virus persistence on innate immunity, including NK cell responses, and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the frequency, phenotype, and function of peripheral blood CD3- CD56+ NK subsets in HIV+ and HCV+ patients and identified significantly reduced numbers of total NK cells and a striking shift in NK subsets, with a marked decrease in the CD56(dim) cell fraction compared to CD56(bright) cells, in both infections. This shift influenced the phenotype and functional capacity (gamma interferon production, killing) of the total NK pool. In addition, abnormalities in the functional capacity of the CD56(dim) NK subset were observed in HIV+ patients. The shared NK alterations were found to be associated with a significant reduction in serum levels of the innate cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15). In vitro stimulation with IL-15 rescued NK cells of HIV+ and HCV+ patients from apoptosis and enhanced proliferation and functional activity. We hypothesize that the reduced levels of IL-15 present in the serum during HIV and HCV infections might impact NK cell homeostasis, contributing to the common alterations of the NK pool observed in these unrelated infections.

  19. NKp46-mediated Dicer1 inactivation results in defective NK-cell differentiation and effector functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Degouve, Sophie; Tavares, Armelle; Viel, Sébastien; Walzer, Thierry; Marçais, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs control developmental pathways and effector functions in immune cells. Previous studies have studied the role of microRNAs in natural killer (NK) cells. However, the mouse models of microRNA depletion used were nonNK-specific and only partially depleting, hampering the interpretation of the data obtained. To clarify the role of microRNAs in murine NK cells, we deleted the RNase III enzyme Dicer1 in NKp46-expressing cells. We observed a drastic decrease in several microRNAs specifically in NK cells. Furthermore, the overall size of the "NK-cell" pool was severely decreased, a phenotype associated with compromised survival. Moreover, performing a broad flow cytometry profiling, we show that Dicer1-deficient NK cells failed to complete their differentiation program. In particular, several integrins were inappropriately expressed in mature NK cells. These defects coincided with decreased response to IL-15, a cytokine responsible for "NK-cell" maturation and survival. In addition, Dicer1 deletion impaired key "NK-cell" functions: target cell killing and production of IFN-γ, leading to defective control of metastasis. Dicer1 deletion thus affects "NK-cell" biology in a cell intrinsic manner at several distinct stages.

  20. High NKG2A expression contributes to NK cell exhaustion and predicts a poor prognosis of patients with liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Xu, Jing; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Mei; Wen, Hao; Zhang, Chuanshan; Wang, Jinyu; Song, Jiaxi; Zheng, Meijuan; Sun, Haoyu; Wei, Haiming; Xiao, Weihua; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: As the predominant lymphocyte subset in the liver, natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to be highly associated with the outcomes of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previously, we reported that NKG2A, a checkpoint candidate, mediates human and murine NK cell dysfunction in CHB. However, NK cell exhaustion and, particularly, the level of NKG2A expression within liver tumors have not been reported. Methods: In this study, we analyzed NKG2A expression and the related dysfunction of NK cells located in intra- or peritumor regions of liver tissue samples from 207 HCC patients, in addition to analyzing disease outcomes. Results: The expression of NKG2A in NK cells and the NKG2A ligand, HLA-E, in intratumor HCC tissues was observed to be increased. These NK cells, and particularly CD56(dim) NK cells, with higher NKG2A expression showed features of functional exhaustion and were associated with a poor prognosis. The increase in NKG2A expression might be induced by IL-10, which was present at a high level in the plasma of HCC patients. Blocking IL-10 could specifically inhibit NKG2A expression in NK cells. Conclusions: These findings indicate that NKG2A expression is influenced by factors from cancer nests and contributes to NK cell exhaustion, suggesting that NKG2A blockade has the potential to restore immunity against liver tumors by reversing NK cell exhaustion.

  1. Memory CD4+ T cells are required for optimal NK cell effector functions against the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis murina.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle N; Zheng, Mingquan; Ruan, Sanbao; Kolls, Jay; D'Souza, Alain; Shellito, Judd E

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of NK cells or their interplay with other immune cells during opportunistic infections. Using our murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, we found that loss of NK cells during immunosuppression results in substantial Pneumocystis lung burden. During early infection of C57B/6 CD4(+) T cell-depleted mice, there were significantly fewer NK cells in the lung tissue compared with CD4(+) T cell-intact animals, and the NK cells present demonstrated decreased upregulation of the activation marker NKp46 and production of the effector cytokine, IFN-γ. Furthermore, coincubation studies revealed a significant increase in fungal killing when NK cells were combined with CD4(+) T cells compared with either cell alone, which was coincident with a significant increase in perforin production by NK cells. Finally, however, we found through adoptive transfer that memory CD4(+) T cells are required for significant NK cell upregulation of the activation marker NK group 2D and production of IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin during Pneumocystis infection. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a role for NK cells in immunity to Pneumocystis pneumonia, as well as to establish a functional relationship between CD4(+) T cells and NK cells in the host response to an opportunistic fungal pathogen.

  2. Elevated interferon-γ-induced protein 10 and its receptor CXCR3 impair NK cell function during HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Wu, Tong; Ma, Meichen; Zhang, Zining; Fu, Yajing; Liu, Jing; Xu, Junjie; Ding, Haibo; Han, Xiaoxu; Chu, Zhenxing; Wu, Yuntao; Shang, Hong; Jiang, Yongjun

    2017-07-01

    As the first line of defense in the human immune system, NK cells play essential roles in prevention of tumorigenesis and viral infection. It is known that NK cells have impaired function in HIV infection; however, it remains unclear why this occurs. IP-10 is a chemokine and inflammatory factor that is associated with such diseases as tuberculosis, hepatitis B virus, and pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate IP-10 levels and CXCR3 expression in NK cells that were affected by HIV and to elucidate whether NK cell function could be affected by IP-10. Our results demonstrate that IP-10 levels and expression of CXCR3 in NK cells was significantly higher in HIV-infected participants compared with noninfected participants. Moreover, the ability of NK cells to secrete IFN-γ and, specifically, to lyse K562, was suppressed with exposure to high levels of IP-10. This study also showed that CXCR3(+) NK cell function decreased dramatically when treated with IP-10, which indicates that CXCR3(+) NK cells were the main targets of IP-10. Furthermore, IP-10 or CXCR3 blocking could restore NK cell function. These data suggest that elevated IP-10 levels may impair NK cell function during HIV infection and that IP-10/CXCR3 blocking may be a novel therapeutic strategy in the control and functional cure of HIV. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  3. Effect of otilonium bromide and ibodutant on the internalization of the NK2 receptor in human colon.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, G; Santicioli, P; Evangelista, S; Maggi, C A; Riccadonna, S; Ringressi, M N; Bechi, P; Faussone-Pellegrini, M S; Vannucchi, M G

    2011-01-01

    The present aim was to study the modulation of NK2 receptor internalization by two compounds, the spasmolytic otilonium bromide (OB) endowed with NK2 receptor antagonistic properties and the selective NK2 receptor antagonist ibodutant. Full-thickness human colonic segments were incubated in the presence of OB (0.1-10 μmol L(-1)) or ibodutant (0.001-0.1 μmol L(-1)), with or without the NK2 receptor selective agonist [ßAla8]NKA(4-10) and then fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. Cryosections were processed for NK2 receptor immunohistochemical revelation. Quantitative analysis evaluated the number of the smooth muscle cells that had internalized the NK2 receptor. Immunohistochemistry revealed that in basal condition, the NK2 receptor was internalized in about 23% of total smooth muscle cells. The exposure to the selective NK2 receptor agonist induced internalization of the receptor in more than 77% of the cells. Previous exposure to both OB or ibodutant, either alone or in the presence of the agonist, concentration-dependently reduced the number of the cells with the internalized receptor. Both OB and ibodutant antagonize the internalization of the NK2 receptor in the human colon. As NK2 receptors are the predominant receptor mediating spasmogenic activity of tachykinins on enteric smooth muscle, we hypothesize that the antagonistic activity found for both OB and ibodutant should play a specific therapeutic role in gut diseases characterized by hypermotility. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Shared Alterations in NK Cell Frequency, Phenotype, and Function in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Ute-Christiane; Owen, Rachel E.; Taylor, Elizabeth; Worth, Andrew; Naoumov, Nikolai; Willberg, Christian; Tang, Kwok; Newton, Phillipa; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Klenerman, Paul; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause clinically important persistent infections. The effects of virus persistence on innate immunity, including NK cell responses, and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the frequency, phenotype, and function of peripheral blood CD3− CD56+ NK subsets in HIV+ and HCV+ patients and identified significantly reduced numbers of total NK cells and a striking shift in NK subsets, with a marked decrease in the CD56dim cell fraction compared to CD56bright cells, in both infections. This shift influenced the phenotype and functional capacity (gamma interferon production, killing) of the total NK pool. In addition, abnormalities in the functional capacity of the CD56dim NK subset were observed in HIV+ patients. The shared NK alterations were found to be associated with a significant reduction in serum levels of the innate cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15). In vitro stimulation with IL-15 rescued NK cells of HIV+ and HCV+ patients from apoptosis and enhanced proliferation and functional activity. We hypothesize that the reduced levels of IL-15 present in the serum during HIV and HCV infections might impact NK cell homeostasis, contributing to the common alterations of the NK pool observed in these unrelated infections. PMID:16160163

  5. Delineation of the endocytic pathway of substance P and its seven-transmembrane domain NK1 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Grady, E F; Garland, A M; Gamp, P D; Lovett, M; Payan, D G; Bunnett, N W

    1995-01-01

    Many of the actions of the neuropeptide substance P (SP) that are mediated by the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R) desensitize and resensitize, which may be associated with NK1-R endocytosis and recycling. We delineated this endocytic pathway in transfected cells by confocal microscopy using cyanine 3-SP and NK1-R antibodies. SP and the NK1-R were internalized into the same clathrin immunoreactive vesicles, and then sorted into different compartments. The NK1-R was colocalized with a marker of early endosomes, but not with markers of late endosomes or lysosomes. We quantified the NK1-R at the cell surface by incubating cells with an antibody to an extracellular epitope. After exposure to SP, there was a loss and subsequent recovery of surface NK1-R. The loss was prevented by hypertonic sucrose and potassium depletion, inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Recovery was independent of new protein synthesis because it was unaffected by cycloheximide. Recovery required endosomal acidification because it was prevented by an H(+)-ATPase inhibitor. The fate of internalized 125I-SP was examined by chromatography. SP was intact at the cell surface and in early endosomes, but slowly degraded in perinuclear vesicles. We conclude that SP induces clathrin-dependent internalization of the NK1-R. The SP/NK1-R complex dissociates in acidified endosomes. SP is degraded, whereas the NK1-R recycles to the cell surface. Images PMID:7545030

  6. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  7. Efficacy benefit of an NK1 receptor antagonist (NK1RA) in patients receiving carboplatin: supportive evidence with NEPA (a fixed combination of the NK1 RA, netupitant, and palonosetron) and aprepitant regimens.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Karin; Gralla, Richard; Rizzi, Giada; Kashef, Kimia

    2016-11-01

    Antiemetic guideline recommendations are inconsistent as to whether a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (NK1 RA) should be administered with a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5HT3) RA + dexamethasone (DEX) in patients receiving carboplatin. Patients receiving cisplatin routinely receive an NK1 RA-containing regimen with a resulting 14-22 % benefit in no emesis rates over a 5-HT3 RA/DEX control. Recent studies suggest a similar benefit in patients receiving carboplatin. NEPA is the first fixed antiemetic combination agent and comprises the highly selective NK1 RA, netupitant, and pharmacologically distinct 5-HT3 RA, palonosetron (PALO). This paper presents the efficacy of NEPA in the subset of patients receiving carboplatin in a phase 3 trial (NCT01376297), in the context of aprepitant (APR) data in the carboplatin setting. One hundred ninety-six patients (47 % of all study patients: n = 145 NEPA + DEX; n = 51 APR + PALO + DEX) received carboplatin in a multinational, double-blind, randomized phase 3 study. Complete response (CR: no emesis/rescue) and no significant nausea (NSN: score ≤25 on 100 mm visual analog scale) rates were calculated. Cycle 1-4 overall (0-120 h) CR rates were similar for NEPA (80, 91, 92, and 93 %) and APR (82, 88, 88, and 90 %). Overall NSN rates were also similar (NEPA 84-96 %; APR 82-90 %). Response rates for NEPA and APR regimens were similar and consistent with prior studies evaluating the contribution of adding NK1 RAs in patients receiving carboplatin. Considering such evidence, guideline groups/practitioners should consider giving a NK1 RA antiemetic triplet in patients receiving carboplatin.

  8. Identification, expression and antibacterial activities of an antimicrobial peptide NK-lysin from a marine fish Larimichthys crocea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi-Jia; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Qiao, Ying; Hong, Wan-Shu; Su, Yong-Quan; Han, Kun-Huang; Ke, Qiao-Zhen; Zheng, Wei-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    As fundamental immunologic mechanism, the innate immunity system is more important than the specific immunity system in teleost fishes during pathogens infection. Antimicrobial peptides are integral parts of the innate immune system, and play significant roles against pathogens infection. NK-lysin, the compounds of the natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells, are potent and effective antimicrobial peptides widely distributed in animals. In this study, we reported the sequence characteristics, expression profiles and antibacterial activities of a NK-lysin gene (Lc-NK-lysin) from a commercially important marine fish, the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). The open reading frame of Lc-NK-lysin cDNA sequence was 447 bp in length, coding 148 amino acids. The genomic DNA of Lc-NK-lysin has the common features of NK-lysin family, consisting of five exons and four introns, and in its deduced mature peptide, there are six well-conserved cysteine residues and a Saposin B domain. Lc-NK-lysin was expressed in all tested tissues (skin, muscle, gill, brain, head kidney, heart, liver, spleen, stomach and intestine) with different expression patterns. In pathogens infection the expression profiles of Lc-NK-lysin varied significantly in gill, head kidney, spleen and liver, indicating its role in immune response. Two peptides (Lc-NK-lysin-1 and Lc-NK-lysin-2) divided from the core region of the Lc-NK-lysin mature polypeptide were chemically synthesized and their antibacterial activities were examined; the potential function on the inhibition of bacteria propagation was revealed. Our results suggested that Lc-NK-lysin is a typical member of the NK-lysin family and as an immune-related gene it involves in the immune response when pathogens invasion.

  9. Effects of X-ray irradiation on natural killer (NK) cell system. I. Elevation of sensitivity of tumor cells and lytic function of NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, A.; Mizutani, Y.; Nagamuta, M.; Ikenaga, M. )

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro effect of X-ray irradiation on the human natural killer (NK) system was studied. When K562 cells were irradiated with X-rays and cultured for 18 hours, they showed increased sensitivity to lysis by blood lymphocytes and purified large granular lymphocytes (LGL). The X-ray-induced augmentation was observed as little as 2 Gy irradiation, reaching maximum at 5 to 20 Gy. The doses of X-rays did not influence the viability and spontaneous release of the target cells. On the other hand, irradiation with X-rays of NK cells at 5 to 15 Gy resulted in a transient increase in NK activity at 1 hour, and then the activity declined and was completely lost after 24 hours. However, when LGL were cultured with interferon immediately after irradiation, they maintained elevated NK activity. These results suggest the possible use of low doses of X-ray irradiation in combination with biological response modifiers for treatment of cancer.

  10. A hematopoietic cell-driven mechanism involving SLAMF6 receptor, SAP adaptors and SHP-1 phosphatase regulates NK cell education.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ning; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Roncagalli, Romain; Pérez-Quintero, Luis-Alberto; Guo, Huaijian; Zhang, Zhanguang; Lenoir, Christelle; Dong, Zhongjun; Latour, Sylvain; Veillette, André

    2016-04-01

    Activation of natural killer (NK) cells by hematopoietic target cells is controlled by the SLAM family of receptors and by the associated SAP family of adaptors. Here we found that SLAM receptors also enhanced NK cell activation by nonhematopoietic target cells, which lack ligands for SLAM receptors. This function was mediated by SLAMF6, a homotypic SLAM receptor found on NK cells and other hematopoietic cells, and was regulated by SAP adaptors, which uncoupled SLAM receptors from phosphatase SHP-1 and diminished the effect of SLAMF6 on NK cell responsiveness toward nonhematopoietic cells. Thus, in addition to their role in NK cell activation by hematopoietic cells, the SLAM-SAP pathways influence responsiveness toward nonhematopoietic targets by a process akin to NK cell 'education'.

  11. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Report – Inception through February 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Don Karner; James Francfort

    2003-07-01

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric transportation in urban applications. The primary Program partners are the New York Power Authority (NYPA) and Ford. The other Program partners providing funding and other support include the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Metro North Railroad, Long Island Railroad, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Long Island Power Authority, New York State Department of Transportation, New York City Department of Transportation, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). The data in this report is being collected via an internet-based questionnaire system by the AVTA through its subcontractor Electric Transportation Applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK cities is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Eighty-seven commuters are using the TH!NK city vehicles, with 80% actively providing data to the AVTA. The participants have driven the vehicles nearly 150,000 miles since Program inception, avoiding the use of almost 7,000 gallons of gasoline. The TH!NK city vehicles are driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month, and over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replace trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through February 2003.

  12. Circulating NK cells and their subsets in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M S; Ryan, P L; Bergmeier, L A; Fortune, F

    2017-02-07

    Behçet's disease (BD) is an autoinflammatory, chronic relapsing/remitting disease of unknown aetiology with both innate and acquired immune cells implicated in disease pathogenesis. Peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells and their CD56(Dim) /CD56(Bright) subsets were surface phenotyped using CD27 and CD16 surface markers in 60 BD patients compared to 60 healthy controls (HCs). Functional potential was assessed by production of interferon (IFN)-γ, granzyme B, perforin and the expression of degranulation marker CD107a. The effects of disease activity (BD(Active) versus BD(Quiet) ) and BD medication on NK cells were also investigated. Peripheral blood NK cells (P < 0·0001) and their constituent CD56(Dim) (P < 0·0001) and CD56(Bright) (P = 0·0015) subsets were depleted significantly in BD patients compared to HCs, and especially in those with active disease (BD(Active) ) (P < 0·0001). BD patients taking azathioprine also had significantly depleted NK cells compared to HCs (P < 0·0001). A stepwise multivariate linear regression model confirmed BD activity and azathioprine therapy as significant independent predictor variables of peripheral blood NK percentage (P < 0·001). In general, CD56(Dim) cells produced more perforin (P < 0·0001) and granzyme B (P < 0·01) expressed higher CD16 levels (P < 0·0001) compared to CD56(Bright) cells, confirming their increased cytotoxic potential with overall higher NK cell CD107a expression in BD compared to HCs (P < 0·01). Interestingly, IFN-γ production and CD27 expression were not significantly different between CD56(Dim) /CD56(Bright) subsets. In conclusion, both BD activity and azathioprine therapy have significant independent depletive effects on the peripheral blood NK cell compartment.

  13. Prostaglandin E2 exerts the proapoptotic and antiproliferative effects on bovine NK cells.

    PubMed

    Maślanka, Tomasz; Chrostowska, Małgorzata; Otrocka-Domagała, Iwona; Snarska, Anna; Mikiewicz, Mateusz; Zuśka-Prot, Monika; Jasiecka, Agnieszka; Ziółkowski, Hubert; Markiewicz, Włodzimierz; Jaroszewski, Jerzy J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this research was to determine whether prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) affects bovine NK cells in respect of their counts, apoptosis and proliferation, and if it does, then which of the PGE2 receptor (EP) subtype(s) mediate(s) these effects. We here report that long-term, but not short-term, exposure of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells to PGE2 at 10(-5)M, 10(-6)M and 10(-7)M, but not at 10(-8)M, caused a significant increase in the percentage of early apoptotic cells among NK cell subset. Moreover, PGE2 at 10(-5)M and 10(-6)M, but not at 10(-7)M and 10(-8)M, induced a considerable decrease in the absolute count of NK cells. The magnitude of these effects increased with an increasing concentration of PGE2. The blockade of EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4 receptors did not prevent the PGE2-induced apoptosis and depletion of NK cells. The results suggest that the proapoptotic effect of PGE2 is secondary in character and the induction of this effect is not mediated through EP receptors. Furthermore, the studies demonstrated that PGE2 at 10(-5)M and 10(-6)M, but not at 10(-7)M and 10(-8)M, highly significantly reduced the percentage of proliferating NK cells. The EP1, EP1/2 and EP3 receptor antagonists were unable to block this effect significantly, whereas the selective blockade of EP4 receptors prevented the PGE2-induced inhibition of NK cells proliferation. These results indicate that PGE2 at certain concentrations may impair the proliferation of NK cells and this effect is mediated via the EP4 receptor.

  14. Metabolic Reprogramming Supports IFN-γ Production by CD56bright NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Keating, Sinéad E; Zaiatz-Bittencourt, Vanessa; Loftus, Roisín M; Keane, Ciara; Brennan, Kiva; Finlay, David K; Gardiner, Clair M

    2016-03-15

    Human NK cells can be classified into phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets based on levels of CD56 receptor. CD56(dim) cells are generally considered more cytotoxic, whereas the CD56(bright) cells are potent producers of IFN-γ. In this study, we define the metabolic changes that occur in peripheral blood NK cells in response to cytokine. Metabolic analysis showed that NK cells upregulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in response to either IL-2 or IL-12/15 cytokine combinations. Despite the fact that both these cytokine combinations robustly upregulated mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 in human NK cells, only the IL-2-induced metabolic changes were sensitive to mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 inhibition by rapamycin. Interestingly, we found that CD56(bright) cells were more metabolically active compared with CD56(dim) cells. They preferentially upregulated nutrient receptors and also differed substantially in terms of their glucose metabolism. CD56(bright) cells expressed high levels of the glucose uptake receptor, Glut1 (in the absence of any cytokine), and had higher rates of glucose uptake compared with CD56(dim) cells. Elevated levels of oxidative phosphorylation were required to support both cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production in all NK cells. Finally, although elevated glycolysis was not required directly for NK cell degranulation, limiting the rate of glycolysis significantly impaired IFN-γ production by the CD56(bright) subset of cells. Overall, we have defined CD56(bright) NK cells to be more metabolically active than CD56(dim) cells, which supports their production of large amounts of IFN-γ during an immune response. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Tumor escape mechanisms: Potential role of soluble HLA antigens and NK cells activating ligands

    PubMed Central

    Campoli, Michael; Ferrone, Soldano

    2009-01-01

    The crucial role played by HLA antigens and natural killer (NK) cell activating ligands in the interactions of malignant cells with components of the host's immune system has stimulated interest in the characterization of their expression by malignant cells. Convincing evidence generated by the immunohistochemical staining of surgically removed malignant lesions with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing HLA antigens and NK cell activating ligands indicates that the surface expression of these molecules is frequently altered on malignant cells. These changes appear to have clinical significance, since in some types of malignant disease they are associated with the histopathological characteristics of the lesions as well as with disease free interval and survival. These associations have been suggested to reflect the effect of HLA antigen and NK cell activating ligand abnormalities on the interactions of tumor cells with antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and with NK cells. Nevertheless, there are examples in which disease progresses in the face of appropriate HLA antigen and/or NK cell activating ligand as well as tumor antigen expression by malignant cells and of functional antigen-specific CTL in the investigated patient. In such scenarios, it is likely that the tumor microenvironment is unfavorable for CTL and NK cell activity and contributes to tumor immune escape. Many distinct escape mechanisms have been shown to protect malignant cells from immune recognition and destruction in the tumor microenvironment. In this paper, following the description of the structural and functional characteristics of soluble HLA antigens and NK cell activating ligands, we will review changes in their serum level in malignant disease and discuss their potential role in the escape mechanisms utilized by tumor cells to avoid recognition and destruction. PMID:18700879

  16. Imaging substance P receptors (NK1) in the living human brain using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Substance P (SP)-neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor pathways have been implicated in the pathophysiology of emesis and depression. Autoradiographic studies in monkey and human brains have shown a high expression of NK1 receptors in regions important for the regulation of affective behaviors and the neurochemical response to stress. Furthermore, clinical studies demonstrated that treatment with the SP (NK1 receptor) antagonist (SPA) aprepitant (also known as MK-0869) significantly improves depression symptoms and reduces the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. An important objective of all neuroscience drug discovery and development programs is to establish the correlation between dose, receptor occupancy, and the observed clinical effect (the dose-response relationship). These goals can be achieved using radioactive receptor-specific tracers and dynamic noninvasive brain imaging modalities, such as positron emission tomography (PET). In the SPA program, a tracer [18F]SPA-RQ was chosen for PET studies on the basis of several criteria, including high affinity for the NK1 receptor, low nonspecific binding, and good blood-brain barrier penetration. PET imaging studies in rhesus monkeys and humans confirmed these tracer features and established the usefulness of this probe for in vivo NK1 receptor occupancy studies. Subsequent PET occupancy studies in humans predicted that very high levels of central NK1 receptor occupancy (> 90%) were associated with therapeutically significant antidepressant and antiemetic effects. Future PET imaging studies will focus on quantification of NK1 receptor expression in depressed patients, both before and after successful treatment with antidepressants.

  17. Calcisponges have a ParaHox gene and dynamic expression of dispersed NK homeobox genes.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Leininger, Sven; Liu, Jing; Ferrier, David E K; Adamska, Maja

    2014-10-30

    Sponges are simple animals with few cell types, but their genomes paradoxically contain a wide variety of developmental transcription factors, including homeobox genes belonging to the Antennapedia (ANTP) class, which in bilaterians encompass Hox, ParaHox and NK genes. In the genome of the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica, no Hox or ParaHox genes are present, but NK genes are linked in a tight cluster similar to the NK clusters of bilaterians. It has been proposed that Hox and ParaHox genes originated from NK cluster genes after divergence of sponges from the lineage leading to cnidarians and bilaterians. On the other hand, synteny analysis lends support to the notion that the absence of Hox and ParaHox genes in Amphimedon is a result of secondary loss (the ghost locus hypothesis). Here we analysed complete suites of ANTP-class homeoboxes in two calcareous sponges, Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata. Our phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that these calcisponges possess orthologues of bilaterian NK genes (Hex, Hmx and Msx), a varying number of additional NK genes and one ParaHox gene, Cdx. Despite the generation of scaffolds spanning multiple genes, we find no evidence of clustering of Sycon NK genes. All Sycon ANTP-class genes are developmentally expressed, with patterns suggesting their involvement in cell type specification in embryos and adults, metamorphosis and body plan patterning. These results demonstrate that ParaHox genes predate the origin of sponges, thus confirming the ghost locus hypothesis, and highlight the need to analyse the genomes of multiple sponge lineages to obtain a complete picture of the ancestral composition of the first animal genome.

  18. GITR ligand provided by thrombopoietic cells inhibits NK cell antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Placke, Theresa; Salih, Helmut R; Kopp, Hans-Georg

    2012-07-01

    Thrombocytopenia inhibits tumor growth and especially metastasis in mice, whereas additional depletion of NK cells reverts this antimetastatic phenotype. It has therefore been speculated that platelets may protect hematogenously disseminating tumor cells from NK-dependent antitumor immunity. Tumor cells do not travel through the blood alone, but are rapidly coated by platelets, and this phenomenon has been proposed to shield disseminating tumor cells from NK-mediated lysis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. In this study, we show that megakaryocytes acquire expression of the TNF family member glucocorticoid-induced TNF-related ligand (GITRL) during differentiation, resulting in GITRL expression by platelets. Upon platelet activation, GITRL is upregulated on the platelet surface in parallel with the α-granular activation marker P-selectin. GITRL is also rapidly mobilized to the platelet surface following interaction with tumor cells, which results in platelet coating. Whereas GITRL, in the fashion of several other TNF family members, is capable of transducing reverse signals, no influence on platelet activation and function was observed upon GITRL triggering. However, platelet coating of tumor cells inhibited NK cell cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production that could partially be restored by blocking GITR on NK cells, thus indicating that platelet-derived GITRL mediates NK-inhibitory forward signaling via GITR. These data identify conferment of GITRL pseudoexpression to tumor cells by platelets as a mechanism by which platelets may alter tumor cell immunogenicity. Our data thus provide further evidence for the involvement of platelets in facilitating evasion of tumor cells from NK cell immune surveillance.

  19. Differential pulmonic NK and NKT cell responses in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hefei; Qin, Wenjuan; Yang, Quan; Xie, Hongyan; Qu, Jiale; Wang, Mei; Chen, Daixiong; Wang, Fang; Dong, Nuo; Chen, Longhua; Huang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) and natural killer T cells (NKT cells) play a role in anti-infection, anti-tumor, transplantation immunity, and autoimmune regulation. However, the role of NK and NKT cells during Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) infection has not been widely reported, especially regarding lung infections. The aim of this study was to research the NK and NKT cell response to S. japonicum infection in the lungs of mice. Using immunofluorescent histological analysis, NK and NKT cells were found near pulmonary granulomas. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed that the percentage and number of pulmonic NK cells in S. japonicum-infected mice were significantly increased (P < 0.05). However, the percentage and cell number of NKT cells were decreased compared to those of normal mice (P < 0.05). The expression of CD69 on pulmonic NK and NKT cells was increased after infection (P < 0.05), and CD25 expression increased only on NKT cells (P < 0.05). Intracellular cytokine staining showed a higher percentage of IFN-γ(+) and lower percentage of IL-5(+) pulmonic NK cells (P < 0.05) compared to controls. However, the percentage of IL-17(+), IL-10(+), and IL-5(+) pulmonic NKT cells significantly increased (P < 0.05). Additionally, there was a significant decrease in NKG2A/C/E (CD94) expression and an increase of NKG2D (CD314) expression on pulmonic NKT cells (P < 0.05), which might serve as a mechanism for NKT cell activation during S. japonicum infection.

  20. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Cassandra C; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C; Abrams, Zachary B; Lee, Robert J; Carson, William E

    2016-08-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is overexpressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is overexpressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and a negative control, respectively. FR-positive and FR-negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G in the presence or absence of cytokines to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells increased following treatment with F-IgG compared with control immunoglobulin G at all effector : target (E : T) ratios (P<0.01). This trend further increased by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12. NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) was also significantly increased in response to costimulation with interleukin-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells compared with controls (P<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells, which can be further increased by the addition of cytokines.

  1. Haploidentical Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Role of NK Cells and Effect of Cytomegalovirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Moretta, Lorenzo; Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Moretta, Francesca; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells play an important role in the immune responses against cancer and viral infections. In addition, NK cells have been shown to exert a key role in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation for the therapy of high-risk leukemias. The anti-leukemia effect is mostly related to the presence of "alloreactive" NK cells, i.e., mature KIR(+) NK cells that express inhibitory KIR mismatched with HLA class I (KIR-L) of the patient. In addition, an important role is played by certain activating KIR (primarily, but not only, KIR2DS1) upon interaction with their HLA class I ligand (C2 alleles). In general, the presence of activating KIR correlates with a better prognosis. Beside the infusion of "pure" CD34(+) cells, a novel protocol has been recently developed in which depletion of αβ T cells and CD19(+) B cells makes it possible to infuse into the patient, together with donor CD34(+) HSCs, important effector cells including mature PB NK cells and γδ T cells. Recent studies revealed that cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection/reactivation may induce rapid NK cell maturation and greatly influence the NK receptor repertoire. The remarkable expansion of a subset expressing the activating receptor NKG2C, together with a more efficient virus-specific effector response after rechallenge with CMV (i.e., antigen specificity), and the longevity of the expanded population are all features consistent with an adaptive type of response and support the notion of a memory-like activity of NK cells.

  2. Atypical hydroa vacciniforme-like epstein-barr virus associated T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Young; Baek, Jin Ok; Lee, Jong Rok; Park, Sang Hui; Jeon, In Sang; Roh, Joo Young

    2012-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell/natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV-T/NK-LPDs) accompany severe chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) or comprise the CAEBV disease entity. The CAEBV disease entity has the common feature of lymphoproliferation of T or NK cells (primarily), and B cells (rarely), with chronic activation of EBV infection. The disease is rare and seems to be more prevalent in East Asian countries. The CAEBV disease entity encompasses heterogenous disorders, including hydroa vacciniforme (HV), hypersensitivity to mosquito bites, EBV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome, NK/T-cell lymphoma, and NK-cell leukemia. Atypical HV-like eruptions are present on sun-exposed and nonexposed areas with facial edema, fever, and hepatosplenomegaly, unlike classic HV. Recently, it has been suggested that classic HV and atypical HV-like eruptions are variants within the same disease spectrum of EBV-T/NK-LPD. We report a Korean boy with an atypical HV-like eruption and various systemic manifestations, including fever, sore throat, abdominal pain, headaches, seizures, and hematologic abnormalities for 2 years. After the initial mild eruption, which resembled a viral exanthem, ulceronecrotic skin lesions gradually developed and were associated with a high-grade fever and constitutional symptoms. He had a CAEBV infection, which showed a predominant proliferation of NK cells with high EBV DNA levels in the peripheral blood. However, in the skin lesions, there were nonneoplastic CD4 T-cell infiltrations predominantly showing a monoclonal T-cell receptor-γ gene rearrangement and positive EBV in situ hybridization.

  3. Comprehensive gene expression analysis of human NK cells and CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Obata-Onai, Aya; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Onai, Nobuyuki; Kurachi, Makoto; Nagai, Shigenori; Shizuno, Ken-ichi; Nagahata, Tomoyuki; Matsushima, Kouji; Mathushima, Kouji

    2002-10-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes, NK cells and CD8(+) T cells play a pivotal role in the host defense. To reveal the biological function of these cells through establishing a comprehensive gene expression profile, serial analysis of gene expression was performed in human peripheral blood NK cells and CD8(+) T cells. In total, 85,848 tags corresponding to >20,000 different transcripts were sequenced. The genes expressed abundantly in these libraries mostly consisted of genes encoding MHC class I and molecules related to protein synthesis. Among gene transcripts which related to cytotoxicity, granulysin, perforin, granzyme B and alpha-defensin 1 were highly expressed in NK cells. Resting CD8(+) T cells did not express the genes related to cytotoxicity, but expressed abundantly the genes encoding chemokines, tumor necrosis factor family. When CD8(+) T cells were sorted into naive, memory and effector subsets based on the expression of CD45RA and CD27, perforin and granzyme B were expressed in the CD45RA(+)CD27(-) effector subset. Alpha-defensin 1, one of the selectively expressed genes in NK cells, induced migration of naive CD8(+)CD45RA(+)CD27(+) T cells, but not memory CD8(+)CD45RA(-)CD27(+) or effector CD8(+)CD45RA(+)CD27(-) T cells. Furthermore, treatment with IL-15, a stimulator of NK cell development, differentiation, survival and cytotoxicity, rapidly enhanced the expression of alpha-defensin 1 in NK cells. The identification of the genes preferentially expressed in NK and CD8(+) T cell subsets may give important insights into the functions of these cells against virus infection and in tumor immunity.

  4. Involvement of NK Cells and NKp30 Pathway in Antisynthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hervier, Baptiste; Perez, Mikaël; Allenbach, Yves; Devilliers, Hervé; Cohen, Fleur; Uzunhan, Yurdagül; Ouakrim, Hanane; Dorgham, Karim; Méritet, Jean-François; Longchampt, Elisabeth; Stenzel, Werner; Cremer, Isabelle; Benveniste, Olivier; Vieillard, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome (aSS) is characterized by the association of interstitial lung disease and myositis with anti-tRNA synthetase autoantibodies. Immune mechanisms leading to aSS could be initiated in the lungs, but the role of NK cells has not yet been studied. Both extensive NK cell phenotype and functions were compared between 33 patients and 26 controls. Direct and redirected polyfunctionality assays (degranulation and intracellular production of TNF-α and IFN-γ) were performed spontaneously or after IL-12 plus IL-18 stimulation in the presence of K562 or P815 target cells, respectively. NK cells from inactive patients showed normal phenotype, whereas active aSS revealed a differentiated NK cell profile, as indicated by increased CD57 and Ig-like transcript 2 and an inability to produce IFN-γ (p = 0.002) compared with controls. Importantly, active aSS was more specifically associated with a significant NKp30 decrease (p = 0.009), although levels of mRNA and intracellular protein were similar in aSS and healthy controls. This NKp30 decrease was strongly correlated with reduced NK cell polyfunctionality in both direct and redirected killing assays with anti-NKp30 Abs (p = 0.009 and p = 0.03, respectively), confirming its important impact in aSS. Histological studies revealed massive infiltrations of NK cells inside the lungs of aSS patients (148 versus 11/mm(2)). Taken together, these data suggest that NK cells and NKp30 could play a role in aSS pathogenesis.

  5. Nitric oxide and NK(1)-tachykinin receptors in cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, in rats.

    PubMed

    Alfieri, A B; Cubeddu, L X

    2000-11-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the role of NK(1) receptors and of nitric oxide (NO) on the pathogenesis of cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, in rats. This bladder toxicity was characterized by marked increases in protein plasma extravasation, urothelial damage, edema, white blood cell infiltrates, and vascular congestion. These changes were associated with appearance of Ca(2+)-independent NO-synthase (NOS) activity [characteristic of inducible NOS (iNOS)] in the bladder and with increases in urinary NO metabolites. GR205171, a selective NK(1) antagonist (10-20 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced cyclophosphamide-induced increases in protein plasma extravasation and in the urinary excretion of NO metabolites. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) (10 mg/kg, i.p.), a NOS inhibitor, reduced basal and cyclophosphamide-induced increases in NO metabolites and protected against cyclophosphamide-induced protein plasma extravasation. GR205171 had no effect, whereas L-NNA reduced basal NO metabolite excretion. Combined treatment with the NK(1) antagonist and the NO-synthesis inhibitor produced comparable reduction in protein plasma extravasation than that achieved with each drug given separately. Combined drug treatment ameliorated cyclophosphamideinduced urothelial damage, and the extent of edema, vascular congestion, and white blood cell infiltrates in the bladder. In summary, NK(1) receptors and iNOS play a role in NO formation and on cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. Activation of NK(1) receptors mainly acts through the formation of NO. It is proposed that cyclophosphamide and/or its metabolites would stimulate primary afferent capsaicin-sensitive fibers in the bladder, releasing neuropeptides, which would activate NK(1) receptors. However, additional mechanisms are involved, because neither the NK(1) receptor antagonist nor the NO synthesis inhibitor, either alone or in combination, were able to completely prevent the toxicity.

  6. Circulating NK cells and their subsets in Behçet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, M. S.; Ryan, P. L.; Bergmeier, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Behçet's disease (BD) is an autoinflammatory, chronic relapsing/remitting disease of unknown aetiology with both innate and acquired immune cells implicated in disease pathogenesis. Peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells and their CD56Dim/CD56Bright subsets were surface phenotyped using CD27 and CD16 surface markers in 60 BD patients compared to 60 healthy controls (HCs). Functional potential was assessed by production of interferon (IFN)‐γ, granzyme B, perforin and the expression of degranulation marker CD107a. The effects of disease activity (BDActive versus BDQuiet) and BD medication on NK cells were also investigated. Peripheral blood NK cells (P < 0·0001) and their constituent CD56Dim (P < 0·0001) and CD56Bright (P = 0·0015) subsets were depleted significantly in BD patients compared to HCs, and especially in those with active disease (BDActive) (P < 0·0001). BD patients taking azathioprine also had significantly depleted NK cells compared to HCs (P < 0·0001). A stepwise multivariate linear regression model confirmed BD activity and azathioprine therapy as significant independent predictor variables of peripheral blood NK percentage (P < 0·001). In general, CD56Dim cells produced more perforin (P < 0·0001) and granzyme B (P < 0·01) expressed higher CD16 levels (P < 0·0001) compared to CD56Bright cells, confirming their increased cytotoxic potential with overall higher NK cell CD107a expression in BD compared to HCs (P < 0·01). Interestingly, IFN‐γ production and CD27 expression were not significantly different between CD56Dim/CD56Bright subsets. In conclusion, both BD activity and azathioprine therapy have significant independent depletive effects on the peripheral blood NK cell compartment. PMID:28170096

  7. IL-28B Genetic Variants Determine the Extent of Monocyte-Induced Activation of NK Cells in Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Finnemann, Claudia; Sastre, Beatriz; Lutz, Philipp; Glässner, Andreas; Wolter, Franziska; Goeser, Felix; Kokordelis, Pavlos; Kaczmarek, Dominik; Nischalke, Hans-Dieter; Strassburg, Christian P.; Spengler, Ulrich; Nattermann, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Background Immuno-genetic studies suggest a functional link between NK cells and λ-IFNs. We recently showed that NK cells are negative for the IFN-λ receptor IFN-λR1 and do not respond to IFN-λ, suggesting a rather indirect association between IL-28B genotype and NK cell activity. Methods A total of 75 HCV(+) patients and 67 healthy controls were enrolled into this study. IL-28B (rs12979860) and IFNL-4 (rs368234815) genotypes were determined by rtPCR. Total PBMC, monocytes, and NK cells were stimulated with IL-29, the TLR-7/8 agonist R848, or a combination of both. NK cell IFN-γ response was analysed by FACS. IL-12 and IL-18 secretion of monocytes was studied by ELISA. In blocking experiments anti-IL-12/anti-IL-18 were used. Results Following stimulation of total PBMCs with R848 we found NK cell IFN- γ responses to vary with the IL-28B genotype, with carriers of a T/T genotype displaying the lowest frequency of IFN-γ(+)NK cells. When isolated NK cells were studied no such associations were observed, indicating an indirect association between IL-28B genotype and NK cell activity. Accordingly, we found R848-stimulated monocytes of patients with a T/T genotype to be significantly less effective in triggering NK cell IFN- γ production than monocytes from carriers of a non-T/T genotype. In line with these findings we observed monocytes from T/T patients to secrete significantly lower concentrations of IL-12 than monocytes from non-T/T individuals. Conclusions Our data indicate that monocytes from carriers of an IL-28B T/T genotype display a reduced ability to stimulate NK cell activity and, thus, provide a link between IL-28B genotype and NK functions. PMID:27583440

  8. High Frequencies of Polyfunctional CD8+ NK Cells in Chronic HIV-1 Infection Are Associated with Slower Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Fareed; Hong, Henoch S.; Jäckel, Marc; Jablonka, Alexandra; Lu, I-Na; Bhatnagar, Nupur; Eberhard, Johanna M.; Bollmann, Benjamin A.; Ballmaier, Matthias; Zielinska-Skowronek, Margot; Schmidt, Reinhold E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are effector and regulatory innate immune cells and play a critical role in the first line of defense against various viral infections. Although previous reports have indicated the vital contributions of NK cells to HIV-1 immune control, nongenetic NK cell parameters directly associated with slower disease progression have not been defined yet. In a longitudinal, retrospective study of 117 untreated HIV-infected subjects, we show that higher frequencies as well as the absolute numbers of CD8+ CD3− lymphocytes are linked to delayed HIV-1 disease progression. We show that the majority of these cells are well-described blood NK cells. In a subsequent cross-sectional study, we demonstrate a significant loss of CD8+ NK cells in untreated HIV-infected individuals, which correlated with HIV loads and inversely correlated with CD4+ T cell counts. CD8+ NK cells had modestly higher frequencies of CD57-expressing cells than CD8− cells, but CD8+ and CD8− NK cells showed no differences in the expression of a number of activating and inhibiting NK cell receptors. However, CD8+ NK cells exhibited a more functional profile, as detected by cytokine production and degranulation. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate that the frequency of highly functional CD8+ NK cells is inversely associated with HIV-related disease markers and linked with delayed disease progression. These results thus indicate that CD8+ NK cells represent a novel NK cell-derived, innate immune correlate with an improved clinical outcome in HIV infection. PMID:25122796

  9. Latent cytomegalovirus infection enhances anti‐tumour cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C+ NK cells in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, A. B.; Rezvani, K.; Shah, N.; Sekine, T.; Balneger, N.; Pistillo, M.; Agha, N.; Kunz, H.; O'Connor, D. P.; Bollard, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection markedly expands NKG2C+/NKG2A− NK cells, which are potent killers of infected cells expressing human leucocyte antigen (HLA)‐E. As HLA‐E is also over‐expressed in several haematological malignancies and CMV has been linked to a reduced risk of leukaemic relapse, we determined the impact of latent CMV infection on NK cell cytotoxicity against four tumour target cell lines with varying levels of HLA‐E expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 (leukaemia origin) and U266 (multiple myeloma origin) target cells was strikingly greater in healthy CMV‐seropositive donors than seronegative donors and was associated strongly with target cell HLA‐E and NK cell NKG2C expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA‐E transfected lymphoma target cells (221.AEH) was ∼threefold higher with CMV, while NK cell cytotoxicity against non‐transfected 721.221 cells was identical between the CMV groups. NK cell degranulation (CD107a+) and interferon (IFN)‐γ production to 221.AEH cells was localized almost exclusively to the NKG2C subset, and antibody blocking of NKG2C completely eliminated the effect of CMV on NK cell cytotoxicity against 221.AEH cells. Moreover, 221.AEH feeder cells and interleukin (IL)−15 were found to expand NKG2C+/NKG2A– NK cells preferentially from CMV‐seronegative donors and increase NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA‐E+ tumour cell lines. We conclude that latent CMV infection enhances NK cell cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C+ NK cells, which may be beneficial in preventing the initiation and progression of haematological malignancies characterized by high HLA‐E expression. PMID:26940026

  10. Latent cytomegalovirus infection enhances anti-tumour cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C+ NK cells in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bigley, A B; Rezvani, K; Shah, N; Sekine, T; Balneger, N; Pistillo, M; Agha, N; Kunz, H; O'Connor, D P; Bollard, C M; Simpson, R J

    2016-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection markedly expands NKG2C+/NKG2A- NK cells, which are potent killers of infected cells expressing human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E. As HLA-E is also over-expressed in several haematological malignancies and CMV has been linked to a reduced risk of leukaemic relapse, we determined the impact of latent CMV infection on NK cell cytotoxicity against four tumour target cell lines with varying levels of HLA-E expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 (leukaemia origin) and U266 (multiple myeloma origin) target cells was strikingly greater in healthy CMV-seropositive donors than seronegative donors and was associated strongly with target cell HLA-E and NK cell NKG2C expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E transfected lymphoma target cells (221.AEH) was ∼threefold higher with CMV, while NK cell cytotoxicity against non-transfected 721.221 cells was identical between the CMV groups. NK cell degranulation (CD107a(+) ) and interferon (IFN)-γ production to 221.AEH cells was localized almost exclusively to the NKG2C subset, and antibody blocking of NKG2C completely eliminated the effect of CMV on NK cell cytotoxicity against 221.AEH cells. Moreover, 221.AEH feeder cells and interleukin (IL)-15 were found to expand NKG2C(+) /NKG2A(-) NK cells preferentially from CMV-seronegative donors and increase NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E(+) tumour cell lines. We conclude that latent CMV infection enhances NK cell cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C(+) NK cells, which may be beneficial in preventing the initiation and progression of haematological malignancies characterized by high HLA-E expression. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  11. NK cells modulate the lung dendritic cell-mediated Th1/Th17 immunity during intracellular bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Peng, Ying; Gao, Xiaoling; Joyee, Antony G; Wang, Shuhe; Bai, Hong; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Jie; Yang, Xi

    2015-10-01

    The impact of the interaction between NK cells and lung dendritic cells (LDCs) on the outcome of respiratory infections is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of NK cells on the function of LDCs during intracellular bacterial lung infection of Chlamydia muridarum in mice. We found that the naive mice receiving LDCs from C. muridarum-infected NK-cell-depleted mice (NK-LDCs) showed more serious body weight loss, bacterial burden, and pathology upon chlamydial challenge when compared with the recipients of LDCs from infected sham-treated mice (NK+LDCs). Cytokine analysis of the local tissues of the former compared with the latter exhibited lower levels of Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17), but higher levels of Th2 (IL-4), cytokines. Consistently, NK-LDCs were less efficient in directing C. muridarum-specific Th1 and Th17 responses than NK+LDCs when cocultured with CD4(+) T cells. In NK cell/LDC coculture experiments, the blockade of NKG2D receptor reduced the production of IL-12p70, IL-6, and IL-23 by LDCs. The neutralization of IFN-γ in the culture decreased the production of IL-12p70 by LDCs, whereas the blockade of TNF-α resulted in diminished IL-6 production. Our findings demonstrate that NK cells modulate LDC function to elicit Th1/Th17 immunity during intracellular bacterial infection.

  12. In Vitro Generation of Human NK cells Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor through Differentiation of Gene-Modified Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Emily; Truscott, Laurel C.; De Oliveira, Satiro N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary NK cells represent a very promising source for adoptive cellular approaches for cancer immunotherapy, and extensive research has been conducted, including clinical trials. Gene modification of NK cells can direct their specificity and enhance their function, but the efficiency of gene transfer techniques is very limited. Here we describe two protocols designed to generate mature human NK cells from gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells. These protocols use chimeric antigen receptor as the transgene, but could potentially be modified for the expression any particular transgene in human NK cells. PMID:27177671

  13. NK cell development requires Tsc1-dependent negative regulation of IL-15-triggered mTORC1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meixiang; Chen, Shasha; Du, Juan; He, Junming; Wang, Yuande; Li, Zehua; Liu, Guangao; Peng, Wanwen; Zeng, Xiaokang; Li, Dan; Xu, Panglian; Guo, Wei; Chang, Zai; Wang, Song; Tian, Zhigang; Dong, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Activation of metabolic signalling by IL-15 is required for natural killer (NK) cell development. Here we show that Tsc1, a repressor of mTOR, is dispensable for the terminal maturation, survival and function of NK cells but is critical to restrict exhaustive proliferation of immature NK cells and activation downstream of IL-15 during NK cell development. Tsc1 is expressed in immature NK cells and is upregulated by IL-15. Haematopoietic-specific deletion of Tsc1 causes a marked decrease in the number of NK cells and compromises rejection of ‘missing-self' haematopoietic tumours and allogeneic bone marrow. The residual Tsc1-null NK cells display activated, pro-apoptotic phenotype and elevated mTORC1 activity. Deletion of Raptor, a component of mTORC1, largely reverses these defects. Tsc1-deficient NK cells express increased levels of T-bet and downregulate Eomes and CD122, a subunit of IL-15 receptor. These results reveal a role for Tsc1-dependent inhibition of mTORC1 activation during immature NK cell development. PMID:27601261

  14. Standardized and flexible eight colour flow cytometry panels harmonized between different laboratories to study human NK cell phenotype and function.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, John P; Delso-Vallejo, María; Kok, Nina; Bohme, Fenna; Seggewiss-Bernhardt, Ruth; van der Vliet, Hans J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Huppert, Volker; Spanholtz, Jan

    2017-03-10

    Advancements in multi-colour fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) panel warrant harmonized procedures to obtain comparable data between various laboratories. The intensifying clinical exploration of Natural Killer (NK) cell-based immunotherapy demands standardized and harmonized NK cell FACS panels and acquisition protocols. Eight colour FACS panels were designed to study human NK cell phenotype and function within peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The panels were designed around fixed backbone markers and channels, covering antigens for non-NK lineage exclusion (CD3, TCRγδ, CD19, CD14, SYTOX(®) Blue) and NK cell selection (CD45, CD56, CD16), complemented with variable drop-in markers/channels to study NK cell phenotype (NKG2A, NKG2C, NKG2D and KIR2D) or NK cell function and activation (CD25, NKp44 and CD107a). Harmonized FACS set-up and data analysis for three different flow cytometers has been established, leading to highly comparable and reproducible data sets using the same PBMC reference samples (n = 6). Further studies of NK cells in fresh or cryopreserved PBMC samples (n = 12) confirmed that freezing and thawing of PBMC samples did not significantly affect NK phenotype or function. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that cryopreserved PBMC samples analysed by standardized FACS panels and harmonized analysis protocols will generate highly reliable data sets for multi-center clinical trials under validated conditions.

  15. T-bet–dependent S1P5 expression in NK cells promotes egress from lymph nodes and bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jenne, Craig N.; Enders, Anselm; Rivera, Richard; Watson, Susan R.; Bankovich, Alexander J.; Pereira, Joao P.; Xu, Ying; Roots, Carla M.; Beilke, Joshua N.; Banerjee, Arnob; Reiner, Steven L.; Miller, Sara A.; Weinmann, Amy S.; Goodnow, Chris C.

    2009-01-01

    During a screen for ethylnitrosourea-induced mutations in mice affecting blood natural killer (NK) cells, we identified a strain, designated Duane, in which NK cells were reduced in blood and spleen but increased in lymph nodes (LNs) and bone marrow (BM). The accumulation of NK cells in LNs reflected a decreased ability to exit into lymph. This strain carries a point mutation within Tbx21 (T-bet), which generates a defective protein. Duane NK cells have a 30-fold deficiency in sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 5 (S1P5) transcript levels, and S1P5-deficient mice exhibit an egress defect similar to Duane. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirms binding of T-bet to the S1pr5 locus. S1P-deficient mice exhibit a more severe NK cell egress block, and the FTY720-sensitive S1P1 also plays a role in NK cell egress from LNs. S1P5 is not inhibited by CD69, a property that may facilitate trafficking of activated NK cells to effector sites. Finally, the accumulation of NK cells within BM of S1P-deficient mice was associated with reduced numbers in BM sinusoids, suggesting a role for S1P in BM egress. In summary, these findings identify S1P5 as a T-bet–induced gene that is required for NK cell egress from LNs and BM. PMID:19808259

  16. Two affinities for a single antagonist at the neuronal NK1 tachykinin receptor: evidence from quantitation of receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, Karl M; Southwell, Bridget R; Furness, John B

    1999-01-01

    In smooth muscle contractility assays, many NK1 receptor (NK1r) antagonists inhibit responses to the neurotransmitter, substance P (SP), and its analogue, septide, with markedly different potency, leading to the proposal that there is a septide-preferring receptor related to the NK1r.We used fluorescence immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy to visualize agonist-induced NK1r endocytosis and analyse agonist/antagonist interactions at native NK1r in neurons of the myenteric plexus of guinea-pig ileum.SP and septide gave sigmoid log concentration-response curves and were equipotent in inducing NK1r endocytosis.The NK1r antagonists, CP-99994 (2S,3S)-3-(2-methoxybenzyl)amino-2-phenylpiperidine dihydrochloride and MEN-10581, cyclo(Leuψ[CH2NH]Lys(benzyloxycarbonyl)-Gln-Trp-Phe-βAla) were both more potent in inhibiting endocytosis (50× and 8× greater respectively) against septide than against SP.The results suggest that SP and septide interact differently with the NK1r, and that a single antagonist can exhibit different affinities at a single NK1r population, depending on the agonist with which it competes. Thus it may not be necessary to posit a separate septide-preferring tachykinin receptor. PMID:10051129

  17. Phenotype of NK Cells Determined on the Basis of Selected Immunological Parameters in Children Treated due to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Koltan, Sylwia; Debski, Robert; Koltan, Andrzej; Grzesk, Elzbieta; Tejza, Barbara; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Gackowska, Lidia; Kubicka, Malgorzata; Kolodziej, Beata; Kurylo-Rafinska, Beata; Kubiszewska, Izabela; Wiese, Malgorzata; Januszewska, Milena; Michalkiewicz, Jacek; Wysocki, Mariusz; Styczynski, Jan; Grzesk, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent pediatric malignancy. The chemotherapy for ALL is associated with a profound secondary immune deficiency. We evaluated the number and phenotype of natural killer (NK) cells at diagnosis, after the intensive chemotherapy and following the completion of the entire treatment for patients with ALL. The fraction, absolute number, and percentage of NK cells expressing interferon-γ were determined in full blood samples. The fraction of NK cells expressing CD158a, CD158b, perforin, A, B, and K granzymes was examined in isolated NK cells. We have shown that patients assessed at ALL diagnosis showed significantly lower values of the fraction of NK cells and percentage of NK cells with the granzyme A expression. Additionally, the absolute number of NK cells, the expression of CD158a, CD158b, perforin, and granzyme A were significantly lower in patients who completed intensive chemotherapy. Also, there was a significantly higher fraction of NK cells expressing granzyme K in patients who completed the therapy. Abnormalities of NK cells were found at all stages of the treatment; however, the most pronounced changes were found at the end of intensive chemotherapy. PMID:26717380

  18. Standardized and flexible eight colour flow cytometry panels harmonized between different laboratories to study human NK cell phenotype and function

    PubMed Central

    Veluchamy, John P.; Delso-Vallejo, María; Kok, Nina; Bohme, Fenna; Seggewiss-Bernhardt, Ruth; van der Vliet, Hans J.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Huppert, Volker; Spanholtz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in multi-colour fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) panel warrant harmonized procedures to obtain comparable data between various laboratories. The intensifying clinical exploration of Natural Killer (NK) cell-based immunotherapy demands standardized and harmonized NK cell FACS panels and acquisition protocols. Eight colour FACS panels were designed to study human NK cell phenotype and function within peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The panels were designed around fixed backbone markers and channels, covering antigens for non-NK lineage exclusion (CD3, TCRγδ, CD19, CD14, SYTOX® Blue) and NK cell selection (CD45, CD56, CD16), complemented with variable drop-in markers/channels to study NK cell phenotype (NKG2A, NKG2C, NKG2D and KIR2D) or NK cell function and activation (CD25, NKp44 and CD107a). Harmonized FACS set-up and data analysis for three different flow cytometers has been established, leading to highly comparable and reproducible data sets using the same PBMC reference samples (n = 6). Further studies of NK cells in fresh or cryopreserved PBMC samples (n = 12) confirmed that free